WorldWideScience

Sample records for water toxicity final

  1. A Broad Spectrum Catalytic System for Removal of Toxic Organics from Water by Deep Oxidation - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ayusman

    2000-12-01

    A most pressing need for the DOE environmental management program is the removal of toxic organic compounds present in groundwater and soil at specific DOE sites. While several remediation procedures have been proposed, they suffer from one or more drawbacks. The objective of the present research was to develop new catalytic procedures for the removal of toxic organic compounds from the environment through their deep oxidation to harmless products. In water, metallic palladium was found to catalyze the deep oxidation of a wide variety of toxic organic compounds by dioxygen at 80-90 C in the presence of carbon monoxide or dihydrogen. Several classes of organic compounds were examined: benzene, phenol and substituted phenols, nitro and halo organics, organophosphorus, and organosulfur compounds. In every case, deep oxidation to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water occurred in high yields, resulting in up to several hundred turnovers over a 24 hour period. For substrates susceptible to hydrogenation, the conversions were generally high with dihydrogen than with carbon monoxide. It is clear from the results obtained that we have discovered an exceptionally versatile catalytic system for the deep oxidation of toxic organic compounds in water. This system possesses several attractive features not found simultaneously in other reported systems. These are (a) the ability to directly utilize dioxygen as the oxidant, (b) the ability to carry out the deep oxidation of a particularly wide range of functional organics, and (c) the ease of recovery of the catalyst by simple filtration.

  2. Water quality criteria for hexachloroethane: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, K.A.; Hovatter, P.S.; Ross, R.H.

    1988-03-01

    The available data regarding the environmental fate, aquatic toxicity, and mammalian toxicity of hexachloroethane, which is used in military screening smokes, were reviewed. The USEPA guidelines were used to generate water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life and its uses and of human health. 16 tabs.

  3. Simulation of heavy metal contamination of fresh water bodies: Toxic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results show that ZnSO4 was significantly toxic to the fish only after 96 hours. Co-contamination of the water with both toxicants was found to ameliorate the toxic effects of ZnSO4 significantly. The metal chelating property of glyphosate may be responsible for the observed attenuation of toxicity in the fish in Group ...

  4. Contaminated marine sediments: Water column and interstitial toxic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, R.M.; Schweitzer, K.A.; McKinney, R.A.; Phelps, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    The toxicity that contaminated sediments may introduce into the water column has not been measured extensively. In order to quantify this potential toxicity, the seawater overlying two uncontaminated and three contaminated marine sediments was evaluated in the laboratory with the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata fertilization test. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and copper, as representative contaminants, were also measured. To characterize sources of toxicity, samples were chemically manipulated using reversed-phase chromatography, cation exchange, and chelation. Water column toxicity and contaminant concentrations were higher in the suspended exposures than in bedded exposures. Interstitial water toxicity and contaminant concentrations were generally greater than either bedded or suspended exposures. Chemical manipulation indicated that the observed toxicity in water column exposures was probably caused by metallic and/or nonionic organic contaminants. Conversely, manipulation of interstitial waters did not result in significantly reduced toxicity, suggesting that other toxicants such as ammonia and hydrogen sulfide may be active.

  5. Contaminated marine sediments: Water column and interstitial toxic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, R.M.; McKinney, R.A. (Science Applications International Corp., Narragansett, RI (United States)); Schweitzer, K.A. (Chemical Waste Management, Inc., Dartmouth, MA (United States)); Phelps, D.K. (Environmental Protection Agency, Narragansett, RI (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The toxicity that contaminated sediments may introduce into the water column has not been measured extensively. In order to quantify this potential toxicity, the seawater overlying two uncontaminated and three contaminated marine sediments was evaluated in the laboratory with the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata fertilization test. Concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and copper, as representative contaminants, were also measured. To characterize sources of toxicity, samples were chemically manipulated using reversed-phase chromatography, cation exchange, and chelation. Water column toxicity and contaminant concentrations were higher in the suspended exposures than in bedded exposures. Interstitial water toxicity and contaminant concentrations were generally greater than either bedded or suspended exposures. Chemical manipulation indicated that the observed toxicity in water column exposures was probably caused by metallic and/or nonionic organic contaminants. Conversely, manipulation of interstitial water did not result in significantly reduced toxicity, suggesting that other toxicants such as ammonia and hydrogen sulfide may be active.

  6. Water pulsejet research. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, P.R.; Brown, R.G.; Brown, J.P.

    1979-04-01

    The steam water pulsejet (SWPJ) - a modern derivative of the Piot-McHugh putt-putt toy boat - is discussed. Studies have revealed that, like its air-breathing relatives, one type of SWPJ is a type of wave engine. This report first reviews the background literature and then summarizes recent improvements in our understanding of the engine's operation. An appendix attempts to show the various physical processes of the wave engine version in a quantifiable way. At low temperatures, the ideal cycle efficiency of this version is almost identical with the Carnot limit, diverging above a ..delta..T approx. = 150/sup 0/F. Maximum ideal cycle efficiency occurs in the 500/sup 0/-600/sup 0/F range, and is 30%-40%. In addition to the two wave engines (simple wave engine, and a wave engine with a water trap), the boundary layer boiler was developed which may but need not involve wave effects and the Piot-cycle. In the latter engine, some water is flashed rapidly to steam in a separate (but connected) compartment and reaches high pressure before the water column (because of its inertia) has moved appreciably. Ideal efficiencies for this cycle can be of the order of 10%-20%. Although a great deal of knowledge was gained, the present program was unsuccessful in applying the newly discovered cycles to build reliable and efficient solar powered pumps.

  7. Recovery of anaerobic digestion after exposure to toxicants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Parkin, G.F.; Speece, R.E.

    1979-12-01

    The concept that methane fermentation cannot tolerate chronic or slug doses of toxicants has almost totally precluded methane fermentation as a viable contender for the treatment of industrial wastewaters. This study assayed a wide variety of toxicants, heavy metals, inorganic salts, organic chemicals, solvents, and antibiotics which are used in industrial processes and, therefore, appear in the industrial wastewaters therefrom. Toxicity was related to the reduction in methane production of a control containing no toxicant. The response of methane fermentation after exposure to a toxicant was assayed with unacclimated cultures as well as cultures which had been acclimated to increasing concentrations of the toxicant over long periods of time. The reversible nature of the toxicants was assayed by adding slug doses to plug flow anaerobic filters and recording gas production prior to, during, and after toxicant addition.

  8. Steroid hormone concentrations and physiological toxicity of water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results suggest that water from Goreangab and Swakoppoort dams may have the potential to modulate endocrine systems, and shows physiological toxicity. Keywords: cytokines, cytotoxicity, endocrine disrupting chemicals, ephemeral rivers, inflammatory response, neurotoxicity, steroid hormones, water quality

  9. Toxic cyanobacteria and drinking water: Impacts, detection, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuexiang; Liu, Yen-Ling; Conklin, Amanda; Westrick, Judy; Weavers, Linda K; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Lenhart, John J; Mouser, Paula J; Szlag, David; Walker, Harold W

    2016-04-01

    Blooms of toxic cyanobacteria in water supply systems are a global issue affecting water supplies on every major continent except Antarctica. The occurrence of toxic cyanobacteria in freshwater is increasing in both frequency and distribution. The protection of water supplies has therefore become increasingly more challenging. To reduce the risk from toxic cyanobacterial blooms in drinking water, a multi-barrier approach is needed, consisting of prevention, source control, treatment optimization, and monitoring. In this paper, current research on some of the critical elements of this multi-barrier approach are reviewed and synthesized, with an emphasis on the effectiveness of water treatment technologies for removing cyanobacteria and related toxic compounds. This paper synthesizes and updates a number of previous review articles on various aspects of this multi-barrier approach in order to provide a holistic resource for researchers, water managers and engineers, as well as water treatment plant operators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Petroleum Refining Industry Final Air Toxics Rule Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains a July 1995 fact sheet for the final NESHAP for Petroleum Refineries. This page also contains a June 2013 fact sheet with information regarding the final amendments to the 2013 final rule for the NESHAP.

  11. Identifying the cause of toxicity of a saline mine water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick A van Dam

    Full Text Available Elevated major ions (or salinity are recognised as being a key contributor to the toxicity of many mine waste waters but the complex interactions between the major ions and large inter-species variability in response to salinity, make it difficult to relate toxicity to causal factors. This study aimed to determine if the toxicity of a typical saline seepage water was solely due to its major ion constituents; and determine which major ions were the leading contributors to the toxicity. Standardised toxicity tests using two tropical freshwater species Chlorella sp. (alga and Moinodaphnia macleayi (cladoceran were used to compare the toxicity of 1 mine and synthetic seepage water; 2 key major ions (e.g. Na, Cl, SO4 and HCO3; 3 synthetic seepage water that were modified by excluding key major ions. For Chlorella sp., the toxicity of the seepage water was not solely due to its major ion concentrations because there were differences in effects caused by the mine seepage and synthetic seepage. However, for M. macleayi this hypothesis was supported because similar effects caused by mine seepage and synthetic seepage. Sulfate was identified as a major ion that could predict the toxicity of the synthetic waters, which might be expected as it was the dominant major ion in the seepage water. However, sulfate was not the primary cause of toxicity in the seepage water and electrical conductivity was a better predictor of effects. Ultimately, the results show that specific major ions do not clearly drive the toxicity of saline seepage waters and the effects are probably due to the electrical conductivity of the mine waste waters.

  12. Effects of a nearshore wastewater discharge: Water column and sediment pore water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, P.R. [MEC Analytical Systems, Inc., Tiburon, CA (United States); Carr, R.S. [National Biological Survey, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The relationship between water column and sediment pore water toxicity was investigated near a municipal-industrial wastewater discharge in southern Texas. Toxicity associated with effluent distributions in the water column are known to vary in both time and space. Toxicity of sediment, however, is often more stable over time. Sediment can serve as a long-term integrator of toxicity in areas subject to chronic exposure of effluents. This study addressed the relationship between water column toxicity and that found in the sediments on both spatial and temporal scales. Four 2 Km transacts were established around a nearshore wastewater outfall. Eight stations along each transact were sampled for both surface waters and sediment pore water toxicity. Toxicity was determined using a modified sea urchin fertilization test. Surface waters were sampled and tested for eight consecutive months, while sediment pore waters were sampled on three occasions over the length of this study. Results have shown that toxicity in receiving waters was a good indicator to trace movements of the highly variable effluent plume. The distribution of effluent in the water column, and hence water column toxicity, was primarily driven by local wind conditions. Toxicity in sediment porewater was, much less variable and more evenly distributed over the study site. Sediment pore water toxicity was also a good predictor of the distribution of benthic infaunal invertebrates over much of the study site.

  13. SNRB{trademark} air toxics monitoring. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is currently conducting a project under the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT II) Program to demonstrate its SO{sub x}NO{sub x}-Rox Box{trademark} (SNRB{trademark}) process in a 5 MWe Field Demonstration Unit at Ohio Edison`s R. E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio. The objective of the SNRB{trademark} Air Toxics Monitoring Project was to provide data on SNRB{trademark} air toxics emissions control performance to B&W and to add to the DOE/EPRI/EPA data base by quantifying the flow rates of selected hazardous substances (or air toxics) in all of the major input and output streams of the SNRB{trademark} process as well as the power plant. Work under the project included the collection and analysis of representative samples of all major input and output streams of the SNRB{trademark} demonstration unit and the power plant, and the subsequent laboratory analysis of these samples to determine the partitioning of the hazardous substances between the various process streams. Material balances for selected air toxics were subsequently calculated around the SNRB{trademark} and host boiler systems, including the removal efficiencies across each of the major air pollution control devices. This report presents results of the SNRB{trademark} Air Toxics Monitoring Project. In addition to the Introduction, a brief description of the test site, including the Boiler No. 8 and the SNRB{trademark} process, is included in Section H. The concentrations of air toxic emissions are presented in Section II according to compound class. Material balances are included in Section IV for three major systems: boiler, electrostatic precipitator, and SNRB{trademark}. Emission factors and removal efficiencies are also presented according to compound class in Sections V and VI, respectively. A data evaluation is provided in Section VII.

  14. Drinking water toxicity study of the environmental contaminant--Bromate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongmei, Liu; Zhiwei, Wang; Qi, Zhu; Fuyi, Cui; Yujuan, Shan; Xiaodong, Liu

    2015-12-01

    Bromate is a byproduct of water disinfection that is produced when waters contain bromide treated with ozone. To investigate the level of the toxicity of bromate and find the most sensitive indicators in a short time, a series of toxicological assessments were conducted including the acute toxicity, cumulative toxicity, genetic toxicity and subacute toxicity of bromate (using Potassium Bromate to represent bromate). The LD50 of orally administered Potassium Bromate was 215 mg/kg in Wistar rats and 464 mg/kg in ICR mice. The cumulative toxicity of Potassium Bromate was not obvious. The Ames test, mouse bone marrow cell micronucleus test and mouse sperm abnormality test did not indicate mutagenicity. The results of the subacute study did not exhibit significant differences in most of the parameters, except the white blood cell count, which was significantly decreased in male rats. In addition, Potassium Bromate influenced the albumin, creatinine, total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels in male rats to various extents. A thorough analysis of the above tests clearly demonstrates that bromate has toxicity, not obvious cumulative toxicity and the white blood cell count can be used as an indicator to reflect the toxicity of bromate and investigate bromate's toxic mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Toxicity Evaluation and Cytogenetic Screening of Process Water 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. K.J. Umar

    ABSTRACT: The effect of toxic substances on aquatic lives from a wastewater indiscriminately discharged into the environment during oil ... treatment of process water before its discharge into water bodies to avoid cyto-genetic damages to aquatic lives. Keywords: ..... of the pesticides phosdrin and bladex in. Tradescantia ...

  16. A scheme for regulating toxic substances to water quality of Chamsil upstream water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Suk; Kim, Jee Hoon [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    This study asserts to reflect a concept of toxicity thoroughly in the present water quality concept. It presents an appropriate solution to control toxic substances flowing into the Chamsil upstream water system. Although a regulation of toxic substances into major rivers in Korea other than Han river is also required urgently, it will be studied in future. It is expected that this study on Chamsil upstream would be a cornerstone for establishing a national regulation policy of toxic substances into water system. 28 refs., 1 fig., 36 tabs.

  17. Subacute toxicity assessment of water disinfection byproducts on zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, Gergely; Csenki, Zsolt; Kovács, Róbert; Hegyi, Arpád; Baska, Ferenc; Sujbert, László; Zsákovics, Ivett; Kis, Renáta; Gustafson, Ryan; Urbányi, Béla; Szende, Béla

    2012-07-01

    Disinfection of raw water is essential to the production of drinking water. However, by-products of disinfection may exert toxic effects. The potential toxic effects of two of these compounds, 4-ethylbenzaldehyde (EBA) and 2,4-difluoroaniline (DFA) were investigated using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) model. The two compounds, dissolved, were introduced in duplicate aquariums containing zebrafish in two different concentrations based on LC50 values. The aquarium water containing EBA or DFA was changed every 96 h throughout the 3 months of treatment. Behavior of the fish in each replicate was inspected twice daily. In course of treatment with both concentrations, fish exposed to DFA displayed behavior associated with visible anxiety, while EBA treated were lethargic and did not evade capture. Application of both concentrations of each component into the aquarium water resulted in dystrophic lesions in the liver, kidney and skin of the fish while preneoplastic lesions and tumors were not observed.

  18. Evaluation of acute toxicity potential of water hyacinth leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenbiao; Guo, Xiaoguang; Huang, Mingliang

    2014-06-01

    Although higher protein yield per hectare of water hyacinth than that of soy, high protein content of its leaves and good essential amino acid pattern have been proven, its dietary toxicity for human or animal consumption has not yet been evaluated. Therefore, the acute toxicity of water hyacinth leaves has been evaluated by an animal feeding test. The concentrations of common toxic metals including cadmium, lead, platinum, palladium, tin, mercury, barium, silver, stibium and aluminum in the water hyacinth leaf powder (WHLP) used for the animal feeding test were within their maximum limits in food additives as reported by the World Health Organization. The median lethal dose (LD50) of WHLP was more than 16 g kg(-1) body weight. In the study, after feeding for 7 and 28 days, the body weight of all the mice increased. The results of hematological analysis, clinical biochemical analysis, histopathological evaluation, general dissection or investigations of internal organs, appearance and behavior observations did not indicate any adverse effects from the diet containing WHLP. It is therefore concluded that water hyacinth leaves are not acutely toxic. © The Author(s) 2012.

  19. Toxicity Evaluation and Cytogenetic Screening of Process Water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of toxic substances on aquatic lives from a wastewater indiscriminately discharged into the environment during oil and gas exploration activities in Nigeria is the focus of this study. A plant bioassay, the Allium cepa test, was used for the cytogenotoxicity screening of process water on root growth inhibition and ...

  20. Migration of toxicants from plastics into drinking water during storage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, migration of toxicants, such as, manufacturing additives and previously adsorbed materials into drinking water stored inside plastic containers was investigated. The study considered virgin containers as well as those previously used to store sulphuric acid, calcium hypochlorite, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) and ...

  1. Effect of water quality on mercury toxicity to Photobacterium phosphoreum: Model development and its application in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinghao; Qu, Ruijuan; Wei, Zhongbo; Yang, Xi; Wang, Zunyao

    2014-06-01

    Mercury (Hg) compounds are widely distributed toxic environmental and industrial pollutants and they may bring danger to growth and development of aquatic organisms. The distribution of Hg species in the 3 percent NaCl solution was calculated using the chemical equilibrium model Visual MINTEQ, which demonstrated that Hg was mainly complexed by chlorides in the pH range 5.0-9.0 and the proportions of HgCl4(2-), HgCl3(-) and HgCl2(aq) reached to 95 percent of total Hg. Then the effects of cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+) and H(+)), anions (HCO3(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-) and HPO4(2-)) and complexing agents (ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and dissolved organic matter (DOM)) on Hg toxicity to Photobacterium phosphoreum were evaluated in standardized 15min acute toxicity tests. The significant increase of 6.3-fold in EC50 data with increasing pH was observed over the tested pH range of 5.0-8.0, which suggested the possible competition between hydroxyl and the negatively charged chloro-complex. By contrast, it was found that major cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and K(+)) have little effect on Hg toxicity to P. phosphoreum. An interesting finding was that the addition of HPO4(2-) significantly increased Hg toxicity, which may imply that the addition of phosphate increased the soluble Hg-chloro complex species. Additions of complexing agents (EDTA and DOM) into the exposure water increased Hg bioavailability via complexation of Hg. Finally, a model which incorporated the effect of pH, HPO4(2-), HCO3(-), SO4(2-) and DOM on Hg toxicity was developed to predict acute Hg toxicity for P. phosphoreum, which may be a useful tool in setting realistic water quality criteria for different types of water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Water Biosensor Challenge to Address Toxicity of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    An ongoing concern for water treatment systems and resource managers is the need to monitor for the presence of increasing number of pollutants from agricultural, municipal, and industrial outfalls that are present in U.S. source waters. The associated environmental compounds can...

  3. FOR SELECTED ORGANIC MICROPOLLUTANTS ELIMINATION AND CHANGE OF WATER TOXICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Dudziak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available All of the available and applicable chemical oxidants were found to affect the quality of the treated water or wastewater. It has been commonly observed that the oxidation processes generate by-products, which often possess unknown biological activity. Accordingly, the present study assessed the degree of degradation of mixture of selected micropollutants and the change of the solution toxicity in the UV/TiO2/H2O2 hybrid process. Water containing bisphenol A and diclofenac at a concentration of 1 mg/dm3 was treated. For toxicological evaluation of solution sample were used three different tests, ie. enzymatic Microtox® using luminescent strain of marine bacteria Aliivibrio fischeri, survival of the crustaceans Daphnia magna and the growth of duckweed Lemna minor. Decomposition of tested micropollutants depend on the processing time and the type of the oxidizing compound. However, during the process we observed adverse effects of water toxicity. The toxicity was documented in both bacteria and water plant.

  4. Field Water Balance of Landfill Final Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfill covers are critical to waste containment, yet field performance of specific cover designs has not been well documented and seldom been compared in side-by-side testing. A study was conducted to assess the ability of landfill final covers to control percolation into unde...

  5. TRACKING PYRETHROID TOXICITY IN SURFACE WATER SAMPLES: EXPOSURE DYNAMICS AND TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION TOOLS FOR LABORATORY TESTS WITH HYALELLA AZTECA (AMPHIPODA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deanovic, Linda A; Stillway, Marie; Hammock, Bruce G; Fong, Stephanie; Werner, Inge

    2017-09-09

    Pyrethroid insecticides are commonly used in pest control and are present at toxic concentrations in surface waters of agricultural and urban areas worldwide. Monitoring is challenging due to their high hydrophobicity and low toxicity thresholds, which often fall below the detection limits of analytical methods. Standard daphnid bioassays used in surface water monitoring are not sensitive enough to protect more susceptible invertebrate species such as the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and chemical loss during toxicity testing is of concern. In this study, we quantified toxicity loss during storage and testing, using both natural and synthetic water, and present a tool to enhance toxic signal strength for improved sensitivity of H. azteca toxicity tests. The average half-life during storage in LDPE cubitainers at 4°C of five pyrethroids (permethrin, bifenthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, esfenvalerate) and one organophosphate (chlorpyrifos; used as reference) was 1.4 d, and piperonyl butoxide (PBO) proved an effective tool to potentiate toxicity. We conclude that toxicity tests on ambient water samples containing these hydrophobic insecticides are likely to underestimate toxicity present in the field, and mimic short pulse rather than continuous exposures. Where these chemicals are of concern, the addition of PBO during testing can yield valuable information on their presence or absence. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of a model to predict the effect of water chemistry on the acute toxicity of cadmium to Photobacterium phosphoreum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Ruijuan; Wang, Xinghao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environment, Xianlin Campus, Nanjing University, Jiangsu Nanjing 210023 (China); Liu, Zhengtao; Yan, Zhenguang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment and State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Ecological Effect and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Wang, Zunyao, E-mail: wangzun315cn@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environment, Xianlin Campus, Nanjing University, Jiangsu Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Acute cadmium toxicity was evaluated with P. phosphoreum as a test organism. • The effect of Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, pH and complexants on Cd toxicity was investigated. • Each factor has its own distinct characteristics on the toxicity-modifying effects. • A model was developed to predict Cd toxicity towards P. phosphoreum. -- Abstract: Cadmium (Cd) compounds are widely distributed toxic environmental and industrial pollutants, and they may bring danger to growth and development of aquatic organisms. The effects of Ca{sup 2+} (as CaCl{sub 2}), Mg{sup 2+} (as MgSO{sub 4}), K{sup +} (as KCl), pH and complexants (EDTA, the commercial DOM, and three homemade DOMs) on Cd toxicity to Photobacterium phosphoreum were evaluated in standardized 15 min acute toxicity tests. Increases in Ca{sup 2+} concentration resulted in higher EC{sub 50} values, indicating the competition between the two ions for uptake sites at the biotic ligand. Increased waterborne Mg{sup 2+} also reduced Cd toxicity, but to a slightly lesser degree compared with Ca{sup 2+}. The overall decline in EC{sub 50} data with increasing K{sup +} in test solutions suggested that Cd toxicity was enhanced at larger K{sup +} concentration. The toxicity alleviation by H{sup +} was observed over the tested pH range of 5.0–9.0. Additions of complexing agents into the exposure water reduced Cd bioavailability via complexation of Cd{sup 2+}, and complexants from different sources displayed different protective effect. The influence of these toxicity modifying factors was finally incorporated into a model that can predict acute cadmidum toxicity for Photobacterium phosphoreum. After validation with laboratory and natural waters, the developed model could support efforts to improve the ecological relevance of presently applied risk assessment procedures.

  7. Development of a model to predict the effect of water chemistry on the acute toxicity of cadmium to Photobacterium phosphoreum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ruijuan; Wang, Xinghao; Liu, Zhengtao; Yan, Zhenguang; Wang, Zunyao

    2013-11-15

    Cadmium (Cd) compounds are widely distributed toxic environmental and industrial pollutants, and they may bring danger to growth and development of aquatic organisms. The effects of Ca(2+) (as CaCl2), Mg(2+) (as MgSO4), K(+) (as KCl), pH and complexants (EDTA, the commercial DOM, and three homemade DOMs) on Cd toxicity to Photobacterium phosphoreum were evaluated in standardized 15 min acute toxicity tests. Increases in Ca(2+) concentration resulted in higher EC50 values, indicating the competition between the two ions for uptake sites at the biotic ligand. Increased waterborne Mg(2+) also reduced Cd toxicity, but to a slightly lesser degree compared with Ca(2+). The overall decline in EC50 data with increasing K(+) in test solutions suggested that Cd toxicity was enhanced at larger K(+) concentration. The toxicity alleviation by H(+) was observed over the tested pH range of 5.0-9.0. Additions of complexing agents into the exposure water reduced Cd bioavailability via complexation of Cd(2+), and complexants from different sources displayed different protective effect. The influence of these toxicity modifying factors was finally incorporated into a model that can predict acute cadmidum toxicity for Photobacterium phosphoreum. After validation with laboratory and natural waters, the developed model could support efforts to improve the ecological relevance of presently applied risk assessment procedures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Attenuation of Chromium toxicity in mine waste water using water hyacinth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanty M.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The mine waste water at South Kaliapani chromite mining area of Orissa (India showed high levels of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr+6. Cr+6 contaminated mine waste water poses potential threats for biotic community in the vicinity. The current field based phytoremediation study is an in situ approach for attenuation of Cr+6 from mine waste water using water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes weeds by rhizofiltration method. The weeds significantly reduced (up to 54% toxic concentrations of Cr+6 from contaminated mine waste water when passed through succeeding water hyacinth ponds. The reduction of toxic chromium level varied with the plant age and passage distance of waste water. Chromium phytoaccumulation and Bio-Concentration Factor (BCF was maximum at growing stage of plant i.e. 75 days old plant. High BCF (10,924 and Transportation Index (32.09 for water hyacinth indicated that the weeds can be used as a tool of phytoremediation to combat the problem of in situ Cr contamination in mining areas.

  9. Microcystins in potable surface waters: toxic effects and removal strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roegner, Amber F; Brena, Beatriz; González-Sapienza, Gualberto; Puschner, Birgit

    2014-05-01

    In freshwater, harmful cyanobacterial blooms threaten to increase with global climate change and eutrophication of surface waters. In addition to the burden and necessity of removal of algal material during water treatment processes, bloom-forming cyanobacteria can produce a class of remarkably stable toxins, microcystins, difficult to remove from drinking water sources. A number of animal intoxications over the past 20 years have served as sentinels for widespread risk presented by microcystins. Cyanobacterial blooms have the potential to threaten severely both public health and the regional economy of affected communities, particularly those with limited infrastructure or resources. Our main objectives were to assess whether existing water treatment infrastructure provides sufficient protection against microcystin exposure, identify available options feasible to implement in resource-limited communities in bloom scenarios and to identify strategies for improved solutions. Finally, interventions at the watershed level aimed at bloom prevention and risk reduction for entry into potable water sources were outlined. We evaluated primary studies, reviews and reports for treatment options for microcystins in surface waters, potable water sources and treatment plants. Because of the difficulty of removal of microcystins, prevention is ideal; once in the public water supply, the coarse removal of cyanobacterial cells combined with secondary carbon filtration of dissolved toxins currently provides the greatest potential for protection of public health. Options for point of use filtration must be optimized to provide affordable and adequate protection for affected communities. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Waste water heat recovery appliance. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapin, H.D.; Armstrong, P.R.; Chapin, F.A.W.

    1983-11-21

    An efficient convective waste heat recovery heat exchanger was designed and tested. The prototype appliance was designed for use in laundromats and other small commercial operations which use large amounts of hot water. Information on general characteristics of the coin-op laundry business, energy use in laundromats, energy saving resources already in use, and the potential market for energy saving devices in laundromats was collected through a literature search and interviews with local laundromat operators in Fort Collins, Colorado. A brief survey of time-use patterns in two local laundromats was conducted. The results were used, with additional information from interviews with owners, as the basis for the statistical model developed. Mathematical models for the advanced and conventional types were developed and the resulting computer program listed. Computer simulations were made using a variety of parameters; for example, different load profiles, hold-up volumes, wall resistances, and wall areas. The computer simulation results are discussed with regard to the overall conclusions. Various materials were explored for use in fabricating the appliance. Resistance to corrosion, workability, and overall suitability for laundromat installations were considered for each material.

  11. Toxicity studies of the water extract from the calyces of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sireeratawong, Seewaboon; Itharat, Arunporn; Khonsung, Parirat; Lertprasertsuke, Nirush; Jaijoy, Kanjana

    2013-01-01

    Acute and chronic toxicities of the water extract from calyces of Hibiscus sabdariffa were studied in male and female rats. After 14 days of a single oral administration of test substance 5,000 mg/kg body weight, measurement of the body and organ weights, necropsy and health monitoring were performed. No signs and differences of the weights or behaviour compared to the control rats were observed. The results indicated that the single oral administration of H. sabdariffa extract in the amount of 5,000 mg/kg body weight does not produce acute toxicity. The chronic toxicity was determined by oral feeding both male and female rats daily with the extract at the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg body weight for 270 days. The examinations of signs, animal behaviour and health monitoring showed no defects in the test groups compared to the control groups. Both test and control groups (day 270th) and satellite group (day 298th) were analysed by measuring their final body and organ weights, taking necropsy, and examining haematology, blood clinical chemistry, and microanatomy. Results showed no differences from the control groups. Overall, our study demonstrated that an oral administration of H. sabdariffa extract at the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight for 270 days does not cause chronic toxicity in rat.

  12. Evaluation of acute copper toxicity to juvenile freshwater mussels (fatmucket, lampsilis siliquoidea) in natural and reconstituted waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Mebane, C.A.; Kunz, J.L.; Ingersoll, C.G.; May, T.W.; Arnold, W.R.; Santore, R.C.; Augspurger, T.; Dwyer, F.J.; Barniiart, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and water composition on the toxicity of copper to juvenile freshwater mussels (fatmucket, Lampsilis siliquoidea) were evaluated in natural and reconstituted waters. Acute 96-h copper toxicity tests were conducted at four nominal DOC concentrations (0, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/L as carbon [C]) in dilutions of natural waters and in American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) reconstituted hard water. Toxicity tests also were conducted in ASTM soft, moderately hard, hard, and very hard reconstituted waters (nominal hardness 45-300 mg/L as CaCO3). Three natural surface waters (9.5-11 mg/L DOC) were diluted to obtain a series of DOC concentrations with diluted well water, and an extract of natural organic matter and commercial humic acid was mixed with ASTM hard water to prepare a series of DOC concentrations for toxicity testing. Median effective concentrations (EC50s) for dissolved copper varied >40-fold (9.9 to >396 ??g Cu/L) over all 21 treatments in various DOC waters. Within a particular type of DOC water, EC50s increased 5- to 12-fold across DOC concentrations of 0.3 to up to 11 mg C/L. However, EC50s increased by only a factor of 1.4 (21 30 ??g Cu/L) in the four ASTM waters with wide range of water hardness (52-300 mg CaCO 3/L). Predictions from the biotic ligand model (BLM) for copper explained nearly 90% of the variability in EC50s. Nearly 70% of BLM-normalized EC50s for fatmucket tested in natural waters were below the final acute value used to derive the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency acute water quality criterion for copper, indicating that the criterion might not be protective of fatmucket and perhaps other mussel species. ?? 2009 SETAC.

  13. Are there toxic interactions between salinity and naphthenic acids in the toxicity of oil sands process water to freshwater invertebrates?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, D.; Pasloski, A.; Lanser, B.; Alm, K.; Liber, K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Large volumes of water are used to extract oil from the oil sands in the Athabasca deposit. The resulting oil sands process water (OSPW) has been proposed for use in future reclamation landscapes. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the toxicity of OSPW to freshwater invertebrates in order to develop environmentally acceptable OSPW reclamation plans. The OSPW generally contains high concentrations of salts and naphthenic acids (NAs), but low levels of other contaminants such as PAHs and metals. This study investigated the combined toxic effect of NAs and salinity on freshwater invertebrates. Laboratory cultured Ceriodaphnia dubia were used initially to determine the toxicity of OSPW from selected water bodies. The pond waters that generated a toxic response had elevated levels of NAs and salinity, but the concentrations of salinity ions varied considerably among ponds. Results suggested that ion composition may be a factor in toxicity. Subsequent bioassays were performed with single salts and with mixtures representing major ion combinations present in the OSPW, such as carbonate, sulphate, chloride and sodium. The interaction between NAs and salinity was evaluated by exposing Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia pulex to mixtures of NAs extracted from OSPW and relevant major ions chosen according to the salt toxicity test results.

  14. Microcystis aeruginosa : source of toxic microcystins in drinking water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , which is the most common toxic cyanobacterium in eutrophic freshwater. The association of environmental parameters with cyanobacterial blooms and the toxicity of microcystin are discussed. Also, the synthesis of the microcystins, as well as ...

  15. Formation and control of disinfection byproducts and toxicity during reclaimed water chlorination: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ye; Lv, Xiao-Tong; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Zhang, Da-Yin; Zhou, Yu-Ting; Peng, Lu; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2017-08-01

    Chlorination is essential to the safety of reclaimed water; however, this process leads to concern regarding the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and toxicity. This study reviewed the formation and control strategies for DBPs and toxicity in reclaimed water during chlorination. Both regulated and emerging DBPs have been frequently detected in reclaimed water during chlorination at a higher level than those in drinking water, indicating they pose a greater risk to humans. Luminescent bacteria and Daphnia magna acute toxicity, anti-estrogenic activity and cytotoxicity generally increased after chlorination because of the formation of DBPs. Genotoxicity by umu-test and estrogenic activity were decreased after chlorination because of destruction of toxic chemicals. During chlorination, water quality significantly impacted changes in toxicity. Ammonium tended to attenuate toxicity changes by reacting with chlorine to form chloramine, while bromide tended to aggravate toxicity changes by forming hypobromous acid. During pretreatment by ozonation and coagulation, disinfection byproduct formation potential (DBPFP) and toxicity formation potential (TFP) occasionally increase, which is accompanied by DOC removal; thus, the decrease of DOC was limited to indicate the decrease of DBPFP and TFP. It is more important to eliminate the key fraction of precursors such as hydrophobic acid and hydrophilic neutrals. During chlorination, toxicities can increase with the increasing chlorine dose and contact time. To control the excessive toxicity formation, a relatively low chlorine dose and short contact time were required. Quenching chlorine residual with reductive reagents also effectively abated the formation of toxic compounds. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Removal of toxic chemicals from water with activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, V.K.; Marking, L.L.; Bills, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    Activated carbon was effective in removing fish toxicants and anesthetics from water solutions. Its capacity to adsorb 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM), antimycin, NoxfishA? (5% rotenone), Dibrorms, juglone, MSa??222, and benzocaine ranged from 0.1 to 64 mg per gram of carbon. The adsorptive capacity (end point considered as a significant discharge) of activated carbon for removal of TFM was determined at column depths of 15, 30, and 60 cm; temperatures of 7, 12, 17, and 22 C; pH's of 6.5, 7.5, 8.5, and 9.5; and flow rates of 50, 78, 100, 200, and 940 ml/min. Adsorptive capacity increased when the contact time was increased by reducing the flow rate or increasing the column depth. The adsorptive capacity was not significantly influenced by temperature but was substantially higher at pH 6.5 than at the other pH's tested. A practical and efficient filter for purifying chemically treated water was developed.

  17. Effects of water quality parameters on boron toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethloff, Gail M; Stubblefield, William A; Schlekat, Christian E

    2009-07-01

    The potential modifying effects of certain water quality parameters (e.g., hardness, alkalinity, pH) on the acute toxicity of boron were tested using a freshwater cladoceran, Ceriodaphnia dubia. By comparison, boron acute toxicity was less affected by water quality characteristics than some metals (e.g., copper and silver). Increases in alkalinity over the range tested did not alter toxicity. Increases in water hardness appeared to have an effect with very hard waters (>500 mg/L as CaCO(3)). Decreased pH had a limited influence on boron acute toxicity in laboratory waters. Increasing chloride concentration did not provide a protective effect. Boron acute toxicity was unaffected by sodium concentrations. Median acute lethal concentrations (LC(50)) in natural water samples collected from three field sites were all greater than in reconstituted laboratory waters that matched natural waters in all respects except for dissolved organic carbon. Water effect ratios in these waters ranged from 1.4 to 1.8. In subsequent studies using a commercially available source of natural organic matter, acute toxicity decreased with increased dissolved organic carbon, suggesting, along with the natural water studies, that dissolved organic carbon should be considered further as a modifier of boron toxicity in natural waters where it exceeds 2 mg/L.

  18. Phytoremediation of wastewater toxicity using water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) and water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Kouamé Kouamé; Séka, Yapoga; Norbert, Kouadio Kouakou; Sanogo, Tidou Abiba; Celestin, Atsé Boua

    2016-10-02

    This paper elucidates the phytoremediation potential of water hyacinth and water lettuce on the reduction of wastewater toxicity. Acute toxicity tests were performed in an aquarium with a population of Sarotherodon melanotheron, contaminated by different concentrations of wastewaters before and after phytoremediation with Eichhornia crassipes and Pistia stratiotes. Lethal concentrations (LC50) of the fish's population obtained during 24 hours of exposures were determined. COD, BOD, ammonium, TKN and PO4(3-) concentrations in wastewaters were of 1850.29, 973.33, 38.34, 61.49 and 39.23 mg L(-1), respectively, for each plant. Phytoremediation reduced 58.87% of ammonium content, 50.04% of PO4(3-), 82.45% of COD and 84.91% of BOD. After 15 days of the experiment, metal contents in treated wastewaters decreased from 6.65 to 97.56% for water hyacinth and 3.51 to 93.51% for water lettuce tanks. Toxicity tests showed that the mortality of fish exposed increased with increase in concentration of pollutants in wastewaters and the time of exposure. Therefore, the highest value of LC50 was recorded for fish subjected to 3 hours of exposure (16.37%). The lowest rate was obtained after an exposure of 20 to 24 hours (5.85%). After phytoremediation, the effluents purified by Eichhornia crassipes can maintain the fish life beyond 24 hours of exposure.

  19. Aluminum toxicity and ecological risk assessment of dried alum residual into surface water disposal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mortula, Maruf; Bard, Shannon M; Walsh, Margaret E; Gagnon, Graham A

    2009-01-01

    This paper presented a simplified ecological risk assessment of the toxicity of alum residuals from water treatment plants to surface water that is based on the framework recommended by United States...

  20. Investigation of Water Safety in Non-treated Drinking Water with Trace Toxic Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Ly, Suw Young; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ga Eun

    2013-01-01

    The trace toxic metal copper was assayed using mercury immobilized on a carbon nanotube electrode (MCW), with a graphite counter and a reference electrode. In this study, a macro-scale convection motor was interfaced with a MCW three-electrode system, in which a handmade MCW was optimized using cyclic- and square-wave stripping voltammetry. An analytical electrolyte for tap water was used instead of an expensive acid or base ionic solution. Under these conditions, optimum parameters were 0.09...

  1. Evaluation of toxicity: Whole-sediment versus overlying-water exposures with amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, C.G.; Ivey, C.D.; Brunson, E.L.; Hardesty, D.K.; Kemble, N.E.

    2000-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity of whole-sediment versus overlying-water exposures to the amphipod Hyalella azteca using field-collected sediments. Severe toxic effects (5-63% survival) were observed with amphipods exposed for 10 d in direct contact with sediment. In contrast, amphipods exposed only to overlying water in these sediment exposures did not exhibit any toxic effects.

  2. [Preliminary survey to detect toxic substances in domestic potable water, Bogotá and Soacha, 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Elizabeth; Villarreal, María Elsa; Cárdenas, Omayda; Cristancho, Carlos Armando; Murillo, Carmenza; Salgado, Manuel Alberto; Nava, Gerardo

    2015-08-01

    Significant alterations may be found in the water of Bogotá´s water supply system after its purification, specifically during its distribution and storage in home reservoirs, which makes it necessary to study the final quality of the domiciliary water consumed by users. To conduct a preliminary study of toxic chemical substances in the water supplied by Bogotá´s water supply system in samples obtained from residential reservoirs and faucets. Descriptive study made in 26 homes located in Bogotá and Soacha. Two samplings were done during different seasons, each including a survey and the collection of water samples from domiciliary storage tanks and faucets. Samples were analyzed for basic physicochemical parameters, a screening test for organic and inorganic substances and the determination of heavy metals and residues of organophosphate pesticides and/or carbamates. Values obtained for conductivity, color and nitrates were acceptable, pH and turbidity were slightly high while residual chlorine levels were low; aluminum traces were found in 94% of the samples; 8% of the samples analyzed during the dry season showed organic compounds, compared to 66.7% during the rainy season, and just one positive result was obtained for inorganic compounds. Consequently, a medium risk level was observed in 11.5% of homes, low risk in 61.5% and no risk in 27.0%. The evidence showed deterioration of the domiciliary water by organic substances present in the reservoirs as well as in the water supply piping, probably caused by the formation of biofilms or organic polymers. Aluminum levels close to the top permissible limit can be explained by the presence of residual coagulants used during water treatment.

  3. Contribution of waste water treatment plants to pesticide toxicity in agriculture catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Trong Dieu Hien; Scharmüller, Andreas; Kattwinkel, Mira; Kühne, Ralph; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2017-11-01

    Pesticide residues are frequently found in water bodies and may threaten freshwater ecosystems and biodiversity. In addition to runoff or leaching from treated agricultural fields, pesticides may enter streams via effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). We compared the pesticide toxicity in terms of log maximum Toxic Unit (log mTU) of sampling sites in small agricultural streams of Germany with and without WWTPs in the upstream catchments. We found an approximately half log unit higher pesticide toxicity for sampling sites with WWTPs (p pesticide toxicity in streams with WWTPs. A few compounds (diuron, terbuthylazin, isoproturon, terbutryn and Metazachlor) dominated the herbicide toxicity. Pesticide toxicity was not correlated with upstream distance to WWTP (Spearman's rank correlation, rho = - 0.11, p > 0.05) suggesting that other context variables are more important to explain WWTP-driven pesticide toxicity. Our results suggest that WWTPs contribute to pesticide toxicity in German streams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Strains of toxic and harmful microalgae, from waste water, marine, brackish and fresh water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Palacio, M C; Crisóstomo-Vázquez, L; Alvarez-Hernández, S; Lozano-Ramírez, C

    2012-01-01

    Some microalgae are economically important in Mexico and the world because they can be potentially toxic. Algal explosive population growths are named harmful algal blooms and are frequently recorded in Mexico. The authors set up potentially toxic microalgae cultures from the Gulf of Mexico (Garrapatas tideland, Barberena river, Carpintero lagoon in Tamaulipas State; Chalchoapan and Catemaco lakes in Veracruz State), from the Mexican Pacific Ocean, Guerrero, Colima and Michoacán States, and from interior water bodies such as Vicente Aguirre dam, Chapultepec lake and several waste water treatment plants. This research is about the diversity and abundance of phytoplankton in relation a specific site because of harmful algal bloom events. Microalgae cultures are useful in order to solve taxonomic problems, to know life cycles, molecular studies, for the study of toxic species, and the isolation of useful metabolites. The cultures for this research are clonal, non-axenic, semi-continuous, 12:12 light/dark photoperiod, 20 ± 1 °C temperature and 90.5 µmol m(-2)s(-1) illumination. Four different culture media were used. This collection is open to the worldwide scientific community as a source of organisms in controlled conditions that can be used as a useful tool for microalgae research work.

  5. Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

    2008-03-31

    This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was

  6. Biochars made from agro-industrial by-products remove chlorine and lower water toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzachristas, Andreas; Xirou, Maria; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Dailianis, Stefanos; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.

    2016-04-01

    Chlorination is the most common disinfection process for water and treated wastewater. For the industrial use of water in food production, chlorine can add undesired taste and odor to the final product. For this reason, dechlorination is desired for food industries that use municipal tap water. For treated wastewater discharge or reuse, chlorine can be toxic to the receiving aqueous systems and to the irrigated plants. In both the above cases, dechlorination is also required. Traditionally activated carbon has been used as the ideal material for the removal of chlorine. The main mechanisms that describe the interaction between activated carbon and HOCl or OCl- are described by the following equations (AWWA, 1990): HOCl + C* → C*O + H+ + Cl- (1), OCl- + C* → C*O + Cl- (2) Where C* and C*O represent the activated carbon surface and a surface oxide, respectively. The present study proposes the use of agro-industrial by-products for the production of biochars that will be used for dechlorination of tap-water used for food-industry production. Different raw materials such as malt spent rootlets, coffee residue, olive and grape seeds, etc. are used for the production of biochar. Various temperatures and air-to-solid ratios are tested for optimizing biochar production. Batch tests as well as a column test are employed to study the dechlorination efficiency and kinetics of the different raw and biochar materials as well as those of commercial activated carbons. As chlorine concentration increases the removal also increases linearily. After 1 and 24 hours of contact the chlorine relative removal efficiencies for the biochar made from olive seeds are 50 and 77 ± 4%, respectively. It seems that the removal kinetics are faster during the first hour; then, removal continues but with a slower rate. Most of the biochars tested (with 3 mg of solid in 20 mL of chlorine solution at initial concentration Co=1.5 mg/L) demonstrated removal efficiencies with an average of 9.4 ± 0

  7. Toxicity assessment of water at different stages of treatment using Microtox assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pogorzelec Marta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Number of potentially toxic hydrophobic organic contaminants e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins having entered aquatic environment, including potential sources of drinking water. Unfortunately, not all micropollutants can be removed during water treatment processes. What is more, disinfectants can react with some organic compounds already present in the water, and form disinfection by-products which also can be toxic. The aim of this study was to assess toxicity of water at different stages of water treatment and to verify usefulness semipermeable membrane devices in monitoring of drinking water. For this purpose, semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs were deployed in a surface water treatment plant. To determine the effect of water treatment on the presence of toxic micropollutants, study was conducted for a period of 5 months. Three sampling places were chosen: raw water input, stream of water just before disinfection and treated water output. After sampling dialysis in organic solvent was carried out and extracts were then analyzed with the Microtox acute toxicity test. The study has indicated the utility as well as some limitations of combining SPMDs with bioluminescence assay in the monitoring of biological effects of bioavailable hydrophobic pollutants in drinking water.

  8. Regulatory Actions - Final Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for power plants to limit mercury, acid gases and other toxic pollution from power plants. This page describes Federal regulatory actions.

  9. Biodegradation of roxarsone by a bacterial community of underground water and its toxic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafla, S; Moraga, R; León, C G; Guzmán-Fierro, V G; Yañez, J; Smith, C T; Mondaca, M A; Campos, V L

    2015-08-01

    Roxarsone is included in chicken food as anticoccidial and mainly excreted unchanged in faeces. Microorganisms biotransform roxarsone into toxic compounds that leach and contaminate underground waters used for human consumption. This study evaluated roxarsone biotransformation by underground water microorganisms and the toxicity of the resulting compounds. Underground water from an agricultural field was used to prepare microcosms, containing 0.05 mM roxarsone, and cultured under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Bacterial communities of microcosms were characterized by PCR-DGGE. Roxarsone degradation was measured by HPLC/HG/AAS. Toxicity was evaluated using HUVEC cells and the Toxi-ChromoTest kit. Roxarsone degradation analysis, after 15 days, showed that microcosms of underground water with nutrients degraded 90 and 83.3% of roxarsone under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. Microcosms without nutrients degraded 50 and 33.1% under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. Microcosms including nutrients showed more roxarsone conversion into toxic inorganic arsenic species. DGGE analyses showed the presence of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes and Spirochaetes. Toxicity assays showed that roxarsone biotransformation by underground water microorganisms in all microcosms generated degradation products toxic for eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Furthermore, toxicity increased when roxarsone leached though a soil column and was further transformed by the bacterial community present in underground water. Therefore, using underground water from areas where roxarsone containing manure is used as fertilizer might be a health risk.

  10. Toxicity and genotoxicity of surface water before and after various potabilization steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zani, Claudia; Feretti, Donatella; Buschini, Annamaria; Poli, Paola; Rossi, Carlo; Guzzella, Licia; Caterino, Filomena Di; Monarca, Silvano

    2005-11-10

    Many studies have revealed the presence of compounds with genotoxic activity in drinking water by means of short-term mutagenicity tests. In this study, the influence of the different steps of surface water treatment on the mutagenicity of drinking water was evaluated. Four different types of samples were collected: raw lake water, water after pre-disinfection with chlorine dioxide, water after filtration on granular activated carbon, and tap water. Water extracts underwent a bacterial toxicity test (Microtox test) and different in vitro genotoxicity tests: a test with Salmonella typhimurium strains, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae test, the SOS Chromotest with Escherichia coli and the Mutatox test with Vibrio fischeri. The Microtox test revealed high toxicity in the treated water samples. The disinfection steps increased the toxicity: the Mutatox test confirmed these results and the Salmonella/microsome test at the highest doses showed toxicity that could conceal mutagenicity. The SOS Chromotest was positive in all treated water samples without metabolic activation. In the test with S. cerevisiae both toxicity and genotoxicity generally increased during the water treatment steps, especially in cells without induction of cytochrome P450.

  11. The final treatment of FGD-waste water sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugghen, F.W. van der (N.V. KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    1993-01-01

    FGD installations based on lime/limestone gypsum processes produce waste water. This waste water has to be treated prior to discharge. The sludge formed during this waste water treatment contains gypsum, CaF[sub 2], Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], SiO[sub 2], Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] and MgO as well as minor amounts of heavy metals like As, Cd, Pb, Zn and Hg. There are three methods for the final treatment of the sludges: disposal; mixing with gypsum; coffering in the boiler. An inventory has been made of the amounts and composition of the sludge produced by FGD plants in The Netherlands. The consequences of the three treatment methods for emissions, by-product quality and costs are described and compared. 1 ref., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Toxicity bioassays for water from black-odor rivers in Wenzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFu, He; RuiRui, Chen; EnHui, Zhu; Na, Chen; Bo, Yang; HuaHong, Shi; MinSheng, Huang

    2015-02-01

    Following urbanization, a large number of urban rivers were contaminated and turned to black-odor rivers. The traditional approach for detecting water quality is based on chemical or physical analysis. However, biological toxicity of black-odor water has been less addressed. As two typical black-odor rivers, Jiushanwai River (JS) and Shanxia River (SX) are tributaries of Wen-Rui Tang River in Wenzhou (south of China). The eco-safety of the urban rivers was evaluated by bioassay for water toxicity in this study. Ten and 5 sampling sites were respectively set along JS and SX. Water samples were collected monthly from October 2010 to October 2011. The general physical and chemical parameters of river water were monitored. In order to investigate the ecotoxicological effects of black-odor water, the following bioassays were used: (1) Fish acute toxicity test (Danio rerio, comprehensive toxicity), (2) luminescent bacteria bioassay (Qinghaiensis vibrio, toxicity to bacteria), and (3) tropical claw embryo assay (Xenopus tropicalis, embryo toxicity). Biotoxicity of black-odor rivers water was demonstrated by D. rerio, Q. vibrio, and X. tropicalis embryos. Toxicological effects of black-odor water were respectively shown by mortality of zebrafish, and by the relative inhibitory light rate of luminescent bacteria. However, luminescent bacteria were more sensitive to inspect biotoxicity than zebrafish. In X. tropicalis embryos test, toxicological effects of black-odor water were mostly shown by embryos' survival rate and teratogenic rate. Bioassay results showed that toxicity of SX water was higher than that of JS water, especially in summer. Statistical analysis of luminescent bacteria toxicity test showed that biotoxicity of SX and JS was high in summer, but low in winter and spring. The seasonal changes of water toxicity of the black-odor river were positively correlative with changes of water temperature (p water. Typical black-odor river water displays different

  13. Assessment of the effect of water quality on copper toxicity in Hyalella azteca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, L. [Univ. of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Walsh, S.; Shultz, C.; Stuart, M. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that when standard artificial media 5-salt culture water (SAM-5S) is used to test sediment toxicity of much lower ionic-strength aquatic ecosystems, the resulting toxicity estimates are lower than if the tests had been conducted in water of comparable ionic strength. Results showed that this concern was unfounded for testing of copper toxicity to Hyalella azteca (H. azteca) in Ottawa River water. Sediment testing is often conducted using a standard water that is prepared in the laboratory. However, this water may have an ionic strength that is different than local water bodies. It follows that laboratory results using the standard water may be unrepresentative. A study was undertaken to assess the copper tolerance of 2 strains of H. azteca in SAM-5S, diluted SAM-5S (similar in electrical conductivity to Ottawa River water), and Ottawa River water. Acute (96 h) copper toxicity tests were conducted with 9-16 day-old H. azteca. For a given water type, the 2 strains of H. azteca yielded comparable responses to copper. The highest copper tolerance was found in Ottawa River water (closely followed by SAM-5S), whereas the lowest copper tolerance was found in diluted SAM-5S. Our results suggest that sediment toxicity is not lowered by the higher ionic strength of SAM-5S and that sediment toxicity tests of Ottawa River sediments, conducted with SAM-5S, can be used to estimate the in situ toxicity of the sediments. (author)

  14. Influence of water hardness on acute toxicity of copper and zinc on fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimpour, Mohammad; Alipour, Hosain; Rakhshah, Solaiman

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to utilize static test for examining the acute toxicity of two essential elements, Cu and Zn, to a native fish, Capoeta fusca, by static bioassay. The acute toxicity of two heavy metals to C. fusca was determined in the soft, hard and very hard water (40, 150 and 380 mg/L as CaCO(3)). Results showed that toxicity of Cu and Zn decreased with increasing water hardness, so that water hardness had a significant effect on Cu and Zn toxicity on fish. Copper and Zn were more toxic in the soft water than in the hard water. The 96-hour lethal concentration for 50% (LC(50)) values for C. fusca were lower in the soft water compared with the hard and very hard water. The 96-hour LC(50) for Cu at the soft, hard and very hard water was found to be 1.1, 5.4 and 7.5 mg/L, respectively, while the 96-hour LC(50) for Zn at the soft, hard and very hard water was found to be 13.7, 74.4 and 102.9 mg/L, respectively.

