WorldWideScience

Sample records for water vapour content

  1. Prediction of clay content from water vapour sorption isotherms considering hysteresis and soil organic matter content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, E.; Tuller, M.; Møldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    Soil texture, in particular the clay fraction, governs numerous environmental, agricultural and engineering soil processes. Traditional measurement methods for clay content are laborious and impractical for large-scale soil surveys. Consequently, clay prediction models that are based on water...... for estimating clay content from hygroscopic water at different relative humidity (RH) levels while considering hysteresis and organic matter content. Continuous adsorption/desorption vapour sorption isotherm loops were measured for 150 differently textured soils with a state-of-the-art vapour sorption analyser...... within a RH range from 3 to 93%. The clay contents, which ranged between 1 and 56%, were measured with a combination of sieving and sedimentation methods. Two regression models were developed for both adsorption and desorption at 10 RH levels (5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90%). While the first...

  2. Efficient quantification of water content in edible oils by headspace gas chromatography with vapour phase calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei-Qi; Gong, Yi-Xian; Yu, Kong-Xian

    2017-11-24

    An automated and accurate headspace gas chromatographic (HS-GC) technique was investigated for rapidly quantifying water content in edible oils. In this method, multiple headspace extraction (MHE) procedures were used to analyse the integrated water content from the edible oil sample. A simple vapour phase calibration technique with an external vapour standard was used to calibrate both the water content in the gas phase and the total weight of water in edible oil sample. After that the water in edible oils can be quantified. The data showed that the relative standard deviation of the present HS-GC method in the precision test was less than 1.13%, the relative differences between the new method and a reference method (i.e. the oven-drying method) were no more than 1.62%. The present HS-GC method is automated, accurate, efficient, and can be a reliable tool for quantifying water content in edible oil related products and research. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. The influence of moisture content on the water vapour resistance of surface coated spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, E.T.; Ulriksen, L.; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2005-01-01

    Two series of cup tests are carried out. The first series is performed on spruce specimens having moisture transport in either radial direction (R-direction) or in tangential direction (T-direction). The T-direction tests are made as wet cup tests having 93 %RH inside the cups, while the R......, but now with one layer of paint (60 g/m^2) on one surface of the wood specimens. The results show that the RH level significantly influences the water vapour resistance of the paint. For wet cup tests a water vapour resistance of the paint of 6.5•10^8 Pa•m^2•s/kg in average is found. In contrast......-direction tests are made as dry cup tests having 33 %RH in the cups. The RH in the outside climate is 60 % for both R- and T-direction. The temperature during the tests is 23 degree C. The second cup test series is performed on the same spruce specimens and at the same climatic conditions as in the first series...

  4. Enhanced MODIS Atmospheric Total Water Vapour Content Trends in Response to Arctic Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunya Alraddawi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the strength of the water vapour feedback within Arctic climate change, 15 years of the total column-integrated density of water vapour (TCWV from the moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS are analysed. Arctic TCWV distribution, trends, and anomalies for the 2001–2015 period, broken down into seasons and months, are analysed. Enhanced local spring TCWV trends above the terrestrial Arctic regions are discussed in relation to land snow cover and vegetation changes. Upward TCWV trends above the oceanic areas are discussed in lien with sea ice extent and sea surface temperature changes. Increased winter TCWV (up to 40% south of the Svalbard archipelago are observed; these trends are probably driven by a local warming and sea ice extent decline. Similarly, the Barents/Kara regions underwent wet trends (up to 40%, also associated with winter/fall local sea ice loss. Positive late summer TCWV trends above the western Greenland and Beaufort seas (about 20% result from enhanced upper ocean warming and thereby a local coastal decline in ice extent. The Mackenzie and Siberia enhanced TCWV trends (about 25% during spring are found to be associated with coincident decreased snow cover and increased vegetation, as a result of the earlier melt onset. Results show drier summers in the Eurasia and western Alaska regions, thought to be affected by changes in albedo from changing vegetation. Other TCWV anomalies are also presented and discussed in relation to the dramatic decline in sea ice extent and the exceptional rise in sea surface temperature.

  5. Intercomparison on measurement of water vapour permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    Three different materials are tested - hard woodfibre board - damp proof course - underlay for roofing The water vapour permeability has been measured according to EN ISO 12572 (2001).......Three different materials are tested - hard woodfibre board - damp proof course - underlay for roofing The water vapour permeability has been measured according to EN ISO 12572 (2001)....

  6. Water vapour measurements during POLINAT 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovarlez, J.; Ovarlez, H. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Meteorologie Dynamique

    1997-12-31

    The POLINAT (POLlution from aircraft emissions In the North ATlantic flight corridor)1 experiment has been performed within the framework of the Environment Programme of the Commission of the European Community. It was devoted to the study of the pollution from aircraft in the North Atlantic flight corridor, in order to investigate the impact of pollutants emitted by aircraft on the concentrations of ozone and other trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. For that experiment the water vapour content was measured with a frost-point hygrometer on board of the DLR Falcon research aircraft. This instrument is described, and some selected results are given. (author) 19 refs.

  7. The Use of Bending Angle Retrieved By GPS Radio Occultation Technique For The Measurement of The Atmospheric Water Vapour Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespe, F.; Benedetto, C.; Pacione, R.

    In the last decade the use of GPS radio occultation technique (GPS RO) has been deeply and widely investigated for retrieving physical and chemical Earth atmospheric parameters. The technique proved to be particularly precise in retrieving temperature profiles with an high vertical resolution (air) in 2 unknown (hydrostatic pressure and temperature). The system cannot be solved for lower troposphere because the water vapour pressu re is not negligible. So we are forced to include some other information such as the humidity computed by the models (ECMWF or NEP) or adding another observable in the system as the zenith troposphere delays estimated by the GPS ground stations. In this work we will investigate the possibility to retrieve humidity using only the bending angles achieved by the GPS RO. In particular, the humidity profiles are extracted differentiating the true bending angle profiles, retrieved by the GPS RO, with the dry ones, obtained by fitting and extrapolating the outer layers bending angles in a dry atmosphere model (exponential or Hopfield). The bending angles will be retrieved by CHAMP and SAC-C GPS RO data. Then the humidity profiles obtained with the proposed technique will be compared and validated with those retrieved with radio-sounding balloons over two sites at different latitudes: Brindisi (Italy) and Singapore (Japan).

  8. On water vapour transfer inside frozen packs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heiss, R

    1971-01-01

    In the case of various foodstuffs, irreversible water- vapour transporations within the frozen packages can bring about a distinct quality drop caused by damage to the surface of the material as a result of drying out (freezer burn...

  9. Water vapour loss measurements on human skin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, Petrus Gerardus Maria van der

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis, the results of a series of investigations into the barrier function of human skin are presented. In these investigations, the barrier function was assessed by water vapour loss measurements of the skin using a method based on gradient estimation.... Zie: Summary and conclusions

  10. estimation of precipitable water vapour in nigeria using surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    affects the climate and weather systems through its effect on the atmospheric temperature and energy transport (Garrison, 1992; Follette et al.,. 2008). A very important measure of the atmospheric water vapour is the precipitable water vapour. (PWV). Precipitable Water Vapour (PWV) is a measure of the total amount of water ...

  11. Upper tropospheric water vapour variability over tropical latitudes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Upper tropospheric water vapour variability over tropical latitudes observed using radiosonde and satellite measurements. Ghouse Basha ... Keywords. Water vapour; radiosonde; satellite measurements. ... National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), Department of Space, Government of India, Gadanki, PB No. 123 ...

  12. Effect of water vapour condensation on the radon content in subsurface air in a hypogeal inactive-volcanic environment in Galdar cave, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Cortes, A.; Benavente, D.; Cuezva, S.; Cañaveras, J. C.; Alvarez-Gallego, M.; Garcia-Anton, E.; Soler, V.; Sanchez-Moral, S.

    2013-08-01

    Fluctuations of trace gas activity as a response to variations in weather and microclimate conditions were monitored over a year in a shallow volcanic cave (Painted Cave, Galdar, Canary Islands, Spain). 222Rn concentration was used due to its greater sensitivity to hygrothermal variations than CO2 concentration. Radon concentration in the cave increases as effective vapour condensation within the porous system of the rock surfaces inside the cave increases due to humidity levels of more than 70%. Condensed water content in pores was assessed and linked to a reduction in the direct passage of trace gases. Fluctuations in radon activity as a response to variations in weather and microclimate conditions were statistically identified by clustering entropy changes on the radon signal and parameterised to predict radon concentration anomalies. This raises important implications for other research fields, including the surveillance of shallow volcanic and seismic activity, preventive conservation of cultural heritage in indoor spaces, indoor air quality control and studies to improve understanding of the role of subterranean terrestrial ecosystems as reservoirs and/or temporary sources of trace gases.

  13. Condensation of water vapour on moss-dominated biological soil ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 123; Issue 2 ... Condensation; water vapour; desert ecosystem; moss; biological soil crust. Abstract. Characteristics of water vapour condensation, including the onset, duration, and amount of water vapour condensation on moss-dominated biological soil crust ...

  14. Precipitable water vapour content from ESR/SKYNET sun-sky radiometers: validation against GNSS/GPS and AERONET over three different sites in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Monica; Mascitelli, Alessandra; Sanò, Paolo; Diémoz, Henri; Estellés, Victor; Federico, Stefano; Iannarelli, Anna Maria; Fratarcangeli, Francesca; Mazzoni, Augusto; Realini, Eugenio; Crespi, Mattia; Bock, Olivier; Martínez-Lozano, Jose A.; Dietrich, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The estimation of the precipitable water vapour content (W) with high temporal and spatial resolution is of great interest to both meteorological and climatological studies. Several methodologies based on remote sensing techniques have been recently developed in order to obtain accurate and frequent measurements of this atmospheric parameter. Among them, the relative low cost and easy deployment of sun-sky radiometers, or sun photometers, operating in several international networks, allowed the development of automatic estimations of W from these instruments with high temporal resolution. However, the great problem of this methodology is the estimation of the sun-photometric calibration parameters. The objective of this paper is to validate a new methodology based on the hypothesis that the calibration parameters characterizing the atmospheric transmittance at 940 nm are dependent on vertical profiles of temperature, air pressure and moisture typical of each measurement site. To obtain the calibration parameters some simultaneously seasonal measurements of W, from independent sources, taken over a large range of solar zenith angle and covering a wide range of W, are needed. In this work yearly GNSS/GPS datasets were used for obtaining a table of photometric calibration constants and the methodology was applied and validated in three European ESR-SKYNET network sites, characterized by different atmospheric and climatic conditions: Rome, Valencia and Aosta. Results were validated against the GNSS/GPS and AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) W estimations. In both the validations the agreement was very high, with a percentage RMSD of about 6, 13 and 8 % in the case of GPS intercomparison at Rome, Aosta and Valencia, respectively, and of 8 % in the case of AERONET comparison in Valencia. Analysing the results by W classes, the present methodology was found to clearly improve W estimation at low W content when compared against AERONET in terms of % bias, bringing the

  15. Precipitable water vapour content from ESR/SKYNET sun–sky radiometers: validation against GNSS/GPS and AERONET over three different sites in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Campanelli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the precipitable water vapour content (W with high temporal and spatial resolution is of great interest to both meteorological and climatological studies. Several methodologies based on remote sensing techniques have been recently developed in order to obtain accurate and frequent measurements of this atmospheric parameter. Among them, the relative low cost and easy deployment of sun–sky radiometers, or sun photometers, operating in several international networks, allowed the development of automatic estimations of W from these instruments with high temporal resolution. However, the great problem of this methodology is the estimation of the sun-photometric calibration parameters. The objective of this paper is to validate a new methodology based on the hypothesis that the calibration parameters characterizing the atmospheric transmittance at 940 nm are dependent on vertical profiles of temperature, air pressure and moisture typical of each measurement site. To obtain the calibration parameters some simultaneously seasonal measurements of W, from independent sources, taken over a large range of solar zenith angle and covering a wide range of W, are needed. In this work yearly GNSS/GPS datasets were used for obtaining a table of photometric calibration constants and the methodology was applied and validated in three European ESR-SKYNET network sites, characterized by different atmospheric and climatic conditions: Rome, Valencia and Aosta. Results were validated against the GNSS/GPS and AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET W estimations. In both the validations the agreement was very high, with a percentage RMSD of about 6, 13 and 8 % in the case of GPS intercomparison at Rome, Aosta and Valencia, respectively, and of 8 % in the case of AERONET comparison in Valencia. Analysing the results by W classes, the present methodology was found to clearly improve W estimation at low W content when compared against AERONET

  16. Variability of water vapour in the Arctic stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thölix, Laura; Backman, Leif; Kivi, Rigel; Karpechko, Alexey Yu.

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluates the stratospheric water vapour distribution and variability in the Arctic. A FinROSE chemistry transport model simulation covering the years 1990-2014 is compared to observations (satellite and frost point hygrometer soundings), and the sources of stratospheric water vapour are studied. In the simulations, the Arctic water vapour shows decadal variability with a magnitude of 0.8 ppm. Both observations and the simulations show an increase in the water vapour concentration in the Arctic stratosphere after the year 2006, but around 2012 the concentration started to decrease. Model calculations suggest that this increase in water vapour is mostly explained by transport-related processes, while the photochemically produced water vapour plays a relatively smaller role. The increase in water vapour in the presence of the low winter temperatures in the Arctic stratosphere led to more frequent occurrence of ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the Arctic vortex. We perform a case study of ice PSC formation focusing on January 2010 when the polar vortex was unusually cold and allowed large-scale formation of PSCs. At the same time a large-scale persistent dehydration was observed. Ice PSCs and dehydration observed at Sodankylä with accurate water vapour soundings in January and February 2010 during the LAPBIAT (Lapland Atmosphere-Biosphere facility) atmospheric measurement campaign were well reproduced by the model. In particular, both the observed and simulated decrease in water vapour in the dehydration layer was up to 1.5 ppm.

  17. Water vapour variability and trends in the Arctic stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thölix, Laura; Kivi, Rigel; Backman, Leif; Karpechko, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    Water vapour in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere (UTLS) is a radiatively and chemically important trace gas. Stratospheric water vapour also affects ozone chemistry through odd-hydrogen chemistry and formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). Both transport and chemistry contribute to the extratropical lower stratospheric water vapour distribution and trends. The main sources of stratospheric water vapour are intrusion through the tropical tropopause and production from oxidation of methane. Accurate observations of UTLS water vapour are difficult to obtain due to the strong gradient in the water vapour profile over the tropopause. However, modelling the stratospheric water vapour distribution is challenging and accurate measurements are needed for model validation. Trends in Arctic water vapour will be analysed and explained in terms of contribution from different processes (transport and chemistry), using observations and chemistry transport model (CTM) simulations. Accurate water vapour soundings from Sodankylä will be used to study water vapour within the Arctic polar vortex, including process studies on formation of PSCs and dehydration. Water vapour profiles measured during the LAPBIAT atmospheric sounding campaign in Sodankylä in January 2010 indicated formation of ice clouds and dehydration. Effects on ozone chemistry will also be studied. Global middle atmospheric simulations have been performed with the FinROSE-ctm using ERA-Interim winds and temperatures. The FinROSE-ctm is a global middle atmosphere model that produces the distribution of 30 long-lived species and tracers and 14 short-lived species. The chemistry describes around 110 gas phase reactions, 37 photodissociation processes and the main heterogeneous reactions related to aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds.

  18. Kinetic model of water vapour adsorption by gluten-free starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocieczek, Aneta; Kostek, Robert; Ruszkowska, Millena

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the kinetics of water vapour adsorption on the surface of starch molecules derived from wheat. The aim of the study was to determine an equation that would allow estimation of water content in tested material in any timepoint of the adsorption process aimed at settling a balance with the environment. An adsorption isotherm of water vapour on starch granules was drawn. The parameters of the Guggenheim, Anderson, and De Boer equation were determined by characterizing the tested product and adsorption process. The equation of kinetics of water vapour adsorption on the surface of starch was determined based on the Guggenheim, Anderson, and De Boer model describing the state of equilibrium and on the model of a first-order linear inert element describing the changes in water content over time.

  19. Retrieving mesospheric water vapour from observations of volume scattering radiances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vergados

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the possibility for a theoretical approach in the estimation of water vapour mixing ratios in the vicinity of polar mesospheric clouds (PMC using satellite observations of Volume Scattering Radiances (VSR obtained at the wavelength of 553 nm. The PMC scattering properties perturb the underlying molecular Rayleigh scattered solar radiance of the background atmosphere. As a result, the presence of PMC leads to an enhancement in the observed VSR at the altitude of the layer; the PMC VSRs are superimposed on the exponentially decreasing with height Rayleigh VSR, of the PMC-free atmosphere. The ratio between the observed and the Rayleigh VSR of the background atmosphere is used to simulate the environment in which the cloud layer is formed. In addition, a microphysical model of ice particle formation is employed to predict the PMC VSRs. The initial water vapour profile is perturbed until the modelled VSRs match the observed, at which point the corresponding temperature and water vapour profiles can be considered as a first approximation of those describing the atmosphere at the time of the observations. The role of temperature and water vapour in the cloud formation is examined by a number of sensitivity tests suggesting that the water vapour plays a dominant role in the cloud formation in agreement with experimental results. The estimated water vapour profiles are compared with independent observations to examine the model capability in the context of this study. The results obtained are in a good agreement at the peak of the PMC layer although the radiance rapidly decreases with height below the peak. This simplified scenario indicates that the technique employed can give a first approximation estimate of the water vapour mixing ratio, giving rise to the VSR observed in the presence of PMC.

  20. Determination of the water content of foods: I. Indirect determination of the water content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reith, J.F.; Mossel, D.A.A.; Kamer, J.H. van de

    1948-01-01

    The indirect determination of the water content of foods is dealt witli on the basis of tlie following general considerations: A. The absolute vapour pressure of the water in the substance to be desiccated ; B. The absolute vapour pressure of the water in the surrounding air, C.

  1. Intercomparison of TCCON and MUSICA Water Vapour Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, D.; Strong, K.; Deutscher, N. M.; Schneider, M.; Blumenstock, T.; Robinson, J.; Notholt, J.; Sherlock, V.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Barthlott, S.; García, O. E.; Smale, D.; Palm, M.; Jones, N. B.; Hase, F.; Kivi, R.; Ramos, Y. G.; Yoshimura, K.; Sepúlveda, E.; Gómez-Peláez, Á. J.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Warneke, T.; Dohe, S.; Wiegele, A.; Christner, E.; Lejeune, B.; Demoulin, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present an intercomparison between the water vapour products from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and the MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water (MUSICA), two datasets from ground-based Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometers with good global representation. Where possible, comparisons to radiosondes are also included. The near-infrared TCCON measurements are optimized to provide precise monitoring of greenhouse gases for carbon cycle studies; however, TCCON's retrievals also produce water vapour products. The mid-infrared MUSICA products result from retrievals optimized to give precise and accurate information about H2O, HDO, and δD. The MUSICA water vapour products have been validated by extensive intercomparisons with H2O and δD in-situ measurements made from ground, radiosonde, and aircraft (Schneider et al. 2012, 2014), as well as by intercomparisons with satellite-based H2O and δD remote sensing measurements (Wiegele et al., 2014). This dataset provides a valuable reference point for other measurements of water vapour. This study is motivated by the limited intercomparisons performed for TCCON water vapour products and limited characterisation of their uncertainties. We compare MUSICA and TCCON products to assess the potential for TCCON measurements to contribute to studies of the water cycle, water vapour's role in climate and use as a tracer for atmospheric dynamics, and to evaluate the performance of climate models. The TCCON and MUSICA products result from measurements taken using the same FTIR instruments, enabling a comparison with constant instrumentation. The retrieval techniques differ, however, in their method and a priori information. We assess the impact of these differences and characterize the comparability of the TCCON and MUSICA datasets.

  2. Modelling and interpreting the isotopic composition of water vapour in convective updrafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bolot

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The isotopic compositions of water vapour and its condensates have long been used as tracers of the global hydrological cycle, but may also be useful for understanding processes within individual convective clouds. We review here the representation of processes that alter water isotopic compositions during processing of air in convective updrafts and present a unified model for water vapour isotopic evolution within undiluted deep convective cores, with a special focus on the out-of-equilibrium conditions of mixed-phase zones where metastable liquid water and ice coexist. We use our model to show that a combination of water isotopologue measurements can constrain critical convective parameters, including degree of supersaturation, supercooled water content and glaciation temperature. Important isotopic processes in updrafts include kinetic effects that are a consequence of diffusive growth or decay of cloud particles within a supersaturated or subsaturated environment; isotopic re-equilibration between vapour and supercooled droplets, which buffers isotopic distillation; and differing mechanisms of glaciation (droplet freezing vs. the Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen process. As all of these processes are related to updraft strength, particle size distribution and the retention of supercooled water, isotopic measurements can serve as a probe of in-cloud conditions of importance to convective processes. We study the sensitivity of the profile of water vapour isotopic composition to differing model assumptions and show how measurements of isotopic composition at cloud base and cloud top alone may be sufficient to retrieve key cloud parameters.

  3. Analysis of radiosonde data on tropospheric water vapour in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analyses of some atmospheric water vapour parameters derived from radiosonde data at the three existing radiosonde stations in Nigeria are reported. The stations essentially represent the climates of the southern (coastal), middlebelt (savannah), and northern (sub-sahel) regions of the country. Monthly means of the ...

  4. Upper tropospheric water vapour variability over tropical latitudes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Upper tropospheric water vapour variability over tropical latitudes observed using radiosonde and satellite measurements. Ghouse Basha1, M Venkat Ratnam1,∗ and B V Krishna Murthy2. 1National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), Department of Space, Government of India,. Gadanki, PB No. 123, Tirupati 517 ...

  5. Carbon dioxide and water vapour characteristics on the west coast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carbon dioxide and water vapour in the atmo- sphere are considered as the green-house gases and responsible for the global warming, hence much attention has been given to its measurement and analysis (Jones et al. 1978; Jones and Smith 1977;. Leuning et al. 1982; Ohtaki and Matsui 1982;. Ohtaki 1985).

  6. Variation In Surface Water Vapour Density Over Four Nigerian Stations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The surface water vapour density ρ has been studied using monthly averages of temperature and relative humidity at four selected weather stations in Nigeria for the years 1987 to 1991. It is found that during the dry season months of November to March, ρ is higher at night by an average of about 9.9% than during the day ...

  7. Observed behaviours of precipitable water vapour and precipitation intensity in response to upper air profiles estimated from surface air temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Mikiko; Sato, Tomonori

    2017-07-06

    Extremely heavy precipitation affects human society and the natural environment, and its behaviour under a warming climate needs to be elucidated. Recent studies have demonstrated that observed extreme precipitation increases with surface air temperature (SAT) at approximately the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) rate, suggesting that atmospheric water vapour content can explain the relationship between extreme precipitation and SAT. However, the relationship between atmospheric water vapour content and SAT is poorly understood due to the lack of reliable observations with sufficient spatial and temporal coverage for statistical analyses. Here, we analyse the relationship between atmospheric water vapour content and SAT using precipitable water vapour (PWV) derived from global positioning system satellites. A super-CC rate appears in hourly PWV when the SAT is below 16 °C, whereas the rate decreases at high SAT, which is different from the precipitation-SAT relationship. The effects of upper air temperature and water vapour can consistently explain the super-CC rate of PWV relative to SAT. The difference between moist and dry adiabatic lapse rates increases with SAT, in consequence of more ability to hold water vapour in the free atmosphere under higher SAT conditions; therefore, attainable PWV increases more rapidly than the CC rate as SAT increases.

  8. shoot water content and reference evapotranspiration for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    is the slope of saturation vapour pressure curve at air temperature T (kPa °C-1), T is air temperature (°C). Crop coefficient. Shoot water content was assumed to be crop coefficient, as crop evapotranspiration is always determined under unlimited water supply (Pereira et al., 2015), and hence the shoot water content reflects ...

  9. Atmospheric radio refractivity and water vapour density at Oshodi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... columnar water vapour density ρ can be used to estimate N over Oshodi, and Kano. For instance, line of regression of N upon ρ for Oshodi at the 0-3km atmospheric column is N = (4.93 ± 0.75) ρ + 254.15 ± 11.26. Keywords: atmospheric humidity, columnar radio refractivity. Nigeria Journal of Pure and Applied Physics Vol ...

  10. Water vapour loss threshold and induction of cholinergic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupker, R A; Doeglas, H M

    1990-01-01

    A patient is described with cholinergic urticaria (CU) in whom the symptoms could be provoked by gustatory stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a threshold of sweating (monitored by skin water vapour loss (SVL) measurements) at which CU can be provoked. Provocations with lemon and sal-ammoniac liquorice induced transient sweating differing both in degree and duration. Only 'doubly salted' liquorice, which caused the most intense sweat response, resulted in urticarial lesions. This findings suggest a threshold dependency for the induction of CU. SVL measurement may be a useful method for the evaluation of sweating tests in CU patients.

  11. The Seasonal Cycle of Water Vapour on Mars from Assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Liam J.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.; Montmessin, Franck; Forget, Francois; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    We present for the first time an assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) water vapour column data into a Mars global climate model (MGCM). We discuss the seasonal cycle of water vapour, the processes responsible for the observed water vapour distribution, and the cross-hemispheric water transport. The assimilation scheme is shown to be robust in producing consistent reanalyses, and the global water vapour column error is reduced to around 2-4 pr micron depending on season. Wave activity is shown to play an important role in the water vapour distribution, with topographically steered flows around the Hellas and Argyre basins acting to increase transport in these regions in all seasons. At high northern latitudes, zonal wavenumber 1 and 2 stationary waves during northern summer are responsible for spreading the sublimed water vapour away from the pole. Transport by the zonal wavenumber 2 waves occurs primarily to the west of Tharsis and Arabia Terra and, combined with the effects of western boundary currents, this leads to peak water vapour column abundances here as observed by numerous spacecraft. A net transport of water to the northern hemisphere over the course of one Mars year is calculated, primarily because of the large northwards flux of water vapour which occurs during the local dust storm around L(sub S) = 240-260deg. Finally, outlying frost deposits that surround the north polar cap are shown to be important in creating the peak water vapour column abundances observed during northern summer.

  12. A miniature discriminating monitor for tritiated water vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, R.A.H.; Ravazzani, A.; Pacenti, P. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Advanced Material, Ispra, Vatican City State, Holy See (Italy); Campi, F. [Nuclear Engineering Dept., Polytechnic of Milan (Italy)

    1998-07-01

    In detecting tritium in air (or other gas) for worker safety, it is important to discriminate between tritiated water vapour and elemental tritium, because the first is much more easily absorbed in the lungs. We haveinvented (patent pending) an innovative discriminating monitor which works better than existing designs, and is much smaller. The air (or other sample gas) passes over a large surface area of solid scintillator, which is surface-treated to make it hygroscopic. Tritiated water vapour in the air exchanges continuously, rapidly and reversibly with the water in the thin hygroscopic layer; which is of the order of 1 micron thick. The beta-emissions from tritium in the hygroscopic layer hit the solid scintillator, causing flashes of light that are detected by a photomultiplier. The new discriminating monitor for tritiated species in air offers superior performance to existing discriminating monitors, and is much smaller. It is planned to develop a portable version which could serve as a personal tritium monitor. (authors)

  13. Study of water vapour adsorption kinetics on aluminium oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livanova, Alesya; Meshcheryakov, Evgeniy; Reshetnikov, Sergey; Kurzina, Irina

    2017-11-01

    Adsorbents on the basis of active aluminum oxide are still of demand on the adsorbent-driers market. Despite comprehensive research of alumina adsorbents, and currently is an urgent task to improve their various characteristics, and especially the task of increasing the sorption capacity. In the present work kinetics of the processes of water vapours' adsorption at room temperature on the surface of desiccant samples has been studied. It was obtained on the basis of bayerite and pseudoboehmite experimentally. The samples of pseudoboehmite modified with sodium and potassium ions were taken as study objects. The influence of an adsorbent's grain size on the kinetics of water vapours' adsorption was studied. The 0.125-0.25 mm and 0.5-1.0 mm fractions of this sample were used. It has been revealed that the saturation water vapor fine powder (0.125-0.25 mm) is almost twofold faster in comparison with the sample of fraction 0.5-1.0 mm due to the decrease in diffusion resistance in the pores of the samples when moving from the sample of larger fraction to the fine-dispersed sample. It has been established that the adsorption capacity of the pseudoboehmite samples, modified by alkaline ions, is higher by ˜40 %, than for the original samples on the basis of bayerite and pseudoboehmite.

  14. Thermally decarboxylated sodium bicarbonate: Interactions with water vapour, calorimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Volkova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC was used to study interactions between water vapour and the surface of thermally converted sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3. The decarboxylation degree of the samples was varied from 3% to 35% and the humidity range was 54–100%. The obtained enthalpy values were all exothermic and showed a positive linear correlation with decarboxylation degrees for each humidity studied. The critical humidity, 75% (RHo, was determined as the inflection point on a plot of the mean−ΔHkJ/mole Na2CO3 against RH. Humidities above the critical humidity lead to complete surface dissolution. The water uptake (m was determined after each calorimetric experiment, complementing the enthalpy data. A mechanism of water vapour interaction with decarboxylated samples, including the formation of trona and Wegscheider’s salt on the bicarbonate surface is proposed for humidities below RHo. Keywords: Isothermal titration calorimetry, Sodium bicarbonate, Sodium carbonate, Trona salt, Wegscheider’s salt, Enthalpy, Relative humidity, Pyrolytic decarboxylation

  15. Effects of water vapour on the structure parameter of the refractive index for near-infrared radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moene, A.F.

    2003-01-01

    The refractive index of air (n) mainly depends on temperature and water vapour content. For near-infrared radiation, temperature is the main determining factor. To determine the structure parameter of temperature (C-T(2)) from the structure parameter of the refractive index (C-n(2)), the influence

  16. Utility of DMSP-SSM/I for integrated water vapour over the Indian seas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recent algorithms for Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (DMSP-SSM/I) satellite data are used for estimating integrated water vapour over the Indian seas. ... On the basis of this algorithm, distribution of integrated water vapour is determined during the monsoon depression (22nd{27th July, 1992) that formed over the Bay of ...

  17. Utility of DMSP-SSM/I for integrated water vapour over the Indian seas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging Solutions)

    Recent algorithms for Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (DMSP-SSM/I) satellite data are used for estimating integrated water vapour over the Indian seas. Integrated water vapour obtained from these algorithms is compared with that derived from radiosonde observations at Minicoy and Port. Blair islands. Algorithm-3 of ...

  18. Stratospheric water vapour as tracer for Vortex filamentation in the Arctic winter 2002/2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Müller

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Balloon-borne frost point hygrometers measured three high-resolution profiles of stratospheric water vapour above Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen during winter 2002/2003. The profiles obtained on 12 December 2002 and on 17 January 2003 provide an insight into the vertical distribution of water vapour in the core of the polar vortex. The water vapour sounding on 11 February 2003 was obtained within the vortex edge region of the lower stratosphere. Here, a significant reduction of water vapour mixing ratio was observed between 16 and 19 km. The stratospheric temperatures indicate that this dehydration was not caused by the presence of polar stratospheric clouds or earlier PSC particle sedimentation. Ozone observations on this day indicate a large scale movement of the polar vortex and show laminae in the same altitude range as the water vapour profile. The link between the observed water vapour reduction and filaments in the vortex edge region is indicated in the results of the semi-lagrangian advection model MIMOSA, which show that adjacent filaments of polar and mid latitude air can be identified above the Spitsbergen region. A vertical cross-section produced by the MIMOSA model reveals that the water vapour sonde flew through polar air in the lowest part of the stratosphere below 425 K, then passed through filaments of mid latitude air with lower water vapour concentrations, before it finally entered the polar vortex above 450 K. These results indicate that on 11 February 2003 the frost point hygrometer measured different water vapour concentrations as the sonde detected air with different origins. Instead of being linked to dehydration due to PSC particle sedimentation, the local reduction in the stratospheric water vapour profile was in this case caused by dynamical processes in the polar stratosphere.

  19. Adsorption Of Water And Benzene Vapour In Mesoporous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Taba

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous materials have attracted the attention of many researchers due to the potential applications promised by the materials. This article discusses adsorption of water and benzene vapour in mesoporous materials (mesoporous silica: MCM-41, MCM-48 and their modification. MCM-41 and MCM-48 were synthesized hydrothermally at 100 oC using cethyltrimethylammonium chloride or dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide for MCM-41 (C16 or MCM-41 (C12 respectively and a mixture of cethyltrimethylammonium bromide and Triton X-100 for MCM-48 as templates. Their modifications were conducted by silylation of MCM-41 (C16 and MCM-48 with trimethylchloro silane (MCM16-TMCS and MCM48-TMCS and t-butyldimethylchloro silane (MCM16-TBDMCS and MCM48-TBDMCS. Results showed that MCM-41 and MCM-48 materials had hydrophobic features which were shown in the small amount of water adsorption at low P/P0. The hydrophobicity of samples used in this study decrease in the sequence: MCM-41 (C16 > MCM-48 > MCM-41 (C12. The hydrophobicity increased when MCM-41 and MCM-48 were silylated with TMCS or TBDMCS. All unsilylated MCM materials show higher affinity to benzene at low P/P0 than the silylated samples. The results of water and benzene adsorption showed that silylated samples are promising candidates as selective adsorbents for organic compounds.

  20. Low pressure water vapour plasma treatment of surfaces for biomolecules decontamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fumagalli, F; Kylian, O; Amato, Letizia

    2012-01-01

    Decontamination treatments of surfaces are performed on bacterial spores, albumin and brain homogenate used as models of biological contaminations in a low-pressure, inductively coupled plasma reactor operated with water-vapour-based gas mixtures. It is shown that removal of contamination can...... vapour plasma process are discussed for practical applications in medical devices decontamination....

  1. Influence of collisional rate coefficients on water vapour excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, F.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Cernicharo, J.; Dubernet, M.-L.; Faure, A.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Water is a key molecule in many astrophysical studies that deal with star or planet forming regions, evolved stars, and galaxies. Its high dipole moment makes this molecule subthermally populated under the typical conditions of most astrophysical objects. This motivated calculation of various sets of collisional rate coefficients (CRC) for H2O (with He or H2), which are needed to model its rotational excitation and line emission. Aims: The most accurate set of CRC are the quantum rates that involve H2. However, they have been published only recently, and less accurate CRC (quantum with He or quantum classical trajectory (QCT) with H2) were used in many studies before that. This work aims to underline the impact that the new available set of CRC have on interpretations of water vapour observations. Methods: We performed accurate non-local, non-LTE radiative transfer calculations using different sets of CRC to predict the line intensities from transitions that involve the lowest energy levels of H2O (E find that the intensities based on the quantum and QCT CRC are in good agreement. However, at relatively low H2 volume density (n(H2) find differences in the predicted line intensities of up to a factor of ~3 for the bulk of the lines. Most of the recent studies interpreting early Herschel Space Observatory spectra have used the QCT CRC. Our results show that, although the global conclusions from those studies will not be drastically changed, each case has to be considered individually, since depending on the physical conditions, the use of the QCT CRC may lead to a mis-estimate of the water vapour abundance of up to a factor of ~3. Additionally, the comparison of the quantum state-to-state and thermalised CRC, including the description of the population of the H2 rotational levels, show that above TK ~ 100 K, large differences are expected from those two sets for the p-H2 symmetry. Finally, we find that at low temperature (i.e. TK < 100 K) modelled line

  2. Vapour and air bubble collapse analysis in viscous compressible water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Bazanini

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of the collapse of bubbles (or cavities are shown, using the finite difference method, taking into account the compressibility of the liquid, expected to occur in the final stages of the collapse process. Results are compared with experimental and theoretical data for incompressible liquids, to see the influence of the compressibility of the water in the bubble collapse. Pressure fields values are calculated in an area of 800 x 800 mm, for the case of one bubble under the hypothesis of spherical symmetry. Results are shown as radius versus time curves for the collapse (to compare collapse times, and pressure curves in the plane, for pressure fields. Such calculations are new because of their general point of view, since the existing works do not take into account the existence of vapour in the bubble, neither show the pressure fields seen here. It is also expected to see the influence of the compressibility of the water in the collapse time, and in the pressure field, when comparing pressure values.

  3. Nicotine content of electronic cigarettes, its release in vapour and its consistency across batches: regulatory implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hajek, Peter; McRobbie, Hayden

    2014-03-01

    Electronic cigarettes (EC) may have a potential for public health benefit as a safer alternative to smoking, but questions have been raised about whether EC should be licensed as a medicine, with accurate labelling of nicotine content. This study determined the nicotine content of the cartridges of the most popular EC brands in the United Kingdom and the nicotine levels they deliver in the vapour, and estimated the safety and consistency of nicotine delivery across batches of the same product as a proxy for quality control for individual brands and within the industry. We studied five UK brands (six products) with high internet popularity. Two samples of each brand were purchased 4 weeks apart, and analysed for nicotine content in the cartridges and nicotine delivery in vapour. The nicotine content of cartridges within the same batch varied by up to 12% relative standard deviation (RSD) and the mean difference between different batches of the same brand ranged from 1% [95% confidence interval (CI) = -5 to 7%] to 20% (95% CI=14-25%) for five brands and 31% (95% CI=21-39%) for the sixth. The puffing schedule used in this study vaporized 10-81% of the nicotine present in the cartridges. The nicotine delivery from 300 puffs ranged from ∼2 mg to ∼15 mg and was not related significantly to the variation of nicotine content in e-liquid (r=0.06, P=0.92). None of the tested products allowed access to e-liquid or produced vapour nicotine concentrations as high as conventional cigarettes. There is very little risk of nicotine toxicity from major electronic cigarette (EC) brands in the United Kingdom. Variation in nicotine concentration in the vapour from a given brand is low. Nicotine concentration in e-liquid is not well related to nicotine in vapour. Other EC brands may be of lower quality and consumer protection regulation needs to be implemented, but in terms of accuracy of labelling of nicotine content and risks of nicotine overdose, regulation over and above

  4. Water vapour and ozone profiles in the midlatitude upper troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vaughan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an investigation of upper tropospheric humidity profiles measured with a standard radiosonde, the Vaisala RS80-A, and a commercial frost-point hygrometer, the Snow White. Modifications to the Snow White, to enable the mirror reflectivity and Peltier cooling current to be monitored during flight, were found to be necessary to determine when the instrument was functioning correctly; a further modification to prevent hydrometeors entering the inlet was also implemented. From 23 combined flights of an ozonesonde, radiosonde and Snow White between September 2001 and July 2002, clear agreement was found between the two humidity sensors, with a mean difference of <2% in relative humidity from 2 to 10km, and 2.2% between 10 and 13km. This agreement required a correction to the radiosonde humidity, as described by Miloshevich et al. (2001. Using this result, the dataset of 324 ozonesonde/RS80-A profiles measured from Aberystwyth between 1991 and 2002 was examined to derive statistics for the distribution of water vapour and ozone. Supersaturation with respect to ice was frequently seen at the higher levels - 24% of the time in winter between 8 and 10km. The fairly uniform distribution of relative humidity persisted to 120% in winter, but decreased rapidly above 100% in summer.

  5. WAVE-E: The WAter Vapour European-Explorer Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-LLuva, David; Deiml, Michael; Pavesi, Sara

    2017-04-01

    In the last decade, stratosphere-troposphere coupling processes in the Upper Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) have been increasingly recognized to severely impact surface climate and high-impact weather phenomena. Weakened stratospheric circumpolar jets have been linked to worldwide extreme temperature and high-precipitation events, while anomalously strong stratospheric jets can lead to an increase in surface winds and tropical cyclone intensity. Moreover, stratospheric water vapor has been identified as an important forcing for global decadal surface climate change. In the past years, operational weather forecast and climate models have adapted a high vertical resolution in the UTLS region in order to capture the dynamical processes occurring in this highly stratified region. However, there is an evident lack of available measurements in the UTLS region to consistently support these models and further improve process understanding. Consequently, both the IPCC fifth assessment report and the ESA-GEWEX report 'Earth Observation and Water Cycle Science Priorities' have identified an urgent need for long-term observations and improved process understanding in the UTLS region. To close this gap, the authors propose the 'WAter Vapour European - Explorer' (WAVE-E) space mission, whose primary goal is to monitor water vapor in the UTLS at 1 km vertical, 25 km horizontal and sub-daily temporal resolution. WAVE-E consists of three quasi-identical small ( 500 kg) satellites (WAVE-E 1-3) in a constellation of Sun-Synchronous Low Earth Orbits, each carrying a limb sounding and cross-track scanning mid-infrared passive spectrometer (824 cm-1 to 829 cm-1). The core of the instruments builds a monolithic, field-widened type of Michelson interferometer without any moving parts, rendering it rigid and fault tolerant. Synergistic use of WAVE-E and MetOp-NG operational satellites is identified, such that a data fusion algorithm could provide water vapour profiles from the

  6. Latent heat flux measurements over complex terrain by airborne water vapour and wind lidars

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kiemle, Christoph; Wirth, Martin; Fix, Andreas; Rahm, Stephan; Corsmeier, Ulrich; Di Girolamo, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Vertical profiles of the latent heat flux in a convective boundary layer (CBL) are obtained for the first time over complex terrain with airborne water vapour differential absorption lidar and Doppler wind lidar...

  7. Quantifying the water vapour feedback associated with post-Pinatubo global cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, P.M. de [NOAA Aeronomy Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading (United Kingdom); Collins, M. [Centre for Global Atmospheric Modelling, Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2004-08-01

    There is an ongoing important debate about the role of water vapour in climate change. Predictions of future climate change depend strongly on the magnitude of the water vapour feedback and until now models have almost exclusively been relied upon to quantify this feedback. In this work we employ observations of water vapour changes, together with detailed radiative calculations to estimate the water vapour feedback for the case of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. We then compare our observed estimate with that calculated from a relatively large ensemble of simulations from a complex coupled climate model. We calculate an observed water vapour feedback parameter of -1.6 Wm{sup -2} K{sup -1}, with uncertainty placing the feedback parameter between -0.9 to -2.5 Wm{sup -2} K{sup -1}. The uncertain is principally from natural climate variations that contaminate the volcanic cooling. The observed estimates are consistent with that found in the climate model, with the ensemble average model feedback parameter being -2.0 Wm{sup -2} K{sup -1}, with a 5-95% range of -0.4 to -3.6 Wm{sup -2} K{sup -1} (as in the case of the observations, the spread is due to an inability to separate the forced response from natural variability). However, in both the upper troposphere and Southern Hemisphere the observed model water vapour response differs markedly from the observations. The observed range represents a 40%-400% increase in the magnitude of surface temperature change when compared to a fixed water vapour response and is in good agreement with values found in other studies. Variability, both in the observed value and in the climate model's feedback parameter, between different ensemble members, suggests that the long-term water vapour feedback associated with global climate change could still be a factor of 2 or 3 different than the mean observed value found here and the model water vapour feedback could be quite different from this value; although a small water vapour feedback

  8. A model study on the influence of overshooting convection on TTL water vapour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. E. Hassim

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Overshooting deep convection that penetrates into the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL is thought to have an important role in regulating the water vapour content of this region. Yet, the net effect of such convection and the dominant mechanisms remain unclear. This study uses two idealised three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulations to examine the influence of overshooting convection on water vapour when it penetrates into two different TTL environments, one supersaturated and the other subsaturated with respect to ice. These simulations show that the overshooting convection plays a direct role in driving the ambient environment towards ice saturation through either net moistening (subsaturated TTL or net dehydration (supersaturated TTL. Moreover, in these cases the extent of dehydration in supersaturated conditions is greater than the moistening in subsaturated conditions. With the aid of modelled passive tracers, the relative roles of transport, mixing and ice microphysics are assessed; ultimately, ice sublimation and scavenging processes play the most important role in defining the different TTL relative humidity tendencies. In addition, significant moistening in both cases is modelled well into the subsaturated tropical lower stratosphere (up to 450 K, even though the overshooting turrets only reach approximately 420 K. It is shown that this moistening is the result of jumping cirrus, which is induced by the localised upward transport and mixing of TTL air following the collapse of the overshooting turret.

  9. First retrieval of global water vapour column amounts from SCIAMACHY measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Noël

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Global water vapour column amounts have been derived for the first time from measurements of the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY on the European environmental satellite ENVISAT. For this purpose, two different existing retrieval algorithms have been adapted, namely the Air Mass Corrected Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (AMC-DOAS which was originally designed for GOME and the Weighting Function Modified Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (WFM-DOAS which was mainly designed for the retrieval of CH4, CO2 and CO from SCIAMACHY near-infrared spectra. Here, both methods have been applied to SCIAMACHY's nadir measurements in the near-visible spectral region around 700 nm. Taking into account a systematic offset of 10%, the results of these two methods agree within a scatter of about ±0.5 g/cm2 with corresponding SSM/I and ECMWF water vapour data. This deviation includes contributions from the temporal and spatial variability of water vapour. In fact, the mean deviation between the SCIAMACHY and the correlative data sets is much smaller: the SCIAMACHY total water vapour columns are typically about 0.15 g/cm2 lower than the SSM/I values and less than 0.1 g/cm2 lower than corresponding ECMWF data. The SCIAMACHY water vapour results agree well with correlative data not only over ocean but also over land, thus showing the capability of SCIAMACHY to derive water vapour concentrations on the global scale.

  10. The water vapour flux above Switzerland and its role in the August 2005 extreme precipitation and flooding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N' Dri Koffi, Ernest; Maetzler, Christian [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. of Applied Physics; Graham, Edward [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. of Applied Physics; University of the Highlands and Islands, Stornoway, Scotland (United Kingdom). Lews Castle College

    2013-10-15

    The water budget approach is applied to an atmospheric box above Switzerland (hereafter referred to as the 'Swiss box') to quantify the atmospheric water vapour flux using ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalyses. The results confirm that the water vapour flux through the Swiss box is highly temporally variable, ranging from 1 to 5 x 10{sup 7} kg/s during settled anticyclonic weather, but increasing in size by a factor of ten or more during high speed currents of water vapour. Overall, Switzerland and the Swiss box 'import' more water vapour than it 'exports', but the amount gained remains only a small fraction (1% to 5%) of the total available water vapour passing by. High inward water vapour fluxes are not necessarily linked to high precipitation episodes. The water vapour flux during the August 2005 floods, which caused severe damage in central Switzerland, is examined and an assessment is made of the computed water vapour fluxes compared to high spatio-temporal rain gauge and radar observations. About 25% of the incoming water vapour flux was stored in Switzerland. The computed water vapour fluxes from ECMWF data compare well with the mean rain gauge observations and the combined rain-gauge radar precipitation products. (orig.)

  11. The water vapour flux above Switzerland and its role in the August 2005 extreme precipitation and flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest N'dri Koffi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The water budget approach is applied to an atmospheric box above Switzerland (hereafter referred to as the “Swiss box” to quantify the atmospheric water vapour flux using ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalyses. The results confirm that the water vapour flux through the Swiss box is highly temporally variable, ranging from 1 to 5 · 107 kg/s during settled anticyclonic weather, but increasing in size by a factor of ten or more during high speed currents of water vapour. Overall, Switzerland and the Swiss box “import” more water vapour than it “exports”, but the amount gained remains only a small fraction (1% to 5% of the total available water vapour passing by. High inward water vapour fluxes are not necessarily linked to high precipitation episodes. The water vapour flux during the August 2005 floods, which caused severe damage in central Switzerland, is examined and an assessment is made of the computed water vapour fluxes compared to high spatio-temporal rain gauge and radar observations. About 25% of the incoming water vapour flux was stored in Switzerland. The computed water vapour fluxes from ECMWF data compare well with the mean rain gauge observations and the combined rain-gauge radar precipitation products.

  12. The millennium water vapour drop in chemistry–climate model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brinkop

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the abrupt and severe water vapour decline in the stratosphere beginning in the year 2000 (the "millennium water vapour drop" and other similarly strong stratospheric water vapour reductions by means of various simulations with the state-of-the-art Chemistry-Climate Model (CCM EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry Model. The model simulations differ with respect to the prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs and whether nudging is applied or not. The CCM EMAC is able to most closely reproduce the signature and pattern of the water vapour drop in agreement with those derived from satellite observations if the model is nudged. Model results confirm that this extraordinary water vapour decline is particularly obvious in the tropical lower stratosphere and is related to a large decrease in cold point temperature. The drop signal propagates under dilution to the higher stratosphere and to the poles via the Brewer–Dobson circulation (BDC. We found that the driving forces for this significant decline in water vapour mixing ratios are tropical sea surface temperature (SST changes due to a coincidence with a preceding strong El Niño–Southern Oscillation event (1997/1998 followed by a strong La Niña event (1999/2000 and supported by the change of the westerly to the easterly phase of the equatorial stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO in 2000. Correct (observed SSTs are important for triggering the strong decline in water vapour. There are indications that, at least partly, SSTs contribute to the long period of low water vapour values from 2001 to 2006. For this period, the specific dynamical state of the atmosphere (overall atmospheric large-scale wind and temperature distribution is important as well, as it causes the observed persistent low cold point temperatures. These are induced by a period of increased upwelling, which, however, has no corresponding pronounced signature in SSTs anomalies in the tropics

  13. Soil-water characteristics of Gaomiaozi bentonite by vapour equilibrium technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Sun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil-water characteristics of Gaomiaozi (GMZ Ca-bentonite at high suctions (3–287 MPa are measured by vapour equilibrium technique. The soil-water retention curve (SWRC of samples with the same initial compaction states is obtained in drying and wetting process. At high suctions, the hysteresis behaviour is not obvious in relationship between water content and suction, while the opposite holds between degree of saturation and suction. The suction variation can change its water retention behaviour and void ratio. Moreover, changes of void ratio can bring about changes in degree of saturation. Therefore, the total change in degree of saturation includes changes caused by suction and that by void ratio. In the space of degree of saturation and suction, the SWRC at constant void ratio shifts to the direction of higher suctions with decreasing void ratio. However, the relationship between water content and suction is less affected by changes of void ratio. The degree of saturation decreases approximately linearly with increasing void ratio at a constant suction. Moreover, the slope of the line decreases with increasing suction and they show an approximately linear relationship in semi-logarithmical scale. From this linear relationship, the variation of degree of saturation caused by the change in void ratio can be obtained. Correspondingly, SWRC at a constant void ratio can be determined from SWRC at different void ratios.

  14. Continuous measurements of isotopic composition of water vapour on the East Antarctic Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Casado

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Water stable isotopes in central Antarctic ice cores are critical to quantify past temperature changes. Accurate temperature reconstructions require one to understand the processes controlling surface snow isotopic composition. Isotopic fractionation processes occurring in the atmosphere and controlling snowfall isotopic composition are well understood theoretically and implemented in atmospheric models. However, post-deposition processes are poorly documented and understood. To quantitatively interpret the isotopic composition of water archived in ice cores, it is thus essential to study the continuum between surface water vapour, precipitation, surface snow and buried snow. Here, we target the isotopic composition of water vapour at Concordia Station, where the oldest EPICA Dome C ice cores have been retrieved. While snowfall and surface snow sampling is routinely performed, accurate measurements of surface water vapour are challenging in such cold and dry conditions. New developments in infrared spectroscopy enable now the measurement of isotopic composition in water vapour traces. Two infrared spectrometers have been deployed at Concordia, allowing continuous, in situ measurements for 1 month in December 2014–January 2015. Comparison of the results from infrared spectroscopy with laboratory measurements of discrete samples trapped using cryogenic sampling validates the relevance of the method to measure isotopic composition in dry conditions. We observe very large diurnal cycles in isotopic composition well correlated with temperature diurnal cycles. Identification of different behaviours of isotopic composition in the water vapour associated with turbulent or stratified regime indicates a strong impact of meteorological processes in local vapour/snow interaction. Even if the vapour isotopic composition seems to be, at least part of the time, at equilibrium with the local snow, the slope of δD against δ18O prevents us from identifying

  15. Multifractal comparison of the extremes of rain rates and integrated vapour content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, Auguste; Ni, Vincent; Bosser, Pierre; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall extremes are studied through the analyse of three related fields measured with the help of co-located devices installed in the roof of the Ecole des Ponts ParisTech building: (i) Integrated Water Vapour (IWV); it corresponds the amount of water vapour present in the vertical columns between a GPS ground receiver and corresponding satellites. It is estimated from the time shift between the expected duration the signal needs to reach the receiver (the two positions are known) and the actual one (ii) Rain rate measured by three optical disdrometers of two different types (Campbell Scientific PWS100 and OTT Parsivel2) (iii) Relative humidity measured by a dedicated sensor First the correlations between these quantities during significant events is analysed. It appears that although IWV tends to decrease (vapour condense to form drops that fall) and relative humidity to increase during a rainfall event, it turns out difficult to quantitatively characterize this link. It is possibly due to the fact that the scale gap between a punctual measure for the rain rate and an average over a few km height column for the IWV is too large. Finally the scaling features of these three fields are investigated with the help of the Universal Multifractal framework which has been extensively used to analyse and simulate geophysical fields extremely variable over wide ranges of scales. Only three parameters are used to characterize variability across scales: C1 the mean intermittency, alpha the multifractality index and H the non-conservative exponent. Retrieved features are compared and the notion of maximum observable singularity is used to quantify the extremes of the various fields. Authors acknowledge the financial support of the Interreg IV NEW RainGain project (www.raingain.eu) and the chair "hydrology for resilient cities" sponsored by Véolia, and the Climate-KIC Blue Green Dream project (bgd.org.uk/).

  16. Initial evaluation of airborne water vapour measurements by the IAGOS-GHG CRDS system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Annette; Gerbig, Christoph; Smit, Herman G. J.; Krämer, Martina; Spelten, Nicole

    2013-04-01

    Accurate and reliable airborne measurements of water vapour are still a challenge. Presently, no airborne humidity sensor exists that covers the entire range of water vapour content between the surface and the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) region with sufficient accuracy and time resolution. Nevertheless , these data are a pre-requisite to study the underlying processes in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere. The DENCHAR project (Development and Evaluation of Novel Compact Hygrometer for Airborne Research) addresses this deficit by developing and characterizing novel or improved compact airborne hygrometers for different airborne applications within EUFAR (European Facility for Airborne Research). As part of the DENCHAR inter-comparison campaign in Hohn (Germany), 23 May - 1 June 2011, a commercial gas analyzer (G2401-m, Picarro Inc.,US), based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), was installed on a Learjet to measure water vapour, CO2, CH4 and CO. The CRDS components are identical to those chosen for integration aboard commercial airliner within IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System). Thus the campaign allowed for the initial assessment validation of the long-term IAGOS H2O measurements by CRDS against reference instruments with a long performance record (FISH, the Fast In-situ Stratospheric Hygrometer, and CR2 frostpoint hygrometer, both research centre Juelich). The inlet system, a one meter long 1/8" FEP-tube connected to a Rosemount TAT housing (model 102BX, deiced) installed on a window plate of the aircraft, was designed to eliminate sampling of larger aerosols, ice particles, and water droplets, and provides about 90% of ram-pressure. In combination with a lowered sample flow of 0.1 slpm (corresponding to a 4 second response time), this ensured a fully controlled sample pressure in the cavity of 140 torr throughout an aircraft altitude operating range up to 12.5 km without the need of an upstream sampling pump

  17. Spatio-Temporal Estimation of Integrated Water Vapour Over the Malaysian Peninsula during Monsoon Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihin, S.; Musa, T. A.; Radzi, Z. Mohd

    2017-10-01

    This paper provides the precise information on spatial-temporal distribution of water vapour that was retrieved from Zenith Path Delay (ZPD) which was estimated by Global Positioning System (GPS) processing over the Malaysian Peninsular. A time series analysis of these ZPD and Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) values was done to capture the characteristic on their seasonal variation during monsoon seasons. This study was found that the pattern and distribution of atmospheric water vapour over Malaysian Peninsular in whole four years periods were influenced by two inter-monsoon and two monsoon seasons which are First Inter-monsoon, Second Inter-monsoon, Southwest monsoon and Northeast monsoon.

  18. Intercomparison of atmospheric water vapour measurements at a Canadian High Arctic site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Dan; Strong, Kimberly; Schneider, Matthias; Rowe, Penny M.; Sioris, Chris; Walker, Kaley A.; Mariani, Zen; Uttal, Taneil; McElroy, C. Thomas; Vömel, Holger; Spassiani, Alessio; Drummond, James R.

    2017-08-01

    Water vapour is a critical component of the Earth system. Techniques to acquire and improve measurements of atmospheric water vapour and its isotopes are under active development. This work presents a detailed intercomparison of water vapour total column measurements taken between 2006 and 2014 at a Canadian High Arctic research site (Eureka, Nunavut). Instruments include radiosondes, sun photometers, a microwave radiometer, and emission and solar absorption Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers. Close agreement is observed between all combination of datasets, with mean differences ≤ 1.0 kg m-2 and correlation coefficients ≥ 0.98. The one exception in the observed high correlation is the comparison between the microwave radiometer and a radiosonde product, which had a correlation coefficient of 0.92.A variety of biases affecting Eureka instruments are revealed and discussed. A subset of Eureka radiosonde measurements was processed by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN) for this study. Comparisons reveal a small dry bias in the standard radiosonde measurement water vapour total columns of approximately 4 %. A recently produced solar absorption FTIR spectrometer dataset resulting from the MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water) retrieval technique is shown to offer accurate measurements of water vapour total columns (e.g. average agreement within -5.2 % of GRUAN and -6.5 % of a co-located emission FTIR spectrometer). However, comparisons show a small wet bias of approximately 6 % at the high-latitude Eureka site. In addition, a new dataset derived from Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) measurements is shown to provide accurate water vapour measurements (e.g. average agreement was within 4 % of GRUAN), which usefully enables measurements to be taken during day and night (especially valuable during polar night).

  19. Distribution of tritium in water vapour and precipitation around Wolsung nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jung-Seok; Lee, Sang-Kuk; Kim, Yongjae; Lee, Jung-Min; Cho, Heung-Joon; Cho, Yong-Woo; Yun, Ju-Yong

    2011-07-01

    The distribution of tritium in water vapour and precipitation with discharge of tritiated water vapour and meteorological factors was studied around the Wolsung nuclear power plant (NPP) site during the period 2004-2008. The tritium concentrations in atmospheric water vapour and precipitation had a temporal variation with relatively high values in the early summer. Spatial distribution of tritium concentrations was affected by various factors such as distance from the NPP site, wind direction, tritium discharge into the atmosphere and atmospheric dispersion factor. The annual mean concentrations of atmospheric HTO and precipitation were correlated with the amount of gaseous tritium released from the Wolsung NPP. The tritium concentrations in precipitation decrease exponentially with an increase of the distance from the Wolsung NPP site.

  20. Influence of water vapour and permanent gases on the atmospheric optical depths and transmittance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, V.

    1991-05-01

    The influence of the atmospheric state on the extinction of direct solar radiation has been studied by using a four layer atmospheric model. Simple analytical formulae are established for the spectral optical depths of permanent gases and water vapour. These formulae use the ground level values of air pressure, temperature and relative huniidity. An additional parameter, related to the vertical distribution of the hunmidity content, is used for a better estimation of the water vapour optical depth. Good agreement between theory and measurements is found. The paper shows the dependence of the atmospheric spectral transmittance on the above mentioned parameters. L'influence de l'état atmosphérique sur l'extinction de la radiation solaire directe a été étudiée à l'aide d'un modèle atmosphérique développé antérieurement par l'auteur. Des formules simples ont été établies pour l'épaisseur optique spectrale des gaz et de la vapeur d'eau. Ces formules utilisent les valeurs de la pression atmosphérique, de la température et de l'humidité relative, mesurées au niveau du sol. Un paramètre supplémentaire, lié à la distribution verticale du contenu d'humidité, est utilisé pour calculer l'épaisseur optique due à la vapeur d'eau. La théorie est en bon accord avec les résultats des mesures. Le travail montre la dépendance de la transmittance atmosphérique spectrale en fonction des paramètres spécifiés ci-dessus.

  1. Upper tropospheric water vapour variability at high latitudes – Part 1: Influence of the annular modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Sioris

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal and monthly zonal medians of water vapour in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS are calculated for both Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE instruments for the northern and southern high-latitude regions (60–90° N and 60–90° S. Chosen for the purpose of observing high-latitude processes, the ACE orbit provides sampling of both regions in 8 of 12 months of the year, with coverage in all seasons. The ACE water vapour sensors, namely MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation and the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS are currently the only satellite instruments that can probe from the lower stratosphere down to the mid-troposphere to study the vertical profile of the response of UTLS water vapour to the annular modes. The Arctic oscillation (AO, also known as the northern annular mode (NAM, explains 64 % (r = −0.80 of the monthly variability in water vapour at northern high latitudes observed by ACE-MAESTRO between 5 and 7 km using only winter months (January to March, 2004–2013. Using a seasonal time step and all seasons, 45 % of the variability is explained by the AO at 6.5 ± 0.5 km, similar to the 46 % value obtained for southern high latitudes at 7.5 ± 0.5 km explained by the Antarctic oscillation or southern annular mode (SAM. A large negative AO event in March 2013 produced the largest relative water vapour anomaly at 5.5 km (+70 % over the ACE record. A similarly large event in the 2010 boreal winter, which was the largest negative AO event in the record (1950–2015, led to > 50 % increases in water vapour observed by MAESTRO and ACE-FTS at 7.5 km.