  15. Portable Sensor for Rapid In Situ Measurement of Trace Toxic Metals in Water Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a sensor to detect select trace toxic heavy metals (Ag, Cd, Mn, Ni, and Zn) in water is proposed. Using an automatic side-stream sampling technique,...

  16. Toxins produced in cyanobacterial water blooms ? toxicity and risks

    OpenAIRE

    Bl?ha, Lud?k; Babica, Pavel; Mar??lek, Blahoslav

    2009-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms in freshwaters represent a major ecological and human health problem worldwide. This paper briefly summarizes information on major cyanobacterial toxins (hepatotoxins, neurotoxins etc.) with special attention to microcystins-cyclic heptapeptides with high acute and chronic toxicities. Besides discussion of human health risks, microcystin ecotoxicology and consequent ecological risks are also highlighted. Although significant research attention has been paid to microcysti...

  17. Microcystis aeruginosa : source of toxic microcystins in drinking water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... cyanobacterial blooms and the toxicity of microcystin are discussed. Also, the synthesis of the microcystins, as well as the mode of action, control and analysis methods for quantitation of the toxin is reviewed. Key Words: Cyanobacteria, microcystins, mcyB gene, PCR-RFLP. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol.3(3) 2004: ...

  18. A review on toxic and harmful algae in Greek coastal waters (E. Mediterranean Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatiades, Lydia; Gotsis-Skretas, Olympia

    2010-05-01

    The Greek coastal waters are subjected to harmful algal bloom (HAB) phenomena due to the occurrence of species characterized as toxic (TX), potentially toxic (PT), and non-toxic, high biomass (HB) producers causing harm at multiple levels. The total number of (TX), (PT) and (HB) algae reported in this work are 61, but only 16 species have been associated with the occurrence of important HABs causing damage in the marine biota and the water quality. These phenomena are sporadic in time, space and recurrence of the causative species, and are related to the anthropogenically-induced eutrophication conditions prevailing in the investigated areas.

  19. Acute and subchronic toxicity study of the water extract from dried fruits of Piper nigrum L. in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanjana Jaijoy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to evaluate acute and subchronic toxicities of the water extract from the dried fruits of Piper nigrum L. A single oral administration of the extract at a dose of 5,000 mg/kg body weight (5 male, 5 female did not produce signs of toxicity, behavioral changes, mortality, changes on gross appearance or histopathological changes of internal organs. The subchronic toxicity was determined by oral feeding both male and female rats (10 male, 10 female daily with the test substance at the doses of 300, 600 and 1,200 mg/kg body weight continuously for 90 days. The examinations of signs, animal behavior and health monitoring showed no abnormalities in the test groups as compared to the controls. The test and control groups (on the 90th day and the satellite group (on the 118th day were analyzed by measuring their final body and organ weights, taking necropsy, and examining hematology, blood clinical chemistry and histopathology. The results suggest that the water extract from the dried fruits of P. nigrum does not cause acute or subchronic toxicities in either male or female rats.

  20. Toxic Combustion By-Products: Final Report CRADA No. TC-0947-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, T. Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Grieves, Colin [Amoco Oil Company, Naperville, IL (United States); Seebold, Jim [Chevron Research and Technology Company, Richmond, CA (United States); Pratapas, John [Gas Research Inst. (Gas Technology Inst.), Des Plaines, IL (United States); Harrison, Doug J. [Exxon Mobil Research & Engineering, Fairfax, VA (United States); Farmayan, Walter [Shell Oil Company, Houston, TX (United States); Youssef, Cherif [Southern California Gas Company, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gilmer, Lee [Texaco R& D (Equilon Enterprises, LLC), Houston, TX (United States)

    2000-11-16

    This CRADA provided a greater understanding of why air toxics are generated and enabled the Participants to find out how the combustion process can be changed to eliminate the air toxics. Ultimately, it would save industry and government millions of dollars in meeting the Clean Air Act standards and would greatly benefit the environment and government.

  1. Ships' Ballast Water Treatment by Chlorination Can Generate Toxic Trihalomethanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Marco R; Ismail, Nargis; Drouillard, Ken G; MacIsaac, Hugh J

    2017-08-01

    The International Maritime Organization (IMO) will enforce a new abundance-based performance standard for ballast water in September, 2017. Strong oxidants, like chlorine, have been proposed as a method for achieving this standard. However chlorine treatment of ballast water can produce hazardous trihalomethanes. We assessed maximum trihalomethane production from one chlorine dose for three types of ballast water (fresh, brackish and marine) and three levels of total organic carbon (TOC) concentration (natural, filtered, enhanced). While the current standard test considers a 5 day voyage, there is a high possibility of shorter trips and sudden change of plans that will release treated waters in the environment. Water source and TOC significantly affected trihalomethane production, with the highest amounts generated in brackish waters and enhanced TOC concentration. The concentration of brominated trihalomethanes increased from background levels and was highest in brackish water, followed by marine and fresh water.

  2. Aquatic toxicity of the decontamination agent: Multipurpose (DAM) decontamination solution. Final report, May-December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, M.V.; Kurnas, C.W.; Chester, N.A.; Muse, W.T.

    1994-05-01

    A new formulation, Decontaminating Agent: Multipurpose (DAM) Decontamination Solution, is being considered as a replacement to the DS-2 decontaminating solution. The new formulation is composed of calcium hypochlorite and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidinone. Since this is a new formulation little environmental data exists. To estimate potential impact to an aquatic environment, Daphnia magna and Photobacterium phosphoreum (a luminescent marine bacterium) were exposed to the DAM solution and to the individual components (Calcium hypochlorite and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidinone). The toxicity of the DAM solution to D. magna and P. phosphoreum was 5000 and 0.00053, respectively (highly toxic). The toxicity of calcium hypochlorite' and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidinone to daphnia was 0.04 mg/L (highly toxic) and 107 mg/L (moderately toxic), respectively.

  3. Toxicity screening of produced water extracts in a zebrafish embryo assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, G; Norrgren, L; Hylland, K; Tollefsen, K E

    2014-01-01

    Produced water is the largest effluent discharge from oil and gas/condensate production facilities in the North Sea. There is concern that contaminants originating from the reservoir and chemicals used in the production process may affect marine organisms. Developmental toxicity of extractable organic compounds in produced water effluents from oil and gas/condensate production platforms in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea was assessed in a temporal and spatial manner using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Large-scale solid-phase extraction (SPE) and on-column fractionation of water-soluble fraction (WSF) and an oil/particulate fraction was used in a rapid screening bioassay for embryotoxicity. Exposure to produced water extracts increased rate of mortality and reduced pigmentation and heart rate, as well as delaying time to hatch. The oil/particulate fraction was 10-fold less toxic than WSF, indicating that toxicity was predominantly produced by moderately polar and bioavailable compounds. Large spatial and temporal variation in produced water toxicity was observed, displaying considerable variability in the reservoir, oil well, and effluent composition over time. The noted toxicity did not correlate well with either reported produced water composition or parameters such as total hydrocarbons, thus challenging chemical measurements as a reliable source of information for predicting complex effects. Although embryotoxicity was observed following exposure to the extracts, dilution and transformation of produced water in the recipient are expected to rapidly reduce the concentrations of compounds in the effluents to levels below the thresholds of observed effects.

  4. A Microfluidic Device for Continuous Sensing of Systemic Acute Toxicants in Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyan Zhao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A bioluminescent-cell-based microfluidic device for sensing toxicants in drinking water was designed and fabricated. The system employed Vibrio fischeri cells as broad-spectrum sensors to monitor potential systemic cell toxicants in water, such as heavy metal ions and phenol. Specifically, the chip was designed for continuous detection. The chip design included two counter-flow micromixers, a T-junction droplet generator and six spiral microchannels. The cell suspension and water sample were introduced into the micromixers and dispersed into droplets in the air flow. This guaranteed sufficient oxygen supply for the cell sensors. Copper (Cu2+, zinc (Zn2+, potassium dichromate and 3,5-dichlorophenol were selected as typical toxicants to validate the sensing system. Preliminary tests verified that the system was an effective screening tool for acute toxicants although it could not recognize or quantify specific toxicants. A distinct non-linear relationship was observed between the zinc ion concentration and the Relative Luminescence Units (RLU obtained during testing. Thus, the concentration of simple toxic chemicals in water can be roughly estimated by this system. The proposed device shows great promise for an early warning system for water safety.

  5. Toxicity of Trinitrotoluene to Sheepshead Minnows in Water Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-06

    reported the toxicity of TNT to freshwater fish including rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), channel catfish ...similar experiments reported in the present study. Feeding experimental fish may have contrib- uted to the observed high loss of TNT during the experiment...invertebrates (Renoux et al., 2000; Dodard et al., 2004). The body concentrations of the ADNTs were much higher than TNT in catfish , even for TNT exposure

  6. Impact of water chemistry on the particle-specific toxicity of copper nanoparticles to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yinlong; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Chen, Guangchao; Vijver, Martina G

    2018-01-01

    Toxicity of metallic nanoparticle suspensions (NP(total)) is generally assumed to result from the combined effect of the particles present in suspensions (NP(particle)) and their released ions (NP(ion)). Evaluation and consideration of how water chemistry affects the particle-specific toxicity of NP(total) are critical for environmental risk assessment of nanoparticles. In this study, it was found that the toxicity of Cu NP(particle) to Daphnia magna, in line with the trends in toxicity for Cu NP(ion), decreased with increasing pH and with increasing concentrations of divalent cations and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Without the addition of DOC, the toxicity of Cu NP(total) to D. magna at the LC50 was driven mainly by Cu NP(ion) (accounting for ≥53% of the observed toxicity). However, toxicity of Cu NP(total) in the presence of DOC at a concentration ranging from 5 to 50mg C/L largely resulted from the NP(particle) (57%-85%), which could be attributable to the large reduction of the concentration of Cu NP(ion) and the enhancement of the stability of Cu NP(particle) when DOC was added. Our results indicate that water chemistry needs to be explicitly taken into consideration when evaluating the role of NP(particle) and NP(ion) in the observed toxicity of NP(total). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fact Sheet: Final Air Toxics Standards for Area Sources in the Chemical Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact sheet on the national air toxics standards issued October 16, 2009 by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for smaller-emitting sources, known as area sources, in the chemical manufacturing industry.

  8. Development and application of a marine sediment pore-water toxicity test using Ulva fasciata zoospores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooten, R.L.; Carr, R.S. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Geological Survey

    1998-01-01

    An acute (96 h) pore-water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of Ulva fasciata zoospores as endpoints was developed to test the toxicity of marine and estuarine sediment pore-water samples. Tests with an organic toxicant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS), three metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn), and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) were conducted to determine zoospore sensitivity. Zoospore germination and gametophyte growth were as sensitive to SDS as sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development. Zoospore sensitivity to metals was greater than or comparable to that of adult macroalgae. Zoospores were less sensitive to NH{sub 3} than were other commonly used toxicity test organisms. Test results using this algal assay with sediment pore-water samples with high NH{sub 3} concentrations were compared with results from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development tests for the same samples. Ulva fasciata zoospore germination was not affected by samples with high NH{sub 3} concentrations that were toxic in both sea urchin tests. Zoospore tolerance of NH{sub 3} and sensitivity to other contaminants indicate that their response may be useful in toxicity identification evaluation studies with pore-water samples that contain high concentrations of unionized NH{sub 3}.

  9. Development and application of a marine sediment pore-water toxicity test using Ulva fasciata zoospores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, Russell L.; Carr, R. Scott

    1998-01-01

    An acute (96 h) pore-water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of Ulva fasciatazoospores as endpoints was developed to test the toxicity of marine and estuarine sediment pore-water samples. Tests with an organic toxicant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS), three metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn), and ammonia (NH3) were conducted to determine zoospore sensitivity. Zoospore germination and gametophyte growth were as sensitive to SDS as sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development. Zoospore sensitivity to metals was greater than or comparable to that of adult macroalgae. Zoospores were less sensitive to NH3than were other commonly used toxicity test organisms. Test results using this algal assay with sediment pore-water samples with high NH3 concentrations were compared with results from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development tests for the same samples. Ulva fasciatazoospore germination was not affected by samples with high NH3 concentrations that were toxic in both sea urchin tests. Zoospore tolerance of NH3 and sensitivity to other contaminants indicate that their response may be useful in toxicity identification evaluation studies with pore-water samples that contain high concentrations of unionized NH3.

  10. A microbial fuel cell-based biosensor for the detection of toxic components in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    In a microbial fuel cell bacteria produce electricity. When water with a constant quality is lead passed the bacteria, a constant current will be measured. When toxic components enter the cell with the water, the bacteria are affected

  11. A microbial fuel cell-based biosensor for the detection of toxic components in water

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    In a microbial fuel cell bacteria produce electricity. When water with a constant quality is lead passed the bacteria, a constant current will be measured. When toxic components enter the cell with the water, the bacteria are affected and this will show as a decrease in current. In this way a microbial fuel cell can act as a sensor for toxic components in water. The research focused on the control of the sensor to reach a sensitive sensor. This was done by controlling the potential of the ano...

  12. On the use of mixture toxicity assessment in REACH and the water framework directive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syberg, Kristian; Jensen, T.S.; Cedergreen, Nina

    2009-01-01

      This review seeks to connect the scientific theory of mixture toxicity to its implementation within different regulatory frameworks. The aim is to demonstrate how mixture toxicity assessment can be more thoroughly integrated into the European chemical regulations, REACH and the Water Framework...... Directive (WFD), using the experiences gained through other regulatory frameworks. The paper consists of 1) an examination of the scientific underpinnings of the common mixture toxicity assessment methods; 2) a discussion of how these methods have been used in regulatory frameworks; and 3) a discussion...... of how the methods could be applied within REACH and WFD. It is concluded that oncentration addition should be applied as a default model for mixture toxicity assessment. Furthermore, it is concluded that REACH and WFD only include mixture toxicity assessments in specific situations. However, it is shown...

  13. Toxicity of acid mine pit lake water remediated with limestone and phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neil, L.L.; McCullough, C.D.; Lund, M.A.; Evans, L.H.; Tsvetnenko, Y. [Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA (Australia)

    2009-11-15

    Pit lakes are increasingly common worldwide and have potential to provide many benefits. However, lake water toxicity may require remediation before beneficial end uses can be realised. Three treatments to remediate AMD (pH similar to 4.8) pit lake water containing elevated concentrations of Al and Zn from Collie, Western Australia were tested in mesocosms. Treatments were: (a) limestone neutralisation (L), (b) phosphorus amendment (P), and c) combined limestone neutralisation and phosphorus amendment (L+P). Laboratory bioassays with Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia, Chlorella protothecoides and Tetrahymena thermophila assessed remediation. Limestone neutralisation increased pH and reduced heavy metal concentrations by 98% (Al) to 14% (Mg), removing toxicity to the three test species within 2 months. Phosphorus amendment removed toxicity after 6 months of treatment. However, phosphorus amendment to prior limestone neutralisation failed to reduce toxicity more than limestone neutralisation alone. Low concentrations of both phosphorus and nitrogen appear to limit phytoplankton population growth in all treatments.

  14. Investigation of Water Safety in Non-treated Drinking Water with Trace Toxic Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Suw Young; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ga Eun

    2013-09-01

    The trace toxic metal copper was assayed using mercury immobilized on a carbon nanotube electrode (MCW), with a graphite counter and a reference electrode. In this study, a macro-scale convection motor was interfaced with a MCW three-electrode system, in which a handmade MCW was optimized using cyclic- and square-wave stripping voltammetry. An analytical electrolyte for tap water was used instead of an expensive acid or base ionic solution. Under these conditions, optimum parameters were 0.09 V amplitude, 40 Hz frequency, 0.01 V incremental potential, and a 60-s accumulation time. A diagnostic working curve was obtained from 50.0 to 350 μg/L. At a constant Cu(II) concentration of 10.0 μg/L, the statistical relative standard deviation was 1.78% (RSD, n = 15), the analytical accumulation time was only 60 s, and the analytical detection limit approached 4.6 μg/L (signal/noise = 3). The results were applied to nontreated drinking water. The content of the analyzed copper using 9.0 and 4.0 μg/L standards were 8.68 μg/L and 3.96 μg/L; statistical values R(2) = 0.9987 and R(2) = 0.9534, respectively. This method is applicable to biological diagnostics or food surveys.

  15. Acute and chronic toxicity of lead in water and diet to the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Brunson, E.L.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of waterborne and dietary lead (Pb) exposure on the acute and chronic toxicity of Pb to the amphipod Hyalella azteca. Test solutions were generated by a modified diluter with an extended (24-h) equilibration period. Acute (96-h) toxicity of Pb varied with water hardness in the range of 71 to 275 mg/L as CaCO3, despite similar dissolved Pb concentrations. Acute toxicity was greatest in soft test water, with less than 50% survival at the lowest dissolved Pb concentration (151 ??g/L). Survival also was significantly reduced in medium-hardness water but not in hard test water. In chronic (42-d) studies, amphipods were exposed to waterborne Pb and fed either a control diet or a diet equilibrated with waterborne Pb levels. For animals fed the control diet, the median lethal concentration (LC50) for Pb was 24 ??g/L (as dissolved Pb), and significant reductions in survival occurred at 16 ??g/L. Exposure to Pb-treated diets significantly increased toxicity across a wide range of dissolved Pb concentrations, with a LC50 of 16 ??g/L and significant reductions in growth and reproduction at 3.5 ??g/L. Significant effects on growth and reproduction occurred at dissolved Pb concentrations close to the current U.S. chronic water-quality criterion. Our results suggest that both aqueous- and dietary-exposure pathways contribute significantly to chronic Pb exposure and toxic effects in aquatic biota. ?? 2005 SETAC.

  16. Toxicity of Demulsifier to Fresh Water Cichlids: Tilapia guineensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dorys

    and the control treatments at levels of p < 0.05. Varying ... Contamination of water bodies with a wide range of pollutants has become a ... The severity of adverse biological effects of oil production chemicals is .... (polyoxyethylated fatty acids).

  17. Development of a Fully Automated Flow Injection Analyzer Implementing Bioluminescent Biosensors for Water Toxicity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinos Georgiou

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of an automated Flow Injection analyzer for water toxicity assessment. The analyzer is validated by assessing the toxicity of heavy metal (Pb2+, Hg2+ and Cu2+ solutions. One hundred μL of a Vibrio fischeri suspension are injected in a carrier solution containing different heavy metal concentrations. Biosensor cells are mixed with the toxic carrier solution in the mixing coil on the way to the detector. Response registered is % inhibition of biosensor bioluminescence due to heavy metal toxicity in comparison to that resulting by injecting the Vibrio fischeri suspension in deionised water. Carrier solutions of mercury showed higher toxicity than the other heavy metals, whereas all metals show concentration related levels of toxicity. The biosensor’s response to carrier solutions of different pHs was tested. Vibrio fischeri’s bioluminescence is promoted in the pH 5–10 range. Experiments indicate that the whole cell biosensor, as applied in the automated fluidic system, responds to various toxic solutions.

  18. Acute and subchronic toxicity study of the water extract from root of Citrus aurantifolia (Christm. et Panz. Swingle in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanjana Jaijoy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute and subchronic toxicities of the water extract from the roots of Citrus aurantifolia were studied in both male and female rats. Oral administration of the extract at a single dose of 5,000 mg/kg body weight (5 male, 5 female did not produce signs of toxicity, behavioral changes, mortality or differences on gross appearance of internal organs. The subchronic toxicity was determined by oral feeding the test substance at the doses of 300, 600 and 1,200 mg/kg body weight for 90 days (10 male, 10 female. The examinations of signs, animal behavior and health monitoring showed no signs of abnormalities in the test groups as compared to the controls. The test and control groups (on the 90th day and the satellite group (on the 118th day were analyzed by measuring their final body and organ weights, taking necropsy, and examining hematological parameters, blood clinical chemistry and histopathology features. The oral administration of 1,200 mg/kg/ day of the extract of C. aurantifolia in male and female rats caused a significant increase in the liver enzymes, which remained within the normal range, but did not produce a significant histopathological change in the internal organs. In conclusion, the extract from the roots of C. aurantifolia administered orally did not cause acute or subchronic toxicities to male and female rats.

  19. Toxicity of phthalates to selected benthic organisms via water and sediment exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Call, D.J.; Markee, T.P.; VandeVenter, F.A.; Cox, D.A.; Geiger, D.L.; Brooke, L.T. [univ. of Wisconsin, Superior, WI (United States). Lake Superior Research Inst.

    1995-12-31

    A three-tiered approach was applied to evaluate the bioavailability and toxicity of a series of phthalic acid esters to selected benthic invertebrates. Tier 1 consisted of 10-day exposures of the test species to the phthalates in water without sediments to determine toxicity. Tier 2 consisted of incorporating the phthalates into natural sediments and evaluating their persistence in phthalate-amended sediments under conditions simulating those of a 10-day toxicity test of contaminated sediments. Tier 3 consisted of performing 10-day exposures of test animals to phthalate-amended sediments. Phthalates were amended to sediments for Tier 3 testing based upon the results of Tier 1 and Tier 2 tests, and an estimation of partitioning between sediment and pore water based upon equilibrium partitioning theory (EPT). Sediments of varying organic carbon content were used to evaluate the bioavailability and toxicity of phthalate-amended sediments. The phthalates included in this study were dimethyl, diethyl, di-n-butyl, butylbenzyl, di-n-hexyl, di-2-ethylhexyl and di-n-decyl phthalate. The sensitivities of the three test species followed the general order in water-only tests: Hyalella azteca > Chironomus tentans > Lumbriculus variegatus. The persistence of selected phthalates from Tier 2 tests, their respective toxicities from Tier 3 tests, and the utility of the EPT approach in assessing phthalate toxicity will be discussed.

  20. Assessment of toxic metal exposure following the Camelford water pollution incident: evidence of acute mobilization of lead into drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J J; Greenfield, S M; Thompson, R P; Cargnello, J A; Kendall, M D; Landsberg, J P; Watt, F; Delves, H T; House, I

    1995-03-01

    Following the incident of acidic pollution of water by aluminium sulfate centred around Camelford in July 1988, we have carried out a retrospective analysis of the mobilization of toxic metals to residents of the area. An advanced nuclear technique was used to measure trace levels of elements within hair, thus, avoiding surface contamination. In contrast to controls, lead, but no other toxic metals, was consistently found within sections of hair that dated to mid-1988 from four residents; they must, therefore, have consumed this metal around the time of the incident. The source of this lead was probably local water pipe residue, and this was found on analysis to have a matrix specific to such soft-water areas that, prior to the incident, had slowly accumulated certain toxic metals such as cadmium and uranium and particularly lead. Lead is mobilized from such residues by acidic water and could, therefore, have heavily contaminated mains water after the incident. However, analyses of residents' plasma and whole blood, and of urine following a lead-chelation test, showed no evidence of either long-term increased body burdens of toxic metals or depletion of essential elements. In addition, we found no evidence of continued poor water quality in the area. In conclusion, during a short period following the pollution, some residents who consumed mains water would have been acutely exposed to lead and other toxic metals. Prediction of the scale of metal exposure to individuals was not possible owing to heterogeneity of the water distribution network, but long-term effects to residents from lead are not anticipated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Dispersed oil toxicity tests with biological species indigenous to the Gulf of Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fucik, K.W.; Carr, K.A.; Balcom, B.J.

    1994-08-01

    Static and flowthrough aquatic acute toxicity testing protocols were utilized on eggs and larvae of seven commercially important invertebrates and fishes from the Gulf of Mexico. Test organisms were exposed to Central and Western Gulf oils, dispersed oil, and Corexit 9527. Species included brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus), white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), inland silverside (Menidia berylina), and spot (Leiosomus xanthurus). Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) was also tested because gulf menhaden were not available. Mysids (Mysidopsis bahia) were evaluated as part of a chronic toxicity assessment.

  2. Vegetated Treatment Systems for Removing Contaminants Associated with Surface Water Toxicity in Agriculture and Urban Runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian S; Phillips, Bryn M; Voorhees, Jennifer P; Cahn, Michael

    2017-05-15

    Urban stormwater and agriculture irrigation runoff contain a complex mixture of contaminants that are often toxic to adjacent receiving waters. Runoff may be treated with simple systems designed to promote sorption of contaminants to vegetation and soils and promote infiltration. Two example systems are described: a bioswale treatment system for urban stormwater treatment, and a vegetated drainage ditch for treating agriculture irrigation runoff. Both have similar attributes that reduce contaminant loading in runoff: vegetation that results in sorption of the contaminants to the soil and plant surfaces, and water infiltration. These systems may also include the integration of granulated activated carbon as a polishing step to remove residual contaminants. Implementation of these systems in agriculture and urban watersheds requires system monitoring to verify treatment efficacy. This includes chemical monitoring for specific contaminants responsible for toxicity. The current paper emphasizes monitoring of current use pesticides since these are responsible for surface water toxicity to aquatic invertebrates.

  3. Water quality criteria for colored smokes: Solvent Yellow 33, Final report. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, K.A.; Hovatter, P.S.

    1987-11-01

    The available data on the environmental fate, aquatic toxicity, and mammalian toxicity of Solvent Yellow 33, a quinoline dye used in colored smoke grenades, were reviewed. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guidelines were used in an attempt to generate water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life and its use and of human health. 87 refs., 2 figs., 13 tabs.

  4. Effect of water hardness on peracetic acid toxicity to zebrafish, Danio rerio, embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchand, Pierre_André; Strauss, David L.; Wienke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The use of peracetic acid (PAA) in aquaculture has been suggested as an alternative therapeutic agent. Few data are available concerning fish toxicity by PAA or factors that modify this toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of water hardness on the acute toxicity of PAA...... products to embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio). Embryos were exposed to PAA ranging from 0 to 9 mg/L in low-hardness (1.4 dH or 25 mg/L hardness as CaCO3), medium-hardness (14 dH or 250 mg/L hardness as CaCO3) and high-hardness (140 dH or 2,500 mg/L hardness as CaCO3) waters. The lowest LC50 value was 2.......24 mg/L PAA in the low-hardness water, and the highest LC50 value was 7.14 mg/L PAA in the high-hardness water. Toxicity of PAA to embryos was found to be negatively correlated with water hardness. The pH decreased with increasing concentrations of PAA, and the test waters were observed to become more...

  5. Toxic impact of bromide and iodide on drinking water disinfected with chlorine or chloramines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Komaki, Yukako; Kimura, Susana Y; Hu, Hong-Ying; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-10-21

    Disinfectants inactivate pathogens in source water; however, they also react with organic matter and bromide/iodide to form disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Although only a few DBP classes have been systematically analyzed for toxicity, iodinated and brominated DBPs tend to be the most toxic. The objectives of this research were (1) to determine if monochloramine (NH2Cl) disinfection generated drinking water with less toxicity than water disinfected with free chlorine (HOCl) and (2) to determine the impact of added bromide and iodide in conjunction with HOCl or NH2Cl disinfection on mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genomic DNA damage induction. Water disinfected with chlorine was less cytotoxic but more genotoxic than water disinfected with chloramine. For both disinfectants, the addition of Br(-) and I(-) increased cytotoxicity and genotoxicity with a greater response observed with NH2Cl disinfection. Both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were highly correlated with TOBr and TOI. However, toxicity was weakly and inversely correlated with TOCl. Thus, the forcing agents for cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were the generation of brominated and iodinated DBPs rather than the formation of chlorinated DBPs. Disinfection practices need careful consideration especially when using source waters containing elevated bromide and iodide.

  6. Associations between water physicochemistry and Prymnesium parvum presence, abundance, and toxicity in west Texas reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanLandeghem, Matthew M.; Farooqi, Mukhtar; Southard, Greg M.; Patino, Reynaldo

    2015-01-01

    Toxic blooms of golden alga (Prymnesium parvum) have caused substantial ecological and economic harm in freshwater and marine systems throughout the world. In North America, toxic blooms have impacted freshwater systems including large reservoirs. Management of water chemistry is one proposed option for golden alga control in these systems. The main objective of this study was to assess physicochemical characteristics of water that influence golden alga presence, abundance, and toxicity in the Upper Colorado River basin (UCR) in Texas. The UCR contains reservoirs that have experienced repeated blooms and other reservoirs where golden alga is present but has not been toxic. We quantified golden alga abundance (hemocytometer counts), ichthyotoxicity (bioassay), and water chemistry (surface grab samples) at three impacted reservoirs on the Colorado River; two reference reservoirs on the Concho River; and three sites at the confluence of these rivers. Sampling occurred monthly from January 2010 to July 2011. Impacted sites were characterized by higher specific conductance, calcium and magnesium hardness, and fluoride than reference and confluence sites. At impacted sites, golden alga abundance and toxicity were positively associated with salinity-related variables and blooms peaked at ~10°C and generally did not occur above 20°C. Overall, these findings suggest management of land and water use to reduce hardness or salinity could produce unfavorable conditions for golden alga.

  7. IPM Analysis of the Final Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA used version 4.10_MATS of the Integrated Planning Model (IPM) to analyze the impact of the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) rule on the U.S. electric power sector. Learn about the results and view links to documentation.

  8. Toxicity of uranium, molybdenum, nickel, and arsenic to Hyalella azteca and Chironomus dilutus in water-only and spiked-sediment toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liber, Karsten; Doig, Lorne E; White-Sobey, Suzanne L

    2011-07-01

    A series of laboratory spiked-sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus dilutus were undertaken to determine acute and chronic toxicity thresholds for uranium (U), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), and arsenic (As) based on both whole-sediment (total) and pore water exposure concentrations. Water-only toxicity data were also generated from separate experiments to determine the toxicities of these metals/metalloids under our test conditions and to help evaluate the hypothesis that pore water metal concentrations are better correlated with sediment toxicity to benthic organisms than whole-sediment metal concentrations. The relative toxicity of the four elements tested differed depending on which test species was used and whether whole-sediment or pore water metal concentrations were correlated with effects. Based on measured whole-sediment concentrations, Ni and As were the two most acutely toxic elements to H. azteca with 10-d LC50s of 521 and 532 mg/kg d.w., respectively. Measured pore water concentrations indicated that U and Ni were the two most acutely toxic elements, with 10-d LC50s to H. azteca of 2.15 and 2.05 mg/L, respectively. Based on pore water metal concentrations, the no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) for growth were (H. azteca and C. dilutus, respectively) 0.67 and 0.21 mg/L for U, 260-fold higher, respectively, than the CNSC LELs for these metals/metalloids. Data on pore water metal concentrations in toxic sediment would be a useful addition to future Guidelines documents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. OTEC Advanced Composite Cold Water Pipe: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Alan Miller; Matthew Ascari

    2011-09-12

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion can exploit natural temperature gradients in the oceans to generate usable forms of energy (for example, cost-competitive baseload electricity in tropical regions such as Hawaii) free from fossil fuel consumption and global warming emissions.The No.1 acknowledged challenge of constructing an OTEC plant is the Cold Water Pipe (CWP), which draws cold water from 1000m depths up to the surface, to serve as the coolant for the OTEC Rankine cycle. For a commercial-scale plant, the CWP is on the order of 10m in diameter.This report describes work done by LMSSC developing the CWP for LM MS2 New Ventures emerging OTEC business. The work started in early 2008 deciding on the minimum-cost CWP architecture, materials, and fabrication process. In order to eliminate what in previous OTEC work had been a very large assembly/deployment risk, we took the innovative approach of building an integral CWP directly from theOTEC platform and down into the water. During the latter half of 2008, we proceeded to a successful small-scale Proof-of-Principles validation of the new fabrication process, at the Engineering Development Lab in Sunnyvale. During 2009-10, under the Cooperative Agreement with the US Dept. of Energy, we have now successfully validated key elements of the process and apparatus at a 4m diameter scale suitable for a future OTEC Pilot Plant. The validations include: (1) Assembly of sandwich core rings from pre-pultruded hollow 'planks,' holding final dimensions accurately; (2) Machine-based dispensing of overlapping strips of thick fiberglass fabric to form the lengthwise-continuous face sheets, holding accurate overlap dimensions; (3) Initial testing of the fabric architecture, showing that the overlap splices develop adequate mechanical strength (work done under a parallel US Naval Facilities Command program); and (4) Successful resin infusion/cure of 4m diameter workpieces, obtaining full wet-out and a non-discernable knitline

  10. Changing patterns in water toxicity associated with current use pesticides in three California agriculture regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian S; Phillips, Bryn M; Voorhees, Jennifer P; Deng, Xin; Geraci, Jeff; Worcester, Karen; Tjeerdema, Ron S

    2017-11-15

    Regulation of agriculture irrigation water discharges in California, USA, is assessed and controlled by its 9 Regional Water Quality Control Boards under the jurisdiction of the California State Water Resources Control Board. Each Regional Water Board has developed programs to control pesticides in runoff as part of the waste discharge requirements implemented through each region's Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program. The present study assessed how pesticide use patterns differ in the Imperial (Imperial County) and the Salinas and Santa Maria (Monterey County) valleys, which host 3 of California's prime agriculture areas. Surface-water toxicity associated with current use pesticides was monitored at several sites in these areas in 2014 and 2015, and results were linked to changes in pesticide use patterns in these areas. Pesticide use patterns appeared to coincide with differences in the way agriculture programs were implemented by the 2 respective Regional Water Quality Control Boards, and these programs differed in the 2 Water Board Regions. Different pesticide use patterns affected the occurrence of pesticides in agriculture runoff, and this influenced toxicity test results. Greater detection frequency and higher concentrations of the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos were detected in agriculture runoff in Imperial County compared to Monterey County, likely due to more rigorous monitoring requirements for growers using this pesticide in Monterey County. Monterey County agriculture runoff contained toxic concentrations of pyrethroid and neonicotinoid pesticides, which impacted amphipods (Hyalella azteca) and midge larvae (Chironomus dilutus) in toxicity tests. Study results illustrate how monitoring strategies need to evolve as regulatory actions affect change in pesticide use and demonstrate the importance of using toxicity test indicator species appropriate for the suite of contaminants in runoff in order to accurately assess environmental risk. Integr

  11. LEVEL OF TOXICITY WATER AREA «TULENIY» AS A RESULT OF BIOASSAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Sokolsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the toxicity of marine waters area " tuleniy ".Location. Area " tuleniy ".Methods. Determining the level of toxicity of marine waters area "seal" method for biological testing was conducted according tothe guidelines approved by the Ministry of natural resources (guidance on the definition of ..., 2002; Dolzhenko, 1978. Guide prepared by the Center for Russian register of hydraulic structures and the state water cadastre of the MNR of Russia jointly with specialists of the Institute Committee of Russia and the UNION of ecological problems of the Ministry of Ukraine. The basis of the proposed system of marine toxicity biotests based on the results of generalization of experimental research based on the problem of pollution of water bodies and numerous literature data, making it possible to identify features of the response of aquatic organisms of different taxonomic groups to toxic impurities of different nature and origin. Experimental studies were conducted on the culture of marine unicellular algae Phaeodactylum tricornutum on planktonic crustacea Acartia tonsa, the larvae of the chironomid Chironomus gr.salinarius and juvenile guppies Poecillia reticulata Peters.Results. Comparative analysis of the results of research from 2001 to 2006 showed no acute toxic effect on the test object zooplankton and phytoplanton.Main conclusions. Throughout the study period (2001-2003, 2005-2006, you must allocate the spring of 2002, when it was recorded,the average of the lowest five years of research, the level of toxicity of water for the analyzed area.Considering the results of biological testing of the surveyed area by periods, it should be noted that the average level of toxicity of the waters did not undergo significant changes and were on the same level, not exceeding 17,6% (table. 1. According to the classification shown in table 2, the water in the surveyed area is assessed as "non-toxic".

  12. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired gasification plant. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Under the Fine Particulate Control/Air Toxics Program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been performing comprehensive assessments of toxic substance emissions from coal-fired electric utility units. An objective of this program is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in evaluating hazardous air pollutant emissions as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has also performed comprehensive assessments of emissions from many power plants and provided the information to the EPA. The DOE program was implemented in two. Phase 1 involved the characterization of eight utility units, with options to sample additional units in Phase 2. Radian was one of five contractors selected to perform these toxic emission assessments.Radian`s Phase 1 test site was at southern Company Service`s Plant Yates, Unit 1, which, as part of the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program, was demonstrating the CT-121 flue gas desulfurization technology. A commercial-scale prototype integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) power plant was selected by DOE for Phase 2 testing. Funding for the Phase 2 effort was provided by DOE, with assistance from EPRI and the host site, the Louisiana Gasification Technology, Inc. (LGTI) project This document presents the results of that effort.

  13. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Developmental toxicity of chloroprene vapors in New Zealand white rabbits. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1994-04-01

    Chloroprene, 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene, is a colorless liquid with a pungent ethereal odor that is primarily used as an intermediate in the manufacture of neoprene rubber, and has been used as such since about 1930. This study addressed the potential for chloroprene to cause developmental toxicity in New Zealand white rabbits following gestational exposure to 0, 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene vapors, 6h/dy, 7dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 15 artificially inseminated females exposed on 6 through 28 days of gestation (dg). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 29 dg. Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. There were no overt signs of maternal toxicity and the change in maternal body weight over the course of the study was not affected. Exposure of pregnant rabbits to chloroprene vapors on 6-28 dg had no effect on the number of implantation, the mean percent of live pups per litter, or on the incidence of resorptions per litter. The incidence of fetal malformations was not increased by exposure to chloroprene. Results of this study indicate that gestational exposure of New Zealand white rabbits to 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene did not result in observable toxicity to either the dam or the offspring.

  14. Toxicity of aluminium in natural waters controlled by type rather than quantity of natural organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papathanasiou, Grigorios [SEAES, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); White, Keith N.; Walton, Rachel [Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Boult, Stephen, E-mail: s.boult@manchester.ac.uk [SEAES, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Extension of the conditions under which Al toxicity is tested is required. Environmentally representative preparation of waters is used in investigating roles of alginate (AA) and humic acids (HA) in partitioning of Al (0.5 mg L{sup -1}), subsequent uptake and accumulation by and toxicity to Lymnaea stagnalis. HA and AA did not alter precipitation of Al(OH){sub 3}, but altered subsequent behaviour of Al. High (40 mg L{sup -1}) HA concentrations, and to a lesser extent AA, prevented settling and availability for benthic grazing but made deposited Al more likely to be ingested. HA detoxified but AA increased toxicity relative to Al alone. Low concentration (4 mg L{sup -1}) AA and HA do not change partitioning but increase uptake; they both detoxify, but AA less than HA. The study shows OC:Al ratio is critical in predicting Al behaviour in natural waters, also uptake is mediated by snail behaviour, not solely a function of concentration and form of Al. Therefore, predicting Al behaviour will be subject to errors in determining relevant water composition and response of biota to the new speciation. However, with respect to toxicity, rather than other aspects of Al behaviour, different ratios of HA and Al are insignificant compared to whether AA is present rather than HA. - Highlights: {yields} Toxicity assessment in which environmental relevance is of primary concern. {yields} Mass balance of Al monitored throughout the exposure period. {yields} Al behaviour influenced by concentration of organic matter. {yields} Strong dependence of toxicity on type rather than concentration of organic matter. {yields} Toxicity is a function of Al behaviour but also animal behaviour.

  15. Application of enzyme multibiosensor for toxicity analysis of real water samples of different origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soldatkin A. P.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The analysis of toxicity of different water samples with the multibiosensor developed earlier. Methods. The potentiometric multibiosensor with several immobilized enzymes as bioselective elements and the matrix of pH-sensitive field effect transistors as transducers of the biochemical signal into the electric one was applied for the analysis. Results. The bioselective elements of the multibiosensor were developed using acetylcholinesterase, butyryl- cholinesterase, urease, glucose oxidase, and three-enzyme system (invertase, mutarotase, glucose oxidase. The measurement of toxic compounds in water samples of different origin was performed using the constructed sensor. The results obtained were compared with those obtained by the conventional methods of toxic agent’s analysis (atomic absorption spectrometry, thin-film chroma- tography, and atomic absorbic analyser of mercury. Conclusion. A strong conformity between the results obtained with the multibiosensor and traditional methods has been shown.

  16. Toxicity of peracetic acid to fish: Variation among species and impact of water chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straus, David L.; Meinelt, Thomas; Liu, Dibo

    2017-01-01

    of fingerling fish that are important to aquaculture were exposed to PAA for 24 h in static toxicity bioassays in well water. These fish were: fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas; black-nose crappie, Pomoxis nigromaculatus; bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus; blue tilapia, Oreochromis aureus; channel catfish......There has been strong interest in the use of peracetic acid (PAA) in aquaculture as it can be used to disinfect water and hard surfaces and thereby eliminate or lower the burden of fish pathogens. Unfortunately, there has been little research on the toxicity of PAA to fish. Twelve species...... of dissolved organic content had no effect on PAA toxicity. Results of the present study are important information on the safe application of PAA for the aquaculture industry...

  17. Management of toxic cyanobacteria for drinking water production of Ain Zada Dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saoudi, Amel; Brient, Luc; Boucetta, Sabrine; Ouzrout, Rachid; Bormans, Myriam; Bensouilah, Mourad

    2017-07-01

    Blooms of toxic cyanobacteria in Algerian reservoirs represent a potential health problem, mainly from drinking water that supplies the local population of Ain Zada (Bordj Bou Arreridj). The objective of this study is to monitor, detect, and identify the existence of cyanobacteria and microcystins during blooming times. Samples were taken in 2013 from eight stations. The results show that three potentially toxic cyanobacterial genera with the species Planktothrix agardhii were dominant. Cyanobacterial biomass, phycocyanin (PC) concentrations, and microcystin (MC) concentrations were high in the surface layer and at 14 m depth; these values were also high in the treated water. On 11 May 2013, MC concentrations were 6.3 μg/L in MC-LR equivalent in the drinking water. This study shows for the first time the presence of cyanotoxins in raw and treated waters, highlighting that regular monitoring of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins must be undertaken to avoid potential health problems.

  18. Fact Sheets: Final Air Toxics Rules for Ethylene Oxide Emissions from Commercial Sterilization and Fumigation Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains November 1994 and November 1999 fact sheets with information regarding the Final Ethylene Oxide Emissions Standards for Sterilization Facilities. These documents contain answers to common questions for this NESHAP

  19. Assessment of acute toxicity of water soluble fraction of diesel on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute toxicity of water soluble fraction (WSF) of diesel fuel was assessed by evaluating its effects on growth of two marine microalgae, Isochrysis and Chaetoceros. Pure cultures of each of the two microalgae were exposed to concentrations of 0% (controls), 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% of diesel WSF (in triplicates) and allowed ...

  20. Rapid toxicity detection in water quality control utilizing automated multispecies biomonitoring for permanent space stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, E. L.; Young, R. C.; Smith, M. D.; Eagleson, K. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate proposed design characteristics and applications of automated biomonitoring devices for real-time toxicity detection in water quality control on-board permanent space stations. Simulated tests in downlinking transmissions of automated biomonitoring data to Earth-receiving stations were simulated using satellite data transmissions from remote Earth-based stations.

  1. The impact of toxic cyanobacteria on the water quality in the Deep Subalpine Lakes (DSL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasino, Leonardo; Shams, Shiva; Salmaso, Nico; Dietrich, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Toxic cyanobacteria represent an emerging threat for aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Eutrophication and climate changes are mentioned among factors favouring toxic blooms. The toxicity of cyanobacteria is related to the ability of some species (the most common in temperate waters belong to the genera Microcystis, Planktothrix, Dolichospermum) of producing a wide variety of toxic secondary metabolites, i.e. microcystins, nodularins, anatoxins, saxitoxins, cylindrospermopsins. Some of these toxins can accumulate in water and aquatic organisms. They can therefore produce severe effects on humans by direct exposure (contact or ingestion of contaminated water) or by indirect exposure (by consumption of contaminated food). We have conducted a survey on the distribution of cyanobacterial toxins in the largest Italian lakes (Garda, Iseo, Como, Maggiore, Lugano), which are important water resources for drinking purposes and for recreational use. Cyanobacterial toxins were present in all lakes, although with a big variability in concentration. More specifically, in the frame of the European project EULAKES, we have investigated in detail the temporal dynamics of the toxin production in Lake Garda, and the mechanisms of trophic transfer of the microcystins along the lacustrine food chain. By applying advanced analytical techniques based on LC-MS technologies, we were able to detect several microcystins at sub-ppb level and follow their variations during the year. The total concentrations of microcystins were strictly linked to the temporal and vertical dynamics of Planktothrix rubescens. Laboratory experiments allowed us to determine the kinetics of microcystin accumulation in zooplankton (daphnia magna).

  2. Toxicity effects of water extracts of Holothuria atra Jaeger in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Ridzwan Bin; Azizan, Nurul Alia; Zamli, Zaitunnatakin; Zulkipli, Farah Hanis; Mazlan, Nurzafirah; Althunibat, Osama Yousef

    2014-08-01

    To determine lethal median dose (LD50) and histopathological toxicity of water extract of Holothuria atra (H. atra) in mice. The behavioral changes, mortality and histopathology examination on liver were assessed in mice 14 d after the administration (i.p.) of H. atra water extract. Seven doses (10, 20, 30, 50, 100, 150 and 200 mg/kg) of H. atra were used. The control group was treated with normal saline. In the acute study in mice, the water extracts of H. atra caused dose-dependent general behavior adverse affects and mortality. The main behavioral sign of toxicity was hypoactivity, noticed immediately after administration of the extract which was more obvious at the higher doses and persisted until death. Mortality increased with increasing doses, the calculated LD50 was 41 mg/kg in mice. The liver toxicity was confirmed by histopathological examination, which indicated the presence of abnormal hepatocytes with a distorted shape and undefined cell lining as well as enlarged nuclei in low doses groups. High doses groups indicated a more prominent distortion of the polyhedral hepatocytes with undefined cell lining, massive cytoplasm, pyknotic, karyorhexis and karyolytic nuclei (necrosis of hepatocytes). Control group showed polyhedral hepatocytes with defined cell lining arranged in cords and normal round nuclei, with granular cytoplasm. Because of the relatively low LD50 value in the acute study in mice, it may be concluded that the H. atra water extract is toxic.

  3. Acute environmental toxicity and persistence of methyl salicylate: A chemical agent simulant. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Ligotke, M.W.; Harvey, S.D.; Fellows, R.J.; Li, S.W.

    1994-06-01

    The interactions of methyl salicylate with plant foliage and soils were assessed using aerosol/vapor exposure methods. Measurements of deposition velocity and residence times for soils and foliar surfaces are reported. Severe plant contact toxicity was observed at foliar mass-loading levels above 4 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} leaf; however, recovery was noted after four to fourteen days. Methyl salicylate has a short-term effect on soil dehydrogenase activity, but not phosphatase activity. Results of the earthworm bioassay indicated only minimal effects on survival.

  4. Overview of Chronic Oral Toxicity Values for Chemicals Present in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids, Flowback and Produced Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    as part of EPA's Hydraulic Fracturing Drinking Water Assessment, EPA is summarizing existing toxicity data for chemicals reported to be used in hydraulic fracturing fluids and/or found in flowback or produced waters from hydraulically fractured wells

  5. Distribution and habitat specificity of potentially-toxic Microcystis across climate, land and water use gradients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophi eMarmen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are a growing threat to freshwater bodies worldwide. In order for a toxic bloom to occur, a population of cells with the genetic capacity to produce toxins must be present together with the appropriate environmental conditions. In this study, we investigated the distribution patterns and phylogeny of potentially-toxic Microcystis (indicated by the presence and/or phylogeny of the mcyD and mcyA genes. Samples were collected from the water column of almost sixty water bodies across widely differing gradients of environmental conditions and land use in Israel. Potentially toxic populations were common but not ubiquitous, detected in ~65% of the studied sites. Local environmental factors, including phosphorus and ammonia concentrations and pH, as well as regional conditions such as the distance from built areas and nature reserves, were correlated with the distribution of the mcyD gene. A specific phylogenetic clade of Microcystis, defined using the sequence of the mcyA gene, was preferentially associated with aquaculture facilities but not irrigation reservoirs. Our results reveal important environmental, geospatial, and land use parameters affecting the geographic distribution of toxinogenic Microcystis, suggesting non-random dispersal of these globally abundant toxic cyanobacteria.

  6. Chronic toxicity of tire and road wear particles to water- and sediment-dwelling organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panko, Julie M; Kreider, Marisa L; McAtee, Britt L; Marwood, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Tire and road wear particles (TRWP) consist of a complex mixture of rubber, and pavement released from tires during use on road surfaces. Subsequent transport of the TRWP into freshwater sediments has raised some concern about the potential adverse effects on aquatic organisms. Previous studies have shown some potential for toxicity for tread particles, however, toxicity studies of TRWP collected from a road simulator system revealed no acute toxicity to green algae, daphnids, or fathead minnows at concentrations up to 10,000 mg/kg under conditions representative of receiving water bodies. In this study, the chronic toxicity of TRWP was evaluated in four aquatic species. Test animals were exposed to whole sediment spiked with TRWP at concentrations up to 10,000 mg/kg sediment or elutriates from spiked sediment. Exposure to TRWP spiked sediment caused mild growth inhibition in Chironomus dilutus but had no adverse effect on growth or reproduction in Hyalella azteca. Exposure to TRWP elutriates resulted in slightly diminished survival in larval Pimephales promelas but had no adverse effect on growth or reproduction in Ceriodaphnia dubia. No other endpoints in these species were affected. These results, together with previous studies demonstrating no acute toxicity of TRWP, indicate that under typical exposure conditions TRWP in sediments pose a low risk of toxicity to aquatic organisms.

  7. Radio-toxicity of spent fuel of the advanced heavy water reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, S; Singh, K D S; Sharma, V K

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a new power reactor concept being developed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The reactor retains many desirable features of the existing Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR), while incorporating new, advanced safety features. The reactor aims to utilise the vast thorium resources available in India. The reactor core will use plutonium as the make-up fuel, while breeding (233)U in situ. On account of this unique combination of fuel materials, the operational characteristics of the fuel as determined by its radioactivity, decay heat and radio-toxicity are being viewed with great interest. Radio-toxicity of the spent fuel is a measure of potential radiological hazard to the members of the public and also important from the ecological point of view. The radio-toxicity of the AHWR fuel is extremely high to start with, being approximately 10(4) times that of the fresh natural U fuel used in a PHWR, and continues to remain relatively high during operation and subsequent cooling. A unique feature of this fuel is the peak observed in its radio-toxicity at approximately 10(5) y of decay cooling. The delayed increase in fuel toxicity has been traced primarily to a build-up of (229)Th, (230)Th and (226)Ra. This phenomenon has been observed earlier for thorium-based fuels and is confirmed for the AHWR fuel. This paper presents radio-toxicity data for AHWR spent fuel up to a period of 10(6) y and the results are compared with the radio-toxicity of PHWR.

  8. Nucleic acid tests for toxic phytoplankton in Irish waters-phytotest: Marine Strategic RTDI project AT/04/02/02 - research update

    OpenAIRE

    Maher, M; Kavanagh, S; Brennan, C.; Moran, M.; R. Salas; Lyons, J.; Silke, J

    2007-01-01

    The Phytotest project is a 3 year collaborative project funded through the Marine Strategic Programme in Advanced Technologies as part of the National Development plan 2000-2006. The project partners include the National Diagnostics Centre at NUI Galway and MI. The overall objective of the project is the development of nucleic acid tests (molecular methods) for the identification of key toxic phytoplankton species in Irish waters. In the final year of the programme the aim is to transfer the ...

  9. A Lymnaea stagnalis Embryo Test for Toxicity Bioindication of Acidification and Ammonia Pollution in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Mazur

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study leading to a new acute toxicity test on embryonic and juvenile organisms of the great pond snail (Lymnaea stagnalis Linnaeus. Sulfuric acid, nitric acid, and ammonium hydroxide were used as waterborne toxicants in laboratory experiments. The exposure time was 24 h. Tests were conducted in 5–10 replications for each toxicant. The toxicity of the substances was classified according to different scales and the test’s sensitivity was compared to that of the commonly used bioindicator Daphnia magna Straus. The assessment of toxicity impact was supported by microscopic observations. The probit method was used as a parametric statistical procedure to estimate LC50 and the associated 95% confidence interval. Our study showed that the early developmental stages of Lymnaea stagnalis are very sensitive bioindicators, making it possible to detect even very low levels of the above-mentioned water toxicants. The highest toxicity is shown by ammonium hydroxide with LC50/24h values, respectively, 24.27 for embryos and 24.72 for juvenile forms, and the lowest is shown by nitric acid ions with LC50/24h values, respectively, 105.19 for embryos and 170.47 for juvenile forms. It is highly cost-effective due to simple and efficient breeding and the small size of the organisms in the bioassay population. Compared with Daphnia magna, relatively low concentrations of toxicants caused a lethal effect on embryonic and juvenile organisms of the great pond snail. Owing to their common occurrence and sensitivity, early developmental forms of Lymnaea stagnalis can be a valuable new tool in biomonitoring of the freshwater environment.

  10. Microencapsulated Aliivibrio fischeri in Alginate Microspheres for Monitoring Heavy Metal Toxicity in Environmental Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Futra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article a luminescence fiber optic biosensor for the microdetection of heavy metal toxicity in waters based on the marine bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri (A. fischeri encapsulated in alginate microspheres is described. Cu(II, Cd(II, Pb(II, Zn(II, Cr(VI, Co(II, Ni(II, Ag(I and Fe(II were selected as sample toxic heavy metal ions for evaluation of the performance of this toxicity microbiosensor. The loss of bioluminescence response from immobilized A. fischeri bacterial cells corresponds to changes in the toxicity levels. The inhibition of the luminescent biosensor response collected at excitation and emission wavelengths of 287 ± 2 nm and 487 ± 2 nm, respectively, was found to be reproducible and repeatable within the relative standard deviation (RSD range of 2.4–5.7% (n = 8. The toxicity biosensor based on alginate micropsheres exhibited a lower limit of detection (LOD for Cu(II (6.40 μg/L, Cd(II (1.56 μg/L, Pb(II (47 μg/L, Ag(I (18 μg/L than Zn(II (320 μg/L, Cr(VI (1,000 μg/L, Co(II (1700 μg/L, Ni(II (2800 μg/L, and Fe(III (3100 μg/L. Such LOD values are lower when compared with other previous reported whole cell toxicity biosensors using agar gel, agarose gel and cellulose membrane biomatrices used for the immobilization of bacterial cells. The A. fischeri bacteria microencapsulated in alginate biopolymer could maintain their metabolic activity for a prolonged period of up to six weeks without any noticeable changes in the bioluminescence response. The bioluminescent biosensor could also be used for the determination of antagonistic toxicity levels for toxicant mixtures. A comparison of the results obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS and using the proposed luminescent A. fischeri-based biosensor suggests that the optical toxicity biosensor can be used for quantitative microdetermination of heavy metal toxicity in environmental water samples.

  11. Microencapsulated Aliivibrio fischeri in alginate microspheres for monitoring heavy metal toxicity in environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futra, Dedi; Heng, Lee Yook; Surif, Salmijah; Ahmad, Asmat; Ling, Tan Ling

    2014-12-05

    In this article a luminescence fiber optic biosensor for the microdetection of heavy metal toxicity in waters based on the marine bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri (A. fischeri) encapsulated in alginate microspheres is described. Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), Co(II), Ni(II), Ag(I) and Fe(II) were selected as sample toxic heavy metal ions for evaluation of the performance of this toxicity microbiosensor. The loss of bioluminescence response from immobilized A. fischeri bacterial cells corresponds to changes in the toxicity levels. The inhibition of the luminescent biosensor response collected at excitation and emission wavelengths of 287 ± 2 nm and 487 ± 2 nm, respectively, was found to be reproducible and repeatable within the relative standard deviation (RSD) range of 2.4-5.7% (n = 8). The toxicity biosensor based on alginate micropsheres exhibited a lower limit of detection (LOD) for Cu(II) (6.40 μg/L), Cd(II) (1.56 μg/L), Pb(II) (47 μg/L), Ag(I) (18 μg/L) than Zn(II) (320 μg/L), Cr(VI) (1,000 μg/L), Co(II) (1700 μg/L), Ni(II) (2800 μg/L), and Fe(III) (3100 μg/L). Such LOD values are lower when compared with other previous reported whole cell toxicity biosensors using agar gel, agarose gel and cellulose membrane biomatrices used for the immobilization of bacterial cells. The A. fischeri bacteria microencapsulated in alginate biopolymer could maintain their metabolic activity for a prolonged period of up to six weeks without any noticeable changes in the bioluminescence response. The bioluminescent biosensor could also be used for the determination of antagonistic toxicity levels for toxicant mixtures. A comparison of the results obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and using the proposed luminescent A. fischeri-based biosensor suggests that the optical toxicity biosensor can be used for quantitative microdetermination of heavy metal toxicity in environmental water samples.

  12. Workshops capacity building for agricultural water demand management; final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehmeijer, P.W.; Wolters, W.

    2004-01-01

    Agricultural Water Demand Management (AWDM) is at the core of the Water for Food Programme launched as a result of a pledge by the Netherlands' Minister for Agriculture at the 2nd World Water Forum in March 2000, The Hague. One of the projects that was started after the March 2000 pledge was

  13. Predicting the toxicity of substituted phenols to aquatic species and its changes in the stream and effluent waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong G; Hwang, Seok H; Kim, Sang D

    2006-02-01

    The changes in the acute toxicity of 16 phenols toward Selenastrum capricornutum and Daphnia magna were examined as a function of their physical/chemical properties. The results demonstrated that phenols with a higher octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) had a higher toxicity toward aquatic organisms. The toxicity of phenols was closely related to the log K(ow) values, with correlation coefficients of 0.93 (except for the nitrophenols) and 0.89 for S. capricornutum and D. magna, respectively. The changes in the phenols toxicities in the site waters (i.e., stream and effluent waters) were investigated by calculating the water effect ratios (WER) from the results of the toxicity tests in the site waters using D. magna. The results showed that the degree of ionization for each phenolic compound was altered by the differences in the dissociation constant (pK(a)), and the change in the toxicity could be predicted. Therefore, the WER should be considered when the toxicity of phenolic compounds is estimated in site waters. The quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) study showed that the toxicity of the phenols to D. magna could be predicted by the hydrophobicity (log K(ow)) alone and by combining the log K(ow) with pK(a), while the toxicity to S. capricornutum was predicted by a combination of hydrophobicity (log K(ow)) and E(LUMO) (or pK(a)).

  14. Toxicity of aluminium in natural waters controlled by type rather than quantity of natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, Grigorios; White, Keith N; Walton, Rachel; Boult, Stephen

    2011-11-15

    Extension of the conditions under which Al toxicity is tested is required. Environmentally representative preparation of waters is used in investigating roles of alginate (AA) and humic acids (HA) in partitioning of Al (0.5 mg L(-1)), subsequent uptake and accumulation by and toxicity to Lymnaea stagnalis. HA and AA did not alter precipitation of Al(OH)3, but altered subsequent behaviour of Al. High (40 mg L(-1)) HA concentrations, and to a lesser extent AA, prevented settling and availability for benthic grazing but made deposited Al more likely to be ingested. HA detoxified but AA increased toxicity relative to Al alone. Low concentration (4 mg L(-1)) AA and HA do not change partitioning but increase uptake; they both detoxify, but AA less than HA. The study shows OC:Al ratio is critical in predicting Al behaviour in natural waters, also uptake is mediated by snail behaviour, not solely a function of concentration and form of Al. Therefore, predicting Al behaviour will be subject to errors in determining relevant water composition and response of biota to the new speciation. However, with respect to toxicity, rather than other aspects of Al behaviour, different ratios of HA and Al are insignificant compared to whether AA is present rather than HA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of water chemistry and surface contact on the toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jun; Cheng, Jinping

    2017-07-01

    The growing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has created concerns about its potential impacts on natural microbial communities. In this study, the physicochemical properties of AgNPs and its toxicity on natural bacteria Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) were investigated in aqueous conditions. The characterization data showed that AgNPs highly aggregated in aqueous conditions, and the hydrodynamic diameter of AgNPs in aqueous conditions was larger than its primary size. The studied AgNPs was less toxic to B. subtilis in estuarine water as compared to that in Milli-Q water and artificial seawater, which might be due to the observed enhanced aggregation of AgNPs in estuarine water. The toxicity of AgNPs to B. subtilis was greatly reduced when their surface contact was blocked by a dialysis membrane. Scanning electron microscope images showed that exposure contact to AgNPs resulted in damage of the microbial cell wall and enhanced formation of fibrillar structures. These results suggest that particle-cell contact is largely responsible for the observed toxicity of AgNPs in B. subtilis. This study can help to understand the potential impacts of AgNPs to natural microbes, especially in the complex aquatic environments.

  16. An automated overlying water-renewal system for sediment toxicity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, G.M.; Wheat, J.V.; Carriger, J.F.; Lee, T.A

    2003-04-01

    A new system is described for sediment toxicity testing. - An automated water-renewal toxicity test system is described for exposing benthic invertebrates to whole sediments. The system will intermittently deliver laboratory or on-site water for overlying water replacement in sediment exposures. A range of cycle rates can be used to produce different volume additions of overlying water per day to exposure chambers. The system can be used with six different treatments and eight replicates per treatment producing 48 exposure chambers. Three formulated sediments with variable organic carbon (1.5%, 7.5%) and sand (14%, 63%) content were prepared to test the system exposing amphipods, Hyalella azteca and midges, Chironomus tentans in 10 day whole sediment tests. Intermittent water flow was used with a 90 min cycle time to create two volume additions of laboratory water per 24 h in exposure chambers (180 ml sediment, 320 ml water). Overlying water quality conditions, and survival and growth of both species were consistent and within acceptable limits for the testing requirements of the U.S. EPA guidelines for sediments with freshwater invertebrates.

  17. Substantial toxic effect of water-pipe smoking on the early stage of embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour, Anas A; Haik, Mahmoud Y; Sadek, Khaled W; Yalcin, Huseyin C; Bitharas, Joanna; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Batist, Gerald; Yasmeen, Amber; Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin

    2017-06-12

    Water-pipe smoking (WPS) is the most widespread tobacco use in the Middle-East, and is rapidly spreading globally. Smoke from WP contains most of the compounds present in cigarette smoke, although in different proportions. WPS is associated with the risk of several human diseases; however, its impact on the early stage of normal development has not been investigated yet. Thus, in this investigation, we assess the effect of WPS on the embryo at the early stage of development. Chicken embryos at three days of incubations were used in this study. Meanwhile, we explored the outcome of WPS on angiogenesis using the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of the chicken embryos. Finally, quantitative real-time PCR was used to study the regulation of some key control genes of cell proliferation, apoptosis and migration. Our data reveal that WPS inhibits angiogenesis of the CAM and in embryos in comparison with their matched controls; in addition, WPS-exposed embryos show slight reduction in their sizes. We also noted that around 80% of WPS-exposed embryos die before ten days of incubation. More significantly, WPS induces up-regulations of BCL-2, Caspase-8, ATF-3, INHIB-A and Cadherin 6 genes, which are important key regulators of cell apoptosis, proliferation and migration. Our data reveal, for the first time, that WPS has very toxic effects during the early stage of embryogenesis. Thus, we believe that further studies are required to elucidate the pathogenic effect of WPS on human health especially on the embryo at the early stage of its development. This investigation addresses an important gap on the outcome of WPS during the early stage of embryogenesis. Data of this study point out that WPS can have a very toxic effect on the embryo at this stage. Additionally, results from this report display for the first time that WPS can damage normal angiogenesis of the embryo thus provoking a significant number of embryonic death. Moreover, this study reveals that this effect can occur

  18. Uses of warmed water in agriculture. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, R.E.

    1978-11-01

    Energy in the form of warmed water is available from condenser cooling water from fossil fuel or nuclear-electric power-generating facilities, geothermal power plants, geothermal fluids, or spent steam and cooling water from industrial processes. A re-analysis of the characteristics of possible agricultural uses of warmed water has revealed the need to decouple considerations of warmed water sources from those of warmed water users. Conflicting objectives and managerial requirements seem to preclude an integrated system approach. Rather an interface must be established with separate costs and benefits identified for a reliable warmed water source and for its various potential uses. These costs and benefits can be utilized as a basis for decisions separately by the energy supplier and the prospective energy users. A method of classifying uses of warmed water according to need, volume, objective, temperature, and quality is presented and preliminary classifications are discussed for several potential agricultural uses of warmed water. Specific uses for soil warming, space heating in greenhouses, and irrigation are noted. Specific uses in aquaculture for catfish, lobster, and prawn production are discussed. Warmed water use in animal shelters is mentioned. Low-quality heat is required for methane generation from biomass and warmed water heating could be utilized in this industry. 53 references. (MCW)

  19. The effect of the cation alkyl chain branching on mutual solubilities with water and toxicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnia, Kiki A; Sintra, Tânia E; Neves, Catarina M S S; Shimizu, Karina; Canongia Lopes, José N; Gonçalves, Fernando; Ventura, Sónia P M; Freire, Mara G; Santos, Luís M N B F; Coutinho, João A P

    2014-10-07

    The design of ionic liquids has been focused on the cation-anion combinations but other more subtle approaches can be used. In this work the effect of the branching of the cation alkyl chain on the design of ionic liquids (ILs) is evaluated. The mutual solubilities with water and toxicities of a series of bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-based ILs, combined with imidazolium, pyridinium, pyrrolidinium, and piperidinium cations with linear or branched alkyl chains, are reported. The mutual solubility measurements were carried out in the temperature range from (288.15 to 323.15) K. From the obtained experimental data, the thermodynamic properties of the solution (in the water-rich phase) were determined and discussed. The COnductor like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS) was used to predict the liquid-liquid equilibrium. Furthermore, molecular dynamic simulations were also carried out aiming to get a deeper understanding of these fluids at the molecular level. The results show that the increase in the number of atoms at the cation ring (from five to six) leads to a decrease in the mutual solubilities with water while increasing their toxicity, and as expected from the well-established relationship between toxicities and hydrophobicities of ILs. The branching of the alkyl chain was observed to decrease the water solubility in ILs, while increasing the ILs solubility in water. The inability of COSMO-RS to correctly predict the effect of branching alkyl chains toward water solubility on them was confirmed using molecular dynamic simulations to be due to the formation of nano-segregated structures of the ILs that are not taken into account by the COSMO-RS model. In addition, the impact of branched alkyl chains on the toxicity is shown to be not trivial and to depend on the aromatic nature of the ILs.

  20. 77 FR 30280 - Final National Recommended Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Carbaryl-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... quality criteria and State or Tribal water quality standards? Water quality standards consist of three...; June 1998); and EPA Review and Approval of State and Tribal Water Quality Standards (65 FR 24641; April... AGENCY Final National Recommended Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Carbaryl--2012 AGENCY: Environmental...

  1. Short-term methods for estimating the chronic toxicity of effluents and receiving water to freshwater organisms. Third edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, P.A.; Klemm, D.J.; Lazorchak, J.M.; Norberg-King, T.J.; Peltier, W.H.

    1994-07-01

    This manual describes four short-term (four- to seven-day) methods for estimating the chronic toxicity of effluents and receiving waters to three freshwater species: The fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, a daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and a green alga, Selenastrum capricornutum. The methods include single and multiple concentration static renewal and non-renewal toxicity tests for effluents and receiving waters. Also included are guidelines on laboratory safety, quality assurance, facilities, equipment and supplies; dilution water; effluent and receiving water sample collection, preservation, shipping, and holding; test conditions; toxicity test data analysis; report preparation; and organism culturing, holding, and handling.

  2. Trophic State and Toxic Cyanobacteria Density in Optimization Modeling of Multi-Reservoir Water Resource Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sulis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The definition of a synthetic index for classifying the quality of water bodies is a key aspect in integrated planning and management of water resource systems. In previous works [1,2], a water system optimization modeling approach that requires a single quality index for stored water in reservoirs has been applied to a complex multi-reservoir system. Considering the same modeling field, this paper presents an improved quality index estimated both on the basis of the overall trophic state of the water body and on the basis of the density values of the most potentially toxic Cyanobacteria. The implementation of the index into the optimization model makes it possible to reproduce the conditions limiting water use due to excessive nutrient enrichment in the water body and to the health hazard linked to toxic blooms. The analysis of an extended limnological database (1996–2012 in four reservoirs of the Flumendosa-Campidano system (Sardinia, Italy provides useful insights into the strengths and limitations of the proposed synthetic index.

  3. Trophic state and toxic cyanobacteria density in optimization modeling of multi-reservoir water resource systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulis, Andrea; Buscarinu, Paola; Soru, Oriana; Sechi, Giovanni M

    2014-04-22

    The definition of a synthetic index for classifying the quality of water bodies is a key aspect in integrated planning and management of water resource systems. In previous works [1,2], a water system optimization modeling approach that requires a single quality index for stored water in reservoirs has been applied to a complex multi-reservoir system. Considering the same modeling field, this paper presents an improved quality index estimated both on the basis of the overall trophic state of the water body and on the basis of the density values of the most potentially toxic Cyanobacteria. The implementation of the index into the optimization model makes it possible to reproduce the conditions limiting water use due to excessive nutrient enrichment in the water body and to the health hazard linked to toxic blooms. The analysis of an extended limnological database (1996-2012) in four reservoirs of the Flumendosa-Campidano system (Sardinia, Italy) provides useful insights into the strengths and limitations of the proposed synthetic index.

  4. Bioluminescence inhibition assays for toxicity screening of wood extractives and biocides in paper mill process waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, Anna; Latorre, Anna; Lacorte, Sílvia; Barceló, Damià

    2004-02-01

    The risk associated with wood extractives, biocides, and other additives in pulp and paper mill effluents was evaluated by performing a characterization of process waters and effluents in terms of toxicity and chemical analysis. The individual toxicity of 10 resin acids, two unsaturated fatty acids, and three biocides was estimated by measuring the bioluminescence inhibition with a ToxAlert 100 system. Median effective concentration values (EC50) of 4.3 to 17.9, 1.2 to 1.5, and 0.022 to 0.50 mg/L were obtained, respectively. Mixtures of these three families of compounds showed antagonistic effects. Chemical analysis of process waters was performed by liquid chromatography- and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Biocides such as 2-(thiocyanomethylthio)-benzotiazole (TCMTB) (EC50 = 0.022 mg/L) and 2,2-dibromo-3-nitrilpropionamide (DBNPA) (EC50 = 0.50 mg/L) were the most toxic compounds tested and were detected at concentrations of 16 and 59 microg/L, respectively, in a closed-circuit recycling paper mill. Process waters from kraft pulp mills, printing paper mills, and packing board paper mills showed the highest concentration of resin acids (up to 400 microg/L) and accounted for inhibition percentages up to 100%. Detergent degradation products such as nonylphenol (NP) and octylphenol (OP) and the plasticizer bisphenol A (BPA) were also detected in the waters at levels of 0.6 to 10.6, 0.3 to 1.4, and 0.7 to 187 microg/L, respectively. However, once these waters were biologically treated, the concentration of detected organic compounds diminished and the toxicity decreased in most cases to values of inhibition lower than 20%.

  5. Effects of nanoplastics and microplastics on toxicity, bioaccumulation, and environmental fate of phenanthrene in fresh water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yini; Huang, Anna; Cao, Siqi; Sun, Feifei; Wang, Lianhong; Guo, Hongyan; Ji, Rong

    2016-12-01

    Contamination of fine plastic particles (FPs), including micrometer to millimeter plastics (MPs) and nanometer plastics (NPs), in the environment has caught great concerns. FPs are strong adsorbents for hydrophobic toxic pollutants and may affect their fate and toxicity in the environment; however, such information is still rare. We studied joint toxicity of FPs with phenanthrene to Daphnia magna and effects of FPs on the environmental fate and bioaccumulation of 14C-phenanthrene in fresh water. Within the five sizes particles we tested (from 50 nm to 10 μm), 50-nm NPs showed significant toxicity and physical damage to D. magna. The joint toxicity of 50-nm NPs and phenanthrene to D. magna showed an additive effect. During a 14-days incubation, the presence of NPs significantly enhanced bioaccumulation of phenanthrene-derived residues in daphnid body and inhibited the dissipation and transformation of phenanthrene in the medium, while 10-μm MPs did not show significant effects on the bioaccumulation, dissipation, and transformation of phenanthrene. The differences may be attributed to higher adsorption of phenanthrene on 50-nm NPs than 10-μm MPs. Our findings underlined the high potential ecological risks of FPs, and suggested that NPs should be given more concerns, in terms of their interaction with hydrophobic pollutants in the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of Low-Toxicity Wastewater Stabilization for Spacecraft Water Recovery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Julie L.; Adam, Niklas; Pickering, Karen D.; Alvarez, Giraldo N.

    2015-01-01

    Wastewater stabilization was an essential component of the spacecraft water cycle. The purpose of stabilizing wastewater was two-fold. First, stabilization prevents the breakdown of urea into ammonia, a toxic gas at high concentrations. Second, it prevents the growth of microorganisms, thereby mitigating hardware and water quality issues due to due biofilm and planktonic growth. Current stabilization techniques involve oxidizers and strong acids (pH=2) such as chromic and sulfuric acid, which are highly toxic and pose a risk to crew health. The purpose of this effort was to explore less toxic stabilization techniques, such as food-grade and commercial care preservatives. Additionally, certain preservatives were tested in the presence of a low-toxicity organic acid. Triplicate 300-milliliter volumes of urine were dosed with a predetermined quantity of stabilizer and stored for two weeks. During that time, pH, total organic carbon (TOC), ammonia, and turbidity were monitored. Those preservatives that showed the lowest visible microbial growth and stable pH were further tested in a six-month stability study. The results of the six-month study are also included in this paper.

  7. Acute and subchronic toxicity study of the water extract from Harrisonia perforata Merr. in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seewaboon Sireeratawong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The water extract from Harrisonia perforata Merr. was studied for acute and subchronic toxicities. The extract at a single dose of 5,000 mg/kg was administered orally to female and male rats (5 males, 5 females. After 14 days, signs and behavioral changes, mortality, gross and histopathological changes of internal organs were examined. The body weight of the male treated rats was significantly decreased when compared to the control group. The extract did not produce signs of toxicity. For the subchronic toxicity test, the extract at doses of 300, 600 and 1,200 mg/kg body weight were orally administeredto rats daily for 90 days (10 males, 10 females. Observation of signs, behavior and health status showed no abnormality in the test groups as compared with the controls. However, the body weight of all male treated rats was significantly decreased when compared to the control group. At the end of the study, necropsy and histopathology examination were performed in all animals in the control group, the test groups and the satellite group in which the extract was discontinued for another 28 days. Body and organ weights, hematological and blood clinical chemistry were also examined. The results suggest that the water extract of Harrisonia perforata Merr. does not cause acute and subchronic toxicities in rats.

  8. Toxicity of diesel water accommodated fraction toward microalgae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlorella sp. MM3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadass, Kavitha; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Kadiyala; Naidu, Ravi

    2017-08-01

    Diesel is a commonly used fuel and a key pollutant on water surface through leaks and accidental spills, thus creating risk directly to planktons as well as other aquatic organisms. We assessed the toxicty of diesel and its water accommodated fraction (WAF) towards two microalgal species, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlorella sp. MM3. The toxicity criteria included were: chlorophyll a content as a growth parameter and induction of enzyme activities linked to oxidative stress. Increase in concentrations of diesel or its WAF significantly increased toxicity towards growth, measured in terms of chlorophyll a content in both the algae. Activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX) and catalase (CAT) in response to addition of diesel or diesel WAF to the microalgal cultures were dose-dependent. Diesel WAF was more toxic than diesel itself, suggesting that use of WAF may be more relevant for environmental risk assessment of diesel. The overall response of the antioxidant enzymes to toxicants' stress followed the order: POX≥SOD>CAT. The present study clearly demonstrated the use of SOD, POX and CAT as suitable biomarkers for assessing diesel pollution in aquatic ecosystem. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of the toxicity of waste water from a textile industry to Cyprinus carpio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopadevi, H; Somashekar, R K

    2012-03-01

    Static, short-term, acute toxicity tests were performed over a period of 96 hrs using different concentrations of influent and effluent of textile industry waste water with the objective of evaluating their acute toxicity on fresh water fish, Cyprinus carpio (common carp). The LC50 24, 48, 72 and 96 hr of influent and effluent were 25.9, 21.10, 15.66, 11.11% (v/v) and 63.18, 54.89, 48.62, 36.04% (v/v), respectively. The acute toxic unit TUa values for 24, 48, 72, 96 hr for influent and effluent are 3.85, 4.73, 6.38, 8.99 and 1.58, 1.82, 2.05, 2.77, respectively. Correspondingly, the TF was found to be 1, 1.22, 1.65 and 2.33 for influent, and for effluent 1, 1.15, 1.29 and 1.75. Total efficiency of the treatment was 69.16% and the safe concentration of effluent is set to be 3.60%. These data are highly useful in establishing limits of acceptability by the aquatic animals. The need to introduce toxicity evaluation assay for confirming the quality of effluent from the point view of effective environmental safe limits and to ensure integrity of aquatic environment, is stressed.

  10. Investigating salt and naphthenic acids interactions in the toxicity of oil sands process water to freshwater invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, D.; Kautzman, M.; Wojnarowicz, P.; Cutter, J.; Bird, E.; Liber, K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Regina, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The hot water extraction process used to produce bitumens from oil sands produces a large volume of oil sands process water (OSPW) that contain elevated concentrations of naphthenic acids (NA) and salts. Many oil sands reclamation projects are proposing the use of OSPW as part of reconstructed wetlands projects. This study investigated the toxicity of OSPW to freshwater invertebrates. The toxic interactions between NA and salinity on freshwater invertebrates were assessed. Bioassays with laboratory-cultured Ceriodaphnia dubia were conducted to determine the toxicity of OSPW from selected water bodies. The study showed that while the concentrations of NAs and salinity were elevated in OSPW waters that caused toxic responses, the concentrations of salinity ions varied greatly among the OSPW samples. Results of the study suggested that ion composition may be a factor in toxicity. Interactions between NAs and salinity were then assessed by performing bioassays with mixtures representing major ion combinations in OSPW.

  11. Toxicity of ozonated estuarine water to juvenile blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and Juvenile Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, L.B.; Burton, D.T.

    1981-02-01

    Large quantitites of estuarine and marine water are treated with chlorine to prevent condenser system fouling at power plants. Chlorine and its residual by-products, however, are toxic to many forms of aquatic life. Ozone is one alternative oxidant which has proven to be an effective biocide and disinfectant in many fresh water applications. Ozonation of estuarine and marine waters, however, may produce residual compounds similar to those produced by chlorination. This study was initiated to provide baseline information on the toxicity of ozonated estuarine water to two representative estuarine species. The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus Rathbun, and the Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus Latrobe, were selected because of their wide distribution and commercial importance. The toxicity of ozone has been compared with chlorine toxicity data from the literature in an effort to examine possible similarities in toxicity.

  12. Evaluation of acute toxicity of water extract of Azadirachta indica leaves and seeds in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakr, Shori Amal

    2013-07-15

    This study 'in vivo' was applied on rats "Rattus norvegicus" to determine the acute toxicity of water extracts of Azadirachta indica leaves and seeds during 48 hours and the 50% lethal dose (LD50) values were calculated. Different doses of A. indica water extracts of leaves and seeds were injected to the rats (Rattus norvegicus) and the percentage of death was recorded during 48 hours. The present study, found that the percentage of death in all treated rats with A. indica leaves and seeds water extracts were increased by doses increased (R2 = 0.9). Rats injected with higher doses of water extract ofA. indica leaves (0.1 and 0.092 g mL(-1)) and seeds (0.2 g mL(-1)) showed 100% death. The LD50 of water extract of A. indica leaves and seeds were 6.2, 9.4 mL kg(-1), respectively. Based on these results, it may be concluded that doses of water extract of A. indica leaves and seeds injected to rats showed significant acute toxicity.

  13. Natural and surfactant modified zeolites: A review of their applications for water remediation with a focus on surfactant desorption and toxicity towards microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Peter J; Fallowfield, Howard J

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this review is to highlight the need for further investigation of microbial toxicity caused by desorption of surfactant from Surfactant Modified Zeolite (SMZ). SMZ is a low cost, versatile permeable reactive media which has the potential to treat multiple classes of contaminants. With this combination of characteristics, SMZ has significant potential to enhance water and wastewater treatment processes. Surfactant desorption has been identified as a potential issue for the ongoing usability of SMZ. Few studies have investigated the toxicity of surfactants used in zeolite modification towards microorganisms and fewer have drawn linkages between surfactant desorption and surfactant toxicity. This review provides an overview of natural zeolite chemistry, characteristics and practical applications. The chemistry of commonly used surfactants is outlined, along with the kinetics that drive their adsorption to the zeolite surface. Methodologies to characterise this surfactant loading are also described. Applications of SMZ in water remediation are highlighted, giving focus to applications which deal with biological pollutants and where microorganisms play a role in the remediation process. Studies that have identified surfactant desorption from SMZ are outlined. Finally, the toxicity of a commonly used cationic surfactant towards microorganisms is discussed. This review highlights the potential for surfactant to desorb from the zeolite surface and the need for further research into the toxicity of this desorbed surfactant towards microorganisms, including pathogens and environmental microbes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pelletized ponderosa pine bark for adsorption of toxic heavy metals from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoung Oh; Mandla A. Tshabalala

    2007-01-01

    Bark flour from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) was consolidated into pellets using citric acid as cross-linking agent. The pellets were evaluated for removal of toxic heavy metals from synthetic aqueous solutions. When soaked in water, pellets did not leach tannins, and they showed high adsorption capacity for Cu(ll), Zn(ll), Cd(ll). and Ni(ll) under both equilibrium...

  15. Water quality mitigation banking : final report, December 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Current practice in New Jersey for mitigating stormwater impacts caused by transportation infrastructure : projects is established by NJDEP Stormwater Regulations (N.J.A.C. 7:8). These rules outline specific : processes to offset impacts to water qua...

  16. Water and land availability for energy farming. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schooley, F.A.; Mara, S.J.; Mendel, D.A.; Meagher, P.C.; So, E.C.

    1979-10-01

    The physical and economic availability of land and water resources for energy farming were determined. Ten water subbasins possessing favorable land and water availabilities were ranked according to their overall potential for biomass production. The study results clearly identify the Southeast as a favorable area for biomass farming. The Northwest and North-Central United States should also be considered on the basis of their highly favorable environmental characteristics. Both high and low estimates of water availability for 1985 and 2000 in each of 99 subbasins were prepared. Subbasins in which surface water consumption was more than 50% of surface water supply were eliminated from the land availability analysis, leaving 71 subbasins to be examined. The amount of acreage potentially available for biomass production in these subbasins was determined through a comparison of estimated average annual net returns developed for conventional agriculture and forestry with net returns for several biomass production options. In addition to a computerized method of ranking subbasins according to their overall potential for biomass production, a methodology for evaluating future energy farm locations was developed. This methodology included a general area selection procedure as well as specific site analysis recommendations. Thirty-five general factors and a five-step site-specific analysis procedure are described.

  17. Toxicity of silicon carbide nanowires to sediment-dwelling invertebrates in water or sediment exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, Joseph N.; Wang, Ning; Ritts, Andrew; Kunz, James L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Li, Hao; Deng, Baolin

    2011-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNW) are insoluble in water. When released into an aquatic environment, SiCNW would likely accumulate in sediment. The objective of this study was to assess the toxicity of SiCNW to four freshwater sediment-dwelling organisms: amphipods (Hyalella azteca), midges (Chironomus dilutus), oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus), and mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea). Amphipods were exposed to either sonicated or nonsonicated SiCNW in water (1.0 g/L) for 48 h. Midges, mussels, and oligochaetes were exposed only to sonicated SiCNW in water for 96 h. In addition, amphipods were exposed to sonicated SiCNW in whole sediment for 10 d (44% SiCNW on dry wt basis). Mean 48-h survival of amphipods exposed to nonsonicated SiCNW in water was not significantly different from the control, whereas mean survival of amphipods exposed to sonicated SiCNW in two 48-h exposures (0 or 15% survival) was significantly different from the control (90 or 98% survival). In contrast, no effect of sonicated SiCNW was observed on survival of midges, mussels, or oligochaetes. Survival of amphipods was not significantly reduced in 10-d exposures to sonicated SiCNW either mixed in the sediment or layered on the sediment surface. However, significant reduction in amphipod biomass was observed with the SiCNW either mixed in sediment or layered on the sediment surface, and the reduction was more pronounced for SiCNW layered on the sediment. These results indicated that, under the experimental conditions, nonsonicated SiCNW in water were not acutely toxic to amphipods, sonicated SiCNW in water were acutely toxic to the amphipods, but not to other organisms tested, and sonicated SiCNW in sediment affected the growth but not the survival of amphipods.

  18. Effect of water treatment residuals on soil phosphorus, copper and aluminium availability and toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombi, E., E-mail: enzo.lombi@unisa.edu.a [CSIRO Land and Water, Centre for Environmental Contaminant Research, PMB 2, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia); Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Building X, Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); CRC CARE, PO Box 486, Salisbury, SA 5106 (Australia); Stevens, D.P. [CSIRO Land and Water, Centre for Environmental Contaminant Research, PMB 2, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia); Arris Pty Ltd, PO Box 5143, Burnley, Victoria 3121 (Australia); McLaughlin, M.J. [CSIRO Land and Water, Centre for Environmental Contaminant Research, PMB 2, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia); Soil and Land Systems, University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia)

    2010-06-15

    Water treatment residuals (WTRs) are produced by the treatment of potable water with coagulating agents. Beneficial recycling in agriculture is hampered by the fact that WTRs contain potentially toxic contaminants (e.g. copper and aluminium) and they bind phosphorus strongly. These issues were investigated using a plant bioassay (Lactuca sativa), chemical extractions and an isotopic dilution technique. Two WTRs were applied to an acidic and a neutral pH soil at six rates. Reductions in plant growth in amended soils were due to WTR-induced P deficiency, rather than Al or Cu toxicity. The release of potentially toxic Al from WTRs was found to be mitigated by their alkaline nature and pH buffering capacity. However, acidification of WTRs was shown to release more soluble Al than soil naturally high in Al. Copper availability was relatively low in all treatments. However, the lability of WTR-Cu increased when the WTR was applied to the soil. - The effect of water treatment residue application to soil was investigated in relation to phosphorus availability, and copper and aluminium phytotoxicity.

  19. Toxicity assessment and modelling of Moringa oleifera seeds in water purification by whole cell bioreporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Anizi, Ali Adnan; Hellyer, Maria Theresa; Zhang, Dayi

    2014-06-01

    Moringa oleifera has been used as a coagulation reagent for drinking water purification, especially in developing countries such as Malawi. This research revealed the cytoxicity and genotoxicity of M. oleifera by Acinetobacter bioreporter. The results indicated that significant cytoxicity effects were observed when the powdered M. oleifera seeds concentration is from 1 to 50 mg/L. Through direct contact, ethanolic-water extraction and hexane extraction, the toxic effects of hydrophobic and hydrophilic components in M. oleifera seeds were distinguished. It suggested that the hydrophobic lipids contributed to the dominant cytoxicity, consequently resulting in the dominant genotoxicity in the water-soluble fraction due to limited dissolution when the M. oleifera seeds granule concentration was from 10 to 1000 mg/L. Based on cytoxicity and genotoxicity model, the LC50 and LC90 of M. oleifera seeds were 8.5 mg/L and 300 mg/L respectively and their genotoxicity was equivalent to 8.3 mg mitomycin C per 1.0 g dry M. oleifera seed. The toxicity of M. oleifera has also remarkable synergistic effects, suggesting whole cell bioreporter as an appropriate and complementary tool to chemical analysis for environmental toxicity assessment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. First report of toxic Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and Raphidiopsis mediterranea (Cyanoprokaryota) in Egyptian fresh waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Zakaria A

    2007-03-01

    Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, a potentially toxic and highly adaptable freshwater cyanobacterium, was believed to have been misidentified in the Nile at the end of the 19th century. This study reports the presence of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and Raphidiopsis mediterranea for the first time in Egyptian fresh waters since that time. Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii appeared in the El-Dowyrat fish pond during May 2002, when bottom waters reached, as a result of climatic change, sufficiently high temperatures to allow the germination of its akinetes in the sediments. Both C. raciborskii and R. mediterranea showed seasonal variations, with highest densities recorded in August of each year. The count of the two species correlated positively with pH, temperature and conductance, and negatively with nutrients, during the study period. The densities of C. raciborskii and R. mediterranea varied significantly along the depth profile of this pond, with peaks obtained at 1 and 0.5m, respectively. Isolates of C. raciborskii and R. mediterranea from this pond exhibited toxicity to Artemia salina, Daphnia magna and mice. Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii extracts had hepatotoxic effects on mice, but R. mediterranea extracts showed neurotoxic effects on mice. The identification of toxic C. raciborskii and R. mediterranea in this pond should be considered during the monitoring of cyanobacteria in drinking and recreational water sources in Egypt.

  1. Sediment toxicity test results for the Urban Waters Study 2010, Bellingham Bay, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedenbach, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The Washington Department of Ecology annually determines the quality of recently deposited sediments in Puget Sound as a part of Ecology's Urban Waters Initiative. The annual sediment quality studies use the Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) approach, thus relying on measures of chemical contamination, toxicity, and benthic in-faunal effects (Chapman, 1990). Since 2002, the studies followed a rotating sampling scheme, each year sampling a different region of the greater Puget Sound Basin. During the annual studies, samples are collected in locations selected with a stratified-random design, patterned after the designs previously used in baseline surveys completed during 1997-1999 (Long and others, 2003; Wilson and Partridge, 2007). Sediment samples were collected by personnel from the Washington Department of Ecology, in June of 2010 and shipped to the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) laboratory in Corpus Christi, Texas (not shown), where the tests were performed. Sediment pore water was extracted with a pneumatic apparatus and was stored frozen. Just before testing, water-quality measurements were made and salinity adjusted, if necessary. Tests were performed on a dilution series of each sample consisting of 100-, 50-, and 25-percent pore-water concentrations. The specific objectives of this study were to: * Extract sediment pore water from a total of 30 sediment samples from the Bellingham Bay, Washington area within a day of receipt of the samples. * Measure water-quality parameters (salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, sulfide, and ammonia) of thawed pore-water samples before testing and adjust salinity, temperature and dissolved oxygen, if necessary, to obtain optimal ranges for the test species. * Conduct the fertilization toxicity test with pore water using sea urchin (Stronylocentrotus purpuratus) (S. purpuratus) gametes. * Perform quality control assays with reference pore water, dilution blanks and a positive control dilution series with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS

  2. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity. Final report, September 15, 1988 - September 14, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugart, L. R.; D' Surney, S. J.; Gettys-Hull, C.; Greeley, Jr, M. S.

    1991-12-15

    Several molecular and cellular markers of genotoxicity were adapted for measurement in the Medaka (Oryzias latipes), and were used to describe the effects of treatment of the organism with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). NO{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts were detected, and a slight statistically significant, increase in DNA strand breaks was observed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high levels of DEN induced alkyltransferase activity which enzymatically removes any O{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts but does not result in strand breaks or hypomethylation of the DNA such as might be expected from excision repair of chemically modified DNA. Following a five week continuous DEN exposure with 100 percent renewal of DEN-water every third day, the F values (DNA double strandedness) increased considerably and to similar extent in fish exposed to 25, 50, and 100 ppM DEN. This has been observed also in medaka exposed to BaP.

  3. Biological efficacy and toxic effect of emergency water disinfection process based on advanced oxidation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yiping; Yuan, Xiaoli; Xu, Shujing; Li, Rihong; Zhou, Xinying; Zhang, Zhitao

    2015-12-01

    An innovative and removable water treatment system consisted of strong electric field discharge and hydrodynamic cavitation based on advanced oxidation technologies was developed for reactive free radicals producing and waterborne pathogens eliminating in the present study. The biological efficacy and toxic effects of this advanced oxidation system were evaluated during water disinfection treatments. Bench tests were carried out with synthetic microbial-contaminated water, as well as source water in rainy season from a reservoir of Dalian city (Liaoning Province, China). Results showed that high inactivation efficiency of Escherichia coli (>5 log) could be obtained for synthetic contaminated water at a low concentration (0.5-0.7 mg L(-1)) of total oxidants in 3-10 s. The numbers of wild total bacteria (108 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1)) and total coliforms (260 × 10(2) MPN 100 mL(-1)) in source water greatly reduced to 50 and 0 CFU mL(-1) respectively after treated by the advanced oxidation system, which meet the microbiological standards of drinking water, and especially that the inactivation efficiency of total coliforms could reach 100%. Meanwhile, source water qualities were greatly improved during the disinfection processes. The values of UV254 in particular were significantly reduced (60-80%) by reactive free radicals. Moreover, the concentrations of possible disinfection by-products (formaldehyde and bromide) in treated water were lower than detection limits, indicating that there was no harmful effect on water after the treatments. These investigations are helpful for the ecotoxicological studies of advanced oxidation system in the treatments of chemical polluted water or waste water. The findings of this work suggest that the developed water treatment system is ideal in the acute phases of emergencies, which also could offer additional advantages over a wide range of applications in water pollution control.

  4. Development and application of a sublethal toxicity test to PAH using marine harpacticoid copepods. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleeger, J.W.; Lotufo, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    This research project was designed to improve the understanding of the acute and sublethal effects of PAHs to benthic invertebrates. Sublethal bioassay protocols for benthic harpacticoid copepods were developed, and two species of harpacticoids were exposed to a range of concentrations of sediment-amended PAHs; the single compounds fluoranthene and phenanthrene as well as a complex mixture (diesel fuel). The harpacticoid copepods Schizopera knabeni and Nitocra lacustris were tested using several bioassay approaches. Reproductive assays, feeding assays and avoidance tests were conducted in addition to lethal tests for S. knabeni. Species-specific differences in sensitivity were detected. Early life history stages were much more sensitive than adults in one species but not in the other. Concentrations of PAH as low as 26 micrograms PAH decreased copepod offspring production, egg hatching success, and embryonic and early-stage development, demonstrating the high sensitivity of life history-related endpoints. In addition, grazing on microalgae was significantly impaired at concentrations as low as 20 micrograms/g PAH after short exposures (<30 h). Finally it was demonstrated that harpacticoids can actively avoid contamination.

  5. Recognition of an important water quality issue at zoos: prevalence and potential threat of toxic cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doster, Enrique; Chislock, Michael F; Roberts, John F; Kottwitz, Jack J; Wilson, Alan E

    2014-03-01

    Zoo animals may be particularly vulnerable to water sources contaminated with cyanobacterial toxins given their nonvoluntary close association with this resource. However, the prevalence and potential threat of toxic cyanobacteria in this setting are unknown. Several otherwise unexplained yellow-bellied slider (Trachemys scripta scripta) deaths were documented in a zoo moat with recurring blooms of toxic Microcystis aeruginosa. Furthermore, an extremely high and potentially lethal concentration of the hepatotoxin microcystin (166 ng/g) was found in the liver of a necropsied turtle that died in this moat. A subsequent monthly survey of water quality revealed detectable concentrations of microcystin in all moats (0.0001 to 7.5 microg/L), with moats higher than 1 microg/L being significantly higher than the threshold for safe drinking water recommended by the World Health Organization. These results demonstrate that cyanobacterial blooms are an important water quality issue in zoos, and future research is necessary to identify potential associations among water quality, zoo animal health, and moat management strategies.

  6. Toxicity and genotoxicity of water and sediment from streams on dotted duckweed (Landoltia punctata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Factori

    Full Text Available Most rivers are used as a source to supply entire cities; the quality of water is directly related to the quality of tributaries. Unfortunately men have neglected the importance of streams, which receive domestic and industrial effluents and transport nutrients and pesticides from rural areas. Given the complexity of the mixtures discharged into these water bodies, this study aimed to evaluate the quality of water and sediment of ten tributaries of Pirapó River, in Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil. To this end, the free-floating macrophyte Landoltia punctata (G. Meyer Les & D.J.Crawford was used as test organism in microcosm, and the toxicity of water and sediment samples was evaluated by the relative growth rate, dry/fresh biomass ratio, and genotoxic effects (comet assay. Samples of water and sediment of each stream were arranged in microcosms with L. punctata. Seven days later, plants were collected for analysis. Nutrient levels were higher than the reference location, indicating eutrophication, but the results indicated a toxic effect for only three streams, and a genotoxic effect for all streams.

  7. Microprocessor control of a ground water heat pump. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This project was a demonstration of the energy savings available to a small well-insulated facility when a properly designed heat pump is operated against a source of constant temperature ground water or pond water. To date, we have assembled the electronic logging devices required to prove the resultant savings. Data to date, (15 November, 1980) is sparse as we are just entering a full heating season. It is expected that a complete data log will be submitted next spring. Initial energy savings computations follow - the system efficiency is impressive. A typical winter day savings is about $24.00 or $720.00 monthly. The system utilizes the 55/sup 0/F ground water directly for summer cooling. The summer savings are estimated to be about $18.00/day or $540.00 monthly. Circuits and diagrams of the microprocessor control system and data logger are presented. Some sample data are included. (WHK)

  8. Selected streambed sediment compounds and water toxicity results for Westside Creeks, San Antonio, Texas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Cassi L.; Wilson, Jennifer T.; Kunz, James L.

    2016-12-01

    IntroductionThe Alazán, Apache, Martínez, and San Pedro Creeks in San Antonio, Texas, are part of a network of urban tributaries to the San Antonio River, known locally as the Westside Creeks. The Westside Creeks flow through some of the oldest neighborhoods in San Antonio. The disruption of streambed sediment is anticipated during a planned restoration to improve and restore the environmental condition of 14 miles of channelized sections of the Westside Creeks in San Antonio. These construction activities can create the potential to reintroduce chemicals found in the sediments into the ecosystem where, depending on hydrologic and environmental conditions, they could become bioavailable and toxic to aquatic life. Elevated concentrations of sediment-associated contaminants often are measured in urban areas such as San Antonio, Tex. Contaminants found in sediment can affect the health of aquatic organisms that ingest sediment. The gradual accumulation of trace elements and organic compounds in aquatic organisms can cause various physiological issues and can ultimately result in death of the aquatic organisms; in addition, subsequent ingestion of aquatic organisms can transfer the accumulated contaminants upward through the food chain (a process called biomagnification).The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio River Authority, collected sediment samples and water samples for toxicity testing from sites on the Westside Creeks as part of an initial characterization of selected contaminants in the study area. Samples were collected in January 2014 during base-flow conditions and again in May 2104 after a period of stormwater runoff (poststorm conditions). Sediment samples were analyzed for selected constituents, including trace elements and organic contaminants such as pesticides, brominated flame retardants, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In addition, as an indicator of ecological health (and

  9. Supercritical water oxidation data acquisition testing. Final report, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This report discusses the phase one testing of a data acquisition system for a supercritical water waste oxidation system. The system is designed to destroy a wide range of organic materials in mixed wastes. The design and testing of the MODAR Oxidizer is discussed. An analysis of the optimized runs is included.

  10. 78 FR 52192 - Final Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria For Ammonia-Freshwater 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... is the relationship between the ammonia criteria recommendations and state or tribal water quality...); and EPA Review and Approval of State and Tribal Water Quality Standards (65FR24641). You can find... AGENCY Final Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria For Ammonia-- Freshwater 2013 AGENCY...

  11. Nitrite toxicity of Litopenaeus vannamei in water containing low concentrations of sea salt or mixed salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, A.; Young, S.P.; Isely, J.J.; Browdy, C.L.; Tomasso, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake, depuration and toxicity of environmental nitrite was characterized in Litopenaeus vannamei exposed in water containing low concentrations of artificial sea salt or mixed salts. In 2 g/L artificial sea salts, nitrite was concentrated in the hemolymph in a dose-dependent and rapid manner (steady-state in about 2 d). When exposed to nitrite in 2 g/L artificial sea salts for 4 d and then moved to a similar environment without added nitrite, complete depuration occurred within a day. Increasing salinity up to 10 g/L decreased uptake of environmental nitrite. Nitrite uptake in environments containing 2 g/L mixed salts (combination of sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium chlorides) was similar to or lower than rates in 2 g/L artificial sea salt. Toxicity was inversely related to total dissolved salt and chloride concentrations and was highest in 2 g/L artificial sea salt (96-h medial lethal concentration = 8.4 mg/L nitrite-N). Animals that molted during the experiments did not appear to be more susceptible to nitrite than animals that did not molt. The shallow slope of the curve describing the relationship between toxicity and salinity suggests that management of nitrite toxicity in low-salinity shrimp ponds by addition of more salts may not be practical. ?? Copyright by the World Aquaculture Society 2004.

  12. Toxicity evaluation of boron nitride nanospheres and water-soluble boron nitride in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Hui; Tang, Chengchun; Lei, Shijun; Shen, Wanqing; Wang, Cong; Wang, Guobin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanomaterials have been increasingly explored for potential biological applications. However, their toxicity remains poorly understood. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a whole-animal model for toxicity analysis of two representative types of BN nanomaterials - BN nanospheres (BNNSs) and highly water-soluble BN nanomaterial (named BN-800-2) - we found that BNNSs overall toxicity was less than soluble BN-800-2 with irregular shapes. The concentration thresholds for BNNSs and BN-800-2 were 100 µg·mL-1 and 10 µg·mL-1, respectively. Above this concentration, both delayed growth, decreased life span, reduced progeny, retarded locomotion behavior, and changed the expression of phenotype-related genes to various extents. BNNSs and BN-800-2 increased oxidative stress levels in C. elegans by promoting reactive oxygen species production. Our results further showed that oxidative stress response and MAPK signaling-related genes, such as GAS1, SOD2, SOD3, MEK1, and PMK1, might be key factors for reactive oxygen species production and toxic responses to BNNSs and BN-800-2 exposure. Together, our results suggest that when concentrations are lower than 10 µg·mL-1, BNNSs are more biocompatible than BN-800-2 and are potentially biocompatible material.

  13. Decreased toxicity of aluminium when the ionic strength increases in water; Blir aluminium mindre toksisk naar ionestyrken i vannet oeker?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alstad, E.W. [Oslo Univ. (Norway)

    1996-01-01

    The conference paper evaluates the acute mortality of fish caused by the toxicity of aluminium in water. The evaluation is based on the polymerization hypothesis. According to the author, the level of toxicity decreases when the concentration and charge of ions increase. The paper presents the preliminary results from the executed experiment. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. In situ and laboratory toxicity of coalbed natural gas produced waters with elevated sodium bicarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Aïda M.; Harper, David D.; Skaar, Don

    2014-01-01

    Some tributaries in the Powder River Structural Basin, USA, were historically ephemeral, but now contain water year round as a result of discharge of coalbed natural gas (CBNG)-produced waters. This presented the opportunity to study field sites with 100% effluent water with elevated concentrations of sodium bicarbonate. In situ experiments, static renewal experiments performed simultaneously with in situ experiments, and static renewal experiments performed with site water in the laboratory demonstrated that CBNG-produced water reduces survival of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus). Age affected survival of fathead minnow, where fish 2 d posthatch (dph) were more sensitive than 6 dph fish, but pallid sturgeon survival was adversely affected at both 4 and 6 dph. This may have implications for acute assays that allow for the use of fish up to 14 dph. The survival of early lifestage fish is reduced significantly in the field when concentrations of NaHCO3 rise to more than 1500 mg/L (also expressed as >1245 mg HCO3 (-) /L). Treatment with the Higgin's Loop technology and dilution of untreated water increased survival in the laboratory. The mixing zones of the 3 outfalls studied ranged from approximately 800 m to 1200 m below the confluence. These experiments addressed the acute toxicity of effluent waters but did not address issues related to the volumes of water that may be added to the watershed.