  2. WATER VAPOUR PERMEABILITY PROPERTIES OF CELLULAR WOOD MATERIAL AND CONDENSATION RISK OF COMPOSITE PANEL WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janis IEJAVS

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Invention of light weight cellular wood material (CWM with a trade mark of Dendrolight is one of innovations in wood industry of the last decade. The aim of the research was to define the water vapour permeability properties of CWM and to analyse the condensation risk of various wall envelopes where solid wood cellular material is used. To determine the water vapour permeability of CWM, test samples were produced in the factory using routine production technology and tested according to the standard EN 12086:2014. Water vapour permeability factor (μ and other properties of six different configurations of CWM samples were determined. Using the experimental data the indicative influence of geometrical parameters such as lamella thickness, number of lamellas and material direction were investigated and evaluated. To study the condensation risk within the wall envelope containing CWM calculation method given in LVS EN ISO 13788:2012 was used. To ease the calculation process previously developed JavaScript calculation software that had only capability to calculate thermal transmittance was extended so that condensation risk in multi-layer composite walls can be analysed. Water vapour permeability factor in CWM is highly direction dependant. If parallel and perpendicular direction of CWM is compared the value of water vapour permeability factor can differentiate more than two times. Another significant factor for condensation risk analysis is overall thickness of CWM since it directly influences the equivalent air layer thickness. The influence of other factors such as lamella thickness, or groove depth is minor when water vapour permeability properties are compared. From the analysis of CWM performance in building envelope it can be concluded that uninsulated CWM panels used during winter months will pose the risk of condensation damage to structure, but the risk can be reduced or prevented if insulation layer is applied to the CWM panel wall

  3. Measurement of water vapour transport through a porous non-hygroscopic material in a temperature gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thor; Padfield, Tim; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2014-01-01

    This was an experiment to identify the driving potential for water vapour diffusion through porous materials in a temperature gradient. The specimen of mineral fibre insulation was placed between a space with controlled temperature and relative humidity and a space with a controlled, higher...... temperature, and a measured but not controlled relative humidity (RH). This assembly was allowed to reach equilibrium with no vapour movement between the spaces, as tested by a constant RH on each side and by zero flux of water vapour measured in the cold side chamber. The RH and temperature values were...... be tested experimentally in this way, but it is reasonable to assume that concentration is the driving potential. The close equality of the concentrations makes it unnecessary to invoke temperature difference as a third possible potential for driving diffusion....

  4. First detection of tidal behaviour in polar mesospheric water vapour by ground based microwave spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hallgren

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Mesospheric water vapour has been observed above ALOMAR in northern Norway (69° N 16° E by our group since 1995 using a 22 GHz ground based microwave spectrometer. A new instrument with higher sensitivity, providing a much better time resolution especially in the upper mesosphere, was installed in May 2008. The time resolution is high enough to provide observations of daily variations in the water vapour mixing ratio. We present the first ground based detections of tidal behaviour in the polar middle atmospheric water vapour distribution.

    Diurnal and semidiurnal variations of water vapour have been observed and due to the long chemical lifetime of water they are assumed to be caused by changing wind patterns which transport water-rich or poor air into the observed region. The detected tidal behaviour does not follow any single other dynamical field but is instead assumed to be a result of the different wind components.

    Both the diurnal and semidiurnal amplitude and phase components are resolved. The former shows a stable seasonal behaviour consistent with earlier observations of wind fields and model calculations, whereas the latter appears more complex and no regular behaviour has so far been observed.

  5. On the representativity of water vapour measurements at Boulder for global stratospheric trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossow, S.

    2016-12-01

    Long-term changes of water vapour in the lower stratosphere inevitably affect the surface climate. Thus understanding such changes is of primary importance. The longest continuous data set is based on balloon-borne frost point hygrometer observations at Boulder. Overall this data set shows an increase in water vapour since the 1980s accompanied by large variability on short time scales (Hurst et al., 2011). Recently a merged satellite data set, covering the time period between 1988 and 2010, has been analysed showing a decrease of water vapour in the lower stratosphere (Hegglin et al., 2014). This discrepancy is difficult to reconcile. There might be problems with one data set or even with both. Also the local behaviour at Boulder might not be representative for the zonal mean behaviour, which is represented by the satellite observations. So far this has been assumed and the Boulder changes have even been considered to be globally representative. Here I present investigations of this aspect using both model simulations and observations. References: Hegglin et al. (2014), "Vertical structure of stratospheric water vapour trends derived from merged satellite data", Nature Geoscience, 7, 768 - 776, doi:10.1038/ngeo2236. Hurst et al. (2011), "Stratospheric water vapor trends over Boulder, Colorado: Analysis of the 30 year Boulder record", Journal of Geophysical Research, 116, D02,306, doi:10.1029/2010JD015065.

  6. Thermal diffusion of water vapour in porous materials: fact or fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The reliable evaluation of moisture transfer in porous materials is essential in many engineering applications, among which building science. One key aspect is a correct description of moisture flow phenomena and their transport potentials. While different issues can be debated in that respect...... its negligible magnitude. It can in conclusion be stated that thermal diffusion is of no importance for building science applications, leaving vapour pressure as the sole significant transport potential for the diffusion of water vapour in porous materials. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  7. Temperature-dependent transport mechanisms through PE-CVD coatings: comparison of oxygen and water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchheim, D.; Wilski, S.; Jaritz, M.; Mitschker, F.; Gebhard, M.; Brochhagen, M.; Böke, M.; Benedikt, Jan; Awakowicz, P.; Devi, A.; Hopmann, Ch; Dahlmann, R.

    2017-10-01

    When it comes to thin coatings such as plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition or plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition coatings on substrates of polymeric material, existing models often describe transport through these thin coatings as mainly driven by transport through defects of different sizes. However, temperature-dependent measurements of permeation could not confirm this hypothesis and instead gaseous transport through these thin coatings was found to more likely to occur through the molecular structure. This paper correlates existing transport models with data from oxygen transmission experiments and puts recent investigations for water vapour transmission mechanisms into context for a better understanding of gaseous transport through thin coatings.

  8. Technical note: Water vapour concentration and flux measurements with PTR-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ammann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The most direct approach for measuring the exchange of biogenic volatile organic compounds between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere is the eddy covariance technique. It has been applied several times in the last few years using fast response proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS. We present an independent validation of this technique by applying it to measure the water vapour flux in comparison to a common reference system comprising an infra-red gas analyser (IRGA. Water vapour was detected in the PTR-MS at mass 37 (atomic mass units corresponding to the cluster ion H3O+·H2O. During a five-week field campaign at a grassland site, we obtained a non-linear but stable calibration function between the mass 37 signal and the reference water vapour concentration. With a correction of the high-frequency damping loss based on empirical ogive analysis, the eddy covariance water vapour flux obtained with the PTR-MS showed a very good agreement with the flux of the reference system. The application of the empirical ogive method for high-frequency correction led to significantly better results than using a correction based on theoretical spectral transfer functions. This finding is attributed to adsorption effects on the tube walls that are presently not included in the theoretical correction approach. The proposed high-frequency correction method can also be used for other trace gases with different adsorption characteristics.

  9. Reaction of soda-lime-silica glass melt with water vapour at melting temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vernerová, Miroslava; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Němec, Lubomír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 416, MAY 15 (2015), s. 21-30 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010844 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt * sulfate * water vapour * bubble nucleation * melt foaming * glass melting Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.825, year: 2015

  10. Behaviour of carbon dioxide and water vapour flux densities from a disturbed raised peat bog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieveen, J.P.; Jacobs, A.F.G.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapour flux densities were carried out for a disturbed raised peat bog in the north of the Netherlands during an 18 month continuous experiment. Tussock grass (sp. Molinea caerulae) mainly dominated the vegetation of the bog area. The maximum leaf area index

  11. The time variation in infrared water-vapour bands in Mira variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsuura, M; Yamamura, [No Value; Cami, J; Onaka, T; Murakami, H; Yamamura, I.

    The time variation in the water-vapour bands in oxygen-rich Mira variables has been investigated using multi-epoch ISO/SWS spectra of four Mira variables in the 2.5-4.0 mum region. All four stars show H2O bands in absorption around minimum in the visual light curve. At maximum, H2O emission features

  12. GPS sensing of precipitable water vapour during the March 2010 Melbourne storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, S.; Wang, C.; Zhang, K.; Kuleshov, Y.

    2013-11-01

    The March 2010 Melbourne storm is used as a case study to examine the potential of using Global Positioning System (GPS) observations for studying the precipitable water vapour (PWV) field. The Victorian statewide GPS infrastructure network, i.e. GPSnet, was used in this study. GPSnet is currently the only statewide and densest GPS infrastructure network in Australia, which provides an excellent opportunity to examine the distribution of water vapour as the severe weather system passed over the state. Data from 15 GPSnet stations were processed over a one-week period, i.e. a few days prior to and after the storm passage, during which the course of the storm extended from the west to the southeast corner of the state. In addition, data from two radiosonde sites of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology Upper Air Network were used to compare and validate the GPS derived PWV measurements. The findings demonstrate that there is strong spatial and temporal correlation between variations of the ground-based GPS-PWV estimates and the passage of the storm over the state. This is encouraging as the ground-based GPS water vapour sensing technique can be considered as a supplemental meteorological sensor in studying severe weather events. The advantage of using ground-based GPS-PWV technique is that it is capable of providing continuous observation of the storm passage with high temporal resolution. The spatial resolution of the distribution of water vapour is dependent on the geographical location and density of the GPS stations.

  13. Water vapour rises from the cooling towers for the ATLAS detector at Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    Electronics on the ATLAS detector produce heat when the experiment is running. An elaborate cooling system keeps the detector from overheating. On the surface, the warm water vapour that rises from the detector 100metres underground is clearly visible from the ATLAS cooling towers on the CERN Meyrin site in Switzerland.

  14. Analysis of carbon dioxide, water vapour and energy fluxes over an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analysis of carbon dioxide, water vapour and energy fluxes over an Indian teak mixed deciduous forest for winter and summer months using eddy covariance technique ... Eddy covariance; Indian deciduous forests; CO2 flux; heat flux. ... National Remote Sensing Centre (ISRO), Balanagar, Hyderabad 500 037, India.

  15. Analysis of carbon dioxide, water vapour and energy fluxes over an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    temperate grassland ecosystem; Bound.-Layer Meteorol. 52 135–149. Mahrt L and Dean V 2002 Relationship of area-averaged carbon dioxide and water vapour fluxes to atmospheric variables; Agric. For. Meteor. 112 195–202. Ohtaki E 1984 Application of an infrared carbon dioxide and humidity instrument to studies of ...

  16. Study and mitigation of calibration error sources in a water vapour Raman lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Leslie; Bock, Olivier; Bosser, Pierre; Thom, Christian; Pelon, Jacques

    2014-05-01

    The monitoring of water vapour throughout the atmosphere is important for many scientific applications (weather forecasting, climate research, calibration of GNSS altimetry measurements). Measuring water vapour remains a technical challenge because of its high variability in space and time. The major issues are achieving long-term stability (e.g., for climate trends monitoring) and high accuracy (e.g. for calibration/validation applications). LAREG and LOEMI at Institut National de l'Information Géographique et Forestière (IGN) have developed a mobile scanning water vapour Raman lidar in collaboration with LATMOS at CNRS. This system aims at providing high accuracy water vapour measurements throughout the troposphere for calibrating GNSS wet delay signals and thus improving vertical positioning. Current developments aim at improving the calibration method and long term stability of the system to allow the Raman lidar to be used as a reference instrument. The IGN-LATMOS lidar was deployed in the DEMEVAP (Development of Methodologies for Water Vapour Measurement) campaign that took place in 2011 at the Observatoire de Haute Provence. The goals of DEMEVAP were to inter-compare different water vapour sounding techniques (lidars, operational and research radiosondes, GPS,…) and to study various calibration methods for the Raman lidar. A significant decrease of the signals and of the calibration constants of the IGN-LATMOS Raman lidar has been noticed all along the campaign. This led us to study the likely sources of uncertainty and drifts in each part of the instrument: emission, reception and detection. We inventoried several error sources as well as instability sources. The impact of the temperature dependence of the Raman lines on the filter transmission or the fluorescence in the fibre, are examples of the error sources. We investigated each error source and each instability source (uncontrolled laser beam jitter, temporal fluctuations of the photomultiplier

  17. Long-term series of tropospheric water vapour amounts and HDO/H2O ratio profiles above Jungfraujoch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, B.; Mahieu, E.; Schneider, M.; Hase, F.; Servais, C.; Demoulin, P.

    2012-04-01

    (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change, http://www.ndacc.org) of the Jungfraujoch International Scientific Station (Swiss Alps, 46.5° N, 8.0° E, 3580m asl). Information content analysis of the retrieved H2O products allows us to produce a long-term trend from 1996 to 2011 for different tropospheric levels. We will compare the annual cycle of tropospheric HDO/H2O ratio profiles with those already produced at other sites (Schneider et al., 2010). We will also focus on the diurnal variability of water vapour to determine a time limit in the inter-comparison of different water vapour measurement techniques. Acknowledgments The University of Liège involvement has primarily been supported by the PRODEX program funded by the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office, Brussels and by the Swiss GAW-CH program. The FRS-FNRS and the Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles are further acknowledged for observational activities support. We thank the International Foundation High Altitude Research Stations Jungfraujoch and Gornergrat (HFSJG, Bern) for supporting the facilities needed to perform the observations. MUSICA is funded by the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC Grant agreement n° 256961.

  18. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation, pulsed electric field, hot water and ethanol vapours treatment on functional properties of mung bean sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Ankit; Siddiqui, Saleem; Upadhyay, Neelam; Soni, Jyoti

    2014-04-01

    The present investigation was conducted with the objective to study the effects of various treatments and storage conditions on ascorbic acid, total phenols, antioxidant activity and polyphenol oxidase activity of mung bean sprouts. The sprouts subjected to various treatments viz., pulsed electric field (PEF) (10,000 V for 10 s), hot water dip (HWD) (50 °C for 2 min), ethanol vapours (1 h) and UV-Irradiation (10 kJm(-2) in laminar flow chamber for 1 h); and then stored at room (25 ± 1 °C) and low (7 ± 1 °C) temperature conditions. The sprouts were analyzed regularly at 24 h interval till end of shelf life. Different treatments given to sprouts resulted in differential effect on various parameters. The ascorbic acid, total phenols and antioxidant activity were highest in ethanol vapours treated sprouts. There was a general decrease in polyphenol oxidase activity by various treatments. During storage ascorbic acid, total phenols and antioxidant activity of sprouts first increased and then decreased significantly, however, for polyphenol oxidase activity a progressive increase with increase in storage period was observed. The trends were similar at room and low temperature storage conditions. Thus, it can be concluded that the ethanol vapours significantly improved the ascorbic acid content, total phenols and antioxidant activity of mung bean sprouts, both at room as well as low temperature conditions of storage.

  19. Leidenfrost vapour layer moderation of the drag crisis and trajectories of superhydrophobic and hydrophilic spheres falling in water

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dynamic effects of a Leidenfrost vapour layer sustained on the surface of heated steel spheres during free fall in water. We find that a stable vapour layer sustained on the textured superhydrophobic surface of spheres falling through 95 °C water can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by up to 75% and stabilize the sphere trajectory for the Reynolds number between 104 and 106, spanning the drag crisis in the absence of the vapour layer. For hydrophilic spheres under the same conditions, the transition to drag reduction and trajectory stability occurs abruptly at a temperature different from the static Leidenfrost point. The observed drag reduction effects are attributed to the disruption of the viscous boundary layer by the vapour layer whose thickness depends on the water temperature. Both the drag reduction and the trajectory stabilization effects are expected to have significant implications for development of sustainable vapour layer based technologies. © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  20. Leidenfrost vapour layer moderation of the drag crisis and trajectories of superhydrophobic and hydrophilic spheres falling in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2014-08-21

    We investigate the dynamic effects of a Leidenfrost vapour layer sustained on the surface of heated steel spheres during free fall in water. We find that a stable vapour layer sustained on the textured superhydrophobic surface of spheres falling through 95 °C water can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by up to 75% and stabilize the sphere trajectory for the Reynolds number between 10(4) and 10(6), spanning the drag crisis in the absence of the vapour layer. For hydrophilic spheres under the same conditions, the transition to drag reduction and trajectory stability occurs abruptly at a temperature different from the static Leidenfrost point. The observed drag reduction effects are attributed to the disruption of the viscous boundary layer by the vapour layer whose thickness depends on the water temperature. Both the drag reduction and the trajectory stabilization effects are expected to have significant implications for development of sustainable vapour layer based technologies.

  1. The water vapour flux above Switzerland and its role in the August 2005 extreme precipitation and flooding

    OpenAIRE

    Ernest N'Dri Koffi; Edward Graham; Andchristian Mätzler

    2013-01-01

    The water budget approach is applied to an atmospheric box above Switzerland (hereafter referred to as the “Swiss box”) to quantify the atmospheric water vapour flux using ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalyses. The results confirm that the water vapour flux through the Swiss box is highly temporally variable, ranging from 1 to 5 · 107 kg/s during settled anticyclonic weather, but increasing in size by a factor of ten or more during high speed currents of water vapour. Overall, Switzerland and the ...

  2. One year observation of water vapour isotopic composition at Ivittuut, Southern Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Delmotte, Marc; Cattani, Olivier; Sodemann, Harald; Risi, Camille

    2013-04-01

    In September 2011, an automatic continuous water vapour isotopic composition monitoring instrument has been installed in the atmospheric station of Ivittuut (61.21° N, 48.17° W), southern Greenland. Precipitation has been regularly sampled on site at event to weekly scales and analysed in our laboratory for isotopic composition. Meteorological parameters (temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed and direction) and atmospheric composition (CO2, CH4, Atmospheric Potential Oxygen) are also continuously monitored at Ivittuut. The meteorological context of our observation period will be assessed by comparison with the local climatology. The water vapour analyser is a Picarro Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS, model L2120i). It is automatically and regularly calibrated on the VSMOW scale using measurements of the isotopic composition of vaporized reference water standards using the Picarro Syringe Delivery Module (SDM). As measurements are sensitive to humidity level, an experimentally estimated calibration response function is used to correct our isotopic measurements. After data treatment, successive isotopic measurements of reference waters have a standard deviation of around 0.35 per mil for δ18O and 2.3 per mil for δD. Our instrumentation protocol and data quality control method will be presented, together with our one year δ18O, δD and d-excess measurements in water vapour and precipitation. The relationship between surface water vapour isotopic composition and precipitation isotopic composition will be investigated based on a distillation model. Specific difficulties linked to our low maintenance remote station will also be discussed. The processes responsible for the synoptic variability of Ivittuut water vapour isotopic composition will be investigated by comparing our observational dataset with (i) atmospheric back-trajectories and (ii) results from an isotopically-enabled atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM

  3. Dynamic water vapour sorption in gluten and starch films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliver, L.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2011-01-01

    Water sorption of gluten and wheat starch films as a function of water activity was studied using gravimetric step-change sorption experiments. Films of different thicknesses were used with the aim to vary the characteristic diffusion time and to get insights in the contribution of the polymer-chain

  4. Study of the Quantum Efficiency of CsI Photocathodes Exposed to Oxygen and Water Vapour

    CERN Document Server

    Di Mauro, A; Piuz, François; Schyns, E M; Van Beelen, J B; Williams, T D

    2000-01-01

    The operation of CsI photocathodes in gaseous detectors requires special attention to the purity of the applied gas mixtures.We have studied the influence of oxygen and water vapour contaminations on the performance of CsI photocathodes for theALICE HMPID RICH prototype. Measurements were done through comparison of Cherenkov rings obtained from beamtests. Increased levels of oxygen and water vapour did not show any effect on the performance. The results of this studyfound a direct application in the way of storing CsI photocathodes over long periods nad in particular in the shipment of theHMPID prototype from CERN to the STAR experiment at BNL. (Abstract only available,full text to follow)

  5. Optimal estimation of water vapour profiles using a combination of Raman lidar and microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foth, Andreas; Pospichal, Bernhard

    2017-09-01

    In this work, a two-step algorithm to obtain water vapour profiles from a combination of Raman lidar and microwave radiometer is presented. Both instruments were applied during an intensive 2-month measurement campaign (HOPE) close to Jülich, western Germany, during spring 2013. To retrieve reliable water vapour information from inside or above the cloud a two-step algorithm is applied. The first step is a Kalman filter that extends the profiles, truncated at cloud base, to the full height range (up to 10 km) by combining previous information and current measurement. Then the complete water vapour profile serves as input to the one-dimensional variational (1D-VAR) method, also known as optimal estimation. A forward model simulates the brightness temperatures which would be observed by the microwave radiometer for the given atmospheric state. The profile is iteratively modified according to its error bars until the modelled and the actually measured brightness temperatures sufficiently agree. The functionality of the retrieval is presented in detail by means of case studies under different conditions. A statistical analysis shows that the availability of Raman lidar data (night) improves the accuracy of the profiles even under cloudy conditions. During the day, the absence of lidar data results in larger differences in comparison to reference radiosondes. The data availability of the full-height water vapour lidar profiles of 17 % during the 2-month campaign is significantly enhanced to 60 % by applying the retrieval. The bias with respect to radiosonde and the retrieved a posteriori uncertainty of the retrieved profiles clearly show that the application of the Kalman filter considerably improves the accuracy and quality of the retrieved mixing ratio profiles.

  6. The influence of heat pre-treatment on the sorption of water vapour on bentonite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mokrejš, P.; Zikánová, Arlette; Hradil, David; Štulík, K.; Pacáková, V.; Kočiřík, Milan; Eić, M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2005), s. 57-63 ISSN 0929-5607 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/02/1464; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : adsorption * bentonite * montmorillonite * water vapour Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.323, year: 2005

  7. ANNEALING OF POLYCRYSTALLINE THIN FILM SILICON SOLAR CELLS IN WATER VAPOUR AT SUB-ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pikna

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thin film polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si solar cells were annealed in water vapour at pressures below atmospheric pressure. PN junction of the sample was contacted by measuring probes directly in the pressure chamber filled with steam during passivation. Suns-VOC method and a Lock-in detector were used to monitor an effect of water vapour to VOC of the solar cell during whole passivation process (in-situ. Tested temperature of the sample (55°C – 110°C was constant during the procedure. Open-circuit voltage of a solar cell at these temperatures is lower than at room temperature. Nevertheless, voltage response of the solar cell to the light flash used during Suns-VOC measurements was good observable. Temperature dependences for multicrystalline wafer-based and polycrystalline thin film solar cells were measured and compared. While no significant improvement of thin film poly-Si solar cell parameters by annealing in water vapour at under-atmospheric pressures was observed up to now, in-situ observation proved required sensitivity to changing VOC at elevated temperatures during the process.

  8. Remote sensing of water vapour profiles in the framework of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We show that the near infrared solar absorption spectra recorded in the framework of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON can be used to derive the vertical distribution of tropospheric water vapour. The resolution of the TCCON spectra of 0.02 cm−1 is sufficient for retrieving lower and middle/upper tropospheric water vapour concentrations with a vertical resolution of about 3 and 8 km, respectively. We document the good quality of the remotely-sensed profiles by comparisons with coincident in-situ Vaisala RS92 radiosonde measurements. Due to the high measurement frequency, the TCCON water vapour profile data offer novel opportunities for estimating the water vapour variability at different timescales and altitudes.

  9. A microwave satellite water vapour column retrieval for polar winter conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perro, Christopher; Lesins, Glen; Duck, Thomas J.; Cadeddu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    A new microwave satellite water vapour retrieval for the polar winter atmosphere is presented. The retrieval builds on the work of Miao et al. (2001) and Melsheimer and Heygster (2008), employing auxiliary information for atmospheric conditions and numerical optimization. It was tested using simulated and actual measurements from the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) satellite instruments. Ground truth was provided by the G-band vapour radiometer (GVR) at Barrow, Alaska. For water vapour columns less than 6 kg m-2, comparisons between the retrieval and GVR result in a root mean square (RMS) deviation of 0.39 kg m-2 and a systematic bias of 0.08 kg m-2. These results are compared with RMS deviations and biases at Barrow for the retrieval of Melsheimer and Heygster (2008), the AIRS and MIRS satellite data products, and the ERA-Interim, NCEP, JRA-55, and ASR reanalyses. When applied to MHS measurements, the new retrieval produces a smaller RMS deviation and bias than for the earlier retrieval and satellite data products. The RMS deviations for the new retrieval were comparable to those for the ERA-Interim, JRA-55, and ASR reanalyses; however, the MHS retrievals have much finer horizontal resolution (15 km at nadir) and reveal more structure. The new retrieval can be used to obtain pan-Arctic maps of water vapour columns of unprecedented quality. It may also be applied to measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave/Temperature 2 (SSM/T2), Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit B (AMSU-B), Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS), Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), and Chinese MicroWave Humidity Sounder (MWHS) instruments.

  10. Parametric Reconstruction of Water Vapour Accumulation Modes in the Western and the Eastern Mediterranean Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palau, J. L.; Rovira, F.; Millan, M.

    2009-09-01

    The Mediterranean Sea acts as a source of heat and moisture for the surrounding regions, but not only because it is a closed and warm sea. The Mediterranean Basin is located in the mid-latitudes (i.e., high solar insolation), and it is almost completely surrounded by mountains. Moreover, from a meteorological point of view, the Mediterranean Basin can be regarded as two well-differentiated sub-basins: The Western Mediterranean Basin, where the prevailing synoptic conditions are associated with the Azores High Pressure system; and the Eastern Mediterranean Basin, which is under the influence of the Middle-East monsoon low-pressure system. The combination of all these features enables strong evapotranspiration with lower ventilation conditions (especially on the Western side) than in other geographical areas of the world (e.g., areas under the direct influence of the Atlantic Ocean). As a result, there are different water vapour "accumulation modes” on both sides of the Mediterranean Basin. The determination of the main atmospheric accumulation modes and their seasonal variability on both sides of the Mediterranean Basin is a relevant issue for integrating some of the feedbacks driving climate change, e.g., precipitation regimes, secondary pollutant production, ventilation conditions, etc. This study focuses on the total water vapour accumulation modes found on both sides of the Mediterranean Basin throughout the year. The data used in this study come from the most recent EOS satellite missions. Specifically, this investigation analyses the nine-year time series of water vapour data measured by the MODIS instrument (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) on board the TERRA (EOS AM-1) satellite. Annual evolution (2000-2008) and seasonality of the total precipitable water column are analysed in both the Western and the Eastern Mediterranean Basins. After carrying out the parametric reconstruction of the water vapour time series, we have obtained their

  11. In-situ Modelisation of a Greenhouse Climate Including Sensible Heat, Water Vapour and CO2 Balances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibi-Triki N.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available While thermal structures such as greenhouses are complex to model under transient conditions because of coupled heat and mass (H2O and CO2 exchanges between their different parts, systems theory allows a simple analysis of the input/output behaviour of the model. In particular, parameters of the reduced dynamic models can be derived from in-situ measurements on these systems. This paper describes an application of the systems approach to a greenhouse climate model which incorporates CO2 balance, crop transpiration and photosynthesis and the effects of heating, CO2 enrichment, natural ventilation and evaporative cooling. In a first stage, system parameters such as the equivalent thermal mass, the wind dependent coefficient of natural ventilation and the various heat exchange coefficients were identified in situ from sequences of input-output data concerning the heat and water vapour balance, recorded over the crop production period from December to July. Good agreement between measured and computed values of air temperature, air humidity was observed. In a second stage, we have considered simultaneously the sensible heat, water vapour and CO2 exchanges and tested the model against experimental data measured using a commercial greenhouse climate control computer. The identified values of the physical and physiological parameters are close the theoretical values and the accuracy of temperature, humidity and CO2 content is rather good.

  12. Airborne differential absorption lidar for water vapour measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in the spectral region around 940 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poberaj, G.

    2000-07-01

    Two all-solid-state laser systems were developed and studied in detail to optimise their performance for an airborne water vapour differential absorption lidar (DIAL). Their special features are high average output powers and excellent spectral properties in the 940-nm spectral region relevant for monitoring very low water vapour contents in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. One system is an injection-seeded pulsed Ti:sapphire ring laser with a spectral bandwidth of 105 MHz and an average power of 1.1 W. The other system is an injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO) in a ring configuration. Using KTP as nonlinear crystal, a signal output with a spectral bandwidth of 140 MHz and an average power of 1.2 W was achieved. Both systems, the Ti:sapphire ring laser and the KTP OPO, possess spectral purity values higher than 99%. The pump source for these systems is a frequency doubled diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser operating at a repetition rate of 100 Hz. The KTP OPO system has been used as a transmitter in a new airborne water vapour DIAL instrument. For the first time, measurements of two-dimensional water vapour distributions with a high vertical (500 m) and horizontal (20 km) resolution across several potential vorticity streamers were performed. Very low water vapour mixing ratios (10-50 ppmv) and strong gradients were observed in the tropopause region. The sensitivity of the DIAL instrument in the centre of a stratospheric intrusion ranges from 3% in the near field to 12% in the far field (4 km). The first comparison experiments with in situ measuring instruments show a good agreement. Considerable differences are found between DIAL measurements and data obtained from the ECMWF operational analyses and a mesoscale numerical model. (orig.)

  13. Novel method for water vapour monitoring using wireless communication networks measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, N.; Alpert, P.; Messer, H.

    2009-04-01

    We propose a new technique for monitoring near-surface water vapour, by estimating humidity from data collected through existing wireless communication networks. Water vapour plays a crucial part in a variety of atmospheric processes. As the most influential of greenhouse gases, it absorbs long-wave terrestrial radiation. The water vapour cycle of evaporation and recondensation is a major energy redistributing mechanism transferring heat energy from the Earth's surface to the atmosphere. Additionally, humidity has an important role in weather forecasting as a key variable required for initialization of atmospheric models and hazard warning techniques. However, current methods of monitoring humidity suffer from low spatial resolution, high cost or a lack of precision when measuring near ground levels. Weather conditions and atmospheric phenomena affect the electromagnetic channel, causing attenuations to the radio signals. Thus, wireless communication networks are in effect built-in environmental monitoring facilities. The wireless microwave links, used in these networks, are widely deployed by cellular providers for backhaul communication between base stations, a few tens of meters above ground level. As a result, the proposed method can provide moisture observations at high temporal and spatial resolution. Further, the implementation cost is minimal, since the data used is already collected and saved by the cellular operators. In addition - many of these links are installed in areas where access is difficult such as orographic terrain and complex topography. As such, our method enables measurements in places that have been hard to measure in the past, or have never been measured before. The technique is restricted to weather conditions which include absence of rain, fog or clouds along the propagation path. We present results from real-data measurements taken from microwave links used in a backhaul cellular network that show very good agreement with surface

  14. Water vapour and hydrogen in the terrestrial-planet-forming region of a protoplanetary disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, J A

    2007-05-31

    Planetary systems (ours included) formed in disks of dust and gas around young stars. Disks are an integral part of the star and planet formation process, and knowledge of the distribution and temperature of inner-disk material is crucial for understanding terrestrial planet formation, giant planet migration, and accretion onto the central star. Although the inner regions of protoplanetary disks in nearby star-forming regions subtend only a few nano-radians, near-infrared interferometry has recently enabled the spatial resolution of these terrestrial zones. Most observations have probed only dust, which typically dominates the near-infrared emission. Here I report spectrally dispersed near-infrared interferometric observations that probe the gas (which dominates the mass and dynamics of the inner disk), in addition to the dust, within one astronomical unit (1 au, the Sun-Earth distance) of the young star MWC 480. I resolve gas, including water vapour and atomic hydrogen, interior to the edge of the dust disk; this contrasts with results of previous spectrally dispersed interferometry observations. Interactions of this accreting gas with migrating planets may lead to short-period exoplanets like those detected around main-sequence stars. The observed water vapour is probably produced by the sublimation of migrating icy bodies, and provides a potential reservoir of water for terrestrial planets.

  15. Microwave measurements of temperature profiles, integrated water vapour, and liquid water path at Thule Air Base, Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Giandomenico; Di Iorio, Tatiana; di Sarra, Alcide; Iaccarino, Antonio; Meloni, Daniela; Mevi, Gabriele; Muscari, Giovanni; Cacciani, Marco

    2017-04-01

    A RPG Humidity And Temperature PROfiler (HATPRO-G2 ) radiometer was installed at Thule Air Base (76.5° N, 68.8° W), Greenland, in June 2016 in the framework of the Study of the water VApour in the polar AtmosPhere (SVAAP) project. The Danish Meteorological Institute started measurements of atmospheric properties at Thule Air Base in early '90s. The Thule High Arctic Atmospheric Observatory (THAAO) has grown in size and observing capabilities during the last three decades through the international effort of United States (NCAR and University of Alaska Fairbanks) and Italian (ENEA, INGV, University of Roma and Firenze) institutions (http://www.thuleatmos-it.it). Within this context, the intensive field campaign of the SVAAP project was aimed at the investigation of the surface radiation budget and took place from 5 to 28 July, 2016. After the summer campaign the HATPRO has continued to operate in order to monitor the annual variability of the temperature profile and integrated water vapour as well as the presence and characteristics of liquid clouds in the Artic environment. The combined use of the HATPRO together with other automatic instruments, such as a new microwave spectrometer (the water Vapour Emission Spectrometer for Polar Atmosphere VESPA-22), upward- and downward-looking pyranometers and pyrgeometers, a zenith-looking pyrometer operating in the 9.6-11.5 µm spectral range, an all sky camera, and a meteorological station, allows to investigate the clouds' physical and optical properties, as well as their impact on the surface radiation budget. This study will present and discuss the first few months of HATPRO observations; the effectiveness of the statistical retrieval used to derive the physical parameters from the HATPRO brightness temperatures will also be investigated through the comparison of the temperature and humidity profiles, and integrated water vapour, with data from radiosondes launched during the summer campaign and in winter time.

  16. Water vapour variability in the high-latitude upper troposphere – Part 2: Impact of volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Sioris

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The impact of volcanic eruptions on water vapour in the high-latitude upper troposphere is studied using deseasonalized time series based on observations by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE water vapour sensors, namely MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation and the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS. The two eruptions with the greatest impact on the high-latitude upper troposphere during the time frame of this satellite-based remote sensing mission are chosen. The Puyehue–Cordón Caulle volcanic eruption in June 2011 was the most explosive in the past 24 years and is shown to be able to account for the observed (50 ± 12 % increase in water vapour in the southern high-latitude upper troposphere in July 2011 after a minor adjustment for the simultaneous influence of the Antarctic oscillation. Eyjafjallajökull erupted in the spring of 2010, increasing water vapour in the upper troposphere at northern high latitudes significantly for a period of  ∼  1 month. These findings imply that extratropical volcanic eruptions in windy environments can lead to significant perturbations to high-latitude upper tropospheric humidity mostly due to entrainment of lower tropospheric moisture by wind-blown plumes. The Puyehue–Cordón Caulle eruption must be taken into account to properly determine the magnitude of the trend in southern high-latitude upper tropospheric water vapour over the last decade.

  17. Airborne hygrometer calibration inter-comparison against a metrological water vapour standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorgon, Denis; Boese, Norbert; Ebert, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Water vapour is the most important atmospheric greenhouse gas, which causes a major feedback to warming and other changes in the climate system. Knowledge of the distribution of water vapour and its climate induced changes is especially important in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) where vapour plays a critical role in atmospheric radiative balance, cirrus cloud formation, and photochemistry. But, our understanding of water in the UT/LS is limited by significant uncertainties in current UT/LS water measurements. One of the most comprehensive inter-comparison campaigns for airborne hygrometers, termed AQUAVIT (AV1) [1], took place in 2007 at the AIDA chamber at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany. AV1 was a well-defined, referred, blind inter-comparison of 22 airborne field instruments from 17 international research groups. One major metrological deficit of AV1, however, was, that no traceable reference instrument participated in the inter-comparison experiments and that the calibration procedures of the participating instruments were not monitored or interrogated. Consequently a follow-up inter-comparison was organized in April 2013, which for the first time also provides a traceable link to the international humidity scale. This AQUAVIT2 (AV2) campaign (details see: http://www.imk-aaf.kit.edu/aquavit/index.php/Main_Page) was again located at KIT/AIDA and organised by an international organizing committee including KIT, PTB, FZJ and others. Generally AV2 is divided in two parallel comparisons: 1) AV2-A uses the AIDA chamber for a simultaneous comparison of all instruments (incl. sampling and in-situ instruments) over a broad range of conditions characteristic for the UT/LS; 2) AV2-B, about which this paper is reporting, is a sequential comparison of selected hygrometers and (when possible) their reference calibration infrastructures by means of a chilled mirror hygrometer traced back to the primary National humidity standard

  18. Swelling behaviour of Early Jurassic shales when exposed to water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, Maartje; Barnhoorn, Auke; Peach, Colin; Drury, Martyn

    2017-04-01

    The presence of water in mudrocks has a largely negative impact on production of gas, due to the fact that water causes swelling of the rock. Removing the water from the mudrock on the other hand could potentially shrink the rock and increase the matrix permeability. Investigation of the swelling/shrinkage behaviour of the rock during exposure to water vapour is of key importance in designing and optimizing unconventional production strategies. We have used outcrop samples of the Whitby Mudstone and the Posidonia shale [1], potential unconventional sources for gas in North-western Europe, to measure the swelling and shrinkage behaviour. Subsamples, 1 mm cubes, were prepared by the Glass Workshop at Utrecht University using a high precision digitally controlled diamond wafering saw cooled by air. The mm cubes were then exposed to atmospheres with different relative humidities either in an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) or in a 3D dilatometer. So that the sample responses to exposure of water vapour could be measured. Parallel to the bedding we found a swelling strain between 0.5 and 1.5 %, perpendicular to the bedding though swelling strain varied between 1 and 3.5%. Volumetric swelling strain varied between 1 and 2% at a maximum relative humidity of 95%. Volumetric swelling strains measured in the Early Toarcian Shales are similar to the ones found in coal [2], where the results suggest that it might be possible to increase permeability in the reservoir by decreasing the in-situ water activity due to shrinkage of the matrix. [1] M.E. Houben, A. Barnhoorn, L. Wasch, J. Trabucho-Alexandre, C. J. Peach, M.R. Drury (2016). Microstructures of Early Jurassic (Toarcian) shales of Northern Europe, International Journal of Coal Geology, 165, 76-89. [2] Jinfeng Liu, Colin J. Peach, Christopher J. Spiers (2016). Anisotropic swelling behaviour of coal matrix cubes exposed to water vapour: Effects of relative humidity and sample size, International Journal of

  19. The H2O-O2 water vapour complex in the Earth's atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kondo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, abundance estimates for bound molecular complexes have been affected by uncertainties of a factor 10–100. This is due to the difficulty of accurately obtaining the equilibrium constant, either from laboratory experiments or by statistical thermodynamic calculations. In this paper, we firstly present laboratory experiments that we performed in order to determine the molecular structure of H2O-O2. We also derive global abundance estimates for H2O-O2 in the Earth's atmosphere. The equilibrium constant Kp evaluated using the "anharmonic oscillator approach" (AHOA (Sabu et al., 2005 was employed: the AHOA explains well the structure of the complex obtained by the present experiment. The Kp calculated by this method shows a realistic temperature dependence. We used this Kp to derive global abundance estimates for H2O-O2 in the Earth's atmosphere. The distribution of H2-O2 follows that of water vapour in the troposphere and seems inversely proportional to temperature in the lower stratosphere. Preliminary estimates at the surface show amount of H2O-O2 is comparable to CO or N2O, ranking water vapour complexes among the ten most abundant species in the boundary layer.

  20. Intercomparison of in-situ and remote sensing δD signals in tropospheric water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Matthias; González, Yenny; Dyroff, Christoph; Christner, Emanuel; García, Omaira; Wiegele, Andreas; Andrey, Javier; Barthlott, Sabine; Blumenstock, Thomas; Guirado, Carmen; Hase, Frank; Ramos, Ramon; Rodríguez, Sergio; Sepúveda, Eliezer

    2014-05-01

    The main mission of the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water) is the generation of a quasi-global tropospheric water vapour isototopologue dataset of a good and well-documented quality. We present a first empirical validation of MUSICA's remote sensing δD products (ground-based FTIR within NDACC, Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change, and space-based with IASI, Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, flown on METOP). As reference we use in-situ measurements made on the island of Tenerife at two different altitudes (2370 and 3550 m a.s.l., using two Picarro L2120-i water isotopologue analyzers) and aboard an aircraft (between 200 and 6800 m a.s.l., using the homemade ISOWAT instrument).

  1. Water vapour source impacts on oxygen isotope variability in tropical precipitation during Heinrich events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Lewis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Water isotope records such as speleothems provide extensive evidence of past tropical hydrological changes. During Heinrich events, isotopic changes in monsoon regions have been interpreted as implying a widespread drying through the Northern Hemisphere tropics and an anti-phased precipitation response in the south. Here, we examine the sources of this variability using a water isotope-enabled general circulation model, Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE. We incorporate a new suite of vapour source distribution tracers to help constrain the impact of precipitation source region changes on the isotopic composition of precipitation and to identify nonlocal amount effects. We simulate a collapse of the North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation with a large freshwater input to the region as an idealised analogue to iceberg discharge during Heinrich events. An increase in monsoon intensity, defined by vertical wind shear, is modelled over the South American domain, with small decreases simulated over Asia. Simulated isotopic anomalies agree well with proxy climate records, with lighter isotopic values simulated over South America and enriched values across East Asia. For this particular abrupt climate event, we identify which climatic change is most likely linked to water isotope change – changes in local precipitation amount, monsoon intensity, water vapour source distributions or precipitation seasonality. We categorise individual sites according to the climate variability that water isotope changes are most closely associated with, and find that the dominant isotopic controls are not consistent across the tropics – simple local explanations, in particular, fall short of explaining water isotope variability at all sites. Instead, the best interpretations appear to be site specific and often regional in scale.

  2. Global distributions of water vapour isotopologues retrieved from IMG/ADEOS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Herbin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The isotopologic composition of water vapour in the atmosphere provides valuable information on many climate, chemical and dynamical processes. The accurate measurements of the water isotopologues by remote-sensing techniques remains a challenge, due to the large spatial and temporal variations. Simultaneous profile retrievals of the main water isotopologues (i.e. H216O, H218O and HDO and their ratios are presented here for the first time, along their retrieved global distributions. The results are obtained by exploiting the high resolution infrared spectra recorded by the Interferometric Monitor for Greenhouse gases (IMG instrument, which has operated in the nadir geometry onboard the ADEOS satellite between 1996 and 1997. The retrievals are performed on cloud-free radiances, measured during ten days of April 1997, considering two atmospheric windows (1205–1228 cm−1; 2004–2032 cm−1 and using a line-by-line radiative transfer model and an inversion procedure based on the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM. Characterizations in terms of vertical sensitivity and error budget are provided. We show that a relatively high vertical resolution is achieved for H216O (~4–5 km, and that the retrieved profiles are in fair agreement with local sonde measurements, at different latitudes. The retrieved global distributions of H216O, H218O, HDO and their ratios are presented and found to be consistent with previous experimental studies and models. The Ocean-Continent difference, the latitudinal and vertical dependence of the water vapour amount and the isotopologic depletion are notably well reproduced. Others trends, possibly related to small-scale variations in the vertical profiles are also discussed. Despite the difficulties encountered for computing accurately the isotopologic ratios, our results demonstrate the ability

  3. Oxidation of X20 in Water Vapour: The Effect of Temperature and Oxygen Partial Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Anette Nørgaard; Montgomery, Melanie; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidation behaviour of X20 in various mixtures of water, oxygen and hydrogen was investigated at temperatures between 500 C and 700 C (time: 336 h). The samples were characterised using reflected light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy....... Double-layered oxides developed during oxidation under all conditions. The morphology of the oxide layers was strongly influenced by temperature, whereas the influence of the oxidising environment appeared to be less pronounced, as long as it contained water vapour. The inner layer consisted of converted...... M23C6 embedded in Fe–Cr spinel after oxidation at 500 and 600 C, while alternating layers of Cr-rich and Cr-poor oxide were observed after oxidation at 700 C. An internal oxidation zone developed during oxidation at 500 and 600 C, with its depth influenced by the oxidising environments. The results...

  4. Strong low-pass filtering effects on water vapour flux measurements with closed-path eddy correlation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrom, Andreas; Dellwik, Ebba; Flyvbjerg, Henrik K.

    2007-01-01

    concentration measurements decreases exponentially with increasing relative humidity. After correction for this unintended filtering, the fluxes are consistent with CO2 and H2O fluxes that were measured with an open-path sensor at the same time. The correction of water vapour flux measurements over a Beech......-pass filtering effects. Other than for CO2 is the magnitude of the correction for water vapour flux measurements unsatisfactorily high, i.e. the EC system needs to be technically improved. Our results suggest that such high correction can be avoided by keeping relative humidity in the entire gas transport system...

  5. An energy balance model exploration of the impacts of interactions between surface albedo, water vapour and clouds on polar amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodergren, Helena; McDonald, Adrian; Bodeker, Greg

    2017-04-01

    The interactions between surface albedo, water vapour and clouds, and how these interactions change with carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the atmosphere, are examined with a newly developed energy balance model. A particular focus is the non-linear interactions of these climate system attributes on polar amplification. Polar amplification is defined here as the ratio of the annual rate of surface warming over the polar regions (latitudes poleward of 60o) to the surface warming over equatorial regions (latitudes equatorward of 30o), and is termed the polar amplification factor. Changes in surface albedo plays a major role in polar amplification as might be expected, due to its amplifying effects of CO2 -induced warming of the polar regions, and relatively small warming effects in the equatorial regions. When considered in isolation from the other climate system components, i.e. when water vapour and cloud cover are prescribed, changes in surface albedo result in a polar amplification factor of 4.83 for a doubling of CO2, compared to 5.54 for the full feedback simulation, i.e. the simulation where all three components are allowed to simultaneously change with temperature. In our simple model framework, changes in surface albedo are responsible for 43% of the polar warming from the full feedback run, and 49% of the equatorial warming. The polar amplification for the simulation with isolated climate feedback from cloud cover variations is smaller than the simulation with isolated surface albedo feedback, mainly due to a weaker warming in the polar regions. The polar amplification factor for the isolated cloud cover feedback simulation is 3.73, contributing 30% of the warming in the polar regions to the full feedback simulation and 45% in the equatorial regions. The amplifying effect from changing surface albedo on polar warming and polar amplification is enhanced when surface albedo interacts with cloud cover or water vapour. The polar amplification factor is

  6. A rapid method for the sampling of atmospheric water vapour for isotopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Leon I; Yakir, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the stable isotopic composition of atmospheric moisture is widely applied in the environmental sciences. Traditional methods for obtaining isotopic compositional data from ambient moisture have required complicated sampling procedures, expensive and sophisticated distillation lines, hazardous consumables, and lengthy treatments prior to analysis. Newer laser-based techniques are expensive and usually not suitable for large-scale field campaigns, especially in cases where access to mains power is not feasible or high spatial coverage is required. Here we outline the construction and usage of a novel vapour-sampling system based on a battery-operated Stirling cycle cooler, which is simple to operate, does not require any consumables, or post-collection distillation, and is light-weight and highly portable. We demonstrate the ability of this system to reproduce delta(18)O isotopic compositions of ambient water vapour, with samples taken simultaneously by a traditional cryogenic collection technique. Samples were collected over 1 h directly into autosampler vials and were analysed by mass spectrometry after pyrolysis of 1 microL aliquots to CO. This yielded an average error of distillation lines, slurry maintenance or mains power is not feasible. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Evolution of stratospheric ozone and water vapour time series studied with satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jones

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The long term evolution of stratospheric ozone and water vapour has been investigated by extending satellite time series to April 2008. For ozone, we examine monthly average ozone values from various satellite data sets for nine latitude and altitude bins covering 60° S to 60° N and 20–45 km and covering the time period of 1979–2008. Data are from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE I+II, the HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE, the Solar BackscatterUltraViolet-2 (SBUV/2 instrument, the Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR, the Optical Spectrograph InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS, and the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartograpY (SCIAMACHY. Monthly ozone anomalies are calculated by utilising a linear regression model, which also models the solar, quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO, and seasonal cycle contributions. Individual instrument ozone anomalies are combined producing an all instrument average. Assuming a turning point of 1997 and that the all instrument average is represented by good instrumental long term stability, the largest statistically significant ozone declines (at two sigma from 1979–1997 are seen at the mid-latitudes between 35 and 45 km, namely −7.2%±0.9%/decade in the Northern Hemisphere and −7.1%±0.9%/in the Southern Hemisphere. Furthermore, for the period 1997 to 2008 we find that the same locations show the largest ozone recovery (+1.4% and +0.8%/decade respectively compared to other global regions, although the estimated trend model errors indicate that the trend estimates are not significantly different from a zero trend at the 2 sigma level. An all instrument average is also constructed from water vapour anomalies during 1991–2008, using the SAGE II, HALOE, SMR, and the Microwave Limb Sounder (Aura/MLS measurements. We report that the decrease in water vapour values after 2001 slows down around 2004–2005 in the lower tropical stratosphere (20–25 km and has even

  8. Usefulness of satellite water vapour imagery in forecasting strong convection: A flash-flood case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Christo G.; Kozinarova, Gergana

    Using a case study of a severe convective event as an example, a framework for interpreting 6.2 µm channel satellite imagery that enables to indicate upper-level conditioning of the convective environment is presented and discussed. In order to illustrate the approach, all convective cells during the summer of 2007 that produced precipitations over Bulgaria are considered. They are classified regarding the observed moisture pattern in mid-upper levels as well as the low-level conditions of air humidity and convergence of the flow. Water vapour (WV) images are used to study the evolution of the upper-level moist and dry structures. The proposed interpretation is that the role of the upper-level dry boundaries identified in the WV imagery as favoured areas for the initiation of deep moist convection cannot be understood (and hence cannot be forecasted accurately) by considering them in isolation from the dynamic rate at which they are maintained. The paper examines the 23 June 2006 flash flood in Sofia city as a case, in which the operational forecast of the National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology of Bulgaria based on the mesoscale NWP model ALADIN underestimated the severity of the convective process. A comparison between the satellite water vapour imagery and the corresponding geopotential field of the dynamical tropopause, expressed in terms of potential vorticity (PV), shows an error in the performance of the ARPEGE operational numerical model. There is an obvious mismatch between the PV anomaly structure and the dry zone of the imagery. The forecast field shows underestimation of the tropopause height gradient and displacement of the PV anomaly to the southwest of the real position seen in the satellite image. It is concluded that the observed poor forecast is a result of the ARPEGE failure to treat correctly the interaction between the PV anomaly and the low-level warm anomaly.

  9. On the importance of proper noise modelling for long-term precipitable water vapour trend estimations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combrink, A.Z.A. [Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory, Krugersdorp (South Africa). Space Geodesy Programme]|[Univ. of Cape town, Rondebosch (South Africa). School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics; Bos, M.S. [Univ. do Porto, do Campo Alegre (Portugal); Fernandes, R.M.S. [IDL, Covilha (Portugal)]|[Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Combrinck, W.L.; Combrinck, W.L. [Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory, Krugersdorp (South Africa). Space Geodesy Programme; Merry, C.L. [Univ. of Cape Town, Rondebosch (South Africa). School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics

    2007-09-15

    Time-series of precipitable water vapour (PWV), derived from continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) observations, are analyzed for the two South African stations HRAO and SUTH. Since water vapour is a major greenhouse gas, observed changes in atmospheric PWV could be indicative of weather and climate change. The authors' main contribution is a realistic noise model of the PWV observations which enables one to draw correct conclusions about the significance of the derived PWV increase or decrease for given time spans longer than five years. It is demonstrated that the PWV residuals that are obtained after fitting a trend and yearly signal to the data are, due to the simple model's exclusion of short-term scatter, much larger than the PWV uncertainties provided by the GPS analysis software. Although a better solution for the associated uncertainties is obtained by using the variance of these PWV residuals for the uncertainty rescaling, it is shown that the ARMA(1,1) noise model better represents the associated statistical uncertainties than the simple white noise model. The ARMA(1,1)-derived PWV trend uncertainties are approximately 2 times greater than those for a rescaled white noise model. Finally, it is argued that the variability of the annual signal prevents any trend estimation using time series shorter than about five years. A quantitative measure is presented to determine the minimum period of continuous GPS observational data required to measure PWV trends to a specified accuracy. As a result of the study, the authors conclude that no statistically significant PWV trends are observed at the two GPS stations between 1998 and 2006.

  10. Water vapour intercomparison effort in the frame of HyMeX-SOP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Donato; Di Girolamo, Paolo; Stelitano, Dario; Cacciani, Marco; Flamant, Cyrille; Chazette, Patrick; Ducrocq, Véronique; Nuret, Mathieu; Fourié, Nadia; Richard, Evelyne

    2014-05-01

    A water vapour intercomparison effort, involving airborne and ground-based water vapour lidar systems and mesoscale models, was carried out in the framework of the international HyMeX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment) dedicated to the hydrological cycle and related high-impact events. Within HyMeX, a major field campaign was dedicated to heavy precipitation and flash flood events from 5 September to 6 November 2012. The 2 month field campaign took place over the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea and its surrounding coastal regions in France, Italy, and Spain. The main objective of this work is to provide accurate error estimates for the lidar systems i.e. the ground-based Raman lidar BASIL and the CNRS DIAL Leandre 2 on board the ATR42, as well as use BASIL data to validate mesoscale model results from the MESO NH and Arome WMED. The effort will benefit from the few dedicated ATR42 flights in the frame of the EUFAR Project "WaLiTemp". In the present work our attention was focused on two specific case studies: 13 September and 2 October in the altitude region 0.5 - 5.5 km. Comparisons between the ground-based Raman lidar BASIL and the airborne CNRS DIAL indicate a mean relative bias between the two sensors of 6.5%, while comparisons between BASIL and CNRS DIAL vs. the radiosondes indicate a bias of 2.6 and -3.5 %, respectively. The bias of BASIL vs. the ATR insitu sensor indicate a bias of -20.4 %. Specific attention will also be dedicated to the WALI/BASIL intercomparison effort which took place in Candillargues on 30 October 2012. Specific results from this intercomparison effort and from the intercomparison between BASIL and Meso-NH/AROME-WMed will be illustrated and discussed at the Conference.

  11. Water mobility within arabinoxylan and β-glucan films studied by NMR and dynamic vapour sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Ruifeng; Barron, Cécile; Saulnier, Luc; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne

    2011-11-01

    The main purpose of this research was to determine the impact of the structure and organisation of polysaccharides on the hydration properties of the cell walls of cereal grains. In order to remodel the lamellar assembly of arabinoxylan (AX) and (1 → 3)(1 → 4)-β-D-glucan (BG) within the endosperm cell walls, films were prepared and analysed using dynamic vapour sorption and time domain nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The water diffusivities within the AX and BG films were measured at 20 °C by observing the water sorption kinetics within a mathematical model based on Fick's second law. The evolution of spin-spin relaxation times of water protons measured by increasing the temperature is explained by the additional contributions of motion of the protons of polysaccharides and/or rapid chemical exchanges of protons between water and hydroxyl groups of polysaccharides. The difference between patterns of water behaviour within the AX and BG films can be related to the difference in their nanostructures. The smaller nanopores of the BG films cause their nanostructure to be more compact. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Continuous quality assessment of atmospheric water vapour measurement techniques: FTIR, Cimel, MFRSR, GPS, and Vaisala RS92

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available At the Izaña Observatory, water vapour amounts have been measured routinely by different techniques for many years. We intercompare the total precipitable water vapour (PWV amounts measured between 2005 and 2009 by a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectrometer, a Multifilter Rotating Shadow-band Radiometer (MFRSR, a Cimel sunphotometer, a Global Positioning System (GPS receiver, and daily radiosondes (Vaisala RS92. The long-term characteristics of our study allows a reliable and extensive empirical quality assessment of long-term validity, which is an important prerequisite when applying the data to climate research. We estimate a PWV precision of 1% for the FTIR, about 10% for the MFRSR, Cimel, and GPS (when excluding rather dry conditions, and significantly better than 15% for the RS92 (the detection of different airmasses avoids a better constrained estimation. We show that the MFRSR, Cimel and GPS data quality depends on the atmospheric conditions (humid or dry and that the restriction to clear-sky observations introduces a significant dry bias in the FTIR and Cimel data. In addition, we intercompare the water vapour profiles measured by the FTIR and the Vaisala RS92, which allows the conclusion that both experiments are able to detect lower to upper tropospheric water vapour mixing ratios with a precision of better than 15%.

  13. The epidermal resistance to diffusion of water vapour : an improved measuring method and field results in Indian corn (Zea mays)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigter, C.J.

    1974-01-01

    The resistance of the epidermis of the leaf to diffusion of water vapour can be measured most accurately in the field by closed diffusion porometers. It was possible to overcome the problems related to calibration and to dynamical use of a LiCl humidity sensor in the porometer. The dynamic behaviour

  14. Large anomalies in lower stratospheric water vapour and ice during the 2015-2016 El Niño

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Melody A.; Davis, Sean M.; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Ye, Hao; Dessler, Andrew E.

    2017-06-01

    The strong and unusual El Niño of 2015-2016 produced a remarkable perturbation to the hydrologic budget of the tropical tropopause layer (14-19 km). This region regulates stratospheric water vapour, which has a direct radiative impact on surface temperatures. To first order, the coldest tropical tropopause temperature regulates the amount of water vapour entering the stratosphere by controlling the amount of dehydration in the rising air. Here we show that tropical convective cloud ice and associated cirrus sublimating at unusually high altitudes might also have a role in stratospheric hydration. The 2015-2016 El Niño produced decadal record water vapour amounts in the tropical Western Pacific, coincident with warm tropopause temperature anomalies. In the Central Pacific, convective cloud ice was observed 2 km above the anomalously cold tropopause. A trajectory-based dehydration model based on two reanalysis temperature and wind fields can account for only about 0.5-0.6 ppmv of the ~0.9 ppmv tropical lower stratospheric moistening observed during this event. This suggests that unresolved convective dynamics and/or associated sublimation of lofted ice particles also contributed to lower stratospheric moistening. These observations suggest that convective moistening could contribute to future climate change-induced stratospheric water vapour increases.

  15. Relative humidity effects on water vapour fluxes measured with closed-path eddy-covariance systems with short sampling lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fratini, Gerardo; Ibrom, Andreas; Arriga, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    It has been formerly recognised that increasing relative humidity in the sampling line of closed-path eddy-covariance systems leads to increasing attenuation of water vapour turbulent fluctuations, resulting in strong latent heat flux losses. This occurrence has been analyzed for very long (50 m)...

  16. Measurements of mesospheric water vapour, aerosols and temperatures with the Spectral Absorption Line Imager (SALI-AT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, M. G.; Mullins, M.; Brown, S.; Sargoytchev, S. I.

    2001-08-01

    Water vapour concentration is one of the most important, yet one of the least known quantities of the mesosphere. Knowledge of water vapour concentration is the key to understanding many mesospheric processes, including the one that is primary focus of our investigation, mesospheric clouds (MC). The processes of formation and occurrence parameters of MC constitute an interesting problem in their own right, but recently evidence has been provided which suggests that they are a critical indicator of atmospheric change. The aim of the SALI-AT experiment is to make simultaneous (although not strictly collocated) measurements of water vapour, aerosols and temperature in the mesosphere and the mesopause region under twilight condition in the presence of mesospheric clouds. The water vapour will be measured in the regime of solar occultation utilizing a water vapour absorption band at 936 nm wavelength employing the SALI (Spectral Absorption Line Imager) instrument concept. A three-channel zenith photometer, AT-3, with wavelengths of 385 nm, 525 nm, and 1040 nm will measure Mie and Rayleigh scattering giving both mesospheric temperature profiles and the particle size distribution. Both instruments are small, low cost and low mass. It is envisioned that the SALI-AT experiment be flown on a small rocket - the Improved Orion/Hotel payload configuration, from the Andoya Rocket range, Norway. Alternatively the instrument can be flown as a "passenger" on larger rocket carrying other experiments. In either case flight costs are relatively low. Some performance simulations are presented showing that the instrument we have designed will be sufficiently sensitive to measure water vapor in concentrations that are expected at the summer mesopause, about 85 km height.

  17. Experimental Investigation of a Mechanical Vapour Compression Chiller at Elevated Chilled Water Temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Thu, Kyaw

    2017-05-18

    The performance of a Mechanical Vapour Compression (MVC) chiller is experimentally investigated under operating conditions suitable for sensible cooling. With the emergence of the energy efficient dehumidification systems, it is possible to decouple the latent load from the MVC chillers which can be operated at higher chilled water temperature for handling sensible cooling load. In this article, the performance of the chiller is evaluated at the elevated chilled water outlet temperatures (7 – 17° C) at various coolant temperatures (28 – 32° C) and flow rates (ΔT = 4 and 5° C) for both full- and part-load conditions. Keeping the performance at the AHRI standard as the baseline condition, the efficacy of the chiller in terms of compression ratio, cooling capacity and COP at aforementioned conditions is quantified experimentally. It is observed that for each one-degree Celsius increase in the chilled water temperature, the COP of the chiller improves by about 3.5% whilst the cooling capacity improvement is about 4%. For operation at 17° C chilled water outlet temperature, the improvements in COP and cooling capacity are between 37 – 40% and 40 – 45%, respectively, compared to the performance at the AHRI standards. The performance of the MVC chiller at the abovementioned operation conditions is mapped on the chiller performance characteristic chart.