  15. Dechlorination Technology Manual. Final report. [Utility cooling water discharge systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschoff, A.F.; Chiesa, R.J.; Jacobs, M.H.; Lee, Y.H.; Mehta, S.C.; Meko, A.C.; Musil, R.R.; Sopocy, D.M.; Wilson, J.A.

    1984-11-01

    On November 19, 1982, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated regulations severely restricting chlorination practices as they relate to utility cooling water discharge systems. EPRI authorized the preparation of a manual on dechlorination technology to assist utilities in evaluating the various alternatives available to them to meet these new requirements. The Dechlorination Technology Manual emphasizes the engineering aspects involved in the selection and design of dechlorination systems. However, background information is included concerning chemistry, regulatory requirements, environmental considerations and aquatic impacts. There is also a brief discussion of the various alternatives to dechlorination. Case studies are given to acquaint the user with the use of the manual for the design of chlorination facilities given various site-related characteristics, such as salt versus fresh waters. Numerous graphs and tables are presented to facilitate the selection and design process. 207 references, 66 figures, 60 tables.

  16. Effect of water treatment residuals on soil phosphorus, copper and aluminium availability and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombi, E; Stevens, D P; McLaughlin, M J

    2010-06-01

    Water treatment residuals (WTRs) are produced by the treatment of potable water with coagulating agents. Beneficial recycling in agriculture is hampered by the fact that WTRs contain potentially toxic contaminants (e.g. copper and aluminium) and they bind phosphorus strongly. These issues were investigated using a plant bioassay (Lactuca sativa), chemical extractions and an isotopic dilution technique. Two WTRs were applied to an acidic and a neutral pH soil at six rates. Reductions in plant growth in amended soils were due to WTR-induced P deficiency, rather than Al or Cu toxicity. The release of potentially toxic Al from WTRs was found to be mitigated by their alkaline nature and pH buffering capacity. However, acidification of WTRs was shown to release more soluble Al than soil naturally high in Al. Copper availability was relatively low in all treatments. However, the lability of WTR-Cu increased when the WTR was applied to the soil. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute toxicity and inactivation tests of CO2 on invertebrates in drinking water treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wen-Chao; Zhang, Jin-Song; Liu, Li-Jun; Zhao, Jian-Shu; Li, Tuo

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the esthetic problem caused by invertebrates, researchers are recently starting to be more aware of their potential importance in terms of public health. However, the inactivation methods of invertebrates which could proliferate in drinking water treatment systems are not well developed. The objective of this study is to assess the acute toxicity and inactivation effects of CO2 on familiar invertebrates in water treatment processes. The results of this study revealed that CO2 has a definite toxicity to familiar invertebrates. The values of 24-h LC50 (median lethal concentration) were calculated for each test with six groups of invertebrates. The toxicity of CO2 was higher with increasing concentrations in solution but was lower with the increase in size of the invertebrates. Above the concentration of 1,000 mg/L for the CO2 solution, the 100% inactivation time of all the invertebrates was less than 5 s, and in 15 min, the inactivation ratio showed a gradient descent with a decline in concentration. As seen for Mesocyclops thermocyclopoides, by dosing with a sodium bicarbonate solution first and adding a dilute hydrochloric acid solution 5 min later, it is possible to obtain a satisfactory inactivation effect in the GAC (granular activated carbon) filters.

  18. Zebrafish and clean water technology: assessing soil bioretention as a protective treatment for toxic urban runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, J K; Davis, J W; Incardona, J P; Stark, J D; Anulacion, B F; Scholz, N L

    2014-12-01

    Urban stormwater contains a complex mixture of contaminants that can be acutely toxic to aquatic biota. Green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) is a set of evolving technologies intended to reduce impacts on natural systems by slowing and filtering runoff. The extent to which GSI methods work as intended is usually assessed in terms of water quantity (hydrology) and quality (chemistry). Biological indicators of GSI effectiveness have received less attention, despite an overarching goal of protecting the health of aquatic species. Here we use the zebrafish (Danio rerio) experimental model to evaluate bioinfiltration as a relatively inexpensive technology for treating runoff from an urban highway with dense motor vehicle traffic. Zebrafish embryos exposed to untreated runoff (48-96h; six storm events) displayed an array of developmental abnormalities, including delayed hatching, reduced growth, pericardial edema, microphthalmia (small eyes), and reduced swim bladder inflation. Three of the six storms were acutely lethal, and sublethal toxicity was evident across all storms, even when stormwater was diluted by as much as 95% in clean water. As anticipated from exposure to cardiotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), untreated runoff also caused heart failure, as indicated by circulatory stasis, pericardial edema, and looping defects. Bioretention treatment dramatically improved stormwater quality and reversed nearly all forms of developmental toxicity. The zebrafish model therefore provides a versatile experimental platform for rapidly assessing GSI effectiveness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Water Management of Noninsulating and Insulating Sheathings: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2012-04-01

    There is an increasing market in liquid (or fluid) applied water management barriers for residential applications that could be used in place of tapes and other self-adhering membranes if applied correctly, especially around penetrations in the enclosure. This report discusses current best practices, recommends ways in which the best practices can be improved, and looks at some current laboratory testing and testing standards.

  20. Behavioral, clinical, and pathological characterization of acid metalliferous water toxicity in mallards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isanhart, J.P.; Wu, H.; Pandher, K.; MacRae, R.K.; Cox, S.B.; Hooper, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    From September to November 2000, United States Fish and Wildlife Service biologists investigated incidents involving 221 bird deaths at 3 mine sites located in New Mexico and Arizona. These bird deaths primarily involved passerine and waterfowl species and were assumed to be linked to consumption of acid metalliferous water (AMW). Because all of the carcasses were found in or near pregnant leach solution ponds, tailings ponds, and associated lakes or storm water retention basins, an acute-toxicity study was undertaken using a synthetic AMW (SAMW) formulation based on the contaminant profile of a representative pond believed to be responsible for avian mortalities. An acute oral-toxicity trial was performed with a mixed-sex group of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). After a 24-h pretreatment food and water fast, gorge drinking was evident in both SAMW treatment and control groups, with water consumption rates greatest during the initial drinking periods. Seven of nine treated mallards were killed in extremis within 12 h after the initiation of dose. Total lethal doses of SAMW ranged from 69.8 to 270.1 mL/kg (mean ?? SE 127.9 ?? 27.1). Lethal doses of SAMW were consumed in as few as 20 to 40 min after first exposure. Clinical signs of SAMW toxicity included increased serum uric acid, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, potassium, and P levels. PCV values of SAMW-treated birds were also increased compared with control mallards. Histopathological lesions were observed in the esophagus, proventriculus, ventriculus, and duodenum of SAMW-treated mallards, with the most distinctive being erosion and ulceration of the kaolin of the ventriculus, ventricular hemorrhage and/or congestion, and duodenal hemorrhage. Clinical, pathological, and tissue-residue results from this study are consistent with literature documenting acute metal toxicosis, especially copper (Cu), in avian species and provide useful diagnostic profiles for AMW toxicity or mortality events. Blood and

  1. Behavioral, clinical, and pathological characterization of acid metalliferous water toxicity in mallards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isanhart, John P.; Wu, Hongmei; Pandher, Karamjeet; MacRae, Russell K.; Cox, Stephen B.; Hooper, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    From September to November 2000, United States Fish and Wildlife Service biologists investigated incidents involving 221 bird deaths at 3 mine sites located in New Mexico and Arizona. These bird deaths primarily involved passerine and waterfowl species and were assumed to be linked to consumption of acid metalliferous water (AMW). Because all of the carcasses were found in or near pregnant leach solution ponds, tailings ponds, and associated lakes or storm water retention basins, an acute-toxicity study was undertaken using a synthetic AMW (SAMW) formulation based on the contaminant profile of a representative pond believed to be responsible for avian mortalities. An acute oral-toxicity trial was performed with a mixed-sex group of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). After a 24-h pretreatment food and water fast, gorge drinking was evident in both SAMW treatment and control groups, with water consumption rates greatest during the initial drinking periods. Seven of nine treated mallards were killed in extremis within 12 h after the initiation of dose. Total lethal doses of SAMW ranged from 69.8 to 270.1 mL/kg (mean ± SE 127.9 ± 27.1). Lethal doses of SAMW were consumed in as few as 20 to 40 min after first exposure. Clinical signs of SAMW toxicity included increased serum uric acid, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, potassium, and P levels. PCV values of SAMW-treated birds were also increased compared with control mallards. Histopathological lesions were observed in the esophagus, proventriculus, ventriculus, and duodenum of SAMW-treated mallards, with the most distinctive being erosion and ulceration of the kaolin of the ventriculus, ventricular hemorrhage and/or congestion, and duodenal hemorrhage. Clinical, pathological, and tissue-residue results from this study are consistent with literature documenting acute metal toxicosis, especially copper (Cu), in avian species and provide useful diagnostic profiles for AMW toxicity or mortality events. Blood and

  2. The influence of particles on bioavailability and toxicity of pesticides in surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauer, Katja; Homazava, Nadzeya; Junghans, Marion; Werner, Inge

    2017-07-01

    Environmental risk assessment is an essential part of the approval process for pesticides. Exposure concentrations are compared with ecotoxicological data obtained from standardized laboratory studies and, if available, from field studies to determine the risk of a substance or formulation for aquatic communities. Predicted concentrations in surface waters are derived using, for example, the European FOrum for the Co-ordination of pesticide fate models and their USe (FOCUS) or the German Exposit models, which distinguish between exposure to dissolved and particle-associated pesticide concentrations, because the dissolved concentration is thought to be the best predictor of bioavailability and toxicity. Water and particle-associated concentrations are estimated based on the organic carbon-water partitioning coefficient (K OC ). This review summarizes published information on the influence of natural suspended solids on bioavailability and toxicity of pesticides to aquatic organisms (algae, invertebrates and fish), and the value of log K OC and log K OW (octanol-water coefficient) as sole predictors of the bioavailable fraction is discussed. The information showed that: 1) the quality and origin of suspended solids played an important role in influencing pesticide bioavailability and toxicity; 2) a decrease in toxicity due to the presence of suspended solids was shown only for pyrethroid insecticides with log K OW greater than 5, but the extent of this reduction depended on particle concentration and size, and potentially also on the ecotoxicological endpoint; 3) for pesticides with a log K OW less than 3 (e.g., triazines, carbamates, and organophosphates), the impact of particles on bioavailability and toxicity is small and species dependent; and 4) pesticide bioavailability is greatly influenced by the test species and their physiology (e.g., feeding behavior or digestion). We conclude that exposure of aquatic organisms to pesticides and environmental risk of many

  3. Toxicity of methylmercury injected into eggs when dissolved in water versus corn oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Klimstra, J.D.; Stebbins, K.R.; Kondrad, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study, the embryotoxicity of methylmercury dissolved in corn oil was compared among 26 species of birds. Corn oil is not soluble in the water-based matrix that constitutes the albumen of an egg. To determine whether the use of corn oil limited the usefulness of this earlier study, a comparison was made of the embryotoxicity of methylmercury dissolved in corn oil versus water. Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and chicken (Gallus gallus) eggs were injected with methylmercury chloride dissolved in corn oil or water to achieve concentrations of 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.6??g/g mercury in the egg on a wet weight basis. Hatching success at each dose of mercury was compared between the two solvents. For mallards, 16.4% of the eggs injected with 1.6??g/g mercury dissolved in water hatched, which was statistically lower than the 37.6% hatch rate of eggs injected with 1.6??g/g mercury dissolved in corn oil, but no differences in hatching success were observed between corn oil and water at any of the other doses. With chicken eggs, no significant differences occurred in percentage hatch of eggs between corn oil and water at any of the mercury doses. Methylmercury dissolved in corn oil seems to have a toxicity to avian embryos similar to that of does methylmercury dissolved in water. Consequently, the results from the earlier study that described the toxicity of methylmercury dissolved in corn oil to avian embryos were probably not compromised by the use of corn oil as a solvent. ?? 2011 SETAC.

  4. Guidelines for the disposal of dangerous and toxic wastes so as to minimize or prevent environmental and water pollution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rudd, RT

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern society is producing ever increasing quantities of dangerous and/or toxic wastes, which require safe and effective disposal if they are not to pose a threat to our water supplies or the environment in general....

  5. Final report on the oxidation of energetic materials in supercritical water. Final Air Force report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelow, S.J.; Allen, D.; Anderson, G.K. [and others

    1995-04-03

    The objective of this project was to determine the suitability of oxidation in supercritical fluids (SCO), particularly water (SCWO), for disposal of propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics (PEPs). The SCO studies of PEPs addressed the following issues: The efficiency of destruction of the substrate. The products of destruction contained in the effluents. Whether the process can be conducted safely on a large scale. Whether energy recovery from the process is economically practicable. The information essential for process development and equipment design was also investigated, including issues such as practical throughput of explosives through a SCWO reactor, reactor materials and corrosion, and models for process design and optimization.

  6. Influence of low levels of water salinity on toxicity of nitrite to anuran larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, C; Marco, A; Serrano, L

    2013-08-01

    Reactive nitrogen compounds such as nitrite (NO2(-)) are highly toxic to aquatic animals and are partly responsible for the global decline of amphibians. On some fish and Caudata amphibian species low levels of sodium chloride significantly reduce the toxicity of nitrite. However, the nitrite-salinity interaction has not been properly studied in anuran amphibians. To verify if chloride (Cl(-)) attenuates NO2(-) toxicity, eggs and larvae of three anuran species were subjected to a series of NO2(-) solutions combined with three salt concentrations (0, 0.4 and 2 or 0, 0.052 and 0.2gL(-1)NaCl). One of the species tested originated from two different populations inhabiting highly contrasted nutrient richness environments: lowland Doñana Natural Park and Sierra de Gredos Mountain. In general, the presence of Cl(-) increased survival and growth of lowland Pelophylax perezi and activity of mountain P. perezi larvae exposed to NO2(-), thus attenuating the toxicity of NO2(-) to developing amphibians. Mountain amphibian populations appeared to be much more sensitive to the concentrations of NO2(-) and Cl(-) used in this experiment than coastal conspecifics, suggesting possible adaptation of populations to local conditions. Nitrogen pollution in coastal wetlands poses a serious threat to aquatic organisms, causing direct toxicity or indirect effects via ecosystem eutrophication. The presence of low to medium levels of salinity that would be common in coastal wetlands may attenuate the direct effects of increasing concentrations of nitrogenous compounds in water bodies. Furthermore, treating cultures of endangered anurans with small amounts of NaCl may provide an additional protective measure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Quality improvement of fishery water using natural zeolite and dynamics of adsorption of hydrological toxicants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović Saša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption capability of the natural mineral zeolite of domestic origin, on chemical parameters in water used for the intensive breeding of the Rainbow Trout was investigated in practical and laboratory conditions. It was established on the grounds of an analysis of the obtained results that there is a statistically significant adsorptive power and selectivity of zeolite towards: ammoniac (p<0.01, nitrates (p<0.01, nitrites (p<0.05, and total hardness of water (p<0.05. The applied zeolite contributed to the improvement of the ambient conditions in the trout pond, and it also had a positive ecological effect on the filtration of hydrological toxicants of the pond water output.

  8. Multi-Applications Small Light Water Reactor - NERI Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Michale Modro; James E. Fisher; Kevan D. Weaver; Jose N. Reyes, Jr.; John T. Groome; Pierre Babka; Thomas M. Carlson

    2003-12-01

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle.

  9. Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, B.I.; Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc. (United States)]|[Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Deo, M.D. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

    1996-11-01

    The objectives of the project were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter core, Formation Micro Imaging (FMI) logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using high-temperature gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2,000 barrels per day.

  10. Determination of toxic metals in drinking water sources in the Chief Albert Luthuli Local Municipality in Mpumalanga, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nthunya, Lebea N.; Masheane, Monaheng L.; Malinga, Soraya P.; Nxumalo, Edward N.; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Mhlanga, Sabelo D.

    2017-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the presence and levels of toxic metals on selected water sources in a rural community in Lochiel, South Africa. Collection of water samples from identified drinking water sources (open wells, community tanks, water treatment works and boreholes) was done in all seasons of the year (winter, spring, summer and autumn) between 2014 and 2015. The concentrations of identified toxic metals (cobalt, chromium, copper, lead, zinc, manganese and iron) were measured using ICP-OES. Some water sources were found to contain concentrations of toxic metals at levels slightly higher than USEPA, WHO and SANS241 set limits (e.g. manganese and cobalt), while others were found to be within the acceptable limits. This suggested that the residents residing in locations that have water sources containing toxic metals at the concentrations above the set limits are at risk and susceptible to suffer diseases caused by these toxic metals. The side effects of the metals may not be acute; however prolonged exposure to the toxic metals may result in detrimental effects since they are known to bioaccumulate in the body.

  11. A lab-on-chip cell-based biosensor for label-free sensing of water toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F; Nordin, A N; Li, F; Voiculescu, I

    2014-04-07

    This paper presents a lab-on-chip biosensor containing an enclosed fluidic cell culturing well seeded with live cells for rapid screening of toxicants in drinking water. The sensor is based on the innovative placement of the working electrode for the electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) technique as the top electrode of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) resonator. Cell damage induced by toxic water will cause a decrease in impedance, as well as an increase in the resonant frequency. For water toxicity tests, the biosensor's unique capabilities of performing two complementary measurements simultaneously (impedance and mass-sensing) will increase the accuracy of detection while decreasing the false-positive rate. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) were used as toxicity sensing cells. The effects of the toxicants, ammonia, nicotine and aldicarb, on cells were monitored with both the QCM and the ECIS technique. The lab-on-chip was demonstrated to be sensitive to low concentrations of toxicants. The responses of BAECs to toxic samples occurred during the initial 5 to 20 minutes depending on the type of chemical and concentrations. Testing the multiparameter biosensor with aldicarb also demonstrated the hypothesis that using two different sensors to monitor the same cell monolayer provides cross validation and increases the accuracy of detection. For low concentrations of aldicarb, the variations in impedance measurements are insignificant in comparison with the shifts of resonant frequency monitored using the QCM resonator. A highly linear correlation between signal shifts and chemical concentrations was demonstrated for each toxicant.

  12. Metals in sediments: bioavailability and toxicity in a tropical reservoir used for public water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Silva, Sheila; Da Silva, Daniel Clemente Vieira Rego; Lage, Fernanda; de Paiva, Teresa Cristina Brazil; Moschini-Carlos, Viviane; Rosa, André Henrique; Pompêo, Marcelo

    2016-05-01

    Sediments may be a repository of contaminants in freshwater ecosystems. One way to assess the quality of this compartment, in terms of potentially bioavailable metals, is by the analysis of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM). In order to investigate the bioavailability, toxicity, and compartmentalization of different metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn), sampling of surface sediments was performed at nine stations along the Paiva Castro reservoir (São Paulo, Brazil). The metals were analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Sediment organic matter (OM), organic carbon (OC), and grain size were also measured. The parameters pH, EH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen were determined at the sediment-water interface. Chronic and acute toxicological tests were performed with sediments from the area where water was extracted for the public water supply. Low levels of OM, associated with loss of stratification in the water column, explained the relatively low AVS values. The molar ratio ∑[SEM]-[AVS]/fOC was less than 130 mmol/kg(-1) for all the sampling stations, indicating that the metals were not bioavailable. With the exception of Cd, metal levels were in accordance with background concentrations and the threshold effect level (TEL) established by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment. The ecotoxicological tests confirmed the absence of toxic effects to biota. Application of principal component analysis indicated the presence of four compartments along the reservoir: (1) a riverine zone, potentially threatened by contamination with Cd; (2) an intermediate zone; (3) a limnic area; and (4) the area where water was taken for the public water supply.

  13. Revisions to the Clean Water Act Regulatory Definition of Discharge of Dredged Material; Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated a final rule Amending a Clean Water Act (CWA) section 404 regulation that defines the term discharge of dredged material.

  14. Final Critical Habitat for the Huachuca water umbel (Lilaeopsis schaffneriana var. recurva)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To provide the user with a general idea of areas where final critical habitat for Huachuca water umbel (Lilaeopsis schaffneriana var. recurva) occur based on the...

  15. EXPOSURES AND INTERNAL DOSES OF TRIHALOMETHANES IN HUMANS: MULTI-ROUTE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM DRINKING WATER (FINAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) has released a final report that presents and applies a method to estimate distributions of internal concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) in humans resulting from a residential drinking water exposure. The report presen...

  16. Climate Change Vulnerability Assessments: Four Case Studies of Water Utility Practices (2011 Final)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has released the final report titled, Climate Change Vulnerability Assessments: Four Case Studies of Water Utility Practices. This report was prepared by the National Center for Environmental Assessment's Global Climate Research Staff in the Office of Research and D...

  17. Effect of water in salt repositories. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baes, C.F. Jr.; Gilpatrick, L.O.; Kitts, F.G.; Bronstein, H.R.; Shor, A.J.

    1983-09-01

    Additional results confirm that during most of the consolidation of polycrystalline salt in brine, the previously proposed rate expression applies. The final consolidation, however, proceeds at a lower rate than predicted. The presence of clay hastens the consolidation process but does not greatly affect the previously observed relationship between permeability and void fraction. Studies of the migration of brine within polycrystalline salt specimens under stress indicate that the principal effect is the exclusion of brine as a result of consolidation, a process that evidently can proceed to completion. No clear effect of a temperature gradient could be identified. A previously reported linear increase with time of the reciprocal permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine was confirmed, though the rate of increase appears more nearly proportional to the product of sigma ..delta..P rather than sigma ..delta..P/sup 2/ (sigma is the uniaxial stress normal to the interface and ..delta..P is the hydraulic pressure drop). The new results suggest that a limiting permeability may be reached. A model for the permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine is developed that is reasonably consistent with the present results and may be used to predict the permeability of bedded salt. More measurements are needed, however, to choose between two limiting forms of the model.

  18. Water quality criteria for colored smokes: 1,4-diamino-2,3-dihydroanthraquinone: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, K.A.; Hovatter, P.S.; Ross, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    The available data on the environmental fate, aquatic toxicity, and mammalian toxicity of 1,4-diamino-2,3-dihydroanthraquinone (DDA), and anthraquinone dye used in violet-colored smoke grenades, were reviewed. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guidelines were used in an attempt to generate water quality criteria for the protection of human health and of aquatic life and its uses. DDA will readily oxidize to 1,4-diaminoanthraquinone (DAA) in air or during combustion of the smoke grenade. The dye is insoluble in water; however, no information is available concerning its transformation or transport in soil, water, and sediments. No data are available concerning the toxic effects of DDA in aquatic organisms; therefore, a Criterion maximum Concentration and a Criterion Continuous Concentration cannot be determined. Toxicity studies following the USEPA guidelines are recommended. DDA is a weak mutagen in the Salmonella Reversin Assay, but the combustion or oxidation product, DAA is a strong mutagen in the same test. Violet smoke is noncarcinogenic in the SENCAR Mouse Skin Tumor Bioassay. 63 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Effects of water chemistry on the dissolution of ZnO nanoparticles and their toxicity to Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Lin, Daohui; Zhu, Lizhong

    2013-02-01

    The dissolution of ZnO nanoparticles (nano-ZnO) plays an important role in the toxicity of nano-ZnO to the aquatic organisms. The effects of water chemistry such as pH, ionic components, and dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the dissolution of nano-ZnO and its toxicity to Escherichia coli (E. coli) were investigated in synthetic and natural water samples. The results showed that the toxicity of nano-ZnO to E. coli depended on not only free Zn(2+) but also the coexisting cations which could reduce the toxicity of Zn(2+). Increasing solution pH, HPO(4)(2), and DOM reduced the concentration of free Zn(2+) released from nano-ZnO, and thus lowered the toxicity of nano-ZnO. In addition, both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) dramatically reduced the toxicity of Zn(2+) to E. coli. These results highlight the importance of water chemistry on the toxicity evaluation of nano-ZnO in natural waters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Toxicity reduction for pharmaceuticals mixture in water by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boiani, Nathalia Fonseca; Tominaga, Flavio Kiyoshi; Borrely, Sueli Ivone, E-mail: flavio_tominaga@hotmail.com, E-mail: sborrely@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The incorrect disposal of products is committing the environment quality once the aquatic environment is the main vehicle for dispersion of pollutants. Among the highlighted contaminants there are the pharmaceuticals, which are also released to the aquatic environment through the domestic sewage, hospitals and effluents. The monitoring of these pharmaceuticals in the environment has grown, showing many of them as persistent pollutants. Pharmaceuticals from different therapeutic classes have been detected in domestic sewage, surface water and groundwater around the world. Several studies evidenced Fluoxetine Hydrochloride residues in waters. Another important product is the Propranolol, used for heart disease treatments as far as fluoxetine is applied for treating mental diseases. The objective of this study was to apply the radiation processing for the abatement of pollutant in waters. Electron beam accelerator was used during irradiation of the mixture (Propranolol + Fluoxetine Hydrochloride) in aqueous solution. Acute toxicity assays were carried out for Vibrio fischeri marine bacterium, 15 minutes exposure. The results showed that irradiation (2.5kGy and 5.0kGy) enhanced the average effective concentration of the mixture, which means reduction of toxicity (56.34%, 55.70% respectively). Inverse effect was obtained with 7.5 kGy and 10 kGy. (author)

  1. A chronic toxicity study of diphenylarsinic acid in F344 rats in drinking water for 52 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takashi; Gi, Min; Yamano, Shotarou; Fujioka, Masaki; Tatsumi, Kumiko; Kawachi, Satoko; Ishii, Naomi; Doi, Kenichiro; Kakehashi, Anna; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA), a chemical warfare-related neurotoxic organic arsenical, is present in the groundwater and soil in some regions of Japan due to illegal dumping after World War II. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential toxicity of DPAA when administered to rats in their drinking water for 52 weeks. DPAA was administered to groups 1-4 at concentrations of 0, 5, 10, and 20ppm in their drinking water for 52 weeks. There were no significant differences in the final body weights between the control groups and the treatment groups in male or female rats. In serum biochemistry, in females 20ppm DPAA significantly increased alkaline phosphatase and γ-glitamyl transferase compared to controls, and 10 and 20ppm DPAA significantly increased total cholesterol compared to controls. Absolute and relative liver weights were significantly increased in females treated with 20ppm DPAA compared to the control group. Dilation of the common bile duct outside the papilla of Vater and stenosis of the papilla of Vater was observed in all male and female rats administered 20ppm DPAA. The incidence of intrahepatic bile duct hyperplasia was significantly increased in male and female rats treated with 20ppm DPAA compared to the control groups. These results suggest that DPAA is toxic to the bile duct epithelium in rats. The no-observed adverse effect levels of DPAA were estimated to be 10ppm (0.48mg/kg b.w./day) for males and 5ppm (0.35mg/kg b.w./day) for females under the conditions of this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Duckweed Lemna minor as a tool for testing toxicity and genotoxicity of surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radić, S; Stipaničev, D; Cvjetko, P; Marijanović Rajčić, M; Sirac, S; Pevalek-Kozlina, B; Pavlica, M

    2011-02-01

    In this investigation growth parameters and certain endpoints (pigment content, peroxidase activity, lipid peroxidation and alkaline comet assay) were used to detect the toxic and genotoxic effects of surface water samples on duckweed plants. The surface waters of different origin and pollutant burdens were collected monthly over a 3-month monitoring period at three sampling sites along the river Sava and its confluents (Croatia). Physicochemical characterization of the water samples included measurements of conductivity, chemical and biological oxygen demand, levels of total suspended solids, nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, Kjeldahl nitrogen and orthophosphate. Surface water samples collected from three stations caused reduction of duckweed growth rates, chlorophylls and carotenoid contents and peroxidase activity. In contrast, damage to membrane lipids (estimated by malondialdehyde content) and especially to DNA (estimated by tail extent moment) markedly increased in duckweed exposed to industrial wastewater samples. The results from the study indicate the ability of selected biomarkers to predict the phyto- and genotoxic effects of complex water mixtures on living organisms as well as the relevance of duckweed as a sensitive indicator of water quality. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Differential toxicity of drinking water disinfected with combinations of ultraviolet radiation and chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewa, Michael J; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Metz, Deborah H; Kashinkunti, Ramesh; Jamriska, Katherine J; Meyer, Maria

    2012-07-17

    Alternative technologies to disinfect drinking water such as ultraviolet (UV) disinfection are becoming more widespread. The benefits of UV disinfection include reduced risk of microbial pathogens such as Cryptosporidium and reduced production of regulated drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs). The objective of this research was to determine if mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity varied in response to different chlorination protocols with and without polychromatic medium pressure UV (MPUV) and monochromatic low pressure UV (LPUV) disinfection technologies. The specific aims were to analyze the mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of concentrated organic fractions from source water before and after chlorination and to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the concentrated organic fractions from water samples treated with UV alone or UV before or after chlorination. Exposure of granular activated carbon-filtered Ohio River water to UV alone resulted in the lowest levels of mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. With combinations of UV and chlorine, the lowest levels of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were observed with MPUV radiation. The best combined UV plus chlorine methodology that generated the lowest cytotoxicity and genotoxicity employed chlorination first followed by MPUV radiation. These data may prove important in the development of multibarrier methods of pathogen inactivation of drinking water, while limiting unintended toxic consequences.

  4. The analysis of toxic connections content in water by spectral methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, I. V.; Chaikovskaya, O. N.; Sokolova, I. V.; Artyushin, V. R.

    2017-08-01

    The current state of ecology means the strict observance of measures for the utilization of household and industrial wastes that is connected with very essential expenses of means and time. Thanks to spectroscopic devices usage the spectral methods allow to carry out the express quantitative and qualitative analysis in a workplace and field conditions. In a work the application of spectral methods by studying the degradation of toxic organic compounds after preliminary radiation of various sources is shown. Experimental data of optical density of water at various influences are given.

  5. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, Ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25-February 1, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids (significantly reduced reproduction) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples.

  6. Detecting total toxicity in water using a mediated biosensor system with flow injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Daming; Liu, Changyu; Zhu, Chengzhou; Yu, Dengbin; Liu, Ling; Zhai, Junfeng; Dong, Shaojun

    2015-11-01

    A novel total toxicity detection method based on a mediated biosensor system with flow injection (MB-FI) was developed to rapidly and reliably detect respiration inhibitors (i.e., As2O3, KCN, salicylic acid (SA), 2,4-dintirophenol (DNP)) in water. The mediated biosensor toxicity assessment using microorganisms immobilized in calcium alginate filaments can greatly simplify the testing process and save time. In the MB-FI system, ferricyanide together with a respiration inhibitor was injected into the bioreactor, inhibiting the respiration of the immobilized microorganisms. The degree of inhibition was measured by determining the ferrocyanide generated in the effluent, expressed as the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50). The IC50 values for the four respiration inhibitors obtained using this method were comparable to those obtained using the classic method, confirming that this approach is an alternative alert method. More importantly, this constructed biosensor system with flow injection will facilitate the application and commercialization of this toxicity monitoring technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of April 14-21, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Poplar Creek Mile 4.3, Poplar Creek Mile 5.1, and Poplar Creek Mile 6.0 on April 13, 15, and 18. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to daphnids in undiluted samples; however, toxicity to fathead minnows (significantly reduced survival) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Miles 4.3 and 6.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Daphnid reproduction was significantly less than controls in 50 percent dilutions of samples from Poplar Creek Miles 4.3 and 6.0, while no toxicity to fathead minnows was shown in diluted (50 percent) samples.

  8. Transformation of halobenzoquinones with the presence of amino acids in water: Products, pathways and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Penghui; Zhao, He; Cao, Hongbin; Huang, Ching-Hua; Liu, Wen; Li, Yao

    2017-10-01

    The transformation and detoxification of halobenzoquinones (HBQs), a class of emerging disinfection byproducts (DBPs), was studied in the presence of amino acids (AAs). The reaction activity of three HBQs with AAs generally ranked as 2-chlorobenzoquinone (CBQ) density functional theory (DFT) calculations, AAs can easily covalently incorporate into HBQs via nucleophilic addition (CBQ and DCBQ) or substitution (TCBQ) through CNC or CSC linkages. Hydroxylation, nucleophilic reaction and decarboxylation were proposed to be the three major reaction pathways for HBQs transformation with AAs. HBQs firstly underwent the spontaneous hydrolysis, resulting in OH-HBQs formation. Then, nucleophilic addition/substitution of AAs occurred on HBQs and OH-HBQs to produce AA-HBQs/AA-HBQs-OH adducts. These adducts were subsequently oxidized into their corresponding decarboxylated forms. Based on the results of Luminous bacterium Q67 acute toxicity test, the toxicity of HBQs solution greatly decreased with AAs presented. The toxicity change was well explained by the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (ELUMO) of formed products. Notably, the step that AAs nucleophilic bonded with HBQs led to the highest rise of ELUMO, which should be the most effective pathway for HBQs detoxification. This study shows that binding with amino nitrogen compounds should be an important process for HBQs transformation and detoxification, which helps to better understand the fate of this typical DBP in surface water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Final report : testing and evaluation for solar hot water reliability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Menicucci, David F. (Building Specialists, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Burch, Jay (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO)

    2011-07-01

    Solar hot water (SHW) systems are being installed by the thousands. Tax credits and utility rebate programs are spurring this burgeoning market. However, the reliability of these systems is virtually unknown. Recent work by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has shown that few data exist to quantify the mean time to failure of these systems. However, there is keen interest in developing new techniques to measure SHW reliability, particularly among utilities that use ratepayer money to pay the rebates. This document reports on an effort to develop and test new, simplified techniques to directly measure the state of health of fielded SHW systems. One approach was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and is based on the idea that the performance of the solar storage tank can reliably indicate the operational status of the SHW systems. Another approach, developed by the University of New Mexico (UNM), uses adaptive resonance theory, a type of neural network, to detect and predict failures. This method uses the same sensors that are normally used to control the SHW system. The NREL method uses two additional temperature sensors on the solar tank. The theories, development, application, and testing of both methods are described in the report. Testing was performed on the SHW Reliability Testbed at UNM, a highly instrumented SHW system developed jointly by SNL and UNM. The two methods were tested against a number of simulated failures. The results show that both methods show promise for inclusion in conventional SHW controllers, giving them advanced capability in detecting and predicting component failures.

  10. Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modro, S.M.; Fisher, J.E.; Weaver, K.D.; Reyes, J.N.; Groome, J.T.; Babka, P.; Carlson, T.M.

    2003-12-01

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle. Development of the baseline design concept has been sufficiently completed to determine that it complies with the safety requirements and criteria, and satisfies the major goals already noted. The more significant features of the baseline single-unit design concept include: (1) Thermal Power--150 MWt; (2) Net Electrical Output--35 MWe; (3) Steam Generator Type--Vertical, helical tubes; (4) Fuel UO{sub 2}, 8% enriched; (5) Refueling Intervals--5 years; (6) Life-Cycle--60 years. The economic performance was assessed by designing a power plant with an electric generation capacity in the range of current and advanced evolutionary systems. This approach allows for direct comparison of economic performance and forms a basis for further evaluation, economic and technical, of the proposed design and for the design evolution towards a more cost competitive concept

  11. Electromyogram as a measure of heavy metal toxicity in fresh water and salt water mussels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidder, G.W. III [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States)]|[Mt. Desert Island Biological Lab., Salsbury Cove, ME (United States); McCoy, A.A. [Mt. Desert Island Biological Lab., Salsbury Cove, ME (United States)]|[Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The response of bivalves to heavy metals and other toxins has usually been determined by observing valve position. Since mussels close their valves to avoid noxious stimuli, experimental delivery of chemicals ins uncertain. To obtain constant results plastic spacers can be employed to hold the valves apart. This obviates valve position as an index of response and some other method is required. Electromyography of intact mussels is one such index, giving a simple, effective, and quantitative measurement of activity. Experiments are reported in this article on the effects of added mercury on salt water and fresh water species.

  12. Perinatal Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Studies of Styrene –Acrylonitrile Trimer, A Ground Water Contaminant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Mamta; Elmore, Susan A.; Malarkey, David E.; Hejtmancik, Milton R.; Gerken, Diane K.; Chhabra, Rajendra S.

    2015-01-01

    Styrene Acrylonitrile (SAN) Trimer is a by-product in the production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics. Following a report of a childhood cancer cluster in the Toms River section of Dover Township, New Jersey, SAN Trimer was identified as one of the groundwater contaminants at Reich Farm Superfund site in the township. The contaminants from the Reich Farm site’s ground water plume impacted two wells at the Parkway well field. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) studied the toxicity and carcinogenicity of SAN Trimer in rats exposed during their perinatal developmental period and adulthood. The chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies in F344/N rats were preceded by 7- and 18-week perinatal toxicity studies to determine the exposure concentrations for the 2-year studies. Subsequently, Fisher 344 pregnant dams were exposed to SAN Trimer containing diet at 400, 800, or 1600 ppm concentrations during gestation, nursing and weaning periods of offspring followed by two year of adult exposures to both male and female pups. There was no statistically significant evidence of carcinogenic activity following SAN-Trimer exposure; however, rare neoplasms in the brain and spinal cord were observed in males and to lesser extent in female rats. These incidences were considered within the range of historical background in the animal model used in the current studies. Therefore, the presence of a few rarely occurring CNS tumors in the treated groups were not judged to be associated with the SAN Trimer exposure. The major finding was a dose-related peripheral neuropathy associated with the sciatic nerves in females and spinal nerve roots in males and females thereby suggesting that SAN trimer is potentially a nervous system toxicant. PMID:24060431

  13. Perinatal toxicity and carcinogenicity studies of styrene-acrylonitrile trimer, a ground water contaminant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Mamta; Elmore, Susan A; Malarkey, David E; Hejtmancik, Milton R; Gerken, Diane K; Chhabra, Rajendra S

    2013-12-06

    Styrene acrylonitrile (SAN) trimer is a by-product in the production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics. Following a report of a childhood cancer cluster in the Toms River section of Dover Township, New Jersey, SAN Trimer was identified as one of the groundwater contaminants at Reich Farm Superfund site in the township. The contaminants from the Reich Farm site's ground water plume impacted two wells at the Parkway well field. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) studied the toxicity and carcinogenicity of SAN Trimer in rats exposed during their perinatal developmental period and adulthood. The chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies in F344/N rats were preceded by 7- and 18-week perinatal toxicity studies to determine the exposure concentrations for the 2-year studies. Subsequently, Fisher 344 pregnant dams were exposed to SAN Trimer containing diet at 400, 800, or 1600ppm concentrations during gestation, nursing and weaning periods of offspring followed by two year of adult exposures to both male and female pups. There was no statistically significant evidence of carcinogenic activity following SAN-Trimer exposure; however, rare neoplasms in the brain and spinal cord were observed in males and to lesser extent in female rats. These incidences were considered within the range of historical background in the animal model used in the current studies. Therefore, the presence of a few rarely occurring CNS tumors in the treated groups were not judged to be associated with the SAN Trimer exposure. The major finding was a dose-related peripheral neuropathy associated with the sciatic nerves in females and spinal nerve roots in males and females thereby suggesting that SAN Trimer is potentially a nervous system toxicant. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Acute toxicity of smoke screen materials to aquatic organisms, white phosphorus-felt, red phosphorus-butyl rubber and SGF No. 2 fog oil. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, T.M.; McFadden, K.M.; Bean, R.M.; Clark, M.L.; Thomas, B.L.; Killand, B.W.; Prohammer, L.A.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    The acute toxicity of three obscurants was determined for nine freshwater organisms. The materials tested were white phosphorus-felt smoke, red phosphorus-butyl rubber (RP-BR) smoke, and smoke generator fuel (SGF) No. 2 fog oil (bulk and vaporized). The chemistry of WP-F and RP-BR smoke in water and the resulting effects on aquatic organisms are similar. Combustion of these two obscurants and their deposition in water leads to the formation of many complex oxy-phosphoric acids. Rates of hydrolysis of these complex products to ortho-phosphate were inconsistent and unpredictable over time. These products acidify water and produce toxic effects after exhausting the buffering capacity of the water. Acute 96 hr tests using Daphnia magna with neutralized and nonneutralized exposure solutions indicated that the presence of unidentified toxic component(s) acted independently of pH. At pH levels of 6.0 to 7.0, phosphorus combustion products precipitated out of solution leading to a bimodal toxic response in extended 96-hr tests with Daphnia magna. Most components of fog oil had low solubility in water. Saturation was apparent at approximately 0.1 to 0.3 mg/L total oil. Vaporization had no demonstrable effect on the chemistry or toxicity of the fog oil. Neither the bulk fog oil nor the vaporized fog oil was acutely toxic to freshwater animals at concentrations less than 10 mg/L total oil. In oil-water mixes in excess of 1.0 mg/L total oil, fog oil quickly separated and floated to the surface. The primary hazard associated with vaporized and bulk fog oil was the physical effect of oil fouling the organisms. Photolysis increased the concentration of water-soluble components of the fog oil. Acute toxicity was demonstrated in oil-water mixes (approx.10 mg/L total oil) of photolyzed bulk and vaporized fog oil. No difference in toxicity was observed between photolyzed and non-photolyzed dilutions of OWM at comparable levels of total oil.

  15. Efficient Adsorptive Removal of Toxic Amaranth Dye from Water using a Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Lin, Kun-Yi; Wu, Chang-Husan

    2017-06-09

    Adsorbents reported to remove a toxic acidic azo dye, Amaranth (AMR) are very limited, and their typical adsorption capacities are quite low. Recently, a zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67) has been proposed as a novel adsorbent as ZIF-67 possesses high surface area, superior chemical stability in water and positive charges, making it a promising adsorbent for AMR. Nevertheless, no studies have been conducted to investigate the adsorption of AMR to ZIF-67. Herein, ZIF-67 is employed for the first time to remove AMR from water via adsorption. Adsorption behaviors are investigated via determining the adsorption kinetics and isotherm. ZIF-67 also exhibits a significant higher maximum adsorption capacity (qmax = 121 mg g-1 at 30 °C) than most of the reported adsorbents. ZIF-67 can be also regenerated by washing it with NaCl solutions and the regeneration efficiency remains effective over multiple cycles, demonstrating that ZIF-67 is a promising adsorbent for AMR.

  16. Toxicity of water and sediment from stormwater retarding basins to Hydra hexactinella

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkrantz, Rikke Tjørnhøj; Pollino, Carmel A.; Nugegoda, Dayanthi

    2008-01-01

    of 50 ml/L and 100 ml/L, while the 7 h pulse exposure caused a significant increase in the mean population growth rate compared to the control. Water samples from the two other retarding basins were found non-toxic to H. hexactinella. This is the first study to employ sediment tests with Hydra spp....... on stormwater sediments and a lower population growth rate was observed for organisms exposed to sediment from the Avoca St retarding basins. The behavioral study showed that H. hexactinella tended to avoid the sediment-water interface when exposed to sediment from all retarding basins, compared...... to the reference sediment. Further work is needed to determine the long-term effects of stormwater polluted sediments and acute effects due to organism exposure to short-term high concentrations during rain events. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  17. Detection of toxic metals in waste water from dairy products plant using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, T; Gondal, M A

    2008-06-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) System was developed locally for determination of toxic metals in liquid samples and the system was tested for analysis of waste water collected from dairy products processing plant. The plasma was generated by focusing a pulsed Nd: YAG laser at 1064 nm on waste water samples. Optimal experimental conditions were evaluated for improving the sensitivity of our LIBS system through parametric dependence investigations. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) results were then compared with the results obtained using standard analytical technique such as Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICP). The evaluation of the potential and capabilities of LIBS as a rapid tool for liquid sample analysis are discussed in brief.

  18. Relationship between organic pollution and the occurrence of toxic Phytoplankton species in the Lebanese coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rahman Hassoun, Abed

    2017-04-01

    Aiming to evaluate the effects of organic pollution, environmental parameters and phytoplankton community were monitored during a two-year period (from April 2010 till March 2012) in the central coast of Lebanon in the Levantine Sub-basin. Data were collected for hydrological (temperature and salinity), chemical (nitrites, nitrates and phosphates), and biological (chlorophyll-a and phytoplankton populations) parameters. Our results show that temperature follows its normal seasonal and annual cycles, usually noted in the Lebanese coastal waters. Salinity presents spatial and temporal variations with low values (19.07 - 39.6) in the areas affected by continental inputs. Significant fluctuations (P phytoplanktonic cells were observed between the sites and through the years. Moreover, a perturbation of the natural phytoplanktonic succession and an occurrence of toxic or potentially harmful algae were noticed in the polluted sites, reflecting the influence of wastewater effluents on the coastal seawater equilibrium and thus on the Lebanese marine biodiversity. This study sheds the light on the current environmental condition of few coastal areas which could facilitate the management of their pollution sources. Keywords: Organic pollution, phytoplankton community, toxic algae, coastal water quality, Lebanon, Mediterranean Sea.

  19. Toxicity of sediments surrounding the Gunpowder Neck Superfund Site at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Final report, August 1992-December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, M.V.; Anthony, J.S.; Chester, N.A.; Kurnas, C.W.

    1995-07-01

    From the late 1940s through the 1960s, the standard practice for disposing of toxic chemicals at Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, was open burning. This disposal site has since been placed on the National Priority List (NPt) by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In the spring 1992, sediment samples were taken from waterways that surround that disposal area. Chemical analysis and sediment toxicity assays (Ampelisca abdita) were conducted. Toxicity comparison, with sediment leachate from an Adapted Toxicity Characteristic teaching Procedure (ATCLP), were made using Daphnia magna and a fluorescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum in MICROTOX assays. Amphipods showed a wide range of mortality in mud as well as coarser sediments indicating substrate preference is not critical to the outcome of the assay. Toxicity results from the leachates showed the sediments were not toxic to daphnia and MICROTOX assays.

  20. Toxicity of Water Samples Collected in the Vicinity of F and H Seepage Basin 1990-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, W.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bowers, B.

    1996-09-01

    Water and contaminants from the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins outcrop as shallow groundwater seeps down gradient from the basins. In 1990, 1991, 1993, 1994, and 1995, toxicity tests were performed on water collected from a number of these seeps, as well as from several locations in Fourmile Branch and several uncontaminated reference locations.

  1. Reproductive toxicity of a mixture of regulated drinking-water disinfection by-products in a multigenerational rat bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND:Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloaretic acids (HAAs) are regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs); their joint reproductive toxicity in drinking water is unknown.OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate a drinking water mixture of the four regulated THMs and five regulated HAAs ...

  2. Testing the toxicity of metals, phenol, effluents, and receiving waters by root elongation in Lactuca sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Jie; Park, Jihae; Kumar Pandey, Lalit; Choi, Soyeon; Lee, Hojun; De Saeger, Jonas; Depuydt, Stephen; Han, Taejun

    2018-03-01

    Phytotoxicity tests using higher plants are among the most simple, sensitive, and cost-effective of the methods available for ecotoxicity testing. In the present study, a hydroponic-based phytotoxicity test using seeds of Lactuca sativa was used to evaluate the water quality of receiving waters and effluents near two industrial sites (Soyo and Daejon) in Korea with respect to the toxicity of 10 metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, Hg, Ni, Zn) and phenol, and of the receiving waters and effluents themselves. First, the L. sativa hydroponic bioassay was used to determine whether the receiving water or effluents were toxic; then, the responsible toxicant was identified. The results obtained with the L. sativa bioassay ranked the EC 50 toxicities of the investigated metal ions and phenol as: Cd > Ni > Cu > Zn > Hg > phenol > As > Mn > Cr > Pb > Fe. We found that Zn was the toxicant principally responsible for toxicity in Daejeon effluents. The Daejeon field effluent had a higher Zn concentration than permitted by the effluent discharge criteria of the Ministry of Environment of Korea. Our conclusion on the importance of Zn toxicity was supported by the results of the L. sativa hydroponic assay, which showed that the concentration of Zn required to inhibit root elongation in L. sativa by 50% (EC 50 ) was higher in the Daejeon field effluent than that of pure Zn. More importantly, we proved that the L. sativa hydroponic test method can be applied not only as an alternative tool for determining whether a given waste is acceptable for discharge into public water bodies, but also as an alternative method for measuring the safety of aquatic environments using EC 20 values, with respect to the water pollutants investigated (i.e., Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Mn, Hg, Ni, Zn, and phenol). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Distinct toxicity of silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate to Daphnia magna in M4 medium and surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Chen, Xiangjie; Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui

    2017-10-17

    Toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has been studied in various culture media. However, these media notably differ from the natural aquatic system, thus the conclusions may be inapplicable for real environment condition. The toxicity and its underlying mechanism of AgNPs in surface waters warrant more investigations. This study investigated the acute toxicity, chronic toxicity, bioaccumulation, and alga-daphnia food chain transfer of citrate-coated AgNPs (C-AgNPs) and Ag+ (from AgNO3) to D. magna in a culture medium (M4) and a surface water sample. Results show that the acute toxicity in the surface water was significantly lower than that in the M4 medium and the toxicity of Ag+ was greatly higher than that of C-AgNPs. The 48h median effect concentration (EC50) of C-AgNPs to D. magna in the M4 medium and the surface water was 110±9.3μg/L and 270±26μg/L, respectively, while that of Ag+ was 1.8±0.7μg/L and 8.0±0.6μg/L, respectively. The released Ag+ contributed to but not dominated the acute toxicity of C-AgNPs. At the EC50 of C-AgNPs, the contribution of released Ag+ was 35.7% and 28.0% to the apparent nanotoxicity in the M4 medium and the surface water sample, respectively. The chronic toxicity of C-AgNPs and Ag+ was also lower in the surface water sample than in the M4 medium as indicated by the significantly higher survival of daphnia in the surface water during the 21d exposure. The daphnia took up less but depurated more Ag in the surface water than in the M4 medium, which could account for the lower toxicity in the surface water. Biological magnification of Ag through the alga-daphnia food chain was not observed. These findings will be helpful for assessing the environmental risk of AgNPs and understanding the mechanism of nanotoxcity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of water quality and genotoxic impact by toxic metals in Geophagus brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Cássio Resende; Carvalho, Stephan Malfitano; Araujo, Galber Rodrigues; Souto, Henrique Nazareth; Bonetti, Ana Maria; Morelli, Sandra; Campos Júnior, Edimar Olegário

    2016-06-01

    This study used the pearl cichlid Geophagus brasiliensis as a bioindicator to survey the health of the aquatic environment on four sites (P1, P2, P3 and P4) of the Mumbuca stream located at Monte Carmelo/MG, Brazil. The selection of different sites was made with reference to the gradient of urban activity and via physicochemical and biological evaluation of water quality and genotoxicity. The water quality index was classified as 'good' for P1 and P4, regular in P2 and 'poor' for P3. The micronuclei (MN) frequency obtained from blood analysis was in agreement with the water quality, such that the higher values of MN were detected in sites evaluated as poor. Water degradation conditions worsen according to the flow of the stream over the sites P1, P2 and P3, but for site P4, located after the Monte Carmelo Sewage Treatment Plant, improvements in the micronuclei frequency are detected. Our results showed high levels of potentially toxic metals (chromium, lead, aluminum and nickel) in specific stream sites (P2 and P3). We suggest that the micronuclei induction in G. brasiliensis could be due to the presence of these compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Contamination, bioaccumulation and toxic effects of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) in the water environment: a review paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suja, Fatihah; Pramanik, Biplob Kumar; Zain, Shahrom Md

    2009-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctane acid (PFOA) have been recognized as emerging environmental pollutants because of their ubiquitous occurrence in the environment, biota and humans. The paper focuses on the distribution, bioaccumulation and toxic effects of PFOS and PFOA in the water. From the available literature, tap and surface water samples in several countries were found to be contaminated with PFOS and PFOA. These compounds were detected globally in the tissues of fish, bird and marine mammals. Their concentrations from relatively more industrialized areas were greater than those from the less populated and remote locations. Blood samples of occupationally exposed people and the general population in various countries were found to contain PFOS and PFOA which suggested a possibility of atmospheric transport of these compounds. There is still a death of information about the environmental pathways of PFOS and PFOA. The presence of these compounds in the tap water, surface water and animal and human tissues indicates their global contamination and bioaccumulative phenomena in the ecosystems.