  18. Response of water vapour D-excess to land-atmosphere interactions in a semi-arid environment

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen

    2016-06-30

    The stable isotopic composition of water vapour provides information about moisture sources and processes difficult to obtain with traditional measurement techniques. Recently, it has been proposed that the D-excess of water vapour can provide a diagnostic tracer of continental moisture recycling. However, D-excess exhibits a diurnal cycle that has been observed across a variety of ecosystems and may be influenced by a range of processes beyond regional-scale moisture recycling, including local evaporation (ET) fluxes. There is a lack of measurements of D-excess in evaporation (ET) fluxes, which has made it difficult to assess how ET fluxes modify the Dexcess in water vapour (dv). With this in mind, we employed a chamber-based approach to directly measure D-excess in ET (dET) fluxes. We show that ET fluxes imposed a negative forcing on the ambient vapour and could not explain the higher daytime dv values. The low dET observed here was sourced from a soil water pool that had undergone an extended drying period, leading to low D-excess in the soil moisture pool. A strong correlation between daytime dv and locally measured relative humidity was consistent with an oceanic moisture source, suggesting that remote hydrological processes were the major contributor to daytime dv variability. During the early evening, ET fluxes into a shallow nocturnal inversion layer caused a lowering of dv values near the surface. In addition, transient mixing of vapour with a higher D-excess from above the nocturnal inversion modified these values, causing large variability during the night. These results indicate dET can generally be expected to show

  19. Water vapour absorption in the clear atmosphere of a Neptune-sized exoplanet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraine, Jonathan; Deming, Drake; Benneke, Bjorn; Knutson, Heather; Jordán, Andrés; Espinoza, Néstor; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Wilkins, Ashlee; Todorov, Kamen

    2014-09-25

    Transmission spectroscopy has so far detected atomic and molecular absorption in Jupiter-sized exoplanets, but intense efforts to measure molecular absorption in the atmospheres of smaller (Neptune-sized) planets during transits have revealed only featureless spectra. From this it was concluded that the majority of small, warm planets evolve to sustain atmospheres with high mean molecular weights (little hydrogen), opaque clouds or scattering hazes, reducing our ability to observe the composition of these atmospheres. Here we report observations of the transmission spectrum of the exoplanet HAT-P-11b (which has a radius about four times that of Earth) from the optical wavelength range to the infrared. We detected water vapour absorption at a wavelength of 1.4 micrometres. The amplitude of the water absorption (approximately 250 parts per million) indicates that the planetary atmosphere is predominantly clear down to an altitude corresponding to about 1 millibar, and sufficiently rich in hydrogen to have a large scale height (over which the atmospheric pressure varies by a factor of e). The spectrum is indicative of a planetary atmosphere in which the abundance of heavy elements is no greater than about 700 times the solar value. This is in good agreement with the core-accretion theory of planet formation, in which a gas giant planet acquires its atmosphere by accreting hydrogen-rich gas directly from the protoplanetary nebula onto a large rocky or icy core.

  20. GNSS-Derived Water Vapour for Riyadh from SOLA IGS Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, Abdullrahman; Alothman, Abdulaziz; Fernandes, Rui; Aodah, Souad

    2017-04-01

    Water vapor is the most abundant and highly variable component of the important gases in the atmosphere. It influences many physical and thermodynamical processes in the atmosphere and plays an important role in the hydrological cycle and has effects on our climate and weather systems. Water vapour affects the electromagnetic radiation through the atmosphere, which is of significance in fields of astronomy, radar, communications and remote sensing. Precipitable water vapor (PWV) is the amount of water obtained if all the water vapor in the atmosphere were to be compressed to the point at which it condenses into liquid. PWV is difficult to measure adequately due to its variable distribution both spatially and temporally. Most of the current techniques (e.g., radiosondes or satellites) are only available at few locations and not continuously (few observations per day at most). However, in the last decades, GPS observations have been proven to accurately measure the ZTD (Zenith Tropospheric Delay) at high frequencies (normally every 5 minutes) above the station. This quantity can be converted to PWV if temperature and pressure is know at the station location. In early 2004, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) established a GPS network for geodetic and geophysical applications to contribute to the International GNSS Service IGS. In this study, we will present the first PWV measurements obtained from Global Navigation Satellite System GNSS receiver at the Solar Village (SOLA), 60 km from Riyadh. GNSS observations for the period between 2004-2006 are used to study the daily and seasonal variations of ZTD, and consequently of PWV in SOLA. In addition, we also compare the GNSS-derived PWV with sunphotometer and radiosonde estimates at SOLA in order to evaluate the compatibility of these techniques in a dry climate as the one in Riyadh.

  1. Influence of sea ice cover on evaporation and water vapour isotopic composition in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Werner, Martin; Meyer, Hanno; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Rabe, Benjamin; Behrens, Melanie; Schönicke, Lutz; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian

    2017-04-01

    Since July 2015, water stable isotopes (HDO and H218O) have been measured at two Arctic facilities: during the summer on board of the research vessel Polarstern, and year-round at the Siberian coastal site of Samoylov, situated in the Lena delta (N 72°22', E 126°29'), close to the Laptev Sea. In both places, the isotopic composition of water vapour is analysed continuously in surface air. Additional isotopic measurements are performed on a daily basis in ocean surface water samples taken on Polarstern and on an event basis from precipitation sampled in Samoylov. The two Polarstern summer campaigns cover a large region of the western Artic Ocean, including a one-month campaign in the central and eastern Arctic crossing the North Pole in September 2015, with very cold conditions (up to -20°C). Combining ocean and atmospheric observations from Polarstern allows an evaluation of local surface water evaporation and its isotopic fingerprint relative to the oceanic and meteorological conditions as well as the partial sea ice cover. In the central and eastern Arctic, a large area of complete sea ice cover also revealed a strong impact on the advected moisture above the ice cap under very cold conditions. A first year of Siberian observations at Samoylov depicted a large seasonal variability, with extremely dry and isotopically depleted winter values. Contrasted seasonal isotopic regimes might be utilized for identifying moisture sources changes in the region, such as ocean surface closure by sea ice, or freezing of the Lena River. Besides documenting the present meteorology and changes in the Arctic, our measurements will contribute to a better interpretation of regional paleoclimate records based on water isotopes and to the evaluation of climate models in the Arctic. A first model-data comparison of our measurements with simulation results by the isotope-enabled atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5-wiso have revealed relevant model biases in the Arctic realm.

  2. Water vapour emission in vegetable fuel: absorption cell measurements and detection limits of our CO II Dial system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellecci, C.; De Leo, L.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Lo Feudo, T.; Martellucci, S.; Richetta, M.

    2006-09-01

    Forest fires can be the cause of serious environmental and economic damages. For this reason a considerable effort has been directed toward the forest protection and fire fighting. In the early forest fire detection, Lidar technique present considerable advantages compared to the passive detection methods based on infrared cameras currently in common use, due its higher sensitivity and ability to accurately locate the fire. The combustion phase of the vegetable matter causes a great amount of water vapour emission, thus the water molecule behaviour will be studied to obtain a fire detection system ready and efficient also before the flame propagation. A first evaluation of increment of the water vapour concentration compared to standard one will be estimated by a numerical simulation. These results will be compared with the experimental measurements carried out into a cell with a CO II Dial system, burning different kinds of vegetable fuel. Our results and their comparison will be reported in this paper.

  3. Feasibility of using ammonia-water mixture in high temperature concentrated solar power plants with direct vapour generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modi, Anish; Knudsen, Thomas; Haglind, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    is to use direct vapour generation with water/steam as both the heat transfer fluid in the solar receivers and the cycle working fluid. This enables to operate the plant with higher turbine inlet temperatures. Available literature suggests that it is feasible to use ammonia-water mixture at high...... temperatures without corroding the equipment by using suitable additives with the mixture. This paper assesses the thermodynamic feasibility of using ammonia-water mixture in high temperature (450 °C) and high pressure (over 100 bar) concentrated solar power plants with direct vapour generation. The following......Concentrated solar power plants have attracted an increasing interest in the past few years – both with respect to the design of various plant components, and extending the operation hours by employing different types of storage systems. One approach to improve the overall plant performance...

  4. Technical Note: Improved total atmospheric water vapour amount determination from near-infrared filter measurements with sun photometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mavromatakis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we explore the effect of the contribution of the solar spectrum to the recorded signal in wavelengths outside the typical 940-nm filter's bandwidth. We employ gaussian-shaped filters as well as actual filter transmission curves, mainly AERONET data, to study the implications imposed by the non-zero out-of-band contribution to the coefficients used to derive precipitable water from the measured water vapour band transmittance. Published parameterized transmittance functions are applied to the data to determine the filter coefficients. We also introduce an improved, three-parameter, fitting function that can describe the theoretical data accurately, with significantly less residual effects than with the existing functions. The moderate-resolution SMARTS radiative transfer code is used to predict the incident spectrum outside the filter bandpass for different atmospheres, solar geometries and aerosol optical depths. The high-resolution LBLRTM radiative transfer code is used to calculate the water vapour transmittance in the 940-nm band. The absolute level of the out-of-band transmittance has been chosen to range from 10−6 to 10−4, and typical response curves of commercially available silicon photodiodes are included into the calculations.

    It is shown that if the out-of-band transmittance effect is neglected, as is generally the case, then the derived columnar water vapour is mainly underestimated by a few percents. The actual error depends on the specific out-of-band transmittance, optical air mass of observation and water vapour amount. Further investigations will use experimental data from field campaigns to validate these findings.

  5. Water Vapour Propulsion Powered by a High-Power Laser-Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Y.; Uchida, S.

    Most of the laser propulsion schemes now being proposed and developed assume neither power supplies nor on-board laser devices and therefore are bound to remote laser stations like a kite via a laser beam “string”. This is a fatal disadvantage for a space vehicle that flies freely though it is often said that no need of installing an energy source is an advantage of a laser propulsion scheme. The possibility of an independent laser propulsion space vehicle that carries a laser source and a power supply on board is discussed. This is mainly due to the latest development of high power laser diode (LD) technology. Both high specific impulse-low thrust mode and high thrust-low specific impulse mode can be selected by controlling the laser output by using vapour or water as a propellant. This mode change can be performed by switching between a high power continuous wave (cw), LD engine for high thrust with a low specific impulse mode and high power LD pumping Q-switched Nd:YAG laser engine for low thrust with the high specific impulse mode. This paper describes an Orbital Transfer Vehicle equipped with the above-mentioned laser engine system and fuel cell that flies to the Moon from a space platform or space hotel in Earth orbit, with cargo shipment from lunar orbit to the surface of the Moon, including the possibility of a sightseeing trip.

  6. A lidar for water vapour measurements in daytime at Lampedusa, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Marenco

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available ENEA is planning to develop a lidar system for measurement of the vertical profi le of water vapour mixing ratio in daytime at a remote site, the Station for Climate Observations located in Lampedusa, Italy. The Raman lidar technique has been retained because of its experimental simplicity with respect to DIAL, and the UV spectral range has been chosen because Raman cross-sections and detector effi ciencies are larger. For a wavelength larger than ~ 300 nm the signal is limited in daytime by sky background, but extinction is acceptable, and the aims of the system can be reached with a strong laser source. The 355 nm wavelength of a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser has been retained as this laser source permits to reach a large pulse energy while keeping the system simple to operate. Geometrical form factor calculations need to be performed to evaluate the near-range overlap between the laser beam and the fi eld-of-view of the receiver. Among several options, a dual-receiver system has been retained to account for the several orders of magnitude expected in the backscattered signal intensity: a smaller receiver, with a primary mirror of 200 mm diameter for the 0.2-1 km range, and a larger 500 mm receiver for the 1-3 km range.

  7. Water vapour transport from the tropical Atlantic and summer rainfall in tropical southern Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigaud, N.; Rouault, M. [University of Cape Town, Oceanography Department, Private Bag 1, Rondebosch (South Africa); Richard, Y.; Fauchereau, N. [UMR 5210 CNRS / Universite de Bourgogne, Centre de Recherches de Climatologie, Dijon (France)

    2007-02-15

    An empirical orthogonal functions analysis of the onshore flow of moisture along the west coast of southern Africa using NCEP-DOE AMIP II Re-analyses suggests two dominant modes of variability that are linked to (a) variations in the circulation linked with the South Atlantic anticyclone (b) the intensity of the flow that penetrates from the tropical Atlantic. The second mode, referred as the Equatorial Westerly mode, contributes the most to moisture input from the Atlantic onto the subcontinent at tropical latitudes. Substantial correlations in austral summer between the Atlantic moisture flux in the tropics and rainfall over the upper lands surrounding the Congo basin suggest the potential role played by this zonal mode of water vapour transport. Composites for austral summer months when this Equatorial Westerly mode had a particularly strong expression, show an enhanced moisture input at tropical latitudes that feeds into the deep convection occurring over the Congo basin. Sustained meridional energy fluxes result in above normal rainfall east and south of the Congo belt. During years of reduced equatorial westerly moisture flux, a deficit of available humidity occurs in the southern tropics. A concomitant eastward shift of deep convection to the southwest Indian ocean and southeastern Africa, leads to below normal rainfall over the uplands surrounding the Congo basin. (orig.)

  8. Effects of SO2 oxidation on ambient aerosol growth in water and ethanol vapours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Petäjä

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hygroscopicity (i.e. water vapour affinity of atmospheric aerosol particles is one of the key factors in defining their impacts on climate. Condensation of sulphuric acid onto less hygroscopic particles is expected to increase their hygrocopicity and hence their cloud condensation nuclei formation potential. In this study, differences in the hygroscopic and ethanol uptake properties of ultrafine aerosol particles in the Arctic air masses with a different exposure to anthropogenic sulfur pollution were examined. The main discovery was that Aitken mode particles having been exposed to polluted air were more hygroscopic and less soluble to ethanol than after transport in clean air. This aging process was attributed to sulphur dioxide oxidation and subsequent condensation during the transport of these particle to our measurement site. The hygroscopicity of nucleation mode aerosol particles, on the other hand, was approximately the same in all the cases, being indicative of a relatively similar chemical composition despite the differences in air mass transport routes. These particles had also been produced closer to the observation site typically 3–8 h prior to sampling. Apparently, these particles did not have an opportunity to accumulate sulphuric acid on their way to the site, but instead their chemical composition (hygroscopicity and ethanol solubility resembled that of particles produced in the local or semi-regional ambient conditions.

  9. Analysis of long time series of precipitable water vapour from GPS, DORIS and NWP models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Olivier; Willis, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    The analysis of GPS and DORIS measurements provides accurate estimates of zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) and total column water vapour (TCWV). Such measurements are now available for more than 15 years from permanent ground-based stations which cover quite homogenously the globe and receive increasing interest for meteorology and climate research. This work assesses the quality of operational and reprocessed GPS and DORIS datasets. Regarding GPS, two solutions produced by JPL as contributions to IGS (repro1, covering period 1995-2007, and trop_new, covering period 2001-2010) are compared. An independent reprocessed solution produced by IGN (sgn_repro1, covering period 2004-2010) is also used in the intercomparison. Differences due to different data processing procedures and errors in metadata and discontinuities due to changes in data processing procedures are evidenced in the operational solution. A reprocessed DORIS solution (IGN solution, period 1993-2008) is also compared to GPS and to the ECMWF reanalysis (ERA-Interim). The impact of changes in GPS or DORIS equipment on the quality of the ZTD estimates is investigated. The reprocessed GPS and DORIS ZTD estimates are converted into TCWV and analysed globally and for different regions. The TCWV time series reveal significant variability at various timescales (inter-annual, seasonal, intra-seasonal and synoptic) and look very promising for validating independent observational datasets (e.g., radiosondes and satellite products) and models (reanalyses, climate models).

  10. Analysis of global water vapour trends from satellite measurements in the visible spectral range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mieruch

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Global water vapour total column amounts have been retrieved from spectral data provided by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME flying on ERS-2, which was launched in April 1995, and the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT launched in March 2002. For this purpose the Air Mass Corrected Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (AMC-DOAS approach has been used. The combination of the data from both instruments provides us with a long-term global data set spanning more than 11 years with the potential of extension up to 2020 by GOME-2 data on MetOp.

    Using linear and non-linear methods from time series analysis and standard statistics the trends of H2O columns and their errors have been calculated. In this study, factors affecting the trend such as the length of the time series, the magnitude of the variability of the noise, and the autocorrelation of the noise are investigated. Special emphasis has been placed on the calculation of the statistical significance of the observed trends, which reveal significant local changes from −5% per year to +5% per year. These significant trends are distributed over the whole globe. Increasing trends have been calculated for Greenland, East Europe, Siberia and Oceania, whereas decreasing trends have been observed for the northwest USA, Central America, Amazonia, Central Africa and the Arabian Peninsular.

  11. Stratospheric water vapour budget and convection overshooting the tropopause: modelling study from SCOUT-AMMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. M. Liu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study the impacts of overshooting convection at a local scale on the water distribution in the tropical UTLS. Overshooting convection is assumed to be one of the processes controlling the entry of water vapour mixing ratio in the stratosphere by injecting ice crystals above the tropopause which later sublimate and hydrate the lower stratosphere. For this purpose, we quantify the individual impact of two cases of overshooting convection in Africa observed during SCOUT-AMMA: the case of 4 August 2006 over Southern Chad which is likely to have influenced the water vapour measurements by micro-SDLA and FLASH-B from Niamey on 5 August, and the case of a mesoscale convective system over Aïr on 5 August 2006. We make use of high resolution (down to 1 km horizontally nested grid simulations with the three-dimensional regional atmospheric model BRAMS (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modelling System. In both cases, BRAMS succeeds in simulating the main features of the convective activity, as well as overshooting convection, though the exact position and time of the overshoots indicated by MSG brightness temperature difference is not fully reproduced (typically 1° displacement in latitude compared with the overshoots indicated by brightness temperature difference from satellite observations for both cases, and several hours shift for the Aïr case on 5 August 2006. Total water budgets associated with these two events show a significant injection of ice particles above the tropopause with maximum values of about 3.7 ton s−1 for the Chad case (4 August and 1.4 ton s−1 for the Aïr case (5 August, and a total upward cross tropopause transport of about 3300 ton h−1 for the Chad case and 2400 ton h−1 for the Aïr case in the third domain of simulation. The order of magnitude of these modelled fluxes is lower but comparable with similar studies in other tropical areas based on

  12. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water, long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere to 8 km (in the upper troposphere and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model. We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  13. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F.; González, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; García, O. E.; Sepúlveda, E.; Gomez-Pelaez, A.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Dohe, S.; Blumenstock, T.; Wiegele, A.; Christner, E.; Strong, K.; Weaver, D.; Palm, M.; Deutscher, N. M.; Warneke, T.; Notholt, J.; Lejeune, B.; Demoulin, P.; Jones, N.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Smale, D.; Robinson, J.

    2012-12-01

    Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water), long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change). We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere) to 8 km (in the upper troposphere) and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model). We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  14. (Vapour + liquid) equilibrium in (N,N-dimethylacetamide + methanol + water) at the temperature 313.15 K[N,N-Dimethylacetamide; Water; Methanol; Amides; Binary mixtures; Ternary mixtures; (Vapour+liquid) equilibrium; Excess Gibbs free energy; Correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielkiewicz, Jan. E-mail: jaz@altis.chem.pg.gda.pl

    2003-12-01

    Total vapour pressures, measured at the temperature 313.15 K, are reported for the ternary mixture (N,N-dimethylacetamide + methanol + water), and for binary constituents (N,N-dimethylacetamide + methanol) and (N,N-dimethylacetamide + water). The present results are compared with previously obtained data for binary mixtures (amide + water) and (amide + methanol), where amide=N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, N-methyl-acetamide, 2-pyrrolidinone and N-methylpyrrolidinone. Moreover, it was found that excess Gibbs free energy of mixing for binary mixtures varies roughly linearly with the molar volume of amide.

  15. Simulating the global atmospheric response to aircraft water vapour emissions and contrails: a first approach using a GCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ponater

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of contrails and aircraft water vapour emissions on global climate is studied by means of a general circulation model (GCM. In a first approach water vapour emissions and mean contrail coverage within the main flight routes are prescribed according to current observations in a simplified manner. A hierarchic experiment strategy with gradual increase of the forcing is applied to identify the resulting climate signals. The water vapour increase to be expected from air traffic is too small to force a detectable radiative or climatic response. The sensitivity of the model climate to the occurrence of contrails appears to be higher. For mid-latitude summer conditions, the high cloud increase experiments show a consistent temperature response pattern. However, its magnitude is statistically significant only for a mean contrail coverage exceeding present-day amounts. Moreover, the magnitude of the contrail climate signal is highly sensitive to the details of the experimental setup due to several non-linearities of the cloud-radiative interaction. Hence, the prescription of contrails in the GCM has to be as careful as possible for an optimal treatment of the problem. Respective recommendations are given.

  16. Simulating the global atmospheric response to aircraft water vapour emissions and contrails: a first approach using a GCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ponater

    Full Text Available The effect of contrails and aircraft water vapour emissions on global climate is studied by means of a general circulation model (GCM. In a first approach water vapour emissions and mean contrail coverage within the main flight routes are prescribed according to current observations in a simplified manner. A hierarchic experiment strategy with gradual increase of the forcing is applied to identify the resulting climate signals. The water vapour increase to be expected from air traffic is too small to force a detectable radiative or climatic response. The sensitivity of the model climate to the occurrence of contrails appears to be higher. For mid-latitude summer conditions, the high cloud increase experiments show a consistent temperature response pattern. However, its magnitude is statistically significant only for a mean contrail coverage exceeding present-day amounts. Moreover, the magnitude of the contrail climate signal is highly sensitive to the details of the experimental setup due to several non-linearities of the cloud-radiative interaction. Hence, the prescription of contrails in the GCM has to be as careful as possible for an optimal treatment of the problem. Respective recommendations are given.

  17. Variability of winter-time middle atmospheric water vapour over the Arctic as observed with a ground-based microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschanz, Brigitte; Kivi, Rigel; Rüfenacht, Rolf; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2014-05-01

    Middle atmospheric water vapour has a long chemical lifetime and can therefore be used as a tracer for dynamics. The ground-based microwave radiometer MIAWARA-C is designed for the use on campaigns and measures profiles of water vapour in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere and thus provides valuable data for the investigation of atmospheric processes. It has been operational for five years and has successfully participated in measurement campaigns under various climatic conditions in Germany, Switzerland, California, Finland and on la Réunion. The temporal resolution of the obtained water vapour profiles approximately 2 hours depending on tropospheric conditions. During two campaigns from January to June 2010 and from July 2011 to April 2013 in Sodankylä, Finland, MIAWARA-C monitored time series of polar middle atmospheric water vapour for three winters with three Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSW) occurring in early 2010, 2012 and 2013. The obtained time series are used to study the effects of the three SSWs on middle-atmospheric water vapour. During an SSW, humid mid- to low-latitude air is transported towards the polar region resulting in a fast increase in water vapour. The descent of water vapour after the SSW allows the estimation of the descent rate over the polar region as the normal wintertime circulation reforms. Results from the three SSWs are compared. The ground-based water vapour data is combined with sonde data of the Finnish Meteorological Institute and ground-based microwave wind measurements for one winter in order to obtain a more complete picture of the dynamics in the polar winter atmosphere.

  18. Analysis of long time series of GPS precipitable water vapour from IGS reprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, O.; Willis, P.; Bar-Sever, Y.; Wang, J.; Garayt, B.

    2012-12-01

    Humidity is an essential climate variable, which needs to be monitored continuously and accurately. Few observational datasets are available, and most of them suffer from biases, uncertainties and discontinuities (e.g. radiosonde data records or satellite products). To date, precipitable water vapour (PWV) estimates from the International GNSS Service (IGS) network have not been used extensively in the climate monitoring. A reprocessed version of zenith tropospheric delays (ZTDs) has been made available recently for the International GNSS Service (IGS) network. It covers period 1995-2007 and has been updated until 2011 using the same data processing software. This work aims at evaluating the quality of these ZTD solutions and corresponding PWV estimates and assessing their potential for climate monitoring and atmospheric model validation. As a first step, the continuity of IGS reprocessed (repro1) and operational (trop-new) ZTD solution is assessed. Both segments before and after 2007 are compared to a third GPS solution for 160 common stations and to a DORIS solution for more than 50 stations. Both these GPS and DORIS solutions were homogenously reprocessed over the study period. The comparison did not show any significant discontinuity between the two IGS segments. However, the differences are found between the three independent datasets which are explained by the differences in data processing procedures (e.g. antenna models, mapping functions) and techniques (GPS vs. DORIS). But the magnitude of the differences is less than a few millimeters. The reprocessed GPS ZTD estimates were converted into PWV and analysed globally and for different regions. The PWV time series reveal significant variability on inter-annual, seasonal, intra-seasonal and synoptic timescales. The GPS results are overall fairly consistent with ECMWF reanalysis (ERA-Interim). The impact of changes in GPS equipment on PWV trend estimates needs further investigation. Reprocessed GPS PWV

  19. Influence of water vapour on the height distribution of positive ions, effective recombination coefficient and ionisation balance in the quiet lower ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barabash

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mesospheric water vapour concentration effects on the ion composition and electron density in the lower ionosphere under quiet geophysical conditions were examined. Water vapour is an important compound in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere that affects ion composition due to hydrogen radical production and consequently modifies the electron number density. Recent lower-ionosphere investigations have primarily concentrated on the geomagnetic disturbance periods. Meanwhile, studies on the electron density under quiet conditions are quite rare. The goal of this study is to contribute to a better understanding of the ionospheric parameter responses to water vapour variability in the quiet lower ionosphere. By applying a numerical D region ion chemistry model, we evaluated efficiencies for the channels forming hydrated cluster ions from the NO+ and O2+ primary ions (i.e. NO+.H2O and O2+.H2O, respectively, and the channel forming H+(H2On proton hydrates from water clusters at different altitudes using profiles with low and high water vapour concentrations. Profiles for positive ions, effective recombination coefficients and electrons were modelled for three particular cases using electron density measurements obtained during rocket campaigns. It was found that the water vapour concentration variations in the mesosphere affect the position of both the Cl2+ proton hydrate layer upper border, comprising the NO+(H2On and O2+(H2On hydrated cluster ions, and the Cl1+ hydrate cluster layer lower border, comprising the H+(H2On pure proton hydrates, as well as the numerical cluster densities. The water variations caused large changes in the effective recombination coefficient and electron density between altitudes of 75 and 87 km. However, the effective recombination coefficient, αeff, and electron number density did not respond even to large water vapour concentration variations occurring at other altitudes in the mesosphere. We determined the water

  20. Response of water vapour D-excess to land–atmosphere interactions in a semi-arid environment

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen

    2017-01-27

    The stable isotopic composition of water vapour provides information about moisture sources and processes difficult to obtain with traditional measurement techniques. Recently, it has been proposed that the D-excess of water vapour (d =δH-8× δO) can provide a diagnostic tracer of continental moisture recycling. However, D-excess exhibits a diurnal cycle that has been observed across a variety of ecosystems and may be influenced by a range of processes beyond regional-scale moisture recycling, including local evaporation (ET) fluxes. There is a lack of measurements of D-excess in evaporation (ET) fluxes, which has made it difficult to assess how ET fluxes modify the Dexcess in water vapour (d). With this in mind, we employed a chamber-based approach to directly measure D-excess in ET (d) fluxes. We show that ET fluxes imposed a negative forcing on the ambient vapour and could not explain the higher daytime d values. The low d observed here was sourced from a soil water pool that had undergone an extended drying period, leading to low D-excess in the soil moisture pool. A strong correlation between daytime d and locally measured relative humidity was consistent with an oceanic moisture source, suggesting that remote hydrological processes were the major contributor to daytime d variability. During the early evening, ET fluxes into a shallow nocturnal inversion layer caused a lowering of d values near the surface. In addition, transient mixing of vapour with a higher D-excess from above the nocturnal inversion modified these values, causing large variability during the night. These results indicate d can generally be expected to show large spatial and temporal variability and to depend on the soil moisture state. For long periods between rain events, common in semi-arid environments, ET would be expected to impose negative forcing on the surface d. Spatial and temporal variability of D-excess in ET fluxes therefore needs to be considered when using d to study

  1. Partitioning understory evapotranspiration in semi-arid ecosystems in Namibia using the isotopic composition of water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blécourt, Marleen; Gaj, Marcel; Holtorf, Kim-Kirsten; Gröngröft, Alexander; Brokate, Ralph; Himmelsbach, Thomas; Eschenbach, Annette

    2016-04-01

    In dry environments with a sparse vegetation cover, understory evapotranspiration is a major component of the ecosystem water balance. Consequently, knowledge on the size of evapotranspiration fluxes and the driving factors is important for our understanding of the hydrological cycle. Understory evapotranspiration is made up of soil evaporation and plant transpiration. Soil evaporation can be measured directly from patches free of vegetation. However, when understory vegetation is present distinguishing between soil evaporation and plant transpiration is challenging. In this study, we aim to partition understory evapotranspiration based on an approach that combines the measurements of water-vapour fluxes using the closed chamber method with measurements of the isotopic composition of water vapour. The measurements were done in the framework of SASSCAL (Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management). The study sites were located in three different semi-arid ecosystems in Namibia: thornbush savanna, Baikiaea woodland and shrubland. At each site measurements were done under tree canopies as well as at unshaded areas between the canopies. We measured evaporation from the bare soil and evapotranspiration from patches covered with herbaceous species and shrubs using a transparent chamber connected with an infrared gas analyser (LI-8100A, LICOR Inc.). The stable isotope composition of water vapour inside the chamber and depth profiles of soil water stable isotopes were determined in-situ using a tuneable off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscope (OA-ICOS, Los Gatos Research, DLT 100). Xylem samples were extracted using the cryogenic vacuum extraction method and the isotopic composition of the extracted water was measured subsequently with a cavity-ring-down spectrometer (CRDS L2120-i, Picarro Inc.). We will present the quantified fluxes of understory evapotranspiration measured in the three different ecosystems, show the

  2. Signal transduction pathway(s) in guard cells after prolonged exposure to low vapour pressure deficit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Niaei Fard, S.

    2014-01-01

    Keywords: Abscisic acid, Arabidopsis thaliana, calcium, CYP707As, desiccation, environmental factors, guard cells’ signalling pathway, hydrogen peroxide, natural variation, nitric oxide, photosystem II efficiency, RD29A, relative water content, secondary messengers, stomata, vapour pressure

  3. SI-traceable and dynamic reference gas mixtures for water vapour at polar and high troposphere atmospheric levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillevic, Myriam; Pascale, Céline; Mutter, Daniel; Wettstein, Sascha; Niederhauser, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of METAS' AtmoChem-ECV project, new facilities are currently being developed to generate reference gas mixtures for water vapour at concentrations measured in the high troposphere and polar regions, in the range 1-20 µmol/mol (ppm). The generation method is dynamic (the mixture is produced continuously over time) and SI-traceable (i.e. the amount of substance fraction in mole per mole is traceable to the definition of SI-units). The generation process is composed of three successive steps. The first step is to purify the matrix gas, nitrogen or synthetic air. Second, this matrix gas is spiked with the pure substance using a permeation technique: a permeation device contains a few grams of pure water in liquid form and loses it linearly over time by permeation through a membrane. In a third step, to reach the desired concentration, the first, high concentration mixture exiting the permeation chamber is then diluted with a chosen flow of matrix gas with one or two subsequent dilution steps. All flows are piloted by mass flow controllers. All parts in contact with the gas mixture are passivated using coated surfaces, to reduce adsorption/desorption processes as much as possible. The mixture can eventually be directly used to calibrate an analyser. The standard mixture produced by METAS' dynamic setup was injected into a chilled mirror from MBW Calibration AG, the designated institute for absolute humidity calibration in Switzerland. The used chilled mirror, model 373LX, is able to measure frost point and sample pressure and therefore calculate the water vapour concentration. This intercomparison of the two systems was performed in the range 4-18 ppm water vapour in synthetic air, at two different pressure levels, 1013.25 hPa and 2000 hPa. We present here METAS' dynamic setup, its uncertainty budget and the first results of the intercomparison with MBW's chilled mirror.

  4. Evaluation of balloon and satellite water vapour measurements in the Southern tropical and subtropical UTLS during the HIBISCUS campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Montoux

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Balloon water vapour in situ and remote measurements in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS obtained during the HIBISCUS campaign around 20° S in Brazil in February–March 2004 using a tunable diode laser (μSDLA, a surface acoustic wave (SAW and a Vis-NIR solar occultation spectrometer (SAOZ on a long duration balloon, have been used for evaluating the performances of satellite borne remote water vapour instruments available at the same latitude and measurement period. In the stratosphere, HALOE displays the best precision (2.5%, followed by SAGE II (7%, MIPAS (10%, SAOZ (20–25% and SCIAMACHY (35%, all of which show approximately constant H2O mixing ratios between 20–25 km. Compared to HALOE of ±10% accuracy between 0.1–100 hPa, SAGE II and SAOZ show insignificant biases, MIPAS is wetter by 10% and SCIAMACHY dryer by 20%. The currently available GOMOS profiles of 25% precision show a positive vertical gradient in error for identified reasons. Compared to these, the water vapour of the Reprobus Chemistry Transport Model, forced at pressures higher than 95 hPa by the ECMWF analyses, is dryer by about 1 ppmv (20%.

    In the lower stratosphere between 16–20 km, most notable features are the steep degradation of MIPAS precision below 18 km, and the appearance of biases between instruments far larger than their quoted total uncertainty. HALOE and SAGE II (after spectral adjustment for reducing the bias with HALOE at northern mid-latitudes both show decreases of water vapour with a minimum at the tropopause not seen by other instruments or the model, possibly attributable to an increasing error in the HALOE altitude registration. Between 16–18 km where the water vapour concentration shows little horizontal variability, and where the μSDLA balloon measurements are not perturbed by outgassing, the average mixing ratios reported by the remote sensing instruments are substantially lower than the 4–5

  5. Technical Note: Novel method for water vapour monitoring using wireless communication networks measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. David

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new technique that overcomes the obstacles of the existing methods for monitoring near-surface water vapour, by estimating humidity from data collected through existing wireless communication networks.

    Weather conditions and atmospheric phenomena affect the electromagnetic channel, causing attenuations to the radio signals. Thus, wireless communication networks are in effect built-in environmental monitoring facilities. The wireless microwave links, used in these networks, are widely deployed by cellular providers for backhaul communication between base stations, a few tens of meters above ground level. As a result, if all available measurements are used, the proposed method can provide moisture observations with high spatial resolution and potentially high temporal resolution. Further, the implementation cost is minimal, since the data used are already collected and saved by the cellular operators. In addition – many of these links are installed in areas where access is difficult such as orographic terrain and complex topography. As such, our method enables measurements in places that have been hard to measure in the past, or have never been measured before. The technique is restricted to weather conditions which exclude rain, fog or clouds along the propagation path. Strong winds that may cause movement of the link transmitter or receiver (or both may also interfere with the ability to conduct accurate measurements.

    We present results from real-data measurements taken from two microwave links used in a backhaul cellular network that show convincing correlation to surface station humidity measurements. The measurements were taken daily in two sites, one in northern Israel (28 measurements, the other in central Israel (29 measurements. The correlation between the microwave link measurements and the humidity gauges were 0.9 and 0.82 for the north and central sites, respectively. The Root Mean Square Differences

  6. Comparison between Satellite Water Vapour Observations and Atmospheric Models’ Predictions of the Upper Tropospheric Thermal Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Dim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric profiles (temperature, pressure, and humidity are commonly used parameters for aerosols and cloud properties retrievals. In preparation of the launch of the Global Change Observation Mission-Climate/Second-Generation GLobal Imager (GCOM-C/SGLI satellite, an evaluation study on the sensitivity of atmospheric models to variations of atmospheric conditions is conducted. In this evaluation, clear sky and above low clouds water vapour radiances of the upper troposphere obtained from satellite observations and those simulated by atmospheric models are compared. The models studied are the Nonhydrostatic ICosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM and the National Center for Environmental Protection/Department Of Energy (NCEP/DOE. The satellite observations are from the Terra/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (Terra/MODIS satellite. The simulations performed are obtained through a forward radiative transfer calculation procedure. The resulting radiances are transformed into the upper tropospheric brightness temperature (UTBT and relative humidity (UTRH. The discrepancies between the simulated data and the observations are analyzed. These analyses show that both the NICAM and the NCEP/DOE simulated UTBT and UTRH have comparable distribution patterns. However the simulations’ differences with the observations are generally lower with the NCEP/DOE than with the NICAM. The NCEP/DOE model outputs very often overestimate the UTBT and therefore present a drier upper troposphere. The impact of the lower troposphere instability (dry convection on the upper tropospheric moisture and the consequences on the models’ results are evaluated through a thunderstorm and moisture predictor (the K-stability index. The results obtained show a positive relation between the instability and the root mean square error (RMSE: observation versus models. The study of the impact of convective clouds shows that the area covered by these clouds increases with the

  7. THE VAPOUR PRESSURES OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE PROBLEM OF THE STATE OF WATER IN BIOLOGICAL FLUIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grollman, Arthur

    1931-01-01

    Data for the depression of vapour pressure are presented for the following aqueous solutions: NaCl (0.03 to 0.1 molar), KCl (0.03 to 0.1 molar), urea (0.05 to 0.5 molar), sucrose (0.05 to 0.10 molar), lactic and succinic acids, creatine, CaCl2 (0.05 molar), and mixtures of these substances with one another and with certain other solutions (gelatin, gum acacia, sea water, LiCl, etc.). The relation of the depression of vapour pressure of a mixed solution to that of solutions of the individual constituents was investigated in order to ascertain to what extent such studies may be used for the determination of the degree of hydration, or of the state of water, in solutions. Organic substances (urea, sucrose, etc.) showed anomalous results which were markedly affected and unpredictable in mixed solutions. They are, therefore, unsuited for the study of water binding. In the case of solutions of inorganic substances—LiCl and CaCl2—the principle of the additive nature of colligative properties is also only approximately true—except perhaps in very dilute solutions. The limitations of the colligative method for determining the degree of hydration have been defined in accord with the above findings. Studies of the vapour pressures of mixtures of gelatin or gum acacia with NaCl or KCl demonstrated that hydration in gelatin is relatively small at pH = 7 and undetectable in gum acacia solutions. The view, therefore, that hydrophilic colloids are strongly hydrated has not been substantiated. The passage from the sol to the gel state also was not accompanied in gelatin or in blood by any appreciable change in the degree of hydration of the hydrophilic colloids present in these substances. PMID:19872614

  8. Line-shape study of water vapour by tunable diode laser spectrometer in the 822 832 nm wavelength region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, A.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Ray, B.; Biswas, D.; Ghosh, P. N.

    2004-11-01

    A near-infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer is set up to measure the air-induced broadening coefficients and the line-strength parameters of water-vapour overtone transitions within the (2,1,1)←(0,0,0) band in the 822 832 nm wavelength region. A Hitachi HL8311 E double hetero-junction structure diode laser is used as a probe. The diode laser controller is home-built and stable within ±10 μA and ±10 mK, respectively. The laser-head mount has a simple design and provides easy access whenever changing of the laser head is required. The diode laser emission wavelength is thermally tuned between 50 °C and 12 °C. Thermal tuning of the diode laser emission wavelength is used to reveal the mode structure of the diode laser and to probe the overtone-band transitions of water vapour within its operating wavelength range. Current tuning of the diode laser is used at a fixed laser temperature to study the transitions one at a time. A balanced detector is used to improve the S/N ratio of the spectrum. A phase sensitive detection technique is followed to obtain the first-derivative spectra of the overtone transitions. The first-derivative spectra have been recorded at different air pressures inside the sample cell while the water-vapour pressure is kept fixed. The first-derivative spectrum is numerically integrated to obtain the original line shape. The original line shape is fitted with a Voigt profile by using a nonlinear least-squares fit program to extract the air-broadening coefficient and the line-strength parameter. The data obtained in our work is compared with the results of the HITRAN database.

  9. (Vapour + liquid) equilibrium in (N,N-dimethylacetamide + ethanol + water) at the temperature 313.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielkiewicz, Jan [Department of Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza Str. 11/12, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)]. E-mail: jaz@altis.chem.pg.gda.pl

    2006-06-15

    Total vapour pressures, measured at the temperature 313.15 K, are reported for the ternary mixture (N,N-dimethylacetamide + ethanol + water), and for binary constituent (N,N-dimethylacetamide + ethanol). The present results are also compared with previously obtained data for (amide + ethanol) binary mixtures, where amide = N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, N-methylacetamide, 2-pyrrolidinone, and N-methylpyrrolidinone. We found that excess Gibbs free energy of mixing for binary (amide + ethanol) mixtures varies roughly linearly with the molar volume of amide.

  10. Use of a water-vapour permeable polyurethane film (omiderm) in the non-surgical treatment of aplasia cutis congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canter, Halil Ibrahim; Vargel, Ibrahim; Nasir, Serdar; Kayikcioglu, Aycan

    2004-01-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita is characterised by congenital absence of all layers of skin, and most commonly affects the scalp. It is often associated with absence of the bone and dura underlining the defective scalp. In this report, we present the result of use of a water-vapour permeable polyurethane film (Omiderm) together with absorbant fine mesh gauze impregnated with 3% bismuth tribromophenate (Xeroform) in the treatment of a cranial defect in a newborn baby of low birth weight, who could not be operated on because of associated medical problems.

  11. Phase correction for ALMA. Investigating water vapour radiometer scaling: The long-baseline science verification data case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maud, L. T.; Tilanus, R. P. J.; van Kempen, T. A.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Schmalzl, M.; Yoon, I.; Contreras, Y.; Toribio, M. C.; Asaki, Y.; Dent, W. R. F.; Fomalont, E.; Matsushita, S.

    2017-09-01

    The Atacama Large millimetre/submillimetre Array (ALMA) makes use of water vapour radiometers (WVR), which monitor the atmospheric water vapour line at 183 GHz along the line of sight above each antenna to correct for phase delays introduced by the wet component of the troposphere. The application of WVR derived phase corrections improve the image quality and facilitate successful observations in weather conditions that were classically marginal or poor. We present work to indicate that a scaling factor applied to the WVR solutions can act to further improve the phase stability and image quality of ALMA data. We find reduced phase noise statistics for 62 out of 75 datasets from the long-baseline science verification campaign after a WVR scaling factor is applied. The improvement of phase noise translates to an expected coherence improvement in 39 datasets. When imaging the bandpass source, we find 33 of the 39 datasets show an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) between a few to 30 percent. There are 23 datasets where the S/N of the science image is improved: 6 by 450 GHz) and long-baseline (>5 km) observations. These inherently have poorer phase stability and are taken in low PWV (python code to allow ALMA users to undertake WVR scaling tests and make improvements to their data.

  12. The δ18O of Atmospheric Water Vapour is Recorded in the Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Leaf water and Organic Molecules at High Relative Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, M. M.; Goldsmith, G. R.; Schmid, L.; Siegwolf, R. T.; Gessler, A.; Saurer, M.

    2016-12-01

    The oxygen stable isotope ratios (δ18O) of water and organic molecules in plants hold information about plant physiology, ecohydrology, and environmental conditions. For instance, the δ18O ratio of leaf water reflects both the δ18O ratios of water in the soil and in the atmosphere. This water, which is incorporated into organic molecules at the time of synthesis, thus serves to record the environment in which the plant was growing. However, how δ18O of atmospheric water vapour affects the δ18O ratio of organic molecules remains poorly understood. In order to investigate the effects of fog and rain (e.g. high atmospheric water availability) on δ18O ratios of leaf water and organic molecules, we exposed oak tree saplings (Quercus robur) in wet and dry soil treatments to 18O-depleted water vapour at ca. 90% relative humidity for 5 h. We harvested plant material over 24 h to trace the movement of the isotopic label in water and organics throughout the plant from the leaves to the stem. The atmospheric water vapour caused a strong 18O-depletion in leaf and xylem water, as well as in leaf carbohydrates, with the most negative ratios observed at the end of the fogging. Moreover, the label was clearly observed in twig and stem phloem carbohydrates following a short delay. A detailed compound-specific isotope analysis of the leaf carbohydrates revealed that the label caused an 18O-depletion in fructose, glucose, and sucrose. Quercitol, an oak-specific alditol, did not show 18O-depletion. Clear soil moisture treatment effects were only observed for twig phloem carbohydrates, with a stronger 18O-depletion in wet plants than in dry plants, suggesting retarded leaf-to-phloem sugar export in trees under drought. We demonstrate that labelling with 18O-depleted water is a potential tool to trace the movement and incorporation of oxygen stable isotopes in plants. We clearly show that changes in δ18O of atmospheric water vapour are quickly imprinted on leaf water and

  13. Online analytical investigations on solvent-, temperature- and water vapour-induced phase transformations of citric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmdach, L.; Ulrich, J. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Zentrum fuer Ingenieurwissenschaft, Verfahrenstechnik/TVT, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Feth, M.P. [Sanofi-Aventis Deutschland GmbH, Chemical and Process Development Frankfurt Chemistry, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    It was demonstrated exemplarily for the crystallization of citric acid that the usage of an ultrasound device as well as Raman spectroscopy enables the inline measurement and the control of phase transitions. The influence of different solvent compositions (water and ethanol-water) on the crystallization of citric acid was investigated. By increasing the ethanol content the transformation point was shifted towards higher temperatures. In addition, a strong impact on the nucleation point as well as on the crystal habit was detected in ethanol-water mixtures. The results lead to the assumption that a citric acid solvate exists, which is, however, highly unstable upon isolation from mother liquor and converts fast into the known anhydrate or monohydrate forms of citric acid. The presence of such a solvate, however, could not be proven during this study. Furthermore, factors such as temperature and humidity which might influence the phase transition of the solid product were analyzed by Hotstage-Raman Spectroscopy and Water Vapor Sorption Gravimetry-Dispersive Raman Spectroscopy. Both, temperature as well as humidity show a strong influence on the behaviour of CAM. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Derivation of canopy resistance for water vapour fluxes over a spruce forest, using a new technique for the viscous sublayer resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, N.O.; Hummelshøj, P.

    1995-01-01

    . The trees close their stomata to limit the water loss. This is also shown through a calculation of the canopy resistance to water vapour exchange. During periods around noon and in the afternoon the resistance becomes very high. The calculations are carried out by using a novel theory for the viscous...... sublayer resistance to atmosphere canopy exchange....

  15. A comparison of ice water content measurement techniques on the FAAM BAe-146 aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Abel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparison of ice water content (qi data from a variety of measurement techniques on the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft. Data are presented from a range of cloud types measured during the PIKNMIX field experiment that include mixed-phase stratocumulus, cumulus congestus and cirrus clouds. These measurements cover a broad range of conditions in which atmospheric ice particles are found in nature, such as the low-ice-water-content environments typically found in midlatitude cirrus and the environments with much higher ice water content often observed in cold convective clouds. The techniques include bulk measurements from (i a Nevzorov hot-wire probe, (ii the difference between the measured total water content (condensed plus vapour and the water vapour content of the atmosphere and (iii a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI (only for cirrus measurements. We also estimate the qi from integration of the measured particle size distribution (PSD with assumptions on how the density of ice particles varies as a function of size. The results show that the only bulk ice water content technique capable of measuring high qi values (several g m−3 was the method of total water content minus water vapour. For low ice water contents we develop a new parametrisation of the Nevzorov baseline drift that enables the probe to be sensitive to qi ± 0.002 g m−3. In cirrus clouds the agreement between the Nevzorov and other bulk measurements was typically better than a factor of 2 for the CVI (qi > 0.008 g m−3 and the method of total water content minus water vapour (qi > 0.02 g m−3. Good agreement with the bulk measurements for all cases could be obtained with the estimate from the PSD provided that appropriate a priori assumptions on the mass–dimension relationship were made. This is problematic in the convective clouds sampled because pristine ice particles, heavily rimed particles and

  16. Trends and variability of midlatitude stratospheric water vapour deduced from the re-evaluated Boulder balloon series and HALOE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scherer

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an updated trend analysis of water vapour in the lower midlatitude stratosphere from the Boulder balloon-borne NOAA frostpoint hygrometer measurements and from the Halogen Occulation Experiment (HALOE. Two corrections for instrumental bias are applied to homogenise the frostpoint data series, and a quality assessment of all soundings after 1991 is presented. Linear trend estimates based on the corrected data for the period 1980–2000 are up to 40% lower than previously reported. Vertically resolved trends and variability are calculated with a multi regression analysis including the quasi-biennal oscillation and equivalent latitude as explanatory variables. In the range of 380 to 640 K potential temperature (≈14 to 25 km, the frostpoint data from 1981 to 2006 show positive linear trends between 0.3±0.3 and 0.7±0.1%/yr. The same dataset shows trends between −0.2±0.3 and 1.0±0.3%/yr for the period 1992 to 2005. HALOE data over the same time period suggest negative trends ranging from −1.1±0.2 to −0.1±0.1%/yr. In the lower stratosphere, a rapid drop of water vapour is observed in 2000/2001 with little change since. At higher altitudes, the transition is more gradual, with slowly decreasing concentrations between 2001 and 2007. This pattern is consistent with a change induced by a drop of water concentrations at entry into the stratosphere. Previously noted differences in trends and variability between frostpoint and HALOE remain for the homogenised data. Due to uncertainties in reanalysis temperatures and stratospheric transport combined with uncertainties in observations, no quantitative inference about changes of water entering the stratosphere in the tropics could be made with the mid latitude measurements analysed here.

  17. Advances in the GNSS Based Estimation of Atmospheric Water Vapour and its Application in Numerical Weather Prediction in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juni, I.

    2015-12-01

    In the last decade a CORS network (GNSSnet.hu) has been established in Hungary by FÖMI, incorporating stations from the neighbouring countries as well. The availability of this network enabled us to develop and realize a processing facility to estimate the tropospheric zenith delays from the observations in near real time within the frames of a research project funded by the Hungarian National Research Fund. An automated near-realtime processing facility was established to collect and process the GNSS observations from 54 GNSSnet.hu stations with spatial resolution of approximately 60 kilometres, and it estimates the zenith wet delays (ZWD) and the precipitable water vapour (PW) and validate these values using radiosonde observations. Recently we updated the operational Bernese processing software from version 5.0 to 5.2. The estimation of precipitable water vapour from the zenith wet delays was also further refined and new methods were implemented. The GNSS based zenith total delay and precipitable water vapour estimates are transmitted to EUMETNET's E-GVAP project. Currently the real-time processing of GNSS observations using the PPP technique is experimented to enable the exploitation of GNSS observations for nowcasting applications. The first results and comparisons with the near-realtime estimations are presented on this poster. We contribute to a dedicated project, concentrating around the Transcarpathian region, which targets the real-time monitoring of severe weather events based on GNSS analysis. The first results may expected by the end of this year. The Hungarian Meteorological Service has also conducted the first tests of the zenith total delay assimilation in their AROME numerical weather prediction model. The data assimilation diagnostics showed that the zenit total delays originated from nearly 70 stations have important contribution to AROME analysis (especially to humidity analysis). The verification results of the first test conducted in January

  18. Tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data (H216O, H218O, and HD16O) as obtained from NDACC/FTIR solar absorption spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthlott, Sabine; Schneider, Matthias; Hase, Frank; Blumenstock, Thomas; Kiel, Matthäus; Dubravica, Darko; García, Omaira E.; Sepúlveda, Eliezer; Mengistu Tsidu, Gizaw; Takele Kenea, Samuel; Grutter, Michel; Plaza-Medina, Eddy F.; Stremme, Wolfgang; Strong, Kim; Weaver, Dan; Palm, Mathias; Warneke, Thorsten; Notholt, Justus; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Servais, Christian; Jones, Nicholas; Griffith, David W. T.; Smale, Dan; Robinson, John

    2017-01-01

    We report on the ground-based FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) tropospheric water vapour isotopologue remote sensing data that have been recently made available via the database of NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change; MUSICA/" target="_blank">ftp://ftp.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/ndacc/MUSICA/) and via doi:10.5281/zenodo.48902. Currently, data are available for 12 globally distributed stations. They have been centrally retrieved and quality-filtered in the framework of the MUSICA project (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water). We explain particularities of retrieving the water vapour isotopologue state (vertical distribution of H216O, H218O, and HD16O) and reveal the need for a new metadata template for archiving FTIR isotopologue data. We describe the format of different data components and give recommendations for correct data usage. Data are provided as two data types. The first type is best-suited for tropospheric water vapour distribution studies disregarding different isotopologues (comparison with radiosonde data, analyses of water vapour variability and trends, etc.). The second type is needed for analysing moisture pathways by means of H2O, δD-pair distributions.

  19. Applicability of the Guggenheim–Anderson–Boer water vapour sorption model for estimation of soil specific surface area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Møldrup, Per

    2018-01-01

    -based modelling approaches to determine SA. Measured water vapour adsorption and desorption isotherms for 321 soil samples were used to parameterize the GAB model, the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) equation and a film adsorption Tuller–Or (TO) model to estimate SA. For adsorption isotherms, the values of the GAB...... compared with SA measured by the ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME) method. For kaolinitic samples, however, the BET equation provided the best estimate of EGME-SA. The SA estimates of the GAB model were comparable to those obtained by the TO adsorption model. Thus, the GAB model provides a good...... alternative to the TO model (applicable only to adsorption data) or the BET model, which fails when the fraction of swelling clay minerals increases....

  20. Water vapour fluxes trends on different time scales and their relationship with weather and soil drivers: a case study from a dehesa site in South Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, María José; Egüen, Marta; Andreu, Ana; Carpintero, Elisabet; Gómez-Giráldez, Pedro; Patrocinio González-Dugo, María

    2017-04-01

    Water vapour fluxes between the soil surface and the atmosphere constitute one of the most important components of the water cycle in the continental areas. Their regime directly affect the availability of water to plants, water storage in surface bodies, air humidity in the boundary layer, snow persistence… among others, and the list of indirectly affected processes comprises a large number of components. Water potential or wetness gradients are some of the main drivers of water vapour fluxes to the atmosphere; soil humidity is usually monitored as key variable in many hydrological and environmental studies, and its estimated series are used to calibrate and validate the modelling of certain hydrological processes. However, such results may differ when water fluxes are used instead of water state variables, such as humidity. This work shows the analysis of high resolution water vapour fluxes series from a dehesa area in South Spain where a complete energy and water fluxes/variables monitoring site has been operating for the last four years. The results include pasture and tree vegetated control points. The daily water budget calculation on both types of sites has been performed from weather and energy fluxes measurements, and soil moisture measurements, and the results have been aggregated on a weekly, monthly and seasonal basis. Comparison between observed trends of soil moisture and calculated trends of water vapour fluxes is included to show the differences arising in terms of the regime of the dominant weather variables in this type of ecosystems. The results identify significant thresholds for each weather variable driver and highlight the importance of the wind regime, which is the somehow forgotten variable in future climate impacts on hydrology. Further work is being carried out to assess water cycle potential trends under future climate conditions and their impacts on the vegetation in dehesa ecosystems.

  1. Lidar observations of low-level wind reversals over the Gulf of Lion and characterization of their impact on the water vapour variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Flamant, Cyrille; Cacciani, Marco; Summa, Donato; Stelitano, Dario; Richard, Evelyne; Ducrocq, Véronique; Fourrie, Nadia; Said, Frédérique

    2017-02-01

    Water vapour measurements from a ground-based Raman lidar and an airborne differential absorption lidar, complemented by high resolution numerical simulations from two mesoscale models (Arome-WMED and MESO-NH), are considered to investigate transition events from Mistral/Tramontane to southerly marine flow taking place over the Gulf of Lion in Southern France in the time frame September-October 2012, during the Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment (HyMeX) Special Observation Period 1 (SOP1). Low-level wind reversals associated with these transitions are found to have a strong impact on water vapour transport, leading to a large variability of the water vapour vertical and horizontal distribution. The high spatial and temporal resolution of the lidar data allow to monitor the time evolution of the three-dimensional water vapour field during these transitions from predominantly northerly Mistral/Tramontane flow to a predominantly southerly flow, allowing to identify the quite sharp separation between these flows, which is also quite well captured by the mesoscale models.

  2. Lidar Observations of Low-level Wind Reversals over the Gulf of Lion and Characterization of Their Impact on the Water Vapour Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Girolamo Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water vapour measurements from a ground-based Raman lidar and an airborne differential absorption lidar, complemented by high resolution numerical simulations from two mesoscale models (Arome-WMED and MESO-NH, are considered to investigate transition events from Mistral/Tramontane to southerly marine flow taking place over the Gulf of Lion in Southern France in the time frame September-October 2012, during the Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment (HyMeX Special Observation Period 1 (SOP1. Low-level wind reversals associated with these transitions are found to have a strong impact on water vapour transport, leading to a large variability of the water vapour vertical and horizontal distribution. The high spatial and temporal resolution of the lidar data allow to monitor the time evolution of the three-dimensional water vapour field during these transitions from predominantly northerly Mistral/Tramontane flow to a predominantly southerly flow, allowing to identify the quite sharp separation between these flows, which is also quite well captured by the mesoscale models.

  3. Improved platelet compatiblity of water vapour glow discharge treated non-woven poly(ethylene terephthalate) leukocyte-reduction filters for different types of platelet concentrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostelijk, E. H.; Klomp, A. J.; Engbers, G. H.; Gouwerok, C. W.; Verhoeven, A. J.; van Aken, W. G.; Feijen, J.; de Korte, D.

    2001-01-01

    Non-woven poly[ethylene terephthalate] (NW-PET) filter fabric, usually used for leucocyte removal of red cells, was modified by water vapour glow discharge (WVGD) treatment to improve platelet compatibility. Modified filter material was evaluated with different kinds of platelet concentrates (PCs).

  4. Improved platelet compatibility of water vapour glow discharge treated non-woven poly(ethylene therephthalate) leukocyte-reduction filters of different types of platelet concentrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostelijk, E.H.; Klomp, A.J.A.; Klomp, A.J.A.; Engbers, G.H.M.; Gouwerok, C.W.N.; van Aken, W.G.; Verhoeven, A.J.; Feijen, Jan; de Korte, D.

    2001-01-01

    Non-woven poly[ethylene terephthalate] (NW-PET) filter fabric, usually used for leucocyte removal of red cells, was modified by water vapour glow discharge (WVGD) treatment to improve platelet compatibility. Modified filter material was evaluated with different kinds of platelet concentrates (PCs).

  5. Properties of alumina films prepared by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition at atmospheric pressure in hte presence of small amounts of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; van Corbach, H.D.; Rem, J.B.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Thin alumina films were deposited on stainless steel, type AISI 304. The deposition process was carried out in nitrogen with low partial pressures of water (0–2.6 × 10−2 kPa (0−0.20 mmHg)) by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) with aluminium-tri-sec-butoxide (ATSB) as the precursor.

  6. Vapour undersaturation in primitive mid-ocean-ridge basalt and the volatile content of Earth's upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saal, Alberto E.; Hauri, Erik H.; Langmuir, Charles H.; Perfit, Michael R.

    2002-10-01

    The analysis of volatiles in magmatic systems can be used to constrain the volatile content of the Earth's mantle and the influence that magmatic degassing has on the chemistry of the oceans and the atmosphere. But most volatile elements have very low solubilities in magmas at atmospheric pressure, and therefore virtually all erupted lavas are degassed and do not retain their primary volatile signatures. Here we report the undersaturated pre-eruptive volatile content for a suite of mid-ocean-ridge basalts from the Siqueiros intra-transform spreading centre. The undersaturation leads to correlations between volatiles and refractory trace elements that provide new constraints on volatile abundances and their behaviour in the upper mantle. Our data generate improved limits on the abundances of carbon dioxide, water, fluorine, sulphur and chlorine in the source of normal mid-ocean-ridge basalt. The incompatible behaviour of carbon dioxide, together with the CO2/Nb and CO2/Cl ratios, permit estimates of primitive carbon dioxide and chlorine to be made for degassed and chlorine-contaminated mid-ocean-ridge basalt magmas, and hence constrain degassing and contamination histories of mid-ocean ridges.

  7. Simultaneous retrieval of water vapour, temperature and cirrus clouds properties from measurements of far infrared spectral radiance over the Antarctic Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Natale, Gianluca; Palchetti, Luca; Bianchini, Giovanni; Del Guasta, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    The possibility separating the contributions of the atmospheric state and ice clouds by using spectral infrared measurements is a fundamental step to quantifying the cloud effect in climate models. A simultaneous retrieval of cloud and atmospheric parameters from infrared wideband spectra will allow the disentanglement of the spectral interference between these variables. In this paper, we describe the development of a code for the simultaneous retrieval of atmospheric state and ice cloud parameters, and its application to the analysis of the spectral measurements acquired by the Radiation Explorer in the Far Infrared - Prototype for Applications and Development (REFIR-PAD) spectroradiometer, which has been in operation at Concordia Station on the Antarctic Plateau since 2012. The code performs the retrieval with a computational time that is comparable with the instrument acquisition time. Water vapour and temperature profiles and the cloud optical and microphysical properties, such as the generalised effective diameter and the ice water path, are retrieved by exploiting the 230-980 cm-1 spectral band. To simulate atmospheric radiative transfer, the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) has been integrated with a specifically developed subroutine based on the δ-Eddington two-stream approximation, whereas the single-scattering properties of cirrus clouds have been derived from a database for hexagonal column habits. In order to detect ice clouds, a backscattering and depolarisation lidar, co-located with REFIR-PAD has been used, allowing us to infer the position and the cloud thickness to be used in the retrieval. A climatology of the vertical profiles of water vapour and temperature has been performed by using the daily radiosounding available at the station at 12:00 UTC. The climatology has been used to build an a priori profile correlation to constrain the fitting procedure. An optimal estimation method with the Levenberg-Marquardt approach has been

  8. Rosetta Alice/VIRTIS observations of the water vapour UV electroglow emissions around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaufray, J.-Y.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Erard, S.; Feldman, P. D.; Capaccioni, F.; Schindhelm, E.; Leyrat, C.; Parker, J.; Filacchione, G.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Feaga, L. M.; Noonan, J.; Keeney, B.; Steffl, A. J.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Broiles, T.; Burch, J.; Clark, G.; Samara, M.