  6. Chemical pollution and toxicity of water samples from stream receiving leachate from controlled municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, A; Kuklińska, K; Wolska, L; Namieśnik, J

    2014-11-01

    The present study was aimed to determine the impact of municipal waste landfill on the pollution level of surface waters, and to investigate whether the choice and number of physical and chemical parameters monitored are sufficient for determining the actual risk related to bioavailability and mobility of contaminants. In 2007-2012, water samples were collected from the stream flowing through the site at two sampling locations, i.e. before the stream׳s entry to the landfill, and at the stream outlet from the landfill. The impact of leachate on the quality of stream water was observed in all samples. In 2007-2010, high values of TOC and conductivity in samples collected down the stream from the landfill were observed; the toxicity of these samples was much greater than that of samples collected up the stream from the landfill. In 2010-2012, a significant decrease of conductivity and TOC was observed, which may be related to the modernization of the landfill. Three tests were used to evaluate the toxicity of sampled water. As a novelty the application of Phytotoxkit F™ for determining water toxicity should be considered. Microtox(®) showed the lowest sensitivity of evaluating the toxicity of water samples, while Phytotoxkit F™ showed the highest. High mortality rates of Thamnocephalus platyurus in Thamnotoxkit F™ test can be caused by high conductivity, high concentration of TOC or the presence of compounds which are not accounted for in the water quality monitoring program. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Architecture of optical sensor for recognition of multiple toxic metal ions from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenashen, M A; El-Safty, S A; Elshehy, E A

    2013-09-15

    Here, we designed novel optical sensor based on the wormhole hexagonal mesoporous core/multi-shell silica nanoparticles that enabled the selective recognition and removal of these extremely toxic metals from drinking water. The surface-coating process of a mesoporous core/double-shell silica platforms by several consequence decorations using a cationic surfactant with double alkyl tails (CS-DAT) and then a synthesized dicarboxylate 1,5-diphenyl-3-thiocarbazone (III) signaling probe enabled us to create a unique hierarchical multi-shell sensor. In this design, the high loading capacity and wrapping of the CS-DAT and III organic moieties could be achieved, leading to the formation of silica core with multi-shells that formed from double-silica, CS-DAT, and III dressing layers. In this sensing system, notable changes in color and reflectance intensity of the multi-shelled sensor for Cu(2+), Co(2+), Cd(2+), and Hg(2+) ions, were observed at pH 2, 8, 9.5 and 11.5, respectively. The multi-shelled sensor is added to enable accessibility for continuous monitoring of several different toxic metal ions and efficient multi-ion sensing and removal capabilities with respect to reversibility, selectivity, and signal stability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of two low-cost adsorption media for removal of toxic metals from contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, R; Norrström, A C

    2009-01-01

    Since the operational costs of commonly used materials for adsorption of toxic metals can be substantial, natural material may be of great interest for treatment applications. Two types of natural material that have shown particular promise are seaweed and seafood waste. In this study, adsorption capacity of Brown seaweed and shrimp shells were compared with a strong acid cation exchange resin (CER). A case study site was used as a reference point and column experiments were designed in a similar manner although at different scale. Each media reduced concentrations of the target metals to levels below defined reference values. If the alternative adsorption media perform as well in the field as the laboratory, the results suggest that the media tested would completely remove the toxic metals in groundwater and runoff water. Seaweed and shrimp shells had stronger affinities for Pb and Cu than CER. However, CER was superior in affinity for Zn, the most weakly bound metal. Moreover, the results showed that Ca in the solution reduced the adsorption capacity of the other metals. This illustrates the limitations of applying the behaviour of the batch studies with single metal solutions to a multi-component system with competitive adsorption.

  9. An evaluation of the applicability of microarrays for monitoring toxic algae in Irish coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Gary R; Touzet, Nicolas; Fleming, Gerard Ta; Raine, Robin

    2013-10-01

    The applicability of microarrays to monitor harmful algae across a broad range of ecological niches and toxic species responsible for harmful algal events has been one of the key tasks in the EU Seventh Framework Programme (FP7)-funded Microarrays for the Detection of Toxic Algae project. The technique has a strong potential for improving speed and accuracy of the identification of harmful algae and their toxins to assist monitoring programmes. Water samples were collected from a number of coastal sites around Ireland, including several that are used in the Irish National Phytoplankton and Biotoxin Monitoring Programme. Ribosomal RNA was extracted from filtered field samples, labelled with a fluorescent dye, and hybridised to probes spotted in a microarray format on a glass slide. The fluorescent signal intensity of the hybridisation to >120 probes on the chip was analysed and compared with actual field counts. There was a general agreement between cell counts and microarray signal. Results are presented for field samples taken from a range of stations along the Irish coastline known for harmful algal events during the first field trial (July 2009-April 2010).

  10. The use of bacteria for detecting toxic effects of pollutants in soil and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiakor, Maximilian; Wilson, Susan; Tighe, Matthew; Pereg, Lily

    2017-04-01

    Microbial abundance and diversity are essential for sustaining soil structure and function and have been strongly linked to human health and wellbeing. Antimony (Sb) in the environment can present an ecological hazard and depending on concentration can be lethal. The toxic effects of Sb(III) and Sb(V) on the model soil bacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 were assessed in exposure-dose-response assays and water samples from an Sb contaminated creek were analyzed for bacterial mortality. In both cases, Sb(III) and Sb(V) greatly affected the survival of A. brasilense Sp7 cells. The Sb(III) had a greater toxic effect than Sb(V) at all concentrations tested. Critical concentrations of Sb also caused variant colonies to appear, indicating both acute and sub-lethal effects, which were dose and time dependent. This work demonstrates the usefulness of A. brasilense as an indicator species to detect harmful effects of an environmental pollutant of emerging concern.

  11. Alleviation of cadmium toxicity in Medicago sativa by hydrogen-rich water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weiti; Gao, Cunyi; Fang, Peng; Lin, Guoqing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2013-09-15

    Hydrogen gas (H₂) induces plant tolerance to several abiotic stresses, including salinity and paraquat exposure. However, the role of H₂ in cadmium (Cd)-induced stress amelioration is largely unknown. Here, pretreatment with hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of H₂ in the alleviation of Cd toxicity in alfalfa plants. Our results showed that the addition of HRW at 10% saturation significantly decreased contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) caused by Cd, and inhibited the appearance of Cd toxicity symptoms, including the improvement of root elongation and seedling growth. These responses were related to a significant increase in the total or isozymatic activities of representative antioxidant enzymes, or their corresponding transcripts. In vivo imaging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the detection of lipid peroxidation and the loss of plasma membrane integrity provided further evidence for the ability of HRW to improve Cd tolerance significantly, which was consistent with a significant enhancement of the ratio of reduced/oxidized (homo)glutathione ((h)GSH). Additionally, plants pretreated with HRW accumulated less amounts of Cd. Together, this study suggested that the usage of HRW could be an effective approach for Cd detoxification and could be explored in agricultural production systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Does water chemistry affect the dietary uptake and toxicity of silver nanoparticles by the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Serrano Oliver, Ana; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Stoiber, Tasha L.; Tejamaya, Mila; Römer, Isabella; Lead, Jamie R.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in many applications and likely released into the aquatic environment. There is increasing evidence that Ag is efficiently delivered to aquatic organisms from AgNPs after aqueous and dietary exposures. Accumulation of AgNPs through the diet can damage digestion and adversely affect growth. It is well recognized that aspects of water quality, such as hardness, affect the bioavailability and toxicity of waterborne Ag. However, the influence of water chemistry on the bioavailability and toxicity of dietborne AgNPs to aquatic invertebrates is largely unknown. Here we characterize for the first time the effects of water hardness and humic acids on the bioaccumulation and toxicity of AgNPs coated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) to the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis after dietary exposures. Our results indicate that bioaccumulation and toxicity of Ag from PVP-AgNPs ingested with food are not affected by water hardness and by humic acids, although both could affect interactions with the biological membrane and trigger nanoparticle transformations. Snails efficiently assimilated Ag from the PVP-AgNPs mixed with diatoms (Ag assimilation efficiencies ranged from 82 to 93%). Rate constants of Ag uptake from food were similar across the entire range of water hardness and humic acid concentrations. These results suggest that correcting regulations for water quality could be irrelevant and ineffective where dietary exposure is important.

  13. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) pilot study, ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a pilot study during the week of April 22-29, 1993, prior to initiation of CR-ERP Phase II Sampling and Analysis activities as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0 and Poplar Creek Kilometer 1.6 on April 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA.

  14. The effects of water quality and age on the acute toxicity of copper to the Florida apple snail, Pomacea paludosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogevich, E C; Hoang, T C; Rand, G M

    2008-05-01

    Copper (Cu)-containing compounds have been used in Florida as fungicides, herbicides, and soil amendments, resulting in elevated Cu in the aquatic ecosystem. The Florida apple snail (Pomacea paludosa), a key species in south Florida, may be adversely affected by Cu. Water-quality parameters, such as hardness, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), pH, and alkalinity, affect metal bioavailability and toxicity in aquatic organisms; however, it is uncertain to what extent these factors affect Cu toxicity in the Florida apple snail. The research presented here characterized the acute (96-hour) toxicity of Cu in water to the Florida apple snail at various life stages and under different water-quality parameters. Cu was more toxic to juvenile than adult apple snails. There was no difference between the 96-hour LC(50) at pH 5.5 and 6.5; however, the 96-hour LC(50 )values at pH 7.5 and 8.5 were greater than at lower pHs. The decrease in Cu(2+) above pH 7, as predicted by the MINTEQ model, accounted for the pH effect. Cu toxicity decreased as DOC increased from 0.2 to 30 mg/L. Unlike other aquatic organisms, hardness had no effect on Cu toxicity to the Florida apple snail, suggesting another mechanism of toxicity. Whole-body tissue analysis indicated that the lethal body burden of 120-day-old snails exposed to Cu for 4 days was 30 mg/kg Cu dry weight. Multiple regression analysis indicated that Cu toxicity was a function of organism age, DOC, and pH.

  15. Toxicity of silver in water and sediment to the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Daniel J; Polkinghorne, Christine N; Markee, Thomas P; Brooke, Larry T; Geiger, Dianne L; Gorsuch, Joseph W; Robillard, Kenneth A

    2006-07-01

    Hyalella azteca was exposed to Ag as AgNO3 over a 10-d period in water and two lake sediments that were selected on the basis of their differences in metal-binding properties. The median lethal concentrations (LC50s) for waterborne exposures were 5.4 and 4.9 microg/L for total and dissolved Ag, respectively. In the sediment containing a lesser quantity of total Ag-binding ligands (i.e., Bond Lake, Douglas County, WI, USA, sediment), an Ag-amended sediment toxicity test resulted in a 10-d LC50 of 0.084 g (i.e., 84,000 microg) Ag/kg dry sediment or 8.6 microg Ag/L of pore water (PW). The no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) to lowest-observed-effect concentration (LOEC) range was 0.012 to 0.031 g Ag/kg dry sediment, or less than 5.0 to 6.0 microg Ag/L of PW. In the sediment with a greater quantity of total Ag-binding ligands (i.e., West Bearskin Lake, Cook County, MN, USA, sediment), the 10-d LC50 was 2.98 g Ag/kg dry sediment, and the NOEC to LOEC range was 2.15 to 4.31 g Ag/kg dry sediment. Because "dissolved" concentrations of Ag in PW were less than 5.0 microg/L at the critical exposures in the latter test, the bioavailable and toxic form of Ag may have been a weakly associated coprecipitate or colloidal complex with hydrous iron oxides that competitively partitioned to the surface of the gills.

  16. Assessment of water quality and toxicity of polluted Rivers Fez and Sebou in the region of Fez (Morocco).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukal, B; Dominik, J; Vignati, D; Arpagaus, P; Santiago, S; Ouddane, B; Benaabidate, L

    2004-09-01

    Water quality assessment in the region of Fez based on the physicochemical and ecotoxicological investigations is presented. The results indicate that sites located close to the most urbanized and industrialized areas are severely impaired. The major water quality problems are: low dissolved oxygen (DO), high turbidity, organic matter and ammonia contents, severe chromium and copper pollution and high acute and chronic toxicity. This results in the loss of the aquatic life which is still flourishing in the Fez River upstream from the Fez Medina. Remote sites downstream show signs of physicochemical recovery. However, even there, bioassays showed significant acute and chronic toxicity. Well water in the region of Fez has moderately poor water quality with nitrate and metal enrichments. Use of water for drinking or for agriculture from the rivers or from some wells without treatment may expose the population to health risk.

  17. Degradation and aquatic toxicity of naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected waters using simulated wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Navdeep S; Franz, Eric D; Fedorak, Phillip M; MacKinnon, Michael D; Liber, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Oil sands process-affected waters (OSPWs) produced during the extraction of bitumen at the Athabasca Oil Sands (AOS) located in northeastern Alberta, Canada, are toxic to many aquatic organisms. Much of this toxicity is related to a group of dissolved organic acids known as naphthenic acids (NAs). Naphthenic acids are a natural component of bitumen and are released into process water during the separation of bitumen from the oil sand ore by a caustic hot water extraction process. Using laboratory microcosms as an analogue of a proposed constructed wetland reclamation strategy for OSPW, we evaluated the effectiveness of these microcosms in degrading NAs and reducing the aquatic toxicity of OSPW over a 52-week test period. Experimental manipulations included two sources of OSPW (one from Syncrude Canada Ltd. and one from Suncor Energy Inc.), two different hydraulic retention times (HRTs; 40 and 400 d), and increased nutrient availability (added nitrate and phosphate). Microcosms with a longer HRT (for both OSPWs) showed higher reductions in total NAs concentrations (64-74% NAs reduction, ptrout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) bioassay showed that the initial acute toxicity of Syncrude OSPW (LC50=67% v/v) was reduced (LC50>100% v/v) independent of HRT. However, EC20s from separate Microtox® bioassays were relatively unchanged when comparing the input and microcosm waters at both HRTs over the 52-week study period (p>0.05), indicating that some sub-lethal toxicity persisted under these experimental conditions. The present study demonstrated that given sufficiently long HRTs, simulated wetland microcosms containing OSPW significantly reduced total NAs concentrations and acute toxicity, but left behind a persistent component of the NAs mixture that appeared to be associated with residual chronic toxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chronic toxicity of azoxystrobin to freshwater amphipods, midges, cladocerans, and mussels in water-only exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, James L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Smalling, Kelly; Elskus, Adria; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the effects of fungicides on nontarget organisms at realistic concentrations and exposure durations is vital for determining potential impacts on aquatic ecosystems. Environmental concentrations of the fungicide azoxystrobin have been reported up to 4.6 μg/L in the United States and 30 μg/L in Europe. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the chronic toxicity of azoxystrobin in water-only exposures with an amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 42-d exposure), a midge (Chironomus dilutus; 50-d exposure), a cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia; 7-d exposure), and a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea; 28-d exposure) at environmentally relevant concentrations. The potential photo-enhanced toxicity of azoxystrobin accumulated by C. dubiaand L. siliquoidea following chronic exposures to azoxystrobin was also evaluated. The 20% effect concentrations (EC20s) based on the most sensitive endpoint were 4.2 μg/L for H. aztecareproduction, 12 μg/L for C. dubia reproduction and C. dilutus emergence, and >28 μg/L for L. siliquoidea. Hyalella azteca was more sensitive to azoxystrobin compared with the other 3 species in the chronic exposures. No photo-enhanced toxicity was observed for either C. dubia or L. siliquoidea exposed to ultraviolet light in control water following azoxystrobin tests. The results of the present study indicate chronic effects of azoxystrobin on 3 of 4 invertebrates tested at environmentally relevant concentrations. The changes noted in biomass and reproduction have the potential to alter the rate of ecological processes driven by aquatic invertebrates. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;9999:1–8. Published 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  19. Water level determination for transportation projects : mean high water manual, final report, November 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    To ensure proficient network management and safe usage of navigable waterways especially in waters that are : subject to tides, it is essential that the height of the water at various tidal phases be known. This knowledge is also : essential for prop...

  20. Toxicity of naphthenic acids to invertebrates: Extracts from oil sands process-affected water versus commercial mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Adrienne J; Frank, Richard A; Gillis, Patricia L; Parrott, Joanne L; Marentette, Julie R; Brown, Lisa R; Hooey, Tina; Vanderveen, Ruth; McInnis, Rodney; Brunswick, Pamela; Shang, Dayue; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; Hewitt, L Mark

    2017-08-01

    The toxicity of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) has been primarily attributed to polar organic constituents, including naphthenic acid fraction components (NAFCs). Our objective was to assess the toxicity of NAFCs derived from fresh and aged OSPW, as well as commercial naphthenic acid (NA) mixtures. Exposures were conducted with three aquatic species: Hyalella azteca (freshwater amphipod), Vibrio fischeri (marine bacterium, Microtox® assay), and Lampsilis cardium (freshwater mussel larvae (glochidia)). Commercial NAs were more toxic than NAFCs, with differences of up to 30-, 4-, and 120-fold for H. azteca, V. fischeri, and L. cardium, respectively, demonstrating that commercial NAs are not reliable surrogates for assessing the toxicity of NAFCs. Differences in toxicity between species were striking for both commercial NAs and NAFCs. Overall, V. fischeri was the least sensitive and H. azteca was the most sensitive organism. Responses of V. fischeri and H. azteca to NAFC exposures were consistent (< 2-fold difference) regardless of source and age of OSPW; however, effects on L. cardium ranged 17-fold between NAFCs. NAFCs derived from fresh OSPW sources were similarly or less toxic to those from aged OSPW. Our results support the need to better characterize the complex mixtures associated with bitumen-influenced waters, both chemically and toxicologically. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A rapid and sensitive p-benzoquinone-mediated bioassay for determination of heavy metal toxicity in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dengbin; Zhai, Junfeng; Yong, Daming; Dong, Shaojun

    2013-06-07

    Determining and monitoring toxicity of chemicals in water are very important for human health and country security. Electrochemical measurement of respiratory chain activity is a rapid and reliable screening of the toxicity towards microorganisms. Here, we report a rapid and sensitive toxicity bioassay using p-benzoquinone as the artificial electron mediator and Escherichia coli as the test organism. Four heavy metal ions, Cu(2+), Ag(+), Hg(2+) and Co(2+), are tested as the model toxicants, and the corresponding 50% respiration inhibition concentrations (IC50) are determined to be 0.95, 8.14, 11.69 and 42.76 mg L(-1), respectively. Based on the IC50 values, the descending order of toxicity is: Cu(2+) > Ag(+) > Hg(2+) > Co(2+). The presented bioassay not only provides a good foundation for further toxicity tests using E. coli, but also the potential for expanding the technique to utilize other bacteria with complementary toxicity responses, thereby allowing use of the bioassay in a wide range of applications.

  2. Increasing oxygen radicals and water temperature select for toxic Microcystis sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Dziallas

    Full Text Available Pronounced rises in frequency of toxic cyanobacterial blooms are recently observed worldwide, particularly when temperatures increase. Different strains of cyanobacterial species vary in their potential to produce toxins but driving forces are still obscure. Our study examines effects of hydrogen peroxide on toxic and non-toxic (including a non-toxic mutant strains of M. aeruginosa. Here we show that hydrogen peroxide diminishes chlorophyll a content and growth of cyanobacteria and that this reduction is significantly lower for toxic than for non-toxic strains. This indicates that microcystins protect from detrimental effects of oxygen radicals. Incubation of toxic and non-toxic strains of M. aeruginosa with other bacteria or without (axenic at three temperatures (20, 26 and 32°C reveals a shift toward toxic strains at higher temperatures. In parallel to increases in abundance of toxic (i.e. toxin gene possessing strains and their actual toxin expression, concentrations of microcystins rise with temperature, when amounts of radicals are expected to be enhanced. Field samples from three continents support the influence of radicals and temperature on toxic potential of M. aeruginosa. Our results imply that global warming will significantly increase toxic potential and toxicity of cyanobacterial blooms which has strong implications for socio-economical assessments of global change.

  3. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in Water Treatment and in Topical Sunscreen (Final)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in Water Treatment and in Topical Sunscreen. This report is a starting point to determine what is known and what needs to be known about selected nanomaterials as par...

  4. Oil and Natural Gas Production Facilities & Natural Gas Transmission and Storage Facilities Final Air Toxics Rules Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains a May 1999 fact sheet for the final National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Petroleum Refineries. This document provides a summary of the 1999 final rule.

  5. Sediment toxicity of a rapidly biodegrading nonionic surfactant: Comparing the equilibrium partitioning approach with measurements in pore water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droge, Steven T J; Postma, Jaap F; Hermens, Joop L M

    2008-06-01

    The equilibrium partitioning theory (EqP) assumes that the toxicity of nonionic surfactants in sediment can be predicted from water-only toxicity data as long as the effect concentrations are properly normalized for chemical activity. Therefore, in marine sediment toxicity tests with the model alcohol ethoxylate (AE), C12EO8, freely dissolved concentrations were both measured via solid-phase microextraction and predicted using sorption coefficients. In fully equilibrated test systems (including the overlying water), both methods showed that concentrations in the pore water of the spiked sediment layer causing 50% mortality (LC50) to the amphipod Corophium volutator were in the same range as LC50 values for amphipods exposed to AE in seawater only. In the sediment systems, AE concentrations in the pore water remained constant up to 15 days, while concentrations in the water overlying the sediment decreased to less than 1% of initial concentrations within 6 days due to biodegradation. In such disequilibrated test systems, C. volutator survived pore water dissolved concentrations that were above the LC50. Apparently, this burrowing amphipod is able to exploit the low chemical activity in the overlying water as a refuge from sediment exposure.

  6. [The use of the R1-fish cell culture for detection of toxicity of waste water according to the German Waste Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahne, W.; Halder, M.

    1990-01-01

    A fibroblastic cell line (R1) established in 1981 from the liver tissue of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) has been used for cytotoxicity testing of 301 waste water samples. The results obtained were compared with the results of the fish test performed parallely according to the German Waste Water Act. 54% of the samples proved to be neither fish toxic nor cytotoxic, 22% were fish and cytotoxic, 5% only fish toxic and 19% only cytotoxic. The results show that the R1-cell culture is useful to determine cytotoxicity of aquatic pollutants.

  7. A dipeptide-based superhydrogel: Removal of toxic dyes and heavy metal ions from waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Nibedita; Baral, Abhishek; Basu, Kingshuk; Roy, Subhasish; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-01-01

    A short peptide-based molecule has been found to form a strong hydrogel at phosphate buffer solution of pH 7.46. The hydrogel has been characterized thoroughly using various techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), wide angle powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and rheological analysis. It has been observed from FE-SEM images that entangled nanofiber network is responsible for gelation. Rheological investigation demonstrates that the self-assembly of this synthetic dipeptide results in the formation of mechanically strong hydrogel with storage modulus (G') around 104 Pa. This gel has been used for removing both cationic and anionic toxic organic dyes (Brilliant Blue, Congo red, Malachite Green, Rhodamine B) and metal ions (Co2+ and Ni2+ ) from waste water. Moreover, only a small amount of the gelator is required (less than 1 mg/mL) for preparation of this superhydrogel and even this hydrogel can be reused three times for dye/metal ion absorption. This signifies the importance of the hydrogel towards waste water management. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Acute copper toxicity in juvenile fat snook Centropomus parallelus (Teleostei: Centropomidae in sea water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno L. Oliveira

    Full Text Available Three experiments were designed to assess the accumulation and acute toxicity of copper (Cu in juvenile fat snook Centropomusparallelus. The first experiment was performed to determine the 96-h lethal concentration (LC50 of Cu. The second experiment was designed to assess the effects of sublethal concentrations of Cu (0.47 and 0.94 mg/L, while the third one allowed us to test the recovery capacity of fish exposed to the sublethal concentrations Cu and kept in sea water without Cu addition. The LC50value for Cu was found to be 1.88 mg/L Cu. Fish exposed to the sublethal concentrations of Cu showed a significant accumulation of Cu in gills at 96 h respect to the control ones (0.43 µg/g Cu. No significant difference was observed in the accumulation of Cu in gills between fish exposed to 0.47 mg/L (1.09 µg/g Cu and 0.94 mg/L (1.26 µg/g Cu. Exposure (24 and 96 h to the sublethal concentrations of Cu tested induced DNA damage in the erythrocytes. The results show that acute exposure to sublethal concentrations induces Cu accumulation and DNA damage in fish, these effects being recovered after 240 h in sea water without Cu addition.

  9. Investigating copper toxicity in the tropical fish cardinal tetra (Paracheirodon axelrodi) in natural Amazonian waters: Measurements, modeling, and reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crémazy, Anne, E-mail: acremazy@zoology.ubc.ca [Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Wood, Chris M. [Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Smith, D. Scott [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5 (Canada); Ferreira, Márcio S. [Laboratory of Ecophysiology and Molecular Evolution, National Institute for Amazonian Research, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Johannsson, Ora E.; Giacomin, Marina [Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Val, Adalberto L. [Laboratory of Ecophysiology and Molecular Evolution, National Institute for Amazonian Research, Manaus, AM (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Copper toxicity to a tropical fish varied greatly in different Amazonian waters. • The biotic ligand model could not capture this variability. • Possible physiological protection was offered by natural organic matter. • Care must be used in applying BLM to fish in tropical waters. - Abstract: Copper at high concentrations is an ionoregulatory toxicant in fish and its toxicity is known to be strongly modulated by the water chemistry. The toxicity of Cu to the tropical fish cardinal tetra (Paracheirodon axelrodi) was investigated in waters from two major rivers of the Amazon watershed: the Rio Negro (filtered <0.45 μm, pH 5.6, DOC = 8.4 mg L{sup −1}, Na = 33 μM, Ca = 8 μM) and the Rio Solimões (filtered <0.45 μm, pH 6.7, DOC = 2.8 mg L{sup −1}, Na = 185 μM, Ca = 340 μM), as well as in a natural “reference water” (groundwater) which was almost DOC-free (pH 6.0, DOC = 0.34 mg L{sup −1}, Na = 53 μM, Ca = 5 μM). Acute 96-h mortality, Cu bioaccumulation and net flux rates of Na{sup +}, Cl{sup −}, K{sup +} and total ammonia were determined in P. axelrodi exposed in each water. Copper speciation in each water was determined by two thermodynamic models and by potentiometry, and its toxicity was predicted based on the biotic ligand model (BLM) framework. Our results indicate that high Na{sup +} loss is the main mode of toxic action of Cu in P. axelrodi, in accordance with general theory. Cardinal tetra showed a particularly high ability to tolerate Cu and to maintain Na{sup +} balance, similar to the ability of this and other endemic Rio Negro species to tolerate low pH and ion-poor conditions. Cu toxicity was lower in Rio Negro than in the other two waters tested, and the free [Cu{sup 2+}] at the LC50, as determined by any of the three speciation methods tested, was approximately 10-fold higher. This variation could not be captured by a realistic set of BLM parameters. At least in part, this observation may be due to gill

  10. Alleviation of cadmium toxicity in Medicago sativa by hydrogen-rich water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Weiti; Gao, Cunyi; Fang, Peng [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Lin, Guoqing [Laboratory Center of Life Sciences, Co. Laboratory of Nanjing Agricultural University and Carl Zeiss Far East, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Shen, Wenbiao, E-mail: wbshenh@njau.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • HRW can alleviate Cd-induced alfalfa seedling growth inhibition and DNA laddering. • HRW alleviates Cd-induced oxidative stress by activating antioxidant enzymes. • Cd uptake in alfalfa seedling roots was decreased by HRW. • HRW can re-establish glutathione homeostasis under Cd stress. -- Abstract: Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) induces plant tolerance to several abiotic stresses, including salinity and paraquat exposure. However, the role of H{sub 2} in cadmium (Cd)-induced stress amelioration is largely unknown. Here, pretreatment with hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of H{sub 2} in the alleviation of Cd toxicity in alfalfa plants. Our results showed that the addition of HRW at 10% saturation significantly decreased contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) caused by Cd, and inhibited the appearance of Cd toxicity symptoms, including the improvement of root elongation and seedling growth. These responses were related to a significant increase in the total or isozymatic activities of representative antioxidant enzymes, or their corresponding transcripts. In vivo imaging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the detection of lipid peroxidation and the loss of plasma membrane integrity provided further evidence for the ability of HRW to improve Cd tolerance significantly, which was consistent with a significant enhancement of the ratio of reduced/oxidized (homo)glutathione ((h)GSH). Additionally, plants pretreated with HRW accumulated less amounts of Cd. Together, this study suggested that the usage of HRW could be an effective approach for Cd detoxification and could be explored in agricultural production systems.

  11. The chronic toxicity of sodium bicarbonate, a major component of coal bed natural gas produced waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Aïda M.; Harper, David D.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is the principal salt in coal bed natural gas produced water from the Powder River Structural Basin, Wyoming, USA, and concentrations of up to 3000 mg NaHCO3/L have been documented at some locations. No adequate studies have been performed to assess the chronic effects of NaHCO3 exposure. The present study was initiated to investigate the chronic toxicity and define sublethal effects at the individual organism level to explain the mechanisms of NaHCO3 toxicity. Three chronic experiments were completed with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), 1 with white suckers (Catostomus commersoni), 1 with Ceriodaphnia dubia, and 1 with a freshwater mussel, (Lampsilis siliquoidea). The data demonstrated that approximately 500 mg NaHCO3/L to 1000 mg NaHCO3/L affected all species of experimental aquatic animals in chronic exposure conditions. Freshwater mussels were the least sensitive to NaHCO3 exposure, with a 10-d inhibition concentration that affects 20% of the sample population (IC20) of 952 mg NaHCO3/L. The IC20 for C. dubia was the smallest, at 359 mg NaHCO3/L. A significant decrease in sodium–potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+ ATPase) together with the lack of growth effects suggests that Na+/K+ ATPase activity was shut down before the onset of death. Several histological anomalies, including increased incidence of necrotic cells, suggested that fish were adversely affected as a result of exposure to >450 mg NaHCO3/L.

  12. Characterization of oil and water accommodated fractions used to conduct aquatic toxicity testing in support of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill natural resource damage assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forth, Heather P; Mitchelmore, Carys L; Morris, Jeffrey M; Lipton, Joshua

    2017-06-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout resulted in the release of millions of barrels of crude oil. As part of the Trustees' Natural Resource Damage Assessment, a testing program was implemented to evaluate the toxicity of Deepwater Horizon oil and oil/dispersant mixtures to aquatic organisms from the Gulf of Mexico. Because of the variety of exposures that likely occurred, the program included 4 Deepwater Horizon oils, which encompassed a range of weathering states, and 3 different oil-in-water mixing methods, for a total of 12 unique water accommodated fractions (WAFs). The present study reports on the chemical characteristics of these 4 Deepwater Horizon oils and 12 WAFs. In addition, to better understand exposure chemistry, an examination was conducted of the effects of WAF preparation parameters-including mixing energy, starting oil composition, and oil-to-water mixing ratios-on the chemical profiles and final concentrations of these 12 WAFs. The results showed that the more weathered the starting oil, the lower the concentrations of the oil constituents in the WAF, with a shift in composition to the less soluble compounds. In addition, higher mixing energies increased the presence of insoluble oil constituents. Finally, at low to mid oil-to-water mixing ratios, the concentration and composition of the WAFs changed with changing mixing ratios; this change was not observed at higher mixing ratios (i.e., >1 g oil/L). Ultimately, the present study provides a basic characterization of the oils and WAFs used in the testing program, which helps to support interpretation of the more than 500 Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment toxicity testing results and to enable a comparison of these results with different tests and with the field. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1450-1459. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  13. Selection of a bioassay battery to assess toxicity in the affluents and effluents of three water-treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Bohórquez-Echeverry

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of water quality includes the analysis of both physical-chemical and microbiological parameters. However,none of these evaluates the biological effect that can be generated in ecosystems or humans. In order to define the most suitable organismsto evaluate the toxicity in the affluent and effluent of three drinking-water treatment plants, five acute toxicity bioassays were used,incorporating three taxonomic groups of the food chain. Materials and methods. The bioassays used were Daphnia magna and Hydraattenuata as animal models, Lactuca sativa and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata as plant models, and Photobacterium leioghnathi asbacterial model. To meet this objective, selection criteria of the organisms evaluated and cluster analysis were used to identify the mostsensitive in the affluent and effluent of each plant. Results. All organisms are potentially useful in the assessment of water quality bymeeting four essential requirements and 17 desirable requirements equivalent to 100% acceptability, except P. leioghnathi which doesnot meet two essential requirements that are the IC50 for the toxic reference and the confidence interval. The animal, plant and bacterialmodels showed different levels of sensitivity at the entrance and exit of the water treatment systems. Conclusions. H. attenuata, P.subcapitata and P. leioghnathi were the most effective organisms in detecting toxicity levels in the affluents and D. magna, P. subcapitataand P. leioghnathi in the effluents.

  14. Supercritical water oxidation of colored smoke, dye, and pyrotechnic compositions. Final report: Pilot plant conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Chan, Jennifer P.; Raber, T.N.; Macmillan, D.C.; Rice, S.F.; Tschritter, K.L.

    1993-11-01

    The existing demilitarization stockpile contains large quantities of colored smoke, spotting dye, and pyrotechnic munitions. For many years, these munitions have been stored in magazines at locations within the continental United States awaiting completion of the life-cycle. The open air burning of these munitions has been shown to produce toxic gases that are detrimental to human health and harmful to the environment. Prior efforts to incinerate these compositions have also produced toxic emissions and have been unsuccessful. Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a rapidly developing hazardous waste treatment method that can be an alternative to incineration for many types of wastes. The primary advantage SCWO affords for the treatment of this selected set of obsolete munitions is that toxic gas and particulate emissions will not occur as part of the effluent stream. Sandia is currently designing a SCWO reactor for the US Army Armament Research, Development & Engineering Center (ARDEC) to destroy colored smoke, spotting dye, and pyrotechnic munitions. This report summarizes the design status of the ARDEC reactor. Process and equipment operation parameters, process flow equations or mass balances, and utility requirements for six wastes of interest are developed in this report. Two conceptual designs are also developed with all process and instrumentation detailed.

  15. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinghao; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters. PMID:26430733

  16. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijuan Qu

    Full Text Available Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters.

  17. Water Conservation Study for Manastash Creek Water Users, Kittias County, Washington, Final Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery Watson Harza (Firm)

    2002-12-31

    Manastash Creek is tributary of the Yakima River and is located southwest and across the Yakima River from the City of Ellensburg. The creek drains mountainous terrain that ranges in elevation from 2,000 feet to over 5,500 feet and is primarily snowmelt fed, with largest flows occurring in spring and early summer. The creek flows through a narrow canyon until reaching a large, open plain that slopes gently toward the Yakima River and enters the main stem of the Yakima River at river mile 154.5. This area, formed by the alluvial fan of the Creek as it leaves the canyon, is the subject of this study. The area is presently dominated by irrigated agriculture, but development pressures are evident as Ellensburg grows and develops as an urban center. Since the mid to late nineteenth century when irrigated agriculture was established in a significant manner in the Yakima River Basin, Manastash Creek has been used to supply irrigation water for farming in the area. Adjudicated water rights dating back to 1871 for 4,465 acres adjacent to Manastash Creek allow appropriation of up to 26,273 acre-feet of creek water for agricultural irrigation and stock water. The diversion of water from Manastash Creek for irrigation has created two main problems for fisheries. They are low flows or dewatered reaches of Manastash Creek and fish passage barriers at the irrigation diversion dams. The primary goal of this study, as expressed by Yakama Nation and BPA, is to reestablish safe access in tributaries of the Yakima River by removing physical barriers and unscreened diversions and by adding instream flow where needed for fisheries. The goal expressed by irrigators who would be affected by these projects is to support sustainable and profitable agricultural use of land that currently uses Manastash Creek water for irrigation. This study provides preliminary costs and recommendations for a range of alternative projects that will partially or fully meet the goal of establishing safe access

  18. Aluminum toxicity and ecological risk assessment of dried alum residual into surface water disposalA paper submitted to the Journal of Environmental Engineering and Science

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gagnon, Graham A; Bard, Shannon M; Walsh, Margaret E; Mortula, Maruf

    2009-01-01

    This paper presented a simplified ecological risk assessment of the toxicity of alum residuals from water treatment plants to surface water that is based on the framework recommended by United States...

  19. Urgent need to reevaluate the latest World Health Organization guidelines for toxic inorganic substances in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisbie, Seth H; Mitchell, Erika J; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-08-13

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has established guidelines for drinking-water quality that cover biological and chemical hazards from both natural and anthropogenic sources. In the most recent edition of Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality (2011), the WHO withdrew, suspended, did not establish, or raised guidelines for the inorganic toxic substances manganese, molybdenum, nitrite, aluminum, boron, nickel, uranium, mercury, and selenium. In this paper, we review these changes to the WHO drinking-water guidelines, examining in detail the material presented in the WHO background documents for each of these toxic substances. In some cases, these WHO background documents use literature reviews that do not take into account scientific research published within the last 10 or more years. In addition, there are instances in which standard WHO practices for deriving guidelines are not used; for example, rounding and other mathematical errors are made. According to published meeting reports from the WHO Chemical Aspects Working Group, the WHO has a timetable for revising some of its guidelines for drinking-water quality, but for many of these toxic substances the planned changes are minimal or will be delayed for as long as 5 years. Given the limited nature of the planned WHO revisions to the inorganic toxic substances and the extended timetable for these revisions, we suggest that governments, researchers, and other stakeholders might establish independent recommendations for inorganic toxic substances and possibly other chemicals to proactively protect public health, or at the very least, revert to previous editions of the Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, which were more protective of public health.

  20. Toxicity of water-soluble fractions of biodiesel fuels derived from castor oil, palm oil, and waste cooking oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Maria Bernadete Neiva Lemos; de Araújo, Milena Maria Sampaio; Nascimento, Iracema Andrade; da Cruz, Andrea Cristina Santos; Pereira, Solange Andrade; do Nascimento, Núbia Costa

    2011-04-01

    Concerns over the sustained availability of fossil fuels and their impact on global warming and pollution have led to the search for fuels from renewable sources to address worldwide rising energy demands. Biodiesel is emerging as one of the possible solutions for the transport sector. It shows comparable engine performance to that of conventional diesel fuel, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, the toxicity of products and effluents from the biodiesel industry has not yet been sufficiently investigated. Brazil has a very high potential as a biodiesel producer, in view of its climatic conditions and vast areas for cropland, with consequent environmental risks because of possible accidental biodiesel spillages into water bodies and runoff to coastal areas. This research determined the toxicity to two marine organisms of the water-soluble fractions (WSF) of three different biodiesel fuels obtained by methanol transesterification of castor oil (CO), palm oil (PO), and waste cooking oil (WCO). Microalgae and sea urchins were used as the test organisms, respectively, for culture-growth-inhibition and early-life-stage-toxicity tests. The toxicity levels of the analyzed biodiesel WSF showed the highest toxicity for the CO, followed by WCO and the PO. Methanol was the most prominent contaminant; concentrations increased over time in WSF samples stored up to 120 d. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  1. Ceriodaphnia dubia as a Potential Bio-Indicator for Assessing Acute Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticle Toxicity in Fresh Water Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakrashi, Sunandan; Dalai, Swayamprava; Humayun, Ahmed; Chakravarty, Sujay; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2013-01-01

    Growing nanomaterials based consumer applications have raised concerns about their potential release into the aquatic ecosystems and the consequent toxicological impacts. So environmental monitoring of the nanomaterials in aqueous systems becomes imperative. The current study reveals the potential of Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia) as a bio-indicator for aluminum oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water aquatic ecosystem where it occupies an important ecological niche as a primary consumer. This study aims to investigate the aluminium oxide nanoparticle induced acute toxicity on Ceriodaphnia dubia in a freshwater system. The bioavailability of the aluminum oxide nanoparticles has been studied with respect to their aggregation behavior in the system and correlated with the toxicity endpoints. The oxidative stress generated by the particles contributed greatly toward their toxicity. The crucial role of leached aluminium ion mediated toxicity in the later phases (48 h and 72 h) in conjunction with the effects from the nano-sized particles in the initial phases (24 h) puts forth the dynamics of nanotoxicity in the test system. The internalization of nanoparticles (both gross and systemic uptake) as substantiated through the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectral (ICP-OES) analysis was another major contributor toward acute toxicity. Concluding the present study, Ceriodaphnia dubia can be a promising candidate for bio-monitoring the aluminium oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water system. PMID:24040143

  2. Ceriodaphnia dubia as a potential bio-indicator for assessing acute aluminum oxide nanoparticle toxicity in fresh water environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunandan Pakrashi

    Full Text Available Growing nanomaterials based consumer applications have raised concerns about their potential release into the aquatic ecosystems and the consequent toxicological impacts. So environmental monitoring of the nanomaterials in aqueous systems becomes imperative. The current study reveals the potential of Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia as a bio-indicator for aluminum oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water aquatic ecosystem where it occupies an important ecological niche as a primary consumer. This study aims to investigate the aluminium oxide nanoparticle induced acute toxicity on Ceriodaphnia dubia in a freshwater system. The bioavailability of the aluminum oxide nanoparticles has been studied with respect to their aggregation behavior in the system and correlated with the toxicity endpoints. The oxidative stress generated by the particles contributed greatly toward their toxicity. The crucial role of leached aluminium ion mediated toxicity in the later phases (48 h and 72 h in conjunction with the effects from the nano-sized particles in the initial phases (24 h puts forth the dynamics of nanotoxicity in the test system. The internalization of nanoparticles (both gross and systemic uptake as substantiated through the transmission electron microscopy (TEM and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectral (ICP-OES analysis was another major contributor toward acute toxicity. Concluding the present study, Ceriodaphnia dubia can be a promising candidate for bio-monitoring the aluminium oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water system.

  3. Arsenic toxicity in the water weed Wolffia arrhiza measured using Pulse Amplitude Modulation Fluorometry (PAM) measurements of photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Raymond J; Mekjinda, Nutsara

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of arsenic in plants is a serious South-east Asian environmental problem. Photosynthesis in the small aquatic angiosperm Wolffia arrhiza is very sensitive to arsenic toxicity, particularly in water below pH 7 where arsenite (As (OH)3) (AsIII) is the dominant form; at pH >7 AsO4(2-) (As(V) predominates). A blue-diode PAM (Pulse Amplitude Fluorometer) machine was used to monitor photosynthesis in Wolffia. Maximum gross photosynthesis (Pgmax) and not maximum yield (Ymax) is the most reliable indicator of arsenic toxicity. The toxicity of arsenite As(III) and arsenate (H2AsO4(2-)) As(V) vary with pH. As(V) was less toxic than As(III) at both pH 5 and pH 8 but both forms of arsenic were toxic (>90% inhibition) at below 0.1molm(-3) when incubated in arsenic for 24h. Arsenite toxicity was apparent after 1h based on Pgmax and gradually increased over 7h but there was no apparent effect on Ymax or photosynthetic efficiency (α0). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Toxicity of sediment pore water in Puget Sound (Washington, USA): a review of spatial status and temporal trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R.; Carr, R. Scott; Biedenbach, James M.; Weakland, Sandra; Partridge, Valerie; Dutch, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Data from toxicity tests of the pore water extracted from Puget Sound sediments were compiled from surveys conducted from 1997 to 2009. Tests were performed on 664 samples collected throughout all of the eight monitoring regions in the Sound, an area encompassing 2,294.1 km2. Tests were performed with the gametes of the Pacific purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, to measure percent fertilization success as an indicator of relative sediment quality. Data were evaluated to determine the incidence, degree of response, geographic patterns, spatial extent, and temporal changes in toxicity. This is the first survey of this kind and magnitude in Puget Sound. In the initial round of surveys of the eight regions, 40 of 381 samples were toxic for an incidence of 10.5 %. Stations classified as toxic represented an estimated total of 107.1 km2, equivalent to 4.7 % of the total area. Percent sea urchin fertilization ranged from >100 % of the nontoxic, negative controls to 0 %. Toxicity was most prevalent and pervasive in the industrialized harbors and lowest in the deep basins. Conditions were intermediate in deep-water passages, urban bays, and rural bays. A second round of testing in four regions and three selected urban bays was completed 5–10 years following the first round. The incidence and spatial extent of toxicity decreased in two of the regions and two of the bays and increased in the other two regions and the third bay; however, only the latter change was statistically significant. Both the incidence and spatial extent of toxicity were lower in the Sound than in most other US estuaries and marine bays.

  5. The Recreational Water Cycle: From Source Water to Tap Water to Spa and Swimming Pool Water: Effects of Disinfectants and Precursors and Implications for Exposure and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current study investigates the effect of different disinfection treatments on the disinfection by-products (DBPs) formed in finished drinking water vs. tap water vs. swimming pool water vs. spa waters. To this end, complete water pathway samples (untreated source waters ->fi...

  6. Toxicity assessment by microtox {sup registered} in sediments, pore waters and sediment saline elutriates in the Gulf of Gdansk (Baltic sea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukawska-Matuszewska, Katarzyna; Burska, Dorota; Niemirycz, Elzbieta [Institute of Oceanography, University of Gdansk (Poland)

    2009-07-15

    The toxicity of sediments in the Gulf of Gdansk is analyzed in relation to the chemical composition of interstitial and near-bottom waters, and sediment properties. The toxicity of sediments, pore waters and saline elutriates is determined by using the Microtox {sup registered} test based on changes in light production of the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The results indicate considerable toxicity in the majority of examined sediments. Since the sediment elutriates and pore waters are toxic in some cases, the total toxicity of the sediments is likely to be due to both sediment-bound and water soluble substances. The sediment toxicity is related to the percentage contribution of the fine fraction of sediments. A significant correlation between the toxicity of the sediments and the black carbon content implies anthropogenic contamination. The toxicity of the sediments is seen to increase with the increase of hydrogen sulfide concentration in pore waters. The ammonia in pore waters was found not to be responsible for the toxicity of the sediments. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Solar heating and hot water system installed at St. Louis, Missouri. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-04-01

    Information is provided on the solar heating and hot water system installed at the William Tao and Associates, Inc., office building in St. Louis, Missouri. The information consists of description, photos, maintenance and construction problems, final drawing, system requirements and manufacturer's component data. The solar system was designed to provide 50% of the hot water requirements and 45% of the space heating needs for a 900 square foot office space and drafting room. The solar facility has 252 square foot of glass tube concentrator collectors and a 1000 gallon steel storage tank buried below a concrete slab floor. Freeze protection is provided by a propylene glycol/water mixture in the collector loop. The collectors are roof mounted on a variable tilt array which is adjusted seasonally and is connected to the solar thermal storage tank by a tube-in-shell heat exchanger. Incoming city water is preheated through the solar energy thermal storage tank.

  8. Comparison of extracts and toxicities of organic compounds in drinking water concentrated by single and composite XAD resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue; Xiang, Lunhui; Wu, Fenghong; Peng, Xiaoling; Xie, Hong; Wang, Jiachun; Yang, Kedi; Lu, Wenqing; Wu, Zhigang

    2013-12-01

    We compared extracts and toxicities of organic compounds (OCs) in drinking water concentrated by composite XAD-2/8 resin (mixed with an equal volume of XAD-2 and XAD-8 resins) with those extracted by single XAD-2 (non-polar) and XAD-8 (polar) resins. Drinking water was processed from raw water of the Han River and the Yangtze River in Wuhan section, China. The extraction efficiency of all resins was controlled at 30%. The types of extracted OCs were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were assessed by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and comet assays, respectively, in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Our results showed that XAD-2/8 extracted a larger variety of OCs, compared with XAD-8 and XAD-2. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of extracted OCs were in the order of XAD-8> XAD-2/8> XAD-2 at almost all tested concentrations after 24 h treatment (P polar or non-polar OCs, which would lead to over- or under-estimation of the toxicity of drinking water. Nevertheless, composite resin extracts both polar and non-polar OCs, and could be utilized as a useful extraction technique to evaluate the level and toxicity of OCs in drinking water.

  9. Rapid effects of diverse toxic water pollutants on chlorophyll a fluorescence: variable responses among freshwater microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang Jae; Berges, John A; Young, Erica B

    2012-05-15

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence of microalgae is a compelling indicator of toxicity of dissolved water contaminants, because it is easily measured and responds rapidly. While different chl a fluorescence parameters have been examined, most studies have focused on single species and/or a narrow range of toxins. We assessed the utility of one chl a fluorescence parameter, the maximum quantum yield of PSII (F(v)/F(m)), for detecting effects of nine environmental pollutants from a range of toxin classes on 5 commonly found freshwater algal species, as well as the USEPA model species, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. F(v)/F(m) declined rapidly over glyphosate (glyphosate increased exponentially with concentration. F(v)/F(m) provides a sensitive and easily-measured parameter for rapid and cost-effective detection of effects of many dissolved toxins. Field-portable fluorometers will facilitate field testing, however distinct responses between different species may complicate net F(v)/F(m) signal from a community. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Whole-cell luminescence biosensor-based lab-on-chip integrated system for water toxicity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabner, Arthur; Belkin, Shimshon; Rozen, Rachel; Shacham, Yosi

    2006-01-01

    A novel water chemical toxin sensor has been successfully developed and evaluated as a working portable laboratory prototype. This sensor relies on a disposable plastic biochip prepared with a 4x4 micro-laboratory (μLab) chambers array of Escherichia coli reporter cells and micro-fluidic channels for liquids translocation. Each bacterial strain has been genetically modified into a bioluminescent reporter that responds to a pre-determined class of chemical agents. When challenged with a water sample containing a toxic chemical, the sensor responds with an increased bioluminescent signal from the biochip that is monitored over time. The signal is received by a motorized photomultiplier-based analyzer and interpreted by signal processing software. We have performed several levels of analysis: (i) the change in the bioluminescent signal from the sensor bacteria serves as a rapid indication for the presence of toxic chemicals in the water sample; (ii) the intensity of the change indicates the toxin concentration level; and (iii) the pattern of the responses for the different members of the bacterial panel on the biochip characterizes the biological origin of the toxin. The analyzer contains housing mechanics, electro-optics for signal acquisition, motorized readout calibration accessories, hydro-pneumatics modules for water sample translocation into biochip micro laboratories, electronics for overall control and communication with the host computer. This prototype has a demonstrated sensitivity for broad classes of water-borne toxic chemicals including naladixic acid (a model genotoxic agent), botulinum and acetylcholine esterase inhibitors. This work has initiated an investigation of a novel handheld field-deployable Water Toxicity Analysis (WTA) device.

  11. Quality control of lightweight aggregate concrete based on initial and final water absorption tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghfouri, M.; Shafigh, P.; Ibrahim, Z. Binti; Alimohammadi, V.

    2017-06-01

    Water absorption test is used to evaluate overall performance of concrete in terms of durability. The water absorption of lightweight concrete might be considerably higher than the conventional concrete due to higher rate of pores in concrete and lightweight aggregate. Oil palm shell is a bio-solid waste in palm oil industry, which could be used as lightweight aggregate in the concrete mixture. The present study aims to measure the initial and final water absorption and compressive strength of oil palm shell lightweight concrete in order to evaluation of quality control and durability performance. Total normal coarse aggregates were substituted with coarse oil palm shell in a high strength concrete mixture. The quality of concrete was then evaluated based on the compressive strength and water absorption rates. The results showed that fully substitution of normal coarse aggregates with oil palm shell significantly reduced the compressive strength. However, this concrete with the 28-day compressive strength of 40 MPa still can be used as structural concrete. The initial and final water absorption test results also showed that this concrete is not considered as a good concrete in terms of durability. Therefore, it is recommended that both compressive strength and waster absorption tests must be performed for quality control of oil palm shell concretes.