    2017-07-01

    Several UV emission lines of the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko have been observed by Alice/Rosetta before the 67P/CG perihelion. The H and O emissions are mainly produced by impact dissociation of water molecules by suprathermal electrons. In this paper, we explore further the electron dissociative excitation of H2O to produce the UV emissions by using simultaneous observations of water and H Lyman β done by the VIRTIS-H and Alice instruments during four periods of time in 2014 December, 2015 March and 2015 May. We used simple theoretical considerations to link the UV brightness to the water vapour column density. Two cases are studied. In the first case, we assume the suprathermal electron density is decreasing radially as the thermal electron population; in the second case, we assume the suprathermal electron density does not vary radially. The second case seems more consistent with the Rosetta Plasma Consortium Ion and Electron Sensor measurements during 2015 March and May. The efficiency of the electron dissociative excitation of H2O is lower during the three last periods of time studied compared to the first period in 2014 December. The variability of the efficiency of the electron dissociative excitation between the four studied periods is not simply inversely proportional to the square of the comet-Sun distance but is most likely associated with the variability of the suprathermal electron distribution.

  9. CO2 and water vapour exchange in four alpine herbs at two altitudes and under varying light and temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, A S; Purohit, A N

    1991-06-01

    CO2 and water vapour exchange rates of four alpine herbs namely: Rheum emodi, R. moorcroftianum, Megacarpaea polyandra and Rumex nepalensis were studied under field conditions at 3600 m (natural habitat) and 550 m altitudes. The effect of light and temperature on CO2 and water vapour exchange was studied in the plants grown at lower altitude. In R. moorcroftianum and R. nepalensis, the average photosynthesis rates were found to be about three times higher at 550 m as compared to that under their natural habitat. However, in M. polyandra, the CO2 exchange rates were two times higher at 3600 m than at 550 m but in R. emodi, there were virtually no differences at the two altitudes. These results indicate the variations in the CO2 exchange rates are species specific. The change in growth altitude does not affect this process uniformly.The transpiration rates in R. emodi and M. polyandra were found to be very high at 3600 m compared to 550 m and are attributed to overall higher stomatal conductance in plants of these species, grown at higher altitude. The mid-day closure of stomata and therefore, restriction of transpirational losses of water were observed in all the species at 550 m altitude. In addition to the effect of temperature and relative humidity, the data also indicate some endogenous rhythmic control of stomatal conductance.The temperature optima for photosynthesis was close to 30°C in M. polyandra and around 20°C in the rest of the three species. High temperature and high light intensity, as well as low temperature and high light intensity, adversely affect the net rate of photosynthesis in these species.Both light compensation point and dark respiration rate increased with increasing temperature.The effect of light was more prominent on photosynthesis than the effect of temperature, however, on transpiration the effect of temperature was more prominent than the effect of light intensity.No definite trends were found in stomatal conductance with respect to

  10. Structural and Phase Transformations in Water-Vapour-Plasma-Treated Hydrophilic TiO 2 Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    L. Pranevicius; M. Urbonavicius; S. Tuckute; K. Gedvilas; T. Rajackas; L. L. Pranevicius; D. Milcius

    2012-01-01

      We have investigated structural and phase transformations in water-vapor-plasma-treated 200-300 nm thick Ti films, maintained at room temperature, by injecting water vapor into radio frequency (RF...

  11. Gravimetric phenotyping of whole plant transpiration responses to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit identifies genotypic variation in water use efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Annette C; Dodd, Ian C; Rothwell, Shane A; Jones, Ros; Tardieu, Francois; Draye, Xavier; Davies, William J

    2016-10-01

    There is increasing interest in rapidly identifying genotypes with improved water use efficiency, exemplified by the development of whole plant phenotyping platforms that automatically measure plant growth and water use. Transpirational responses to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and whole plant water use efficiency (WUE, defined as the accumulation of above ground biomass per unit of water used) were measured in 100 maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes. Using a glasshouse based phenotyping platform with naturally varying VPD (1.5-3.8kPa), a 2-fold variation in WUE was identified in well-watered plants. Regression analysis of transpiration versus VPD under these conditions, and subsequent whole plant gas exchange at imposed VPDs (0.8-3.4kPa) showed identical responses in specific genotypes. Genotype response of transpiration versus VPD fell into two categories: 1) a linear increase in transpiration rate with VPD with low (high WUE) or high (low WUE) transpiration rate at all VPDs, 2) a non-linear response with a pronounced change point at low VPD (high WUE) or high VPD (low WUE). In the latter group, high WUE genotypes required a significantly lower VPD before transpiration was restricted, and had a significantly lower rate of transpiration in response to VPD after this point, when compared to low WUE genotypes. Change point values were significantly positively correlated with stomatal sensitivity to VPD. A change point in stomatal response to VPD may explain why some genotypes show contradictory WUE rankings according to whether they are measured under glasshouse or field conditions. Furthermore, this novel use of a high throughput phenotyping platform successfully reproduced the gas exchange responses of individuals measured in whole plant chambers, accelerating the identification of plants with high WUE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modelling of the vapour-liquid equilibrium of water and the in situ concentration of H3PO4 in a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdal, Timur J.; Lang, Sebastian; Kühl, Frank; Hampe, Manfred J.

    2014-03-01

    The fuel cell technology is a key element for the hydrogen energy economy and therefore crucial for sustainable development. High temperature proton exchange membrane (HT-PEM) fuel cells (FC) can be operated with reformate gas and thus represent an important bridging technology for the energy transition to a renewable energy based system. HT-PEM FCs based on phosphoric acid (PA) are still subject to intense research, investigating the electrolyte behaviour. By enhancing state of the art 2D FEM simulations of FCs with the vapour liquid equilibrium of water-phosphoric acid and evaporation kinetics, a model was created in which the local concentration of PA can be calculated. Knowledge of the concentration field yields the basis for calculating the locally varying ionic conductivity and other physical properties. By describing the volume expansion behaviour of PA it was possible to predict the catalyst particle deactivation due to the swelling of PA. The in situ concentration predicted by the simulation ranges from 96 to 111 wt%. The model was validated using measured data of a single cell design for different temperatures and pressures. By varying the PA content flooding of the simulated fuel cell could be observed and was linked to humidification effects.

  13. Accuracy assessment of water vapour measurements from in situ and remote sensing techniques during the DEMEVAP 2011 campaign at OHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Bock

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Development of Methodologies for Water Vapour Measurement (DEMEVAP project aims at assessing and improving humidity sounding techniques and establishing a reference system based on the combination of Raman lidars, ground-based sensors and GPS. Such a system may be used for climate monitoring, radiosonde bias detection and correction, satellite measurement calibration/validation, and mm-level geodetic positioning with Global Navigation Satellite Systems. A field experiment was conducted in September–October 2011 at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP. Two Raman lidars (IGN mobile lidar and OHP NDACC lidar, a stellar spectrometer (SOPHIE, a differential absorption spectrometer (SAOZ, a sun photometer (AERONET, 5 GPS receivers and 4 types of radiosondes (Vaisala RS92, MODEM M2K2-DC and M10, and Meteolabor Snow White participated in the campaign. A total of 26 balloons with multiple radiosondes were flown during 16 clear nights. This paper presents preliminary findings from the analysis of all these data sets. Several classical Raman lidar calibration methods are evaluated which use either Vaisala RS92 measurements, point capacitive humidity measurements, or GPS integrated water vapour (IWV measurements. A novel method proposed by Bosser et al. (2010 is also tested. It consists in calibrating the lidar measurements during the GPS data processing. The methods achieve a repeatability of 4–5%. Changes in the calibration factor of IGN Raman lidar are evidenced which are attributed to frequent optical re-alignments. When modelling and correcting the changes as a linear function of time, the precision of the calibration factors improves to 2–3%. However, the variations in the calibration factor, and hence the absolute accuracy, between methods and types of reference data remain at the level of 7%. The intercomparison of radiosonde measurements shows good agreement between RS92 and Snow White measurements up to 12 km. An overall dry bias is found

  14. Effect of surface albedo, water vapour, and atmospheric aerosols on the cloud-free shortwave radiative budget in the Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Biagio, C. [ENEA, Laboratory for Earth Observations and Analyses, Rome (Italy); University of Siena, Department of Earth Science, Siena (Italy); Di Sarra, A. [ENEA, Laboratory for Earth Observations and Analyses, Rome (Italy); Eriksen, P. [Danish Climate Centre, DMI, Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ascanius, S.E. [DMI, Danish Meteorological Institute, Qaanaaq (Greenland); Muscari, G. [INGV, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy); Holben, B. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This study is based on ground-based measurements of downward surface shortwave irradiance (SW), columnar water vapour (wv), and aerosol optical depth ({tau}) obtained at Thule Air Base (Greenland) in 2007-2010, together with MODIS observations of the surface shortwave albedo (A). Radiative transfer model calculations are used in combination with measurements to separate the radiative effect of A ({Delta}SW{sub A}), wv ({Delta}SW{sub wv}), and aerosols ({Delta}SW{sub {tau}}) in modulating SW in cloud-free conditions. The shortwave radiation at the surface is mainly affected by water vapour absorption, which produces a reduction of SW as low as -100 Wm{sup -2} (-18%). The seasonal change of A produces an increase of SW by up to +25 Wm{sup -2} (+4.5%). The annual mean radiative effect is estimated to be -(21-22) Wm{sup -2} for wv, and +(2-3) Wm{sup -2} for A. An increase by +0.065 cm in the annual mean wv, to which corresponds an absolute increase in {Delta}SW{sub wv} by 0.93 Wm{sup -2} (4.3%), has been observed to occur between 2007 and 2010. In the same period, the annual mean A has decreased by -0.027, with a corresponding decrease in {Delta}SW{sub A} by 0.41 Wm{sup -2} (-14.9%). Atmospheric aerosols produce a reduction of SW as low as -32 Wm{sup -2} (-6.7%). The instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing (RF{sub {tau}}) reaches values of -28 Wm{sup -2} and shows a strong dependency on surface albedo. The derived radiative forcing efficiency (FE{sub {tau}}) for solar zenith angles between 55 and 70 is estimated to be (-120.6 {+-} 4.3) for 0.1 < A < 0.2, and (-41.2 {+-} 1.6) Wm{sup -2} for 0.5 < A < 0.6. (orig.)

  15. Developing a western Siberia reference site for tropospheric water vapour isotopologue observations obtained by different techniques (in situ and remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gribanov

    2014-06-01

    water cycle, affected by changes in air mass origin, non-convective and convective processes and continental recycling. Novel remote sensing and in situ measuring techniques have recently offered opportunities for monitoring atmospheric water vapour isotopic composition. Recently developed infrared laser spectrometers allow for continuous in situ measurements of surface water vapour δDv and δ18Ov. So far, very few intercomparisons of measurements conducted using different techniques have been achieved at a given location, due to difficulties intrinsic to the comparison of integrated with local measurements. Nudged simulations conducted with high-resolution isotopically enabled general circulation models (GCMs provide a consistent framework for comparison with the different types of observations. Here, we compare simulations conducted with the ECHAM5-wiso model with two types of water vapour isotopic data obtained during summer 2012 at the forest site of Kourovka, western Siberia: hourly ground-based FTIR total atmospheric columnar δDv amounts, and in situ hourly Picarro δDv measurements. There is an excellent correlation between observed and predicted δDv at surface while the comparison between water column values derived from the model compares well with FTIR estimates.

  16. The Effect of Climate Change on Ozone Depletion through Changes in Stratospheric Water Vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk-Davidoff, Daniel B.; Hintsa, Eric J.; Anderson, James G.; Keith, David W.

    1999-01-01

    Several studies have predicted substantial increases in Arctic ozone depletion due to the stratospheric cooling induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. But climate change may additionally influence Arctic ozone depletion through changes in the water vapor cycle. Here we investigate this possibility by combining predictions of tropical tropopause temperatures from a general circulation model with results from a one-dimensional radiative convective model, recent progress in understanding the stratospheric water vapor budget, modelling of heterogeneous reaction rates and the results of a general circulation model on the radiative effect of increased water vapor. Whereas most of the stratosphere will cool as greenhouse-gas concentrations increase, the tropical tropopause may become warmer, resulting in an increase of the mean saturation mixing ratio of water vapor and hence an increased transport of water vapor from the troposphere to the stratosphere. Stratospheric water vapor concentration in the polar regions determines both the critical temperature below which heterogeneous reactions on cold aerosols become important (the mechanism driving enhanced ozone depletion) and the temperature of the Arctic vortex itself. Our results indicate that ozone loss in the later winter and spring Arctic vortex depends critically on water vapor variations which are forced by sea surface temperature changes in the tropics. This potentially important effect has not been taken into account in previous scenarios of Arctic ozone loss under climate change conditions.

  17. Structural and Phase Transformations in Water-Vapour-Plasma-Treated Hydrophilic TiO2 Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pranevicius

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated structural and phase transformations in water-vapor-plasma-treated 200–300 nm thick Ti films, maintained at room temperature, by injecting water vapor into radio frequency (RF plasma at different processing powers. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with optical microscopy and surface nanotopography analysis were used to view tracks of adsorbed water layers and to detect bulges or blisters appeared on the surface of treated samples. Rough surfaces with different size of holes (5–20 μm through the entire film thickness have been observed. X-ray diffraction results show that the oxidation rate of Ti film drastically increases in the presence of an adsorbed water on the hydrophilic layer. It is assumed that the defining factor which controls oxidation kinetics is the hydroxyl radicals formation.

  18. Quality assessment of integrated water vapour measurements at the St. Petersburg site, Russia: FTIR vs. MW and GPS techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virolainen, Yana A.; Timofeyev, Yury M.; Kostsov, Vladimir S.; Ionov, Dmitry V.; Kalinnikov, Vladislav V.; Makarova, Maria V.; Poberovsky, Anatoly V.; Zaitsev, Nikita A.; Imhasin, Hamud H.; Polyakov, Alexander V.; Schneider, Matthias; Hase, Frank; Barthlott, Sabine; Blumenstock, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The cross-comparison of different techniques for atmospheric integrated water vapour (IWV) measurements is the essential part of their quality assessment protocol. We inter-compare the synchronised data sets of IWV values measured by the Bruker 125 HR Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), RPG-HATPRO microwave radiometer (MW), and Novatel ProPak-V3 global navigation satellite system receiver (GPS) at the St. Petersburg site between August 2014 and October 2016. As the result of accurate spatial and temporal matching of different IWV measurements, all three techniques agree well with each other except for small IWV values. We show that GPS and MW data quality depends on the atmospheric conditions; in dry atmosphere (IWV smaller than 6 mm), these techniques are less reliable at the St. Petersburg site than the FTIR method. We evaluate the upper bound of statistical measurement errors for clear-sky conditions as 0.29 ± 0.02 mm (1.6 ± 0.3 %), 0.55 ± 0.02 mm (4.7 ± 0.4 %), and 0.76 ± 0.04 mm (6.3 ± 0.8 %) for FTIR, GPS, and MW methods, respectively. We propose the use of FTIR as a reference method under clear-sky conditions since it is reliable on all scales of IWV variability.

  19. High-Resolution Vertical Profile Measurements for Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapour Concentrations Within and Above Crop Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, Patrizia; Graf, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    We present a portable elevator-based facility for measuring CO2 , water vapour, temperature and wind-speed profiles between the soil surface and the atmospheric surface layer above crop canopies. The end of a tube connected to a closed-path gas analyzer is continuously moved up and down over the profile range (in our case, approximately 2 m) while concentrations are logged at a frequency of 20 s^{-1} . Using campaign measurements in winter wheat, winter barley and a catch crop mixture (spring 2015 to autumn 2016) during different stages of crop development and different times of the day, we demonstrate a simple approach to correct for time lags, and the resulting profiles of 30-min mean mole fractions of CO2 and H2O over height increments of 0.025 m. The profiles clearly show the effects of soil respiration and photosynthetic carbon assimilation, varying both during the diurnal cycle and during the growing season. Profiles of temperature and wind speed are based on a ventilated finewire thermocouple and a hot-wire anemometer, respectively. Measurements over bare soil and a short plant canopy were analyzed in the framework of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory to check the validity of the measurements and raw-data-processing approach. Derived fluxes of CO2 , latent and sensible heat and momentum show good agreement with eddy-covariance measurements.

  20. A numerical and experimental analysis of the process of water vapour absorption by a static lithium bromide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, R.; Knikker, R.; Boudard, E.; Stutz, B.; Bonjour, J.

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes a numerical and experimental analysis of the process of water vapour absorption by a static lithium bromide solution. In the experiment, the temperature evolution of the absorbent solution is measured at different heights. The numerical model solves the set of governing equations for the simultaneous heat and mass transfer inside the absorbent by means of the finite-volume method. An iterative method is used to take into account the strong coupling of heat and mass transfer at the interface and variations of thermophysical properties. A moving grid technique is employed to represent the increase of the solution volume. Model results are compared with our measurements and data reported in the literature. The influence of using constant properties is analysed by comparison with the variable properties and experimental results. It is found that this assumption provides acceptable results in the investigated pool absorption cases despite a strong underestimation of the increase of the solution volume in the course of the absorption process.

  1. The first regular measurements of ozone, carbon monoxide and water vapour in the Pacific UTLS by IAGOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Clark

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the features seen in the first 2 months (July and August 2012 of data collected over the Pacific by IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System-equipped aircraft. IAGOS is the continuation and development of the well-known MOZAIC (Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapour on Airbus in-service Aircraft project where scientific instruments were carried on commercially operated A340 aircraft to make measurements of chemical species in the atmosphere. Here, we show data from an aircraft operated by China Airlines on routes from Taipei to Vancouver, which provided the first trans-Pacific measurements by an IAGOS-equipped aircraft. We describe the chemical composition of the extratropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (Ex-UTLS across the Pacific basin in the Northern Hemisphere. The observed concentrations of ozone span a range from 18 to 500 ppbv indicating sources in the marine boundary layer and lowermost stratosphere, respectively. Concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO greater than 400 ppbv are observed in the Ex-UTLS suggesting that plumes of pollution have been exported from the continent. These low concentrations of ozone and high concentrations of CO were rarely recorded in 8 yr of MOZAIC observations over the Atlantic.

  2. Renovation and design of double casement windows with regard to the occurrence of water vapour condensation or mould on the interior surface of the window jamb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrnacova, L.; Balik, L.

    2017-10-01

    The condensation of water vapour on the interior surface is an indicator of construction dysfunction or ignoring of the surroundings temperature and relative humidity. This paper deals with analysis of the occurrence of condensation on the jamb of double casement windows (windows with two window casements). More precisely, this is a surface in the interior where water vapour condensation or mould occur. For the renovation of existing double casement windows, there are different solutions based on window design: application of double insulating glazing on the interior window casement, application of double insulating glazing on the exterior casement, or installation of a simple window. We first describe measurement of an existing double casement window located in a mountain cottage. Second, the results and comparison of 2D thermal model of different types of double casement window construction. Also, the external insulation of the peripheral wall was included in the model.

  3. The effect of the low-level jet on the poleward water vapour transport in the central region of South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berri, Guillermo J.; Inzunza, Juan B.

    The low-level jet (LLJ) in the central region of South America is studied. This LLJ is generated by the daily cycle of convergence and divergence east of the Andes Mountains. We use the 1973-1974 radiosonde and pilot balloon data set from the upper air weather stations, Salta and Resistencia, in northern Argentina to select 10 LLJ cases and another 10 NoLLJ cases (when the LLJ is not present). We use the University of Utah Mesoscale Model to simulate these situations in order to obtain a high-resolution low-level wind field. These model predictions are then used to calculate the meridional water vapour transport across a vertical cross-section, along 26°S in central South America. The results reveal that the LLJs are a very effective mechanism for the poleward water vapour transport.

  4. Positive water vapour feedback in climate models confirmed by satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, D.; Lerner, J.; Chiou, E.-W.; Chu, W.; Larsen, J.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L.

    1991-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that GCMs used to evaluate climate change overestimate the greenhouse effect due to increased concentrations of trace gases in the atmosphere. Here, new satellite-generated water vapor data are used to compare summer and winter moisture values in regions of the middle and upper troposphere that have previously been difficult to observe with confidence. It is found that, as the hemispheres warm, increased convection leads to increased water vapor above 500 mbar in approximate quantitative agreement with results from current climate models. The same conclusion is reached by comparing the tropical western and eastern Pacific regions. Thus, water vapor feedback is not overestimated in models and should amplify the climate response to increased trace-gas concentrations.

  5. Thickness and structure of the water film deposited from vapour on calcite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Wogelius, Roy A.; Morris, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray reflectivity (SXR) was used to measure the thickness of the water film that adsorbs on a {10¯14} cleavage surface of calcite (CaCO3) in a sample chamber where relative humidity could be controlled within the range from......Synchrotron X-ray reflectivity (SXR) was used to measure the thickness of the water film that adsorbs on a {10¯14} cleavage surface of calcite (CaCO3) in a sample chamber where relative humidity could be controlled within the range from...

  6. In situ measurement of CO2 and water vapour isotopic compositions at a forest site using mid-infrared laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Ryuichi; Matsumi, Yutaka; Takanashi, Satoru; Nakai, Yuichiro; Nakayama, Tomoki; Ouchi, Mai; Hiyama, Tetsuya; Fujiyoshi, Yasushi; Nakano, Takashi; Kurita, Naoyuki; Muramoto, Kenichiro; Kodama, Naomi

    2016-12-01

    We conducted continuous, high time-resolution measurements of CO2 and water vapour isotopologues ((16)O(12)C(16)O, (16)O(13)C(16)O and (18)O(12)C(16)O for CO2, and H2(18)O for water vapour) in a red pine forest at the foot of Mt. Fuji for 9 days from the end of July 2010 using in situ absorption laser spectroscopy. The δ(18)O values in water vapour were estimated using the δ(2)H-δ(18)O relationship. At a scale of several days, the temporal variations in δ(18)O-CO2 and δ(18)O-H2O are similar. The orders of the daily Keeling plots are almost identical. A possible reason for the similar behaviour of δ(18)O-CO2 and δ(18)O-H2O is considered to be that the air masses with different water vapour isotopic ratios moved into the forest, and changed the atmosphere of the forest. A significant correlation was observed between δ(18)O-CO2 and δ(13)C-CO2 values at nighttime (r(2)≈0.9) due to mixing between soil (and/or leaf) respiration and tropospheric CO2. The ratios of the discrimination coefficients (Δa/Δ) for oxygen (Δa) and carbon (Δ) isotopes during photosynthesis were estimated in the range of 0.7-1.2 from the daytime correlations between δ(18)O-CO2 and δ(13)C-CO2 values.

  7. Carbon dioxide and water vapour exchange from understory species in boreal forest.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.M.P.D.; Arp, W.J.; Chapin, F.S.

    2004-01-01

    Although recent eddy covariance measurements in boreal forests provide CO2 and energy exchange data for the whole ecosystem, very little is known about the role of the understory vegetation. We conducted chamber flux measurements in an Alaskan black spruce forest in order to compare CO2 and water

  8. A water-vapour giga-maser in the active galaxy TXFS2226-184.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekemoer, A M; Henkel, C; Greenhill, L J; Dey, A; van Breugel, W; Codella, C; Antonucci, R

    1995-12-14

    Active galactic nuclei are thought to be powered by gas falling into a massive black hole; the different types of active galaxy may arise because we view them through a thick torus of molecular gas at varying angles of inclination. One way to determine whether the black hole is surrounded by a torus, which would obscure the accretion disk around the black hole along certain lines of sight, is to search for water masers, as these exist only in regions with plentiful molecular gas. Since the first detection of an extra-galactic water maser in 1979, they have come to be associated primarily with active galaxies, and have even been used to probe the mass of the central engine. Here we report the detection of a water giga-maser in the radio galaxy TXFS2226-184. The strength of the emission supports a recently proposed theory of maser pumping that allows for even more powerful masers, which might be detectable at cosmological distances. Water masers may accordingly provide a way to determine distances to galaxies outside the usual distance ladder, providing an independent calibration of the Hubble constant.

  9. Experimental study to distinguish the effects of methanol slip and water vapour on a high temperature PEM fuel cell at different operating conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, Sobi; Vang, Jakob Rabjerg; Araya, Samuel Simon

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to separate out the effects of methanol and water vapour on a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell under different temperatures (160°C and 180°C) and current densities (0.2Acm-2, 0.4Acm-2 and 0.6Acm-2). The degradation rates at the different current...... the presence of 5% methanol tends to degrade the cell performance. However, the presence of H2O mitigates some of the adverse effects of methanol. The effect of varying fuel compositions was found to be more prominent at lower current densities. The voltage improves significantly when adding water vapour...... to the anode after pure hydrogen operation at 180°C. A decrease in the total resistance corresponding to the voltage improvement is observed from the impedance spectra. There is minimal variation in performance with the introduction of 3% and 5% methanol along with water vapour in the anode feed at all current...

  10. Study of transport of oxygen and water vapour between cells in valve regulated lead-acid batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpin, Barry; Peters, Ken

    Valve-regulated lead-acid batteries are maintenance free, safer, office compatible, and have higher volume efficiency than conventional designs. They are universally used in telecommunications and uninterruptible power supply systems. With the electrolyte immobilized in the separator or as a gel, it is feasible for a monobloc battery to have cells that are not fully sealed from one another, that is to have a common gas space, with certain attendant benefits. This study demonstrates that small differences in the saturation level, acid strength or operating temperature of the cells in such designs can initiate a cycle that may subsequently result in failure if the movement of oxygen and water vapour between cells is unrestricted. Cells that are initially out-of-balance will go further out-of-balance at an ever-increasing rate. This situation can also arise in monobloc designs with sealed cells if the intercell seal is inadequate or incomplete. Battery failure is associated with a re-distribution of water between the cells with some drying out and having high impedance. The preferential oxygen absorption in those cells produces heavily sulfated negative plates. Results on batteries tested under a range of overcharge conditions and temperatures are presented to illustrate these effects. The rate at which the cycle occurs depends on the initial relative density of the acid, the temperature or saturation imbalance between the cells, and the size of the interconnecting gas space. Batteries operating under a continuous cycling regime, particularly those with high overcharge currents and voltages that generate large volumes of oxygen, are more prone to this type of failure mode than batteries operating under low overcharge, intermittent cycling, or float conditions.

  11. Effect of water vapour on the molecular structures of supported vanadium oxide catalysts at elevated temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jehng, Jih-Mirn; Deo, G.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of water vapor on the molecular structures of V2O3-supported catalysts (SiO2, Al2o3, TiO2, and CeO2) was investigated by in situ Raman spectroscopy as a function of temperature (from 500°C to 120°C). Under dry conditions only isolated surface VO4 species are present on the dehydrated SiO2

  12. Water vapour solubility and conductivity study of the proton conductor BaCe(0.9 − x)ZrxY0.1O(3 − δ)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricote, Sandrine; Bonanos, Nikolaos; Caboche, G:

    2009-01-01

    in the sample. The direct current conductivity has been measured as a function of oxygen partial pressure, at a water vapour partial pressure of 0.015 atm. The total conductivity has been resolved into a p-type and an ionic component using a fitting procedure appropriate to the assumed defect model....... An estimation of the protonic component was made by assuming a conductivity isotope effect between 1.4 and 1.8. The total conductivity, obtained using impedance spectroscopy has been measured as a function of temperature in the water and heavy water exchanged states. The activation energy has been found to be 0...

  13. High temperature vapour-liquid equilibria of water-polyalcohol mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Cristino,Ana Filipa Russo de Albuquerque

    2014-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Química (Química Tecnológica), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2014 It is known that the presence of strong hydrogen bonds in the liquid state creates azeotropes, which disappear with the increase of temperature. This behavior suggests that the distillation at high temperatures could provide a good strategy to separate components of binary mixtures such as alcohol-water systems, very relevant in the chemical industry. Biodegradable fuels start to play ...

  14. Correcting atmospheric effects on InSAR with MERIS water vapour data and elevation-dependent interpolation model

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Z. W.

    2012-05-01

    The propagation delay when radar signals travel from the troposphere has been one of the major limitations for the applications of high precision repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). In this paper, we first present an elevation-dependent atmospheric correction model for Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR—the instrument aboard the ENVISAT satellite) interferograms with Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) integrated water vapour (IWV) data. Then, using four ASAR interferometric pairs over Southern California as examples, we conduct the atmospheric correction experiments with cloud-free MERIS IWV data. The results show that after the correction the rms differences between InSAR and GPS have reduced by 69.6 per cent, 29 per cent, 31.8 per cent and 23.3 per cent, respectively for the four selected interferograms, with an average improvement of 38.4 per cent. Most importantly, after the correction, six distinct deformation areas have been identified, that is, Long Beach–Santa Ana Basin, Pomona–Ontario, San Bernardino and Elsinore basin, with the deformation velocities along the radar line-of-sight (LOS) direction ranging from −20 mm yr−1 to −30 mm yr−1 and on average around −25 mm yr−1, and Santa Fe Springs and Wilmington, with a slightly low deformation rate of about −10 mm yr−1 along LOS. Finally, through the method of stacking, we generate a mean deformation velocity map of Los Angeles over a period of 5 yr. The deformation is quite consistent with the historical deformation of the area. Thus, using the cloud-free MERIS IWV data correcting synchronized ASAR interferograms can significantly reduce the atmospheric effects in the interferograms and further better capture the ground deformation and other geophysical signals.

  15. CM-SAF water vapour and temperature products from ATOVS onboard NOAA and MetOp: 2004-2008, five years of data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courcoux, N.; Schröder, M.; Steenbergen, T.; Schulz, J.

    2009-04-01

    The major objective of the satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM-SAF) is the exploitation of the satellite measurement with state of the art algorithms to derive information about key climate variable of the Earth system. The derived products focus on the atmospheric part of the "Essential Climate Variable" developed within the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) framework. Furthermore, the CM-SAF products are tailored with respect to the need of the current and potential future users and are developed by applying the GCOS climate monitoring principles as far as possible. Concerning water vapour and temperature, which are essential climate variables, the CM-SAF operationally retrieves water vapour and temperature profiles from ATOVS observations. The ATOVS instruments, namely HIRS, AMSU-A, and AMSU-B are flying onboard the NOAA satellites and now onboard MetOp as well. The CM-SAF ATOVS data have a global coverage with a spatial resolution of 90 km2 and are available as monthly and daily means. The CM-SAF ATOVS retrieved products are vertically integrated water vapour from the surface to 100 hPa, layered vertically integrated water vapour, layered mean temperature and layered mean relative humidity all three on five layers, as well as temperature and water vapour mixing ratio on six pressure levels. A total of 28 CM-SAF ATOVS products is available. The CM-SAF ATOVS data are, for example, valuable products for the evaluation of climate models because of the simultaneous retrieval of temperature and water vapour profiles with global coverage and high quality in the upper troposphere. On the other hand, the CM-SAF ATOVS products are not suitable for monitoring the interannual variability and trends since the bias errors due to orbit shift and decay, and the intersatellite biases are not corrected. The CM-SAF operational processing scheme is using the International ATOVS Processing Package (IAPP) developed by the University of Wisconsin to retrieve

  16. Condensation analysis of water vapour in the presence of inert gas(ses) for the CO2 capture

    OpenAIRE

    Sivalingam, S.;Raindl, M.;Gleis, S.;Spliethoff, H.

    2017-01-01

    The vapour in oxy fuel combustion flue gasses can be condensed using an atmospheric condenser in order to separate and capture the CO2. The conditions of heat transfer are considerably impaired in the presence of non-condensable gasses e.g.CO2, and the over all heat transfer coefficient is drastically reduced when compared to that of the pure vapour. The presented experimental works are conducted to determine the effects of CO2 and N2 as non-condensable gasses in the condensation heat transfe...

  17. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of water content of the magma ocean would have water contents of 320 ppm for the bulk Moon and 1.4 wt % for urKREEP from plagioclase in ferroan anorthosites. Results and interpretation: NanoSIMS data from granitic clasts from Apollo sample 15405,78 show that alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was likely very significant in the evolution of the lunar mantle. Conclusions: Lunar granites

  18. shoot water content and reference evapotranspiration for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Penmann-Monteith equation and finally calculation of crop evapotranspiration. The objective of this study was to establish crop coefficients and evapotranspiration of different soybean varieties using shoot water content and reference evapotranspiration (ET0). MATERIALS AND METHODS. Reference evapotranspiration.

  19. Measuring variations of δ18O and δ2H in atmospheric water vapour using two commercial laser-based spectrometers: an instrument characterisation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pfahl

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Variations of stable water isotopes in water vapour have become measurable at a measurement frequency of about 1 Hz in recent years using novel laser spectroscopic techniques. This enables us to perform continuous measurements for process-based investigations of the atmospheric water cycle at the time scales relevant for synoptic and mesoscale meteorology. An important prerequisite for the interpretation of data from automated field measurements lasting for several weeks or months is a detailed knowledge about instrument properties and the sources of measurement uncertainty. We present here a comprehensive characterisation and comparison study of two commercial laser spectroscopic systems based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research. The uncertainty components of the measurements were first assessed in laboratory experiments, focussing on the effects of (i water vapour mixing ratio, (ii measurement stability, (iii uncertainties due to calibration and (iv response times of the isotope measurements due to adsorption-desorption processes on the tubing and measurement cavity walls. Based on the experience from our laboratory experiments, we set up a one-week field campaign for comparing measurements of the ambient isotope signals from the two laser spectroscopic systems. The optimal calibration strategy determined for both instruments was applied as well as the correction functions for water vapour mixing ratio effects. The root mean square difference between the isotope signals from the two instruments during the field deployment was 2.3‰ for δ2H, 0.5‰ for δ18O and 3.1‰ for deuterium excess. These uncertainty estimates from field measurements compare well to those found in the laboratory experiments. The present quality of measurements from laser spectroscopic instruments combined with a calibration system opens new possibilities for investigating the atmospheric

  20. [Ethanol content of Kefir water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabl, W; Liniger, B; Sutter, K; Sigrist, T

    1994-03-01

    The question of the influence of kefir on blood-alcohol-level has been asked in a legal proceeding. The questioned recipe consisted of 21 water, 6 soup-spoons of kefir granules (about 120 g), 150 g sugar, 2 figs and one lemon. The consumption took place after two days of fermentation. Experimentally we found, that one liter of this kefir product may contain up to 38 g/l ethanol after 7 to 10 days. On the second day we measured up to 16 g/l ethanol. Our results may be import for expert appraisements concerning unability of driving.

  1. Increased cerebral water content in hemodialysis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Reetz

    Full Text Available Little information is available on the impact of hemodialysis on cerebral water homeostasis and its distribution in chronic kidney disease. We used a neuropsychological test battery, structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and a novel technique for quantitative measurement of localized water content using 3T MRI to investigate ten hemodialysis patients (HD on a dialysis-free day and after hemodialysis (2.4±2.2 hours, and a matched healthy control group with the same time interval. Neuropsychological testing revealed mainly attentional and executive cognitive dysfunction in HD. Voxel-based-morphometry showed only marginal alterations in the right inferior medial temporal lobe white matter in HD compared to controls. Marked increases in global brain water content were found in the white matter, specifically in parietal areas, in HD patients compared to controls. Although the global water content in the gray matter did not differ between the two groups, regional increases of brain water content in particular in parieto-temporal gray matter areas were observed in HD patients. No relevant brain hydration changes were revealed before and after hemodialysis. Whereas longer duration of dialysis vintage was associated with increased water content in parieto-temporal-occipital regions, lower intradialytic weight changes were negatively correlated with brain water content in these areas in HD patients. Worse cognitive performance on an attention task correlated with increased hydration in frontal white matter. In conclusion, long-term HD is associated with altered brain tissue water homeostasis mainly in parietal white matter regions, whereas the attentional domain in the cognitive dysfunction profile in HD could be linked to increased frontal white matter water content.

  2. Fluoride content of tank water in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, N J; Hopcraft, M S; Tong, A C; Thean, H l; Thum, Y S; Tong, D E; Wen, J; Zhao, S C; Stanton, D P; Yuan, Y; Shen, P; Reynolds, E C

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) analyse the fluoride content of tank water; (2) determine whether the method of water collection or storage influenced fluoride content; and (3) survey participant attitudes towards water fluoridation. Plastic tubes and a questionnaire were distributed through dentists to households with water tanks in Victoria. A midstream tank water sample was collected and fluoride analysed in triplicate using ion chromatography All samples (n = 123) contained negligible amounts of fluoride, with a mean fluoride concentration of fluoride content and variables investigated such as tank material, tank age, roof material and gutter material. Most people did not know whether their tank water contained fluoride and 40.8% preferred to have access to fluoridated water. The majority thought fluoride was safe and more than half of the respondents supported fluoridation. Fluoride content of tank water was well below the optimal levels for caries prevention. People who rely solely on tank water for drinking may require additional exposure to fluoride for optimal caries prevention. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  3. Validation of GOME-2/MetOp-A total water vapour column using reference radiosonde data from GRUAN network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón, M.; Loyola, D.; Román, R.; Vömel, H.

    2014-09-01

    The main goal of this article is to validate the total water vapour column (TWVC) measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) satellite sensor and generated using the GOME Data Processor (GDP) retrieval algorithm developed by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). For this purpose, spatially and temporally collocated TWVC data from highly accurate sounding measurements for the period January 2009-May 2014 at six sites are used. These balloon-borne data are provided by GCOS Reference Upper-Air Network (GRUAN). The correlation between GOME-2 and sounding TWVC data is reasonably good (determination coefficient (R2) of 0.89) when all available radiosondes (1400) are employed in the inter-comparison. When cloud-free cases (544) are selected by means of the satellite cloud fraction (CF), the correlation exhibits a remarkable improvement (R2 ~ 0.95). Nevertheless, analyzing the six datasets together, the relative differences between GOME-2 and GRUAN data shows mean values (in absolute term) of 19% for all-sky conditions and 14% for cloud-free cases, which evidences a notable bias in the satellite TWVC data against the reference balloon-borne measurements. The satellite-sounding TWVC differences show a strong solar zenith angle (SZA) dependence for values above 50° with a stable behaviour for values below this zenith angle. The smallest relative differences found in the inter-comparison (between -5 and +3%) are achieved for those cloud-free cases with SZA below 50°. Furthermore, the detailed analysis of the influence of cloud properties (CF, cloud top albedo (CTA) and cloud top pressure (CTP)) on the satellite-sounding differences reveals, as expected, a large effect of clouds in the GOME-2 TWVC data. For instance, the relative differences exhibit a large negative dependence on CTA, varying from +5 to -20% when CTA rises from 0.3 to 0.9. Finally, the satellite-sounding differences also show a negative dependence on the reference TWVC values, changing from

  4. Validation of GOME-2/MetOp-A total water vapour column using reference radiosonde data from the GRUAN network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón, M.; Loyola, D.; Román, R.; Vömel, H.

    2015-03-01

    The main goal of this paper is to validate the total water vapour column (TWVC) measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) satellite sensor and generated using the GOME Data Processor (GDP) retrieval algorithm developed by the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). For this purpose, spatially and temporally collocated TWVC data from highly accurate sounding measurements for the period January 2009-May 2014 at six sites are used. These balloon-borne data are provided by the GCOS Reference Upper-Air Network (GRUAN). The correlation between GOME-2 and sounding TWVC data is reasonably good (determination coefficient, R2, of 0.89) when all available radiosondes (1400) are employed in the inter-comparison. When cloud-free cases (544) are selected by means of the satellite cloud fraction (CF < 5%), the correlation exhibits a remarkable improvement (R2 ~ 0.95). Nevertheless, the analysis of the relative differences between GOME-2 and GRUAN data shows a mean absolute bias error (weighted with the combined uncertainty derived from the estimated errors of both data sets) of 15% for all-sky conditions (9% for cloud-free cases). These results evidence a notable bias in the satellite TWVC data against the reference balloon-borne measurements, partially related to the cloudy conditions during the satellite overpass. The detailed analysis of the influence of cloud properties - CF, cloud top albedo (CTA) and cloud top pressure (CTP) - on the satellite-sounding differences reveals, as expected, a large effect of clouds in the GOME-2 TWVC data. For instance, the relative differences exhibit a large negative dependence on CTA, varying from -6 to -23% when CTA rises from 0.3 to 0.8. Furthermore, the satellite-sounding TWVC differences show a strong dependence on the satellite solar zenith angle (SZA) for values above 50°. Hence the smallest relative differences found in this satellite-sounding comparison are achieved for those cloud-free cases with satellite SZA below 50

  5. Zonal asymmetries in middle atmospheric ozone and water vapour derived from Odin satellite data 2001–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gabriel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stationary wave patterns in middle atmospheric ozone (O3 and water vapour (H2O are an important factor in the atmospheric circulation, but there is a strong gap in diagnosing and understanding their configuration and origin. Based on Odin satellite data from 2001 to 2010 we investigate the stationary wave patterns in O3 and H2O as indicated by the seasonal long-term means of the zonally asymmetric components O3* = O3-[O3] and H2O* = H2O-[H2O] ([O3], [H2O]: zonal means. At mid- and polar latitudes we find a pronounced wave one pattern in both constituents. In the Northern Hemisphere, the wave patterns increase during autumn, maintain their strength during winter and decay during spring, with maximum amplitudes of about 10–20 % of the zonal mean values. During winter, the wave one in O3* shows a maximum over the North Pacific/Aleutians and a minimum over the North Atlantic/Northern Europe and a double-peak structure with enhanced amplitude in the lower and in the upper stratosphere. The wave one in H2O* extends from the lower stratosphere to the upper mesosphere with a westward shift in phase with increasing height including a jump in phase at upper stratosphere altitudes. In the Southern Hemisphere, similar wave patterns occur mainly during southern spring. By comparing the observed wave patterns in O3* and H2O* with a linear solution of a steady-state transport equation for a zonally asymmetric tracer component we find that these wave patterns are primarily due to zonally asymmetric transport by geostrophically balanced winds, which are derived from observed temperature profiles. In addition temperature-dependent photochemistry contributes substantially to the spatial structure of the wave pattern in O3* . Further influences, e.g., zonal asymmetries in eddy

  6. The importance of the poikilohydric nature of lichens as natural tracers for delta18O of ambient vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartard, Britta; Cuntz, Matthias; Lakatos, Michael; Máguas, Cristina

    2010-05-01

    The stable isotope composition of water is routinely used as a tracer to study water exchange processes in vascular plants and ecosystems. To date, no study has focussed on isotope processes in poikilohydric organisms (i.e. lichens and bryophytes), where relative water content equilibrate with the surrounding humidity conditions and that are able to use distinct water sources such as precipitation, dew, fog and also water vapour. Moreover, lichens are ubiquitous organisms, and on a global scale, they are found in nearly all terrestrial ecosystems and also within these ecosystems they inhabit many microhabitats. As poikilohydric. especially green algal lichens are known to photosynthetically reactivate solely upon uptake of atmospheric moisture, even at non-saturated ambient humidity conditions. To understand basic isotope exchange processes on non-vascular plants, thallus water isotopic composition was studied in various green-algal lichens exposed to desiccation. The study indicates that lichens equilibrates with the isotopic composition of surrounding water vapour. We found that the thallus water of lichens exposed to high relative humidity shows fast isotopic equilibration with the surrounding vapour regardless of whether the lichen experiences water loss or vapour uptake. The time until isotopic equilibrium is achieved depends on the initial water status as well as on the lichen's specific morphology. It ranged from 5 to 12h in previously dried lichens to approximately 40h in lichens previously rehydrated with liquid water of distinct isotopic composition. Even though markedly slower, isotopic equilibration between leaf water and ambient vapour may also occur in homoiohydric plants exposed to high relative humidity. At low relative humidity, however, the apparent vapour pressure deficit between the evaporative sites and the ambient air and the increased stomatal diffusion resistance generally causes leaf water enrichment. In contrast, poikilohydric lichens lack

  7. Vapour pressures, aqueous solubilities, Henry's law constants, partition coefficients between gas/water (Kgw), n-octanol/water (Kow) and gas/n-octanol (Kgo) of 106 polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz; Ballschmiter

    1999-02-01

    Modelling the environmental fate of persistent organic pollutants like polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDE) requires the knowledge of a number of fundamental physico-chemical properties of these compounds. We report here the physico-chemical properties of 106 PCDEs, which are over 50% of all possible congeners. Vapour pressures P(OL), water solubilities S(H2O), and n-octanol/water partition coefficients K(OW) were determined with chromatographic methods. With these experimental data the Henry's law constants H, gas/water K(GW) and gas/n-octanol K(GO) partition coefficients were calculated. Vapour pressures and water solubilities and n-octanol/water partition coefficients of the PCDEs are close to those of similar groups of organochlorine compounds like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs). A similar environmental fate can be predicted and was partially already been observed.

  8. Temperature Humidity Dissimilarity and Heat-to-water-vapour Transport Efficiency Above and Within a Pine Forest Canopy: the Role of the Bowen Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamaud, E.; Irvine, M.

    2006-07-01

    Over the past 15 years atmospheric surface-layer experiments over heterogeneous canopies have shown that the vertical transfer of sensible heat and water vapour exhibit a strong dissimilarity. In particular, the sensible-heat-to-water-vapour transport efficiencies generally exceed unity. One of the main consequences is that evaporation (latent heat flux) computed by the flux-variance method is overestimated, as persistently demonstrated by comparisons with evaporation obtained with the eddy-correlation method. Various authors proposed to take into account the temperature humidity dissimilarity to extend the applicability of the flux-variance method in order to compute evaporation from non-uniform surfaces. They attempted to connect the sensible-heat-to-water-vapour transport efficiency (λ) to the correlation coefficient between temperature and humidity turbulent fluctuations ( R Tq ). This approach was found to be successful over ‘wet’ surfaces for which λ can be approximated by R Tq and ‘dry’ surfaces for which λ can be approximated by 1/ R Tq . However, no solution has been proposed until now for intermediate hydrological conditions. We investigated this question using eddy-correlation measurements above and inside a pine forest canopy. For both levels, our data present a strong likeness with previously published results over heterogeneous surfaces. In particular, they confirm that λ is R Tq in wet conditions and 1/ R Tq in dry conditions. Moreover, we defined the range of the Bowen ratio ( Bo) values for which those two approximations are valid (below 0.1 and greater than 1, respectively) and established a relationship between λ, R Tq and Bo for the intermediate range of Bo. We are confident that this new parameterization will enlarge the applicability of the flux-variance method to all kinds of heterogeneous surfaces in various hydrological conditions

  9. Metrologically Traceable Determination of the Water Content in Biopolymers: INRiM Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolle, F.; Beltramino, G.; Fernicola, V.; Sega, M.; Verdoja, A.

    2017-03-01

    Water content in materials is a key factor affecting many chemical and physical properties. In polymers of biological origin, it influences their stability and mechanical properties as well as their biodegradability. The present work describes the activity carried out at INRiM on the determination of water content in samples of a commercial starch-derived biopolymer widely used in shopping bags (Mater-Bi^{circledR }). Its water content, together with temperature, is the most influencing parameter affecting its biodegradability, because of the considerable impact on the microbial activity which is responsible for the biopolymer degradation in the environment. The main scope of the work was the establishment of a metrologically traceable procedure for the determination of water content by using two electrochemical methods, namely coulometric Karl Fischer (cKF) titration and evolved water vapour (EWV) analysis. The obtained results are presented. The most significant operational parameters were considered, and a particular attention was devoted to the establishment of metrological traceability of the measurement results by using appropriate calibration procedures, calibrated standards and suitable certified reference materials. Sample homogeneity and oven-drying temperature were found to be the most important influence quantities in the whole water content measurement process. The results of the two methods were in agreement within the stated uncertainties. Further development is foreseen for the application of cKF and EWV to other polymers.

  10. The relative importance of water vapour and dust in controlling the variability in radiative heating of the summertime Saharan heat low

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsham, John H.; Parker, Douglas J.; Todd, Martin C.; Banks, Jamie R.; Brindley, Helen E.; Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Roberts, Alexander J.; Ryder, Claire L.

    2017-04-01

    The summertime Sahara heat low (SHL) is a key component of the West African monsoon (WAM) system but is a key source of uncertainty in global models. There is considerable uncertainty over the relative importance of water vapour and dust concentrations in controlling the radiation budget over the Sahara. This limits our ability to explain the variability and trends in the SHL and WAM systems, and so hampers our ability to reduce model biases. Here we use in situ observations from Fennec supersite-1 in the central Sahara from June 2011 and 2012, as well as satellite retrievals from GERB, to quantify how total column water vapour (TCWV) and dust aerosols control day-to-day variability in the energy balance in observations and ECMWF reanalyses (ERA-I). Results show that the earth-atmosphere system is radiatively heated in June 2011 and 2012. While we are not able to completely disentangle the roles of water vapour, clouds and dust from the observations, the analysis demonstrates that TCWV provides a far stronger control on TOA net radiation, and so the net heating of the earth-atmosphere system, than AOD does. Variations in dust provide a much stronger control on surface heating, but the reduction in surface heating associated with high dust loadings are largely compensated by associated increases in atmospheric heating, and so dust control on net TOA radiation is weak. Dust and TCWV are both important for direct atmospheric heating. ERA-I assimilated radiosondes from the Fennec campaign but uses a monthly dust climatology, and so cannot capture the impact of daily variations in dustiness. Despite this, ERA-I managed to capture the control of TOA net flux by TCWV, with a positive correlation (r = 0.6) between observed and modelled TOA net radiation. Variations in surface net radiation, and so the vertical profile of radiative heating, are not captured in ERA-I, given it does not capture variations in dust. Results show that ventilation of the SHL by cool moist air

  11. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation, pulsed electric field, hot water dip and ethanol vapours treatment on keeping and sensory quality of mung bean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Ankit; Siddiqui, Saleem

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this research work was to evaluate the effects of UV- irradiation, pulsed electric field (PEF), hot water dip (HWD) and ethanol vapours on the quality and storage life of mung bean sprouts (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek). The sprouts were subjected to various treatments viz., UV-Irradiation (10 kJm(-2) in laminar flow chamber for 1 h), PEF (10,000 V for 10s), HWD (50 °C for 2 min) and ethanol vapours (1 h); and then stored in thermocol cups wrapped with perforated cling films at room (25 ± 1 °C) and low (7 ± 1 °C) temperature conditions. The sprouts were analyzed regularly at 24 h interval for sprout length, sprout weight, total soluble solids (TSS), titratable acidity, non-enzymatic browning, total plate count and overall acceptability. Sprout length and weight increased during storage. There was no significant effect of various treatments on sprout length and weight, except in ethanol treatment, where suppression was observed. HWD showed higher TSS and acidity than that of control. The least browning was observed in ethanol treatment. The total plate count was not significantly affected by various treatments. Overall acceptability under various treatments decreased during storage period both at room and low temperature. Hot water and ethanol vapour treated sprouts showed higher acceptability than other treatments. However, the acceptability scores for sprouts remained within the acceptable range (≥6) up to 72 h at room temperature and 120 h at low temperature conditions.

  12. When do Acacia mellifera trees use water? Responses of sap velocity to soil water availability, vapour pressure deficit and global radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blécourt, Marleen; Thomsen, Simon; Gröngröft, Alexander; Eschenbach, Annette

    2017-04-01

    Acacia mellifera (multi-stem deciduous tree) is one of the dominant woody species responsible for bush encroachment in southern African savannahs. However, very little is known on water use, transpiration or xylem sap flow of A. mellifera. We analyzed the responses of sap velocity in A. mellifera to soil moisture, vapour pressure deficit and global radiation. This knowledge is necessary to improve hydrological modelling and will as such contribute to our understanding of the impacts of bush encroachment in (semi) arid savannahs on the soil water balance. We monitored sap velocities at two sites that differed in tree density in a semi-arid thornbush savannah in central Namibia (mean annual precipitation = 346 mm). Sap velocities were derived using the Heat Ratio Method. Measurements were done in four periods of 3-4 months between November 2014 and September 2016. The measurement periods covered the transitions between the dry and rainy season and vice versa, and the dry season. In two of these periods we did measurements at all stems of three trees per site (a total of 17-19 stems), while in the other two periods sap velocities were measured on one stem per tree for six to eight trees per site. The study was done in the framework of SASSCAL (Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management) granted by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Preliminary results indicate that the day-to-day fluctuations in cumulative daily sap velocity showed a three-phase interaction with soil water tension (minimum soil water tension of four sensors to 1-m depth). Phase I: At soil water tension water tension had little influence on sap velocities, and fluctuations in sapflow seemed to be related to VPD and global radiation. Phase II: At soil water tensions between pF 2.5 and pF 3.2, sap velocities were negatively related to soil water tension. Phase III: At soil water tensions > pF 3.2 no sap flow could be detected.

  13. Vapour pressures, aqueous solubility, Henry's law constants and air/water partition coefficients of 1,8-dichlorooctane and 1,8-dibromooctane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarraute, Sabine; Mokbel, Ilham; Costa Gomes, Margarida F; Majer, Vladimir; Delepine, Hervé; Jose, Jacques

    2006-09-01

    New data on the vapour pressures and aqueous solubility of 1,8-dichlorooctane and 1,8-dibromooctane are reported as a function of temperature between 20 degrees C and 80 degrees C and 1 degrees C and 40 degrees C, respectively. For the vapour pressures, a static method was used during the measurements which have an estimated uncertainty between 3% and 5%. The aqueous solubilities were determined using a dynamic saturation column method and the values are accurate to within +/-10%. 1,8-Dichlorooctane is more volatile than 1,8-dibromooctane in the temperature range covered (p(sat) varies from 3 to 250 Pa and from 0.53 to 62 Pa, respectively) and is also approximately three times more soluble in water (mole fraction solubilities at 25 degrees C of 5.95 x 10(-7) and 1.92 x 10(-7), respectively). A combination of the two sets of data allowed the calculation of the Henry's law constants and the air water partition coefficients. A simple group contribution concept was used to rationalize the data obtained.

  14. Characterization of simultaneous heat and mass transfer phenomena for water vapour condensation on a solid surface in an abiotic environment--application to bioprocesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Akhilesh; Kondjoyan, Alain; Fontaine, Jean-Pierre

    2012-07-01

    The phenomenon of heat and mass transfer by condensation of water vapour from humid air involves several key concepts in aerobic bioreactors. The high performance of bioreactors results from optimised interactions between biological processes and multiphase heat and mass transfer. Indeed in various processes such as submerged fermenters and solid-state fermenters, gas/liquid transfer need to be well controlled, as it is involved at the microorganism interface and for the control of the global process. For the theoretical prediction of such phenomena, mathematical models require heat and mass transfer coefficients. To date, very few data have been validated concerning mass transfer coefficients from humid air inflows relevant to those bioprocesses. Our study focussed on the condensation process of water vapour and developed an experimental set-up and protocol to study the velocity profiles and the mass flux on a small size horizontal flat plate in controlled environmental conditions. A closed circuit wind tunnel facility was used to control the temperature, hygrometry and hydrodynamics of the flow. The temperature of the active surface was controlled and kept isothermal below the dew point to induce condensation, by the use of thermoelectricity. The experiments were performed at ambient temperature for a relative humidity between 35-65% and for a velocity of 1.0 ms⁻¹. The obtained data are analysed and compared to available theoretical calculations on condensation mass flux.

  15. Substrate water availability and seed water content on niger germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Regina Baptista Gordin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Niger is an oleaginous species whose cultivation has been spreading, but there is not much information on the adverse conditions during its seedling establishment. This study aimed at evaluating the effects of substrate water availability and seed water content on niger germination. Seeds were moistened using the humid atmosphere method for 0; 24; 48; and 72 hours, obtaining the water contents of 7.0 %, 12.8 %, 16.8 % and 32.2 %. Then, they were sown in substrate moistened with PEG 6000 solutions with different osmotic potentials: 0.0 MPa (control, -0.1 MPa, -0.2 MPa, -0.3 MPa and -0.4 MPa. A completely randomized design, in a 4 x 5 factorial scheme (water content x osmotic potential, with four replications of 50 seeds, was used. First count and germination percentage, germination speed index and mean time, shoot and root length and seedlings dry weight were evaluated. The reduction in the substrate osmotic potential decreases the niger seed germination and seedling growth, regardless of water content, but with a higher evidence in seed water contents below 32.2 % and 12.8 %, respectively.

  16. The Liquid Vapour Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1985-01-01

    In this short review we are concerned with the density variation across the liquid-vapour interface, i.e. from the bulk density of the liquid to the essentially zero density of the vapour phase. This density variation can in principle be determined from the deviation of the reflectivity from...

  17. NAMMA CVI CLOUD CONDENSED WATER CONTENT V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the NAMMA CVI Cloud Condensed Water Content dataset the counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) was used to measure condensed water content (liquid water or ice in...

  18. The CM SAF SSM/I-based total column water vapour climate data record: methods and evaluation against re-analyses and satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schröder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF aims at the provision and sound validation of well documented Climate Data Records (CDRs in sustained and operational environments. In this study, a total column water vapour path (WVPA climatology from CM SAF is presented and inter-compared to water vapour data records from various data sources. Based on homogenised brightness temperatures from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I, a climatology of WVPA has been generated within the Hamburg Ocean–Atmosphere Fluxes and Parameters from Satellite (HOAPS framework. Within a research and operation transition activity the HOAPS data and operation capabilities have been successfully transferred to the CM SAF where the complete HOAPS data and processing schemes are hosted in an operational environment. An objective analysis for interpolation, namely kriging, has been applied to the swath-based WVPA retrievals from the HOAPS data set. The resulting climatology consists of daily and monthly mean fields of WVPA over the global ice-free ocean. The temporal coverage ranges from July 1987 to August 2006. After a comparison to the precursor product the CM SAF SSM/I-based climatology has been comprehensively compared to different types of meteorological analyses from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF-ERA40, ERA INTERIM and operational analyses and from the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA–JRA. This inter-comparison shows an overall good agreement between the climatology and the analyses, with daily absolute biases generally smaller than 2 kg m−2. The absolute value of the bias to JRA and ERA INTERIM is typically smaller than 0.5 kg m−2. For the period 1991–2006, the root mean square error (RMSE for both reanalyses is approximately 2 kg m−2. As SSM/I WVPA and radiances are assimilated into JMA and all ECMWF analyses and

  19. The July 2016 Study of the water VApour in the polar AtmosPhere (SVAAP) campaign at Thule, Greenland: surface radiation budget and role of clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Daniela; Di Iorio, Tatiana; di Sarra, Alcide; Iaccarino, Antonio; Pace, Giandomenico; Mevi, Gabriele; Muscari, Giovanni; Cacciani, Marco; Gröbner, Julian

    2017-04-01

    The Study of the water VApour in the polar AtmosPhere (SVAAP) project, funded by the Italian Programme for Antarctic Research, is aimed at investigating the surface radiation budget (SRB), the variability of atmospheric water vapour, and the long-term variations in stratospheric composition and structure at Thule, Greenland, in the framework of the international Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). Thule High Arctic Atmospheric Observatory (THAAO, 76.5° N, 68.8° W) is devoted to study climate change and has been operational since 1990, with the contribution of different international institutions: DMI, NCAR, ENEA, INGV, Universities of Roma and Firenze (http://www.thuleatmos-it.it). As part of SVAAP an intensive field campaign was held at Thule from 5 to 28 July 2016. The campaign was also aimed at supporting the installation of VESPA-22, a new microwave radiometer for water vapour profiling in the upper atmosphere and integrated water vapour (IWV), and offered the possibility to study the cloud physical and optical properties and their impact on the SRB. Measurements of downward shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) irradiance were already available since 2009. Additional observations were added to obtain the SRB and to characterize the atmospheric state: upward SW and LW irradiance, upwelling and downwelling photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), downward irradiance in the 8-14 µm infrared window, temperature and relative humidity tropospheric profiles, IWV, liquid water path (LWP), lidar tropospheric backscattering profiles, sky brightness temperature (BT) in the 9.6-11.5 µm spectral range, visible and infrared sky images, surface meteorological parameters. Moreover, 23 radiosonde were launched during the campaign. Data from the period 14-28 July are presented in this study. The first part of the campaign was characterized by stable cloud-free conditions, while alternation of cloudy and cloud-free sky occurred after 18 July. The

  20. The 1997 El Niño impact on clouds, water vapour, aerosols and reactive trace gases in the troposphere, as measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Loyola

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The El Niño event of 1997/1998 caused dry conditions over the Indonesian area that were followed by large scale forest and savannah fires over Kalimantan, Sumatra, Java, and parts of Irian Jaya. Biomass burning was most intense between August and October 1997, and large amounts of ozone precursors, such as nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons were emitted into the atmosphere. In this work, we use satellite measurements from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME sensor to study the teleconnections between the El Niño event of 1997 and the Indonesian fires, clouds, water vapour, aerosols and reactive trace gases (nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and ozone in the troposphere.

  1. Experimental evaluation of water vapour cross-sensitivity for accurate eddy covariance measurement of CO2 flux using open-path CO2/H2O gas analysers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiyoshi Kondo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-dispersive infrared CO2/H2O gas analysers produce erroneous CO2 outputs when CO2 is measured in humid air, unless a correction for water vapour cross-sensitivity is applied. Spectroscopic cross-sensitivities arising from direct absorption interference and from the pressure broadening effect are significant in CO2 flux measurements by the eddy covariance technique using open-path gas analysers over the ocean, as opposed to land-surface measurements, where CO2 fluxes are orders of magnitude larger. In this study, a widely used analyser with manufacturer-determined correction coefficients for both cross-sensitivities was tested by laboratory experiments. Our results showed that the correction coefficient for direct absorption interference was not optimised to calculate CO2 flux accurately, and that the correction coefficient for the pressure broadening caused overestimation of the CO2 mixing ratio flux in the same direction as the water vapour flux. Overestimations of open-path eddy covariance measurements of upward CO2 fluxes in previous ocean observations probably resulted from inaccuracies in both of these correction coefficients. We also found that slight changes in spectroscopic cross-sensitivities due to contamination of the analyser's optical windows by sea salt caused a low bias in CO2 outputs with increasing H2O; however, this contamination effect was not always observed in repeated tests under different contamination conditions. We suggest that previously proposed methods for correcting the effect of optical window contamination is of limited value and that measurement of small CO2 fluxes by the open-path eddy covariance technique over the ocean should be performed after confirming the spectroscopic cross-sensitivity and ensuring that the optical windows are as clean as possible.