  12. Drinking water obtaining by nanofiltration from waters contaminated with glyphosate formulations: process evaluation by means of toxicity tests and studies on operating parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitúa, Hugo; Giannini, Fernando; Padilla, Antonio Perez

    2012-08-15

    Glyphosate formulations toxicity depends on all its components but commercial products only specify the active principle in their label. To treat contaminated waters and to verify if the unknown components which add toxicity have been removed represent a challenge. Nanofiltration and permeate analysis by toxicity tests with fish are an interesting alternative to evaluate the process. Permeates of solutions with concentrations five times above the lethal doses (48 mg/l) did not present toxicity, pointing that all toxic compounds were removed at the same time. Glyphosate rejection over an 80% despite its molecular weight is lower than membrane MWCO, this could be associated to a predominant Donnan exclusion mechanism, combined with dielectric exclusion due to the solute high charge density. Glyphosate concentration did not show any effect over rejection. It increased when pressure was incremented from 2.5 to 4 bar and then remained constant in a 4-10 bar range. Because of dissociation of the glyphosate and the surface charged of the membrane depend on pH value, the rejection increase from 72.5 to 92.5% when pH increase from 4 to 8.5. Studies with river water showed the same behavior with a slight decrease in rejection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Intravenous Toxicity Study of Water-soluble Ginseng Pharmacopuncture in SD Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Sang Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Radix Ginseng has been used for thousands of years to treat a wide variety of diseases. Radix ginseng has also been used as a traditional medicine for boosting Qi energy and tonifying the spleen and lungs. Traditionally, its effect could be obtained orally. Nowadays, a new method, the injection of herbal medicine, is being used. This study was performed to investigate the single-dose intravenous toxicity of water-soluble ginseng pharmacopuncture (WSGP in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. Methods: All experiments were carried out at Biotoxtech, an institute authorized to perform non-clinical studies under the regulation of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP. At the age of six weeks, 40 SD rats, 20 male rats and 20 female rats, were allocated into one of 4 groups according to the dosages they would receive. The WSGP was prepared in the Korean Pharmacopuncture Institute under the regulation of Korea-Good Manufacturing Practice (K-GMP. Dosages of WSGP were 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mL/animal for the experimental groups, and normal saline was administered to the control group. The rat's general conditions and body weights, the results of their hematological and biochemistry tests, and their necropsy and histopathological findings were investigated to identify the toxicological effect of WSGP injected intravenously. The effect was examined for 14 days after the WSGP injection. This study was performed under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee of Biotoxtech. Results: No deaths were found in this single-dose toxicity test on the intravenous injection of WSGP, and no significant changes in the rat's general conditions and body weights, the results on their hematological and biochemistry test, and their necropsy findings were observed during the test. The local area of the injection site showed minial change. The lethal dose was assumed to be over 1.0 mL/animal in both sexes. Conclusion: These results indicate that WSGP is safe at dosages up to

  14. Final Rule to Reduce Toxic Air Pollutants from Surface Coating of Plastic Parts and Products Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains an August 2004 fact sheet with information regarding the final NESHAP for Surface Coating of Plastic Parts and Products. This document provides a summary of the information for the information for this regulation.

  15. Effect of water hardness on peracetic toxicity to zebrafish, Danio rerio, embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of peracetic acid (PAA) in aquaculture has been suggested as an alternative therapeutic agent as use of previous therapeutants becomes restricted. Few data are available concerning fish toxicity by PAA or factors that affect this toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the influ...

  16. Comparing the effectiveness of chronic water column tests with the crustaceans Hyalella azteca (order: Amphipoda) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (order: Cladocera) in detecting toxicity of current-use insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deanovic, Linda A; Markiewicz, Dan; Stillway, Marie; Fong, Stephanie; Werner, Inge

    2013-03-01

    Standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency laboratory tests are used to monitor water column toxicity in U.S. surface waters. The water flea Ceriodaphnia dubia is among the most sensitive test species for detecting insecticide toxicity in freshwater environments.Its usefulness is limited, however, when water conductivity exceeds 2,000 µS/cm (approximately 1 ppt salinity) and test effectiveness is insufficient. Water column toxicity tests using the euryhaline amphipod Hyalella azteca could complement C. dubia tests; however, standard chronic protocols do not exist. The present study compares the effectiveness of two water column toxicity tests in detecting the toxicity of two organophosphate (OP) and two pyrethroid insecticides: the short-term chronic C. dubia test, which measures mortality and fecundity, and a 10-d H. azteca test, which measures mortality and growth. Sensitivity was evaluated by comparing effect data, and end point variability was evaluated by comparing minimum significant differences. Tests were performed in synthetic water and filtered ambient water to quantify the influence of water matrix on effect concentrations. The H. azteca test detected pyrethroid toxicity far more effectively, while the C. dubia test was more sensitive to OPs. Among endpoints, H. azteca mortality was most robust. The results demonstrate that the H. azteca test is preferable when conductivity of water samples is 2,000 to 10,000 µS/cm or if contaminants of concern include pyrethroid insecticides. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  17. Solar photo-Fenton treatment of microcystin-LR in aqueous environment: Transformation products and toxicity in different water matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karci, Akin; Wurtzler, Elizabeth M; de la Cruz, Armah A; Wendell, David; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2018-05-05

    Transformation products and toxicity patterns of microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a common cyanotoxin in freshwaters, during degradation by solar photo-Fenton process were studied in the absence and presence of two major water components, namely fulvic acid and alkalinity. The transformation products m/z 795, 835, 515/1030 and 532 can be formed through attack of OH on the conjugated carbon double bonds of Adda. Transformation products with m/z 1010, 966 and 513 can be generated through the attack of OH on the methoxy group of Adda. The transformation products m/z 783, 508 and 1012 can be originated from the attack of OH on the cyclic structure of MC-LR. Transformation products (m/z 522, 1028, 1012, 1046 and 514) formed after hydroxylation of the aromatic ring with OH were also identified in this study. The toxicity study revealed that fulvic acid and alkalinity strongly influence the toxicity profiles of solar photo-Fenton treated MC-LR. Fulvic acid enhanced the detoxification whereas low level total alkalinity (1.8 mg L -1 CaCO 3 ) inhibited the detoxification of MC-LR by solar photo-Fenton process as assessed by protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) inhibition assay. This work provides insights on the utility of solar photo-Fenton destruction of MC-LR in water based on transformation products and toxicity data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute and chronic toxicity studies on partially purified hypoglycemic preparation from water extract of bark ofFicus bengalensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Shukla, R; Prabhu, K M; Aggrawal, S; Rusia, U; Murthy, P S

    2002-01-01

    Acute and chronic toxicity studies were conducted to assess toxicity of a partially purified preparation from the water extract of the bark ofFicus bengalensis, which was demonstrated in our earlier studies to have significant hypoglycemic and hypocholesteroiemic effect on alloxan induced, mild and severe diabetes in rabbits. LD(50) of this preparation was found to be ∼1 gm/kg in rats when given orally. For chronic toxicity studies 3 doses of aqueous preparation were given to 3 groups of rats. First group received 5 times ED(50) (50 mg/kg), second group 10 times ED(50) (100 mg/kg) and the third group 15 times ED(50) (150 mg/kg) for 3 months. Fourth group which served as control was given water. After three months, blood was collected for studying biochemical and hematological parameters. Blood glucose, serum cholesterol, liver and kidney function tests, haemoglobin, total and differential leukocyte count were determined. Animals were sacrificed and histopathological examination of liver, heart and kidneys was carried out. Results of the study showed that partially purified preparation fromFicus bengalensis is not toxic by all the above mentioned parameters.

  19. Solar process water heat for the Iris Images Custom Color Photo Lab. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    This is the final technical report of the solar facility locted at Iris Images Custom Photo Laboratory in Mill Valley, California. It was designed to provide 59 percent of the hot water requirements for developing photographic film and domestic hot water use. The design load is to provide 6 gallons of hot water per minute for 8 hours per working day at 100/sup 0/F. It has 640 square feet of flat plate collectors and 360 gallons of hot water storage. The auxiliary back up system is a conventional gas-fired water heater. Freeze protection in this mild climate was originally provided by closed-loop circulation of hot water from the storage tank. Later this was changed to a drain-down system due to a freeze when electrical power failed. This system has been relatively successful with little or no scheduled maintenance. The site and building description, subsystem description, as-built drawings, cost breakdown and analysis, performance analysis, lessons learned, and the operation and maintenance manual are included.

  20. Toxicity detection in water containing heavy metal ions with a self-powered microbial fuel cell-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dengbin; Bai, Lu; Zhai, Junfeng; Wang, Yizhe; Dong, Shaojun

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a self-powered microbial fuel cell (MFC)-based biosensor was developed for detecting toxicity in water containing heavy metal ions. Experimental conditions containing concentration of potassium ferricyanide, load resistor and glucose concentration were optimized. Six heavy metal ions (2mg/L, Cu2+, Hg2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Pb2+ and Cr3+) were tested by this biosensor and the inhibition ratios obtained were 12.56%, 13.99%, 8.81%, 9.29%, 5.59% and 1.95%, respectively. The inhibition ratios of 28.13% was also obtained for detecting the laboratory wastewater containing several heavy metal ions. The experimental results exhibited the feasibility and potential of the self-powered biosensor in detecting toxicities in water containing heavy metal ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evalution of toxicity of abcisic acid and gibberellic acid in rats: 50 days drinking water study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Ismail; Tuluce, Yasin; Isik, Ismail

    2007-04-01

    In the present study, the influence of subchronic effects of two plant growth regulators (PGRs) [Abcisic acid (ABA) and Gibberellic acid (GA3)] on antioxidant defense systems [reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT)] and lipid peroxidation level (malondialdehyde = MDA) in various tissues of the rat were investigated during treatment as a drinking water model. 75 ppm of ABA and GA3 in drinking water were continuously administered orally to rats (Sprague-Dawley albino) ad libitum for 50 days. The PGRs treatments caused different effects on the antioxidant defense systems and MDA content of dosed rats compared to controls. The lipid peroxidation end product MDA significantly increased in the lungs, heart and kidney of rats treated with GA3 without significant change in the spleen. ABA caused also a significant increase in MDA content in the spleen, lungs, heart and kidney. The GSH levels were significantly depleted in the spleen, lungs and stomach of rats treated with ABA without any change in the tissues of rats treated with GA3 except the kidney where it increased. Antioxidant enzyme activities such as SOD significantly increased in the lungs and stomach and decreased in the spleen and heart tissues of rats treated with GA3. Meanwhile, SOD significantly decreased in the spleen, heart and kidney and increased in the lungs of rats treated with ABA. While CAT activity significantly decreased in the lungs of rats treated with GA3, a significant increase occurred in the heart of rats treated with both PGRs. On the other hand, the ancillary enzyme GR activity in the tissues were either significantly depleted or not changed with PGRs treatment. The drug metabolizing enzyme GST activity significantly decreased in the lungs of rats treated with ABA but increased in the stomach of rats treated with both PGRs. As a conclusion, the rats resisted oxidative stress via the antioxidant

  2. Detection of microcystins in Pamvotis lake water and assessment of cyanobacterial bloom toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Theodoti; Armeni, Euthimia; Stalikas, Constantine D; Kagalou, Ifigeneia; Leonardos, Ioannis D

    2012-05-01

    Lake Pamvotis is a shallow, eutrophic Mediterranean lake with ecological significance. This paper deals with the evaluation of cyanobacterial toxicity in Lake Pamvotis. ELISA and HPLC revealed the presence of significant amounts of MCYST-LR. Danio rerio bioassay confirmed the toxic nature of the bloom. Cyanobacterial extracts had adverse toxic effects on development of D. rerio. Also, it was shown that cyanobacterial extracts containing environmentally detected concentrations of MCYST can cause reduced survival rate of fish species. The results clearly indicate that cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Pamvotis may be regarded as human and fish health hazard. Continuous monitoring of the lake is suggested, in order to prevent future possible intoxications.

  3. Concentrations, diffusive fluxes and toxicity of heavy metals in pore water of the Fuyang River, Haihe Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenzhong; Duan, Shenghui; Shan, Baoqing; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Wenqiang; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-05-01

    While the concentrations of heavy metals in pore water provide important information about their bioavailability, to date few studies have focused on this topic. In this study, pore water in river sediments collected from nine sampling sites (S1-S9) was examined to determine the concentrations, fluxes, and toxicity of heavy metals in the Fuyang River. The results showed that the average concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cu, As, Zn, and Pb in pore water were 17.06, 15.97, 20.93, 19.08, 43.72, and 0.56μgL(-1), respectively; these concentrations varied as the pore water depth increased. The diffusive fluxes of Cr, Ni, Cu, As, Zn, and Pb were in the following range: (-0.37) to 3.17, (-1.37) to 2.63, (-4.61) to 3.44, 0.17-6.02, (-180.26) to 7.51, and (-0.92) to (-0.29)μg(m(2)day)(-1), respectively. There was a potential risk of toxicity from Cu to aquatic organisms, as indicated by a value of the Interstitial Water Criteria Toxic Units that exceeded 1.0. Values of the Nemeraw Index were 2.06, 0.48, 0.11, 0.20, 1.11, 1.03, 0.99, 0.88, and 0.89 from S1 to S9, respectively. Only S1 was moderately polluted by heavy metals in pore water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Coastal upwelling linked to toxic Pseudo-nitzschia australis blooms in Los Angeles coastal waters, 2005-2007

    KAUST Repository

    Schnetzer, Astrid

    2013-06-10

    Harmful algal blooms dominated by the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia spp. have become a perennial but variable event within surface waters near the greater Los Angeles area. Toxic blooms during spring seasons from 2005 to 2007 varied strongly in their overall toxicity and duration. Differences in bloom dynamics were linked to differences in storm-induced river discharge following episodic rain events and coastal upwelling, both major coastal processes that led to the injection of nutrients into coastal surface waters. Heavy river runoff during early 2005, a record-rainfall year, favored a phytoplankton community mainly comprised of algal taxa other than Pseudo-nitzschia. The spring bloom during 2005 was associated with low domoic acid surface concentrations and minor contributions of (mainly) P. delicatissima to the diatom assemblage. In contrast, highly toxic P. australis-dominated blooms during spring seasons of 2006 and 2007 were linked to strong upwelling events. River discharge quotas in 2006 and 2007, in contrast to 2005, fell well below annual averages for the region. Surface toxin levels were linked to colder, more saline (i.e. upwelled) water over the 3-year study, but no such consistent relationship between domoic acid levels and other physiochemical parameters, such as macronutrient concentrations or nutrient ratios, was observed. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  5. Water quality criteria for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT): Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryon, M.G.

    1987-08-01

    Studies of the acute toxicity of TNT to aquatic organisms indicate that LC/sub 50/ values range from 5.2 to 27.0 mg/L for invertebrates in 48-hr static tests, and from 2.0 to 3.7 mg/L for fish in 96-hr flow-through tests. TNT is absorbed by both humans and test animals through the skin, by ingestion, and by inhalation. Following oral absorption, /sup 14/C-TNT is found at highest levels in the GI tract, liver, kidneys, and blood. The liver is the site for metabolic and detoxification activity. The primary effects of occupational exposure to TNT are jaundice with toxic hepatic and/or aplastic anemia that can be fetal. Significant effects on the hematological system occurred at mean exposure levels of 0.2 to 7.5 mg/m/sup 3/. Evaluations of oral TNT toxicity were reported for 90-day exposures of dogs, mice, and rats. The effects for all three species were similar and included depressed weight gain, mild to moderate anemia, enlarged livers and spleens, some testicular atrophy, and hemosiderosis of the spleen. Carcinogenicity data were limited to a 2-yr study of rats which indicated hyperplasia and carcinoma of the urinary bladder in females at the highest dose (50 mg/kg/day). Standards for TNT occupational exposures have been recommended by OSHA (TLV of 1.5 mg/m/sup 3/), US Army (0.5 mg/m/sup 3/), and ACGIH (TLV of 0.5 mg/m/sup 3/ and STEL of 0.3 mg/m/sup 3/). Drinking water limits of 0.03 to 0.05 mg/L were recommended by the US Army and Navy. Available data for calculating water quality criteria were insufficient to meet all the USEPA guideline requirements. However, a reasonable estimate of the criterion maximum concentration is 557 ..mu..g/L. 54 refs., 3 figs., 31 tabs.

  6. Fact Sheets: Final Rule to Reduce Toxic Air Pollutants from Printing, Coating, and Dyeing of Fabrics and Other Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains the February 2003 and the October 2004 final rule fact sheet that contain information on the NESHAP for Printing, Coating, and Dyeing of Fabrics and Other Textiles. These documents provide a summary of the information for this NESHAP.

  7. The Acute Toxicity of Major Ion Salts to Ceriodaphnia dubia: I. Influence of background water chemistry.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset provides concentration-response data and associated general chemistry conditions for 26 experiments consisting of 149 tests regarding the acute toxicity...

  8. 75 FR 43160 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Final Agency Action on One Arkansas Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    .../region6/water/npdes/tmdl/index.htm . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Diane Smith at (214) 665-2145. EPA... Final TMDL may be found at http://www.epa.gov/region6/water/npdes/tmdl/index.htm . Dated: July 15, 2010. Claudia V. Hosch, Acting Director, Water Quality Protection Division, EPA Region 6. BILLING CODE 6560-50-P ...

  9. Control of aliphatic halogenated DBP precursors with multiple drinking water treatment processes: Formation potential and integrated toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimeng; Chu, Wenhai; Yao, Dechang; Yin, Daqiang

    2017-08-01

    The comprehensive control efficiency for the formation potentials (FPs) of a range of regulated and unregulated halogenated disinfection by-products (DBPs) (including carbonaceous DBPs (C-DBPs), nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs), and iodinated DBPs (I-DBPs)) with the multiple drinking water treatment processes, including pre-ozonation, conventional treatment (coagulation-sedimentation, pre-sand filtration), ozone-biological activated carbon (O 3 -BAC) advanced treatment, and post-sand filtration, was investigated. The potential toxic risks of DBPs by combing their FPs and toxicity values were also evaluated. The results showed that the multiple drinking water treatment processes had superior performance in removing organic/inorganic precursors and reducing the formation of a range of halogenated DBPs. Therein, ozonation significantly removed bromide and iodide, and thus reduced the formation of brominated and iodinated DBPs. The removal of organic carbon and nitrogen precursors by the conventional treatment processes was substantially improved by O 3 -BAC advanced treatment, and thus prevented the formation of chlorinated C-DBPs and N-DBPs. However, BAC filtration leads to the increased formation of brominated C-DBPs and N-DBPs due to the increase of bromide/DOC and bromide/DON. After the whole multiple treatment processes, the rank order for integrated toxic risk values caused by these halogenated DBPs was haloacetonitriles (HANs)≫haloacetamides (HAMs)>haloacetic acids (HAAs)>trihalomethanes (THMs)>halonitromethanes (HNMs)≫I-DBPs (I-HAMs and I-THMs). I-DBPs failed to cause high integrated toxic risk because of their very low FPs. The significant higher integrated toxic risk value caused by HANs than other halogenated DBPs cannot be ignored. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Salinity-dependent toxicity of water-dispersible, single-walled carbon nanotubes to Japanese medaka embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Chisato; Nakahara, Kousuke; Shimizu, Kaori; Kowase, Shinsuke; Nagasaka, Seiji; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Kashiwada, Shosaku

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effects of salinity on the behavior and toxicity of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), which are chemical modified nanotube to increase dispersibility, medaka embryos were exposed to non-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (N-SWCNTs), water-dispersible, cationic, plastic-polymer-coated, single-walled carbon nanotubes (W-SWCNTs), or hydrophobic polyethylene glycol-functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (PEG-SWCNTs) at different salinities, from freshwater to seawater. As reference nanomaterials, we tested dispersible chitin nanofiber (CNF), chitosan-chitin nanofiber (CCNF) and chitin nanocrystal (CNC, i.e. shortened CNF). Under freshwater conditions, with exposure to 10 mg l -1  W-SWCNTs, the yolk sacks of 57.8% of embryos shrank, and the remaining embryos had a reduced heart rate, eye diameter and hatching rate. Larvae had severe defects of the spinal cord, membranous fin and tail formation. These toxic effects increased with increasing salinity. Survival rates declined with increasing salinity and reached 0.0% in seawater. In scanning electron microscope images, W-SWCNTs, CNF, CCNF and CNC were adsorbed densely over the egg chorion surface; however, because of chitin's biologically harmless properties, only W-SWCNTs had toxic effects on the medaka eggs. No toxicity was observed from N-SWCNT and PEG-SWCNT exposure. We demonstrated that water dispersibility, surface chemistry, biomedical properties and salinity were important factors in assessing the aquatic toxicity of nanomaterials. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The reproductive toxicity of organic compounds extracted from drinking water sources on Sprague Dawley rats: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiang; Hu, Guanjiu; Wang, Xiaoyi; Li, Dongmei; Yu, Hongxia; Han, Xiaodong

    2010-06-01

    The safety of drinking water always causes worldwide concern. Water pollution increases with urban development and industrialization in developing countries. During recent decades, increasing numbers of environmental organic compounds have been found in aquatic environments. These organic compounds are capable of bioaccumulating to much higher concentrations in food webs and cause health effects on human beings. Reproductive impairment is one of the commonest consequences of environmental pollution. Our goal was to investigate the reproductive toxicity of organic compounds extracted from surface water samples collected in drinking water sources. This study focused on the surface water in lower Yangtze River and Taihu Lake, which act as drinking water sources of Jiangsu province, one of the most rapidly developing regions in China. We used solid-phase extraction (SPE) to condense organic compounds by 286 times from natural surface water samples and established in vitro system to evaluate their effects on reproductive system. We found that organic compounds destroyed the plasma membrane integrity of Sertoli cells and Spermatogenic cells to a certain degree and significantly depressed viability of Sertoli cells and Spermatogenic cells as well. Accordingly, the proportion of apoptotic Sertoli cells and dead Spermatogenic cells enhanced markedly. Although viability of organic-compound-treated Leydig cells did not come down remarkably, testosterone production of Leydig cells decreased evidently. These results suggest that accumulated comprehensive effects of organic compounds in surface water of drinking water sources may induce spermatogenesis malfunction and reduction of testosterone production in the long term. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Assessment of diazinon toxicity in sediment and water of constructed wetlands using deployed Corbicula fluminea and laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouldin, J L; Farris, J L; Moore, M T; Smith, S; Cooper, C M

    2007-08-01

    Constructed wetlands for mitigation of nonpoint agricultural runoff have been assessed for their ability to decrease potential toxicity from associated contaminants. After a simulated runoff event, constructed wetlands positioned in series were used to measure the effects of the organophosphate insecticide diazinon. Water, sediment, and plant samples from five sites were analyzed for diazinon concentrations from 0.5 hours to 26 days; peak concentrations were measured in sediment after 0.5 hours (268.7 microg/kg) and in water and plant tissue after 3 hours (121.71 microg/L and 300.7 microg/kg, respectively). Cholinesterase activity and changes in shell growth were measured from Corbicula fluminea deployed at corresponding sites. Water collected after 9 hours from all wetland sites contained diazinon concentrations sufficient to cause toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia, but not to Pimephales promelas. C. dubia survival was decreased in water sampled through 7 days from the site nearest runoff introduction, whereas C. fluminea deployed at this same site experienced 100% mortality after 26 days. Clams from lower sites survived wetland conditions, but growth and ChE activity were significantly decreased lower than that of clams from a control site. C. dubia exposed to water from these sites continued to have decreased survival throughout the 26-day sampling. Sediment sampled from 48 hours through 14 days at the lowest wetland site decreased the laboratory survival of Chironomus dilutus, and sediment from upper sites elicited an effect only on day 26. Although wetland concentrations of aqueous diazinon were decreased lower than toxic thresholds after 26 days, decreased ChE activity in deployed clams provided evidence of residual diazinon effects to deployed organisms.

  13. WEXA: exergy analysis for increasing the efficiency of air/water heat pumps - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasser, L.; Wellig, B.; Hilfiker, K.

    2008-04-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a study at the made by the Engineering and Architecture department at the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts. The subject of the WEXA study (Waermepumpen-Exergie-Analyse - heat pump exergy analysis) is the analysis of the operation of air/water heat-pumps using exergy analysis methods. The basic thermodynamics of heating systems using heat-pumps is discussed. The exergy analyses and exergy balances for the various components and processes of an air/water heat-pump are presented and discussed. Comparisons are presented for heat-pumps with on/off and continuous control systems for their compressors and fans. The paper is concluded with a collection of appendices on the subject.

  14. Distribution, diffusive fluxes, and toxicity of heavy metals and PAHs in pore water profiles from the northern bays of Taihu Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Pei; Zhang, Hong; Shan, Baoqing; Zhang, Bozheng

    2016-11-01

    Pore water plays a more significant role than do sediments in pollutant cycling dynamics. Also, concentrations of pollutants in pore water provide important information about their bioavailability or eco-toxicity; however, very few studies have focused on this topic. In this study, four duplicate sediment cores from three typical northern bays as well as the central part of Taihu Lake were collected to investigate the distribution, diffusive fluxes, and toxicity of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in pore water profiles, which will be good in understanding the mobility and toxicity of these toxic pollutants and achieving better environmental management. The diffusive fluxes of heavy metals across the sediment-water interface was estimated through Fick's First Law, and the toxicity of heavy metals and PAHs in pore water was assessed by applying a water quality index (interstitial water toxicity criteria unit, IWCTU) and a hazard index (HI), respectively. The average concentrations of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in surface pore water were 18.8, 23.4, 12.0, 13.5, and 42.5 μg L-1, respectively. Also, concentrations of the selected heavy metals in both overlying water and pore water from Taihu Lake were all lower than the standard values of the environmental quality standards for surface water. The concentrations as the pore water depth increased, and the highest detected concentrations of heavy metals were recorded between 3 and 5 cm below the sediment surface. The average diffusive fluxes of these metals were 27.3, 24.8, 7.03, 7.81, and -3.32 μg (m2 day)-1, respectively, indicating export from sediment into overlying water, with the exception of Zn. There was a potential risk of toxicity, mainly from Pb and Cu, indicating that heavy metals in pore water had slight to moderate impact on sediment-dwelling organisms by values of the IWCTU and the Nemeraw index. The total PAH concentrations in pore water were higher than those in overlying water

  15. A Portable Cell Maintenance System for Rapid Toxicity Monitoring Final Report CRADA No. TC-02081-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhou, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    The Phase I STTR research project was targeted at meeting the objectives and requirements stated in STTR solicitation A04-T028 for a Portable Cell Maintenance System for Rapid Toxicity Monitoring. In accordance with the requirements for STTR programs, collaboration was formed between a small business, Kionix, Inc., and The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The collaboration included CytoDiscovery, Inc. (CDI) which, in collaboration with Kionix, provided access to membrane chip technology and provided program support and coordination. The objective of the overall program (excerpted from the original solicitation) was: “To develop a small, portable cell maintenance system for the transport, storage, and monitoring of viable vertebrate cells and tissues.” The goal of the Phase I project was to demonstrate the feasibility of achieving the program objectives utilizing a system comprised of a small-size, microfluidic chip-based cell maintenance cartridge (CMC) and a portable cell maintenance system (CMS) capable of housing a minimum of four CMCs. The system was designed to be capable of optimally maintaining multiple vertebrate cell types while supporting a wide variety of cellular assays.

  16. New Mexico cloud super cooled liquid water survey final report 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beavis, Nick; Roskovensky, John K.; Ivey, Mark D.

    2010-02-01

    Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories are partners in an effort to survey the super-cooled liquid water in clouds over the state of New Mexico in a project sponsored by the New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program. This report summarizes the scientific work performed at Sandia National Laboratories during the 2009. In this second year of the project a practical methodology for estimating cloud super-cooled liquid water was created. This was accomplished through the analysis of certain MODIS sensor satellite derived cloud products and vetted parameterizations techniques. A software code was developed to analyze multiple cases automatically. The eighty-one storm events identified in the previous year effort from 2006-2007 were again the focus. Six derived MODIS products were obtained first through careful MODIS image evaluation. Both cloud and clear-sky properties from this dataset were determined over New Mexico. Sensitivity studies were performed that identified the parameters which most influenced the estimation of cloud super-cooled liquid water. Limited validation was undertaken to ensure the soundness of the cloud super-cooled estimates. Finally, a path forward was formulized to insure the successful completion of the initial scientific goals which include analyzing different of annual datasets, validation of the developed algorithm, and the creation of a user-friendly and interactive tool for estimating cloud super-cooled liquid water.

  17. Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seright, R.S.; Liang, J.T.; Schrader, R.; Hagstrom, J. II; Liu, J.; Wavrik, K.

    1998-10-01

    In the United States, more than 20 billion barrels of salt water are produced each year during oilfield operations. A tremendous economic incentive exists to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without significantly sacrificing hydrocarbon production. This three-year research project had three objectives. The first objective was to identify chemical blocking agents that will (a) during placement, flow readily through fractures without penetrating significantly into porous rock and with screening out or developing excessive pressure gradients and (b) at a predictable and controllable time, become immobile and resistant breakdown upon exposure to moderate to high pressure gradients. The second objective was to identify schemes that optimize placement of the above blocking agents. The third objective was to explain why gels and other chemical blocking agents reduce permeability to one phase (e.g., water) more than that to another phase (e.g., oil or gas). The authors also wanted to identify conditions that maximize this phenomenon. This project consisted of three tasks, each of which addressed one of the above objectives. This report describes work performed during the third and final period of the project. During this three-year project, they: (1) Developed a procedure and software for sizing gelant treatments in hydraulically fractured production wells; (2) Developed a method (based on interwell tracer results) to determine the potential for applying gel treatments in naturally fractured reservoirs; (3) Characterized gel properties during extrusion through fractures; (4) Developed a method to predict gel placement in naturally fractured reservoirs; (5) Made progress in elucidating the mechanism for why some gels can reduce permeability to water more than that to oil; (6) Demonstrated the limitations of using water/oil ratio diagnostic plots to distinguish between channeling and coning; and (7) Proposed a philosophy for diagnosing and attacking water

  18. A Bayesian approach to probabilistic ecological risk assessment: risk comparison of nine toxic substances in Tokyo surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takehiko I; Kashiwagi, Nobuhisa

    2011-03-01

    Quantitative risk comparison of toxic substances is necessary to decide which substances should be prioritized to achieve effective risk management. This study compared the ecological risk among nine major toxic substances (ammonia, bisphenol-A, chloroform, copper, hexavalent chromium, lead, manganese, nickel, and zinc) in Tokyo surface waters by adopting an integrated risk analysis procedure using Bayesian statistics. Species sensitivity distributions of these substances were derived by using four Bayesian models. Environmental concentration distributions were derived by a hierarchical Bayesian model that explicitly considered the differences between within-site and between-site variations in environmental concentrations. Medians and confidence intervals of the expected potentially affected fraction (EPAF) of species were then computed by the Monte Carlo method. The estimated EPAF values suggested that risk from nickel was highest and risk from zinc and ammonia were also high relative to other substances. The risk from copper was highest if bioavailability was not considered, although toxicity correction by a biotic ligand model greatly reduced the estimated risk. The risk from manganese was highest if a conservative risk index estimate (90% upper EPAF confidence limit) was selected. It is suggested that zinc is not a predominant risk factor in Tokyo surface waters and strategic efforts are required to reduce the total ecological risk from multiple substances. The presented risk analysis procedure using EPAF and Bayesian statistics is expected to advance methodologies and practices in quantitative ecological risk comparison.

  19. A Potentiometric Flow Biosensor Based on Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria for the Detection of Toxicity in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianyu Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A flow biosensor for the detection of toxicity in water using the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AOB Nitrosomonas europaea as a bioreceptor and a polymeric membrane ammonium-selective electrode as a transducer is described. The system is based on the inhibition effects of toxicants on the activity of AOB, which can be evaluated by measuring the ammonium consumption rates with the ammonium-selective membrane electrode. The AOB cells are immobilized on polyethersulfone membranes packed in a holder, while the membrane electrode is placed downstream in the flow cell. Two specific inhibitors of the ammonia oxidation‒allylthiourea and thioacetamide‒have been tested. The IC50 values defined as the concentration of an inhibitor causing a 50% reduction in the ammonia oxidation activity have been measured as 0.17 μM and 0.46 μM for allylthiourea and thioacetamide, respectively. The proposed sensor offers advantages of simplicity, speed and high sensitivity for measuring toxicity in water.

  20. Are luminescent bacteria suitable for online detection and monitoring of toxic compounds in drinking water and its sources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Marjolijn; Belkin, Shimshon; Brouwer, Bram; van Wezel, Annemarie P; Heringa, Minne B

    2011-05-01

    Biosensors based on luminescent bacteria may be valuable tools to monitor the chemical quality and safety of surface and drinking water. In this review, an overview is presented of the recombinant strains available that harbour the bacterial luciferase genes luxCDABE, and which may be used in an online biosensor for water quality monitoring. Many bacterial strains have been described for the detection of a broad range of toxicity parameters, including DNA damage, protein damage, membrane damage, oxidative stress, organic pollutants, and heavy metals. Most lux strains have sensitivities with detection limits ranging from milligrams per litre to micrograms per litre, usually with higher sensitivities in compound-specific strains. Although the sensitivity of lux strains can be enhanced by various molecular manipulations, most reported detection thresholds are still too high to detect levels of individual contaminants as they occur nowadays in European drinking waters. However, lux strains sensing specific toxic effects have the advantage of being able to respond to mixtures of contaminants inducing the same effect, and thus could be used as a sensor for the sum effect, including the effect of compounds that are as yet not identified by chemical analysis. An evaluation of the suitability of lux strains for monitoring surface and drinking water is therefore provided.

  1. Toxic cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins in European waters – recent progress achieved through the CYANOCOST Action and challenges for further research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Meriluoto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to summarise the outcomes of some recent European research concerning toxic cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins, with an emphasis on developments within the framework of the CYANOCOST Action (COST Action ES1105, Cyanobacterial Blooms and Toxins in Water Resources: Occurrence, Impacts and Management. State of the art research and management capabilities in Europe on cyanobacteria have benefitted from input from the pure and applied life sciences, the human and animal health sectors, water engineers, economists and planners. Many of these professional groups have been brought together and they interacted favourably within the framework of CYANOCOST. Highlights of the Action include phycological and ecological studies, development of advanced techniques for cyanotoxin analysis, elucidation of cyanotoxin modes of action, management techniques to reduce cyanobacterial mass development, and research on methods and practices for cyanotoxin removal during drinking water treatment. The CYANOCOST Action has had an active outreach policy throughout its lifetime, resulting in e.g. three handbooks, two special issues in scientific journals and activities in the social media. The many contact channels to end-users, including environmental and drinking water supply authorities, health professionals and the general public are described in this review. Furthermore, the authors have identified a number of gaps in knowledge. Proposed  directions for  future research in the field of toxic cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins are also discussed.

  2. Human Health Risk Assessment of Artisanal Miners Exposed to Toxic Chemicals in Water and Sediments in the Prestea Huni Valley District of Ghana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Obiri, Samuel; Yeboah, Philip O; Osae, Shiloh; Adu-Kumi, Sam; Cobbina, Samuel J; Armah, Frederick A; Ason, Benjamin; Antwi, Edward; Quansah, Reginald

    2016-01-01

    A human health risk assessment of artisanal miners exposed to toxic metals in water bodies and sediments in the PresteaHuni Valley District of Ghana was carried out in this study, in line with US EPA...

  3. Final report of the SIM.QM-S7 supplementary comparison, trace metals in drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Nadeau, Kenny; Gedara Pihillagawa, Indu; Meija, Juris; Grinberg, Patricia; Mester, Zoltan; Valle Moya, Edith; Solís González, Faviola Alejandra; del Rocio Arvizu Torres, María; Yañez Muñoz, Oscar; Velina Lara-Manzano, Judith; Mazzitello, Gisela; Prina, Pedro; Acosta, Osvaldo; Napoli, Romina; Pérez Zambra, Ramiro; Ferreira, Elizabeth; Dobrovolskiy, Vladimir; Aprelev, Aleksei; Stakheev, Aleksei; Frolov, Dmitriy; Gusev, Leonid; Ivanova, Veronika; Näykki, Teemu; Sara-Aho, Timo; Venegas Padilla, Jimmy; Acuña Cubillo, Carlos; Bremmer, Dwyte; Freemantle, Ruel; Taebunpakul, Sutthinun; Tangpaisarnkul, Nongluck; Rodruangthum, Patumporn; Kaewkhomdee, Nattikarn; Thiengmanee, Usana; Tangjit, Tararat; Buzoianu, Mirella; Alejandro Ahumada Forigua, Diego; Abella Gamba, Johanna Paola; Alfredo Chavarro Medina, Luis; Sobina, Egor; Tabatchikova, Tatyana; Alexopoulos, Charalambos; Kakoulides, Elias; Delgado, Mabel; Flores, Liliana; Knox, Saira; Siewlal, Kester; Maharaj, Avinash

    2018-01-01

    SIM.QM-S7 was performed to assess the analytical capabilities of National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and Designated Institutes (DIs) of SIM members (or other regions) for the accurate determination of trace metals in drinking water. The study was proposed by the coordinating laboratories National Research Council Canada (NRC) and Centro Nacional de Metrologia (CENAM) as an activity of Inorganic Analysis Working Group (IAWG) of Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance - Metrology in Chemistry and Biology (CCQM). Participants included 16 NMIs/DIs from 15 countries. No measurement method was prescribed by the coordinating laboratories. Therefore, NMIs used measurement methods of their choice. However, the majority of NMIs/DIs used ICP-MS. This SIM.QM-S7 Supplementary Comparison provides NMIs/DIs with the needed evidence for CMC claims for trace elements in fresh waters and similar matrices. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  4. Influence of cement shade and water storage on the final color of leucite-reinforced ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaagaclioglu, Lale; Yilmaz, Burak

    2008-01-01

    Leucite-reinforced ceramics have a translucent structure, which may have an advantage when fabricating esthetic restorations. However, the different shades of cement and water storage may adversely affect the final color of translucent restorations. Over time, the final color of a restoration may be significantly affected by the shade of the cement. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different cement shades (Vita A1 and A3) and water storage on the final color of leucite-reinforced ceramics over time. Twenty disks of standardized thickness (0.8 mm), diameter (5 mm) and color (shade 110, Chromascope) were prepared from leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic (IPS Empress). Ten freshly extracted human molars were used as the underlying structure, and both the buccal and lingual surfaces of each tooth were prepared with a diamond rotary cutting instrument and flat surfaces were created. Initially, all of the disks were bonded to the flat surfaces of the teeth with a thin layer of bonding agent (Single Bond, 3M Dental Products) to ensure immobilization of the specimens (baseline). The teeth and ceramic specimens were not etched and silanated for easy removal of the specimens. The color of the ceramic specimens was measured with a colorimeter. All disks were gently removed from the tooth surfaces, and 10 specimens (Group A1) were luted to the buccal surfaces of teeth using a dual-polymerizing resin composite cement (Vita A1, Rely X ARC), while the remaining 10 specimens (Group A3) were luted to the lingual surfaces of the teeth with a different shade (Vita A3, Rely X ARC) of the same cement. The final color of the specimens was measured immediately after cementation and at 3-, 30- and 90-day intervals after cementation. Color coordinates L*, a*, b* were recorded. The teeth were stored in 37 degrees C saline solution during measurement intervals. The Mann-Whitney U-test (post-hoc test) was performed to compare the results (alpha=0.05). The color difference of

  5. Interaction of Actinide Species with Microorganisms & Microbial Chelators: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, & Implications for Bioremediation of Soil & Ground Water.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim Boukhalfa

    2006-03-28

    Microorganisms influence the natural cycle of major elements, including C, N, P, S, and transition metals such as Mn and Fe. Bacterial processes can also influence the behavior of actinides in soil and ground water. While radionuclides have no known biological utility, they have the potential to interact with microorganisms and to interfere with processes involving other elements such as Fe and Mn. These interactions can transform radionuclides and affect their fate and transport. Organic acids, extruded by-products of cell metabolism, can solubilize radionuclides and facilitate their transport. The soluble complexes formed can be taken up by the cells and incorporated into biofilm structures. We have examined the interactions of Pu species with bacterial metabolites, studied Pu uptake by microorganisms and examined the toxicity of Pu and other toxic metals to environmentally relevant bacteria. We have also studied the speciation of Pu(IV) in the presence of natural and synthetic chelators.

  6. Study of radon concentration and toxic elements in drinking and irrigated water and its implications in Sungai Petani, Kedah, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Nisar; Jaafar, Mohamad Suhaimi; Alsaffar, Mohammed Saad

    2015-01-01

    The radon activity concentration and toxic elements have been assessed in drinking and irrigated water samples collected from different locations of Sungai Petani, Kedah, Malaysia. The water samples were collected from wells, streams and taps. A calibrated alpha spectrometer RAD-7 (Model 2890) and Atomic Absorption Spectrometers (Perkin–Elmer, Model AAnalyst 200, Shimadzu, Model AA-700) were used to estimate radon activity concentration and toxic elements, respectively. Maximum average value ...

  7. Structure elucidation and toxicity analyses of the radiolytic products of aflatoxin B{sub 1} in methanol-water solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng [Institute of Agro-food Science and Technology of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 2nd Yuanmingyuan West Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100193 (China); Key Opening Laboratory of Agricultural Products Processing and Quality Control, Ministry of Agriculture, 2nd Yuanmingyuan West Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100193 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 12th Zhongguancun South Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Xie, Fang [Institute of Agro-food Science and Technology of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 2nd Yuanmingyuan West Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100193 (China); Key Opening Laboratory of Agricultural Products Processing and Quality Control, Ministry of Agriculture, 2nd Yuanmingyuan West Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100193 (China); Xue, Xiaofeng [Bee Research Institute of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 1st Xiangshan North Ditch, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100093 (China); Wang, Zhidong; Fan, Bei [Institute of Agro-food Science and Technology of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 2nd Yuanmingyuan West Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100193 (China); Key Opening Laboratory of Agricultural Products Processing and Quality Control, Ministry of Agriculture, 2nd Yuanmingyuan West Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100193 (China); Ha, Yiming, E-mail: wxfay2011@hotmail.com [Institute of Agro-food Science and Technology of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 2nd Yuanmingyuan West Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100193 (China); Key Opening Laboratory of Agricultural Products Processing and Quality Control, Ministry of Agriculture, 2nd Yuanmingyuan West Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Radiolytic products of aflatoxin B{sub 1} were produced under gamma irradiation. {yields} Seven key radiolytic products were structure-elucidated. {yields} Free-radical species in radiolytic solution resulted in the formation of products. {yields} Based on the structure-activity relationship analysis, the toxicity of radiolytic products was significantly reduced compared with that of AFB{sub 1}. {yields} The addition reaction on furan ring double bond was the reason for the reduced toxicity. - Abstract: The identification of the radiolytic products of mycotoxins is a key issue in the feasibility study of gamma ray radiation detoxification. Methanol-water solution (60:40, v/v) spiked with aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}; 20 mg L{sup -1}) was irradiated with Co{sup 60} gamma ray to generate radiolytic products. Liquid chromatography-quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry was applied to identify the radiolytic products of AFB{sub 1}. Accurate mass and proposed molecular formulas with a high-matching property of more than 20 radiolytic products were obtained. Seven key radiolytic products were proposed based on the molecular formulas and tandem mass spectrometry spectra. The analyses of toxicity and formation pathways were proposed based on the structure of the radiolytic products. The addition reaction caused by the free-radical species in the methanol-water solution resulted in the formation of most radiolytic products. Based on the structure-activity relationship analysis, the toxicity of radiolytic products was significantly reduced compared with that of AFB{sub 1} because of the addition reaction that occurred on the double bond in the terminal furan ring. For this reason, gamma irradiation is deemed an effective tool for the detoxification of AFB{sub 1}.

  8. Management of a toxic cyanobacterium bloom (Planktothrix rubescens) affecting an Italian drinking water basin: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogialli, Sara; Nigro di Gregorio, Federica; Lucentini, Luca; Ferretti, Emanuele; Ottaviani, Massimo; Ungaro, Nicola; Abis, Pier Paolo; Cannarozzi de Grazia, Matteo

    2013-01-02

    An extraordinary bloom of Planktothrix rubescens, which can produce microcystins (MCs), was observed in early 2009 in the Occhito basin, used even as a source of drinking water in Southern Italy. Several activities, coordinated by a task force, were implemented to assess and manage the risk associated to drinking water contaminated by cyanobacteria. Main actions were: evaluation of analytical protocols for screening and confirmatory purpose, monitoring the drinking water supply chain, training of operators, a dedicated web site for risk communication. ELISA assay was considered suitable for health authorities as screening method for MCs and to optimize frequency of sampling according to alert levels, and as internal control for the water supplier. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method able to quantify 9 MCs was optimized with the aim of supporting health authorities in a comprehensive risk evaluation based on the relative toxicity of different congeners. Short, medium, and long-term corrective actions were implemented to mitigate the health risk. Preoxidation with chlorine dioxide followed by flocculation and settling have been shown to be effective in removing MCs in the water treatment plant. Over two years, despite the high levels of cyanobacteria (up to 160 × 10(6) cells/L) and MCs (28.4 μg/L) initially reached in surface waters, the drinking water distribution was never limited.

  9. Organic micropollutants (OMPs) in natural waters: Oxidation by UV/H2O2 treatment and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozas, Oscar; Vidal, Cristiane; Baeza, Carolina; Jardim, Wilson F; Rossner, Alfred; Mansilla, Héctor D

    2016-07-01

    Organic micropollutants (OMPs) are ubiquitous in natural waters even in places where the human activity is limited. The presence of OMPs in natural water sources for human consumption encourages the evaluation of different water purification technologies to ensure water quality. In this study, the Biobío river (Chile) was selected since the watershed includes urban settlements and economic activities (i.e. agriculture, forestry) that incorporate a variety of OMPs into the aquatic environment, such as pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products. Atrazine (herbicide), caffeine (psychotropic), diclofenac (anti-inflammatory) and triclosan (antimicrobial) in Biobío river water and in different stages of a drinking and two wastewater treatment plants downstream Biobío river were determined using solid phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and electrospray ionization (ESI). Quantification of these four compounds showed concentrations in the range of 8 ± 2 to 55 ± 10 ng L(-1) in Biobío river water, 11 ± 2 to 74 ± 21 ng L(-1) in the drinking water treatment plant, and 60 ± 10 to 15,000 ± 1300 ng L(-1) in the wastewater treatment plants. Caffeine was used as an indicator of wastewater discharges. Because conventional water treatment technologies are not designed to eliminate some emerging organic pollutants, alternative treatment processes, UV and UV/H2O2, were employed. The transformation of atrazine, carbamazepine (antiepileptic), diclofenac and triclosan was investigated at laboratory scale. Both processes were tested at different UV doses and the Biobío river water matrix effects were evaluated. Initial H2O2 concentration used was 10 mg L(-1). Results showed that, the transformation profile obtained using UV/H2O2 at UV doses up to 900 mJ cm(-2), followed the trend of diclofenac > triclosan > atrazine > carbamazepine. Furthermore acute toxicity tests with Daphnia magna were carried

  10. Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas: Impacts from the Hydraulic Fracturing Water Cycle on Drinking Water Resources in the United States (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This final report provides a review and synthesis of available scientific information concerning the relationship between hydraulic fracturing activities and drinking water resources in the United States. The report is organized around activities in the hydraulic...

  11. Development of an automated water toxicity biosensor using Thiobacillus ferrooxidans for monitoring cyanides in natural water for a water filtering plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okochi, Mina; Mima, Koji; Miyata, Maki; Shinozaki, Youhei; Haraguchi, Satoshi; Fujisawa, Minoru; Kaneko, Masao; Masukata, Tadashi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2004-09-30

    An on-line biosensor consisting of immobilized Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and an oxygen electrode was developed for automated monitoring of acute toxicity in water samples. T. ferrooxidans is an obligatory acidophilic, autotrophic bacterium and derives its energy by the oxidation of ferrous ion, elemental sulfur, and reduced sulfur compounds including metal sulfides. The assay is based on the monitoring of a current increase by addition of toxicoids, which is caused by the inhibition of bacterial respiration and decrease in oxygen consumption. Optimum cell number on the membrane was 5.0 x 10(8) cells. The steady-state current was obtained when concentration of FeSO4 was above 3.6 mM at pH 3. The sensor response of T. ferrooxidans immobilized membrane for 5.0 microM KCN was within an error of 10% for 30 membranes. A linear relationship was obtained at KCN concentration in the range of 0.5-3.0 microM in a flow-type monitoring system. Minimum detectable concentrations of KCN, Na2S, and NaN3 were 0.5, 1.2, and 0.07 microM, respectively. The monitoring system contained two biosensors and these sensors were cleaned with sulfuric acid (pH 1.5) twice a day. This treatment could remove fouling on microbial immobilized membrane by natural water and ferrous precipitation in the flow cell. This flow-type monitoring sensor was operated continuously for 5 months. Also, T. ferrooxidans immobilized membrane can be stored for one month at 4 degrees C when preserved with wet absorbent cotton under argon gas. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Evaluation of toxic trace metals Cd and Pb in Arabian Sea waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sanzgiri, S.; Mesquita, A.; Kureishy, T.W.; SenGupta, R.

    An attempt has been made to present a picture of the distribution of toxic trace elements Cd and Pb in the Northern Arabian Sea by applying an improved analytical technique for the detection of dissolved forms of the metals at nanogram levels...

  13. Treatment with coated layer double hydroxide clays decreases the toxicity of copper-contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Deanne; Nar, Mangesh; D'Souza, Nandika Anne; Glenn, J Brad; Klaine, Stephen J; Roberts, Aaron P

    2014-05-01

    Copper is a common pollutant found in watersheds that exerts toxic effects on both invertebrates and vertebrates. Layer double hydroxide (LDH) clays are able to adsorb a wide range of contaminants through ion-exchange mechanisms. Coating LDH clays with various materials alters the aggregation of clay particles into the nano-size range, thus increasing relative surface area and offering great potential for contaminant remediation. The goal of this study was to determine if treatment with coated LDH clays decreases the toxicity of copper-containing solutions to Daphnia magna. Four LDH clays with different coatings used to alter hydrophobicity were as follows: used: Na(+) montmorillonite, Zn-Al LDH-nitrate, Zn-Al LDH-stearate, and Zn-Al LDH-carbonate. It was determined that coated LDH clays decreased copper toxicity by decreasing bioavailability and that smaller aggregate sizes decreased bioavailability the most. 96 h LC50 values increased by as much as 4.2 times with the treatment of the solutions with 100 mg/L LDH clay. Copper analysis of the clay and solutions indicated that the clays work by decreasing copper bioavailability by way of a binding mechanism. Coated LDH clays hold promise as a small-scale remediation tool or as an innovative tool for toxicity identification and evaluation characterization of metals.

  14. Selection of a Battery of Rapid Toxicity Sensors for Drinking Water Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Strategic Diagnostics, nc., Newark, DE) measured changes in natural bioluminescence roduced by the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri (Bulich, 1979...tates et al., 2003). Toxic substances decreased light output, hich was measured using a photometer.Vibrio fischeri supplied n a standard freeze-dried

  15. Reproductive toxicity assessment of surface water of the Tai section of the Yangtze River, China by in vitro bioassays coupled with chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiaoyi [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu Academy of Environmental Science, Nanjing 210036 (China); Wu Jiang [Laboratory of Immunology and Reproductive Biology, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Hao Yingqun [Environmental Monitoring Center of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing 210036 (China); Zhu Bingqing [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Shi Wei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Hu Guanjiu [Environmental Monitoring Center of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing 210036 (China); Han Xiaodong [Laboratory of Immunology and Reproductive Biology, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Giesy, John P. [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Zoology Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Yu Hongxia, E-mail: yuhx@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Reproductive toxicity of organic extracts of the surface water from the Tai section of the Yangtze River was assessed by in vitro cytotoxity assays and selected persistent organic pollutants including PCBs, OCPs and PAHs were quantified by instrumental analysis. Eleven of the US EPA priority PAHs were detected. Individual PAHs were found to range from 0.7 to 20 ng/L. Concentrations of BaP did not exceed the national drinking water source quality standard of China. However, a 286-fold concentrated organic extract induced significant reproductive toxicity in adult male rats. The morphology of cells, MTT assay and LDH release assay were all affected by exposure to the organic extracts of water. The results of the reproductive toxicity indicated that PAHs posed the greatest risk of the chemicals studied. The compounds present in the water could be bioconcentrated and result in adverse effects. - Highlights: > Only 11 PAHs of US EPA priority PAHs were detected in surface water the Yangtze River. > Level of BaP didn't exceed national drinking water source quality standard of China. > 286-fold concentrated organic extracts induced great reproductive toxicity in rats. > PAHs posed the greatest risk of the chemicals studied. > The compounds in the water could be bioconcentrated and result in adverse effects. - In vitro bioassay responses observed in Yangtze River source water extracts showed great reproductive toxicity, and PAHs were responsible.

  16. Reducing the chlorine dioxide demand in final disinfection of drinking water treatment plants using activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Crotti, Barbara Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is one of the most widely employed chemicals in the disinfection process of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of the adsorption process with granular activated carbon (GAC) on the chlorine dioxide consumption in final oxidation/disinfection. A first series of tests was performed at the laboratory scale employing water samples collected at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter of Cremona (Italy). The adsorption process in batch conditions with seven different types of GAC was studied. A second series of tests was performed on water samples collected at the outlet of four GAC columns installed at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter. The results showed that the best chlorine dioxide demand (ClO2-D) reduction yields are equal to 60-80% and are achieved in the first 30 min after ClO2 addition, during the first 16 days of the column operation using a mineral, coal-based, mesoporous GAC. Therefore, this carbon removes organic compounds that are more rapidly reactive with ClO2. Moreover, a good correlation was found between the ClO2-D and UV absorbance at wavelength 254 nm using mineral carbons; therefore, the use of a mineral mesoporous GAC is an effective solution to control the high ClO2-D in the disinfection stage of a DWTP.

  17. Final Report: Development of a Thermal and Water Management System for PEM Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zia Mirza, Program Manager

    2011-12-06

    This final program report is prepared to provide the status of program activities performed over the period of 9 years to develop a thermal and water management (TWM) system for an 80-kW PEM fuel cell power system. The technical information and data collected during this period are presented in chronological order by each calendar year. Balance of plant (BOP) components of a PEM fuel cell automotive system represents a significant portion of total cost based on the 2008 study by TIAX LLC, Cambridge, MA. The objectives of this TWM program were two-fold. The first objective was to develop an advanced cooling system (efficient radiator) to meet the fuel cell cooling requirements. The heat generated by the fuel cell stack is a low-quality heat (small difference between fuel cell stack operating temperature and ambient air temperature) that needs to be dissipated to the ambient air. To minimize size, weight, and cost of the radiator, advanced fin configurations were evaluated. The second objective was to evaluate air humidification systems which can meet the fuel cell stack inlet air humidity requirements. The moisture from the fuel cell outlet air is transferred to inlet air, thus eliminating the need for an outside water source. Two types of humidification devices were down-selected: one based on membrane and the other based on rotating enthalpy wheel. The sub-scale units for both of these devices have been successfully tested by the suppliers. This project addresses System Thermal and Water Management.

  18. The implementation of an aquatic toxicity index as a water quality monitoring tool in the Olifants River (Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wepener

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Large sets of water quality data can leave water quality managers and decision-makers totally overwhelmed. In order to convey the interpretation of the data in a simplified and understandable manner, the water quality results from bi-monthly surveys undertaken at seven different sampling sites in the Letaba, Olifants, and Selati rivers over a two year period (February 1990 to April 1992 were reduced to index values, using a water quality index. The water quality index (Aquatic Toxicity Index or ATI revealed spatial and temporal trends. The higher index values, recorded for the sampling sites towards the eastern part of the Kruger National Park (KNP, revealed that the water quality was better than the quality measured in the Olifants River on the western bound-ary. The lowest index values were calculated for the Selati River, with index values consistently below 50. Index values indicate that the water quality in the Selati River was unsuitable for supporting normal physiological processes in fish. The water quality of the Selati River had an immediate impact on the water quality of the Olifants River directly below the confluence. Lower index values recorded at sites further downstream was also attributed to the influence of the Selati River since there are no known point sources of contaminants within the boundaries of the KNP. The index scores also elucidated temporal trends with lower scores evident during winter months. This was due to reduced flow in the Olifants River and a greater contribution of contaminated water from the Selati River. Index values increased following the first seasonal rains due to a dilution effect. Very low index values were recorded at certain sites during flood periods due to increased turbidity, reduced oxygen, and increased metal concentrations.

  19. Contribution of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) to whole toxicity of water samples collected in effluent-dominated urban streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Ikumi; Yasuda, Yusuke; Kagota, Kei-Ichiro; Yoneda, Saori; Nakada, Norihide; Kumar, Vimal; Kameda, Yutaka; Kimura, Kumiko; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    Water samples were collected from effluent-dominated urban streams in Tokushima, Kyoto, and Saitama in Japan to roughly determine the contribution of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and surfactants to whole toxicity of the water. Approximately 100 PPCPs including anionic surfactants such as linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS), were chemically analyzed. Using 14 water samples, chronic or sub-chronic toxicity tests were conducted on three aquatic species, the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata, the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia, and the zebrafish Danio rerio. Bioassays for the selected individual PPCPs were conducted using the three species. Assuming the concentration addition (CA) model, the contribution of each PPCP to the whole toxicity of the riverwater was estimated based on toxicity unit (TU). The contribution of PPCPs, which primarily consists of a few antibiotic agents such as triclosan and clarithromycin, ranged from 0.9% to 69% of the whole toxicity of the water samples for algae, whereas the selected LAS congeners accounted for at most 5.3%. In contrast, the contribution of LAS ranged from 0.067% to 86% and from 0.021% to 27% of the whole toxicity for cladoceran and zebrafish, respectively, whereas that of PPCPs for these species was at most 2.1% at all sampling points. Our results suggest a limited contribution of PPCPs except for antimicrobial agents and the possible substantial contribution of LAS to toxicity in cladocerans and zebrafish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of arsenic contaminated irrigation water on Lens culinaris L. and toxicity assessment using lux marked biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, F R Sadeque; Alexander, Ian J; Mwinyihija, Mwinyikione; Killham, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Contamination of irrigation water represents a major constraint to Bangladesh agriculture, resulting in elevated levels in the terrestrial systems. Lux bacterial biosensor technology has previously been used to measure the toxicity of metals in various environmental matrices. While arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi have their most significant effect on phosphorus uptake, but showed alleviated metal toxicity to the host plant. The study examined the effects of arsenic and inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Glomus mosseae, on lentil (Lens culinaris L. cv. Titore). Plants were grown with and without arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculum for 9 weeks in a sand and terra-green mixture (50:50, V/V) and watered with five levels of arsenic (0, 1, 2, 5, 10 mg As/L arsenate). The results showed that arsenic addition above 1 mg/L significantly reduced percentage of mycorrhizal root infection. On further analysis a close relationship was established with the vegetative and reproductive properties of lentil (L. culinaris) plants compared to the percentage bioluminescence of the soil leachate. However, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation reduced arsenic concentration in roots and shoots. Higher concentrations of arsenic (5, 10 mg As/L arsenate) reduced the mycorrhizal efficiency to increase phosphorus content and nitrogen fixation. Therefore, this study showed that increased concentration of arsenic in irrigation water had direct implications to the lentil (L. culinaris) plants overall performance. Moreover the use of bioassay demonstrated that mycorrhiza and clay particle reduced arsenic bioavailability in soil.

  1. Kinetics of uranium uptake in soft water and the effect of body size, bioaccumulation and toxicity to Hyalella azteca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, L.C. [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada); Aquatic Ecosystems Protection Research Division, Environment Canada, P.O. Box 5050, Burlington, ON L7R 4A6 (Canada); Borgmann, U. [Aquatic Ecosystems Protection Research Division, Environment Canada, P.O. Box 5050, Burlington, ON L7R 4A6 (Canada); Dixon, D.G., E-mail: dgdixon@uwaterloo.c [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    The kinetics of uptake and the effect of body size on uranium (U) bioaccumulation and toxicity to Hyalella azteca exposed to water-only U concentrations in soft water were evaluated. The effect of body size on U bioaccumulation was significant with a slope of -0.35 between log body concentration and log body mass. A saturation kinetic model was satisfactory to describe the uptake rate, elimination rate and the effect of gut-clearance on size-corrected U bioaccumulation in H. azteca. The one-week lethal water concentrations causing 50% mortality for juvenile and adult H. azteca were 1100 and 4000 nmol U/L, respectively. The one-week lethal body concentration causing 50% mortality was 140 nmol U/g for juvenile H. azteca and 220 nmol U/g for adult H. azteca. One-week bioaccumulation studies that properly account for body-size and gut-clearance times can provide valuable data on U bioavailability and toxicity in the environment. - Uranium accumulation by Hyalella azteca approaches steady state after one week but is strongly dependent on body size.

  2. Kinetics of uranium uptake in soft water and the effect of body size, bioaccumulation and toxicity to Hyalella azteca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, L C; Borgmann, U; Dixon, D G

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of uptake and the effect of body size on uranium (U) bioaccumulation and toxicity to Hyalella azteca exposed to water-only U concentrations in soft water were evaluated. The effect of body size on U bioaccumulation was significant with a slope of -0.35 between log body concentration and log body mass. A saturation kinetic model was satisfactory to describe the uptake rate, elimination rate and the effect of gut-clearance on size-corrected U bioaccumulation in H. azteca. The one-week lethal water concentrations causing 50% mortality for juvenile and adult H. azteca were 1100 and 4000 nmol U/L, respectively. The one-week lethal body concentration causing 50% mortality was 140 nmol U/g for juvenile H. azteca and 220 nmol U/g for adult H. azteca. One-week bioaccumulation studies that properly account for body-size and gut-clearance times can provide valuable data on U bioavailability and toxicity in the environment.

  3. Modulation of protein fermentation does not affect fecal water toxicity: a randomized cross-over study in healthy subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Windey

    Full Text Available Protein fermentation results in production of metabolites such as ammonia, amines and indolic, phenolic and sulfur-containing compounds. In vitro studies suggest that these metabolites might be toxic. However, human and animal studies do not consistently support these findings. We modified protein fermentation in healthy subjects to assess the effects on colonic metabolism and parameters of gut health, and to identify metabolites associated with toxicity.After a 2-week run-in period with normal protein intake (NP, 20 healthy subjects followed an isocaloric high protein (HP and low protein (LP diet for 2 weeks in a cross-over design. Protein fermentation was estimated from urinary p-cresol excretion. Fecal metabolite profiles were analyzed using GC-MS and compared using cluster analysis. DGGE was used to analyze microbiota composition. Fecal water genotoxicity and cytotoxicity were determined using the Comet assay and the WST-1-assay, respectively, and were related to the metabolite profiles.Dietary protein intake was significantly higher during the HP diet compared to the NP and LP diet. Urinary p-cresol excretion correlated positively with protein intake. Fecal water cytotoxicity correlated negatively with protein fermentation, while fecal water genotoxicity was not correlated with protein fermentation. Heptanal, 3-methyl-2-butanone, dimethyl disulfide and 2-propenyl ester of acetic acid are associated with genotoxicity and indole, 1-octanol, heptanal, 2,4-dithiapentane, allyl-isothiocyanate, 1-methyl-4-(1-methylethenyl-benzene, propionic acid, octanoic acid, nonanoic acid and decanoic acid with cytotoxicity.This study does not support a role of protein fermentation in gut toxicity. The identified metabolites can provide new insight into colonic health.ClinicalTrial.gov NCT01280513.

  4. [Application of Whole-cell Biosensor ADP1_pWHlux for Acute Toxicity Detection in Water Environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui; Song, Yi-zhi; Jiang, Bo; Chen, Guang-yu; Jia, Jian-li; Zhang, Xu; Li, Guang-he

    2015-10-01

    A whole-cell biosensor acinetobacter ADP1_pWHlux was constructed by genetic engineering for detecting acute toxicity, so as to overcome the harsh application conditions when detecting acute toxicity using natural luminescent bacteria or whole-cell biosensor constructed by model microorganisms as the host cell. Detection methods, detection sensitivity and detection range of acinetobacter ADP1_pWHlux were studied. The results showed that the luminescence of ADP1_pWHlux was inhibited by acute poison, poison dose and inhibition of luminescence exhibit dose-response relationship. ADPL_pWHlux was respond to 4 mg x L(-1) HgCl2 within 5 min. The detection limit for HgCl2 was 0.04 mg x L(-1). The detectable effects for indicators of Be2+, Ba2+, Cu2+, Ni2+ in standards for drinking water quality were obvious. The detection range of Be2+, Ba2+, Cu2+ were 0.025-250 mg x L(-1), the detection range of Ni2+, was 0.0025-250 mg x L(-1), the detection limit of Pb2+, BrO3(-) , ClO2(-) were 0.002 5 mg x L(-1), the detection limit of ClO3(-) was 0.025 mg x L(-1). The whole-cell biosensor ADPl_pWHlux detection method has been applied to evaluate acute toxicity in water environment of Qinghe river in Beijing, indicating the established method can be used to detect contaminated water samples.

  5. Multiple linear regression models for predicting chronic aluminum toxicity to freshwater aquatic organisms and developing water quality guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, David K; Brix, Kevin V; Tear, Lucinda M; Adams, William J

    2018-01-01

    The bioavailability of aluminum (Al) to freshwater aquatic organisms varies as a function of several water chemistry parameters, including pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and water hardness. We evaluated the ability of multiple linear regression (MLR) models to predict chronic Al toxicity to a green alga (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), a cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia), and a fish (Pimephales promelas) as a function of varying DOC, pH, and hardness conditions. The MLR models predicted toxicity values that were within a factor of 2 of observed values in 100% of the cases for P. subcapitata (10 and 20% effective concentrations [EC10s and EC20s]), 91% of the cases for C. dubia (EC10s and EC20s), and 95% (EC10s) and 91% (EC20s) of the cases for P. promelas. The MLR models were then applied to all species with Al toxicity data to derive species and genus sensitivity distributions that could be adjusted as a function of varying DOC, pH, and hardness conditions (the P. subcapitata model was applied to algae and macrophytes, the C. dubia model was applied to invertebrates, and the P. promelas model was applied to fish). Hazardous concentrations to 5% of the species or genera were then derived in 2 ways: 1) fitting a log-normal distribution to species-mean EC10s for all species (following the European Union methodology), and 2) fitting a triangular distribution to genus-mean EC20s for animals only (following the US Environmental Protection Agency methodology). Overall, MLR-based models provide a viable approach for deriving Al water quality guidelines that vary as a function of DOC, pH, and hardness conditions and are a significant improvement over bioavailability corrections based on single parameters. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:80-90. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  6. Cell-based Metabolomics for Assessing Chemical Exposure and Toxicity of Environmental Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waste water treatment plants (WWTPs), concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), mining activities, and agricultural operations release contaminants that negatively affect surface water quality. Traditional methods using live animals/fish to monitor/assess contaminant exposu...

  7. Cell-based metabolomics for assessing chemical exposure and toxicity of environmental surface waters (presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Waste water treatment plants (WWTPs), concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), mining activities, and agricultural operations release contaminants that negatively affect surface water quality. Traditional methods using live animals (e.g. fish) to monitor/as...

  8. Multi-linear regression analysis, preliminary biotic ligand modeling, and cross species comparison of the effects of water chemistry on chronic lead toxicity in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbaugh, A J; Brix, K V; Mager, E M; De Schamphelaere, K; Grosell, M

    2012-03-01

    The current study examined the chronic toxicity of lead (Pb) to three invertebrate species: the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia, the snail Lymnaea stagnalis and the rotifer Philodina rapida. The test media consisted of natural waters from across North America, varying in pertinent water chemistry parameters including dissolved organic carbon (DOC), calcium, pH and total CO(2). Chronic toxicity was assessed using reproductive endpoints for C. dubia and P. rapida while growth was assessed for L. stagnalis, with chronic toxicity varying markedly according to water chemistry. A multi-linear regression (MLR) approach was used to identify the relative importance of individual water chemistry components in predicting chronic Pb toxicity for each species. DOC was an integral component of MLR models for C. dubia and L. stagnalis, but surprisingly had no predictive impact on chronic Pb toxicity for P. rapida. Furthermore, sodium and total CO(2) were also identified as important factors affecting C. dubia toxicity; no other factors were predictive for L. stagnalis. The Pb toxicity of P. rapida was predicted by calcium and pH. The predictive power of the C. dubia and L. stagnalis MLR models was generally similar to that of the current C. dubia BLM, with R(2) values of 0.55 and 0.82 for the respective MLR models, compared to 0.45 and 0.79 for the respective BLMs. In contrast the BLM poorly predicted P. rapida toxicity (R(2)=0.19), as compared to the MLR (R(2)=0.92). The cross species variability in the effects of water chemistry, especially with respect to rotifers, suggests that cross species modeling of invertebrate chronic Pb toxicity using a C. dubia model may not always be appropriate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Toxicity of waters from the St. Lawrence River at Massena Area-of-Concern to the plankton species Selenastrum capricornutum and Ceriodaphnia dubia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Duffy, Brian T.; Nally, Christopher J.; David, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    In 1972, the US and Canada committed to restore the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Great Lakes Ecosystem under the first Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. During subsequent amendments, part of the St. Lawrence River at Massena NY, and segments of three tributaries, were designated as one Area of Concern (AOC) due to various beneficial use impairments (BUIs). Plankton beneficial use was designated impaired within this AOC because phytoplankton and zooplankton population data were unavailable or needed “further assessment”. Contaminated sediments from industrial waste disposal have been largely remediated, thus, the plankton BUI may currently be obsolete. The St. Lawrence River at Massena AOC remedial action plan established two criteria which may be used to assess the plankton BUI; the second states that, “in the absence of community structure data, plankton bioassays confirm no toxicity impact in ambient waters”. This study was implemented during 2011 to determine whether this criterion was achieved. Acute toxicity and chronic toxicity of local waters were quantified seasonally using standardized bioassays with green alga Selenastrum capricornutum and water flea Ceriodaphnia dubia to test the hypothesis that waters from sites within the AOC were no more toxic than were waters from adjacent reference sites. The results of univariate and multivariate analyses confirm that ambient waters from most AOC sites (and seasons) were not toxic to both species. Assuming both test species represent natural plankton assemblages, the quality of surface waters throughout most of this AOC should not seriously impair the health of resident plankton communities.

  10. Exploring the biodegradation and toxicity of naphthenic acids present in Athabasca oil sands process affected waters using simulated wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, N.; Liber, K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Regina, SK (Canada); MacKinnon, M. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Fedorak, P. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a persistent group of dissolved organic acids found in oil sands process affected water (OSPW) from the Athabasca Oil Sands (AOS) in northern Alberta. This study investigated the feasibility of reducing the toxicity of OSPW in wetland environments, and proposed a strategy for reclamation at the AOS. Laboratory microcosms were used to mimic natural wetlands. The purpose was to determine if the toxicities of OSPWs generated by Syncrude Canada Ltd. (Syncrude) and Suncor Energy Inc. (Suncor) change with time as a result of aging and biodegradation. Experiments involved 2 types of OSPW obtained from Syncrude and Suncor. Nutrient availability (nitrogen and phosphorus enrichment) was increased for both short and long hydraulic retention times (40 and 400 days). The NAs found in the OSPW were tracked over the course of one year using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and Microtox bioassays. The objective was to determine the relationships between total NA concentrations, the degree to which different sub-groups of NAs are biodegraded and any potential reduction in OSPW toxicity.

  11. Subchronic and acute preclinic toxicity and some pharmacological effects of the water extract from leaves of Petiveria alliacea (Phytolaccaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Mildred; Morales, Teresita Coto; Ocampo, Rafael; Pazos, Liliana

    2006-12-01

    We tested the effects of the aqueous extract of Petiveria alliacea leaves on acute and sub-chronic toxicity, hematocrit and blood glucose level and intestinal motility of male albino NGP mice of 20 to 25 g mean weight. Treatments were in all cases doses of 1,000 and 2,000 mg/kg animal weight and a control treatment with 0.5 ml distilled water, using 10 animals per treatment and administered orally every day (5 days per week). Experimental periods were 18 and 70 days for acute and sub chronic toxicity, respectively. No mortality nor any toxicity signs could be observed. A slight but significant increase in the glucose levels during the first three weeks was observed with the 1,000 mg/kg dose but not for the higher 2,000 mg/kg dose. After administering the doses once after a starving period of six hours, no significant differences in intestinal motility could be found.

  12. Effects of water quality and fish size on toxicity of methiocarb, a carbamate pesticide, to rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinok, Ilhan; Capkin, Erol; Karahan, Siyami; Boran, Muhammet

    2006-07-01

    The acute toxicity of methiocarb in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, 3.25±0.79g) was evaluated in glass aquaria under static conditions. Nominal concentrations of methiocarb in the toxicity test ranged from 1.25 to 7.50mgL(-1). The concentrations of methiocarb that killed 50% of the rainbow trout within 24-h (24-h LC(50)), 48-h LC(50), 72-h LC(50), and 96-h LC(50) were 5.43±0.19, 5.04±0.18, 4.95±0.19, and 4.82±0.21mgL(-1) (95% confidence limits), respectively. Mortality of fish increased with increasing water temperature. Increasing alkalinity from 19mgL(-1) as CaCO(3) to 40, 60, or 90mgL(-1) as CaCO(3) significantly decreased mortality of fish. Total hardness ranging from 50mgL(-1) as CaCO(3) to 147mgL(-1) as CaCO(3) did not affect mortality of fish exposed to methiocarb. Fish exposed to methiocarb had histological alterations such as lamellar edema, separation of epidermis from lamellae, and lamellar fusion. Methiocarb exposed fish had necrosis between molecular and granular layer of cerebellum where Purkinje cells present. Results indicate that alkalinity, temperature, and fish size affect methiocarb toxicity of rainbow trout.

  13. Replacement of chemical intensive water treatment processes with energy saving membrane. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickley, M.C.; Goering, S.W.

    1983-11-01

    The project investigated the use of charged ultrafiltration membranes to treat hard water. More specifically, the work was undertaken to (1) make charged ultrafiltration membranes to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the chemical grafting approach; (2) evaluate the market potential for charged ultrafiltration membranes; and (3) evaluate the cost and energy savings for using charged ultrafiltration as compared to lime-based clarification and other treatment methods. The results suggest that chemical grafting is a relatively simple, reproducible and low-cost way to modify existing substrate materials to give them enhanced transport performance. Process studies lead to the identification of good market potential for membrane processes using charged ultrafiltration membranes. Capital and operating costs relative to lime-based clarification are favorable for low- and medium-sized treatment plants. Finally, substantial energy savings are apparent as compared to lime-based precipitation systems which incur substantial energy consumption in the lime production and transportation steps.

  14. Dredged Material Evaluations: Review of Zooplankton Toxicity Test Methods for Marine Water Quality Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    for elutriate toxicity tests are fish, invertebrates ( crustaceans ), and zooplankton. Freshwater evaluations (following CWA regulations) use standard...one species each representative of phytoplankton or zooplankton, crustacean or mollusk, and fish species chosen from ERDC TN-DOER-R24 September...Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and ASTM. Much of this work has focused on full life-cycle testing of the epibenthic

  15. Carbon and water footprint of pork supply chain in Catalonia: From feed to final products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noya, Isabel; Aldea, Xavier; Gasol, Carles M; González-García, Sara; Amores, Maria José; Colón, Joan; Ponsá, Sergio; Roman, Isabel; Rubio, Miguel A; Casas, Eudald; Moreira, María Teresa; Boschmonart-Rives, Jesús

    2016-04-15

    A systematic tool to assess the Carbon Footprint (CF) and Water Footprint (WF) of pork production companies was developed and applied to representative Catalan companies. To do so, a cradle-to-gate environmental assessment was carried out by means of the LCA methodology, taking into account all the stages involved in the pork chain, from feed production to the processing of final products, ready for distribution. In this approach, the environmental results are reported based on eight different functional units (FUs) according to the main pork products obtained. With the aim of ensuring the reliability of the results and facilitating the comparison with other available reports, the Product Category Rules (PCR) for Catalan pork sector were also defined as a basis for calculations. The characterization results show fodder production as the main contributor to the global environmental burdens, with contributions higher than 76% regardless the environmental indicator or the life cycle stage considered, which is in agreement with other published data. In contrast, the results in terms of CF and WF lay above the range of values reported elsewhere. However, major discrepancies are mainly due to the differences in the co-products allocation criteria. In this sense, economic/physical allocation and/or system expansion have been mostly considered in literature. In contrast, no allocation was considered appropriate in this study, according to the characteristics of the industries and products under assessment; thus, the major impacts fall on the main product, which derives on comparatively higher environmental burdens. Finally, due to the relevance of fodder production in the overall impact assessment results, strategies to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions as well as water use associated to this stage were proposed in the pork supply chain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Toxic elements in sediment from two water bodies near Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor: RMB installation area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Tatiane B.S.C. da; Stellato, Thamiris B.; Monteiro, Lucilena R.; Marques, Joyce R.; Faustino, Mainara G.; Santos, Camila F.R.T.T.; Oliveira, Cintia C. de; Miranda, Gabrielle S.; Pires, Maria Aparecida F.; Cotrim, Marycel E.B., E-mail: tatianebscs@live.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are directly affected by contaminants, such as, toxic elements that do not remain in sediment in a insoluble form. Anthropogenic and natural actions influence sediment dynamics that could lead to a potential contaminant accumulation. Therefore, to evaluate possible environmental impacts is,in many cases, mandatory. Environmental impact assessment studies are a licensing tool that seeks to control degradation activities, taking into account the legal and regulatory provisions and technical standards applicable to the case. The present study aims to evaluate the sediment quality in the area of influence of the Brazilian Multipurpose Nuclear Reactor (RMB) to be installed in the contiguous area of the Experimental Center of Aramar of the Technological Center of the Navy in São Paulo (CTMSP), located in the city of Iperó - SP. The potentially toxic elements As, Cd and Hg were analyzed by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (GFAAS) and Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). Results were compared with Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) guideline values (TEL and PEL) and the maximum permitted values of Resolution 454/12. These toxic elements (As, Cd, Hg, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn) were found below maximum allowed concentrations from national and international legislation. This study provides support for RMB post-completion evaluations, in order to prevent these elements to exceed tolerated levels, ensuring ecological, social and economic values. (author)

  17. Toxicity of chromium (VI) to two mussels and an amphipod in water-only exposures with or without a co-stressor of elevated temperature, zinc, or nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Kunz, James L.; Ivey, Chris D.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Barnhart, M. Christopher; Glidewell, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to develop methods for propagating western pearlshell (Margaritifera falcata) for laboratory toxicity testing and evaluate acute and chronic toxicity of chromium VI [Cr(VI)] to the pearlshell and a commonly tested mussel (fatmucket, Lampsilis siliquoidea at 20 °C or in association with a co-stressor of elevated temperature (27 °C), zinc (50 µg Zn/L), or nitrate (35 mg NO3/L). A commonly tested invertebrate (amphipod, Hyalella azteca) also was tested in chronic exposures. Newly transformed pearlshell (~1 week old) were successfully cultured and tested in acute 96 h Cr exposures (control survival 100%). However, the grow-out of juveniles in culture for chronic toxicity testing was less successful and chronic 28-day Cr toxicity tests started with 4 month-old pearlshell failed due to low control survival (39–68%). Acute median effect concentration (EC50) for the pearlshell (919 µg Cr/L) and fatmucket (456 µg Cr/L) tested at 20 °C without a co-stressor decreased by a factor of > 2 at elevated temperature but did not decrease at elevated Zn or elevated NO3. Chronic 28-day Cr tests were completed successfully with the fatmucket and amphipod (control survival 83–98%). Chronic maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) for fatmucket at 20 °C (26 µg Cr/L) decreased by a factor of 2 at elevated temperature or NO3 but did not decrease at elevated Zn. However, chronic MATC for amphipod at 20 °C (13 µg Cr/L) did not decrease at elevated temperature, Zn, or NO3. Acute EC50s for both mussels tested with or without a co-stressor were above the final acute value used to derive United States Environmental Protection Agency acute water quality criterion (WQC) for Cr(VI); however, chronic MATCs for fatmucket at elevated temperature or NO3 and chronic MATCs for the amphipod at 20 °C with or without elevated Zn or NO3 were about equal to the chronic WQC. The results indicate that (1) the elevated temperature

  18. Development and Validation of an On-Line Water Toxicity Sensor with Immobilized Luminescent Bacteria for On-Line Surface Water Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Marjolijn; van der Gaag, Bram; Abrafi Boakye, Afua; Mink, Jan; Marks, Robert S; Wagenvoort, Arco J; Ketelaars, Henk A M; Brouwer, Bram; Heringa, Minne B

    2017-11-22

    Surface water used for drinking water production is frequently monitored in The Netherlands using whole organism biomonitors, with for example Daphnia magna or Dreissena mussels, which respond to changes in the water quality. However, not all human-relevant toxic compounds can be detected by these biomonitors. Therefore, a new on-line biosensor has been developed, containing immobilized genetically modified bacteria, which respond to genotoxicity in the water by emitting luminescence. The performance of this sensor was tested under laboratory conditions, as well as under field conditions at a monitoring station along the river Meuse in The Netherlands. The sensor was robust and easy to clean, with inert materials, temperature control and nutrient feed for the reporter organisms. The bacteria were immobilized in sol-gel on either an optical fiber or a glass slide and then continuously exposed to water. Since the glass slide was more sensitive and robust, only this setup was used in the field. The sensor responded to spikes of genotoxic compounds in the water with a minimal detectable concentration of 0.01 mg/L mitomycin C in the laboratory and 0.1 mg/L mitomycin C in the field. With further optimization, which should include a reduction in daily maintenance, the sensor has the potential to become a useful addition to the currently available biomonitors.

  19. Development and Validation of an On-Line Water Toxicity Sensor with Immobilized Luminescent Bacteria for On-Line Surface Water Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolijn Woutersen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface water used for drinking water production is frequently monitored in The Netherlands using whole organism biomonitors, with for example Daphnia magna or Dreissena mussels, which respond to changes in the water quality. However, not all human-relevant toxic compounds can be detected by these biomonitors. Therefore, a new on-line biosensor has been developed, containing immobilized genetically modified bacteria, which respond to genotoxicity in the water by emitting luminescence. The performance of this sensor was tested under laboratory conditions, as well as under field conditions at a monitoring station along the river Meuse in The Netherlands. The sensor was robust and easy to clean, with inert materials, temperature control and nutrient feed for the reporter organisms. The bacteria were immobilized in sol-gel on either an optical fiber or a glass slide and then continuously exposed to water. Since the glass slide was more sensitive and robust, only this setup was used in the field. The sensor responded to spikes of genotoxic compounds in the water with a minimal detectable concentration of 0.01 mg/L mitomycin C in the laboratory and 0.1 mg/L mitomycin C in the field. With further optimization, which should include a reduction in daily maintenance, the sensor has the potential to become a useful addition to the currently available biomonitors.

  20. Chronic toxicity and three-generation reproduction study of styrene monomer in the drinking water of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beliles, R.P.; Butala, J.H.; Stack, C.R.; Makris, S.

    1985-10-01

    Chronic toxicity and reproductive performance were evaluated in groups of rats receiving styrene monomer in their drinking water at nominal concentrations of 0, 125, or 250 ppm. Fifty male and 70 female rats in each test group and 76 males and 104 females in the control group were placed on a 2-year study and followed for observations of general health which included measurement of body weight, food and water consumption, hemograms, clinical chemistries, urinalysis, and histopathological examination. Ten males and 20 females from each group in the study were mated to produce F1 pups. These pups were subsequently mated to produce three generations of offspring, all maintained on styrene-treated drinking water. For each generation, the following were evaluated: fertility, litter size, pup viability, pup survival, sex ratio, pup body weight, weanling liver and kidney weight, and marrow cytogenetics. Except for a statistically significant reduction in water consumption for styrene-treated rats, no treatment-related changes, including mortality patterns, were reported for animals in the chronic study. The data evaluated for reproductive performance also showed no evidence of styrene-related changes. It was concluded that the administration of styrene in the drinking water of rats for 2 years produced no deleterious dose-related effects or decrements in reproductive performance.

  1. Selective Removal of Toxic Metals like Copper and Arsenic from Drinking Water Using Phenol-Formaldehyde Type Chelating Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Mohanty

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of different toxic metals has increased beyond environmentally and ecologically permissible levels due to the increase in industrial activity. More than 100 million people of Bangladesh and West Bengal in India are affected by drinking ground water contaminated with arsenic and some parts of India is also affected by poisoning effect of copper, cadmium and fluoride. Different methods have been evolved to reduce the arsenic concentration in drinking water to a maximum permissible level of 10 μg/L where as various methods are also available to separate copper from drinking water. Of the proven methods available today, removal of arsenic by polymeric ion exchangers has been most effective. While chelating ion exchange resins having specific chelating groups attached to a polymer have found extensive use in sorption and pre concentration of Cu2+ ions. Both the methods are coupled here to separate and preconcentrate toxic metal cation Cu2+ and metal anion arsenate(AsO4– at the same time. We have prepared a series of low-cost polymeric resins, which are very efficient in removing copper ion from drinking water and after coordinating with copper ion they act as polymeric ligand exchanger, which are efficiently removing arsenate from drinking water. For this purpose Schiff bases were prepared by condensing o-phenylenediamine with o-, m-, and p-hydroxybenzaldehydes. Condensing these phenolic Schiff bases with formaldehyde afforded the chelating resins in high yields. These resins are loaded with Cu2+, Ni2+ 2+, and Fe3+ ions. The resins and the polychelates are highly insoluble in water. In powdered form the metal ion-loaded resins are found to very efficiently remove arsenate ion from water at neutral pH. Resins loaded with optimum amount of Cu2+ ion is more effective in removing arsenate ions compared to those with Fe3+ ion, apparently because Cu2+ is a stronger Lewis acid than Fe3+. Various parameters influencing the removal of the

  2. The link between shrimp farm runoff and blooms of toxic Heterosigma akashiwo in Red Sea coastal waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria A. Mohamed

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In May 2010 a copious bloom of the raphidophyte Heterosigma akashiwo was observed for the first time in Red Sea waters off the coasts of Saudi Arabia.This bloom was confined to an area where water and phytoplankton flow freely between the sea and a shrimp farm. The phytoplankton density and physico-chemical characteristics of the sea water were therefore investigated weekly at bloom and non-bloom sites in order to gain insightinto the environmental factors prevailing at the bloom site and their link with the shrimp farm runoff. The bloom site showed higher nutrient concentrations than the non-bloom site, indicating the possible role of the shrimp farm in flushing nutrients into this site. The bloom appeared on 27 May, coinciding with a decrease in salinity (19°C. The results of toxicological assays showed that both bloom samples and batch cultures of H. akashiwo were toxic toArtemia salina and exhibited haemolytic activity with respectto rabbit erythrocytes.Bloom samples showed a higher toxicity (LC50=8.9 ×10^4 cells ml-1 and haemolytic activity (EC50=3.64 × 104cells ml-1 than the batch cultures (LC50=11.6 × 104 cells ml-1, EC50=5.1 imes 104 cells ml-1. In the light ofthe results of this study, the link between H. akashiwoblooms and shrimp farm runoff should be considered during the monitoring of Red Sea coastal waters for the presence of harmful algal blooms.

  3. Influence of dissolved organic matter on nickel bioavailability and toxicity to Hyalella azteca in water-only exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, Lorne E; Liber, Karsten

    2006-03-10

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is known to reduce the bioavailability of metals in aquatic systems. This study evaluated the effects of DOM from various sources (e.g., Little Bear Lake sediment, Suwannee River, peat moss) and various DOM fractions (humic acids, HA; fulvic acids, FA) on the bioavailability of nickel (Ni) to Hyalella azteca, a common freshwater benthic invertebrate. In particular, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of surficial sediment DOM on Ni bioavailability. Short-term (48 h) acute toxicity tests with H. azteca conducted in synthetic water demonstrated that the aqueous Ni concentrations required for lethality were greater than what could be significantly complexed by environmentally relevant concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC: 0.6-30.4 mg/L). At Ni concentrations sublethal to H. azteca (500 microg/L), the bioavailability of Ni was significantly reduced in the presence of representative surface water DOC concentrations regardless of DOC source or fraction. DOC fraction (i.e., FA and HA) differentially affected Ni speciation, but had little or no effect on Ni accumulation by H. azteca. Tissue Ni was found to be strongly dependent upon the Ni(2+) concentration in the exposure solutions and the Ni:DOC ratio. Overall, the concentration of DOC played a greater role than either DOC source or fraction in determining Ni speciation and hence bioavailability and toxicity to H. azteca.

  4. Comparative toxicity of water soluble fractions of four oils on the growth of a Microalga

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Phatarpekar, P.V.; Ansari, Z.A.

    the market. Water soluble fractions (WSF) were prepared by adding one part of oil to nine parts of filtered, auto- claved sea water (1:9, v/v) in a volumetric flask. The flask was tightly capped with a stopper and covered 368 P. V. Phatarpekar and Z. A...

  5. Toxic Levels of Some Heavy Metals in Drinking Network Surface Water of Damietta Governorate, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    EL-Bady, M. S. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the heavy metals of the surface drinking water of Damietta governorate were evaluated. Damietta district, Farascore City, EL-Zarka City and Kafr Saad City are the main locations of drinking water pollution. The villages of the Damietta governorate have concentration values less than the permissible limits of World Health Organization (WHO) and Egyptian Ministry Health (EMH).

  6. Nitrite-induced enhancement of toxicity of phenanthrene in fish and its implications for coastal waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shailaja, M.S.; Rodrigues, A.

    the effect of a natural stress such as the presence of nitrite in water on the xenobiotic metabolism in fish, the euryhaline cichlid Oreochromis mossambicus was exposed for up to 9 days to environmentally relevant concentrations of water-borne nitrite...

  7. A molecular study on bacterial resistance to arsenic-toxicity in surface and underground waters of Latium (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davolos, Domenico; Pietrangeli, Biancamaria

    2013-10-01

    Latium, a region in central Italy, is known for its extensive volcanic areas that make a significant contribution to the arsenic (As) contamination of freshwater environments, even though some degree of As water pollution may be caused by human activities. The information available on indigenous As-resistant prokaryotes in aquatic environments of Latium is, however, still limited. In this study, we describe new bacteria that are resistant to arsenic toxicity and were isolated from the surface waters of Lake Vico and the Sacco River, two groundwater systems in Latium, as well as from bottled natural mineral water from the same region. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for the As-resistant strains in lake and river waters points to a prevalence of β- and γ-Proteobacteria, while α-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes are represented to a lesser extent. By contrast, solely γ-Proteobacteria were isolated from groundwater samples. The presence of Actinobacteria was documented exclusively in bottled mineral water. In addition, we conducted a DNA sequence-based study on the gene codifying arsB, an As(III) efflux membrane protein pump related to arsenic resistance, for all the As-resistant bacterial isolates. A phylogenetic analysis was carried out on the newly sequenced 16S rRNA genes and arsB in the present study as well as on an additional 16S rRNA/arsB dataset we obtained previously from Lake Albano, from the Tiber and from a well in Bassano Romano located in Latium (Davolos and Pietrangeli, 2011). Overall, the phylogenetic diversity of As-resistant bacteria in underground water was very limited if compared with lentic and lotic waters. Lastly, our molecular data support the hypothesis that the horizontal gene transfer of ars in As-containing freshwater environments is not limited to closely-related genomes, but also occurs between bacteria that are distant from an evolutionary viewpoint, thereby indicating that such genetic events may be considered a

  8. Fluoride, boron and nitrate toxicity in ground water of northwest Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Veena; Kumar, Mukesh; Sharma, Mukesh; Yadav, B S

    2010-02-01

    The study was carried out to access the fluoride, boron, and nitrate concentrations in ground water samples of different villages in Indira Gandhi, Bhakra, and Gang canal catchment area of northwest Rajasthan, India. Rural population, in the study site, is using groundwater for drinking and irrigation purposes, without any quality test of water. All water samples (including canal water) were contaminated with fluoride. Fluoride, boron, and nitrate were observed in the ranges of 0.50-8.50, 0.0-7.73, and 0.0-278.68 mg/l, respectively. Most of the water samples were in the categories of fluoride 1.50 mg/l, of boron 2.0-4.0 mg/l, and of nitrate < 45 mg/l. There was no industrial pollution in the study site; hence, availability of these compounds in groundwater was due to natural reasons and by the use of chemical fertilizers.

  9. Probit Analysis of Carbamate-Pesticide-Toxicity at Soil-Water Interface to N2-Fixing Cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindra N. Padhy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxicity-data of two carbamate insecticides, carbaryl and carbofuran, and three fungicides, ziram, zineb and mancozeb with rice-field N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum sp., obtained by in vitro growth and at soil-water interface, were analyzed by the probit method. Growth enhancing concentration, no-observed effective concentration, minimum inhibitory concentration, the highest permissive concentration and lethal concentration100 (LC100 were determined experimentally. The LC50 values of carbaryl, carbofuran, ziram, zineb and mancozeb in N2-fixing liquid medium were 56.2, 588.8, 0.07, 4.2 and 3.4 μg/mL, respectively, whereas the corresponding LC100 values were 100.0, 1500.0, 0.17, 25.0 and 9.0 μg/mL, respectively. The LC50 values of these pesticides in succession in N2-fixing agar medium were 44.7, 239.9, 0.07, 1.8 and 2.3 μg/mL, respectively, whereas the corresponding LC100 values were 100.0, 600.0, 0.17, 10.0 and 7.0 μg/mL, respectively. Similar results with nitrate supplemented liquid and agar media indicated that nitrate supplementation had toxicity reducing effect. The LC50 and LC100 values of toxicity in the N2-fixing liquid medium at soil-water interface were 91.2 and 200.0 μg/mL for carbaryl, 2 317 and 6 000 μg/mL for carbofuran, 0.15 and 0.50 μg/mL for ziram, 16.4 and 50.0 μg/mL for zineb, and 7.2 and 25.0 μg/mL for mancozeb, respectively. Each LC100 value at soil-water interface with a pesticide was significantly higher than its corresponding LC100 value at liquid/agar media. It can be concluded that, under the N2-fixing conditions, the cyanobacterium tolerated higher levels of each pesticide at soil-water interface.

  10. Preparation of Zeolite/Zinc Oxide Nanocomposites for toxic metals removal from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah A. Alswata

    Full Text Available This research work has proposed preparation of Zeolite/Zinc Oxide Nanocomposite (Zeolite/ZnO NCs by using a co-precipitation method. Then, the prepared Nanocomposite has been tested for adsorption of Lead Pb (II and Arsenic As (V from aqueous solution under the room pressure and temperature. After that, the prepared adsorbent has been studied by several techniques. For adsorption process; the effect of the adsorbent masses, contact time, PH and initial metals concentration as well as, the kinetics and isotherm for adsorption process have been investigated. The results revealed that; ZnO nanoparticles (NPs with average diameter 4.5 nm have successfully been loaded into Zeolite. The optimum parameters for the removal of the toxic metals 93% and 89% of Pb (II and As (V, respectively, in 100 mg/L aqua solutions were pH4, 0.15 g and 30 min. According to the obtained results; pseudo second-order kinetic and Langmuir isotherm model have higher correlation coefficients and provided a better agreement with the experimental data. The prepared sorbent showed an economical and effective way to remove the heavy toxic metals due to its ambient operation conditions, low- consumption energy and facile regeneration method. Keywords: Zeolite, ZnO, Nanocomposites, Adsorbent, Kinetic, Isotherm

  11. Preparation of Zeolite/Zinc Oxide Nanocomposites for toxic metals removal from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alswata, Abdullah A.; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Al-Hada, Naif Mohammed; Kamari, Halimah Mohamed; Hussein, Mohd Zobir Bin; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa

    This research work has proposed preparation of Zeolite/Zinc Oxide Nanocomposite (Zeolite/ZnO NCs) by using a co-precipitation method. Then, the prepared Nanocomposite has been tested for adsorption of Lead Pb (II) and Arsenic As (V) from aqueous solution under the room pressure and temperature. After that, the prepared adsorbent has been studied by several techniques. For adsorption process; the effect of the adsorbent masses, contact time, PH and initial metals concentration as well as, the kinetics and isotherm for adsorption process have been investigated. The results revealed that; ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) with average diameter 4.5 nm have successfully been loaded into Zeolite. The optimum parameters for the removal of the toxic metals 93% and 89% of Pb (II) and As (V), respectively, in 100 mg/L aqua solutions were pH4, 0.15 g and 30 min. According to the obtained results; pseudo second-order kinetic and Langmuir isotherm model have higher correlation coefficients and provided a better agreement with the experimental data. The prepared sorbent showed an economical and effective way to remove the heavy toxic metals due to its ambient operation conditions, low- consumption energy and facile regeneration method.

  12. INFLUENCE OF WATER-SOLUBLE COMPOUNDS OF RESTORED SULFUR ONTO TOXIC PROPERTIES OF NATURAL AND WASTE WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frog Boris Nikolaevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Whenever environmental pollution by sulphur compounds is under discussion, the latter contemplate those compounds that may be subjected to consideration through the employment of methods of analytical control. First of all, sulphates and volatile compounds of partially or completely restored sulphur, such as SO2, H2S, methyl sulphur compounds (merkaptans, dimethyl sulphide, dimethyl disulphide and others may be subjected to control. Elementary sulphur that is contained in the water is difficult to analyze. At the same time, an extensive group of water-soluble compounds of restored sulphur is not considered by numerous nature protection organizations. As a rule, they do not possess distinct analytical properties. The latter include any organic and inorganic thio-acids and their combinations with ions of transitive metals, in particular, with ions of monovalent copper. Microcolloidal (nano- particles of FeS may also be included into this group of compounds. The objective of the article is to generate the awareness of those compounds of reduced sulphur that are out of control. By virtue of this article, the authors apply to specialists in water treatment, water conditioning and water quality regulation.

  13. Comparative studies on plasma mineral status of cattle in fluoride toxic brackish water zone of Punjab, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Chhabra

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chronic fluoride intoxication or fluorosis is a worldwide health problem in humans and animals. The present research work was aimed to assess the status of copper, zinc, cobalt, manganese, magnesium, calcium and phosphorus in blood of fluorotic cattle in brackish water zone of Punjab. Methods: The present study was conducted in villages of district Muktsar, a brackish water zone, of Punjab state. Cattle (n=103 showing signs of dental lesions or lameness, from the villages with water fluoride concentration more than 1 ppm, were selected for the study whereas cattle (n=98 from villages with water fluoride concentration less than 1 ppm and with no clinical signs served as control. Blood samples were collected from both the groups and were analysed for minerals.Results: Significantly (P<0.05 higher plasma F concentrations were observed in animals of fluorotic region in comparison to healthy control animals. Concentrations of plasma Ca, Mg, Cu and Zn were significantly lower in cattle of hydrofluorotic region. Plasma phosphorus, iron and iodine concentrations were higher in animals of hydrofluorotic region whereas Mo and Mn did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions: Present study indicated decrease in certain essential minerals in animals of fluorotic region and such changes may contribute to the toxic effects associated with exposure to excess fluoride and salinity

  14. From Source Water to Tap Water to Spa and Swimming Pool Water: Effects of Disinfectanta and Precursors and Implications for Exposure and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction The current study investigated the effect of different disinfection treatments on the disinfection by-products (DBPs) formed in finished drinking water vs. tap water vs. swimming pool water vs. spa waters. To this end, samples across the complete water pathway (untr...

  15. Study of radon concentration and toxic elements in drinking and irrigated water and its implications in Sungai Petani, Kedah, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisar Ahmad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The radon activity concentration and toxic elements have been assessed in drinking and irrigated water samples collected from different locations of Sungai Petani, Kedah, Malaysia. The water samples were collected from wells, streams and taps. A calibrated alpha spectrometer RAD-7 (Model 2890 and Atomic Absorption Spectrometers (Perkin–Elmer, Model AAnalyst 200, Shimadzu, Model AA-700 were used to estimate radon activity concentration and toxic elements, respectively. Maximum average value of radon concentration among the various types of water sources was found 14.7 ± 1.44 Bq/l in well water used for drinking and irrigation and minimum was found 5.37 ± 0.58 Bq/l in tap water used for drinking. Contribution of radon in drinking water to indoor air and age dependent associated annual effective doses were calculated from the measured radon concentration and were found less than lower limit of recommended action level. The activity concentrations of Ni > Pb > Cd > As > Cr were found higher for streams water as compared to wells and tap water. Values of radon concentration in well water were found higher than EPA recommended level and lower than WHO action level while the annual effective doses and level of toxic elements in water reported in this study were found lower than recommended level.

  16. Portable Sensor for Rapid In Situ Measurement of Trace Toxic Metals in Water Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Water is one of the most crucial provisions that astronauts need to live and work in space, whether orbiting Earth, working at a lunar base or traveling to Mars. For...

  17. Toxicity studies of the water extract from the calyces of Hibiscus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both test and control groups (day 270th) and satellite group (day 298th) were analysed by measuring their final body and organ weights, taking necropsy, and examining haematology, blood clinical chemistry, and microanatomy. Results showed no differences from the control groups. Overall, our study demonstrated that an ...

  18. Effects of Cd and Ni toxicity to Ceratophyllum demersum under environmentally relevant conditions in soft and hard water including a German lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, Elisa, E-mail: Elisa.Andresen@uni-konstanz.de [University of Konstanz, Department of Biology, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Opitz, Judith, E-mail: Daniela.Opitz@uni-konstanz.de [University of Konstanz, Department of Biology, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Thomas, George, E-mail: George.Thomas@uni-konstanz.de [University of Konstanz, Department of Biology, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Stärk, Hans-Joachim, E-mail: Ha-Jo.Staerk@ufz.de [UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Dienemann, Holger, E-mail: Holger.Dienemann@smul.sachsen.de [Saxon State Company for Environment and Agriculture, Business Domain 5 (Laboratory), Department 53, Bitterfelder Str. 25, D-04849 Bad Düben (Germany); Jenemann, Kerstin, E-mail: Kerstin.Jenemann@smul.sachsen.de [Sächsisches Landesamt für Umwelt, Landwirtschaft und Geologie, Abteilung Wasser, Boden, Wertstoffe, Zur Wetterwarte 11, D-01109 Dresden (Germany); Dickinson, Bryan C., E-mail: Bryan.Dickinson@gmail.com [Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Küpper, Hendrik, E-mail: Hendrik.Kuepper@uni-konstanz.de [University of Konstanz, Department of Biology, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); University of South Bohemia, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Institute of Physical Biology, Branišovská 31, CZ-370 05 České Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Hardly any macrophytic growth occurred in an oligotrophic hard water lake in Germany. •All parameters were optimal, besides elevated, nanomolar concentrations of Ni and Cd. •We cultivated submerged macrophytes in real and simulated hard and soft lake water. •Nanomolar Cd and Ni inhibited the plants’ photosynthetic light reactions in soft water. •The inhibition was synergistic, i.e. stronger than the addition of Cd and Ni effects. -- Abstract: Even essential trace elements are phytotoxic over a certain threshold. In this study, we investigated whether heavy metal concentrations were responsible for the nearly complete lack of submerged macrophytes in an oligotrophic lake in Germany. We cultivated the rootless aquatic model plant Ceratophyllum demersum under environmentally relevant conditions like sinusoidal light and temperature cycles and a low plant biomass to water volume ratio. Experiments lasted for six weeks and were analysed by detailed measurements of photosynthetic biophysics, pigment content and hydrogen peroxide production. We established that individually non-toxic cadmium (3 nM) and slightly toxic nickel (300 nM) concentrations became highly toxic when applied together in soft water, severely inhibiting photosynthetic light reactions. Toxicity was further enhanced by phosphate limitation (75 nM) in soft water as present in many freshwater habitats. In the investigated lake, however, high water hardness limited the toxicity of these metal concentrations, thus the inhibition of macrophytic growth in the lake must have additional reasons. The results showed that synergistic heavy metal toxicity may change ecosystems in many more cases than estimated so far.

  19. Electrolyte selection and microbial toxicity for electrochemical oxidative water treatment using a boron-doped diamond anode to support site specific contamination incident response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Rebecca B; James, Ryan R; Magnuson, Matthew L

    2018-01-06

    Intentional and unintentional contamination incidents, such as terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and accidental spills, can result in large volumes of contaminated water. These waters may require pre-treatment before disposal and assurances that treated waters will not adversely impact biological processes at wastewater treatment facilities, or receiving waters. Based on recommendations of an industrial workgroup, this study addresses such concerns by studying electrochemical advanced oxidation process (EAOP) pre-treatment for contaminated waters, using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode, prior to discharge to wastewater treatment facilities. Reaction conditions were investigated, and microbial toxicity was assessed using the Microtox® toxicity assay and the Nitrification Inhibition test. A range of contaminants were studied including herbicides, pesticides, pharmaceuticals and flame retardants. Resulting toxicities varied with supporting electrolyte from 5% to 92%, often increasing, indicating that microbial toxicity, in addition to parent compound degradation, should be monitored during treatment. These toxicity results are particularly novel because they systematically compare the microbial toxicity effects of a variety of supporting electrolytes, indicating some electrolytes may not be appropriate in certain applications. Further, these results are the first known report of the use of the Nitrification Inhibition test for this application. Overall, these results systematically demonstrate that anodic oxidation using the BDD anode is useful for addressing water contaminated with refractory organic contaminants, while minimizing impacts to wastewater plants or receiving waters accepting EAOP-treated effluent. The results of this study indicate nitrate can be a suitable electrolyte for incident response and, more importantly, serve as a baseline for site specific EAOP usage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Degradation and toxicity depletion of RB19 anthraquinone dye in water by ozone-based technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, María E; Fiasconaro, María L; Martín, Carlos A

    2017-02-01

    This research investigated the discoloration and mineralization of Reactive Blue 19 (RB19) anthraquinone dye by single ozonation, single UV radiation and ozonation jointed with UV radiation (O3/UV). The problem was approached from two points of view: with the objective of color removal or the mineralization of solution. In each case, the optimum operating conditions were different. Ozonation was the most effective treatment for color removal, while the combined O3/UV treatment was for mineralization. Major intermediates of the dye degradation were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and a degradation pathway was proposed. In addition, a clear decrease of the toxicity of the dye was achieved at the end of the experiments. The effect of initial dye concentration, pH, ozone dose, and UV radiation on the degradation of the dye and decrease of total organic carbon was investigated, in order to establish the optimal operating conditions to achieve discoloration, mineralization or a combination of both.