  2. Corrigendum to “Relative humidity effects on water vapour fluxes measured with closed-path eddy-covariance systems with short sampling lines” [Agric. Forest Meteorol. 165 (2012) 53–63

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fratini, Gerardo; Ibrom, Andreas; Arriga, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    It has been formerly recognised that increasing relative humidity in the sampling line of closed-path eddy-covariance systems leads to increasing attenuation of water vapour turbulent fluctuations, resulting in strong latent heat flux losses. This occurrence has been analyzed for very long (50 m)...

  3. The MODIS Vegetation Canopy Water Content product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustin, S. L.; Riano, D.; Trombetti, M.

    2008-12-01

    Vegetation water stress drives wildfire behavior and risk, having important implications for biogeochemical cycling in natural ecosystems, agriculture, and forestry. Water stress limits plant transpiration and carbon gain. The regulation of photosynthesis creates close linkages between the carbon, water, and energy cycles and through metabolism to the nitrogen cycle. We generated systematic weekly CWC estimated for the USA from 2000-2006. MODIS measures the sunlit reflectance of the vegetation in the visible, near-infrared, and shortwave infrared. Radiative transfer models, such as PROSPECT-SAILH, determine how sunlight interacts with plant and soil materials. These models can be applied over a range of scales and ecosystem types. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) were used to optimize the inversion of these models to determine vegetation water content. We carried out multi-scale validation of the product using field data, airborne and satellite cross-calibration. An Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD) of the product is under evaluation by NASA. The CWC product inputs are 1) The MODIS Terra/Aqua surface reflectance product (MOD09A1/MYD09A1) 2) The MODIS land cover map product (MOD12Q1) reclassified to grassland, shrub-land and forest canopies; 3) An ANN trained with PROSPECT-SAILH; 4) A calibration file for each land cover type. The output is an ENVI file with the CWC values. The code is written in Matlab environment and is being adapted to read not only the 8 day MODIS composites, but also daily surface reflectance data. We plan to incorporate the cloud and snow mask and generate as output a geotiff file. Vegetation water content estimates will help predicting linkages between biogeochemical cycles, which will enable further understanding of feedbacks to atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. It will also serve to estimate primary productivity of the biosphere; monitor/assess natural vegetation health related to drought, pollution or diseases

  4. Can painted glass felt or glass fibre cloth be used as vapour barrier?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Khattam, Amira; Andersen, Mie Them; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2014-01-01

    with a ventilated attic where the ceiling may be air tight but has no vapour barrier; post-insulation of the attic may cause the need for a vapour barrier. Placing a vapour barrier above the ceiling can be tiresome and it is difficult to ensure tightness. A simpler way is to paint a vapour barrier directly...... on the ceiling e.g. as an ordinary paint. This paper presents the results of an investigation of the water vapour resistance of surface treatments which are commonly used in-door. The water vapour resistance was measured by the cup method. Aerated concrete was investigated with and without various surface...

  5. Are high-water-content contact lenses safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, R P; Panday, Kshama; Srivastava, Rashmi; Indolia, Hitendra Singh

    2006-01-01

    We examined the role of tear secretion on contact lens water content during selection. Tear secretion was estimated using Schirmer's tests. High-water-content contact lenses compromised the tear film more than low-water-content contact lenses, hence they should not be advised in low or marginal Schirmer's test cases.

  6. Estimation of areal soil water content through microwave remote sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oevelen, van P.J.

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis the use of microwave remote sensing to estimate soil water content is investigated. A general framework is described which is applicable to both passive and active microwave remote sensing of soil water content. The various steps necessary to estimate areal soil water content

  7. Bread Water Content Measurement Based on Hyperspectral Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhi; Møller, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Water content is one of the most important properties of the bread for tasting assesment or store monitoring. Traditional bread water content measurement methods mostly are processed manually, which is destructive and time consuming. This paper proposes an automated water content measurement...

  8. Automated dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to high performance liquid chromatography - cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of mercury species in natural water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Min; Zhang, Feng-Ping; Jiao, Bao-Yu; Rao, Jin-Yu; Leng, Geng

    2017-04-14

    An automated, home-constructed, and low cost dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) device that directly coupled to a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) - cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CVAFS) system was designed and developed for the determination of trace concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg(+)), ethylmercury (EtHg(+)) and inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) in natural waters. With a simple, miniaturized and efficient automated DLLME system, nanogram amounts of these mercury species were extracted from natural water samples and injected into a hyphenated HPLC-CVAFS for quantification. The complete analytical procedure, including chelation, extraction, phase separation, collection and injection of the extracts, as well as HPLC-CVAFS quantification, was automated. Key parameters, such as the type and volume of the chelation, extraction and dispersive solvent, aspiration speed, sample pH, salt effect and matrix effect, were thoroughly investigated. Under the optimum conditions, linear range was 10-1200ngL(-1) for EtHg(+) and 5-450ngL(-1) for MeHg(+) and Hg(2+). Limits of detection were 3.0ngL(-1) for EtHg(+) and 1.5ngL(-1) for MeHg(+) and Hg(2+). Reproducibility and recoveries were assessed by spiking three natural water samples with different Hg concentrations, giving recoveries from 88.4-96.1%, and relative standard deviations <5.1%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Water contents and OH speciation in pyroxenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bégaudeau, K.; Morizet, Y.; Mercier, J.

    2010-12-01

    Nominally anhydrous minerals such as pyroxene contain trace amounts of hydrogen which reside in structural defects. Dissolved water (hydroxyls species OH) plays a crucial role in modifying the physical and chemical properties of the Earth’s mantle and attests a significant water reservoir inside. For a series of natural clino- and orthopyroxenes (cpx and opx) from large suite mantle xenoliths, we investigated the total water (H2Otot) in pyroxenes using micro-FTIR so as to constrain the OH dissolution mechanisms. Samples studied have been brought up either by 1) alkaline basalts magmas, Mont Briançon, Maar de Borée , Barges (France), Dreiser Weiher (Germany), San Carlos (Arizona), Black Rock Sumitt (Nevada), Kilbourne Hole (New Mexico), or by 2) kimberlite magmas, Letseng-la-Terae (South Africa). Crystal chemistry from the different xenoliths was determined by microprobe analyses. Pyroxenes have high Mg number (about 0.9) and spinels contain 0.19 Fe3+/Fetot. Equilibrium P, T conditions were determined by geothermobarometry. P-T conditions were estimated between 700 and 1400°C and between 0.5 and 6.3 GPa. Polarized FTIR spectra acquired on natural cpx and opx are consistent with previous studies, showing the main absorption bands attributed to OH species in the region between 3000-3800 cm-1. H2Otot was estimated by the Beer-Lambert law using the calibration of Libowitzky and Rossman (1997) and gives about 300 ppm and 100 ppm H2O for cpx and opx, respectively. Partionning coefficient between cpx and opx is estimated to 2.1, similar to those from literature data on pyroxenes of alkali-basalt and kimberlitic xenoliths. The H2Otot does not show significant correlation with crystal chemistry, therefore contrasting with previous studies. However, we observe a good linear correlation between the cpx/opx water content and the physical conditions (P, T and fO2 determined from Fe3+/Fetot in spinel) recorded by the mantle xenoliths: ppm H2Ocpx=522.89-119.38*P-0.195*T+484

  10. Validation of water vapour profiles (version 13 retrieved by the IMK/IAA scientific retrieval processor based on full resolution spectra measured by MIPAS on board Envisat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Milz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of stratospheric water vapour measured by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS with the full resolution mode between September 2002 and March 2004 and retrieved with the IMK/IAA scientific retrieval processor were compared to a number of independent measurements in order to estimate the bias and to validate the existing precision estimates of the MIPAS data. The estimated precision for MIPAS is 5 to 10% in the stratosphere, depending on altitude, latitude, and season. The independent instruments were: the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS, the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer-II (ILAS-II, the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III instrument, the Middle Atmospheric Water Vapour Radiometer (MIAWARA, the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding, balloon-borne version (MIPAS-B, the Airborne Microwave Stratospheric Observing System (AMSOS, the Fluorescent Stratospheric Hygrometer for Balloon (FLASH-B, the NOAA frostpoint hygrometer, and the Fast In Situ Hygrometer (FISH. For the in-situ measurements and the ground based, air- and balloon borne remote sensing instruments, the measurements are restricted to central and northern Europe. The comparisons to satellite-borne instruments are predominantly at mid- to high latitudes on both hemispheres. In the stratosphere there is no clear indication of a bias in MIPAS data, because the independent measurements in some cases are drier and in some cases are moister than the MIPAS measurements. Compared to the infrared measurements of MIPAS, measurements in the ultraviolet and visible have a tendency to be high, whereas microwave measurements have a tendency to be low. The results of χ2-based precision validation are somewhat controversial among the comparison estimates. However, for comparison instruments whose error budget also includes

  11. Improved water vapour spectroscopy in the 4174–4300 cm−1 region and its impact on SCIAMACHY HDO/H2O measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Scheepmaker

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The relative abundance of the heavy water isotopologue HDO provides a deeper insight into the atmospheric hydrological cycle. The SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY (SCIAMACHY allows for global retrievals of the ratio HDO/H2O in the 2.3 micron wavelength range. However, the spectroscopy of water lines in this region remains a large source of uncertainty for these retrievals. We therefore evaluate and improve the water spectroscopy in the range 4174–4300 cm−1 and test if this reduces systematic uncertainties in the SCIAMACHY retrievals of HDO/H2O. We use a laboratory spectrum of water vapour to fit line intensity, air broadening and wavelength shift parameters. The improved spectroscopy is tested on a series of ground-based high resolution FTS spectra as well as on SCIAMACHY retrievals of H2O and the ratio HDO/H2O. We find that the improved spectroscopy leads to lower residuals in the FTS spectra compared to HITRAN 2008 and Jenouvrier et al. (2007 spectroscopy, and the retrievals become more robust against changes in the retrieval window. For both the FTS and SCIAMACHY measurements, the retrieved total H2O columns decrease by 2–4% and we find a negative shift of the HDO/H2O ratio, which for SCIAMACHY is partly compensated by changes in the retrieval setup and calibration software. The updated SCIAMACHY HDO/H2O product shows somewhat steeper latitudinal and temporal gradients and a steeper Rayleigh distillation curve, strengthening previous conclusions that current isotope-enabled general circulation models underestimate the variability in the near-surface HDO/H2O ratio.

  12. Effects of drought and changes in vapour pressure deficit on water relations of Populusdeltoides growing in ambient and elevated CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobich, E.G.; Barron-Gafford, G.A.; Rascher, K.G. [Columbia Univ., Oracle, AZ (United States). Biosphere 2 Center; Murthy, R. [Columbia Univ., Oracle, AZ (United States). Biosphere 2 Center, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

    2010-07-15

    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), changes in the earth's climate are expected to become more extreme as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations increase over the next century. This study examined the means by which growth CO{sub 2} concentration affects anatomy and water relation responses to drought and vapour pressure deficit (VPD). Yearly coppiced, 4-year-old Populus deltoides clones grown in either ambient or elevated CO{sub 2} for 3 years were examined to determine if trees growing in elevated CO{sub 2} during drought would have a lower volume flux density of water (JV), stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration per leaf area (E), as well as a lower stomatal density and a greater stomatal response to drought and changes in VPD than would trees in ambient CO{sub 2}. The study showed that trees in elevated CO{sub 2} actually had higher JV values, but did not differ from trees in ambient CO{sub 2} in terms of gs or E under saturating light or E scaled from JV. The higher JV in elevated CO{sub 2} was attributed to the greater leaf area in the trees and not from differences in gs. Plants in elevated CO{sub 2} had greater absolute leaf loss during the drought, but the percentage of leaf area lost was similar to that of trees in ambient CO{sub 2}. Under saturating light, gs and E were influenced by changes in VPD after the first 9 days of the experiment, which coincided with a large decrease in water potential. It was concluded that longer-term growth of P. deltoides clone under elevated CO{sub 2} did not improve the effects of drought and high VPD on plant and water relations. 56 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  13. An atlas of mean distribution of precipitable water vapour over the tropical Indian Ocean for the year 1979

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Sathe, P.V.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; Rao, L.V.G.

    The monthly mean maps of the precipitable water (PW) over the tropical Indian Ocean are prepared using the data derived from the Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) sensor for the period January to December, 1979. The PW...

  14. Behavioural Change according to the Si/Al Ratio of Successive Na-Mordenites Observed through Their Dielectric Relaxation during Water Vapour Adsorption Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekou Diaby

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental study of water vapour adsorption phenomenon on a zeolite, by dielectric relaxation measurement, makes it possible to determine the variations in the exchangeable cation hopping activation energy, on the surface of the solid, in relation to the number of adsorbed molecules. The present work shows that it is possible to explain the change observed in the energy, by means of simple assumptions based, on the one hand, on the models used in order to simulate the adsorption process and, on the other hand, on the distribution of the molecules adsorbed near the exchangeable cations. Thus, the phenomenological interpretation suggested here, about the change in the exchangeable cation hopping energy, obtained by dielectric relaxation measurement, makes us with a mind to conceive a simple method for explaining the results leading to new information on the organization of the first adsorbed molecules on the surface of the studied zeolite. Then, it can be verified that these conclusions confirm the assumptions already developed for interpreting the inferences from previous experiments carried out by means of other techniques.

  15. Effect of preparation procedures on catalytic activity and selectivity of copper-based mixed oxides in selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia into nitrogen and water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłońska, Magdalena; Nocuń, Marek; Gołąbek, Kinga; Palkovits, Regina

    2017-11-01

    The selective oxidation of ammonia into nitrogen and water vapour (NH3-SCO) was studied over Cu-Mg(Zn)-Al-(Zr) mixed metal oxides, obtained by coprecipitation and their subsequent calcination. The effect of acid-base properties of Cu-Mg-Al-Ox on catalytic activity was investigated by changing the Mg/Al molar ratio. Other Cu-containing oxides were prepared by rehydration of calcined Mg-Al hydrotalcite-like compounds or thermal decomposition of metal nitrate precursors. XRD, BET, NH3-TPD, H2-TPR, XPS, FTIR with adsorption of pyridine and CO as well as TEM techniques were used for catalysts characterization. The results of catalytic tests revealed a crucial role of easily reducible highly dispersed copper oxide species to obtain enhanced activity and N2 selectivity in NH3-SCO. The selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 (NH3-SCR) and in situ DRIFT of NH3 sorption indicated that NH3-SCO proceeds according to the internal selective catalytic reduction mechanism (i-SCR).

  16. Mean ozone and water vapour height profiles for Southern hemisphere region using radiosonde or ozonesonde and haloe satelite data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sivakumar, V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to construct a model (mean) profile for ozone and water vapor in Southern hemisphere latitude using 14 years (1993-2006) of Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) satellite data and about 10 years (1998-2007) of the Southern...

  17. Recreational runners with patellofemoral pain exhibit elevated patella water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kai-Yu; Hu, Houchun H; Colletti, Patrick M; Powers, Christopher M

    2014-09-01

    Increased bone water content resulting from repetitive patellofemoral joint overloading has been suggested to be a possible mechanism underlying patellofemoral pain (PFP). To date, it remains unknown whether persons with PFP exhibit elevated bone water content. The purpose of this study was to determine whether recreational runners with PFP exhibit elevated patella water content when compared to pain-free controls. Ten female recreational runners with a diagnosis of PFP (22 to 39years of age) and 10 gender, age, weight, height, and activity matched controls underwent chemical-shift-encoded water-fat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify patella water content (i.e., water-signal fraction). Differences in bone water content of the total patella, lateral aspect of the patella, and medial aspect of the patella were compared between groups using independent t tests. Compared with the control group, the PFP group demonstrated significantly greater total patella bone water content (15.4±3.5% vs. 10.3±2.1%; P=0.001), lateral patella water content (17.2±4.2% vs. 11.5±2.5%; P=0.002), and medial patella water content (13.2±2.7% vs. 8.4±2.3%; Prunners with PFP is suggestive of venous engorgement and elevated extracellular fluid. In turn, this may lead to an increase in intraosseous pressure and pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mass-independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes during H2O2 formation by gas-phase discharge from water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Ignatiev, Alexander V.; Budnitskiy, Sergey Y.; Yakovenko, Victoria V.; Vysotskiy, Sergey V.

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important atmospheric component involved in various gas-phase and aqueous-phase transformation processes in the Earth's atmosphere. A study of mass-independent 17O anomalies in H2O2 can provide additional insights into the chemistry of the modern atmosphere and, possibly, of the ancient atmosphere. Here, we report the results of laboratory experiments to study the fractionation of three oxygen isotopes (16O, 17O, and 18O) during H2O2 formation from products of water vapour dissociation. The experiments were carried out by passing an electrical discharge through a gaseous mixture of helium and water at atmospheric pressure. The effect of the presence of O2 in the gas mixture on the isotopic composition of H2O2 was also investigated. All of the experiments showed that H2O2 produced under two different conditions (with or without O2 added in the gas mixtures) was mass-independently fractionated (MIF). We found a positive MIF signal (∼1.4‰) in the no-O2 added experiments, and this signal increased to ∼2.5‰ once O2 was added (1.6% mixing ratio). We suggest that if O2 concentrations are very low, the hydroxyl radical recombination reaction is the dominant pathway for H2O2 formation and is the source of MIF in H2O2. Although H2O2 formation via a hydroxyl radical recombination process is limited in the modern atmosphere, it would be possible in the Archean atmosphere when O2 was a trace constituent, and H2O2 would be mass-independently fractionated. The anomalous 17O excess, which was observed in H2O2 produced by spark discharge experiments, may provide useful information about the radical chemistry of the ancient atmosphere and the role of H2O2 in maintaining and controlling the atmospheric composition.

  19. On the relation of 6.7-micron water vapour features to isentropic distributions of potential vorticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manney, Gloria L.; Stanford, John L.

    1987-01-01

    Currently available isentropic maps of potential vorticity (IPV maps) are of low resolution. In this note, the possibility of using 6.7-micron satellite-derived water vapor measurements to obtain higher resolution information about IPV distributions is examined. While attempts to related the two data sets analytically have so far proved unsuccessful, a qualitative comparison shows very similar features in both. The results obtained here suggest that, over limited areas, it may be possible to use 6.7-micron brightness temperatures to obtain approximate contours for water vapor mixing ratio on a particular isentropic surface in the upper troposphere. For areas free of high clouds, these contours are expected to parallel the IPV contours on this surface. In a case study, the resulting map exhibits dramatically increased horizontal resolution compared with present IPV maps, detailing an intriguing upper-tropospheric feature at subsynoptic scales.

  20. NAMMA CVI CLOUD CONDENSED WATER CONTENT V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) was used to measure condensed water content (liquid water or ice in particles about 8 microns in diameter and up) and cloud...

  1. CAMEX-4 CVI CLOUD CONDENSED WATER CONTENT V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) was used to measure condensed water content (liquid water or ice in particles about 8 microns in diameter and up) and cloud...

  2. A ``nano-windmill'' driven by a flux of water vapour: a comparison to the rotating ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitoń, Patrycja; Żywociński, Andrzej; Fiałkowski, Marcin; Hołyst, Robert

    2013-09-01

    We measure the frequency of collective molecular precession as a function of temperature in the ferroelectric liquid crystalline monolayer at the water-air interface. This movement is driven by the unidirectional flux of evaporating water molecules. The collective rotation in the monolayer with angular velocities ω ~ 1 s-1 (at T = 312 K) to 10-2 s-1 (at T = 285.8 K) is 9 to 14 orders of magnitude slower than rotation of a single molecule (typically ω ~ 109 to 1012 s-1). The angular velocity reaches 0 upon approach to the two dimensional liquid-to-solid transition in the monolayer at T = 285.8 K. We estimate the rotational viscosity, γ1, in the monolayer and the torque, Γ, driving this rotation. The torque per molecule equals Γ = 5.7 × 10-8 pN nm at 310 K (γ1 = 0.081 Pa s, ω = 0.87 s-1). The energy generated during one turn of the molecule at the same temperature is W = 3.5 × 10-28 J. Surprisingly, although this energy is 7 orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy, kBT (310 K) = 4.3 × 10-21 J, the rotation is very stable. The potential of the studied effect lies in the collective motion of many (>1012) ``nano-windmills'' acting ``in concerto'' at the scale of millimetres. Therefore, such systems are candidates for construction of artificial molecular engines, despite the small energy density per molecular volume (5 orders of magnitude smaller than for a single ATPase).We measure the frequency of collective molecular precession as a function of temperature in the ferroelectric liquid crystalline monolayer at the water-air interface. This movement is driven by the unidirectional flux of evaporating water molecules. The collective rotation in the monolayer with angular velocities ω ~ 1 s-1 (at T = 312 K) to 10-2 s-1 (at T = 285.8 K) is 9 to 14 orders of magnitude slower than rotation of a single molecule (typically ω ~ 109 to 1012 s-1). The angular velocity reaches 0 upon approach to the two dimensional liquid-to-solid transition in the monolayer

  3. A "nano-windmill" driven by a flux of water vapour: a comparison to the rotating ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitoń, Patrycja; Żywociński, Andrzej; Fiałkowski, Marcin; Hołyst, Robert

    2013-10-21

    We measure the frequency of collective molecular precession as a function of temperature in the ferroelectric liquid crystalline monolayer at the water-air interface. This movement is driven by the unidirectional flux of evaporating water molecules. The collective rotation in the monolayer with angular velocities ω ~ 1 s(-1) (at T = 312 K) to 10(-2) s(-1) (at T = 285.8 K) is 9 to 14 orders of magnitude slower than rotation of a single molecule (typically ω ~ 10(9) to 10(12) s(-1)). The angular velocity reaches 0 upon approach to the two dimensional liquid-to-solid transition in the monolayer at T = 285.8 K. We estimate the rotational viscosity, γ1, in the monolayer and the torque, Γ, driving this rotation. The torque per molecule equals Γ = 5.7 × 10(-8) pN nm at 310 K (γ1 = 0.081 Pa s, ω = 0.87 s(-1)). The energy generated during one turn of the molecule at the same temperature is W = 3.5 × 10(-28) J. Surprisingly, although this energy is 7 orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy, kBT (310 K) = 4.3 × 10(-21) J, the rotation is very stable. The potential of the studied effect lies in the collective motion of many (>10(12)) "nano-windmills" acting "in concerto" at the scale of millimetres. Therefore, such systems are candidates for construction of artificial molecular engines, despite the small energy density per molecular volume (5 orders of magnitude smaller than for a single ATPase).

  4. Modelling unfrozen water content in a silty clay permafrost deposit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Frederik Ancker; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    of a calibration equation for determining the unfrozen water content of a Greenlandic silty clay permafrost deposit. Calibration experiments have been conducted for water contents in the interval 0 – 10 % at both 5 °C and 22 °C. Calibration equations are verified against permittivity data from a permafrost core...

  5. Vapour pressures, aqueous solubilities, Henry's Law constants, and octanol/water partition coefficients of a series of mixed halogenated dimethyl bipyrroles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittlemier, Sheryl A; Braekevelt, Eric; Halldorson, Thor; Reddy, Christopher M; Norstrom, Ross J

    2004-12-01

    Basic physical-chemical properties of five bromine and chlorine containing mixed halogenated dimethyl bipyrroles (HDBPs) were determined using established methods. Subcooled liquid vapour pressures (P(o)(L,25)), aqueous solubilities (S(w,25)), and octanol/water partition coefficients (K(ow)) were determined using the gas chromatography-retention time, generator column, and slow-stirring methods, respectively. Henry's Law constants (H25) were estimated using experimentally-derived P(o)(L) and S(w,25) data. Values of all four properties were generally similar to those reported for other polyhalogenated aromatic compounds [P(o)(L,25) = (7.55-191) x 10(-6) Pa; S(w,25) = (1.0-1.9) x 10(-5) g/l; log K(ow) = 6.4-6.7; H25 = 0.0020-0.14 Pa m3/mol]. The effect of replacing a chlorine with a bromine atom significantly decreased P(o)(L,25) (log P(o)(L,25) = -0.4197 (# bromine atoms) - 2.643, p<0.01) and H25 (log H25 = -0.508 (# bromine atoms) + 0.394, p<0.02). There were no significant effects of bromine/chlorine substitution on S(w,25) or K(ow). A simple Level I equilibrium partitioning model predicted the environmental behaviour of HDBPs to be similar to a tetrabrominated diphenyl ether. Only slight differences in behaviour amongst HDBP congeners were predicted since substitution of a bromine for a chlorine (Cl/Br substitution) atom had less effect than H/Cl or H/Br substitution on P(o)(L,25), S(w,25), H25, and K(ow).

  6. Upper tropospheric water vapour and its interaction with cirrus clouds as seen from IAGOS long-term routine in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Andreas; Krämer, Martina; Neis, Patrick; Rolf, Christian; Rohs, Susanne; Berkes, Florian; Smit, Herman G. J.; Gallagher, Martin; Beswick, Karl; Lloyd, Gary; Baumgardner, Darrel; Spichtinger, Peter; Nédélec, Philippe; Ebert, Volker; Buchholz, Bernhard; Riese, Martin; Wahner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System) performs long-term routine in-situ observations of atmospheric chemical composition (ozone, CO, NOx, NOy, CO2, CH4), water vapour, aerosols, clouds and temperature on a global scale by operating compact instruments on board of passenger aircraft. The unique characteristics of the IAGOS data set originate from the global-scale sampling on air traffic routes with similar instrumentation such that the observations are truly comparable and well suited for atmospheric research on a statistical basis. Here, we present the analysis of 15 months of simultaneous observations of relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) and ice crystal number concentration in cirrus (Nice) from July 2014 to October 2015. The joint data set of 360 hours of RHice - Nice observations in the global upper troposphere and tropopause region is analysed with respect to the in-cloud distribution of RHice and related cirrus properties. The majority of the observed cirrus is thin with Nice < 0.1 cm-3. The respective fractions of all cloud observations range from 90% over the mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean and the Eurasian continent to 67% over the subtropical and tropical Pacific Ocean. The in-cloud RHice distributions do not depend on the geographical region of sampling. Types of cirrus origin (in situ origin, liquid origin) are inferred for different Nice regimes and geographical regions. Most important, we found that in-cloud RHice shows a strong correlation to Nice with slightly supersaturated dynamic equilibrium RHice associated to higher Nice values in stronger updrafts.

  7. Influence of Water Content on Pullout Behaviour of Geogrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Song, Yang-yang; Hao, Dong-xue; Gao, Yu-cong

    2017-06-01

    The interaction between geogrid and soil is fundamental and crucial factor on safety and stability of geogrid-reinforced earth structure. Therefore, the interface index between geogrid and soil is of vital importance in the design of reinforced earth structures. The pullout behaviour of geogrid in soil is studied, an experimental investigation is conducted using geogrid in four groups of soil with 20%, 24%, 28%, 32% water contents, which correspond to normal stresses of 50, 100, 200 and 300 kPa respectively. The results indicate that the geogrid embedded in soil mainly represents pullout failure, and the ultimate pullout force is sensitive to water content. It decreases with the increase of the water content firstly. Besides, the water content influences the process of the pullout behaviour. The increase of water content leads to the ultimate pullout force soon.

  8. shoot water content and reference evapotranspiration for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Determination of water requirement for crops in resource limited areas is challenging, yet worsened by the common assumption that all crop varieties within a species have similar water requirements. The objective of the study was to indirectly determine crop evapotranspiration of soybean varieties, using reference ...

  9. Effects of drought and changes in vapour pressure deficit on water relations of Populus deltoides growing in ambient and elevated CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobich, Edward G; Barron-Gafford, Greg A; Rascher, Katherine G; Murthy, Ramesh

    2010-07-01

    The means by which growth CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]) affects anatomy and water relations responses to drought and vapour pressure deficit (VPD) were studied for yearly coppiced, 4-year-old Populus deltoides clones that were grown in either 400 mumol mol(-1) (ambient) or 800 mumol mol(-1) (elevated) CO(2) for 3 years. It was hypothesized that, during drought, trees growing in elevated [CO(2)] would have a lower volume flux density of water (J(V)), stomatal conductance (g(s)) and transpiration per leaf area (E), as well as a lower stomatal density and a greater stomatal response to drought and changes in VPD than would trees in ambient [CO(2)]. Trees in elevated [CO(2)] actually had higher J(V) values throughout the study, but did not differ from trees in ambient [CO(2)] with respect to g(s) or E under saturating light or E scaled from J(V) (E(scaled)), all of which indicates that the higher J(V) in elevated [CO(2)] resulted from those trees having greater leaf area and not from differences in g(s). Furthermore, although plants in elevated [CO(2)] had greater absolute leaf loss during the drought, the percentage of leaf area lost was similar to that of trees in ambient [CO(2)]. g(s) and E under saturating light were affected by changes in VPD after the first 9 days of the experiment, which coincided with a large decrease in water potential at a soil depth of 0.1 m. Trees in elevated [CO(2)] had a greater stomatal density and a lower wood density than trees in ambient [CO(2)], both traits that may make the trees more susceptible to xylem cavitation in severe drought. Drought and VPD effects for the P. deltoides clone were not ameliorated by long-term growth in elevated [CO(2)] compared with ambient [CO(2)], and plants in elevated [CO(2)] possessed anatomical traits that may result in greater stress associated with long-term drought.

  10. DEHYDRATION OF LOW WATER CONTENT ETHANOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervaporation has emerged as an economically viable alternative technology for the dehydration of organic solvents, removal of organic compounds from water and organic/organic separations. Development of a membrane system with suitable flux and selectivity characteristics plays a...

  11. Use spectral derivatives for estimating canopy water content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, J.G.P.W.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing has demonstrated great potential for accurate retrieval of canopy water content (CWC). This CWC is defined by the product of the leaf equivalent water thickness (EWT) and the leaf area index (LAI). In this paper the spectral information provided by the canopy water

  12. Terahertz Measurement of the Water Content Distribution in Wood Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensalem, M.; Sommier, A.; Mindeguia, J. C.; Batsale, J. C.; Pradere, C.

    2018-02-01

    Recently, THz waves have been shown to be an effective technique for investigating the water diffusion within porous media, such as biomaterial or insulation materials. This applicability is due to the sufficient resolution for such applications and the safe levels of radiation. This study aims to achieve contactless absolute water content measurements at a steady state case in semi-transparent solids (wood) using a transmittance THz wave range setup. First, a calibration method is developed to validate an analytical model based on the Beer-Lambert law, linking the absorption coefficient, the density of the solid, and its water content. Then, an estimation of the water content on a local scale in a transient-state case (drying) is performed. This study shows that THz waves are an effective contactless, safe, and low-cost technique for the measurement of water content in a porous medium, such as wood.

  13. Stabilization of Leidenfrost vapour layer by textured superhydrophobic surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2012-09-12

    In 1756, Leidenfrost observed that water drops skittered on a sufficiently hot skillet, owing to levitation by an evaporative vapour film. Such films are stable only when the hot surface is above a critical temperature, and are a central phenomenon in boiling. In this so-called Leidenfrost regime, the low thermal conductivity of the vapour layer inhibits heat transfer between the hot surface and the liquid. When the temperature of the cooling surface drops below the critical temperature, the vapour film collapses and the system enters a nucleate-boiling regime, which can result in vapour explosions that are particularly detrimental in certain contexts, such as in nuclear power plants. The presence of these vapour films can also reduce liquid-solid drag. Here we show how vapour film collapse can be completely suppressed at textured superhydrophobic surfaces. At a smooth hydrophobic surface, the vapour film still collapses on cooling, albeit at a reduced critical temperature, and the system switches explosively to nucleate boiling. In contrast, at textured, superhydrophobic surfaces, the vapour layer gradually relaxes until the surface is completely cooled, without exhibiting a nucleate-boiling phase. This result demonstrates that topological texture on superhydrophobic materials is critical in stabilizing the vapour layer and thus in controlling-by heat transfer-the liquid-gas phase transition at hot surfaces. This concept can potentially be applied to control other phase transitions, such as ice or frost formation, and to the design of low-drag surfaces at which the vapour phase is stabilized in the grooves of textures without heating. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. Soil volumetric water content measurements using TDR technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vincenzi

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A physical model to measure some hydrological and thermal parameters in soils will to be set up. The vertical profiles of: volumetric water content, matric potential and temperature will be monitored in different soils. The volumetric soil water content is measured by means of the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR technique. The result of a test to determine experimentally the reproducibility of the volumetric water content measurements is reported together with the methodology and the results of the analysis of the TDR wave forms. The analysis is based on the calculation of the travel time of the TDR signal in the wave guide embedded in the soil.

  15. Shoot water content and reference evapotranspiration for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conversely,water use efficiency (WUE) was 0.58 in SB19, 0.52 in Nyala, and 0.47 in SB20.Validation of the calculated ETC using a crop production function showed a correlation of r = 0.97 between the observed and predicted yields of the three varieties. Furthermore, the normalised root mean square error (NRMSE) and ...

  16. Inherent calibration of a blue LED-CE-DOAS instrument to measure iodine oxide, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide, water vapour and aerosol extinction in open cavity mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thalman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The combination of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS with broad-band light sources (e.g. Light-Emitting Diodes, LEDs lends itself to the application of cavity enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS to perform sensitive and selective point measurements of multiple trace gases and aerosol extinction with a single instrument. In contrast to other broad-band CEAS techniques, CE-DOAS relies only on the measurement of relative intensity changes, i.e. does not require knowledge of the light intensity in the absence of trace gases and aerosols (I0. We have built a prototype LED-CE-DOAS instrument in the blue spectral range (420–490 nm to measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2, glyoxal (CHOCHO, methyl glyoxal (CH3COCHO, iodine oxide (IO, water vapour (H2O and oxygen dimers (O4. We demonstrate the first direct detection of methyl glyoxal, and the first CE-DOAS detection of CHOCHO and IO. The instrument is further inherently calibrated for light extinction from the cavity by observing O4 or H2O (at 477 nm and 443 nm and measuring the pressure, relative humidity and temperature independently. This approach is demonstrated by experiments where laboratory aerosols of known size and refractive index were generated and their extinction measured. The measured extinctions were then compared to the theoretical extinctions calculated using Mie theory (3–7 × 10−7cm−1. Excellent agreement is found from both the O4 and H2O retrievals. This enables the first inherently calibrated CEAS measurement at blue wavelengths in open cavity mode, and eliminates the need for sampling lines to supply air to the cavity, i.e., keep the cavity enclosed and/or aerosol free. Measurements in open cavity mode are demonstrated for CHOCHO, CH3COCHO, NO2, H2O and aerosol extinction. Our prototype

  17. Nitrates and nitrites content of water boreholes and packaged water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitrate and nitrite levels were determined in forty-three water samples obtained from different locations in Calabar using colorimetric methods. Twenty-three of these samples were packaged water while twenty were borehole water. Nitrate levels were found to be 24.28 ± 9.30μg/ml and 34.57 ± 14.56µ/ml for packaged water ...

  18. Droplet-Sizing Liquid Water Content Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Icing is one of the most significant hazards to aircraft. A sizing supercooled liquid water content (SSLWC) sonde is being developed to meet a directly related need...

  19. Low-Power, Lightweight Cloud Water Content Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The water content of clouds, whether in liquid or ice form, is a key variable to be measured when either calibrating remote sensing systems or when calculating the...

  20. Low-Power, Lightweight Cloud Water Content Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The measurement of cloud water content is of great importance in understanding the formation of clouds, their structure, and their radiative properties which in turn...

  1. Soil water and mineral nitrogen content as influenced by crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) and wheat–medic rotation (McWMcW) and tillage, conventional-till (CT), minimum-till (MT), no-till (NT) and zero-till (ZT) were studied. Crop rotation did not influence soil moisture content. Soil water content in CT tended to be lower compared ...

  2. The stable isotopic composition of water vapour above Corsica during the HyMeX SOP1 campaign: insight into vertical mixing processes from lower-tropospheric survey flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodemann, Harald; Aemisegger, Franziska; Pfahl, Stephan; Bitter, Mark; Corsmeier, Ulrich; Feuerle, Thomas; Graf, Pascal; Hankers, Rolf; Hsiao, Gregor; Schulz, Helmut; Wieser, Andreas; Wernli, Heini

    2017-05-01

    Stable isotopes of water vapour are powerful indicators of meteorological processes on a broad range of scales, reflecting evaporation, condensation, and air mass mixing processes. With the recent advent of fast laser-based spectroscopic methods, it has become possible to measure the stable isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapour in situ at a high temporal resolution. Here we present results from such comprehensive airborne spectroscopic isotope measurements in water vapour over the western Mediterranean at a high spatial and temporal resolution. Measurements have been acquired by a customized Picarro L2130-i cavity-ring down spectrometer deployed onboard the Dornier 128 D-IBUF aircraft together with a meteorological flux measurement package during the HyMeX SOP1 (Hydrological cycle in Mediterranean Experiment special observation period 1) field campaign in Corsica, France, during September and October 2012. Taking into account memory effects of the air inlet pipe, the typical time resolution of the measurements was about 15-30 s, resulting in an average horizontal resolution of about 1-2 km. Cross-calibration of the water vapour measurements from all humidity sensors showed good agreement under most flight conditions but the most turbulent ones. In total 21 successful stable isotope flights with 59 flight hours have been performed. Our data provide quasi-climatological autumn average conditions and vertical profiles of the stable isotope parameters δD, δ18O, and d-excess during the study period. A d-excess minimum in the overall average profile is reached in the region of the boundary-layer top, possibly caused by precipitation evaporation. This minimum is bracketed by higher d-excess values near the surface caused by non-equilibrium fractionation, and a maximum above the boundary layer related to the increasing d-excess in very depleted and dry high-altitude air masses. Repeated flights along the same pattern reveal pronounced day-to-day variability

  3. Optimized sampling of hydroperoxides and investigations of the water vapour dependence of hydroperoxide formation during ozonolysis of alkenes; Optimierung der Probenahme von Hydroperoxiden und Untersuchungen zur Wasserdampfabhaengigkeit der Bildung von Hydroperoxiden bei der Ozonolyse von Alkenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, K.H.; Plagens, H.

    1997-06-01

    There are several sampling methods for hydroperoxides none of which is particularly reliable. The authors therefore tested three new methods in order to optimize hydroperoxide sampling and, using the optimized sampling procedure, to investigate the water vapour dependence of hydroperoxide formation during ozonolysis of alkenes. (orig.) [Deutsch] Fuer die Probenahme von Hydroperoxiden existieren verschiedene Verfahren, von denen bisher keines als besonders zuverlaessig angesehen werden konnte. Daher wurden in dieser Arbeit drei Verfahren getestet, um die Probenahme von Hydroperoxiden zu optimieren und mit dem entsprechenden Verfahren die Wasserdampfabhaengigkeit der Bildung von Hydroperoxiden bei der Ozonolyse von Alkenen zu untersuchen. (orig.)

  4. Effect of water and salt content on protein solubility and water retention of meat preblends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, P B; Hunt, M C

    1990-01-01

    Different preblend water contents at a constant ionic strength were investigated to determine if increasing water availability would increase protein solubility and water retention in meat preblends. Four salt levels (0, 2, 4 and 8%) and four water levels (0, 20, 40 and 80% formulation water) were used with ground bovine semimembranosus muscle that had been frozen once. Ground muscle was mixed with either NaCl alone (0% formulation water) or NaCl and brine (20, 40 and 80% formulation water) for the 2, 4 and 8% NaCl treatments. Distilled water was used for the 0% NaCl treatment. The mixtures were stored at 5°C for 12 h. Following storage, the water/brine content was standardized, and protein solubility and water retention were measured. Elevating the water content of preblends, in which the salt concentration had been standardized, increased the water retained during centrifugation (P water retention. Copyright © 1990. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Tritium in the food chain. Intercomparison of model predictions of contamination in soil, crops, milk and beef after a short exposure to tritiated water vapour in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, P. [PJS Barry (Canada)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Future fusion reactors using tritium as fuel will contain large inventories of the gas. The possibility that a significant fraction of an inventory may accidentally escape into the atmosphere from this and other potential sources such as tritium handling facilities and some fission reactors e g, PWRs has to be recognized and its potential impact on local human populations and biota assessed. Tritium gas is relatively inert chemically and of low radiotoxicity but it is readily oxidized by soil organisms to the mixed oxide, HTO or tritiated water. In this form it is highly mobile, strongly reactive biologically and much more toxic. Models of how tritiated water vapour is transported through the biosphere to foodstuffs important to man are essential components of such an assessment and it is important to test the models for their suitability when used for this purpose. To evaluate such models, access to experimental measurements made after actual releases are needed. There have however, been very few accidental releases of tritiated water to the atmosphere and the experimental findings of those that have occurred have been used to develop the models under test. Models must nevertheless be evaluated before their predictions can be used to decide the acceptability or otherwise of designing and operating major nuclear facilities. To fulfil this need a model intercomparison study was carried out for a hypothetical release scenario. The study described in this report is a contribution to the development of model evaluation procedures in general as well as a description of the results of applying these procedures to the particular case of models of HTO transport in the biosphere which are currently in use or being developed. The study involved eight modelers using seven models in as many countries. In the scenario farmland was exposed to 1E10 Bq d/m{sup 3} of HTO in air during 1 hour starting at midnight in one case and at 10.00 a.m. in the other, 30 days before harvest of

  6. Sugar and water contents of honey with dielectrc property sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The dielectric properties of pure yellow locust, jujube and rape flower honey and their water-adulterated products with water content from 18% to 42.6% were measured with open-ended coaxial-line probe technology and a network analyzer from 10 to 4500 MHz at 25oC. Dielectric constants of pure honeys ...

  7. Field, laboratory and estimated soil-water content limits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study the field method involved measuring simultaneously the soil-water content (using a frequency domain reflectometer with the PR1 profile probe that relies on changes in the dielectric constant of soil), and soil-water potential (using Watermark granular matrix sensors and tensiometers) at three depths (100, 300 ...

  8. Spectroscopic determination of leaf water content using linear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to detect crop water status with fast, non-destructive monitoring based on its spectral characteristics, this study measured 33 groups of peach tree leaf reflectance spectra (350 to 1075 nm). Linear regression and backpropagation artificial neural network methods were used to establish peach tree leaf water content ...

  9. Estimating canopy water content using hyperspectral remote sensing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Kooistra, L.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing has demonstrated great potential for accurate retrieval of canopy water content (CWC). This CWC is defined by the product of the leaf equivalent water thickness (EWT) and the leaf area index (LAI). In this paper, in particular the spectral information provided by the

  10. Nutrient content of water spinach ( Ipomoea aquatica ) under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water spinach is very perishable and it does not store well even in the refrigerator. It requires special processing treatments to reduce post-harvest losses. Nutrient content analysis of the water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) was carried out at different harvest stages and under different preservation methods. Standard ...

  11. Time lapse imaging of water content with geoelectrical methods: on the interest of working with absolute water content data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Gaël; Pilawski, Tamara; Robert, Tanguy; Hermans, Thomas; Garré, Sarah; Nguyen, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography is a suitable method to estimate the water content of a waste material and detect changes in water content. Various ERT profiles, both static data and time-lapse, where acquired on a landfill during the Minerve project. In the literature, the relative change of resistivity (Δρ/ρ) is generally computed. For saline or heat tracer tests in the saturated zone, the Δρ/ρ can be easily translated into pore water conductivity or underground temperature changes (provided that the initial salinity or temperature condition is homogeneous over the ERT panel extension). For water content changes in the vadose zone resulting of an infiltration event or injection experiment, many authors also work with the Δρ/ρ or relative changes of water content Δθ/θ (linked to the change of resistivity through one single parameter: the Archie's law exponent "m"). This parameter is not influenced by the underground temperature and pore fluid conductivity (ρ¬w) condition but is influenced by the initial water content distribution. Therefore, you never know if the loss of Δθ/θ signal is representative of the limit of the infiltration front or more humid initial condition. Another approach for the understanding of the infiltration process is the assessment of the absolute change of water content (Δθ). This requires the direct computation of the water content of the waste from the resistivity data. For that purpose, we used petrophysical laws calibrated with laboratory experiments and our knowledge of the in situ temperature and pore fluid conductivity parameters. Then, we investigated water content changes in the waste material after a rainfall event (Δθ= Δθ/θ* θ). This new observation is really representatives of the quantity of water infiltrated in the waste material. However, the uncertainty in the pore fluid conductivity value may influence the computed water changes (Δθ=k*m√(ρw) ; where "m" is the Archie's law exponent

  12. The effect of water purification systems on fluoride content of drinking water

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhakar A; Raju O; Kurthukoti A; Vishwas T

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of different water purification systems on the fluoride content of drinking water and to compare the efficacy of these water purification systems in reducing the fluoride content. Materials and Methods: Five different water purification systems were tested in this study. They were reverse osmosis, distillation, activated carbon, Reviva ® , and candle filter. The water samples in the study were of two types, viz, bo...

  13. Oceanographic controls over sediment water content: northern Bermuda rise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, M.; Laine, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    Cores taken from the plateaus of Northern Bermuda Rise show that the region is underlain at depths of 1-5 m by a 1-3 m thick layer of hemipelagic lutites with anomalously high water contents. The lack of visually apparent textural and lithological changes in this extremely fine grained sediment rule out these common causes for variation in water content. The water content averages 175% within this layer and 100% immediately above and below it. This is an increase of 9.5% in porosity. The high water content sediment is confined to a period between 12 and 16 ka. Current work on the mineralogy of the sediments which comprise this layer suggest two oceanographic factors that may have influenced its formation. A meltwater spike associated with deglaciation may have altered the ecological conditions above the thermocline sufficiently to promote the increased production of radiolaria, resulting in the deposition of silica enriched sediment on the sea floor. A combination of textural and perhaps chemical factors caused by the silica enrichment may have influenced the increase in water content. Intensified bottom currents at this time also may have eroded smectite rich sediments from exposures of Neogene age and deposited them on the plateaus. An increase in smectite would increase the water content due to the extremely fine grain size and the chemistry of the clay. Thus, the lateral continuity and isochroniety of this layer, combined with its mineralogical characteristics suggests that oceanographic changes can influence water content and perhaps other geotechnical properties on a regional scale.

  14. [Near infrared spectroscopy study on water content in turbine oil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Xian-Ming

    2013-11-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with successive projections algorithm (SPA) was investigated for determination of water content in turbine oil. Through the 57 samples of different water content in turbine oil scanned applying near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, with the water content in the turbine oil of 0-0.156%, different pretreatment methods such as the original spectra, first derivative spectra and differential polynomial least squares fitting algorithm Savitzky-Golay (SG), and successive projections algorithm (SPA) were applied for the extraction of effective wavelengths, the correlation coefficient (R) and root mean square error (RMSE) were used as the model evaluation indices, accordingly water content in turbine oil was investigated. The results indicated that the original spectra with different water content in turbine oil were pretreated by the performance of first derivative + SG pretreatments, then the selected effective wavelengths were used as the inputs of least square support vector machine (LS-SVM). A total of 16 variables selected by SPA were employed to construct the model of SPA and least square support vector machine (SPA-LS-SVM). There is 9 as The correlation coefficient was 0.975 9 and the root of mean square error of validation set was 2.655 8 x 10(-3) using the model, and it is feasible to determine the water content in oil using near infrared spectroscopy and SPA-LS-SVM, and an excellent prediction precision was obtained. This study supplied a new and alternative approach to the further application of near infrared spectroscopy in on-line monitoring of contamination such as water content in oil.

  15. Measurements of Isotopic Composition of Vapour on the Antarctic Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, M.; Landais, A.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Genthon, C.; Prie, F.; Kerstel, E.; Kassi, S.; Arnaud, L.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Vignon, E.

    2015-12-01

    The oldest ice core records are obtained on the East Antarctic plateau. The composition in stable isotopes of water (δ18O, δD, δ17O) permits to reconstruct the past climatic conditions over the ice sheet and also at the evaporation source. Paleothermometer accuracy relies on good knowledge of processes affecting the isotopic composition of surface snow in Polar Regions. Both simple models such as Rayleigh distillation and global atmospheric models with isotopes provide good prediction of precipitation isotopic composition in East Antarctica but post deposition processes can alter isotopic composition on site, in particular exchanges with local vapour. To quantitatively interpret the isotopic composition of water archived in ice cores, it is thus essential to study the continuum water vapour - precipitation - surface snow - buried snow. While precipitation and snow sampling are routinely performed in Antarctica, climatic conditions in Concordia, very cold (-55°C in average) and very dry (less than 1000ppmv), impose difficult conditions to measure the water vapour isotopic composition. New developments in infrared spectroscopy enable now the measurement of isotopic composition in water vapour traces (down to 20ppmv). Here we present the results of a campaign of measurement of isotopic composition in Concordia in 2014/2015. Two infrared spectrometers have been deployed or the first time on top of the East Antarctic Plateau allowing a continuous vapour measurement for a month. Comparison of the results from infrared spectroscopy with cryogenic trapping validates the relevance of the method to measure isotopic composition in dry conditions. Identification of different behaviour of isotopic composition in the water vapour associated to turbulent or stratified regime indicates a strong impact of meteorological processes in local vapour/snow interaction.

  16. Influence of salinity and water content on soil microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Yan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Salinization is one of the most serious land degradation problems facing world. Salinity results in poor plant growth and low soil microbial activity due to osmotic stress and toxic ions. Soil microorganisms play a pivotal role in soils through mineralization of organic matter into plant available nutrients. Therefore it is important to maintain high microbial activity in soils. Salinity tolerant soil microbes counteract osmotic stress by synthesizing osmolytes which allows them to maintain their cell turgor and metabolism. Osmotic potential is a function of the salt concentration in the soil solution and therefore affected by both salinity (measured as electrical conductivity at a certain water content and soil water content. Soil salinity and water content vary in time and space. Understanding the effect of changes in salinity and water content on soil microorganisms is important for crop production, sustainable land use and rehabilitation of saline soils. In this review, the effects of soil salinity and water content on microbes are discussed to guide future research into management of saline soils.

  17. Dynamic effects in the water contentwater potential relation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheffler, Gregor Albrecht; Plagge, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    The moisture storage characteristic is a basic material property of moisture transport modeling. It is measured under equilibrium conditions for adsorption and desorption. One commonly accepted assumption is that this equilibrium data is also applicable for transient conditions. This paper provid...... evidence on the limitations of this assumptions obtained during transient adsorption and desorption experiments where moisture content and moisture potential was measured simultaneously at different sample positions versus time....

  18. Absorption of water vapour in the falling film of water-(LiBr + LiI + LiNO{sub 3} + LiCl) in a vertical tube at air-cooling thermal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourouis, Mahmoud; Valles, Manel; Medrano, Marc; Coronas, Alberto [Centro de Innovacion Tecnologica en Revalorizacion Energetica y Refrigeracion, CREVER, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Autovia de Salou, s/n, 43006, Tarragona (Spain)

    2005-05-01

    In air-cooled water-LiBr absorption chillers the working conditions in the absorber and condenser are shifted to higher temperatures and concentrations, thereby increasing the risk of crystallisation. To develop this technology, two main problems are to be addressed: the availability of new salt mixtures with wider range of solubility than water-LiBr, and advanced absorber configurations that enable to carry out simultaneously an appropriate absorption process and an effective air-cooling. One way of improving the solubility of LiBr aqueous solutions is to add other salts to create multicomponent salt solutions. The aqueous solution of the quaternary salt system (LiBr + LiI + LiNO{sub 3} + LiCl) presents favourable properties required for air-cooled absorption systems: less corrosive and crystallisation temperature about 35 K lower than that of water-LiBr.This paper presents an experimental study on the absorption of water vapour over a wavy laminar falling film of an aqueous solution of (LiBr + LiI + LiNO{sub 3} + LiCl) on the inner wall of a water-cooled smooth vertical tube. Cooling water temperatures in the range 30-45 C were selected to simulate air-cooling thermal conditions. The results are compared with those obtained in the same experimental set-up with water-LiBr solutions.The control variables for the experimental study were: absorber pressure, solution Reynolds number, solution concentration and cooling water temperature. The parameters considered to assess the absorber performance were: absorber thermal load, mass absorption flux, degree of subcooling of the solution leaving the absorber, and the falling film heat transfer coefficient.The higher solubility of the multicomponent salt solution makes possible the operation of the absorber at higher salt concentration than with the conventional working fluid water-LiBr. The absorption fluxes achieved with water-(LiBr + LiI + LiNO{sub 3} + LiCl) at a concentration of 64.2 wt% are around 60 % higher than

  19. Leaf Relative Water Content Estimated from Leaf Reflectance and Transmittance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. In the research we report here, we used optical polarization techniques to monitor the light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both change nonlinearly. The result show that the nonlinearities cancel in the ratio R/T, which appears linearly related to RWC for RWC less than 90%. The results suggest that potentially leaf water status and perhaps even canopy water status could be monitored starting from leaf and canopy optical measurements.

  20. MR-visible brain water content in human acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Rosenbaum, S; Sperling, B

    1999-01-01

    Quantification of metabolite concentrations by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in the human brain using water as an internal standard is based on the assumption that water content does not change significantly in pathologic brain tissue. To test this, we used 1H-MRS to estimate...... brain water content during the course of cerebral infarction. Measurements were performed serially in the acute, subacute, and chronic phase of infarction. Fourteen patients with acute cerebral infarction were examined as well as 9 healthy controls. To correlate with regional cerebral blood flow (r......CBF from Day 0-3 to Day 4-7 (p = 0.050) and from Day 0-3 to Day 8-21 (p = 0.028). No correlation between rCBF and water content was found. Water content in ischemic brain tissue increased significantly between Day 4-7 after stroke. This should be considered when performing quantitative 1H-MRS using water...

  1. Water content or water activity: what rules crispy behavior in bread crust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, N H; Primo-Martín, C; Meinders, M B J; Tromp, R H; Hamer, R J; van Vliet, T

    2008-08-13

    A dry crust loses its crispness when water migrates into the crust. It is not clear if it is the amount of water absorbed or the water activity ( a w) that leads to a loss of crispness. The hysteresis effect observed when recording a water sorption isotherm allowed us to study the effects of a w and moisture content separately. All experiments were carried out on model bread crusts made from Soissons bread flour. The effect of water content and water activity on the glass transition of model bread crusts was studied in detail using two complimentary techniques: phase transition analysis (PTA) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The results were compared with sensory data and results from a puncture test, which provided data on acoustic emission and fracture mechanics during breaking of the crusts. The water content of the crust was found to be decisive for the transition point as measured by PTA and NMR. However, both water content and water activity had an effect on perceived crispness and number of force and sound peaks. From this may be concluded that the distribution of the water in the samples with a history of high water content is more inhomogeneous, which results in crispy and less crispy regions, thus making them overall more crispy than samples with the same water content but higher a w.

  2. MR-visible brain water content in human acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Rosenbaum, S; Sperling, B

    1999-01-01

    CBF) SPECT-scanning using 99mTc-HMPAO as flow tracer was performed in the patients. Mean water content (SD) in the infarct area was 37.7 (5.1); 41.8 (4.8); 35.2 (5.4); and 39.3 (5.1) mol x [kg wet weight](-1) at 0-3; 4-7; 8-21; and >180 days after stroke, respectively. Water content increased between Day 0......Quantification of metabolite concentrations by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in the human brain using water as an internal standard is based on the assumption that water content does not change significantly in pathologic brain tissue. To test this, we used 1H-MRS to estimate...... brain water content during the course of cerebral infarction. Measurements were performed serially in the acute, subacute, and chronic phase of infarction. Fourteen patients with acute cerebral infarction were examined as well as 9 healthy controls. To correlate with regional cerebral blood flow (r...

  3. Influence of water air content on cavitation erosion in distilled water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Auret, JG

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of increased air content of the cavitating liquid (distilled water) was studied in a rotating disk test rig. A rise in the total air content including dissolved and entrained air of the water in the under saturated range resulted...

  4. Interactions of fission product vapours with aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, C.G.; Newland, M.S. [AEA Technology, Winfrith (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01

    Reactions between structural and reactor materials aerosols and fission product vapours released during a severe accident in a light water reactor (LWR) will influence the magnitude of the radiological source term ultimately released to the environment. The interaction of cadmium aerosol with iodine vapour at different temperatures has been examined in a programme of experiments designed to characterise the kinetics of the system. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is a technique that is particularly amenable to the study of systems involving elemental iodine because of the high intensity of the fluorescence lines. Therefore this technique was used in the experiments to measure the decrease in the concentration of iodine vapour as the reaction with cadmium proceeded. Experiments were conducted over the range of temperatures (20-350{sup o}C), using calibrated iodine vapour and cadmium aerosol generators that gave well-quantified sources. The LIF results provided information on the kinetics of the process, whilst examination of filter samples gave data on the composition and morphology of the aerosol particles that were formed. The results showed that the reaction of cadmium with iodine was relatively fast, giving reaction half-lives of approximately 0.3 s. This suggests that the assumption used by primary circuit codes such as VICTORIA that reaction rates are mass-transfer limited, is justified for the cadmium-iodine reaction. The reaction was first order with respect to both cadmium and iodine, and was assigned as pseudo second order overall. However, there appeared to be a dependence of aerosol surface area on the overall rate constant, making the precise order of the reaction difficult to assign. The relatively high volatility of the cadmium iodide formed in the reaction played an important role in determining the composition of the particles. (author) 23 figs., 7 tabs., 22 refs.

  5. Can painted glass felt or glass fibre cloth be used as vapour barrier?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Khattam, Amira; Andersen, Mie Them; Kielsgaard Hansen, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    it is essential to know how much influence a surface treatment has on the water vapour transport. Traditionally, there has been most focus on paints that affect the permeability as little as possible. However, sometimes water vapour resistance is desirable. Especially, this is relevant in existing buildings...... on the ceiling e.g. as an ordinary paint. This paper presents the results of an investigation of the water vapour resistance of surface treatments which are commonly used in-door. The water vapour resistance was measured by the cup method. Aerated concrete was investigated with and without various surface...... treatments. The surface treatments were glass felt or glass fibre cloth with different types of paints or just paint. The paint types were acrylic paint and silicate paint. The results show that the paint type has high influence on the water vapour resistance while the underlay i.e. glass felt or glass fibre...

  6. Determining water content and other impurities in Siparuna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Siparuna guianensis Aublet is a predominant species in the Brazilian Cerrado. Some studies found that its essential oil has properties that could be useful for manufacturing new products. Its quality depends on physicochemical properties, since its degradation, as well as water content and other volatile materials may ...

  7. Influence of Molding Water Content on Shear Strength Characteristic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A laboratory investigation was carried out to determine the shear strength characteristics of compacted cement kiln dust treated lateritic soils for use in liners and covers with up to 12.5% cement kiln dust by dry weight of soil. Specimens were prepared at molding water contents of -2, 0, +2 and +4% of the optimum moisture ...

  8. Pedotransfer functions to estimate soil water content at field capacity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    20

    Pedotransfer functions to estimate soil water content at field capacity and permanent wilting point in hot Arid Western India. 1*Priyabrata Santra, 1Mahesh Kumar, 1R N Kumawat, 1D K Painuli, 2K M Hati,. 3G B M Heuvelink and 3N H Batjes. 1ICAR-Central Arid Zone Research Institute (CAZRI), Jopdhpur, Rajasthan, India ...

  9. influence of molding water content on shear strength characteristic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    well as water content, clays compacted dry of optimum are initially stronger than when compacted wet of optimum. Compacted soil strength can be evaluated in terms of confined compression strength,. [1] selected minimum unconfined compressive strength of 200kN/m2. (200kPa) to represent adequate shear strength for ...

  10. Equilibrium water content and glistenings in acrylic intraocular lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Akira; Yaguchi, Shigeo

    2004-08-01

    To investigate the possible relationship between temperature and water absorption in acrylic intraocular lenses (IOLs). Laboratory setting, Miyata Eye Clinic, Hiroshima, Japan. The equilibrium water content (amount of water absorbed per weight of the resin x 100) in 2 hydrophobic acrylic IOLs (AcrySof MA60BM [Alcon] and Sensar AR40 [AMO]) was calculated at 30 degrees C, 40 degrees C, and 50 degrees C. The 2 IOLs were also subjected to 3 changes in temperature: from 37 degrees C to 35 degrees C, 39 degrees C to 35 degrees C, and 41 degrees C to 35 degrees C. They were incubated in physiological saline at the higher temperature for 2 hours and at the lower temperature for 30 days before being examined for glistening formation. The water content was higher in the AR40 IOL than in the MA60BM IOL at all temperatures. A temperature-dependent increase in water content was seen in both IOLs, greater in the MA60BM. With a temperature change from 37 degrees C to 35 degrees C, glistening formation was not observed in either IOL. With a temperature change from 39 degrees C to 35 degrees C, glistenings were observed in the MA60BM IOL, and with a temperature change from 41 degrees C to 35 degrees C, they were observed in both IOLs. The change in the equilibrium water content caused by temperature changes between 30 degrees C and 40 degrees C is an important factor in glistening formation, and thus an IOL featuring less temperature-dependent water absorption is less likely to form glistenings.

  11. Fluoride content of bottled waters available in Northern Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiropoulos, V

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride content of bottled drinking waters commercially available in northern Greece and to report on the accuracy of the labelling of fluoride concentration. Twenty-two randomly selected commercial brands of bottled water were obtained from three supermarkets in Thessaloniki, Greece. Three bottles of each brand were purchased. Following calibration, six tests were conducted on each bottle using a combination fluoride-ion selective electrode (Orion, 96-09-00, MA, USA). The average reading for each brand was estimated and also compared with the fluoride content printed on the label. The mean (+/- SD) fluoride content of the bottled water samples was 0.35 (+/- 1.00) mg F/L with a range from 0.05 to 4.8 mg F/L. Only 18% (N = 4) of brands tested mention the fluoride concentration on the label, and 90% (N = 22) had a tested fluoride between 0.05 and 0.21 mg F/L. Of the remaining two brands, one was found to contain 0.3 mg F/L without having the fluoride concentration indicated on the label, and the other was labelled at 6 mg F/L, whereas the concentration was estimated as 4.8 mg F/L. The use of bottled water may be a significant source of systemic fluoride and therefore be considered as a risk factor for dental fluorosis in young children. This article shows that bottled drinking waters contain differing concentrations of fluoride. The manufacturers' labelling of fluoride concentrations may be inaccurate. When prescribing fluoride supplements, dentists should be aware of the fluoride content of bottled waters used by paediatric patients, especially brands with a concentration higher than 0.3 mg F/L. In view of the wide variation of fluoride concentration in the tested bottled waters, regulatory guidelines for controlling concentration in order to prevent dental fluorosis are recommended.

  12. Water content and glycosaminoglycan disaccharide concentration of the canine meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, J S; McLaughlin, R M; Griffith, G

    1998-02-01

    To determine the regional composition of water and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) disaccharides of the canine meniscus. 52 menisci from the stifle of dogs. Regional sections of each meniscus were weighed, dried, and reweighed to determine water content. Dried tissue specimens were subjected to enzymatic digestion. Analysis and quantification of disaccharide degradation products were performed, using high-performance liquid chromatography. Water content was approximately 65% in polar and central regions of the canine meniscus. Water content of the central region of the lateral meniscus was significantly higher than that of the medial meniscus (P = 0.0090). Chondroitinase digestion of canine meniscal tissue yielded detectable delta Di-HA, delta Di-4S, and delta Di-6S GAG disaccharides. Disaccharides specific to dermatan sulfate and chondroitin D or E sulfate were not detected. Concentrations of delta Di-4S and delta Di-6S were significantly greater in the lateral central region, compared with the medial central region (P = 0.0005 and 0.0002, respectively). Water content and delta Di-4S and delta Di-6S concentrations were significantly lower in the central region of the medial meniscus, compared with the central region of the lateral meniscus. Reduced tissue hydration of the medial central region may have been a direct result of its overall decrease in total GAG content. The ability to evaluate subtle differences in tissue GAG composition by analytical measurement of their constituent disaccharides may aid in the understanding of the complex material properties of the normal and diseased meniscus, which may be applied to the study of meniscal healing and biomechanics.

  13. The water content of recurring slope lineae on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Christopher S.; Piqueux, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Observations of recurring slope lineae (RSL) from the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment have been interpreted as present-day, seasonally variable liquid water flows; however, orbital spectroscopy has not confirmed the presence of liquid H2O, only hydrated salts. Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) temperature data and a numerical heat transfer model definitively constrain the amount of water associated with RSL. Surface temperature differences between RSL-bearing and dry RSL-free terrains are consistent with no water associated with RSL and, based on measurement uncertainties, limit the water content of RSL to at most 0.5–3 wt %. In addition, distinct high thermal inertia regolith signatures expected with crust-forming evaporitic salt deposits from cyclical briny water flows are not observed, indicating low water salinity (if any) and/or low enough volumes to prevent their formation. Alternatively, observed salts may be preexisting in soils at low abundances (i.e., near or below detection limits) and largely immobile. These RSL-rich surfaces experience ~100 K diurnal temperature oscillations, possible freeze/thaw cycles and/or complete evaporation on time scales that challenge their habitability potential. The unique surface temperature measurements provided by THEMIS are consistent with a dry RSL hypothesis or at least significantly limit the water content of Martian RSL.

  14. Total Water Content Measurements with an Isokinetic Sampling Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Miller, Dean R.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a Total Water Content (TWC) Isokinetic Sampling Probe. Since it is not sensitive to cloud water particle phase nor size, it is particularly attractive to support super-cooled large droplet and high ice water content aircraft icing studies. The instrument is comprised of the Sampling Probe, Sample Flow Control, and Water Vapor Measurement subsystems. Analysis and testing have been conducted on the subsystems to ensure their proper function and accuracy. End-to-end bench testing has also been conducted to ensure the reliability of the entire instrument system. A Stokes Number based collection efficiency correction was developed to correct for probe thickness effects. The authors further discuss the need to ensure that no condensation occurs within the instrument plumbing. Instrument measurements compared to facility calibrations from testing in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel are presented and discussed. There appears to be liquid water content and droplet size effects in the differences between the two measurement techniques.

  15. Numerical implementation and oceanographic application of the thermodynamic potentials of liquid water, water vapour, ice, seawater and humid air – Part 2: The library routines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Wright

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The SCOR/IAPSO1 Working Group 127 on Thermodynamics and Equation of State of Seawater has prepared recommendations for new methods and algorithms for numerical estimation of the the thermophysical properties of seawater. As an outcome of this work, a new International Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater (TEOS–10 was endorsed by IOC/UNESCO2 in June 2009 as the official replacement and extension of the 1980 International Equation of State, EOS-80. As part of this new standard a source code package has been prepared that is now made freely available to users via the World Wide Web. This package includes two libraries referred to as the SIA (Sea-Ice-Air library and the GSW (Gibbs SeaWater library. Information on the GSW library may be found on the TEOS-10 web site (http://www.TEOS-10.org. This publication provides an introduction to the SIA library which contains routines to calculate various thermodynamic properties as discussed in the companion paper. The SIA library is very comprehensive, including routines to deal with fluid water, ice, seawater and humid air as well as equilibrium states involving various combinations of these, with equivalent code developed in different languages. The code is hierachically structured in modules that support (i almost unlimited extension with respect to additional properties or relations, (ii an extraction of self-contained sub-libraries, (iii separate updating of the empirical thermodynamic potentials, and (iv code verification on different platforms and between different languages. Error trapping is implemented to identify when one or more of the primary routines are accessed significantly beyond their established range of validity. The initial version of the SIA library is available in Visual Basic and FORTRAN as a supplement to this publication and updates will be maintained on the TEOS-10 web site.

    1

  16. Numerical implementation and oceanographic application of the thermodynamic potentials of liquid water, water vapour, ice, seawater and humid air - Part 2: The library routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D. G.; Feistel, R.; Reissmann, J. H.; Miyagawa, K.; Jackett, D. R.; Wagner, W.; Overhoff, U.; Guder, C.; Feistel, A.; Marion, G. M.

    2010-07-01

    The SCOR/IAPSO1 Working Group 127 on Thermodynamics and Equation of State of Seawater has prepared recommendations for new methods and algorithms for numerical estimation of the the thermophysical properties of seawater. As an outcome of this work, a new International Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater (TEOS-10) was endorsed by IOC/UNESCO2 in June 2009 as the official replacement and extension of the 1980 International Equation of State, EOS-80. As part of this new standard a source code package has been prepared that is now made freely available to users via the World Wide Web. This package includes two libraries referred to as the SIA (Sea-Ice-Air) library and the GSW (Gibbs SeaWater) library. Information on the GSW library may be found on the TEOS-10 web site (http://www.TEOS-10.org). This publication provides an introduction to the SIA library which contains routines to calculate various thermodynamic properties as discussed in the companion paper. The SIA library is very comprehensive, including routines to deal with fluid water, ice, seawater and humid air as well as equilibrium states involving various combinations of these, with equivalent code developed in different languages. The code is hierachically structured in modules that support (i) almost unlimited extension with respect to additional properties or relations, (ii) an extraction of self-contained sub-libraries, (iii) separate updating of the empirical thermodynamic potentials, and (iv) code verification on different platforms and between different languages. Error trapping is implemented to identify when one or more of the primary routines are accessed significantly beyond their established range of validity. The initial version of the SIA library is available in Visual Basic and FORTRAN as a supplement to this publication and updates will be maintained on the TEOS-10 web site. 1SCOR/IAPSO: Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research/International Association for the Physical Sciences of the Oceans 2

  17. Tritium content in tissue free water of Japanese bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ujeno, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Aoki, T.; Kurihara, N.

    1986-01-01

    The tritium content of tissue free water was measured in fresh, non-diseased organs (brain, lungs, liver, kidneys and muscle) removed by forensic autopsy from 4 male and 4 female bodies. Tissue free water was extracted by freeze drying and distillation and tritium measured in the absence of background radon gas. A typical count was approximately 2.70 cpm. The mean tritium content of tissue free water in all the organs examined was 2.50 + - 0.67 Bq.1/sup -1/ (67.6 + -18.2 pCi1/sup -1/). This value was much lower than that obtained for tissues from Italian bodies: the value was, however, similar to that obtained for tap water (70.2 + -28.0 pCi.1/sup -1/), rain water (77.8 + - 47.4 pCi.1/sup -1/) and tissue free water of foods (55.6 + - 26.2 pCi.1/sup -1/).

  18. Seasonal, interannual and long-term variabilities and tendencies of water vapour in the upper stratosphere and mesospheric region over tropics (30°N-30°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Oindrila; Sridharan, S.; Naidu, C. V.

    2018-01-01

    Tropical water vapour volume mixing ratio (WVMR) data for October 2004-September 2015 obtained from the Microwave Limb Sounder are used to study its long-term variabilities and tendencies in the height region 12.1-0.002 hPa. Above 0.01 hPa, the WVMR shows minimum March-May and September-November (∼0.7-0.8 ppmv) and maximum during June-August. It shows a large interannual variability at 31-64 km. The results from multivariate regression analysis show an increasing trend with maximum value of ∼0.045 ppmv/yr at 1.21-0.41 hPa. It shows a significant negative solar cycle response at mesospheric heights.

  19. Impact of water content and decomposition stage on the soil water repellency of peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmann, Ullrich; Sokolowsky, Liv; Piayda, Arndt; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Bachmann, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Soil water repellency is widely reported for all kinds of soils and mainly caused by hydrophobic organic compounds. It has a substantial influence on soil hydraulic processes such as water infiltration, preferential flow paths and evaporation and therefore on hydrological processes in general. The severity of soil water repellency strongly depends on the soil water content and the amount of soil organic carbon. Although peat soils are characterized by high soil organic carbon contents, studies about peat soils are rare and mostly available for horticultural substrates. Here, we present soil water repellency measurements for peat soils with varying porosities, bulk densities and stages of decomposition. The peat soils were sampled at two different sites in a bog complex. The sites have been drained for 1 and 100 years. Samples were taken from each soil layer and, additionally, in a vertical resolution of 0.03 m. To determine the soil water contents at which the peat becomes water repellent, we applied the commonly used water drop penetration time test on progressively dewatered samples. In order to identify the influence of the decomposition stage as determined by the depth within the soil profile and duration of drainage, the potential soil water repellency was measured at air-dried sieved samples by the sessile drop method. First results show that the soil water repellency of peat soils is strongly dependent on the soil water content. For air-dried peat samples, the influence of different decomposition stages of the bog peat is negligible. All air-dried samples are extremely water repellent with contact angles > 130°. However, comparing the results with the soil organic matter content shows a slightly tendency of increasing soil water repellency with increasing soil organic matter contents.

  20. Influence of hydrogen on chemical vapour synthesis of different ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The role of hydrogen in the catalytic chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes using sputtered nickel thin film as a catalyst is explained in this work. The growth of different carbon nanostruc- tures with the variation in the precursor gas content was studied by keeping all other process parameters constant ...

  1. Presbyopia and the water content of the human crystalline lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, R. F.; Pettet, Barbara E.

    1973-01-01

    1. The water content of the human crystallaline lens nucleus is 63·4% S.D. ± 2·9%, and cortex 68·6% S.D. ± 4·3%. 2. Neither the total water content of the cortex, nor that of the nucleus show any significant changes with age, so `sclerosis' of the lens due to loss of water is not a cause of presbyopia. 3. The initial loss of water from the nucleus of the lens substance obtained by drying in vacuo at 20° C for 2 hr is related to age (P = 0·05) and deformability (0·02 > P > 0·01). 4. The lens fibres of the ageing nucleus have an increased resistance to deformation associated with a decrease in initial water loss. These characteristics can be explained by a common physical property of the fibres, namely increased adhesion to each other as the lens nucleus ages. The newly formed cortical fibres do not appear to show these changes. PMID:4767060

  2. [Radiation absorption, water content and contrast medium impregnation of gallstones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, W G

    1982-12-01

    Gallstones extracted by surgery were examined for CT density, which was compared with the x-ray-film, floating performance and chemical analysis of the stones. So far, the water content of the biliary concrements--14% on the average--has not been given much attention. Drying will considerably reduce the density; examination of dried gallstones yields a false picture of direct ray absorption. Pure cholesterol stones do not float in water, and they show positive values on Hounsfield's scale (+30--+60). The article discusses the question whether CT is suitable for effecting a better selection of gallstone patients who can be treated by drug therapy.

  3. Modeling root water uptake with root mediated soil water content redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnal, M.; Votrubova, J.; Vogel, T.; Tesar, M.

    2012-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop and test a simple root water uptake parameterization applicable in numerical models of soil water movement. The suggested approach was implemented in a one-dimensional dual-continuum model of soil water flow based on Richards' equation. The model was used to simulate soil water movement at an experimental forest site. The performance of the model was evaluated using observed soil water pressure and soil water content data. Several episodes, during which the root mediated soil water content redistribution effects played an important role, were detected. Differences between the model responses and observations, as well as differences between the traditional and newly developed root water uptake modeling approaches, were analyzed. The research was supported by the Czech Science Foundation project No. 205/08/1174.

  4. Certified reference material to water content determination in bioethanol fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína M. Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol is a strategic biofuel in Brazil. Thus, a strong metrological basis for its measurements is required to ensure the quality and promote its exportation. Recently, Inmetro certified a reference material for water content in bioethanol. This paper presents the results of these studies. The characterization, homogeneity, short-term stability and long-term stability uncertainty contributions values were 0.00500, 0.0166, 0.0355 and 0.0391 mg g-1, respectively. The certificated value for water content of bioethanol fuel was (3.65 ± 0.11 mg g-1. This CRM is the first and up to now the unique in the world.

  5. Interferometric tomography of fuel cells for monitoring membrane water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Laura; Kim, Jungik; Shao-Horn, Yang; Barbastathis, George

    2009-08-17

    We have developed a system that uses two 1D interferometric phase projections for reconstruction of 2D water content changes over time in situ in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system. By modifying the filtered backprojection tomographic algorithm, we are able to incorporate a priori information about the object distribution into a fast reconstruction algorithm which is suitable for real-time monitoring.

  6. Impact of diurnal variation in vegetation water content on radar backscatter from maize during water stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Emmerik, T.H.M.; Dunne, S.C.; Judge, J.; van de Giesen, N.C.

    2014-01-01

    Microwave backscatter from vegetated surfaces is influenced by vegetation structure and vegetation water content (VWC), which varies with meteorological conditions and moisture in the root zone. Radar backscatter observations are used for many vegetation and soil moisture monitoring applications

  7. Monitoring water content in Opalinus Clay within the FE-Experiment: Test application of dielectric water content sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaki, T.; Vogt, T.; Komatsu, M.; Müller, H. R.

    2013-12-01

    The spatiotemporal variation of water content in the near field rock around repository tunnels for radioactive waste in clay formations is one of the essential quantities to be monitored for safety assessment in many waste disposal programs. Reliable measurements of water content are important not only for the understanding and prediction of coupled hydraulic-mechanic processes that occur during tunnel construction and ventilation phase, but also for the understanding of coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) processes that take place in the host rock during the post closure phase of a repository tunnel for spent fuel and high level radioactive waste (SF/HLW). The host rock of the Swiss disposal concept for SF/HLW is the Opalinus Clay formation (age of approx. 175 Million years). To better understand the THM effects in a full-scale heater-engineered barrier-rock system in Opalinus Clay, a full-scale heater test, namely the Full-Scale Emplacement (FE) experiment, was initiated in 2010 at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in north-western Switzerland. The experiment is designed to simulate the THM evolution of a SF/HLW repository tunnel based on the Swiss disposal concept in a realistic manner during the construction, emplacement, backfilling, and post-closure phases. The entire experiment implementation (in a 50 m long gallery with approx. 3 m diameter) as well as the post-closure THM evolution will be monitored using a network of several hundred sensors. The sensors will be distributed in the host rock, the tunnel lining, the engineered barrier, which consists of bentonite pellets and blocks, and on the heaters. The excavation is completed and the tunnel is currently being ventilated. Measuring water content in partially saturated clay-rich high-salinity rock with a deformable grain skeleton is challenging. Therefore, we use the ventilation phase (before backfilling and heating) to examine the applicability of commercial water content sensors and to

  8. Intra-abdominal pressure correlates with extracellular water content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Dąbrowski

    Full Text Available Secondary increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP may result from extra-abdominal pathology, such as massive fluid resuscitation, capillary leak or sepsis. All these conditions increase the extravascular water content. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between IAP and body water volume.Adult patients treated for sepsis or septic shock with acute kidney injury (AKI and patients undergoing elective pharyngolaryngeal or orthopedic surgery were enrolled. IAP was measured in the urinary bladder. Total body water (TBW, extracellular water content (ECW and volume excess (VE were measured by whole body bioimpedance. Among critically ill patients, all parameters were analyzed over three consecutive days, and parameters were evaluated perioperatively in surgical patients.One hundred twenty patients were studied. Taken together, the correlations between IAP and VE, TBW, and ECW were measured at 408 time points. In all participants, IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE. In critically ill patients, IAP correlated with ECW and VE. In surgical patients, IAP correlated with ECW and TBW. IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE in the mixed population. IAP also correlated with VE in critically ill patients. ROC curve analysis showed that ECW and VE might be discriminative parameters of risk for increased IAP.IAP strongly correlates with ECW.

  9. The effect of water purification systems on fluoride content of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, A R; Raju, O S; Kurthukoti, A J; Vishwas, T D

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of different water purification systems on the fluoride content of drinking water and to compare the efficacy of these water purification systems in reducing the fluoride content. Five different water purification systems were tested in this study. They were reverse osmosis, distillation, activated carbon, Reviva , and candle filter. The water samples in the study were of two types, viz, borewell water and tap water, these being commonly used by the people of Davangere City, Karnataka. The samples were collected before and after purification, and fluoride analysis was done using fluoride ion-specific electrode. The results showed that the systems based on reverse osmosis, viz, reverse osmosis system and Reviva showed maximum reduction in fluoride levels, the former proving to be more effective than the latter; followed by distillation and the activated carbon system, with the least reduction being brought about by candle filter. The amount of fluoride removed by the purification system varied between the system and from one source of water to the other. Considering the beneficial effects of fluoride on caries prevention; when drinking water is subjected to water purification systems that reduce fluoride significantly below the optimal level, fluoride supplementation may be necessary. The efficacy of systems based on reverse osmosis in reducing the fluoride content of water indicates their potential for use as defluoridation devices.

  10. The effect of water purification systems on fluoride content of drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of different water purification systems on the fluoride content of drinking water and to compare the efficacy of these water purification systems in reducing the fluoride content. Materials and Methods: Five different water purification systems were tested in this study. They were reverse osmosis, distillation, activated carbon, Reviva ® , and candle filter. The water samples in the study were of two types, viz, borewell water and tap water, these being commonly used by the people of Davangere City, Karnataka. The samples were collected before and after purification, and fluoride analysis was done using fluoride ion-specific electrode. Results: The results showed that the systems based on reverse osmosis, viz, reverse osmosis system and Reviva ® showed maximum reduction in fluoride levels, the former proving to be more effective than the latter; followed by distillation and the activated carbon system, with the least reduction being brought about by candle filter. The amount of fluoride removed by the purification system varied between the system and from one source of water to the other. Interpretation and Conclusion: Considering the beneficial effects of fluoride on caries prevention; when drinking water is subjected to water purification systems that reduce fluoride significantly below the optimal level, fluoride supplementation may be necessary. The efficacy of systems based on reverse osmosis in reducing the fluoride content of water indicates their potential for use as defluoridation devices.

  11. Fluoride and bacterial content of bottled drinking water versus municipal tap water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythri H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Water is a divine gift. People quench their thirst without questioning the source of water. But, apprehension about contaminants in municipal water supplies along with increased fear of fluorosis made bottled drinking water as one of the important tradable commodities. Objectives: The objectives of the study were to determine and compare the fluoride and bacterial contents of commercially available bottled drinking water and municipal tap water in Davangere city, Karnataka. Materials and Methods: Fifty samples of 10 categories of bottled drinking water with different batch numbers were purchased and municipal water from different sources were collected. Fluoride levels were determined by an ion-selective electrode. Water was cultured quantitatively and levels of bacteria were calculated as colony-forming units (CFUs per milliliter. Results: Descriptive analysis of water samples for fluoride concentration was in the range of 0.07-0.33 for bottled drinking water, Bisleri showing the highest of 0.33. A comparison of the mean values of microbial count for bottled drinking water with that of municipal tap water showed no statistically significant difference, but was more than the standard levels along with the presence of fungus and maggots. Conclusion: The fluoride concentration was below the optimal level for both municipal tap water and bottled drinking water. CFUs were more than the recommended level in both municipal tap water and bottled drinking water.

  12. Performance evaluation of TDT soil water content and watermark soil water potential sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated the performance of digitized Time Domain Transmissometry (TDT) soil water content sensors (Acclima, Inc., Meridian, ID) and resistance-based soil water potential sensors (Watermark 200, Irrometer Company, Inc., Riverside, CA) in two soils. The evaluation was performed by compar...

  13. Peatland water repellency: Importance of soil water content, moss species, and burn severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, P. A.; Lukenbach, M. C.; Kettridge, N.; Petrone, R. M.; Devito, K. J.; Waddington, J. M.

    2017-11-01

    Wildfire is the largest disturbance affecting peatlands, with northern peat reserves expected to become more vulnerable to wildfire as climate change enhances the length and severity of the fire season. Recent research suggests that high water table positions after wildfire are critical to limit atmospheric carbon losses and enable the re-establishment of keystone peatland mosses (i.e. Sphagnum). Post-fire recovery of the moss surface in Sphagnum-feathermoss peatlands, however, has been shown to be limited where moss type and burn severity interact to result in a water repellent surface. While in situ measurements of moss water repellency in peatlands have been shown to be greater for feathermoss in both a burned and unburned state in comparison to Sphagnum moss, it is difficult to separate the effect of water content from species. Consequently, we carried out a laboratory based drying experiment where we compared the water repellency of two dominant peatland moss species, Sphagnum and feathermoss, for several burn severity classes including unburned samples. The results suggest that water repellency in moss is primarily controlled by water content, where a sharp threshold exists at gravimetric water contents (GWC) lower than ∼1.4 g g-1. While GWC is shown to be a strong predictor of water repellency, the effect is enhanced by burning. Based on soil water retention curves, we suggest that it is highly unlikely that Sphagnum will exhibit strong hydrophobic conditions under field conditions.

  14. Liquid water content variation with altitude in clouds over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreea, Boscornea; Sabina, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Cloud water content is one of the most fundamental measurements in cloud physics. Knowledge of the vertical variability of cloud microphysical characteristics is important for a variety of reasons. The profile of liquid water content (LWC) partially governs the radiative transfer for cloudy atmospheres, LWC profiles improves our understanding of processes acting to form and maintain cloud systems and may lead to improvements in the representation of clouds in numerical models. Presently, in situ airborne measurements provide the most accurate information about cloud microphysical characteristics. This information can be used for verification of both numerical models and cloud remote sensing techniques. The aim of this paper was to analyze the liquid water content (LWC) measurements in clouds, in time of the aircraft flights. The aircraft and its platform ATMOSLAB - Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Atmospheric Research is property of the National Institute for Aerospace Research "Elie Carafoli" (INCAS), Bucharest, Romania. The airborne laboratory equipped for special research missions is based on a Hawker Beechcraft - King Air C90 GTx aircraft and is equipped with a sensors system CAPS - Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (30 bins, 0.51-50 m). The processed and analyzed measurements are acquired during 4 flights from Romania (Bucharest, 44°25'57″N 26°06'14″E) to Germany (Berlin 52°30'2″N 13°23'56″E) above the same region of Europe. The flight path was starting from Bucharest to the western part of Romania above Hungary, Austria at a cruse altitude between 6000-8500 m, and after 5 hours reaching Berlin. In total we acquired data during approximately 20 flight hours and we presented the vertical and horizontal LWC variations for different cloud types. The LWC values are similar for each type of cloud to values from literature. The vertical LWC profiles in the atmosphere measured during takeoff and landing of the aircraft have shown their

  15. Evidence on dynamic effects in the water contentwater potential relation of building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheffler, Gregor Albrecht; Plagge, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    a series of adsorption and desorption processes. The data provides clear evidence that the water contentwater potential relationship is not only dependent on the process history, but also on the process dynamics. The higher moisture potential gradients were induced, the larger was the deviation between...... static and dynamic moisture storage data and the more pronounced was the corresponding dynamic hysteresis. The paper thus provides clear experimental evidence on dynamic effects in the water contentwater potential relation of building materials. By that, data published by previous authors as Topp et...... the required material functions, i.e. the moisture storage characteristic and the liquid water conductivity, from measured basic properties. The current state of the art in material modelling as well as the corresponding transport theory implies that the moisture transport function is unique...

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  17. Oxy-combustion of high water content fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Fei

    As the issues of global warming and the energy crisis arouse extensive concern, more and more research is focused on maximizing energy efficiency and capturing CO2 in power generation. To achieve this, in this research, we propose an unconventional concept of combustion - direct combustion of high water content fuels. Due to the high water content in the fuels, they may not burn under air-fired conditions. Therefore, oxy-combustion is applied. Three applications of this concept in power generation are proposed - direct steam generation for the turbine cycle, staged oxy-combustion with zero flue gas recycle, and oxy-combustion in a low speed diesel-type engine. The proposed processes could provide alternative approaches to directly utilize fuels which intrinsically have high water content. A large amount of energy to remove the water, when the fuels are utilized in a conventional approach, is saved. The properties and difficulty in dewatering high water content fuels (e.g. bioethanol, microalgae and fine coal) are summarized. These fuels include both renewable and fossil fuels. In addition, the technique can also allow for low-cost carbon capture due to oxy-combustion. When renewable fuel is utilized, the whole process can be carbon negative. To validate and evaluate this concept, the research focused on the investigation of the flame stability and characteristics for high water content fuels. My study has demonstrated the feasibility of burning fuels that have been heavily diluted with water in a swirl-stabilized burner. Ethanol and 1-propanol were first tested as the fuels and the flame stability maps were obtained. Flame stability, as characterized by the blow-off limit -- the lowest O2 concentration when a flame could exist under a given oxidizer flow rate, was determined as a function of total oxidizer flow rate, fuel concentration and nozzle type. Furthermore, both the gas temperature contour and the overall ethanol concentration in the droplets along the

  18. CAMEX-4 DC-8 NEVZOROV TOTAL CONDENSED WATER CONTENT SENSOR V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 DC-8 Nevzorov Total Condensed Water Content Sensor dataset was collected by the Nevzorov total condensed water content sensor which was used to measure...

  19. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grote, K.; Anger, C.; Kelly, B.; Hubbard, S.; Rubin, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Accurate characterization of near-surface soil water content is vital for guiding agricultural management decisions and for reducing the potential negative environmental impacts of agriculture. Characterizing the near-surface soil water content can be difficult, as this parameter is often both spatially and temporally variable, and obtaining sufficient measurements to describe the heterogeneity can be prohibitively expensive. Understanding the spatial correlation of near-surface soil water content can help optimize data acquisition and improve understanding of the processes controlling soil water content at the field scale. In this study, ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods were used to characterize the spatial correlation of water content in a three acre field as a function of sampling depth, season, vegetation, and soil texture. GPR data were acquired with 450 MHz and 900 MHz antennas, and measurements of the GPR groundwave were used to estimate soil water content at four different times. Additional water content estimates were obtained using time domain reflectometry measurements, and soil texture measurements were also acquired. Variograms were calculated for each set of measurements, and comparison of these variograms showed that the horizontal spatial correlation was greater for deeper water content measurements than for shallower measurements. Precipitation and irrigation were both shown to increase the spatial variability of water content, while shallowly-rooted vegetation decreased the variability. Comparison of the variograms of water content and soil texture showed that soil texture generally had greater small-scale spatial correlation than water content, and that the variability of water content in deeper soil layers was more closely correlated to soil texture than were shallower water content measurements. Lastly, cross-variograms of soil texture and water content were calculated, and co-kriging of water content estimates and soil texture

  20. Assessment of water vapor content from MIVIS TIR data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tramutoli

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of land remotely sensed images is to derive biological, chemical and physical parameters by inverting sample sets of spectral data. For the above aim hyperspectral scanners on airborne platform are a powerful remote sensing instrument for both research and environmental applications because of their spectral resolution and the high operability of the platform. Fine spectral information by MIVIS (airborne hyperspectral scanner operating in 102 channels ranging from VIS to TIR allows researchers to characterize atmospheric parameters and their effects on measured data which produce undesirable features on surface spectral signatures. These effects can be estimated (and remotely sensed radiances corrected if atmospheric spectral transmittance is known at each image pixel. Usually ground-based punctual observations (atmospheric sounding balloons, sun photometers, etc. are used to estimate the main physical parameters (like water vapor and temperature profiles which permit us to estimate atmospheric spectral transmittance by using suitable radiative transfer model and a specific (often too strong assumption which enable atmospheric properties measured only in very few points to be extended to the whole image. Several atmospheric gases produce observable absorption features, but only water vapor strongly varies in time and space. In this work the authors customize a self-sufficient «split-window technique» to derive (at each image pixel atmospheric total columnar water vapor content (TWVC using only MIVIS data collected by the fourth MIVIS spectrometer (Thermal Infrared band. MIVIS radiances have been simulated by means of MODTRAN4 radiative transfer code and the coefficients of linear regression to estimate TWVC from «split-windows» MIVIS radiances, based on 450 atmospheric water vapor profiles obtained by radiosonde data provided by NOAANESDIS. The method has been applied to produce maps describing the spatial variability of

  1. Sensing the water content of honey from temperature-dependent electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to predict water content in honey, electrical conductivity was measured on blossom honey types of milk-vetch, jujube and yellow-locust with water content of 18%-37% between 5-40ºC. Regression models of electrical conductivity were developed as functions of water content and temperature. The...

  2. Stalagmite water content as a proxy for drip water supply in tropical and subtropical areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vogel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this pilot study water was extracted from samples of two Holocene stalagmites from Socotra Island, Yemen, and one Eemian stalagmite from southern continental Yemen. The amount of water extracted per unit mass of stalagmite rock, termed "water yield" hereafter, serves as a measure of its total water content. Based on direct correlation plots of water yields and δ18Ocalcite and on regime shift analyses, we demonstrate that for the studied stalagmites the water yield records vary systematically with the corresponding oxygen isotopic compositions of the calcite (δ18Ocalcite. Within each stalagmite lower δ18Ocalcite values are accompanied by lower water yields and vice versa. The δ18Ocalcite records of the studied stalagmites have previously been interpreted to predominantly reflect the amount of rainfall in the area; thus, water yields can be linked to drip water supply. Higher, and therefore more continuous drip water supply caused by higher rainfall rates, supports homogeneous deposition of calcite with low porosity and therefore a small fraction of water-filled inclusions, resulting in low water yields of the respective samples. A reduction of drip water supply fosters irregular growth of calcite with higher porosity, leading to an increase of the fraction of water-filled inclusions and thus higher water yields. The results are consistent with the literature on stalagmite growth and supported by optical inspection of thin sections of our samples. We propose that for a stalagmite from a dry tropical or subtropical area, its water yield record represents a novel paleo-climate proxy recording changes in drip water supply, which can in turn be interpreted in terms of associated rainfall rates.

  3. Volumetric water content measurement probes in earth-dam construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardanis Michael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two frequency domain reflectometry (FDR probes have been used. They were used on compacted soils both in the laboratory and in the field. Measurements in the laboratory were intended for calibration. The range of densities and types of materials where insertion of the probes can be achieved was investigated first. The effect of sporadic presence of coarser grains and density on these calibrations, once insertion could be achieved, were investigated second. Measurements on laboratory prepared samples with the same moisture content were different when the sample was kept in the mould from when it was extruded from it. Also both these measurements were different from that in a sample of the same density but significantly larger in diameter. It was found that measurements with these probes are affected by dilation exhibited by soil around the rods of the probes during insertion. Readings immediately after insertion of the sensors on samples extruded from their moulds were the ones closer to measured values. These readings combined with total volume and mass obtained from sand-cone tests during the construction of an earth-dam allowed fairly accurate estimation of the dry unit weight but not the gravimetric water content.

  4. Performance evaluation of volumetric water content and relative permittivity models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhlisin, Muhammad; Saputra, Almushfi

    2013-01-01

    In recent years many models have been proposed for measuring soil water content (θ) based on the permittivity (ε) value. Permittivity is one of the properties used to determine θ in measurements using the electromagnetic method. This method is widely used due to quite substantial differences in values of ε for air, soil, and water, as it allows the θ value to be measured accurately. The performance of six proposed models with one parameter (i.e., permittivity) and five proposed models with two or more parameters (i.e., permittivity, porosity, and dry bulk density of soil) is discussed and evaluated. Secondary data obtained from previous studies are used for comparison to calibrate and evaluate the models. The results show that the models with one parameter proposed by Roth et al. (1992) and Topp et al. (1980) have the greatest R² data errors, while for the model with two parameters, the model proposed by Malicki et al. (1996) agrees very well with the data compared with other models.

  5. Understanding the bias between moisture content by oven drying and water content by Karl Fischer titration at moisture equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple causes of the difference between equilibrium moisture and water content have been found. The errors or biases were traced to the oven drying procedure to determine moisture content. The present paper explains the nature of the biases in oven drying and how it is possible to suppress one ...

  6. Terahertz-dependent evaluation of water content in high-water-cut crude oil using additive-manufactured samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, LiMei; Zhan, HongLei; Miao, XinYang; Zhu, Jing; Zhao, Kun

    2017-04-01

    The evaluation of water content in crude oil is of significance to petroleum exploration and transportation. Terahertz (THz) waves are sensitive to fluctuations in the dipole moment of water. However, due to the strong absorption of water in the THz range, it is difficult for the THz spectrum to determine high water content with the common sampler. In this research, micron-grade samplers for THz detection were designed and manufactured using additive manufacturing (AM) technology. Oil-water mixtures with water content from 1.8% to 90.6% were measured with the THz-TDS system using sample cells. In addition, a detailed analysis was performed of the relationships among THz parameters such as signal peak, time delay, and refractive index as well as absorption coefficient and high water content (>60%). Results suggest that the combination of THz spectroscopy and AM technique is effective for water content evaluation in crude oil and can be further applied in the petroleum industry.

  7. An analysis of infiltration with moisture content distribution in a two-dimensional discretized water content domain

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-06-11

    On the basis of unsaturated Darcy\\'s law, the Talbot-Ogden method provides a fast unconditional mass conservative algorithm to simulate groundwater infiltration in various unsaturated soil textures. Unlike advanced reservoir modelling methods that compute unsaturated flow in space, it only discretizes the moisture content domain into a suitable number of bins so that the vertical water movement is estimated piecewise in each bin. The dimensionality of the moisture content domain is extended from one dimensional to two dimensional in this study, which allows us to distinguish pore shapes within the same moisture content range. The vertical movement of water in the extended model imitates the infiltration phase in the Talbot-Ogden method. However, the difference in this extension is the directional redistribution, which represents the horizontal inter-bin flow and causes the water content distribution to have an effect on infiltration. Using this extension, we mathematically analyse the general relationship between infiltration and the moisture content distribution associated with wetting front depths in different bins. We show that a more negatively skewed moisture content distribution can produce a longer ponding time, whereas a higher overall flux cannot be guaranteed in this situation. It is proven on the basis of the water content probability distribution independent of soil textures. To illustrate this analysis, we also present numerical examples for both fine and coarse soil textures.

  8. Effect of soil water stress on yield and proline content of four wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-01-04

    Jan 4, 2010 ... Tatar and Gevrek (2008) and Kameli and Losel (1996) showed that wheat dry mater production, relative water content (RWC) decreased and proline content increased under drought stress. Higher proline content in wheat plants after water stress has been reported by. Vendruscolo et al. (2007) and Patel ...

  9. Estimation water vapor content using the mixing ratio method and validated with the ANFIS PWV model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suparta, W.; Alhasa, K. M.; Singh, M. S. J.

    2017-05-01

    This study reported the comparison between water vapor content, the surface meteorological data (pressure, temperature, and relative humidity), and precipitable water vapor (PWV) produced by PWV from adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for areas in the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Bangi (UKMB) station. The water vapor content value was estimated with mixing ratio method and the surface meteorological data as the parameter inputs. The accuracy of water vapor content was validated with PWV from ANFIS PWV model for the period of 20-23 December 2016. The result showed that the water vapor content has a similar trend with the PWV which produced by ANFIS PWV model (r = 0.975 at the 99% confidence level). This indicates that the water vapor content that obtained with mixing ratio agreed very well with the ANFIS PWV model. In addition, this study also found, the pattern of water vapor content and PWV have more influenced by the relative humidity.

  10. [Spectrum Variance Analysis of Tree Leaves Under the Condition of Different Leaf water Content].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Chen, Tai-sheng; Pan, Li-xin

    2015-07-01

    Leaf water content is an important factor affecting tree spectral characteristics. So Exploring the leaf spectral characteristics change rule of the same tree under the condition of different leaf water content and the spectral differences of different tree leaves under the condition of the same leaf water content are not only the keys of hyperspectral vegetation remote sensing information identification but also the theoretical support of research on vegetation spectrum change as the differences in leaf water content. The spectrometer was used to observe six species of tree leaves, and the reflectivity and first order differential spectrum of different leaf water content were obtained. Then, the spectral characteristics of each tree species leaves under the condition of different leaf water content were analyzed, and the spectral differences of different tree species leaves under the condition of the same leaf water content were compared to explore possible bands of the leaf water content identification by hyperspectral remote sensing. Results show that the spectra of each tree leaf have changed a lot with the change of the leaf water content, but the change laws are different. Leaf spectral of different tree species has lager differences in some wavelength range under the condition of same leaf water content, and it provides some possibility for high precision identification of tree species.

  11. MEASURING LEAF WATER CONTENT USING MULTISPECTRAL TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Junttila

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is increasing the amount and intensity of disturbance events, i.e. drought, pest insect outbreaks and fungal pathogens, in forests worldwide. Leaf water content (LWC is an early indicator of tree stress that can be measured remotely using multispectral terrestrial laser scanning (MS-TLS. LWC affects leaf reflectance in the shortwave infrared spectrum which can be used to predict LWC from spatially explicit MS-TLS intensity data. Here, we investigated the relationship between LWC and MS-TLS intensity features at 690 nm, 905 nm and 1550 nm wavelengths with Norway spruce seedlings in greenhouse conditions. We found that a simple ratio of 905 nm and 1550 nm wavelengths was able to explain 84 % of the variation (R2 in LWC with a respective prediction accuracy of 0.0041 g/cm2. Our results showed that MS-TLS can be used to estimate LWC with a reasonable accuracy in environmentally stable conditions.

  12. Detection of Water Content in Rapeseed Leaves Using Terahertz Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Nie

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The terahertz (THz spectra of rapeseed leaves with different water content (WC were investigated. The transmission and absorption spectra in the range of 0.3–2 THz were measured by using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The mean transmittance and absorption coefficients were applied to analyze the change regulation of WC. In addition, the Savitzky-Golay method was performed to preprocess the spectra. Then, the partial least squares (PLS, kernel PLS (KPLS, and Boosting-PLS were conducted to establish models for predicting WC based on the processed transmission and absorption spectra. Reliable results were obtained by these three methods. KPLS generated the best prediction accuracy of WC. The prediction coefficient correlation (Rval and root mean square error (RMSEP of KPLS based on transmission were Rval = 0.8508, RMSEP = 0.1015, and that based on absorption were Rval = 0.8574, RMSEP = 0.1009. Results demonstrated that THz spectroscopy combined with modeling methods provided an efficient and feasible technique for detecting plant physiological information.

  13. Environmental and Physiographic Controls on Inter-Growing Season Variability of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapour Fluxes in a Minerotrophic Fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kamp, G.; Sonnentag, O.; Chen, J. M.; Barr, A.; Hedstrom, N.; Granger, R.

    2008-12-01

    The interaction of fens with groundwater is spatially and temporally highly variable in response to meteorological conditions, resulting in frequent changes of groundwater fluxes in both vertical and lateral directions (flow reversals) across the mineral soil-peat boundary. However, despite the importance of the topographic and hydrogeological setting of fens, no study has been reported in the literature that explores a fen's atmospheric CO2 and energy flux densities under contrasting meteorological conditions in response to its physiographic setting. In our contribution we report four years of growing season eddy covariance and supporting measurements from the Canada Fluxnet-BERMS fen (formerly BOREAS southern peatland) in Saskatchewan, Canada. We first analyze hydrological data along two piezometer transects across the mineral soil-peat boundary with the objective of assessing changes in water table configuration and thus hydraulic gradients, indicating flow reversals, in response to dry and wet meteorological conditions. Next we quantify and compare growing season totals and diurnal and daily variations in evapotranspiration (ET) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and its component fluxes gross ecosystem productivity (GPP) and terrestrial ecosystem respiration (TER) to identify their controls with a major focus on water table depth. While ET growing season totals were similar (~ 310 mm) under dry and wet meteorological conditions, the CO2 sink- source strength of Sandhill fen varied substantially from carbon neutral (NEE = -2 [+-7] g C m-2 per growing season) under dry meteorological condition (2003) to a moderate CO2- sink with NEE ranging between 157 [+- 10] and 190 [+- 11] g C m-2 per growing season under wet meteorological conditions (2004, 2005, and 2006). Using a process-oriented ecosystem model, BEPS-TerrainLab, we investigate how different canopy components at Sandhill contribute to total ET and GPP, and thus water use efficiency, under dry and wet

  14. Gas and vapour detection using polypyrrole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leur, R.H.M. van de; Waal, A. van der

    1999-01-01

    The vapours of organic solvents like toluene, butanon, and ethanol do effect the electrical conductivity of electrochemically synthesised polypyrrole. This property allows the use of polypyrrole in sensors for vapour detection. The conductivity is also a function of temperature and the history of

  15. Water content and its effect on ultrasound propagation in concrete--the possibility of NDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohdaira; Masuzawa

    2000-03-01

    It is known that water content or moisture affects the strength of concrete. The purpose of this study is to examine the possibility of the NDE of concrete from a knowledge of the relationship between water content and ultrasonic propagation in concrete. The results of measurements made on the ultrasound velocity and the frequency component on ultrasonic propagation as a function of the water content in concrete are reported. Test pieces of concrete made from common materials were made for the fundamental studies. The test piece dimensions were 10 cm in diameter and 20 cm in length. Test pieces were immersed in water for about 50 days to saturate them. To measure the effect of different water contents, test pieces were put in a drying chamber to change the amount of water between measurements. This procedure was repeated until the concrete was completely dried and the weight no longer changed. Water contents were defined as weight percentage to full dried state. Thus water content could be changed from 8% to 0%. Using the pulse transmission method, ultrasonic propagation in the frequency range 20 to 100 kHz was measured as a function of water content. The sound velocity varied gradually from 3000 m/s to 4500 m/s according to the water content. The frequency of maximum transmission also depended on the water content in this frequency range. It is considered that the ultrasonic NDE of concrete strength is feasible.

  16. Lagrangian process attribution of isotopic variations in near-surface water vapour in a 30-year regional climate simulation over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dütsch, Marina; Pfahl, Stephan; Meyer, Miro; Wernli, Heini

    2018-02-01

    Stable water isotopes are naturally available tracers of moisture in the atmosphere. Due to isotopic fractionation, they record information about condensation and evaporation processes during the transport of air parcels, and therefore present a valuable means for studying the global water cycle. However, the meteorological processes driving isotopic variations are complex and not very well understood so far, in particular on short (hourly to daily) timescales. This study presents a Lagrangian method for attributing the isotopic composition of air parcels to meteorological processes, which provides new insight into the isotopic history of air parcels. It is based on the temporal evolution of the isotope ratios, the humidity, the temperature, and the location of the air parcels. Here these values are extracted along 7-day backward trajectories started every 6 hours from near the surface in a 30-year regional climate simulation over Europe with the isotope-enabled version of the model of the Consortium for Small-Scale Modelling (COSMOiso). The COSMOiso simulation has a horizontal resolution of 0.25° and is driven at the lateral boundaries by a T106 global climate simulation with the isotope-enabled version of the European Centre Hamburg model (ECHAMwiso). Both simulations are validated against measurements from the Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP), which shows that nesting COSMOiso within ECHAMwiso improves the representation of δ2H and deuterium excess in monthly accumulated precipitation. The method considers all isotopic changes that occur inside the COSMOiso model domain, which, on average, correspond to more than half of the mean and variability in both δ2H and deuterium excess at the air parcels' arrival points. Along every trajectory, the variations in the isotope values are quantitatively decomposed into eight process categories (evaporation from the ocean, evapotranspiration from land, mixing with moister air, mixing with drier air

  17. Does water content or flow rate control colloid transport in unsaturated porous media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappenberger, Thorsten; Flury, Markus; Mattson, Earl D; Harsh, James B

    2014-04-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (θ - θr)/(θs - θr)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  18. Numerical implementation and oceanographic application of the thermodynamic potentials of water, vapour, ice, seawater and air - Part 2: The library routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D. G.; Feistel, R.; Reissmann, J. H.; Miyagawa, K.; Jackett, D. R.; Wagner, W.; Overhoff, U.; Guder, C.; Feistel, A.; Marion, G. M.

    2010-03-01

    The SCOR/IAPSO1 Working Group 127 on Thermodynamics and Equation of State of Seawater has prepared recommendations for new methods and algorithms for numerical estimation of the thermophysical properties of seawater. As an outcome of this work, a new International Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater (TEOS-10) was endorsed by IOC/UNESCO2 in June 2009 as the official replacement and extension of the 1980 International Equation of State, EOS-80. As part of this new standard a source code package has been prepared that is now made freely available to users via the World Wide Web. This package includes two libraries referred to as the SIA (Sea-Ice-Air) library and the GSW (Gibbs SeaWater) library. Information on the GSW library may be found on the TEOS-10 web site (http://www.TEOS-10.org). This publication provides an introduction to the SIA library which contains routines to calculate various thermodynamic properties as discussed in the companion paper. The SIA library is very comprehensive, including routines to deal with fluid water, ice, seawater and humid air as well as equilibrium states involving various combinations of these, with equivalent code developed in different languages. The code is hierachically structured in modules that support (i) almost unlimited extension with respect to additional properties or relations, (ii) an extraction of self-contained sub-libraries, (iii) separate updating of the empirical thermodynamic potentials, and (iv) code verification on different platforms and between different languages. Error trapping is implemented to identify when one or more of the primary routines are accessed significantly beyond their established range of validity. The initial version of the SIA library is available in Visual Basic and FORTRAN as a supplement to this publication and updates will be maintained on the TEOS-10 web site. 1 SCOR/IAPSO: Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research/International Association for the Physical Sciences of the Oceans 2 IOC

  19. Experimental test of methods for detecting water vapour penetration in sodium during operation of Czechoslovak modular 30 MW steam generator with BOR 60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matal, O.; Sobotka, J.; Banovec, J. (Vyzkumny Ustav Zavodu Energetickeho Strojirenstvi, Brno-Slatina (Czechoslovakia))

    1983-05-01

    The Czechoslovak modular 30 MW steam generator was installed on the BOR 60 experimental reactor with the aim of testing the consequences of water penetration into liquid sodium, refining hydrodynamic and temperature reaction characteristics and testing various types of accident protection. The experiments proved that changes resulting from small steam penetration into sodium have a stochastic character. From the alarm signals from the individual detectors of the accident protection system it will be necessary to select and accurately define those signals which differ sufficiently from the actual noise of the steam generator, i.e., to make a technical and economic optimization of diagnostic systems. Various types of alarm signals were tested: the measurement of hydrogen and oxygen concentrations using a wide range of instruments, the processing of the vibroacoustic spectrum by accelerometers and other apparatus, the measurement of fluctuations of sodium flow, the pulse-noise method, the method of measuring magnetic induction during the flow of the two-phase mixture through the pipes, etc.

  20. Reliability of Blotting Techniques to Assess Contact Lens Water Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadas, Pilar; López-Miguel, Alberto; Gómez, Alba; López-de la Rosa, Alberto; Fernández, Itziar; González-García, María J

    2018-02-15

    To determine the reliability of wet and modified dry blotting techniques used in the gravimetric method to assess contact lens (CL) water content (WC), the accuracy of both techniques in comparison with the nominal WC, and also their agreement. We evaluated hydrated and dry CL mass values and WC using the gravimetric method in 440 daily disposable CLs. Samples assessed corresponded to Dailies Total 1, Dailies AquaComfort Plus, 1-Day Acuvue TruEye, and Biotrue ONEday. Back vertex power ranged from +3.00 diopters (D) to -6.00 D. Within-subject coefficient of variation (CVw) and intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated. Bland-Altman analysis was also performed. The modified dry blotting technique yielded significantly (P≤0.0001) higher hydrated CL mass values. The wet blotting technique provided significantly (P≤0.04) better consistency than the modified dry one. Values of CVw for wet and modified dry blotting techniques ranged from 1.2% to 2.1% and from 3.7% to 5.4%, respectively. As for dry CL mass values, CVw values were not significantly different (P≥0.05) between wet (range: 1.1%-1.9%) and dry (range: 1.0%-5.1%) blotting techniques, except for Dailies AquaComfort Plus (P=0.03). Bland-Altman analysis showed poor agreement between the techniques. The wet blotting technique yielded WC values close (around 1%) to nominal ones, in contrast to modified dry blotting technique (≥2.5%). The wet blotting technique is not only more reliable than the modified dry one when obtaining hydrated CL mass but also provides more accurate nominal WC measurements. Agreement between the techniques was poor.

  1. Visualizing ocular lens fluid dynamics using MRI: manipulation of steady state water content and water fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghefi, Ehsan; Pontre, Beau P; Jacobs, Marc D; Donaldson, Paul J

    2011-08-01

    Studies using various MRI techniques have shown that a water-protein concentration gradient exists in the ocular lens. Because this concentration is higher in the core relative to the lens periphery, a gradient in refractive index is established in the lens. To investigate how the water-protein concentration profile is maintained, bovine lenses were incubated in different solutions, and changes in water-protein concentration ratio monitored using proton density weighted (PD-weighted) imaging in the absence and presence of heavy water (D(2)O). Lenses incubated in artificial aqueous humor (AAH) maintained the steady state water-protein concentration gradient, but incubating lenses in high extracellular potassium (KCl-AAH) or low temperature (Low T-AAH) caused a collapse of the gradient due to a rise in water content in the core of the lens. To visualize water fluxes, lenses were incubated in D(2)O, which acts as a contrast agent. Incubation in KCl-AAH and low T-AAH dramatically slowed the movement of D(2)O into the core but did not affect the movement of D(2)O into the outer cortex. D(2)O seemed to preferentially enter the lens cortex at the anterior and posterior poles before moving circumferentially toward the equatorial regions. This directionality of D(2)O influx into the lens cortex was abolished by incubating lenses in high KCl-AAH or low T-AAH, and resulted in homogenous influx of D(2)O into the outer cortex. Taken together, our results show that the water-protein concentration ratio is actively maintained in the core of the lens and that water fluxes preferentially enter the lens at the poles.

  2. Recovery of the water content of hydrogel contact lenses after use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Josefa Velasco; Velasco, María José García

    2005-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the amount and time of water-content recovery of ionic contact lenses (Surevue and Acuvue) and non-ionic contact lenses (Soflens 38, Soflens 66 and Optima 38) when submerged in maintenance solution for 9 h. Using a hand-held refractometer, we measured the water content of the lenses upon removal from the eye, and after 15, 30, 45 min, 1, 2 and 9 h in soaking solution. Both ionic lenses presented pre-wear water content of 58%, while two of the non-ionic ones (Soflens 38 and Optima 38) registered 38.6% and the third (Soflens 66) had 66%. We found a significant increase (p 0.05) between ionic and non-ionic lenses, although the non-ionic lenses reached slightly higher water-content values at all the times studied. These results indicate that when the refractometer technique is used to measure water content, the lens types used in this study regain their initial water-content values after 9 h in soaking solution. These data indicate the time needed for hydrogel contact lenses to reach their maximum water content after removal from the eye and submersion in maintenance solution. By ensuring maximum water content and minimum reduction of oxygen for the cornea, the specialist can help avoid clinical signs and symptoms related to low water content in the lenses.

  3. [Comparison of conductivity-water content curve and visual methods for ascertaintation of the critical water content of O/W microemulsions formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Da-wei; Tang, Tian-tian; Peng, Jin-fei; Li, Lan-lin; Sun, Xiao-bo; Xiang, Da-xiong

    2010-08-01

    This study is to screen 23 blank O/W type microemulsion (ME) samples, that is 15 samples from our laboratory, and 8 samples from literature; compare the conductivity-water content curve (CWCC) method and visual method in determining the critical water content during O/W type MEs' formation, to analyze the deficiency and the feasibility of visual method and to exploxe scientific meanings of CWCC method in judging the critical water content of O/W type MEs during formation. The results show that there is a significant difference between the theoretical feasible CWCC method and visual method in determining the critical water content (Pcontent. Therefore, this article firmly confirmed the shortcomings of visual method and suggested that the eye-base "critical water content" may falls into continuous ME stage during O/W MEs' formation. Further more, the CWCC method has theoretical feasibility and scientific meanings in determining the critical water content of O/W type MEs during formation.

  4. Using the right slope of the 970 nm absorption feature for estimating canopy water content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Kooistra, L.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    Canopy water content (CWC) is important for understanding the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Biogeochemical processes like photosynthesis, transpiration and net primary production are related to foliar water. The first derivative of the reflectance spectrum at wavelengths corresponding to

  5. Lithium content in potable water, surface water, ground water, and mineral water on the territory of Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Kostik, Vesna; Bauer, Biljana; Kavrakovski, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine lithium concentration in potable water, surface water, ground, and mineral water on the territory of the Republic of Macedonia. Water samples were collected from water bodies such as multiple public water supply systems located in 13 cities, wells boreholes located in 12 areas, lakes and rivers located in three different areas. Determination of lithium concentration in potable water, surface water was performed by the technique of inductively coupl...

  6. Physico-chemical properties and heavy metal content of water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The water quality examination in Ife–North Local Government of Osun State Nigeria was conducted by determining the physico–chemical parameters of 40 samples. Surface water, bore holes, wells and pipe borne water samples were collected from major towns in the Local Government Area and analyzed. Results showed ...

  7. Vapours of US and EU Market Leader Electronic Cigarette Brands and Liquids Are Cytotoxic for Human Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzhammer, Raphaela; Doppler, Christian; Jakschitz, Thomas; Heinz, Katharina; Förste, Juliane; Danzl, Katarina; Messner, Barbara; Bernhard, David

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to provide toxicological data on e-cigarette vapours of different e-cigarette brands and liquids from systems viewed as leaders in the e-cigarette market and to compare e-cigarette vapour toxicity to the toxicity of conventional strong high-nicotine cigarette smoke. Using an adapted version of a previously constructed cigarette smoke constituent sampling device, we collected the hydrophilic fraction of e-cigarette vapour and exposed human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to the mixture of compounds present in the vapour of 4 different single-use e-cigarettes, 6 different liquid vapours produced by the same refillable e-cigarette, and one e-cigarette with an exchangeable liquid cartridge. After incubation of cells with various concentrations and for various periods of time we analysed cell death induction, proliferation rates, the occurrence of intra-cellular reactive oxygen species, cell morphology, and we also measured e-cigarette heating coil temperatures. Overall, conventional cigarette smoke extract showed the most severe impact on endothelial cells. However, some e-cigarette vapour extracts showed high cytotoxicity, inhibition of cell proliferation, and alterations in cell morphology, which were comparable to conventional high-nicotine cigarettes. The vapours generated from different liquids using the same e-cigarette show substantial differences, pointing to the liquids as an important source for toxicity. E-cigarette vapour-mediated induction of oxidative stress was significant in one out of the 11 analysed vapours. There is a high variability in the acute cytotoxicity of e-cigarette vapours depending on the liquid and on the e-cigarettes used. Some products showed toxic effects close to a conventional high-nicotine cigarette. Liquid nicotine, menthol content, and the formation of acute intracellular reactive oxygen species do not seem to be the central elements in e-cigarette vapour toxicity.

  8. Vapours of US and EU Market Leader Electronic Cigarette Brands and Liquids Are Cytotoxic for Human Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela Putzhammer

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to provide toxicological data on e-cigarette vapours of different e-cigarette brands and liquids from systems viewed as leaders in the e-cigarette market and to compare e-cigarette vapour toxicity to the toxicity of conventional strong high-nicotine cigarette smoke. Using an adapted version of a previously constructed cigarette smoke constituent sampling device, we collected the hydrophilic fraction of e-cigarette vapour and exposed human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs to the mixture of compounds present in the vapour of 4 different single-use e-cigarettes, 6 different liquid vapours produced by the same refillable e-cigarette, and one e-cigarette with an exchangeable liquid cartridge. After incubation of cells with various concentrations and for various periods of time we analysed cell death induction, proliferation rates, the occurrence of intra-cellular reactive oxygen species, cell morphology, and we also measured e-cigarette heating coil temperatures. Overall, conventional cigarette smoke extract showed the most severe impact on endothelial cells. However, some e-cigarette vapour extracts showed high cytotoxicity, inhibition of cell proliferation, and alterations in cell morphology, which were comparable to conventional high-nicotine cigarettes. The vapours generated from different liquids using the same e-cigarette show substantial differences, pointing to the liquids as an important source for toxicity. E-cigarette vapour-mediated induction of oxidative stress was significant in one out of the 11 analysed vapours. There is a high variability in the acute cytotoxicity of e-cigarette vapours depending on the liquid and on the e-cigarettes used. Some products showed toxic effects close to a conventional high-nicotine cigarette. Liquid nicotine, menthol content, and the formation of acute intracellular reactive oxygen species do not seem to be the central elements in e-cigarette vapour toxicity.

  9. Running-induced patellofemoral pain fluctuates with changes in patella water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kai-Yu; Hu, Houchun H; Colletti, Patrick M; Powers, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    Although increased bone water content resulting from repetitive patellofemoral joint loading has been suggested to be a possible mechanism underlying patellofemoral pain (PFP), there is little data to support this mechanism. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether running results in increases in patella water content and pain and whether 48 hours of rest reduces patella water content and pain to pre-running levels. Ten female runners with a diagnosis of PFP (mean age 25.1 years) participated. Patella water content was quantified using a chemical-shift-encoded water-fat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol. The visual analog scale (VAS) was used to quantify subjects' pain levels. MRI and pain data were obtained prior to running, immediately following a 40-minute running session, and 48 hours post-running. Pain and patella water content were compared among the 3 time points using one-way ANOVA's with repeated measures. Immediately post-running, persons with PFP reported significant increases in pain and exhibited elevated patella water content. Pain and patella water content decreased to pre-running levels following 48 hours of rest. Our findings suggest that transient changes in patella water content associated with running may, in part, contribute to patellofemoral symptoms.

  10. [Spectral reflectance characteristics and modeling of typical Takyr Solonetzs water content].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-hua; Jia, Ke-li

    2015-03-01

    Based on the analysis of the spectral reflectance of the typical Takyr Solonetzs soil in Ningxia, the relationship of soil water content and spectral reflectance was determined, and a quantitative model for the prediction of soil water content was constructed. The results showed that soil spectral reflectance decreased with the increasing soil water content when it was below the water holding capacity but increased with the increasing soil water content when it was higher than the water holding capacity. Soil water content presented significantly negative correlation with original reflectance (r), smooth reflectance (R), logarithm of reflectance (IgR), and positive correlation with the reciprocal of R and logarithm of reciprocal [lg (1/R)]. The correlation coefficient of soil water content and R in the whole wavelength was 0.0013, 0.0397 higher than r and lgR, respectively. Average correlation coefficient of soil water content with 1/R and [lg (1/R)] at the wavelength of 950-1000 nm was 0.2350 higher than that of 400-950 nm. The relationships of soil water content with the first derivate differential (R') , the first derivate differential of logarithm (lgR)' and the first derivate differential of logarithm of reciprocal [lg(1/R)]' were unstable. Base on the coefficients of r, lg(1/R), R' and (lgR)', different regression models were established to predict soil water content, and the coefficients of determination were 0.7610, 0.8184, 0.8524 and 0.8255, respectively. The determination coefficient for power function model of R'. reached 0.9447, while the fitting degree between the predicted value based on this model and on-site measured value was 0.8279. The model of R' had the highest fitted accuracy, while that of r had the lowest one. The results could provide a scientific basis for soil water content prediction and field irrigation in the Takyr Solonetzs region.

  11. De-coupling seasonal changes in water content and dry matter to predict live conifer foliar moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Matt Jolly; Ann M. Hadlow; Kathleen Huguet

    2014-01-01

    Live foliar moisture content (LFMC) significantly influences wildland fire behaviour. However, characterising variations in LFMC is difficult because both foliar mass and dry mass can change throughout the season. Here we quantify the seasonal changes in both plant water status and dry matter partitioning. We collected new and old foliar samples from Pinus contorta for...

  12. ONLINE MONITORING OF THE INSULATION WATER CONTENT CHARACTERISTICS OF THE OILFILLED ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Andrienko

    2014-12-01

    The new method of water content calculation based on relative oil saturation measurement is proposed, new method doesn’t depend from laboratory tests of limit oil saturation. The analysis of the practical monitoring data is made. Recommendations on the organization of the continuous monitoring of the water content and the interpretation of its results are performed

  13. Lead Content of Well Water in Enugu South-East Nigeria | Ogbu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To study the lead content of well water in Enugu, Southeast Nigeria. Method: Wells (101) were located using the multistage sampling procedure and samples were collected into clean plastic containers. Analysis was done using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Result: The means lead content of well water ...

  14. Concurrent temporal stability of the apparent electrical conductivity and soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge of spatio-temporal soil water content (SWC) variability within agricultural fields is useful to improve crop management. Spatial patterns of soil water contents can be characterized using the temporal stability analysis, however high density sampling is required. Soil apparent electrical c...

  15. Dynamic Measurement of Air Permeability as a Function of Water Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crenshaw, A. D.; Tyner, J. S.

    2003-12-01

    Determining the air permeability of a soil column as a function of water content is typically a tedious task because each measurement of permeability requires a constant water content over space and time. Between each individual measurement of permeability, the water content of the sample must be modified and allowed to equilibrate. A dynamic air permeability test is proposed that measures airflow rate, water content, and air pressure, while continually modifying the water content. Dry air is pumped into the inlet of an initially wet soil column, which slowly dries the soil within approximately 24-48 hours. A computer controlled gamma ray attenuation system measures and logs the water content along the length of the soil column over time. Hypodermic needles are inserted into the soil column and connected to pressure transducers, which measure the air pressure at multiple locations over time. An electronic flow meter logs the airflow rate over time. These measurements enable direct calculation of air permeability as a function of water content. Due to the large number of air pressure and water content measurements along the length of the soil column, the air permeability functions of individual layers can be distinguished from the remainder of the soil core. Because all measurements are computer controlled and logged, the system is completely autonomous.

  16. Autonomous Chemical Vapour Detection by Micro UAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Rosser

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to remotely detect and map chemical vapour clouds in open air environments is a topic of significant interest to both defence and civilian communities. In this study, we integrate a prototype miniature colorimetric chemical sensor developed for methyl salicylate (MeS, as a model chemical vapour, into a micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV, and perform flights through a raised MeS vapour cloud. Our results show that that the system is capable of detecting MeS vapours at low ppm concentration in real-time flight and rapidly sending this information to users by on-board telemetry. Further, the results also indicate that the sensor is capable of distinguishing “clean” air from “dirty”, multiple times per flight, allowing us to look towards autonomous cloud mapping and source localization applications. Further development will focus on a broader range of integrated sensors, increased autonomy of detection and improved engineering of the system.

  17. NUTRIENT CONTENT IN SUNFLOWERS IRRIGATED WITH OIL EXPLORATION WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADERVAN FERNANDES SOUSA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation using produced water, which is generated during crude oil and gas recovery and treated by the exploration industry, could be an option for irrigated agriculture in semiarid regions. To determine the viability of this option, the effects of this treated water on the nutritional status of plants should be assessed. For this purpose, we examined the nutritional changes in sunflowers after they were irrigated with oil - produced water and the effects of this water on plant biomass and seed production. The sunflower cultivar BRS 321 was grown for three crop cycles in areas irrigated with filtered produced water (FPW, reverse osmosis - treated produced water (OPW, or ground water (GW. At the end of each cycle, roots, shoots, and seeds were collected to examine their nutrient concentrations. Produced water irrigation affected nutrient accumulation in the sunflower plants. OPW irrigation promoted the accumulation of Ca, Na, N, P, and Mg. FPW irrigation favored the accumulation of Na in both roots and shoots, and biomass and seed production were negatively affected. The Na in the shoots of plants irrigated with FPW increased throughout the three crop cycles. Under controlled conditions, it is possible to reuse reverse osmosis - treated produced water in agriculture. However, more long - term research is needed to understand its cumulative effects on the chemical and biological properties of the soil and crop production.

  18. [The new method monitoring crop water content based on NIR-Red spectrum feature space].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao-juan; Xu, Xin-gang; Chen, Tian-en; Yang, Gui-jun; Li, Zhen-hai

    2014-06-01

    Moisture content is an important index of crop water stress condition, timely and effective monitoring of crop water content is of great significance for evaluating crop water deficit balance and guiding agriculture irrigation. The present paper was trying to build a new crop water index for winter wheat vegetation water content based on NIR-Red spectral space. Firstly, canopy spectrums of winter wheat with narrow-band were resampled according to relative spectral response function of HJ-CCD and ZY-3. Then, a new index (PWI) was set up to estimate vegetation water content of winter wheat by improveing PDI (perpendicular drought index) and PVI (perpendicular vegetation index) based on NIR-Red spectral feature space. The results showed that the relationship between PWI and VWC (vegetation water content) was stable based on simulation of wide-band multispectral data HJ-CCD and ZY-3 with R2 being 0.684 and 0.683, respectively. And then VWC was estimated by using PWI with the R2 and RMSE being 0.764 and 0.764, 3.837% and 3.840%, respectively. The results indicated that PWI has certain feasibility to estimate crop water content. At the same time, it provides a new method for monitoring crop water content using remote sensing data HJ-CCD and ZY-3.

  19. Water content distribution in a polymer electrolyte membrane for advanced fuel cell system with liquid water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, Shohji; Teranishi, Kazuhiro; Nishida, Kousuke; Hirai, Shuichiro

    2005-02-01

    To better understand the operation of a new fuel cell design, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the water content distribution in a polymer electrolyte membrane under fuel cell operation with and without a supply of liquid water. The supply of liquid water to the membrane improved the cell performance by increasing the water content in the membrane and thus reducing the electrical resistance of the membrane. The study also showed that MRI is a promising method to investigate the distribution of water in the membrane of a fuel cell under operating conditions.

  20. Total phenol content and antioxidant activity of water solutions of plant extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Kopjar, Mirela; Piližota, Vlasta; Hribar, J.; Simčić, M.

    2009-01-01

    Water solutions of extracts were investigated for total phenol content, flavonoid content and antioxidant activity. Susceptibility to degradation of water solutions of plant extracts, under light and in the dark, during storage at room temperature was investigated in order to determine their stability prior to their application for fortification of food products. Large dispersion of total phenol (TP) content in the investigated model solutions of selected extracts (olive leaves, green tea, re...

  1. Spectroscopic determination of leaf water content using linear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-02-02

    Feb 2, 2012 ... Key words: Spectroscopy, crop water, linear regression, artificial neural network. ... performed to ease shortages of water resources and .... Modeling. Simple linear regression. Simple linear regression is the most basic modeling approach; because the modeling construction is simple and the model is.

  2. Water content and other aspects of brittle versus normal fingernails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stern, Dana Kazlow; Diamantis, Stephanie; Smith, Elizabeth; Wei, Huachen; Gordon, Marsha; Muigai, Wangui; Moshier, Erin; Lebwohl, Mark; Spuls, Phyllis

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous authors have claimed that dehydration of the nail plate causes brittle nails. Some experts claim that normal nails contain 18% water, and brittle nails contain less than 16%. OBJECTIVE: We sought to test the hypothesis that brittle nails contain 2% less water than normal nails.

  3. Fluoride Content of Bottled Drinking Waters in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almulla, Hessa Ibrahim; King, Nigel M; Alnsour, Hamza Mohammad; Sajnani, Anand K

    2016-12-01

    Fluoridation of drinking water has been recognized as one of the most effective ways of achieving community-wide exposure to the caries prevention effects of fluoride (F). A vast majority of people in Qatar use bottled water for drinking. Use of bottled water without knowing the F level may expose children to dental caries risk if the F level is lower than optimal or to dental fluorosis if the F level is too high. The aim of this study was to determine the F concentration of bottled water available in Qatar. A total of 32 brands of bottled water were evaluated. The F concentrations displayed on the labels were recorded. The F ion-selective electrode method was used to measure the F concentration in water samples, and three measurements were taken for every sample to ensure reproducibility. The p value was set at 0.05. The F concentration ranged from 0.06 to 3.0 ppm with a mean value of 0.8 ppm (±0.88). The F levels were provided by the manufacturers on the labels of 60 % of the samples, but this was significantly lower than the measured F levels (p water that was produced in Saudi Arabia had significantly higher levels of F when compared to those produced in other countries (p water. Furthermore, there was a significant disparity between the F levels which were measured and those that were provided on the labels.

  4. The Soil Characteristic Curve at Low Water Contents: Relations to Specific Surface Area and Texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resurreccion, Augustus; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    Accurate description of the soil-water retention curve (SWRC) at low water contents is important for simulating water dynamics, plant-water relations, and microbial processes in surface soil. Soil-water retention at soil-water matric potential of less than -10 MPa, where adsorptive forces dominate...... over capillary forces, has also been used to estimate the soil specific surface area (SA, m2 kg-1). In the present study, the dry part of the SWRC was measured by dewpoint potentiameter on 41 Danish soils covering a wide range of clay (CL, kg kg-1) and organic carbon content (OC, kg kg-1). It was found...... that measurements by traditional pressure plate apparatus generally overestimated water contents at -1.5 MPa (plant wilting point). The 41 soils were classified into four textural classes based on the so-called Dexter index n (= CL/OC), and the Tuller-Or (TO) general scaling model describing the water film...

  5. Thermal properties of ration components as affected by moisture content and water activity during freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Chinachoti, P; Wang, D; Hallberg, L M; Sun, X S

    2008-11-01

    Beef roast with vegetables is an example of a meal, ready-to-eat (MRE) ration entrée. It is a mixture of meat, potato, mushroom, and carrot with a gravy sauce. The thermal properties of each component were characterized in terms of freezing point, latent heat, freezable and unfreezable water contents, and enthalpy during freezing using differential scanning calorimetry. Freezing and thawing curves and the effect of freezing and thawing cycles on thermal properties were also evaluated. The freezing points of beef, potato, mushroom, and sauce were all in the range of -5.1 to -5.6 degrees C, but moisture content, water activity, latent heat, freezable and unfreezable water contents, and enthalpy varied among these components. Freezing temperature greatly affected the unfrozen water fraction. The unfreezable water content (unfrozen water fraction at -50 degrees C) of ration components was in the range of 8.2% to 9.7%. The freezing and thawing curves of vegetables with sauce differed from those of beef but took similar time to freeze or thaw. Freezing and thawing cycles did not greatly affect the thermal properties of each component. Freezing point and latent heat were reduced by decreasing moisture content and water activity of each component. Water activity was proportionally linear to freezing point at a(w) > 0.88, and moisture content was proportionally linear to freezable water content in all ration components. Water was not available for freezing when moisture content was reduced to 28.8% or less. This study indicates that moisture content and water activity are critical factors affecting thermal behavior of ration components during freezing.

  6. Quantitative radial imaging of porous particles beds with varying water contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, B P; Babonneau, F

    1994-01-01

    Radial imaging protocols suitable for monitoring water transport in biopolymer and food materials during processes such as drying and rehydration are developed and tested on a well-characterized model sample. This model consisted of a randomly packed bed of Sephadex beads with varying water content. The results are interpreted with theoretical models for the dependence of the initial water magnetization, transverse relaxation, and diffusive attenuation on water content for two slice-selective radial imaging pulse sequences. It is shown that volume shrinkage and changes in packing density complicate the dependence of the initial magnetization on water content, so that the transverse relaxation rate provides the most reliable monitor of water content. Radial imaging is shown to offer many advantages over conventional two-dimensional imaging whenever the sample can be made with cylindrical symmetry.

  7. Importance of Rain Evaporation and Continental Convection in the Tropical Water Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, John; Noone, David; Bowman, Kevin; Beer, R.; Eldering, A.; Fisher, B.; Gunson, M.; Goldman, Aaron; Kulawik, S. S.; Lampel, Michael; hide

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric moisture cycling is an important aspect of the Earth's climate system, yet the processes determining atmospheric humidity are poorly understood. For example, direct evaporation of rain contributes significantly to the heat and moisture budgets of clouds, but few observations of these processes are available. Similarly, the relative contributions to atmospheric moisture over land from local evaporation and humidity from oceanic sources are uncertain. Lighter isotopes of water vapour preferentially evaporate whereas heavier isotopes preferentially condense and the isotopic composition of ocean water is known. Here we use this information combined with global measurements of the isotopic composition of tropospheric water vapour from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard the Aura spacecraft, to investigate aspects of the atmospheric hydrological cycle that are not well constrained by observations of precipitation or atmospheric vapour content. Our measurements of the isotopic composition of water vapour near tropical clouds suggest that rainfall evaporation contributes significantly to lower troposphere humidity, with typically 20% and up to 50% of rainfall evaporating near convective clouds. Over the tropical continents the isotopic signature of tropospheric water vapour differs significantly from that of precipitation, suggesting that convection of vapour from both oceanic sources and evapotranspiration are the dominant moisture sources. Our measurements allow an assessment of the intensity of the present hydrological cycle and will help identify any future changes as they occur.

  8. Content of Fluorine in Drinking Water in FYR Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carcev M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available From all the methods applied in preventing dental caries, the most significant is the use of fluorides. Nowadays, 6 decades after its massive use, it can certainly be argued that it is the most efficient, cheapest and safest way of preventing dental caries, confirmed by more than 150 longitudinal studies. In order to determine the presence of fluorides in drinking water, in coordination with the Institute for Public Health of the FYR Macedonia in 2009, we conducted a research for determining the presence of fluorides in drinking water from the public water supply in the country.

  9. The Mediterranean Water content in the Northeast Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Angela; Bashmachnikov, Igor; Neves, Filipe

    2014-05-01

    Distribution of the Mediterranean Water (MW) in the subtropical Northeast Atlantic [20-50o N, 5-40o W] was studied using Optimum Multiparameter analysis (OMP) applied to the World Ocean Atlas (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/) and MEDTRANS climatologies (http://co.fc.ul.pt/en/). The areas of influence of water masses in the study region were obtained from literature and from analysis of individual TS-diagrams. The analysis permitted to divide the water column between 500 to 2000 m into 5 vertical layers. The boundaries of the layers separated different expected sets of the dominant water masses; their depth varied across the study region. For the OMP we used the following water masses: the central fraction of the North Atlantic Central Water (H), the lower fraction of the North Atlantic Central Water (NACWl), the Mediterranean Water (MW), the Sub-Artic Intermediate Water (SAIW), the modified Antarctic Intermediate Water (AA), the Labrador Sea Water (LSW) and the upper fraction of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADWu). The characteristics of the water masses were obtained from Perez et al. (2001), Alvarez et al. (2004) and Barbero et al. (2010), taken at the places where the water masses entered the study region. For each of the layers and each of the grid-points OMP was applied for estimation of the percentage of the each of the water masses in the observed mixture. The analysis of sensitivity of the results to the definition of water mass proprieties showed that their percentages were derived within the average error of 10%. The percentages of water masses obtained in this study compared well with the previous OMP results at some individual sections across our region (Hinrichsen and Tomczak, 1993; Alvarez et al., 2004 and Barbero et al., 2010). In this work we specifically focused on distribution of the MW. The results showed that the MW reached its maximum of 50% at 1200 m depth in the Gulf of Cadiz. The percentage decreased to about 40% along the Iberian continental

  10. Variation in VIP latrine sludge contents | Bakare | Water SA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated variations in the characteristics of the sludge content from different ventilated improved pit (VIP) latrines and variation in these characteristics at specific depths within each pit. Faecal sludge from 16 VIP latrines within the eThekwini Municipality was collected and laboratory characterisation including ...

  11. Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    Aim, content and methods are fundamental categories of both theoretical and practical general didactics. A quick glance in recent pedagogical literature on higher education, however, reveals a strong preoccupation with methods, i.e. how teaching should be organized socially (Biggs & Tang, 2007...... a theoretical approach, which takes complexity as fundamental premise for modern society (Luhmann, 1985, 2002). In educational situations conditionally valuable content generally will exceed what can actually be taught within the frames of an education. In pedagogy this situation is often referred...... to as ‘abundance of material’, and in many cases it is not obvious, how the line between actually chosen and conditionally relevant content can be draw. Difficulties in drawing the line between actual educational content and conditionally relevant content can be handled in different way. One way, quite efficient...

  12. Modeling Soil Water Retention Curves in the Dry Range Using the Hygroscopic Water Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Chong; Hu, Kelin; Arthur, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    curves of soils and to predict SWRCs at the dry end using the hygroscopic water content at a relative humidity of 50% (θRH50). The Oswin model yielded satisfactory fits to dry-end SWRCs for soils dominated by both 2:1 and 1:1 clay minerals. Compared with the Oswin model, the Campbell and Shiozawa model...... combined with the Kelvin equation (CS-K) produced better fits to dry-end SWRCs of soils dominated by 2:1 clays but provided poor fits for soils dominated by 1:1 clays. The shape parameter α of the Oswin model was dependent on clay mineral type, and approximate values of 0.29 and 0.57 were obtained...... for soils dominated by 2:1 and 1:1 clays, respectively. Comparison of the Oswin model combined with the Kelvin equation, with water potential estimated from θRH50 (Oswin-KRH50), CS model combined with the Arthur equation (CS-A), and CS-K model, with water potential obtained from θRH50 (CS-KRH50) indicated...

  13. EFFECT OF WATER CONTENT, TEMPERATURE AND AVERAGE DROPLET SIZE ON THE SETTLING VELOCITY OF WATER-IN-OIL EMULSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWater-in-oil (W/O emulsions are complex mixtures generally found in crude oil production in reservoirs and processing equipment. Sedimentation studies of water-oil emulsions enable the analysis of the fluid dynamic behavior concerning separation of this system composed of two immiscible liquids. Gravitational settling was evaluated in this article for a model emulsion system consisting of water and a Brazilian crude oil diluted in a clear mineral oil as organic phase. The effects of water content and temperature were considered in the study of sedimentation velocity of water-oil emulsions. Water contents between 10% and 50 % and temperatures of 25, 40 and 60 ºC were evaluated, and a Richardson-Zaki type correlation was obtained to calculate settling velocities as a function of the process variables investigated. Water contents and average droplet sizes were monitored at different levels in the settling equipment, thus enabling identification of the effect of these variables on the phenomena of sedimentation and coalescence of the emulsions studied. The results showed that the emulsion stability during sedimentation was governed by the emulsion water content, which yielded high settling velocities at low water contents, even when very small droplets were present. A quantitative analysis of the combined effects of drop size and droplet concentration supports the conclusion that a stronger effect is produced by the higher concentration of particles, compared with the relatively smaller effect of increasing the size of the droplets.

  14. Influence of heat consumers distribution and flashing vapours effect on steam consumption of evaporation plant of sugar factory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. A. Gromkovskii

    2016-01-01

    The article considered the influence of the heat consumers distribution and the flashing vapours effect juice for multipleevaporator sugar factory on the consumption the main production flow of heat transfer agent – water vapor...

  15. Glacial melt content of water use in the tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buytaert, Wouter; Moulds, Simon; Acosta, Luis; De Bièvre, Bert; Olmos, Carlos; Villacis, Marcos; Tovar, Carolina; Verbist, Koen M. J.

    2017-11-01

    Accelerated melting of glaciers is expected to have a negative effect on the water resources of mountain regions and their adjacent lowlands, with tropical mountain regions being among the most vulnerable. In order to quantify those impacts, it is necessary to understand the changing dynamics of glacial melting, but also to map how glacial meltwater contributes to current and future water use, which often occurs at considerable distance downstream of the terminus of the glacier. While the dynamics of tropical glacial melt are increasingly well understood and documented, major uncertainty remains on how the contribution of tropical glacial meltwater propagates through the hydrological system, and hence how it contributes to various types of human water use in downstream regions. Therefore, in this paper we present a detailed regional mapping of current water demand in regions downstream of the major tropical glaciers. We combine these maps with a regional water balance model to determine the dominant spatiotemporal patterns of the contribution of glacial meltwater to human water use at an unprecedented scale and resolution. We find that the number of users relying continuously on water resources with a high (>25%) long-term average contribution from glacial melt is low (391 000 domestic users, 398 km2 of irrigated land, and 11 MW of hydropower production), but this reliance increases sharply during drought conditions (up to 3.92 million domestic users, 2096 km2 of irrigated land, and 732 MW of hydropower production in the driest month of a drought year). A large proportion of domestic and agricultural users are located in rural regions where climate adaptation capacity tends to be low. Therefore, we suggest that adaptation strategies should focus on increasing the natural and artificial water storage and regulation capacity to bridge dry periods.

  16. Durability of silver nanoparticulate films within a silica matrix by flame assisted chemical vapour deposition for biocidal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ian; Shee, David W; Foster, Howard A; Varghese, Sajnu

    2011-09-01

    Healthcare acquired infection (HCAI) rates have come under increasing scrutiny in recent years and been a major priority for health professionals in the UK and elsewhere. Of particular concern is the rise of so called 'superbugs', or those resistant to conventional antibiotics, such as Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The reasons for this rise are many and complex, but one important factor is bacterial survival rates on wards and other hospital areas. In this respect, nanostructured biocidal surfaces offer a potentially powerful weapon in the fight against HCAI. In addition to providing a toxic environment to a range of infectious disease-causing bacteria (while remaining harmless to human health), any potential bioactive coated surface is required to be durable enough to withstand regular hospital cleaning methods without a reduction in biocidal activity over time and be economically viable to mass produce. The flame assisted chemical vapour deposition (FACVD) of silver and silver/silica films offer a means of producing such surfaces. In this work, we report investigations into a wide range of experimental factors and parameters affecting film durability, including burner head design and relative water vapour content in the flame environment. The produced films were assessed in terms of durability (by scratch testing) and relative silver content using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES).

  17. System Regulates the Water Contents of Fuel-Cell Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Arturo; Lazaroff, Scott

    2005-01-01

    An assembly of devices provides for both humidification of the reactant gas streams of a fuel cell and removal of the product water (the water generated by operation of the fuel cell). The assembly includes externally-sensing forward-pressure regulators that supply reactant gases (fuel and oxygen) at variable pressures to ejector reactant pumps. The ejector supply pressures depend on the consumption flows. The ejectors develop differential pressures approximately proportional to the consumption flow rates at constant system pressure and with constant flow restriction between the mixer-outlet and suction ports of the ejectors. For removal of product water from the circulating oxygen stream, the assembly includes a water/gas separator that contains hydrophobic and hydrophilic membranes. The water separator imposes an approximately constant flow restriction, regardless of the quality of the two-phase flow that enters it from the fuel cell. The gas leaving the water separator is nearly 100 percent humid. This gas is returned to the inlet of the fuel cell along with a quantity of dry incoming oxygen, via the oxygen ejector, thereby providing some humidification.

  18. Vapour-phase crystallisation of silica from SiF4-bearing volcanic gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. G. Jacobs

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic modelling of magmatic gases shows that SiF4 may be an important F-bearing species at the high pressures typical of magma reservoirs. Upon decompression during degassing, SiF4 will react with water vapour to form HF and silica. Common magmatic gases of high-T fumaroles seem to contain too little SiF4 to be a significant source of silica, except if extremely large amounts of gas percolate through a small volume of rock, as is the case in lava domes. Only if fluorine contents of the gases exceed 1 mol% detectable amounts of silica may be formed, but such high fluorine contents have not yet been observed in natural gases. Alternatively, silica may be formed by heating of cool SiF4-rich gases circulating in cooling lava bodies. We suggest that these mechanisms may be responsible for the deposition of crystalline silica, most probably cristobalite, observed in vesicles in lavas from Lewotolo volcano (Eastern Sunda Arc, Indonesia. Silica occurs as vapour-crystallised patches in vesicles, and is sometimes associated with F-phlogopite, which further supports F-rich conditions during deposition. Because of the connection between F-rich conditions and high-K volcanism, we propose that late-stage gaseous transport and deposition of silica may be more widespread in K-rich volcanoes than elsewhere, and long-term exposure to ash from eruptions of such volcanoes could therefore carry an increased risk for respiratory diseases. The dependence of SiF4/HF on temperature reported here differs from the current calibration used for temperature measurements of fumarolic gases by remote sensing techniques, and we suggest an updated calibration.

  19. Data and prediction of water content of high pressure nitrogen, methane and natural gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Froyna, E.W.; Lovland, J.

    2007-01-01

    New data for the equilibrium water content of nitrogen, methane and one natural gas mixture are presented. The new binary data and existing binary sets were compared to calculated values of dew point temperature using both the CPA (Cubic-Plus-Association) EoS and the GERG-water EoS. CPA is purely...... predictive (i.e. all binary interaction parameters are set equal to 0), while GERG-water uses a temperature dependent interaction parameter fitted to published data. The GERG-water model is proposed as an ISO standard for determining the water content of natural gas. The data sets for nitrogen cover...... conclusion is that GERG-water must be used with caution outside its specified working range. For some selected natural gas mixtures the two models also perform very much alike. The water content of the mixtures decreases with increasing amount of heavier components, and it seems that both models slightly...

  20. MR-based water content estimation in cartilage: design and validation of a method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Kristiansen, Maja Sophie; Ringgaard, Steffen

    cartilage samples from living animals (pig) and on 8 gelatin samples which water content was already known. For the data analysis a T1 intensity signal map software analyzer used. Finally, the method was validated after measuring and comparing 3 more cartilage samples in a living animal (pig). The obtained...... data was analyzed and the water content calculated. Then, the same samples were freeze-dried (this technique allows to take out all the water that a tissue contains) and we measured the water they contained. Results:The 37 Celsius degree system and the analysis can be reproduced in a similar way. MR T1...... map based water content sequences can provide information that, after being analyzed using a T1-map analysis software, can be interpreted as the water contained inside a cartilage tissue. The amount of water estimated using this method was similar to the one obtained at the dry-freeze procedure...

  1. Rapid assessment of water pollution by airborne measurement of chlorophyll content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvesen, J. C.; Weaver, E. C.; Millard, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Present techniques of airborne chlorophyll measurement are discussed as an approach to water pollution assessment. The differential radiometer, the chlorophyll correlation radiometer, and an infrared radiometer for water temperature measurements are described as the key components of the equipment. Also covered are flight missions carried out to evaluate the capability of the chlorophyll correlation radiometer in measuring the chlorophyll content in water bodies with widely different levels of nutrients, such as fresh-water lakes of high and low eutrophic levels, marine waters of high and low productivity, and an estuary with a high sediment content. The feasibility and usefulness of these techniques are indicated.

  2. The Effect of Water Content of Medium Containing Oryctes rhinoceros Larvae on Metarhizium anisopliae Pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Rini Indriyanti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff Sorokin (Ascomycota: Hypocrealeswould effectively infect the target host on the appropriate medium water content. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of water content of medium on the effectiveness of M. anisopliae fungus infection on O. rhinoceros larvae in the laboratory. Fifty healthy third instar larvae of O. rhinoceros were  obtained from field. The M. anisopliae obtained from Estate Crop Protection Board in Salatiga. The conidia density and viability of M. anisopliae were examined before used. The medium for maintaining the larva was the sawdust that had been sterilized. A total of 50 plastic cups were prepared to place 50 larvae (1 larva/cup. Each cup was filled with 100 g medium  of sawdust plus 2 g of M. anisopliae which was then stirred until mixed, with different water content: P1 (20%, P2 (40%, P3 (60%, P4 (80% and P5 (98%. The result indicated that  the water content of the medium affected the effectiveness of M. anisopliae fungus infection on O. rhinoceros larvae. The water content influenced the duration of larval mortality at each treatment. An important finding in this study is that controlling O. rhineceros larvae  with M. anisopliae can be done by manipulating the water content of medium. The benefit of this study may be used for the recommendation of O. rhinoceros pest control using M. anisopliae  with an effective water media content.

  3. The Effect of Preservative Methods on the Yield, Water Content and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The water content (water activity) of the treatments in relation to storage life of the dairy products was determined. All samples were smoke-dried for five hours and each was equilibrated to water activities of 0.11, 0.33 and 0.75 for two weeks undisturbed. A control experiment was also prepared. Analysis of variance was ...

  4. Remote sensing of atmospheric water content from Bhaskara SAMIR data. [using statistical linear regression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohil, B. S.; Hariharan, T. A.; Sharma, A. K.; Pandey, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    The 19.35 GHz and 22.235 GHz passive microwave radiometers (SAMIR) on board the Indian satellite Bhaskara have provided very useful data. From these data has been demonstrated the feasibility of deriving atmospheric and ocean surface parameters such as water vapor content, liquid water content, rainfall rate and ocean surface winds. Different approaches have been tried for deriving the atmospheric water content. The statistical and empirical methods have been used by others for the analysis of the Nimbus data. A simulation technique has been attempted for the first time for 19.35 GHz and 22.235 GHz radiometer data. The results obtained from three different methods are compared with radiosonde data. A case study of a tropical depression has been undertaken to demonstrate the capability of Bhaskara SAMIR data to show the variation of total water vapor and liquid water contents.

  5. SI-Traceable Water Content Measurements in Solids, Bulks, and Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Peter; Nielsen, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Methods such as Karl Fischer titration and Loss-on-Drying, commonly used for estimating moisture content in samples, have been in existence for many years, but have difficulties obtaining a direct calibration chain toward water content. In recognition of this challenge, the joint research project, METefnet, was funded by the European Metrology Research Programme in 2012. The goal of METefnet is to establish a European metrology infrastructure for water content measurement and to develop primary standards for unambiguous determination of water mass fraction in materials. Here, we describe the primary standard developed by Danish Technological Institute in METefnet. This standard establishes traceability of the water content of a sample to dewpoint temperature. The standard only measures water, and the measurement result is not affected by other components.

  6. The reliability and validity of hand-held refractometry water content measures of hydrogel lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jason J; Mitchell, G Lynn; Good, Gregory W

    2003-06-01

    To investigate within- and between-examiner reliability and validity of hand-held refractometry water content measures of hydrogel lenses. Nineteen lenses of various nominal water contents were examined by two examiners on two occasions separated by 1 hour. An Atago N2 hand-held refractometer was used for all water content measures. Lenses were presented in a random order to each examiner by a third party, and examiners were masked to any potential lens identifiers. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), 95% limits of agreement, and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to characterize the within- and between-examiner reliability and validity of lens water content measures. Within-examiner reliability was excellent (ICC, 0.97; 95% limits of agreement, -3.6% to +5.7%), and the inter-visit mean difference of 1.1 +/- 2.4% was not biased (p = 0.08). Between-examiner reliability was also excellent (ICC, 0.98; 95% limits of agreement, -4.1% to +3.9%). The mean difference between examiners was -0.1 +/- 2.1% (p = 0.83). The mean difference between the nominally reported water content and our water content measures was -2.1 +/- 1.7% (p water content of hydrogel lenses. However, with our sample of lenses, examiners tended to overestimate the nominal water content of hydrogel lenses. As discussed, this bias may be associated with the Brix scale used in refractometry and is material dependent. Therefore, investigators may need to account for bias when measuring hydrogel lens water content via hand-held refractometry.

  7. A New Method for Sensing Soil Water Content in Green Roofs Using Plant Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia F. Tapia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs have many benefits, but in countries with semiarid climates the amount of water needed for irrigation is a limiting factor for their maintenance. The use of drought-tolerant plants such as Sedum species, reduces the water requirements in the dry season, but, even so, in semiarid environments these can reach up to 60 L m−2 per day. Continuous substrate/soil water content monitoring would facilitate the efficient use of this critical resource. In this context, the use of plant microbial fuel cells (PMFCs emerges as a suitable and more sustainable alternative for monitoring water content in green roofs in semiarid climates. In this study, bench and pilot-scale experiments using seven Sedum species showed a positive relationship between current generation and water content in the substrate. PMFC reactors with higher water content (around 27% vs. 17.5% v/v showed larger power density (114.6 and 82.3 μW m−2 vs. 32.5 μW m−2. Moreover, a correlation coefficient of 0.95 (±0.01 between current density and water content was observed. The results of this research represent the first effort of using PMFCs as low-cost water content biosensors for green roofs.

  8. A New Method for Sensing Soil Water Content in Green Roofs Using Plant Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Natalia F; Rojas, Claudia; Bonilla, Carlos A; Vargas, Ignacio T

    2017-12-28

    Green roofs have many benefits, but in countries with semiarid climates the amount of water needed for irrigation is a limiting factor for their maintenance. The use of drought-tolerant plants such as Sedum species, reduces the water requirements in the dry season, but, even so, in semiarid environments these can reach up to 60 L m-2 per day. Continuous substrate/soil water content monitoring would facilitate the efficient use of this critical resource. In this context, the use of plant microbial fuel cells (PMFCs) emerges as a suitable and more sustainable alternative for monitoring water content in green roofs in semiarid climates. In this study, bench and pilot-scale experiments using seven Sedum species showed a positive relationship between current generation and water content in the substrate. PMFC reactors with higher water content (around 27% vs. 17.5% v/v) showed larger power density (114.6 and 82.3 μW m-2 vs. 32.5 μW m-2). Moreover, a correlation coefficient of 0.95 (±0.01) between current density and water content was observed. The results of this research represent the first effort of using PMFCs as low-cost water content biosensors for green roofs.

  9. Arsenic content in ground and canal waters of Punjab, North-West India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundal, H S; Singh, Kuldip; Singh, Dhanwinder

    2009-07-01

    Groundwater is the primary source of drinking water for more than 95% of the population in Punjab. The world health organization and US Environment Protection Agency recently established a new maximum contaminant level of 10 ppb for arsenic in drinking water. The arsenic concentration of deep water tube wells located in Amritsar city used for domestic supply for urban population ranged from 3.8 to 19.1 ppb with mean value of 9.8 ppb. Arsenic content in hand pump water varied from 9 to 85 ppb with a mean value of 29.5 ppb. According to the safe limit of As, 54% and 97%, water samples collected from deep water tube wells and hand pumps, respectively, were not fit for human consumption. Arsenic content in canal water varied from 0.3 to 8.8 ppb with a mean value of 2.89 ppb. Canal water has got higher oxidation potential followed by deep tube well and hand pump water. The present study suggests the regular monitoring of arsenic content in deep tube well and shallow hand pump waters by water testing laboratories. The consumption of water having elevated concentration of As above the safe limit must be discouraged. In south-western districts of Punjab, it recommends the use of canal water for drinking purposes and domestic use by rural and urban populations than ground water sources.

  10. Total water content in different areas of the human term placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, M A; Jacomo, K H; Benedetti, W L; Alvarez, H

    1975-01-01

    The authors study the total water content in two different areas (parabasal and subchorial), in 40 normal, full-term placentas. The water content is found to be different in these two areas. As an average, it is 0.90% higher in the parabasal area. This difference persists even after washing off the fetal placental blood by perfusión with saline. The difference in the total water content between both areas, which is added to other differences previously demonstrated, must be related to a different functional role of the placental areas.

  11. Germination, seedling growth and relative water content of shoot in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-18

    Aug 18, 2008 ... and plant growth under drought and salinity stress of field condition have difficulties. Therefore, NaCl and polyethy- lene glycol (PEG) compounds have been used to simulate osmotic stress effects in Petri dishes to maintain uniform water potential throughout the experimental period for plants (Kulkarni and ...

  12. Hydrogen production from high moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Xu, X. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

    1998-08-01

    By mixing wood sawdust with a corn starch gel, a viscous paste can be produced that is easily delivered to a supercritical flow reactor by means of a cement pump. Mixtures of about 10 wt% wood sawdust with 3.65 wt% starch are employed in this work, which the authors estimate to cost about $0.043 per lb. Significant reductions in feed cost can be achieved by increasing the wood sawdust loading, but such an increase may require a more complex pump. When this feed is rapidly heated in a tubular flow reactor at pressures above the critical pressure of water (22 MPa), the sawdust paste vaporizes without the formation of char. A packed bed of carbon catalyst in the reactor operating at about 650 C causes the tarry vapors to react with water, producing hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and some methane with a trace of carbon monoxide. The temperature and history of the reactor`s wall influence the hydrogen-methane product equilibrium by catalyzing the methane steam reforming reaction. The water effluent from the reactor is clean. Other biomass feedstocks, such as the waste product of biodiesel production, behave similarly. Unfortunately, sewage sludge does not evidence favorable gasification characteristics and is not a promising feedstock for supercritical water gasification.

  13. Effect of water deficit stress on proline contents, soluble sugars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the present work was to determine the mechanisms of tolerance of four sunflower hybrids; H1 = Azargol, H2 = Alstar, H3 = Hysun 33 and H4 = Hysun 25 to water stress under three different levels of irrigation regimes; WD1 = irrigation after 50 mm (normal irrigation), WD2 = 100 mm (mild stress) and WD3 ...

  14. A new method for measuring unfrozen water content of frozen soil based on soil resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liyun; Yang, Gengshe; Xi, Jiami; Jia, Hailiang; Qiu, Peiyong; Wang, Ke

    2017-04-01

    In the field of permafrost engineering, in order to determine the unfrozen water content of frozen soil in a more economical and quick way, a resistivity-based method is proposed to predict the unfrozen water content by building the relationship of resistivity (ρ), water content (θ) and temperature (T) through laboratory experiments. In the experiments, advanced Mile soil sample boxes are used to shape groups of soil samples with an initial water content of 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% separately. The experiment is composed of two parts. In the first part, oven drying method is used to dry the soil sample until the water content is less than 1%, and the resistivity of samples is continuously measured for each decrease of 0.5g water in soil samples; the relationship between water content (ρ) and resistivity (θ) at normal temperatures is established and expressed as a ρ-θ mode, which accords with power function. In the second part, the freezing method is used to freeze soil samples. When soil samples' temperature decreases from 0°C to -25°C, the resistivity of samples is continuously measured for each decrease of 0.1°C; the relationship between resistivity (ρ) and temperature (T) at minus degrees is established and expressed as a ρ-T mode, which accords with power function. The ρ-θ model at normal temperature is introduced to indirectly reflect the ρ-θu model at negative degree of temperature, which has been verified through a series of experiments with the NMR method. Combined with the ρ-T mode at minus degree of temperature, the relationship between unfrozen water content and temperature is deduced and established as θu-T model. By contrastive analysis, the accuracy to measure unfrozen water content with the resistivity-based method is validated by the NMR method, which is used to obtain the relationship between the unfrozen water contents and temperature. Based on the research results, the surface model related to resistivity, temperature and

  15. DETERMINATION OF WATER CONTENT IN PYROLYTIC TARS USING COULOMETRIC KARL-FISHER TITRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Jílková

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The liquid organic fraction of pyrolytic tar has a high energy value which makes possible its utilization as an energy source. However, before utilization, it is crucial to remove water from the liquid fraction. The presence of water reduces the energy value of pyrolytic tars. Water separation from the organic tar fraction is a complex process, since an emulsion can be readily formed. Therefore, after phase separation, it is important to know the residual water content in the organic phase and whether it is necessary to further dry it. The results presented in this manuscript focus on a water determination in liquid products from coal and biomass pyrolysis by a coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration. The Coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration is often used for a water content determination in gaseous, liquid and solid samples. However, to date, this titration method has not been used for a water determination in tars. A new water determination method, which has been tested on different types of tar, has been developed. The Coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration is suitable for tar samples with a water content not greater than 5 wt. %. The obtained experimental results indicate that the new introduced method can be used with a very good repeatability for a water content determination in tars.

  16. Origin of the water content of Europa : Evidence for pebble accretion ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnet, T.; Mousis, O.; Vernazza, P.

    2017-09-01

    Despite the fact that the observed gradient in water content among the Galilean satellites is globally consistent with a formation in a circum-Jovian disk on both sides of the snowline, the mechanisms that led to a low water mass fraction in Europa (˜8%) are not yet understood. Here we show that the water mass fraction of pebbles, as they drift inward, is globally consistent with the current water content of the Galilean system. This opens the possibility that each satellite could have formed through pebble accretion within a delimited region whose boundaries were defined by the position of the snowline.

  17. Laser-light backscattering response to water content and proteolysis in dry-cured ham

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulladosa, E.; Rubio-Celorio, M.; Skytte, Jacob Lercke

    2017-01-01

    of laser incidence) and to analyse the laser-light backscattering changes caused by additional hot air drying and proteolysis of dry-cured ham slices. The feasibility of the technology to determine water content and proteolysis (which is related to textural characteristics) of commercial sliced dry...... was only detected when the water content was decreased (618 mm(2) per 1% weight loss). Changes on scattering of light profiles were only observed when the water content changed. Although there is a good correlation between water content and LBI parameters when analysing commercial samples, proteolysis...... index has an important effect on the response. This fact hinder estimation of dry-cured ham composition and textural characteristics of dry-cured ham. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  18. LBA-ECO ND-02 Soil Volumetric Water Content, Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports monthly measured soil volumetric water content (VWC) from a rainfall exclusion experiment that was conducted from 1999-2001 at the km 67 Seca...

  19. LBA-ECO ND-02 Soil Gas and Water Content, Rainfall Exclusion, Tapajos National Forest

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports soil carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations and soil volumetric water content (VWC) from a rainfall exclusion...

  20. Determining water content in human nails with a portable near-infrared spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Mariko; Fukuhara, Tadao; Takahashi, Motoji; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2003-04-01

    The water content of human nail plates was determined using a portable near-infrared (NIR) spectrometer with an InGaAs photodiode array detector. NIR diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra were collected from 108 cut nail plates with different relative humidity and in vivo from fingernails. Partial least-squares (PLS) regression was applied to the NIR spectra in the 1115-1645 nm region to develop calibration models that determine the water content in the cut nail plates and fingernails. A good correlation was obtained between the NIR spectra and the water content measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the NIR measurement of both cut nail plates and fingernails. The results indicate that the water content in the nails can be determined very rapidly (1 s) by means of the portable NIR spectrometer and PLS regression.

  1. CAMEX-4 DC-8 NEVZOROV TOTAL CONDENSED WATER CONTENT SENSOR V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nevzorov probe is an instrument that measures the total water content of the sample of air which passes through it. It flew on the NASA DC-8 during the CAMEX-4...

  2. LBA-ECO ND-02 Soil Gas and Water Content, Rainfall Exclusion, Tapajos National Forest

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports soil carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations and soil volumetric water content (VWC) from a rainfall exclusion experiment...

  3. Fluoride content of still bottled waters available in the North-East of England, UK

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zohouri, F V; Moynihan, P J; Maguire, A

    2003-01-01

    .... All samples were still spring, mineral or distilled waters, sold in plastic bottles. The fluoride content of all samples was determined, in duplicate, using a Fluoride Ion Selective Electrode. The mean (+/- SD...

  4. Determination of moisture content and water activity in algae and fish by thermoanalytical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Mota da Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The water content in seafoods is very important since it affects their sensorial quality, microbiological stability, physical characteristics and shelf life. In this study, thermoanalytical techniques were employed to develop a simple and accurate method to determine water content (moisture by thermogravimetry (TG and water activity from moisture content values and freezing point depression using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The precision of the results suggests that TG is a suitable technique to determine moisture content in biological samples. The average water content values for fish samples of Lutjanus synagris and Ocyurus chrysurus species were 76.4 ± 5.7% and 63.3 ± 3.9%, respectively, while that of Ulva lactuca marine algae species was 76.0 ± 4.4%. The method presented here was also successfully applied to determine water activity in two species of fish and six species of marine algae collected in the Atlantic coastal waters of Bahia, in Brazil. Water activity determined in fish samples ranged from 0.946 - 0.960 and was consistent with values reported in the literature, i.e., 0.9 - 1.0. The water activity values determined in marine algae samples lay within the interval of 0.974 - 0.979.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of the water content and transport in rat lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobretsov, Egor A; Snytnikova, Olga A; Koptyug, Igor V; Kaptein, Robert; Tsentalovich, Yuri P

    2013-08-01

    NMR micro-imaging technique has been used for the measurement of the water content distribution in lenses of senescence-accelerated OXYS rats and age-matched Wistar rats, as well as for the study of water and phosphate transport in rat lenses. The water content in the lens cortex is significantly higher than in the nucleus; the spatial gradient of the water content becomes steeper with age. No difference in the water content distribution has been found between Wistar and OXYS rat lenses of matching ages, although cataract onset in the OXYS rat lens occurs much earlier due to the enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species associated with oxidative stress. This finding implies that cataract development does not lead to significant changes in water content distribution inside the lens. The water transport in rat lenses slows down with age, and in OXYS lenses it is somewhat faster than in lenses of Wistar rats, probably due to the compensatory response to oxidative stress. The application of (31)P MRI for the monitoring of phosphate penetration into a lens has been performed for the first time. It is found that phosphate transport in a lens is significantly slower than that of water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of moisture content and water activity in algae and fish by thermoanalytical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Vilma Mota da; Silva, Luciana Almeida; Andrade, Jailson B. de [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: jailsong@ufba.br; Veloso, Marcia C. da Cunha [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Bahia (CEFET-BA), Salvador, BA (Brazil)); Santos, Gislaine Vieira [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia

    2008-07-01

    The water content in seafoods is very important since it affects their sensorial quality, microbiological stability, physical characteristics and shelf life. In this study, thermoanalytical techniques were employed to develop a simple and accurate method to determine water content (moisture) by thermogravimetry (TG) and water activity from moisture content values and freezing point depression using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The precision of the results suggests that TG is a suitable technique to determine moisture content in biological samples. The average water content values for fish samples of Lutjanus synagris and Ocyurus chrysurus species were 76.4 {+-} 5.7% and 63.3 {+-} 3.9%, respectively, while that of Ulva lactuca marine algae species was 76.0 {+-} 4.4%. The method presented here was also successfully applied to determine water activity in two species of fish and six species of marine algae collected in the Atlantic coastal waters of Bahia, in Brazil. Water activity determined in fish samples ranged from 0.946 - 0.960 and was consistent with values reported in the literature, i.e., 0.9 - 1.0. The water activity values determined in marine algae samples lay within the interval of 0.974 - 0.979. (author)

  7. Silicon nanowire arrays as learning chemical vapour classifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niskanen, A O; Colli, A; White, R; Li, H W; Spigone, E; Kivioja, J M, E-mail: antti.niskanen@nokia.com [Nokia Research Center, Broers Building, 21 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-22

    Nanowire field-effect transistors are a promising class of devices for various sensing applications. Apart from detecting individual chemical or biological analytes, it is especially interesting to use multiple selective sensors to look at their collective response in order to perform classification into predetermined categories. We show that non-functionalised silicon nanowire arrays can be used to robustly classify different chemical vapours using simple statistical machine learning methods. We were able to distinguish between acetone, ethanol and water with 100% accuracy while methanol, ethanol and 2-propanol were classified with 96% accuracy in ambient conditions.

  8. Determining the virgin compression lines of reconstituted clays at different initial water contents

    OpenAIRE

    ZENG, Ling-Ling; HONG, Zhenshun; CUI, Yu-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Forty-eight consolidometer tests were performed on various natural clays and a kaolinite clay reconstituted in the laboratory at different initial water contents using a modified consolidometer apparatus. These data together with those published previously allow a multi-regression analysis for the development of an approach for determining the intrinsic compression parameters that depend on initial water content and liquid limit. The approach proposed by Burland can be thereby extended to pro...

  9. The correlation of metal content in medicinal plants and their water extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranđelović Saša S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of some medicinal plants and their water extracts from South East Serbia is determined on the basis of metal content using atomic absorption spectrometry. The two methods were used for the preparation of water extracts, to examine the impact of the preparation on the content of metals in them. Content of investigated metals in both water extracts is markedly lower then in medicinal plants, but were higher in water extract prepared by method (I, with exception of lead content. The coefficients of extraction for the observed metal can be represented in the following order: Zn > Mn > Pb > Cu > Fe. Correlation coefficients between the metal concentration in the extract and total metal content in plant material vary in the range from 0.6369 to 0.9956. This indicates need the plants to be collected and grown in the unpolluted area and to examine the metal content. The content of heavy metals in the investigated medicinal plants and their water extracts is below the maximum allowable values, so they are safe to use.

  10. [Differential approach to spring water choice regarding fluoride content for caries prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeeva, I M; Protsenko, A S; Svistunova, E G

    2013-01-01

    The research includes an investigation of the tap water in different districts of Moscow. It was found out that Moscow tap water contains little fluoride, the difference between districts and okrugs is of no consequence. There is no centralized water fluoridization in Moscow therefore the authors suggest using bottled potable water with sufficient fluoride level. The fluoride concentration in one hundred of the most popular and wide-spread bottled potable water labels was examined. High in fluoride and low in fluoride labels were identified as well as the labels with the optimal fluoride content. Some practical guidelines for selection of bottled potable water depending on the quantity of liquid consummation were elaborated.

  11. A Simple Beta-Function Model for Soil-Water Repellency as a Function of Water and Organic Carbon Contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunarathna, Anurudda Kumara; Kawamoto, Ken; Møldrup, Per

    2010-01-01

    (θ) is based on measurement of WR on air-dry soil and three additional model parameters: the water contents at which the maximum WR (highest α) occurs and where WR ceases (α = 90 degrees), and the maximum α value. The MED data for three data sets from literature comprising WR measurements across moisture......Soil-water content (θ) and soil organic carbon (SOC) are key factors controlling the occurrence and magnitude of soil-water repellency (WR). Although expressions have recently been proposed to describe the nonlinear variation of WR with θ, the inclusion of easily measurable parameters in predictive...... WR(θ) models is still lacking. In this study, a simple empirical beta function was suggested to describe the effect of changing soil-water content on the change of WR given as apparent contact angle (α) measured by the molarity of ethanol droplet (MED) method. The beta function for predicting α...

  12. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Nitrogen Content for Spatially Explicit Carbon and Water Cycle Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Miller, J. R.; Chen, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    Foliage nitrogen concentration is a determinant of photosynthetic capacity of leaves, thereby an important input to ecological models for estimating terrestrial carbon and water budgets. Recently, spectrally continuous airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery has proven to be useful for retrieving an important related parameter, total chlorophyll content at both leaf and canopy scales. Thus remote sensing of vegetation biochemical parameters has promising potential for improving the prediction of global carbon and water balance patterns. In this research, we explored the feasibility of estimating leaf nitrogen content using hyperspectral remote sensing data for spatially explicit estimation of carbon and water budgets. Multi-year measurements of leaf biochemical contents of seven major boreal forest species were carried out in northeastern Ontario, Canada. The variation of leaf chlorophyll and nitrogen content in response to various growth conditions, and the relationship between them,were investigated. Despite differences in plant type (deciduous and evergreen), leaf age, stand growth conditions and developmental stages, leaf nitrogen content was strongly correlated with leaf chlorophyll content on a mass basis during the active growing season (r2=0.78). With this general correlation, leaf nitrogen content was estimated from leaf chlorophyll content at an accuracy of RMSE=2.2 mg/g, equivalent to 20.5% of the average measured leaf nitrogen content. Based on this correlation and a hyperspectral remote sensing algorithm for leaf chlorophyll content retrieval, the spatial variation of leaf nitrogen content was inferred from the airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery acquired by Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI). A process-based ecological model Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) was used for estimating terrestrial carbon and water budgets. In contrast to the scenario with leaf nitrogen content assigned as a constant value without

  13. Monitoring of Water Content in Building Materials Using a Wireless Passive Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Stojanović

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an innovative design of a wireless, passive LC sensor and its application for monitoring of water content in building materials. The sensor was embedded in test material samples so that the internal water content of the samples could be measured with an antenna by tracking the changes in the sensor’s resonant frequency. Since the dielectric constant of water was much higher compared with that of the test samples, the presence of water in the samples increased the capacitance of the LC circuit, thus decreasing the sensor’s resonant frequency. The sensor is made up of a printed circuit board in one metal layer and water content has been determined for clay brick and autoclaved aerated concrete block, both widely used construction materials. Measurements were conducted at room temperature using a HP-4194A Impedance/Gain-Phase Analyzer instrument.

  14. Determination of Water Content in THF Based on Chemical Shift Differences in Solution NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Kyung; Park, Hey Rhee; Lee, Yunhee; Choi, Myung Gil; Chang, Suk-Kyu; Ahn, Sangdoo [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    In this study, H NMR chemical shift differences were used as a probe for water content in organic solvents. Changes in chemical shift differences reflecting the competition for hydrogen bondings between fluoride ions and water were linearly proportional to water content within certain ranges. Comparison between the results obtained using the developed sensor and Karl Fischer showed that this method could be useful to understand water sensing mechanisms of dye and that the probes were sensitive to water content in organic solvents. NMR spectroscopy is one of the most powerful and versatile analytical techniques for the analysis of molecular structures and properties. Chemical shifts can be regarded as the most important information that can be obtained from NMR in regard to molecular structures. Changes in chemical and/or physical environments affecting electronic distributions result in alterations in the chemical shifts of the nuclei involved.

  15. Estimating the Relative Water Content of Single Leaves from Optical Polarization Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long-term goals of remote sensing research. For monitoring canopy water status, existing approaches such as the Crop Water Stress Index and the Equivalent Water Thickness have limitations. The CWSI does not work well in humid regions, requires estimates of the vapor pressure deficit near the canopy during the remote sensing over-flight and, once stomata close, provides little information regarding the canopy water status. The EWI is based upon the physics of water-light interaction, not plant physiology. In this research, we applied optical polarization techniques to monitor the VISNIR light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both changed nonlinearly as each leaf dried, R increasing and T decreasing. Our results tie changes in the VISNIR R and T to leaf physiological changes linking the light scattered out of the drying leaf interior to its relative water content and to changes in leaf cellular structure and pigments. Our results suggest remotely sensing the physiological water status of a single leaf and perhaps of a plant canopy might be possible in the future. However, using our approach to estimate the water status of a leaf does not appear possible at present, because our results display too much variability that we do not yet understand.

  16. Estimating the Relative Water Content of Single Leaves from Optical Polarization Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Dahlgren, R. P.

    2016-12-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. For monitoring canopy water status, existing approaches such as the Crop Water Stress Index and the Equivalent Water Thickness have limitations. The CWSI does not work well in humid regions, requires estimates of the vapor pressure deficit near the canopy during the remote sensing over-flight and, once stomata close, provides little information regarding the canopy water status. The EWI is based upon the physics of water-light interaction, not plant physiology. In this research, we applied optical polarization techniques to monitor the VIS/NIR light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both changed nonlinearly as each leaf dried, R increasing and T decreasing. Our results tie changes in the VIS/NIR R and T to leaf physiological changes - linking the light scattered out of the drying leaf interior to its relative water content and to changes in leaf cellular structure and pigments. Our results suggest remotely sensing the physiological water status of a single leaf - and perhaps of a plant canopy - might be possible in the future. However, using our approach to estimate the water status of a leaf does not appear possible at present, because our results display too much variability that we do not yet understand.

  17. Levels of selected carcinogens and toxicants in vapour from electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniewicz, Maciej Lukasz; Knysak, Jakub; Gawron, Michal; Kosmider, Leon; Sobczak, Andrzej; Kurek, Jolanta; Prokopowicz, Adam; Jablonska-Czapla, Magdalena; Rosik-Dulewska, Czeslawa; Havel, Christopher; Jacob, Peyton; Benowitz, Neal

    2014-03-01

    Electronic cigarettes, also known as e-cigarettes, are devices designed to imitate regular cigarettes and deliver nicotine via inhalation without combusting tobacco. They are purported to deliver nicotine without other toxicants and to be a safer alternative to regular cigarettes. However, little toxicity testing has been performed to evaluate the chemical nature of vapour generated from e-cigarettes. The aim of this study was to screen e-cigarette vapours for content of four groups of potentially toxic and carcinogenic compounds: carbonyls, volatile organic compounds, nitrosamines and heavy metals. Vapours were generated from 12 brands of e-cigarettes and the reference product, the medicinal nicotine inhaler, in controlled conditions using a modified smoking machine. The selected toxic compounds were extracted from vapours into a solid or liquid phase and analysed with chromatographic and spectroscopy methods. We found that the e-cigarette vapours contained some toxic substances. The levels of the toxicants were 9-450 times lower than in cigarette smoke and were, in many cases, comparable with trace amounts found in the reference product. Our findings are consistent with the idea that substituting tobacco cigarettes with e-cigarettes may substantially reduce exposure to selected tobacco-specific toxicants. E-cigarettes as a harm reduction strategy among smokers unwilling to quit, warrants further study. (To view this abstract in Polish and German, please see the supplementary files online.).

  18. Porous media matric potential and water content measurements during parabolic flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norikane, Joey H.; Jones, Scott B.; Steinberg, Susan L.; Levine, Howard G.; Or, Dani

    2005-01-01

    Control of water and air in the root zone of plants remains a challenge in the microgravity environment of space. Due to limited flight opportunities, research aimed at resolving microgravity porous media fluid dynamics must often be conducted on Earth. The NASA KC-135 reduced gravity flight program offers an opportunity for Earth-based researchers to study physical processes in a variable gravity environment. The objectives of this study were to obtain measurements of water content and matric potential during the parabolic profile flown by the KC-135 aircraft. The flight profile provided 20-25 s of microgravity at the top of the parabola, while pulling 1.8 g at the bottom. The soil moisture sensors (Temperature and Moisture Acquisition System: Orbital Technologies, Madison, WI) used a heat-pulse method to indirectly estimate water content from heat dissipation. Tensiometers were constructed using a stainless steel porous cup with a pressure transducer and were used to measure the matric potential of the medium. The two types of sensors were placed at different depths in a substrate compartment filled with 1-2 mm Turface (calcined clay). The ability of the heat-pulse sensors to monitor overall changes in water content in the substrate compartment decreased with water content. Differences in measured water content data recorded at 0, 1, and 1.8 g were not significant. Tensiometer readings tracked pressure differences due to the hydrostatic force changes with variable gravity. The readings may have been affected by changes in cabin air pressure that occurred during each parabola. Tensiometer porous membrane conductivity (function of pore size) and fluid volume both influence response time. Porous media sample height and water content influence time-to-equilibrium, where shorter samples and higher water content achieve faster equilibrium. Further testing is needed to develop these sensors for space flight applications.

  19. An accurate retrieval of leaf water content from mid to thermal infrared spectra using continuous wavelet analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ullah, S.; Skidmore, A.K.; Naeem, M.; Schlerf, M.

    2012-01-01

    Leaf water content determines plant health, vitality, photosynthetic efficiency and is an important indicator of drought assessment. The retrieval of leaf water content from the visible to shortwave infrared spectra is well known. Here for the first time, we estimated leaf water content from the mid

  20. Water content of acacia honey dertermined by two established methods and by optothermal window

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szopos, S.; Doka, O.; Bicanic, D.D.; Ajtony, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The major objective of the research study described here was to explore the potential of the optothermal window (OW) technique as a new approach towards a simple, rapid determination of water content in honey. Water, major component of foods, influences their physical and chemical properties. Single

  1. MR-based Water Content Estimation in Cartilage: Design and Validation of a Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Kristiansen, Maja Sofie; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    was costumed and programmed. Finally, we validated the method after measuring and comparing 3 more cartilage samples in a living animal (pig). The obtained data was analyzed and the water content calculated. Then, the same samples were freeze-dried (this technique allows to take out all the water that a tissue...

  2. Modeling the release of E. coli D21g with transients in water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transients in water content are well known to mobilize colloids that are retained in the vadose zone. However, there is no consensus on the proper model formulation to simulate colloid release during drainage and imbibition. We present a model that relates colloid release to changes in the air-water...

  3. Ultrasensitive 4-methylumbelliferone fluorimetric determination of water contents in aprotic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłucińska, Katarzyna; Jurczakowski, Rafał; Maksymiuk, Krzysztof; Michalska, Agata

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach to the quantification of relatively small amounts of water present in low polarity, aprotic solvents is proposed. This method takes advantage of protolitic reaction of 4-methylumbelliferone dissolved in the solvent with water, acting as a base. The low emission intensity neutral 4-methylumbelliferone is transformed in reaction with water to a highly fluorescent anionic form. Thus the increase in emission intensity is observed for increasing water contents in aprotic solvents. For low water contents and highly lipophilic solvents, this method yields (in practical conditions) higher sensitivity compared to biamperometric Karl Fischer titration method in volumetric mode. It is also shown that organic compounds of protolitic character (amines, acids) not only interfere with water contents determination but increase the sensitivity of emission vs. water contents dependence. Introduction of aqueous solution of strong acid or base (HCl or NaOH) has similar effect on the system as introduction of pure water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pb and Cd Contents in Soil, Water, and Trees at an Afforestation Site, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Nancai; Chen, Bufeng; Liu, Shuguang

    2015-11-01

    Pb and Cd contents in 13 plantation tree species (leaf and branch components), soil, water (groundwater and river water) at a young (3-5 year-old) seashore afforestation stand were investigated in Nansha district, Guangzhou city in southern China. The results showed that (1) soil, rather than water or trees, had the highest content of both Pb (averagely 48.79 mg/kg) and Cd (0.50 mg/kg), demonstrating that soil might function as a major reservoir for extraneously derived heavy metals; (2) Pb content was higher in branches than in leaves, but Cd content appeared similar in both components, implying possibly different accumulation mechanisms in trees; (3) Pb and Cd appeared to accumulate differently among some tree taxa, whereas almost no significant difference was detected between introduced and indigenous species. The study indicated that trees were potentially useful to remediate sites contaminated with Pb and Cd in the urbanized areas.

  5. Quality of Water Content, Diastase Enzyme Activity and Hidroximetilfurfural (HMF in Rubber and Rambutan Honey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulis Setio Toto Harjo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to determine the water content, diastase enzyme activity and HMF of the rubber and rambutan honey. The method was a laboratory experiments with statistical analysis unpaired student t-test by two treatments and fifteen replications. The variable of this research were water content, diastase enzyme activity and HMF. The results of rubber and rambutan honey showed that there were significant difference effect (P0.05 that is 11 DN and there is a highly significant difference (P<0.01 on the HMF content of 17.23±0.54 mg/kg and 7.61±0.23 mg/kg. Rubber and rambutan honey have good quality based on the water content, diastase enzyme activity and HMF. It was concluded that the rubber and rambutan honey used were of good quality because it has met the requirements of SNI.

  6. Novel method for the determination of water content and higher heating value of pyrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Isah; Kabir, Feroz Kazi; Abakr, Yousif; Yusuf, Suzana; Razzaque, Abdur

    2015-01-01

    This research provides a novel approach for the determination of water content and higher heating value of pyrolysis oil. Pyrolysis oil from Napier grass was used in this study. Water content was determined with pH adjustment using a Karl Fisher titration unit. An equation for actual water in the oil was developed and used, and the results were compared with the traditional Karl Fisher method. The oil was found to have between 42 and 64% moisture under the same pyrolysis condition depending o...

  7. Comparing electronic probes for volumetric water content of low-density feathermoss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overduin, P.P.; Yoshikawa, K.; Kane, D.L.; Harden, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - Feathermoss is ubiquitous in the boreal forest and across various land-cover types of the arctic and subarctic. A variety of affordable commercial sensors for soil moisture content measurement have recently become available and are in use in such regions, often in conjunction with fire-susceptibility or ecological studies. Few come supplied with calibrations suitable or suggested for soils high in organics. Aims to test seven of these sensors for use in feathermoss, seeking calibrations between sensor output and volumetric water content. Design/methodology/approach - Measurements from seven sensors installed in live, dead and burned feathermoss samples, drying in a controlled manner, were compared to moisture content measurements. Empirical calibrations of sensor output to water content were determined. Findings - Almost all of the sensors tested were suitable for measuring the moss sample water content, and a unique calibration for each sensor for this material is presented. Differences in sensor design lead to changes in sensitivity as a function of volumetric water content, affecting the spatial averaging over the soil measurement volume. Research limitations/implications - The wide range of electromagnetic sensors available include frequency and time domain designs with variations in wave guide and sensor geometry, the location of sensor electronics and operating frequency. Practical implications - This study provides information for extending the use of electromagnetic sensors to feathermoss. Originality/value - A comparison of volumetric water content sensor mechanics and design is of general interest to researchers measuring soil water content. In particular, researchers working in wetlands, boreal forests and tundra regions will be able to apply these results. ?? Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  8. [Survey on children's dental fluorosis and fluoride content in urine after defluridation to improve drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Zhang, J; Chen, Z; Du, G

    2000-07-01

    The authors surveyed the dental fluorosis and fluoride content in urine of 8-12 years old children's in 1993 to 1999 for the evaluation of the efficiency to prevent endemic fluorosis after defluoridation to change drinking water source in Guangdong Province. Three villages: slight fluorosis area in Dazhai village, middle fluorosis area in Hupi village and severe fluorosis area in Anquan village in Fengshun County were surveyed. The results showed that the fluoride contents in drinking water were 1 mg/L (or less) in Anquan village, at the same time the prevalence of dental fluorosis and indexes of dental fluorosis were decreasing as changing water time. Fluoride contents in urine were normal. But in other two villages, the fluoride contents in drinking water exceeded 1 mg/L, therefore the children's prevalence rates and indexes of dental fluorosis were higher than the national standards. It is important to keep fluoride contents in drinking water under 1 mg/L for preventing endemic fluorosis by defluoridation to improve drinking water.

  9. Developments in vapour cloud explosion blast modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mercx, W.P.M.; Berg, A.C. van den; Hayhurst, C.J.; Robertson, N.J.; Moran, K.C.

    2000-01-01

    TNT Equivalency methods are widely used for vapour cloud explosion blast modeling. Presently, however, other types of models are available which do not have the fundamental objections TNT Equivalency models have. TNO Multi-Energy method is increasingly accepted as a more reasonable alternative to be

  10. Virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.; Terpstra, P.; Koopmans, M.; Duizer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Viral contamination of surfaces is thought to be important in transmission. Chemical disinfection can be an effective means of intervention, but little is known about the virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) against enteric and respiratory viruses. Aim: To measure the

  11. Water content estimation of natural glasses and melt inclusions: a Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicola, Stefania; Di Genova, Danilo; Romano, Claudia; Vona, Alessandro; Fanara, Sara; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.; Landi, Patrizia

    2017-04-01

    Water is the most abundant volatile dissolved in silicate melts and strongly affects melt structure, magma transport and eruptive style. Raman spectroscopy can give insight into the silicate structure and water content of silicate melts. This technique presents several advantages such as: 1) high-spatial resolution; 2) non-destructive character; 3) minor sample preparation 4) crystals detection; and 5) the possibility to perform in-situ investigations at high temperature and pressure. Several approaches to estimate the water content of silicate glasses (mostly iron-free) and melt inclusions have been presented based on internal and/or external calibration. Here, we discuss these different approaches using a wide range of chemical composition of glasses, which has never been investigated so far. We used 25 natural samples from basaltic to rhyolitic composition and water content up to 7wt% (independently measured). By using two different Raman spectrometers we also explore potential causes for variations in the estimation of water content due to instrumental effects. Based on the results of this study, we show that the difference in instrumental response is the main factor against a unique calibration for the estimation of water content. On the other hand, the choice of the analytical procedure depends significantly on the iron content and its oxidation state. We applied the proposed model to a set of melt inclusions trapped in crystals belonging to the Green Tuff eruption (Pantelleria Island, Italy) in order to provide insights on magma pre-eruptive storage conditions (i.e. dissolved water content and iron oxidation state). Finally, we show a simple correlation between the glass structure as inferred by Raman spectroscopy and the glass transition temperature.

  12. A High Resolution Capacitive Sensing System for the Measurement of Water Content in Crude Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zubair Aslam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a non-intrusive system to measure ultra-low water content in crude oil. The system is based on a capacitance to phase angle conversion method. Water content is measured with a capacitance sensor comprising two semi-cylindrical electrodes mounted on the outer side of a glass tube. The presence of water induces a capacitance change that in turn converts into a phase angle, with respect to a main oscillator. A differential sensing technique is adopted not only to ensure high immunity against temperature variation and background noise, but also to eliminate phase jitter and amplitude variation of the main oscillator that could destabilize the output. The complete capacitive sensing system was implemented in hardware and experiment results using crude oil samples demonstrated that a resolution of ±50 ppm of water content in crude oil was achieved by the proposed design.

  13. The influence of changes in water content on the electrical resistivity of a natural unsaturated loess

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu Jun

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive methods of measuring water content in soils have been extensively developed in the last decades, especially in soil science. Among these methods, the measurements based on the electrical resistivity are simple and reliable thanks to the clear relationship between the water content and the electrical resistivity of soils. In this work, a new electrical resistivity probe was developed to monitor the change in local water content in the triaxial apparatus. The probe is composed of two-pair of electrodes, and an electrical current is induced through the soil at the vicinity of the contact between the probe and the specimen. Some experimental data on the changes in resistivity with the degree of saturation were obtained in specimens of a natural unsaturated loess from Northern France. Two theoretical models of resistivity were also used to analyze the obtained data. Results are finally discussed with respect to the loess's water retention properties.

  14. Assessment of a calibration procedure to estimate soil water content with Sentek Diviner 2000 capacitance probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallo, G.; Giordano, G.; Provenzano, G.

    2012-04-01

    In irrigated systems, soil water content is a major factor determining plant growth. Irrigation scheduling criteria are often related to measurements of soil water content or matric potential. Strategies to manage irrigation can be used to optimize irrigation water use or to maximize crop yield and/or quality, in order to increase the net return for the farmer. Of course, whatever criterion is adopted to schedule irrigation and in particular when crop water stress conditions are considered, the accurate monitoring of the water content in the soil profile, could allow to verify the exact irrigation timing, defined according to the crop response to water stress. Currently many methods are available for determining soil water content on a volume basis (m3m-3) or a tension basis (MPa), as described by Robinson (2008). Recently, distributed fiber optic temperature measurement, has been assessed as a new technique for indirect and precise estimation of soil water contents. Over the past decade Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) probes, allowing to measure the apparent dielectric constant of the soil (K), indirectly related to the volumetric water content (θv), have been improved, due to the good potentiality of capacitance based sensors to in situ measurements of soil water content. However, due to the high variability of K with soil minerals and dry plants tissues, it necessary to proceed to a specific calibration of the sensor for each soil (Baumhardt et al., 2000), even to take into account the effect of soil temperature, bulk density and water salinity (Al Ain et al., 2009). . According to Paltineanu and Starr (1997), the precision of the calibration equation, obtained with in situ measurements, mainly depends on the errors related to the sampling of the soil volume investigated by the sensor, that must be done accurately. For swelling/shrinking soils, the changes of soil bulk volume with water content cause modifications in the geometry of some if not all the

  15. Inactivation of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in Rumen Content- or Feces-Contaminated Drinking Water for Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Tong; Zhao, Ping; West, Joe W.; Bernard, John K.; Cross, Heath G.; Doyle, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    Cattle drinking water is a source of on-farm Escherichia coli O157:H7 transmission. The antimicrobial activities of disinfectants to control E. coli O157:H7 in on-farm drinking water are frequently neutralized by the presence of rumen content and manure that generally contaminate the drinking water. Different chemical treatments, including lactic acid, acidic calcium sulfate, chlorine, chlorine dioxide, hydrogen peroxide, caprylic acid, ozone, butyric acid, sodium benzoate, and competing E. c...

  16. [Metallic content of water sources and drinkable water in industrial cities of Murmansk region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doushkina, E V; Dudarev, A A; Sladkova, Yu N; Zachinskaya, I Yu; Chupakhin, V S; Goushchin, I V; Talykova, L V; Nikanov, A N

    2015-01-01

    Performed in 2013, sampling of centralized and noncentralized water-supply and analysis of engineering technology materials on household water use in 6 cities of Murmansk region (Nikel, Zapolyarny, Olenegorsk, Montchegorsk, Apatity, Kirovsk), subjected to industrial emissions, enabled to evaluate and compare levels of 15 metals in water sources (lakes and springs) and the cities' drinkable waters. Findings are that some cities lack sanitary protection zones for water sources, most cities require preliminary water processing, water desinfection involves only chlorination. Concentrations of most metals in water samples from all the cities at the points of water intake, water preparation and water supply are within the hygienic norms. But values significantly (2-5 times) exceeding MACs (both in water sources and in drinkable waters of the cities) were seen for aluminium in Kirovsk city and for nickel in Zapolarny and Nikel cities. To decrease effects of aluminium, nickel and their compounds in the three cities' residents (and preserve health of the population and offsprings), the authors necessitate specification and adaptation of measures to purify the drinkable waters from the pollutants. In all the cities studied, significantly increased concentrations of iron and other metals were seen during water transportation from the source to the city supply--that necessitates replacement of depreciated water supply systems by modern ones. Water taken from Petchenga region springs demonstrated relatively low levels of metals, except from strontium and barium.

  17. A rapid method for measuring soil water content in the field with a areometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calbo Adonai Gimenez

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of a rapid method to evaluate the soil water content (U can be an important tool to determine the moment to irrigate. The soil areometer consists of an elongated hydrostatic balance with a weighing pan, a graduated neck, a float and a pynometric flask. In this work an areometer was adapted to rapidly measure soil water content without the need of drying the soil. The expression U = (M A - M AD/(M M -M A was used to calculate the soil water content. In this equation M M is the mass to level the areometer with the pycnometric flask filled with water, M A the mass to level the areometer with a mass M M of soil in the pycnometer, the volume being completed with water, and similarly M AD the mass added to the pan to level the areometer with a mass M M of dried soil in the pycnometric flask. The convenience of this method is that the values M M and M AD are known. Consequently, the decision on irrigation can be made after a measurement that takes, about, ten minutes. The procedure involves only stirring the soil with water for at least 2 minutes to remove the adhered air. The soil water content data obtained with the areometric method were similar to those obtained weighing the soil before and after drying to constant weight, in an oven at 105º C.

  18. The application of δ¹⁸O and δD for understanding water pools and fluxes in a Typha marsh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijoor, Neeta S; Pataki, Diane E; Rocha, Adrian V; Goulden, Michael L

    2011-10-01

    The δ¹⁸O and δD composition of water pools (leaf, root, standing water and soil water) and fluxes [transpiration (T), evaporation (E)] were used to understand ecohydrological processes in a managed Typha latifolia L. freshwater marsh. We observed isotopic steady-state T and deep rooting in Typha. The isotopic mass balance of marsh standing water showed that E accounted for 3% of the total water loss, T accounted for 17% and subsurface drainage (D) accounted for the majority (80%). There was a vertical gradient in water vapour content and isotopic composition within and above the canopy sufficient for constructing an isotopic mass balance of water vapour during some sampling periods. During these periods, the proportion of T in evapotranspiration (T/ET) was between 56 ± 17% and 96 ± 67%, and the estimated error was relatively high (>37%) because of non-local, background sources in vapour. Independent estimates of T/ET using eddy covariance measurements yielded similar mean values during the Typha growing season. The various T/ET estimates agreed that T was the dominant source of marsh vapour loss in the growing season. The isotopic mass balance of water vapour yielded reasonable results, but the mass balance of standing water provided more definitive estimates of water losses. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Water Content or Water Activity: What Rules Crispy Behavior in Bread Crust?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, van N.H.; Primo-Martin, C.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Tromp, R.H.; Hamer, R.J.; Vliet, van T.

    2008-01-01

    A dry crust loses its crispness when water migrates into the crust. It is not clear if it is the amount of water absorbed or the water activity (aw) that leads to a loss of crispness. The hysteresis effect observed when recording a water sorption isotherm allowed us to study the effects of aw and

  20. Water content or water activity: What rules crispy behavior in bread crust?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, N.H. van; Primo-Martín, C.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Tromp, R.H.; Hamer, R.J.; Vliet, T. van

    2008-01-01

    A dry crust loses its crispness when water migrates into the crust. It is not clear if it is the amount of water absorbed or the water activity (a w) that leads to a loss of crispness. The hysteresis effect observed when recording a water sorption isotherm allowed us to study the effects of aw and

  1. Computation of porosity and water content from geophysical logs, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, P.H.

    1996-12-31

    Neutron and density logs acquired in boreholes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada are used to determine porosity and water content as a function of depth. Computation of porosity requires an estimate of grain density, which is provided by core data, mineralogical data, or is inferred from rock type where neither core nor mineralogy are available. The porosity estimate is merged with mineralogical data acquired by X-ray diffraction to compute the volumetric fractions of major mineral groups. The resulting depth-based portrayal of bulk rock composition is equivalent to a whole rock analysis of mineralogy and porosity. Water content is computed from epithermal and thermal neutron logs. In the unsaturated zone, the density log is required along with a neutron log. Water content can also be computed from dielectric logs, which were acquired in only a fraction of the boreholes, whereas neutron logs were acquired in all boreholes. Mineralogical data are used to compute a structural (or bound) water estimate, which is subtracted from the total water estimate from the neutron-density combination. Structural water can be subtracted only from intervals where mineralogical analyses are available; otherwise only total water can be reported. The algorithms and procedures are applied to logs acquired during 1979 to 1984 at Yucca Mountain. Examples illustrate the results. Comparison between computed porosity and core measurements shows systematic differences ranging from 0.005 to 0.04. These values are consistent with a sensitivity analysis using uncertainty parameters for good logging conditions. Water content from core measurements is available in only one borehole, yielding a difference between computed and core-based water content of 0.006.

  2. Pore-Scale Transport of Strontium During Dynamic Water Content Changes in the Unsaturated Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, W.; Kibbey, T. C. G.; Papelis, C.

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic water content changes in the unsaturated zone caused by natural and manmade processes, such as evaporation, rainfall, and irrigation, have an effect on contaminant mobility. In general, in the unsaturated zone, evaporation causes an increase in contaminant concentrations, potentially leading to sorption of contaminants on aquifer materials or precipitation of crystalline or amorphous phases. On the other hand, increase of water content may result in dissolution of precipitated phases and increased mobility of contaminants. The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative model for the transport of strontium through sand under dynamic water content conditions, as a function of strontium concentration, pH, and ionic strength. Strontium was selected as a surrogate for strontium-90, a by-product of nuclear reactions. The dynamic water content was determined using an automated device for rapidly measuring the hysteretic capillary pressure—saturation relationship, followed by ambient air evaporation, and gravimetric water content measurement. Strontium concentrations were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Flow interruption experiments were conducted to determine whether equilibrium conditions existed for a given flowrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to visualize the treated quartz sand particles and the distribution of strontium on sand grains was determined using elemental maps created by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Strontium behavior appears to be pH dependent as well as ionic strength dependent under these conditions.

  3. THE EFFECT OF WATER CONTENT UPON THE RATE OF HEAT DENATURATION OF CRYSTALLIZABLE EGG ALBUMIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, H A

    1933-09-20

    1. The denaturation rate of partially dried crystallizable egg albumin is greatly decreased by decreasing its water content. 2. The temperature of denaturation, defined as the temperature at which half of the protein becomes insoluble in distilled water after a definite time of heating, is a linear function of the relative humidity with which the protein is in equilibrium. 3. By applying the Arrhenius equation it is shown that the rate of heat denaturation at a given temperature is an exponential function of the relative humidity. 4. The application of the observed relations to the analysis of the mechanism of thermal death of microorganisms is suggested. 5. The water content of native and heat-denatured egg albumin is determined as a function of the relative humidity of water vapor. It is shown that the heat-denatured modification takes up approximately 80 per cent as much water at all relative humidities as does native egg albumin.

  4. Differential responses of plumbagin content in Plumbago zeylanica L. (Chitrak under controlled water stress treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharadi R.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted on Plumbago zeylanica L. (Chitrak under controlled water stress environment in greenhouse during the kharif season. The experiment was laid out in completely randomized design with five treatments of different water stress levels i.e. control, 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% and four replications. Out of five stress levels, 80% water stress has influenced root length, dry herbage, plumbagin, potassium and proline content. In control conditions the plant height, number of leaf, total leaf area, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, photosynthesis, CO2 utilization, H2O utilization and chlorophyll were found to be maximum. The impact of water stress on plumbagin content has shown increase trend with respect to different water stress levels that is maximum at 80 % and minimum at control.

  5. Assessing HYDRUS-2D model to estimate soil water contents and olive tree transpiration fluxes under different water distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autovino, Dario; Negm, Amro; Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In Mediterranean countries characterized by limited water resources for agricultural and societal sectors, irrigation management plays a major role to improve water use efficiency at farm scale, mainly where irrigation systems are correctly designed to guarantee a suitable application efficiency and the uniform water distribution throughout the field. In the last two decades, physically-based agro-hydrological models have been developed to simulate mass and energy exchange processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA) system. Mechanistic models like HYDRUS 2D/3D (Šimunek et al., 2011) have been proposed to simulate all the components of water balance, including actual crop transpiration fluxes estimated according to a soil potential-dependent sink term. Even though the suitability of these models to simulate the temporal dynamics of soil and crop water status has been reported in the literature for different horticultural crops, a few researches have been considering arboreal crops where the higher gradients of root water uptake are the combination between the localized irrigation supply and the three dimensional root system distribution. The main objective of the paper was to assess the performance of HYDRUS-2D model to evaluate soil water contents and transpiration fluxes of an olive orchard irrigated with two different water distribution systems. Experiments were carried out in Castelvetrano (Sicily) during irrigation seasons 2011 and 2012, in a commercial farm specialized in the production of table olives (Olea europaea L., var. Nocellara del Belice), representing the typical variety of the surrounding area. During the first season, irrigation water was provided by a single lateral placed along the plant row with four emitters per plant (ordinary irrigation), whereas during the second season a grid of emitters laid on the soil was installed in order to irrigate the whole soil surface around the selected trees. The model performance was assessed based on the

  6. Nondestructive Measurement of Water Content and Moisture Migration of Unsaturated Red Clays in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To reveal the moisture migration mechanism of the unsaturated red clays, which are sensitive to water content change and widely distributed in South China, and then rationally use them as a filling material for highway embankments, a method to measure the water content of red clay cylinders using X-ray computed tomography (CT was proposed and verified. Then, studies on the moisture migrations in the red clays under the rainfall and ground water level were performed at different degrees of compaction. The results show that the relationship between dry density, water content, and CT value determined from X-ray CT tests can be used to nondestructively measure the water content of red clay cylinders at different migration time, which avoids the error reduced by the sample-to-sample variation. The rainfall, ground water level, and degree of compaction are factors that can significantly affect the moisture migration distance and migration rate. Some techniques, such as lowering groundwater table and increasing degree of compaction of the red clays, can be used to prevent or delay the moisture migration in highway embankments filled with red clays.

  7. Deuterium content of water increases depression susceptibility: the potential role of a serotonin-related mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalova, Tatyana; Evans, Matthew; Chernopiatko, Anton; Couch, Yvonne; Costa-Nunes, João; Cespuglio, Raymond; Chesson, Lesley; Vignisse, Julie; Steinbusch, Harry W; Anthony, Daniel C; Pomytkin, Igor; Lesch, Klaus-Peter

    2015-01-15

    Environmental factors can significantly affect disease prevalence, including neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. The ratio of deuterium to protium in water shows substantial geographical variation, which could affect disease susceptibility. Thus the link between deuterium content of water and depression was investigated, both epidemiologically, and in a mouse model of chronic mild stress. We performed a correlation analysis between deuterium content of tap water and rates of depression in regions of the USA. Next, we used a 10-day chronic stress paradigm to test whether 2-week deuterium-depleted water treatment (91 ppm) affects depressive-like behavior and hippocampal SERT. The effect of deuterium-depletion on sleep electrophysiology was also evaluated in naïve mice. There was a geographic correlation between a content of deuterium and the prevalence of depression across the USA. In the chronic stress model, depressive-like features were reduced in mice fed with deuterium-depleted water, and SERT expression was decreased in mice treated with deuterium-treated water compared with regular water. Five days of predator stress also suppressed proliferation in the dentate gyrus; this effect was attenuated in mice fed with deuterium-depleted water. Finally, in naïve mice, deuterium-depleted water treatment increased EEG indices of wakefulness, and decreased duration of REM sleep, phenomena that have been shown to result from the administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). Our data suggest that the deuterium content of water may influence the incidence of affective disorder-related pathophysiology and major depression, which might be mediated by the serotoninergic mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor IJRED

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available International Journal of Renewable Energy Development www.ijred.com Volume 1             Number 3            October 2012                ISSN 2252- 4940   CONTENTS OF ARTICLES page Design and Economic Analysis of a Photovoltaic System: A Case Study 65-73 C.O.C. Oko , E.O. Diemuodeke, N.F. Omunakwe, and E. Nnamdi     Development of Formaldehyde Adsorption using Modified Activated Carbon – A Review 75-80 W.D.P Rengga , M. Sudibandriyo and M. Nasikin     Process Optimization for Ethyl Ester Production in Fixed Bed Reactor Using Calcium Oxide Impregnated Palm Shell Activated Carbon (CaO/PSAC 81-86 A. Buasri , B. Ksapabutr, M. Panapoy and N. Chaiyut     Wind Resource Assessment in Abadan Airport in Iran 87-97 Mojtaba Nedaei       The Energy Processing by Power Electronics and its Impact on Power Quality 99-105 J. E. Rocha and B. W. D. C. Sanchez       First Aspect of Conventional Power System Assessment for High Wind Power Plants Penetration 107-113 A. Merzic , M. Music, and M. Rascic   Experimental Study on the Production of Karanja Oil Methyl Ester and Its Effect on Diesel Engine 115-122 N. Shrivastava,  , S.N. Varma and M. Pandey  

  9. Water Vapour Weighted Mean Temperature Model for Gps-Derived Integrated Water Vapour in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, T. A.; Mazlan, M. H.; Opaluwa, Y. D.; Musliman, I. A.; Radzi, Z. M.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the development of TM model by using the radiosonde stations from Peninsular Malaysia. Two types of TM model were developed; site-specific and regional models. The result revealed that the estimation from site-specific model has small improvement compared to the regional model, indicating that the regional model is adequately to use in estimation of GPS-derived IWV over Peninsular Malaysia. Meanwhile, this study found that the diurnal cycle of TS has influenced the TM-TS relationship. The separation between daytime and nighttime observation can improve the relationship of TM-TS. However, the impact of diurnal cycle to IWV estimation is less than 1 %. The TM model from Global and Tropic also been evaluated. The Tropic TM model is superior to be utilized as compared to the Global TM model.

  10. Determination of water content in clay and organic soil using microwave oven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramarenko, V. V.; Nikitenkov, A. N.; Matveenko, I. A.; Molokov, V. Yu; Vasilenko, Ye S.

    2016-09-01

    The article deals with the techniques of soil water content determination using microwave radiation. Its practical application would allow solving the problems of resource efficiency in geotechnical survey due to reduction of energy and resource intensity of laboratory analysis as well as its acceleration by means of decreasing labour intensity and, as a result, cost reduction. The article presents a detail analysis of approaches to soil water content determination and soil drying, considers its features and application. The study in soil of different composition, typical for Western Siberia including organic and organic-mineral ones, is a peculiarity of the given article, which makes it rather topical. The article compares and analyzes the results of the investigation into soil water content, which are obtained via conventional techniques and the original one developed by the authors, consisting in microwave drying. The authors also give recommendation on microwave technique application to dry soil.

  11. Management of corm size and soil water content for gladiolus flower production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bachin Mazzini-Guedes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gladiolus grandiflorus Andrews, in the family Iridaceae, is one of the most produced and marketed flowers in the world. In general, however, research results on gladioli production factors are scarce and divergent. The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of corm size and soil water content on gladiolus flower production. The experimental design, using the early maturity cultivar ‘White Friendship’, was entirely randomized, arranged in a 5 x 2 factorial scheme (five soil water contents: 25; 50; 75; 100; and 125% field capacity, combined with two corm sizes: medium and big, with four replications per treatment. Each replication, composed of one pot, comprised three corms, totaling 40 pots and 120 plants. Both vegetative and flowering characteristics were evaluated. Gladiolus cultivation at 80% soil field capacity presents best results for commercialization, generating longer flower stems with greater diameter and flower number, plus larger flowers. Furthermore, such soil water content promotes the shortest cultivation period

  12. Modified Liu-Carter Compression Model for Natural Clays with Various Initial Water Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Qian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial water content has a significant effect on the compression behaviour of reconstituted clays. This effect has to be considered in the Liu-Carter model to ensure the addition voids ratio only related to soil structure. A modified Liu-Carter compression model is proposed by introducing the empirical equations for reconstituted clays at different initial water contents into the Liu-Carter model. The proposed model is verified against the experimental results from the literature. The simulations by the proposed method are also compared with that by old method where the influence of initial water content is not considered. The results show that the predicted virgin compression curves of natural clays are similar, but the values of b and Δey may be very different.

  13. Combustion dynamics of low vapour pressure nanofuel droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Khushboo; Chattopadhyay, Kamanio; Basu, Saptarshi

    2017-07-01

    Multiscale combustion dynamics, shape oscillations, secondary atomization, and precipitate formation have been elucidated for low vapour pressure nanofuel [n-dodecane seeded with alumina nanoparticles (NPs)] droplets. Dilute nanoparticle loading rates (0.1%-1%) have been considered. Contrary to our previous studies of ethanol-water blend (high vapour pressure fuel), pure dodecane droplets do not exhibit internal boiling after ignition. However, variation in surface tension due to temperature causes shape deformations for pure dodecane droplets. In the case of nanofuels, intense heat release from the enveloping flame leads to the formation of micron-size aggregates (of alumina NPS) which serve as nucleation sites promoting heterogeneous boiling. Three boiling regimes (A, B, and C) have been identified with varying bubble dynamics. We have deciphered key mechanisms responsible for the growth, transport, and rupture of the bubbles. Bubble rupture causes ejections of liquid droplets termed as secondary atomization. Ejection of small bubbles (mode 1) resembles the classical vapour bubble collapse mechanism near a flat free surface. However, large bubbles induce severe shape deformations as well as bulk oscillations. Rupture of large bubbles results in high speed liquid jet formation which undergoes Rayleigh-Plateau tip break-up. Both modes contribute towards direct fuel transfer from the droplet surface to flame envelope bypassing diffusion limitations. Combustion lifetime of nanofuel droplets consequently has two stages: stage I (where bubble dynamics are dominant) and stage II (formation of gelatinous mass due to continuous fuel depletion; NP agglomeration). In the present work, variation of flame dynamics and spatio-temporal heat release (HR) have been analysed using high speed OH* chemiluminescence imaging. Fluctuations in droplet shape and flame heat release are found to be well correlated. Droplet flame is bifurcated in two zones (I and II). Flame response is

  14. An effect of liming on magnesium content in meadow vegetation and leachate water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacorzyk Piotr A.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate an effect of liming on chemical properties of the soil, magnesium content in the meadow vegetation and leachate water moving through the soil profile. The study was conducted in the growing seasons in the years 2012-2014. The study included three plots in two series: with lime and without lime. The plant material was subjected to dry digestion and ash was dissolved in HNO3 (1:3. The soil was mineralized in a muffle furnace and the ashes were dissolved in a mixture of HNO3 and HClO4 (3:1 v/v. In the obtained samples and in leaching water, estimated the content of phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and sodium by induction plasma emission spectrophotometer. In the soil content of assimilable phosphorus and potassium was determined by the Egner-Riehm method. The content of assimilable magnesium was determined by the Schachtschabel method and the pH of the soil by potentiometric method in water and in mol KC1·dm-3. Liming positively affected on soil pH and magnesium content in plants increasing its amount of about 15- 21% of dry matter with respect to not limed plots. In turn, lime fertilization negatively affected the content of magnesium in leachate water and the load eluted per unit area. Magnesium content in leachate water and the amount of loads eluted from limed plots were lower on average by 16-23% with respect to not limed plots.

  15. Water sorption and water permeability properties of edible film made from potato peel waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hajar OTHMAN

    Full Text Available Abstract The water sorption and permeability properties of edible film produced from potato peel waste was investigated under different levels of relative humidity (23, 33, 43, 57, 75% RH and temperatures (5, 30, 50 °C. The water sorption behaviour and isotherms of the film were investigated by fitting water sorption data to the Peleg model and the Guggenheim, Anderson de Boer model (GAB model. The amount of moisture content, time required for the moisture content of the film to reach equilibrium, water sorption rate, and water sorption capacity increased when the relative humidity increased. The effect of temperature on moisture content, water sorption rate, water sorption capacity, and monolayer moisture content is complex and related to the water activity as well as the moisture content. Based on R2 and RMSE values, the Peleg and GAB models were respectively determined as excellent models to predict the water sorption properties of the films, thus supporting the reliability of water sorption behaviour prediction. The water vapour transmission rate and water vapour permeability increased with an increase in relative humidity and temperature. The sorption and permeability properties of the film are worth investigation since the final application of the film as food packaging is ultimately dependent on these behaviours.

  16. [Screening of water retention agent for moisture content regulation in the biocover of municipal landfill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-jing; Mou, Zi-shen; Zhu, Yong; Wang, Hong-tao; Zhao, Chen-xi

    2010-02-01

    Synthetic materials of polyacrylamide (PAM) are known as the flocculating agent as well as water retention agents. In this study, ten types of water-soluble PAM as well as four types of water-insoluble ones were selected and the influences of relative molecular weight, ion types, charge density and particle size on water retention and service life were determined. Based on the results, evaluation method for performance of water retention agent was established and two optimal PAM (water-insoluble JB and water-soluble WSN20) were screened for further study. It showed that JB increased the degree of hydration of testing soil for 32% compared with that of control. Moreover, multiple-step-outflow test using municipal waste showed that addition of JB (0.1%) had significantly effect on its moisture characteristic curve as evidenced by increasing of equilibrium moisture content over 12% under high matrix potential.

  17. Methane Production Explained Largely by Water Content in the Heartwood of Living Trees in Upland Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Ping; Han, Shi-Jie; Li, Huan-Long; Deng, Feng-Dan; Zheng, Yan-Hai; Liu, Hai-Feng; Han, Xing-Guo

    2017-10-01

    Most forests worldwide are located in upland landscapes. Previous studies have mainly focused on ground methane (CH4) flux in upland forests, and living tree stem-based CH4 processes and fluxes are thus relatively poorly understood. This study investigated the relationship between CH4 concentration and water content in the heartwood of living trees in midtemperate, warm temperate, and subtropical upland forests and also measured seasonal changes of in situ stem CH4 flux and the CH4 concentration and water content in the heartwood of Populus davidiana Dode in a warm temperate upland forest. We found that approximately 4-13% of tree stems or approximately 8-31% of tree species had a substantial CH4 concentration of ≥10,000 μL L-1 in their heartwood across the three types of upland forests. The heartwood CH4 concentration was related to water content by a power function. A threshold of water content occurred beyond which CH4 was produced at high levels in the heartwood. The CH4 emissions from the breast height stems of P. davidiana ranged from 202.1 to 331.6 μg m-2 h-1 on a stem surface area basis during July-October 2016 and were significantly linearly correlated with the CH4 concentration or water content in the heartwood throughout the experimental period, but the linear correlation was not significant at daily and monthly scales. Temperature was not a limiting factor for CH4 production during July-October 2016, and thus, most of the CH4 production may be explained by water content in the heartwood of living trees in upland forests.

  18. Gas phase dispersion in compost as a function of different water contents and air flow rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.

    2009-07-01

    Gas phase dispersion in a natural porous medium (yard waste compost) was investigated as a function of gas flow velocity and compost volumetric water content using oxygen and nitrogen as tracer gases. The compost was chosen because it has a very wide water content range and because it represents a wide range of porous media, including soils and biofilter media. Column breakthrough curves for oxygen and nitrogen were measured at relatively low pore gas velocities, corresponding to those observed in for instance soil vapor extraction systems or biofilters for air cleaning at biogas plants or composting facilities. Total gas mechanical dispersion-molecular diffusion coefficients were fitted from the breakthrough curves using a one-dimensional numerical solution to the advection-dispersion equation and used to determine gas dispersivities at different volumetric gas contents. The results showed that gas mechanical dispersion dominated over molecular diffusion with mechanical dispersion for all water contents and pore gas velocities investigated. Importance of mechanical dispersion increased with increasing pore gas velocity and compost water content. The results further showed that gas dispersivity was relatively constant at high values of compost gas-filled porosity but increased with decreasing gas-filled porosity at lower values of gas-filled porosity. Results finally showed that measurement uncertainty in gas dispersivity is generally highest at low values of pore gas velocity.

  19. Experimental study on water content detection of traditional masonry based on infrared thermal image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baoqing; Lei, Zukang

    2017-10-01

    Based on infrared thermal imaging technology for seepage test of two kinds of brick masonry, find out the relationship between the distribution of one-dimensional two brick surface temperature distribution and one-dimensional surface moisture content were determined after seepage brick masonry minimum temperature zone and water content determination method of the highest point of the regression equation, the relationship between temperature and moisture content of the brick masonry reflected the quantitative and establish the initial wet masonry building disease analysis method, then the infrared technology is applied to the protection of historic buildings in.

  20. Review of Suction Water Content Relationship of Bentonite-Sand Mixtures Considering Temperature Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Abhishek; Zhi Lang, Lin; Baille, Wiebke

    2015-04-01

    Bentonite-sand mixture is one of the candidate sealing/ buffer material for landfills, hazardous and high level radioactive waste repository. The long term satisfactory performance of bentonite sand mixture in terms of load bearing function, sealing function and buffer function is governed by hydro-mechanical response of material under elevated temperature conditions. The suction-water content relationship is one of the key parameter, which govern the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of compacted bentonite-sand mixture. This paper presents brief review of suction water content relationships of bentonite-sand mixture considering temperature effects. Numerous parametric models or equations have been developed for representing the soil water characteristics curve i.e. SWCC for isothermal conditions. The most frequently used equations for representing the SWCC are the van Genuchten (1980) and Fredlund and Xing (1994) SWCC equations. Various researchers (Romero et al. 2000; Villar and Lloret, 2004; Tang and Cui, 2005; Agus, 2005; Arifin, 2008) have reported the temperature effect on the water retention behavior of compacted bentonite-sand mixtures. The testing program, results and major conclusions made by above mentioned researchers were discussed in this paper. The changes in hydro-mechanical behavior due to elevated temperature are also discussed based on the suction components of soil which are influenced by temperature. As a general conclusion, total suction of the bentonite-sand mixtures is a function of mixture water content and mixture bentonite content or collectively a function of bentonite water content both at room temperature and at elevated temperature. At a constant temperature, different techniques for measuring suction results in different values of suction depending on accuracy of the sensor and calibration technique used as founded earlier by Agus (2005). The change in total suction due to change in temperature lower than 100 degree C is reversible

  1. Total phenol content and antioxidant activity of water solutions of plant extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Kopjar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Water solutions of extracts were investigated for total phenol content, flavonoid content and antioxidant activity. Susceptibility to degradation of water solutions of plant extracts, under light and in the dark, during storage at room temperature was investigated in order to determine their stability prior to their application for fortification of food products. Large dispersion of total phenol (TP content in the investigated model solutions of selected extracts (olive leaves, green tea, red grape, red wine, pine bark PE 5:1, pine bark PE 95 %, resveratrol, ranging from 11.10 mg GAE/100 mL to 92.19 mg GAE/100 mL was observed. Consequently, large dispersion of total flavonoids (TF content (8.89 mg to 61.75 mg CTE/100 mL was also observed. Since phenols have been mostly responsible for antioxidant activity of extracts, in most cases, antioxidant activity followed the TP content. That was proven by estimation of correlation coefficient between the total phenol content and antioxidant activity. Correlation coefficients between investigated parameters ranged from 0.5749 to 0.9604. During storage of 5 weeks at room temperature loss of phenols and flavonoids occurred. Antioxidant activity decreased with the decrease of TP and TF content. Degradations of phenols and flavonoids were more pronounced in samples stored at light.

  2. Effect of stone content on water flow velocity over Loess slope: Frozen soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yunyun; Lei, Tingwu; Feng, Ren; Qian, Dengfeng

    2017-11-01

    Soils in high-altitude or -latitude regions are commonly rich in stone fragments, which are frequently frozen. The hydrodynamics of water flow over frozen, stony slopes must be investigated to understand soil erosion and sediment transportation. The objective of this laboratory experiments was to measure water flow velocity over frozen slopes with different stone contents by using electrolyte trace method. The experiments were performed under slope gradients of 5°, 10°, 15°, and 20°; flow discharge rates of 1, 2, 4, and 8 L/min; and stone contents of 0%, 10%, 20%, and 50% on mass basis. Nine equidistant sensors were used to measure flow velocity along flume from the top of the slope. Results indicated that stone content significantly affected flow velocity under increasing slope gradient. The increase in stone content rapidly reduced the flow velocity. The flow velocities over frozen slopes were 1.21 to 1.30 times of those over non-frozen slopes under different slope gradients and flow rates. When the stone content increased from 0% to 20%, proportions gradually decreased from 52% to 25% and 13%. Additionally, flow velocities over frozen and non-frozen soil slopes became gradually similar with increasing stone content. This study will help elucidate the hydrodynamics, soil erosion, and sediment transport behaviors of frozen or partially unfrozen hillslopes with different stone contents.

  3. Vegetation Water Content Mapping in a Diverse Agricultural Landscape: National Airborne Field Experiment 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosh, Michael H.; Jing Tao; Jackson, Thomas J.; McKee, Lynn; O'Neill, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    Mapping land cover and vegetation characteristics on a regional scale is critical to soil moisture retrieval using microwave remote sensing. In aircraft-based experiments such as the National Airborne Field Experiment 2006 (NAFE 06), it is challenging to provide accurate high resolution vegetation information, especially on a daily basis. A technique proposed in previous studies was adapted here to the heterogenous conditions encountered in NAFE 06, which included a hydrologically complex landscape consisting of both irrigated and dryland agriculture. Using field vegetation sampling and ground-based reflectance measurements, the knowledge base for relating the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and the vegetation water content was extended to a greater diversity of agricultural crops, which included dryland and irrigated wheat, alfalfa, and canola. Critical to the generation of vegetation water content maps, the land cover for this region was determined from satellite visible/infrared imagery and ground surveys with an accuracy of 95.5% and a kappa coefficient of 0.95. The vegetation water content was estimated with a root mean square error of 0.33 kg/sq m. The results of this investigation contribute to a more robust database of global vegetation water content observations and demonstrate that the approach can be applied with high accuracy. Keywords: Vegetation, field experimentation, thematic mapper, NDWI, agriculture.

  4. Mobile TDR for geo-referenced measurement of soil water content and electrical conductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anton; Schelde, Kirsten; Drøscher, Per

    2007-01-01

    content and electrical conductivity within two research fields. Measurements made during the early or late season, when soil moisture levels are close to field capacity, are related to the amount of plant available water and soil texture. Combined measurements of water content and electrical conductivity...... analysis of the soil water measurements, recommendations are made with respect to sampling strategies. Depending on the variability of a given area, between 15 and 30 ha can be mapped with respect to soil moisture and electrical conductivity with sufficient detail within 8 h......The development of site-specific crop management is constrained by the availability of sensors for monitoring important soil and crop related conditions. A mobile time-domain reflectometry (TDR) unit for geo-referenced soil measurements has been developed and used for detailed mapping of soil water...

  5. [Preparation of water in oil type cream with high content of water containing Kochia scoparia fruit and Cnidium monnieri fruit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohri, Naonori; Yamashita, Miki; Kanazawa, Tsutomu; Kodera, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Kikisui is a herbal lotion containing Kochia scoparia Fruit and Cnidium monnieri Fruit that is clinically used as an antipruritic for itchy dry skin. However, this formulation is unsuitable for inducing a prolonged effect. Here, we attempted to change the formulation from a lotion to a cream. The cream we chose was a water-in-oil (W/O) type emulsion for enhancing skin compatibility. In addition, the high water content imparts a sensation of coolness. However, it is difficult to prepare a stable W/O type cream with high water content using a mechanical mixing method. Instead, we prepared the W/O type emulsion using liquid crystals. Water containing cocamidopropyl betaine was added to a dispersed phase comprising an oil phase of oleic acid and liquid paraffin that was constantly stirred. Addition of an aqueous solution containing Kochia scoparia Fruit and Cnidium monnieri Fruit decreased the stability of the cream. However, addition of glycerin as a humectant, and ethyl p-hydroxybenzoate/n-butyl p-hydroxybenzoate as preservatives enhanced the stability of the cream. The stability of the emulsion was correlated with the apparent viscosity of the cream. The final W/O type cream had a water content of 83% and was stable for more than 6 months at 4°C. Furthermore, ostol, which is one of the main biologically active herbal compounds, was also stable for more than 6 months.

  6. Effect of water regime on the growth, flower yield, essential oil and proline contents of Calendula officinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAMI ALI METWALLY

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Metwally SA,Khalid KA, Abou-Leila BH. 2013. Effect of water regime on the growth, flower yield, essential oil and proline contents of Calendula officinalis. Nusantara Bioscience 5: 63-67. The effects of water regime on the growth, content of essential oil and proline of Calendula officinalis L. plants were investigated. Water regimes of 75% of field water capacity increased certain growth characters [i.e. plant height (cm, leaf area (cm2, flower diameter (cm and spike stem diameter] and vase life (day. Water regime promoted the accumulation of essential oil content and its main components as well as proline contents.

  7. Evaluation of free water and water activity measurements as functional alternatives to total moisture content in broiler excreta and litter samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeven-Hangoor, van der E.; Rademaker, C.; Paton, N.D.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    Litter moisture contents vary greatly between and within practical poultry barns. The current experiment was designed to measure the effects of 8 different dietary characteristics on litter and excreta moisture content. Additionally, free water content and water activity of the excreta and litter

  8. Modeling the release of E. coli D21g with transients in water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Wang, Yusong; Torkzaban, Saeed; Šimůnek, Jiri

    2015-05-01

    Transients in water content are well known to mobilize colloids that are retained in the vadose zone. However, there is no consensus on the proper model formulation to simulate colloid release during drainage and imbibition. We present a model that relates colloid release to changes in the air-water interfacial area (Aaw) with transients in water content. Colloid release from the solid-water interface (SWI) is modeled in two steps. First, a fraction of the colloids on the SWI partitions to the mobile aqueous phase and air-water interface (AWI) when the Aaw increases during drainage. Second, colloids that are retained on the AWI or at the air-water-solid triple line are released during imbibition as the AWI is destroyed. The developed model was used to describe the release of Escherichia coli D21g during cycles of drainage and imbibition under various saturation conditions. Simulations provided a reasonable description of experimental D21g release results. Only two model parameters were optimized to the D21g release data: (i) the cell fraction that was released from the SWI (fr) and (ii) the cell fraction that partitioned from the SWI to the AWI (fawi). Numerical simulations indicated that cell release was proportional to fr and the initial amount of retention on the SWI and AWI. Drainage to a lower water content enhanced cell release, especially during subsequent imbibition, because more bacteria on the SWI were partitioned to the AWI and/or aqueous phase. Imbibition to a larger water content produced greater colloid release because of higher flow rates, and more destruction of the AWI (smaller Aaw). Variation in the value of fawi was found to have a pronounced influence on the amount of cell release in both drainage and imbibition due to changes in the partitioning of cells from the SWI to the aqueous phase and the AWI.

  9. Spectral estimation of soil water content in visible and near infra-red range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Nagy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Soils can be examined on the basis of spectral data, using such methods with which the reflected radiation can be divided into a large number of (several hundreds small spectral channel (some nm. Based on the spectral characteristics of the soils, or the different index numbers calculated from hyperspectral data water content of soils can be well characterized. The examined soil samples were coming from different apple orchards of which soils had different physical characteristics (sandy loamy and clay. The goals of my experiments were the evaluation of spectral measurement method for soil content detection, and to carry out algorithms for fast field scale spectral evaluation of different soil water content. The spectral measuring was carried out by laboratory scale AvaSpec 2048 spectrometer at 400 – 1000 nm wavelength interval with 0.6 nm spectral resolutions and by ASD FieldSpec Junior at 350 – 2500 nm. After drying, dry soil samples were watered by 2.5 m/m% till maximal saturation, and each wetting was measured spectrally. Based on spectral properties, reflectances were decreased in the whole spectral range within the continuous wetting due to the high absorption characteristics of water. The most water sensitive spectral ranges were selected by principal component, and such algorithms were created, with which the water content can be detectable in the certain soil. The algorithms can facilitate farmers for irrigation scheduling of their orchards. These results can also be utilizable in precision water management, since it can be a basis for such integrated active sensors with LED or laser light source, measuring reflectance at the certain spectral range, which can facilitate real time water status assessment of orchards.

  10. Effects of Water Bottle Materials and Filtration on Bisphenol A Content in Laboratory Animal Drinking Water

    OpenAIRE

    Honeycutt, Jennifer A; Nguyen, Jenny Q T; Kentner, Amanda C.; Brenhouse, Heather C.

    2017-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in the polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins that are found in laboratory animal husbandry materials including cages and water bottles. Concerns about BPA exposure in humans has led to investigations that suggest physiologic health risks including disruptions to the endocrine system and CNS. However, the extent of exposure of laboratory animals to BPA in drinking water is unclear. In the first study, we compared the amount of BPA contamination in water store...

  11. Anthropomorphic breast phantoms with physiological water, lipid, and hemoglobin content for near-infrared spectral tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelsen, Kelly E.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Shenoy, Adele; Jordan, Emily; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Breast mimicking tissue optical phantoms with sufficient structural integrity to be deployed as stand-alone imaging targets are developed and successfully constructed with biologically relevant concentrations of water, lipid, and blood. The results show excellent material homogeneity and reproducibility with inter- and intraphantom variability of 3.5 and 3.8%, respectively, for water and lipid concentrations ranging from 15 to 85%. The phantoms were long-lasting and exhibited water and lipid fractions that were consistent to within 5% of their original content when measured 2 weeks after creation. A breast-shaped three-compartment model of adipose, fibroglandular, and malignant tissues was created with water content ranging from 30% for the adipose simulant to 80% for the tumor. Mean measured water content ranged from 30% in simulated adipose to 73% in simulated tumor with the higher water localized to the tumor-like material. This novel heterogeneous phantom design is composed of physiologically relevant concentrations of the major optical absorbers in the breast in the near-infrared wavelengths that should significantly improve imaging system characterization and optimization because the materials have stand-alone structural integrity and can be readily molded into the sizes and shapes of tissues commensurate with clinical breast imaging. PMID:24549438

  12. Contribution to the activation analysis of the rare gases. Contribution to the analysis of carbon monoxide and water vapour in gases (1963); Contribution a l'analyse par activation des gaz rares. Contribution a l'analyse de l'oxyde de carbone et de la vapeur d'eau dans les gaz (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebolt, J. [Commisariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-15

    In the present work, we have applied radioactive analysis to the general technique of rare gas separation. This separation is carried out on active charcoal, at constant pressure. The desorption of the gas is caused by an increase in the initial temperature of adsorption. These separations are quantitative and can be confirmed by chemical analysis. The volumes of desorbed gas are measured by radioactive counting. We have also used radioactivation to study the reduction of palladous chloride by carbon monoxide. Since this reduction is quantitative, we can have a knowledge of the mass of palladium reduced by measuring its activity. We have used the property which have organic chlorides of being hydrolysed by water vapour and of liberating hydrochloric acid to study quantitatively the amount of water vapour which a gas contains. The hydrochloric acid formed is measured by activation of the chlorine in the acid. (author) [French] Dans les travaux que nous presentons, nous avons applique l'analyse par radioactivation, a la technique generale de separation des gaz rares. Cette separation est faite sur charbon active, a pression constante. La desorption des gaz est provoquee par une augmentation de la temperature initiale d'adsorption. Ces separations sont quantitatives, et peuvent etre exploitees par l'analyse chimique. Les volumes de gaz dedorbes sont mesures par comptage de la radioactivite. Nous avons egalement utilise la radioactivation pour l'etude de la reduction du chlorure palladeux par l'oxyde de carbone. Cette reduction etant quantitative, nous pouvons connaitre la masse de palladium reduit par la mesure de son activite. Nous avons exploite la propriete que possede un chlorure organique d'etre hydrolise par la vapeur d'eau et de liberer de l'acide chlorhydrique pour etudier quantitativement la vapeur d'eau contenue dans un gaz. L'acide chlorhydrique forme est mesure par l'activation du chlore de l

  13. Effects of Water Bottle Materials and Filtration on Bisphenol A Content in Laboratory Animal Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Jennifer A; Nguyen, Jenny Q T; Kentner, Amanda C; Brenhouse, Heather C

    2017-05-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in the polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins that are found in laboratory animal husbandry materials including cages and water bottles. Concerns about BPA exposure in humans has led to investigations that suggest physiologic health risks including disruptions to the endocrine system and CNS. However, the extent of exposure of laboratory animals to BPA in drinking water is unclear. In the first study, we compared the amount of BPA contamination in water stored in plastic bottles used in research settings with that in glass bottles. The amount of BPA that leached into water was measured across several time points ranging from 24 to 96 h by using a BPA ELISA assay. The results showed that considerable amounts of BPA (approximately 0.15 μg/L) leached from polycarbonate bottles within the first 24 h of storage. In the second study, BPA levels were measured directly from water taken from filtered compared with unfiltered taps. We observed significantly higher BPA levels in water from unfiltered taps (approximately 0.40 μg/L) compared with taps with filtration systems (approximately 0.04 μg/L). Taken together, our findings indicate that the use of different types of water bottles and water sources, combined with the use of different laboratory products (food, caging systems) between laboratories, likely contribute to decreased rigor and reproducibility in research. We suggest that researchers consider reporting the types of water bottles used and that animal care facilities educate staff regarding the importance of flushing nonfiltered water taps when filling animal water bottles.

  14. Rain- vapour isotopic interaction over the south-west coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palliyil Ravisankar, Lekshmy; Madhavan, Midhun; Rengaswamy, Ramesh

    2015-04-01

    Boundary layer water vapor isotopic composition (δv) is an important factor that controls the isotopic composition of evaporation flux and modulating the δ18O of tree ring cellulose through plant physiological cycle. But due to the difficult sampling procedure for water vapor, δv has rarely been quantified. Since many simple isotopic models require δvas an input, mostly we assume that the water vapor is in isotopic equilibrium with δof monthly rain (δr). Here we present simultaneous observations of water vapour (~ 300 samples) and rainfall (~200 samples) isotopic ratios from two stations in the south-west coast of India (both the stations are located in the west of Western Ghats), sampled during April- October, 2012. Daily rain water and water vapour (cryogenic trapping method) were collected according to the IAEA protocol and the isotopic analyses (D and 18O) were done using a Thermo Fisher Delta V+ Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer. We observe that, water vapour and rain are close to the equilibrium values during pre monsoon (April-May, ɛ = δr - δv= 8.9 ± 1.4 ), summer monsoon (June-September, ɛ = 9.0 ± 1.8 ) and North- East (NE) monsoon (October, ɛ = 7.9 ± 2.9 ) seasons. However, some individual rain events show more deviations from the equilibrium values. NE monsoon rainfall and water vapour are isotopically more depleted in 18O compared to the pre monsoon and summer monsoon seasons, in which the depletion is more in rain (~4 ) compared to water vapour (~2 ). This is because of the 18O enrichment of ground level vapour due to local evapo- transpiration (stations are at the leeward side of the Ghats), while rainfall is directly formed from the NE monsoon clouds which is more depleted in 18O. These results will be useful for the interpretation of δ18O of tree rings from south west.

  15. Aluminum bioavailability from drinking water is very low and is not appreciably influenced by stomach contents or water hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokel, R A; Rhineheimer, S S; Brauer, R D; Sharma, P; Elmore, D; McNamara, P J

    2001-03-21

    The objectives were to estimate aluminum (Al) oral bioavailability under conditions that model its consumption in drinking water, and to test the hypotheses that stomach contents and co-administration of the major components of hard water affect Al absorption. Rats received intragastric 26Al in the absence and presence of food in the stomach and with or without concomitant calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) at concentrations found in hard drinking water. The use of 26Al enables the study of Al pharmacokinetics at physiological Al concentrations without interference from 27Al in the environment or the subject. 27Al was intravenously administered throughout the study. Repeated blood withdrawal enabled determination of oral 26Al bioavailability from the area under its serum concentrationxtime curve compared to serum 27Al concentration in relation to its infusion rate. Oral Al bioavailability averaged 0.28%. The presence of food in the stomach and Ca and Mg in the water that contained the orally dosed 26Al appeared to delay but not significantly alter the extent of 26Al absorption. The present and published results suggest oral bioavailability of Al from drinking water is very low, about 0.3%. The present results suggest it is independent of stomach contents and water hardness.

  16. Microbial content of drinking water in Finnish and Russian Karelia - implications for atopy prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hertzen, L; Laatikainen, T; Pitkänen, T; Vlasoff, T; Mäkelä, M J; Vartiainen, E; Haahtela, T

    2007-03-01

    The influence of microbial quality of drinking water from different sources on the occurrence of atopy has been poorly examined. This study was undertaken to clarify the association between the overall microbial content in drinking water and the occurrence of atopy among schoolchildren from two neighbouring areas with profound differences in living conditions and lifestyles. Drinking water samples were obtained from kitchens of nine schools in North Karelia, Finland and of nine schools from Pitkäranta, the Republic of Karelia, Russia. The pupils of these schools were participants of the Karelian Allergy Study. Occurrence of atopy, determined by skin prick test positivity (one or more) to 14 common airborne and food allergens, was measured in all 563 children, aged 7-16 years, from these 18 schools. Water samples were analysed using standard methods for drinking water analyses including viable counts for Escherichia coli, intestinal enterococci, coliform bacteria and heterotrophic bacteria. In addition, total cell counts including both viable and nonviable bacteria, algae and protozoans were assessed using epifluorescence microscope with 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. In Finland, 29% of the children were sensitized to birch when compared with 2% of the Russian children (P water sources and treatment practices, the total numbers of microbial cells in drinking water were many-fold higher in Russia than in Finland. A dose-response relationship was found for occurrence of atopy and the DAPI value indicative of microbial cell content in the water (P 10(6) cells/ml) and intermediate (10(5)-10(6) cells/ml) DAPI values were associated with reduced risk of atopy (odds ratio 0.34, 95% confidence interval 0.20-0.57 and 0.39, 0.23-0.69, respectively), independently from other factors. High overall content of micro-organisms in drinking water may be associated with reduced risk of atopy, independently from other determinants.

  17. Predicting Soil-Water Characteristics from Volumetric Contents of Pore-Size Analogue Particle Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus

    ) for the SWC, derived from readily available soil properties such as texture and bulk density. A total of 46 soils from different horizons at 15 locations across Denmark were used for models evaluation. The Xw-model predicts the volumetric water content as a function of volumetric fines content (organic matter......Modelling water distribution and flow in partially saturated soils requires knowledge of the soil-water characteristic (SWC). However, measurement of the SWC is challenging and time-consuming, and in some cases not feasible. This study introduces two predictive models (Xw-model and Xw*-model...... and clay). It performed reasonably well for the dry-end (above a pF value of 2.0; pF = log(|Ψ|), where Ψ is the matric potential in cm), but did not do as well closer to saturated conditions. The Xw*-model gives the volumetric water content as a function of volumetric content of particle size fractions...

  18. Retrieval of leaf water content spanning the visible to thermal infrared spectra

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ullah, S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the entire spectra (from visible to the thermal infrared; 0.390 µm -14.0 µm) to retrieve leaf water content in a consistent manner. Narrow-band spectral indices (calculated from all possible two band...

  19. Impact of water deficit stress on growth and alkaloid content of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiments were conducted to study the effect of water deficit stress on the growth and alkaloid content of different organs of Spigelia anthelmia (L), a medicinal plant used locally as an anthelminthic. Plants were subjected to 6 days drought at the early (EV plants) and late (LV plants) vegetative stages (30-35 and 52-57 ...

  20. A complex permittivity model for field estimation of soil water contents using time domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate electromagnetic sensing of soil water contents (') under field conditions is complicated by the dependence of permittivity on specific surface area, temperature, and apparent electrical conductivity, all which may vary across space or time. We present a physically-based mixing model to pred...

  1. Complex permittivity model for time domain reflectometry soil water content sensing: II. Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite numerous applications of time domain reflectometry (TDR), serious difficulties in estimating accurate soil water contents under field conditions remain, especially in fine-textured soils. Our objectives were to calibrate a complex dielectric mixing model described by Schwartz et al. (this is...

  2. Complex permittivity model for time domain reflectometry soil water content sensing: I. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite numerous applications of time-domain reflectometry (TDR), serious difficulties exist in estimating accurate soil water contents under field conditions remain, especially in fine-textured soils. We developed a physically-based calibration model to predict the frequency and temperature depende...

  3. Impact of soil water content on landmine detection using radar and thermal infared sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, S.-H.; Miller, T.W.; Tobin, H.; Borchers, B.; Hendrickx, J.M.H.; Lensen, H.A.; Schwering, P.B.W.

    2001-01-01

    Land mines are a major problem in many areas of the world. In spite of the fact that many different types of land mines sensors have been developed, the detection of non-metallic land mines remains very difficult. Most landmine detection sensors are affected by soil properties such as water content,

  4. Building phenomenological models that relate proteolysis in pork muscles to temperature, water and salt content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkouss, Rami; Safa, Hassan; Gatellier, Philippe; Lebert, André; Mirade, Pierre-Sylvain

    2014-05-15

    Throughout dry-cured ham production, salt and water content, pH and temperature are key factors affecting proteolysis, one of the main biochemical processes influencing sensory properties and final quality of the product. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of these variables (except pH) on the time course of proteolysis in laboratory-prepared pork meat samples. Based on a Doehlert design, samples of five different types of pork muscle were prepared, salted, dried and placed at different temperatures, and sampled at different times for quantification of proteolysis. Statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the proteolysis index (PI) was correlated positively with temperature and water content, but negatively with salt content. Applying response surface methodology and multiple linear regressions enabled us to build phenomenological models relating PI to water and salt content, and to temperature. These models could then be integrated into a 3D numerical ham model, coupling salt and water transfers to proteolysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A new wireless underground network system for continuous monitoring of soil water contents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema, Coen J.; Kuipers, Henk; Kleiboer, L.; Kleiboer, Leon; van den Elsen, Erik; Oostindie, Klaas; Wesseling, Jan G.; Wolthuis, Jan-Willem; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2009-01-01

    A new stand-alone wireless embedded network system has been developed recently for continuous monitoring of soil water contents at multiple depths. This paper presents information on the technical aspects of the system, including the applied sensor technology, the wireless communication protocols,

  6. Time-lapse monitoring of soil water content using electromagnetic conductivity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    The volumetric soil water content (VWC) is fundamental to agriculture. Unfortunately, the universally accepted thermogravimetric method is labour intensive and time-consuming to use for field-scale monitoring. Electromagnetic (EM) induction instruments have proven to be useful in mapping the spatio-...

  7. Potential use of aquarius scatterometer observations to estimate vegetation water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about vegetation water content (VWC) is useful in agriculture, forestry and hydrology. It will be also employed in several of the soil moisture retrieval algorithms. All of these algorithms utilize variations of the same radiative transfer equation that accounts for vegetation attenuatio...

  8. Probing bias reduction to improve comparability of lint cotton water and moisture contents at moisture equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Karl Fischer Titration (KFT) reference method is specific for water in lint cotton and was designed for samples conditioned to moisture equilibrium, thus limiting its biases. There is a standard method for moisture content – weight loss – by oven drying (OD), just not for equilibrium moisture c...

  9. HIGH PERMEABILITY MEMBRANES FOR THE DEHYDRATION OF LOW WATER CONTENT ETHANOL BY PERVAPORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy efficient dehydration of low water content ethanol is a challenge for the sustainable production of fuel-grade ethanol. Pervaporative membrane dehydration using a recently developed hydrophilic polymer membrane formulation consisting of a cross-linked mixture of poly(allyl...

  10. Release of E.coli D21g with transients in water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transients in water content are well known to mobilize microorganisms that are retained in the vadose zone. However, there is no consensus on the relative importance of drainage and imbibition events on microorganism release. To overcome this limitation, we have systematically studied the release o...

  11. Conversion function between the Linke turbidity and the atmospheric water vapor and aerosol content

    OpenAIRE

    Ineichen, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    This technical note presents a conversion function between the widely used Linke turbidity coefficient TL, the atmospheric water vapor and urban aerosol content. It takes into account the altitude of the application site. The function is based on radiative transfer calculations and validated with the help of an independent clear sky model. Its precision is around 0.12