  1. Evaluation of using aluminum sulfate and water-soluble Moringa oleifera seed lectin to reduce turbidity and toxicity of polluted stream water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, José Henrique Edmilson Souza; de Santana, Keissy Vanderley; do Nascimento, Ana Cláudia Claudina; de Paiva, Sérgio Carvalho; de Moura, Maiara Celine; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; de Oliveira, Maria Betânia Melo; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; do Nascimento, Aline Elesbão; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique

    2016-11-01

    Aluminum salts are used as coagulants in water treatment; however, the exposure to residual aluminum has been associated with human brain lesions. The water-soluble Moringa oleifera lectin (WSMoL), which is extracted with distilled water and isolated by chitin chromatography, has coagulant activity and is able to reduce the concentration of metal ions in aqueous solutions. This study evaluated the potential of using aluminum sulfate and WSMoL to reduce the turbidity and toxicity of water from the Cavouco stream located in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. The water sample used (called P1) was collected from the stream source, which was found to be strongly polluted based on physicochemical and water quality analyses, as well as ecotoxicity assays with Artemia salina and seeds of Eruca sativa and Lactuca sativa. The assays combining WSMoL and aluminum sulfate were more efficient than those that used these agents separately. Furthermore, the greatest reduction in turbidity (96.8%) was obtained with the treatment using aluminum sulfate followed by WSMoL, compared to when they were applied simultaneously (91.3%). In addition, aluminum sulfate followed by WSMoL treatment resulted in residual aluminum concentration (0.3 mg/L) that was much lower than that recorded after the treatment using only the salt (35.5 mg/L). The ecotoxicity of P1 was also strongly reduced after the treatments. In summary, the combined use of aluminum sulfate and WSMoL was efficient in promoting a strong reduction of turbidity and ecotoxicity of a polluted water sample, without resulting in a high residual aluminum concentration at the conclusion of the treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  3. A screen-printed paper microbial fuel cell biosensor for detection of toxic compounds in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouler, Jon; Cruz-Izquierdo, Álvaro; Rengaraj, Saravanan; Scott, Janet L; Di Lorenzo, Mirella

    2018-04-15

    Access to safe drinking water is a human right, crucial to combat inequalities, reduce poverty and allow sustainable development. In many areas of the world, however, this right is not guaranteed, in part because of the lack of easily deployable diagnostic tools. Low-cost and simple methods to test water supplies onsite can protect vulnerable communities from the impact of contaminants in drinking water. Ideally such devices would also be easy to dispose of so as to leave no trace, or have a detrimental effect on the environment. To this aim, we here report the first paper microbial fuel cell (pMFC) fabricated by screen-printing biodegradable carbon-based electrodes onto a single sheet of paper, and demonstrate its use as a shock sensor for bioactive compounds (e.g. formaldehyde) in water. We also show a simple route to enhance the sensor performance by folding back-to-back two pMFCs electrically connected in parallel. This promising proof of concept work can lead to a revolutionizing way of testing water at point of use, which is not only green, easy-to-operate and rapid, but is also affordable to all. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Liukang [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); McDermitt, Dayle [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Anderson, Tyler [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Riensche, Brad [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Komissarov, Anatoly [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Howe, Julie [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Robust, economical, low-power and reliable closed-path methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) analyzers suitable for long-term measurements are not readily available commercially. Such analyzers are essential for quantifying the amount of CH4 and CO2 released from various ecosystems (wetlands, rice paddies, forests, etc.) and other surface contexts (e.g. landfills, animal husbandry lots, etc.), and for understanding the dynamics of the atmospheric CH4 and CO2 budget and their impact on climate change and global warming. The purpose of this project is to develop a closed-path methane, carbon dioxide gas and water vapor analyzer capable of long-term measurements in remote areas for global climate change and environmental research. The analyzer will be capable of being deployed over a wide range of ecosystems to understand methane and carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide exchange need to be made all year-round with limited maintenance requirements. During this Phase II effort, we successfully completed the design of the electronics, optical bench, trace gas detection method and mechanical infrastructure. We are using the technologies of two vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, a multiple-pass Herriott optical cell, wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. We also have designed the instrument application software, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), along with partial completion of the embedded software. The optical bench has been tested in a lab setting with very good results. Major sources of optical noise have been identified and through design, the optical noise floor is approaching -60dB. Both laser modules can be temperature controlled to help maximize the stability of the analyzer. Additionally, a piezo electric transducer has been

  5. An in situ postexposure feeding assay with Carcinus maenas for estuarine sediment-overlying water toxicity evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Susana M. [Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas de Abel Salazar (ICBAS), Departamento de Estudos de Populacoes, Largo Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Moreira-Santos, Matilde [Instituto do Ambiente e Vida, Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade de Coimbra, Largo Marques de Pombal, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal); Guilhermino, Lucia [Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas de Abel Salazar (ICBAS), Departamento de Estudos de Populacoes, Largo Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Ribeiro, Rui [Instituto do Ambiente e Vida, Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade de Coimbra, Largo Marques de Pombal, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: rui.ribeiro@zoo.uc.pt

    2006-01-15

    This study developed and evaluated a short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay for estuarine sediment-overlying waters, with the crab Carcinus maenas (L.) based on postexposure feeding. It consisted of a 48-h in situ exposure period followed by a short postexposure feeding period (30 min). A precise method for quantifying feeding, using the Polychaeta Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Mueller as food source, was first developed. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response was verified by comparing it to that of lethality, upon cadmium exposure. The influence of environmental conditions prevailing during exposure (salinity, temperature, substrate, light regime, and food availability) on postexposure feeding was also addressed. The potential of this in situ assay was then investigated by deploying organisms at ten sites, located in reference and contaminated Portuguese estuaries. Organism recovery ranged between 90% and 100% and a significant postexposure feeding depression (16.3-72.7%) was observed at all contaminated sites relatively to references. - A new sub-lethal toxicity assay is presented for marine invertebrates.

  6. Toxic metals in aquatic plants surviving in surface water polluted by copper mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samecka-Cymerman, A; Kempers, A J

    2004-09-01

    Concentrations of the metals Al, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn, as well as the macronutrients N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and S were measured in water, sediments, and the aquatic macrophytes Potamogeton pectinatus and Myriophyllum spicatum, growing in surface water receiving sewages and solid wastes from a copper smelter and a copper ore processing factory located in the Legnica-Glogow copper district in Southwest Poland. The deposition of mineral wastes in this area belong to the largest repository in Europe. The plants were able to survive at heavily contaminated sites. The concentrations of Cd (up to 0.6-1.7 microg/L in water and up to 10.1-12.9 mg/kg in sediments), Cu (up to 29-48 microg/L in water and up to 4.6-5.6g/kg in sediments), Pb (up to 1.5-2.2 g/kg in sediments), and Zn (up to 167-200 microg/L in water and up to 1.4-1.8 g/kg in sediments) seriously exceeded background values. P. pectinatus was able to survive tissue concentrations (in mg/kg) of up to 920 Cu, 6240 Mn, 98 Co, and 59 Ni, while M. spicatum survived tissue concentrations up to 1040 Cu, 6660 Mn, and 57 Co for. Enrichment ratios of elements in plant tissue and in water were much higher than those between plant tissue and sediments. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Inc.

  7. Freshwater molluscs as indicators of bioavailability and toxicity of metals in surface-water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, John F.; Collins, Jerilyn J.; Ware, George W.

    1991-01-01

    During the past several decades, studies from a variety of locations have demonstrated widespread occurrence of metals in surface waters at concentrations significantly higher than background levels. Elevated concentrations are not limited to certain water types or polluted areas; they appear in all types of systems and in all geographic areas. It is clear that metals enter the aquatic systems from diverse sources, both point and nonpoint, and they can be readily transported from one system to another. Transport routes include atmospheric, terrestrial, subterranean, aquatic, and biological pathways (Elder 1988; Salomons and Forstner 1984).

  8. Influence of salinity and organic matter on the toxicity of Cu to a brackish water and marine clone of the red macroalga Ceramium tenuicorne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ytreberg, Erik; Karlsson, Jenny; Ndungu, Kuria; Hassellöv, Martin; Breitbarth, Eike; Eklund, Britta

    2011-05-01

    Cu is a major active component in anti-fouling paints, which may reach toxic levels in areas with intense boat traffic and therefore is a metal of environmental concern. The bioavailability of metals is influenced by factors such as salinity and organic matter measured as total organic carbon (TOC). The influence of these two factors was studied, with a focus on brackish water conditions, by exposing a marine and a brackish water clone of the red macroalga Ceramium tenuicorne to Cu in different combinations of artificial seawater (salinity 5-15‰) and TOC (0-4 mg/L) in the form of fulvic acid (FA). In addition, the toxicity of Cu to both clones was compared in salinity 10‰ and 15‰. The results show that by increasing TOC from 0 to 2 and 4 mg/L, Cu was in general less toxic to both algal clones at all salinities tested (p<0.05). The effect of salinity on Cu toxicity was not as apparent, both a positive and negative effect was observed. The brackish water clone showed generally to be more sensitive to Cu in salinity 10‰ and 15‰ than the marine counterpart. In conclusion, FA reduced the Cu toxicity overall. The Cu tolerance of both strains at different salinities may reflect their origin and their adaptations to marine and brackish water. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Silicon enhanced salt tolerance by improving the root water uptake and decreasing the ion toxicity in cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiwen; Liu, Peng; Chen, Daoqian; Yin, Lina; Li, Hongbing; Deng, Xiping

    2015-01-01

    Although the effects of silicon application on enhancing plant salt tolerance have been widely investigated, the underlying mechanism has remained unclear. In this study, seedlings of cucumber, a medium silicon accumulator plant, grown in 0.83 mM silicon solution for 2 weeks were exposed to 65 mM NaCl solution for another 1 week. The dry weight and shoot/root ratio were reduced by salt stress, but silicon application significantly alleviated these decreases. The chlorophyll concentration, net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate and leaf water content were higher in plants treated with silicon than in untreated plants under salt stress conditions. Further investigation showed that salt stress decreased root hydraulic conductance (Lp), but that silicon application moderated this salt-induced decrease in Lp. The higher Lp in silicon-treated plants may account for the superior plant water balance. Moreover, silicon application significantly decreased Na+ concentration in the leaves while increasing K+ concentration. Simultaneously, both free and conjugated types of polyamines were maintained at high levels in silicon-treated plants, suggesting that polyamines may be involved in the ion toxicity. Our results indicate that silicon enhances the salt tolerance of cucumber through improving plant water balance by increasing the Lp and reducing Na+ content by increasing polyamine accumulation. PMID:26442072

  10. Water management strategies against toxic Microcycstis blooms in the Dutch delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verspagen, J.M.H.; Passarge, J.; Jöhnk, K.D.; Visser, P.M.; Peperzak, L.; Boers, P.; Laanbroek, H.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070378282; Huisman, J.

    2006-01-01

    To prevent flooding of the Dutch delta, former estuaries have been impounded by the building of dams and sluices. Some of these water bodies, however, experience major ecological problems. One of the problem areas is the former Volkerak estuary that was turned into a freshwater lake in 1987. From

  11. Water management strategies against toxic Microcystis blooms in the Dutch delta.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verspagen, J.M.H.; Passarge, J.; Jöhnk, K.; Visser, P.M.; Peperzak, L.; Boers, P.; Laanbroek, H.J.; Huisman, J.

    2006-01-01

    To prevent flooding of the Dutch delta, former estuaries have been impounded by the building of dams and sluices. Some of these water bodies, however, experience major ecological problems. One of the problem areas is the former Volkerak estuary that was turned into a freshwater lake in 1987. From

  12. CHALLENGES IN MAINTAINING DRINKING WATER QUALITY AT THE TAP: CONTAMINATION WITH TOXIC LEAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging drinking water infrastructure in the US was given a grade of D (poor) by the American Society of Civil Engineers, and was voted as the most urgent of all societal infrastructure challenges. Legacy lead pipe, leaded solder and/or leaded brass are a particularly notorious old...

  13. JP-4 and JP-9 fuel toxicity studies using fresh water fish and aufwuchs. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, S.; Cooper, R.; Jenkins, D.

    1976-06-01

    This report contains the results of research efforts concerned with defining the effects of potential environmental contamination resulting from the use of certain Air Force materials on fresh water fish and aufwuchs. Materials evaluated include RJ-4, RJ-5, Methylcyclohexane, JP-9 and JP-4. Techniques for exposing organisms to those substances are discussed and the results of such exposures are presented.

  14. Concentration and toxicity of some metals in zooplankton from nearshore waters of Bombay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gajbhiye, S.N.; Nair, V.R.; Narvekar, P.V.; Desai, B.N.

    Zooplankton samples collected from 4 stations located in the nearshore waters of Bombay were analysed for Cu, Co, Mn, Ni and Cd. Concentrations of Co, Mn and Ni were more in copepods and gelatinous organisms than in mysids and decapods. High...

  15. Multi-linear regression models predict the effects of water chemistry on acute lead toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbaugh, A J; Brix, K V; Mager, E M; Grosell, M

    2011-09-01

    The current study examined the acute toxicity of lead (Pb) to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas in a variety of natural waters. The natural waters were selected to range in pertinent water chemistry parameters such as calcium, pH, total CO(2) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Acute toxicity was determined for C. dubia and P. promelas using standard 48h and 96h protocols, respectively. For both organisms acute toxicity varied markedly according to water chemistry, with C. dubia LC50s ranging from 29 to 180μg/L and P. promelas LC50s ranging from 41 to 3598μg/L. Additionally, no Pb toxicity was observed for P. promelas in three alkaline natural waters. With respect to water chemistry parameters, DOC had the strongest protective impact for both organisms. A multi-linear regression (MLR) approach combining previous lab data and the current data was used to identify the relative importance of individual water chemistry components in predicting acute Pb toxicity for both species. As anticipated, the P. promelas best-fit MLR model combined DOC, calcium and pH. Unexpectedly, in the C. dubiaMLR model the importance of pH, TCO(2) and calcium was minimal while DOC and ionic strength were the controlling water quality variables. Adjusted R(2) values of 0.82 and 0.64 for the P. promelas and C. dubia models, respectively, are comparable to previously developed biotic ligand models for other metals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Toxic diatoms and domoic acid in natural and iron enriched waters of the oceanic Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Mary W; Bargu, Sibel; Coale, Susan L; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R; Garcia, Ana C; Roberts, Kathryn J; Sekula-Wood, Emily; Bruland, Kenneth W; Coale, Kenneth H

    2010-11-30

    Near-surface waters ranging from the Pacific subarctic (58°N) to the Southern Ocean (66°S) contain the neurotoxin domoic acid (DA), associated with the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia. Of the 35 stations sampled, including ones from historic iron fertilization experiments (SOFeX, IronEx II), we found Pseudo-nitzschia at 34 stations and DA measurable at 14 of the 26 stations analyzed for DA. Toxin ranged from 0.3 fg·cell(-1) to 2 pg·cell(-1), comparable with levels found in similar-sized cells from coastal waters. In the western subarctic, descent of intact Pseudo-nitzschia likely delivered significant amounts of toxin (up to 4 μg of DA·m(-2)·d(-1)) to underlying mesopelagic waters (150-500 m). By reexamining phytoplankton samples from SOFeX and IronEx II, we found substantial amounts of DA associated with Pseudo-nitzschia. Indeed, at SOFeX in the Antarctic Pacific, DA reached 220 ng·L(-1), levels at which animal mortalities have occurred on continental shelves. Iron ocean fertilization also occurs naturally and may have promoted blooms of these ubiquitous algae over previous glacial cycles during deposition of iron-rich aerosols. Thus, the neurotoxin DA occurs both in coastal and oceanic waters, and its concentration, associated with changes in Pseudo-nitzschia abundance, likely varies naturally with climate cycles, as well as with artificial iron fertilization. Given that iron fertilization in iron-depleted regions of the sea has been proposed to enhance phytoplankton growth and, thereby, both reduce atmospheric CO(2) and moderate ocean acidification in surface waters, consideration of the potentially serious ecosystem impacts associated with DA is prudent.

  17. Toxic diatoms and domoic acid in natural and iron enriched waters of the oceanic Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Mary W.; Bargu, Sibel; Coale, Susan L.; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.; Garcia, Ana C.; Roberts, Kathryn J.; Sekula-Wood, Emily; Bruland, Kenneth W.; Coale, Kenneth H.

    2010-01-01

    Near-surface waters ranging from the Pacific subarctic (58°N) to the Southern Ocean (66°S) contain the neurotoxin domoic acid (DA), associated with the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia. Of the 35 stations sampled, including ones from historic iron fertilization experiments (SOFeX, IronEx II), we found Pseudo-nitzschia at 34 stations and DA measurable at 14 of the 26 stations analyzed for DA. Toxin ranged from 0.3 fg·cell−1 to 2 pg·cell−1, comparable with levels found in similar-sized cells from coastal waters. In the western subarctic, descent of intact Pseudo-nitzschia likely delivered significant amounts of toxin (up to 4 μg of DA·m−2·d−1) to underlying mesopelagic waters (150–500 m). By reexamining phytoplankton samples from SOFeX and IronEx II, we found substantial amounts of DA associated with Pseudo-nitzschia. Indeed, at SOFeX in the Antarctic Pacific, DA reached 220 ng·L−1, levels at which animal mortalities have occurred on continental shelves. Iron ocean fertilization also occurs naturally and may have promoted blooms of these ubiquitous algae over previous glacial cycles during deposition of iron-rich aerosols. Thus, the neurotoxin DA occurs both in coastal and oceanic waters, and its concentration, associated with changes in Pseudo-nitzschia abundance, likely varies naturally with climate cycles, as well as with artificial iron fertilization. Given that iron fertilization in iron-depleted regions of the sea has been proposed to enhance phytoplankton growth and, thereby, both reduce atmospheric CO2 and moderate ocean acidification in surface waters, consideration of the potentially serious ecosystem impacts associated with DA is prudent. PMID:21068374

  18. Ultra-trace recognition and removal of toxic chromium (VI) ions from water using visual mesocaptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenashen, Md A; Shahat, A; El-Safty, Sherif A

    2013-01-15

    The key to designing optical mesocaptors is to construct a chromogenic receptor, namely, diphenylcarbazide (DPC), as a nanoscale platform scavenger with different functional characteristics, such as density, accessibility, and intrinsic mobility. Engineering of optical captors allows facile and reliable signaling in continuous monitoring modes, and enables simple and high-speed removal of toxic chromium (VI) ions. Mesoporous aluminosilica monoliths, with unique morphologies, active surface sites, and physical properties, enhance sensing/removal characteristics in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, and response time. The systematic design of optical mesocaptor is based on a densely patterned selective binding site (DPC) in engineered mesocylinder carriers that have multidirectional pores and microsized particle-like monoliths to control the adsorption/detection assays of Cr(VI) ions. Synthetic mesocaptor can be used for visual removal of Cr(VI) ions even at low concentration levels of 10(-10)M (i.e., 0.07 ppb) with rapid response time in minutes. Moreover, these new classes of design-made hybrid mesocaptor exhibit long-term signaling stability and recognition functionalities that provided extraordinary sensitivity, selectivity, reusability, and fast kinetic detection and quantification of various deleterious metal ions in the environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mesoporous hexagonal and cubic aluminosilica adsorbents for toxic nitroanilines from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, Sherif A; Ismael, M; Shahat, A; Shenashen, M A

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, ordered mesocage hexagonal P6mm and cubic Pm3n aluminosilica nanoadsorbents with monolith-like morphology and micro-, meso-, and macro-pores were fabricated using a simple, reproducible, direct synthesis. Our results suggest that the aluminosilica nanoadsorbents attained the ordering and uniform hexagonal and cubic pores even at the high Si/Al ratio of 4. The acidity of nanoadsorbents significantly based on the amount of aluminum species in the walls of the silica pore framework. Aluminosilica nanoadsorbents were used as a removal of environmentally toxic aromatic amines, namely p-nitroaniline (p-NA), from wastewater. The loading amount of Bronsted acid sites, mesostructural geometries, and multi-directional pores (3D) of the aluminosilica adsorbents played a key factor in the enhancement of the coverage adsorbent surfaces and intraparticle diffusion of adsorbate molecules onto the network surfaces and into the pore architectures of monoliths. Significantly, we developed theoretical models to explain the 3D microscopic geometry and the pore orientation of aluminosilica monoliths. A key component of the nanoadsorbents is the ability to create revisable p-NA adsorption systems with multiple reuse cycles. However, simple treatment using an acidic aqueous solution was found to remove effectively the p-NA and to form "p-NA-free" pore surfaces without any mesostructural damage.

  20. Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collar, Craig W

    2012-11-16

    Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program's goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and

  1. Chronic sublethal effects of San Francisco Bay sediments on nereis (neanthes) arenaceodentata; effect of food ration on sediment toxicity. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, D.W.; Dillon, T.M.

    1993-09-01

    This report is designed to address concerns regarding the effect of food ration on toxicity during chronic sublethal sediment bioassays. To this end, a contaminated San Francisco Bay sediment and a clean control sediment were evaluated in a chronic sublethal test under a series of different food rations, with the marine polychaete worm Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata. Animals were exposed from early juvenile stage through the onset of gametogenesis. Treatments were 2.OX, 1.OX, 0.5X, and 0.25X where X is the recommended food ration for laboratory cultures. Test end points were survival, growth, and reproduction. The contaminated sediment was a composite of several cores taken to project depth (38 ft (11.6 m) below mean low water mark) from an area in Oakland Inner Harbor known to be contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals. Comparisons were made with a clean control sediment. The control sediment is used in the laboratory cultures of N. arenaceodentata and was collected from Sequim, WA. Mean percent survival of Neanthes was high (>90 percent) in both the contaminated and control sediment across all food ration treatments. Individual wet weights were significantly reduced with decreasing food ration in both contaminated and control sediments. Significant differences in wet weight between sediment types were observed at the 1.OX, 0.5X, and 0.25X rations. Reproduction (fecundity and emergent juvenile (EJ) production) was also Chronic sublethal, Neanthes, Dredged material, San Francisco Bay, Food ration, Sediment.

  2. Oral (drinking water) two-generation reproductive toxicity study of dibromoacetic acid (DBA) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, M S; York, R G; Hoberman, A M; Frazee, J; Fisher, L C; Brown, W R; Creasy, D M

    2002-01-01

    In a two-generation study of dibromoacetic acid (DBA), Crl SD rats (30 rats/sex/group/generation) were provided DBA in drinking water at 0 (reverse osmosis-deionized water), 50, 250, and 650 ppm (0, 4.4 to 11.6, 22.4 to 55.6, and 52.4 to 132.0 mg/kg/day, respectively; human intake approximates 0.1 microg/kg/day [0.0001 mg/kg/day]). Observations included viability, clinical signs, water and feed consumption, body and organ weights, histopathology, and reproductive parameters (mating, fertility, abortions, premature deliveries, durations of gestation, litter sizes, sex ratios and viabilities, maternal behaviors, reproductive organ weights, sperm parameters and implantation sites, sexual maturation). Histopathological evaluations were performed on at least 10 P and F1 rats/sex at 0 and 650 ppm (gross lesions, testes, intact epididymis; 10 F1 dams at 0, 250, and 650 ppm for primordial follicles). Developmental observations included implantations, pup numbers, sexes, viabilities, body weights, morphology, and reproductive performance. At 50 ppm and higher, both sexes and generations had increased absolute and relative liver and kidneys weights, and female rats in both generations had reduced absolute and relative adrenal weights; adrenal changes were probably associated with physiological changes in water balance. The livers and kidneys (10/sex/group/generation) had no histopathological changes. Other minimal effects at 50 ppm were reduced water consumption and a transient reduction in body weight. At 250 and 650 ppm, DBA reduced parental water consumption, body weight gains, body weights, feed consumption, and pup body weights. P and F1 generation male rats at 250 and 650 ppm had altered sperm production (retained step 19 spermatids in stages IX and X tubules sometimes associated with residual bodies) and some epididymal tubule changes (increased amounts of exfoliated spermatogenic cells/residual bodies in epididymal tubules, atrophy, and hypospermia), although

  3. Toxicity Sub chronic Water Extract Meretrix meretrix Linnaeus In Vivo on Sprague dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azwin Apriandi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Meretrix meretrix is one of the shells of sea water are widely utilized by people as food. This clamalso has many properties and benefits, so in this study tested the effect of the water extract of Meretrixmeretrix against blood chemistry profile Sprague Dawley rats with the method (OECD 413: 2009. Based onobservations obtained growth, feed intake, weight of liver and kidney in normal conditions. Levels of urea,creatinine, cholesterol between the control mice treated with A/0.1 and A/1 were not significantly different(p> 0.05 while the levels of bilirubin and albumin between control mice treated with A/0.1 and A/1 resultssignificantly different (p<0.05, but all blood chemistry parameters tested is still in the normal category.

  4. Effect of Fenton treatment on the aquatic toxicity of bisphenol A in different water matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Aytac, Ece; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    2014-01-01

    incomplete, speaking for the accumulation of refractory degradation products. The presence of chloride and/or natural organic matter influenced H2O2 consumption rates and the treatment performance of the Fenton's reagent as well. The sensitivity of the selected test organisms for BPA and its Fenton treatment...... products. For this purpose, BPA was subjected to Fenton treatment in the growth medium of the test organisms employed as well as in real lake water. Treatment results indicated that BPA removals were fast and complete within less than a minute, whereas total organic carbon (TOC) removals were rather...... products in different water matrices was found in the following decreasing order: the freshwater microalgae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) > the freshwater cladoceran (Daphnia magna) > marine photobacteria (Vibrio fischeri)....

  5. Commercialization of air conditioning heat pump/water heater. Final technical report, Volume 1: Transmittal documents; Executive summary; Project summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-30

    This is the final technical report on a commercialization project for an air conditioning heat pump water heater. The objective of the project was to produce a saleable system which would be economically competitive with natural gas and cost effective with regard to initial cost versus annual operating costs. The development and commercialization of the system is described.

  6. Studying toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkus, A.; LeBlanc, L.; Kim, C.; Van Beneden, R.; Mayer, G.

    2006-01-01

    With funding from the George Mitchell Center for the Environment at the University of Maine, a team of scientists used a simple laboratory-based sediment resuspension design, and two well-established aquatic toxicology models, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio), to evaluate if resuspension of Penobscot river sediment significantly elevates the toxicity of river water and to provide preliminary information on the types of chemicals likely to desorb during resuspension. The group collected sediments from two sites with known chemical contamination downstream of the Great Works and Veazie dams. The sediments were examined to determine the dynamics of PAH desorption and degradation under different resuspension frequencies. The scientists used clarified water from resuspension experiments for toxicity tests with the water-flea Ceriodaphnia dubia, and other aquatic test organisms to infer toxicity from sediments from northern California rivers. Data from the study will help ascertain whether metals and/or xenoestrogens are present in the desorption water and give insight into possible avenues of sediment remediation.

  7. ASSESSMENT AND TOXICITY OF FLUORIDE FROM GROUND WATER SOURCES IN AND AROUND BAGALKOT DISTRICT, KARNATAKA, INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    B. M. Kalshetty; S.M.Gaonkar; R. S. Gani; M.B.Kalashetti

    2013-01-01

    Physico-Chemical analysis of ground water samples was carried out from 20 locations of Bagalkot, Badami and Hungund and Ilkal taluks. The analysis of different parameters such as Temperature, pH, EC, TDS and Fluoride were carried out as per the standard methods. All the parameters studied were within the permissible limit except Fluoride content in few locations. The analyzed results indicate the Fluoride concentration in some sampling spots namely Simikeri (Govt. Primary School Campus) of Ba...

  8. Contribution of Colonic Fermentation and Fecal Water Toxicity to the Pathophysiology of Lactose-Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windey, Karen; Houben, Els; Deroover, Lise; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-09-08

    Whether or not abdominal symptoms occur in subjects with small intestinal lactose malabsorption might depend on differences in colonic fermentation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we collected fecal samples from subjects with lactose malabsorption with abdominal complaints (LM-IT, n = 11) and without abdominal complaints (LM-T, n = 8) and subjects with normal lactose digestion (NLD, n = 15). Lactose malabsorption was diagnosed using a (13)C-lactose breath test. Colonic fermentation was characterized in fecal samples at baseline and after incubation with lactose for 3 h, 6 h and 24 h through a metabolomics approach using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Fecal water cytotoxicity was analyzed using a colorimetric assay. Fecal water cytotoxicity was not different between the three groups (Kruskall-Wallis p = 0.164). Cluster analysis of the metabolite patterns revealed separate clusters for NLD, LM-T and LM-IT samples at baseline and after 24 h incubation with lactose. Levels of 5-methyl-2-furancarboxaldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD whereas those of an unidentified aldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT compared to LM-T and NLD. Incubation with lactose increased short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations more in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD. In conclusion, fermentation patterns were clearly different in NLD, LM-IT and LM-T, but not related to differences in fecal water cytotoxicity.

  9. Assessing water quality in a tropical lake using biomarkers in zebrafish embryos: developmental toxicity and stress protein responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallare, A V; Pagulayan, R; Lacdan, N; Köhler, H R; Triebskorn, R

    2005-05-01

    In order to achieve a more substantial appraisal of lake water quality, the assessment must not be based only on chemical measurements and analyses of the water itself, but even more so on the impact of existing conditions on aquatic biota. This is possible with the use of biotests or biomarkers, e.g. investigations of the developmental parameters (96-h embryotoxicity evaluate) or of the induction of heat shock proteins (proteotoxicity evaluate). To evaluate the suitability of these tests for environmental screening, fertilized zebrafish eggs were exposed to water samples collected from five sites of varying levels of stress from Laguna Lake, Philippines. Reconstituted water was used as laboratory control while water samples from a highly polluted freshwater source was used as positive control. Developmental parameters were noted and described within 48 and 96 h of exposure. Dilution experiments of the positive control were also done to further assess and compare toxicity potentials of Laguna Lake waters with those originating from a polluted freshwater. After the 96-h exposure, the levels of stress proteins (hsp 70) were determined in embryos from all exposure groups. Results showed 100% mortality in embryos exposed to undiluted positive control (PC) within only 12 h. Increasing dilution levels, however, resulted in lower mortality and lower abnormality rates. No detectable developmental differences were noted among embryos exposed to either the laboratory control or Laguna Lake waters at the end of 96 h, regardless of the source. Very high survival rates and high hatching success rates were observed in embryos exposed to lake waters as well as laboratory control, and the data did not differ significantly among the groups. Likewise, no significant malformations were noted among all developing embryos throughout the exposure period. However, the levels of heat shock proteins in the two sites located closest to Manila, the Philippine capital (Northern West Bay and

  10. Development Of Nutrient And Water Recycling Capabilities In Algae Biofuels Production Systems. Final Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, Tryg [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Dept.; Spierling, Ruth [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Poole, Kyle [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Blackwell, Shelley [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Crowe, Braden [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Hutton, Matt [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Lehr, Corinne [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2018-01-25

    inhibition was only observed in the final fifth round of reuse. 11. No decline in productivity was detected after 15 rounds of water recycling with nutrients provided by whole digestate in lab cultivation. Lab tests allowed for steady light and temperature, increasing the ability to detect inhibition. 12. In initial pilot inhibition studies, wastewater growth media was reused once while productivity was monitored. Media reuse was accomplished with triplicate sets of 33-m2 raceways operated in series. First-round gross productivity (based on effluent biomass flow) averaged 23 g/m2-day annually while second-round gross productivity averaged 19 g/m2-day annually. In terms of net productivity (based on raceway effluent biomass minus influent biomass), the first-round productivity averaged 15 g/m2-d and second round averaged 13 g/m2-d during June-September operation. The higher productivity in the first-round ponds was likely due to heterotrophic/mixotrophic growth on the wastewater organic matter. 13. In a culminating pilot experiment, coagulant was used to decrease the carry-over of unsettled algae into subsequent rounds of growth. Over nearly 8 months, 93% of the media (the equivalent of 14 rounds of water reuse) was recycled without significant productivity loss compared to controls. Ponds receiving both recycled water and nutrients had net productivities of 14-24 g/m2-d during fall and mid-summer, respectively. 14. Techno-economic analysis of the proposed facility found minimum fuel selling price to range from $7.01/gallon gasoline equivalent without revenue other than fuel to $3.85/GGE with revenue from wastewater treatment fees and LCFS and RIN (Low Carbon Fuel Standard and Renewable Identification Numbers) credits. 15. Life cycle assessment indicated GHG emissions of 40.7 g CO2/MJ fuel and a net energy ratio (energy required/energy produced) of 0.37.

  11. Solar heating and hot water system installed at office building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This document is the Final Report of the Solar Energy System Installed at the First Solar Heated Office Building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas. The Solar System was designed to provide 87 percent of the space heating needs, 100 percent of the potable hot water needs and is sized for future absorption cooling. The collection subsystem consists of 28 Solargenics, series 76, flat plate collectors with a total area of 1596 square feet. The solar loop circulates an ethylene glycol-water solution through the collectors into a hot water system heat exchanger. The hot water storage subsystem consists of a heat exchanger, two 2300 gallon concrete hot water storage tanks with built in heat exchangers and a back-up electric boiler. The domestic hot water subsystem sends hot water to the 10,200 square feet floor area office building hot water fixtures. The building cold water system provides make-up to the solar loop, the heating loop, and the hot water concrete storage tanks. The design, construction, cost analysis, operation and maintenance of the solar system are described. The system became operational July 11, 1979.

  12. Quantitative PCR method for enumeration of cells of cryptic species of the toxic marine dinoflagellate Ostreopsis spp. in coastal waters of Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohito Hariganeya

    Full Text Available Monitoring of harmful algal bloom (HAB species in coastal waters is important for assessment of environmental impacts associated with HABs. Co-occurrence of multiple cryptic species such as toxic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis species make reliable microscopic identification difficult, so the employment of molecular tools is often necessary. Here we developed new qPCR method by which cells of cryptic species can be enumerated based on actual gene number of target species. The qPCR assay targets the LSU rDNA of Ostreopsis spp. from Japan. First, we constructed standard curves with a linearized plasmid containing the target rDNA. We then determined the number of rDNA copies per cell of target species from a single cell isolated from environmental samples using the qPCR assay. Differences in the DNA recovery efficiency was calculated by adding exogenous plasmid to a portion of the sample lysate before and after DNA extraction followed by qPCR. Then, the number of cells of each species was calculated by division of the total number of rDNA copies of each species in the samples by the number of rDNA copies per cell. To test our procedure, we determined the total number of rDNA copies using environmental samples containing no target cells but spiked with cultured cells of several species of Ostreopsis. The numbers estimated by the qPCR method closely approximated total numbers of cells added. Finally, the numbers of cells of target species in environmental samples containing cryptic species were enumerated by the qPCR method and the total numbers also closely approximated the microscopy cell counts. We developed a qPCR method that provides accurate enumeration of each cryptic species in environments. This method is expected to be a powerful tool for monitoring the various HAB species that occur as cryptic species in coastal waters.

  13. Monitoring acute and chronic water column toxicity in the Northern Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary, California, USA, using the euryhaline amphipod, Hyalella azteca: 2006 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Inge; Deanovic, Linda A; Markiewicz, Dan; Khamphanh, Manisay; Reece, Charles K; Stillway, Marie; Reece, Charissa

    2010-10-01

    After the significant population decline of several pelagic fish species in the Northern Sacramento-San Joaquin (SSJ) Estuary (CA, USA) in 2002, a study was performed to monitor water column toxicity using the amphipod Hyalella azteca. From January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2007, water samples were collected biweekly from 15 to 16 sites located in large delta channels and main-stem rivers, selected based on prevalent distribution patterns of fish species of concern. Ten-day laboratory tests with H. azteca survival and relative growth as toxicity endpoints were conducted. The enzyme inhibitor piperonyl butoxide ([PBO], 25 µg/L) was added to synergize or antagonize pyrethroid or organophosphate (OP) insecticide toxicity, respectively. Significant amphipod mortality was observed in 5.6% of ambient samples. Addition of PBO significantly changed survival or growth in 1.1% and 10.1% of ambient samples, respectively. Sites in the Lower Sacramento River had the largest number of acutely toxic samples, high occurrence of PBO effects on amphipod growth (along with sites in the South Delta), and the highest total ammonia/ammonium concentrations (0.28 ± 0.15 mg/L). Ammonia/ammonium, or contaminants occurring in mixture with these, likely contributed to the observed toxicity. Pyrethroid insecticides were detected at potentially toxic concentrations. Overall, results of this study identified specific areas and contaminants of concern and showed that water in the Northern SSJ Estuary was at times acutely toxic to sensitive invertebrates. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2010;29:2190-2199. © 2010 SETAC.

  14. Water Spinach, Ipomoea aquatic (Convolvulaceae, Ameliorates Lead Toxicity by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat Dewanjee

    Full Text Available Ipomoea aquatica (Convolvulaceae, an aquatic edible plant, is traditionally used against heavy metal toxicity in India. The current study intended to explore the protective role of edible (aqueous extract of I. aquatica (AEIA against experimentally induced Pb-intoxication.The cytoprotective role of AEIA was measured on mouse hepatocytes by cell viability assay followed by Hoechst staining and flow cytometric assay. The effect on ROS production, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, intracellular redox status were measured after incubating the hepatocytes with Pb-acetate (6.8 μM along with AEIA (400 μg/ml. The effects on the expressions of apoptotic signal proteins were estimated by western blotting. The protective role of AEIA was measured by in vivo assay in mice. Haematological, serum biochemical, tissue redox status, Pb bioaccumulation and histological parameters were evaluated to estimate the protective role of AEIA (100 mg/kg against Pb-acetate (5 mg/kg intoxication.Pb-acetate treated hepatocytes showed a gradual reduction of cell viability dose-dependently with an IC50 value of 6.8 μM. Pb-acetate treated hepatocytes exhibited significantly enhanced levels (p < 0.01 of ROS production, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation with concomitant depletion (p < 0.01 of antioxidant enzymes and GSH. However, AEIA treatment could significantly restore the aforementioned parameters in murine hepatocytes near to normalcy. Besides, AEIA significantly reversed (p < 0.05-0.01 the alterations of transcription levels of apoptotic proteins viz. Bcl 2, Bad, Cyt C, Apaf-1, cleaved caspases [caspase 3, caspase 8 and caspase 9], Fas and Bid. In in vivo bioassay, Pb-acetate treatment caused significantly high intracellular Pb burden and oxidative pressure in the kidney, liver, heart, brain and testes in mice. In addition, the haematological and serum biochemical factors were changed significantly in Pb-acetate-treated animals. AEIA treatment restored

  15. Effects of marine actinomycete on the removal of a toxicity alga Phaeocystis globose in eutrophication waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huajun eZhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Phaeocystis globosa blooms in eutrophication waters can cause severely damage in marine ecosystem and consequently influence human activities. This study investigated the effect and role of an algicidal actinomycete (Streptomyces sp. JS01 on the elimination process of P. globosa. JS01 supernatant could alter algal cell membrane permeability in 4 h when analyzed with flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS levels were 7.2 times higher than that at 0 h following exposure to JS01 supernatant for 8 h, which indicated that algal cells suffered from oxidative damage. The Fv/Fm value which could reflect photosystem II (PS II electron flow status also decreased. Real-time PCR showed that the expression of the photosynthesis related genes psbA and rbcS were suppressed by JS01 supernatant, which might induce damage to PS II. Our results demonstrated that JS01 supernatant can change algal membrane permeability in a short time and then affect photosynthesis process, which might block the PS II electron transport chain to produce excessive ROS. This experiment demonstrated that Streptomyces sp. JS01 could eliminate harmful algae in marine waters efficiently and may be function as a harmful algal bloom controller material.

  16. Chronic Arsenic Toxicity from Drinking Well Water in a Rural Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Mohammad Kazemifar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drinking water is the most important cause of poisoning in the world. Iran is one of the countries with arsenic-contaminated water upper limit of normal. In this study, we decided to determine the effects of chronic arsenic poisoning on demographic, clinical and laboratory features of people. Methods: This descriptive-sectional study carried out on all people resided in Shahidabad Village, Qazvin Province in 2015. All of them were evaluated in terms of demographic features, blood pressure, diabetes, dermatologic, and neurologic lesions, and fasting blood sugar. People with exclusion criteria were excluded. The data were analyzed by SPSS software and descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 400 subjects, 278 (69.5% females and 122 (30.5% males, 88 (22% people had positive urine test for arsenic and 312 (78% subjects had negative urine test. The mean age of them was 48.9± 16.6 yr. The mean age and duration of residence in the region in arsenic positive group were significantly higher than arsenic negative group (P<0.05. Blood pressure, history of diabetes, dermatologic and neurologic lesions, and fasting blood sugar had no significant differences between two groups. Conclusion: Although there were no significant differences between two groups in terms of many clinical and laboratory findings but the prevalence of 22% of poisoning with arsenic in the selected population reveals the necessity of screening, preventive measures and appropriate treatments in people exposed to arsenic contamination.

  17. Chemical comparison and acute toxicity of water accommodated fraction (WAF) of source and field collected Macondo oils from the Deepwater Horizon spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faksness, Liv-Guri; Altin, Dag; Nordtug, Trond; Daling, Per S; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik

    2015-02-15

    Two Source oils and five field collected oil residues from the Deepwater Horizon incident were chemically characterized. Water accommodated fractions (WAFs) of the Source oils and two of the field-weathered oils were prepared to evaluate the impact of natural weathering on the chemical composition and the acute toxicity of the WAFs. Toxicity test species representing different tropic levels were used (the primary producer Skeletonema costatum (algae) and the herbivorous copepod Acartia tonsa). The results suggest that the potential for acute toxicity is higher in WAFs from non-weathered oils than WAFs from the field weathered oils. The Source oils contained a large fraction of soluble and bioavailable components (such as BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, xylenes) and naphthalene), whereas in the surface collected oils these components were depleted by dissolution into the water column as the oil rose to the surface and by evaporative loss after reaching the sea surface. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effective, Low-Cost Recovery of Toxic Arsenate Anions from Water by Using Hollow-Sphere Geode Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenashen, Mohamed A; Akhtar, Naeem; Selim, Mahmoud M; Morsy, Wafaa M; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Kawada, Satoshi; Alhamid, Abdulaziz A; Ohashi, Naoki; Ichinose, Izumi; Alamoudi, Ahmad S; El-Safty, Sherif A

    2017-08-04

    Because of the devastating impact of arsenic on terrestrial and aquatic organisms, the recovery, removal, disposal, and management of arsenic-contaminated water is a considerable challenge and has become an urgent necessity in the field of water treatment. This study reports the controlled fabrication of a low-cost adsorbent based on microscopic C-,N-doped NiO hollow spheres with geode shells composed of poly-CN nanospherical nodules (100 nm) that were intrinsically stacked and wrapped around the hollow spheres to form a shell with a thickness of 500-700 nm. This C-,N-doped NiO hollow-sphere adsorbent (termed CNN) with multiple diffusion routes through open pores and caves with connected open macro/meso windows over the entire surface and well-dispersed hollow-sphere particles that create vesicle traps for the capture, extraction, and separation of arsenate (AsO 4 3- ) species from aqueous solution. The CNN structures are considered to be a potentially attractive adsorbent for AsO 4 3- species due to 1) superior removal and trapping capacity from water samples and 2) selective trapping of AsO 4 3- from real water samples that mainly contained chloride and nitrate anions and Fe 2+ , and Mn 2+ , Ca 2+ , and Mg 2+ cations. The structural stability of the hierarchal geodes was evident after 20 cycles without any significant decrease in the recovery efficiency of AsO 4 3- species. To achieve low-cost adsorbents and toxic-waste management, this superior CNN AsO 4 3- dead-end trapping and recovery system evidently enabled the continuous control of AsO 4 3- disposal in water-scarce environments, presents a low-cost and eco-friendly adsorbent for AsO 4 3- species, and selectively produced water-free arsenate species. These CNN geode traps show potential as excellent adsorbent candidates in environment remediation tools and human healthcare. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A novel two-dimensional liquid-chromatography method for online prediction of the toxicity of transformation products of benzophenones after water chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Ma, Li-Yun; Xu, Li; Shi, Zhi-Guo

    2015-08-01

    Benzophenone-type UV filters (BPs) are ubiquitous in the environment. Transformation products (TPs) of BPs with suspected toxicity are likely to be produced during disinfection of water by chlorination. To quickly predict the toxicity of TPs, in this study, a novel two-dimensional liquid-chromatography (2D-LC) method was established in which the objective of the first dimension was to separate the multiple components of the BPs sample after chlorination, using a reversed-phase liquid-chromatography mode. A biochromatographic system, i.e. bio-partitioning micellar chromatography with the polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether aqueous solution as the mobile phase, served as the second dimension to predict the toxicity of the fraction from the first dimension on the basis of the quantitative retention-activity relationships (QRARs) model. Six BPs, namely 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone, oxybenzone, 4-hydroxybenzophenone, 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone-5-sulfonic acid, 2,2'-dihydroxy-4,4'-dimethoxybenzophenone and 2,2'-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, were the target analytes subjected to chlorination. The products of these BPs after chlorination were directly injected to the 2D-LC system for analysis. The results indicated that most TPs may be less toxic than their parent chemicals, but some may be more toxic, and that intestinal toxicity of TPs may be more obvious than blood toxicity. The proposed method is time-saving, high-throughput, and reliable, and has great potential for predicting toxicity or bioactivity of unknown and/or known components in a complex sample. Graphical Abstract The scheme for the 2D-LC online prediction of toxicity of the transformation products of benzophenone-type UV filters after chlorination.

  20. Toxicity of drinking water disinfection byproducts: cell cycle alterations induced by the monohaloacetonitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaki, Yukako; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-10-07

    Haloacetonitriles (HANs) are a chemical class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that form from reactions between disinfectants and nitrogen-containing precursors, the latter more prevalent in water sources impacted by algae bloom and municipal wastewater effluent discharge. HANs, previously demonstrated to be genotoxic, were investigated for their effects on the mammalian cell cycle. Treating Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with monoHANs followed by the release from the chemical treatment resulted in the accumulation of abnormally high DNA content in cells over time (hyperploid). The potency for the cell cycle alteration followed the order: iodoacetonitrile (IAN) > bromoacetonitrile (BAN) ≫ chloroacetonitrile (CAN). Exposure to 6 μM IAN, 12 μM BAN and 900 μM CAN after 26 h post-treatment incubation resulted in DNA repair; however, subsequent cell cycle alteration effects were observed. Cell proliferation of HAN-treated cells was suppressed for as long as 43 to 52 h. Enlarged cell size was observed after 52 h post-treatment incubation without the induction of cytotoxicity. The HAN-mediated cell cycle alteration was mitosis- and proliferation-dependent, which suggests that HAN treatment induced mitosis override, and that HAN-treated cells proceeded into S phase and directly into the next cell cycle. Cells with multiples genomes would result in aneuploidy (state of abnormal chromosome number and DNA content) at the next mitosis since extra centrosomes could compromise the assembly of bipolar spindles. There is accumulating evidence of a transient tetraploid state proceeding to aneuploidy in cancer progression. Biological self-defense systems to ensure genomic stability and to eliminate tetraploid cells exist in eukaryotic cells. A key tumor suppressor gene, p53, is oftentimes mutated in various types of human cancer. It is possible that HAN disruption of the normal cell cycle and the generation of aberrant cells with an abnormal number of

  1. 77 FR 12076 - Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and Integrated Water Resource Management Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... Management Plan, Yakima River Basin, Water Enhancement Project, Benton, Kittitas, Klickitat, and Yakima... analyzed the elements of the Integrated Water Resource Management Plan in the FPEIS. The FPEIS addresses... management plan includes three major components (Habitat, Systems Modification, and Water Supply) which are...

  2. Final Environmental Impact Statement : Water rights acquisition for Lahontan Valley Wetlands : Volume 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Truckee-Carson-Pyramid Lake Water Rights Settlement Act (Public Law 1 0 1-618) directs the Secretary of the Interior to acquire enough water and water rights to...

  3. Sinclair and Dyes Inlets Toxicity Study: An Assessment of Copper Bioavailability and Toxicity in Surface Waters Adjacent to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    and Corneillie, 2006). In the recent update of copper criteria recommended for fresh water (U.S. EPA, 2003), EPA used the biotic ligand model (BLM... waters because of fecal coliform (FC) contamination in the marine waters and metals and organic contaminants in bottom sediments and fish tissues...conducted at Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) reported that juvenile salmonids were sensitive to Cu exposure in fresh water (sublethal olfactory

  4. Single Intramuscular-dose Toxicity of Water soluble Carthmi-Flos herbal acupuncture (WCF in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Hyung-geol

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This experiment was conducted to examine the toxicity of WCF (Water soluble Carthmi-Flos herbal acupuncture by administering a single intramuscular dose of WCF in 6-week-old, male and female Sprague-Dawley rats and to find the lethality dose for WCF. Methods: The experiment was conducted at Biotoxtech according to Good Laboratory Practices under a request by the Korean Pharmacopuncture Institute. This experiment was performed based on the testing standards of “Toxicity Test Standards for Drugs” by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety. Subjects were divided into 4 groups: 1 control group in which normal saline was administered and 3 test groups in which 0.1, 0.5 or 1.0 mL of WCF was administered; a single intramuscular dose was injected into 5 males and 5 females in each group. General symptoms and body weights were observed/measured for 14 days after injection. At the end of the observation period, hematological and clinical chemistry tests were performed, followed by necropsy and histopathological examinations of the injected sections. Results: No mortalities were observed in any group. Also, symptoms, body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry and necropsy were not affected. However, histopathological examination of the injected part in one female in the 1.0-mL group showed infiltration of mononuclear cells and a multi-nucleated giant cell around eosinophilic material. Conclusion: Administration of single intramuscular doses of WCF in 3 groups of rats showed that the approximate lethal dose of WCF for all rats was in excess of 1.0 mL, as no mortalities were observed for injections up to and including 1.0 mL.

  5. Aquatic invertebrates in final void water bodies at an open-cut coal mine in central Queensland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proctor, H.; Grigg, A. [Griffith University, Nathan, Qld. (Australia). Australian School of Environmental Studies

    2006-07-01

    We describe the diversity of aquatic invertebrates colonising water-filled final voids produced by an open-cut coal mine near Moura, central Queensland. Ten disused pits that had been filled with water from < 1 year to 22 years prior to the survey and three nearby 'natural' water bodies were sampled in December 1998 and again in March 1999. All invertebrates collected were identified to family with the exception of oligochaetes, cladocerans, ostracods and copepods, which were identified to these coarser taxonomic levels. Sixty-two taxa were recorded from > 20 000 individuals. The greatest familial richness was displayed by the Insecta (33 families) followed by the mites (Acari) with 12 families. While natural water bodies held the greatest diversity, several mine pits were almost as rich in families. Classification analyses showed that natural sites tended to cluster together, but the groupings did not clearly exclude pit sites. Mining pits that supported higher diversity tended to be older and had lower salinity (< 2000 {mu}S/cm); however, salinity in all water bodies varied with rainfall conditions. We conclude that ponds formed in final voids at this mine have the potential to provide habitat for many invertebrate taxa typical of lentic inland water bodies in central Queensland.

  6. Subchronic and acute preclinic toxicity and some pharmacological effects of the water extract from leaves of Petiveria alliacea (Phytolaccaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mildred García-González

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We tested the effects of the aqueous extract of Petiveria alliacea leaves on acute and sub-chronic toxicity, hematocrit and blood glucose level and intestinal motility of male albino NGP mice of 20 to 25 g mean weight. Treatments were in all cases doses of 1 000 and 2 000 mg/kg animal weight and a control treatment with 0.5 ml distilled water, using 10 animals per treatment and administered orally every day (5 days per week. Experimental periods were 18 and 70 days for acute and sub chronic toxicity, respectively. No mortality nor any toxicity signs could be observed. A slight but significant increase in the glucose levels during the first three weeks was observed with the 1 000 mg/kg dose but not for the higher 2 000 mg/kg dose. After administering the doses once after a starving period of six hours, no significant differences in intestinal motility could be found. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (4: 1323-1326. Epub 2006 Dec. 15Se evaluaron los efectos del estracto acuoso de las hojas de Petiveria alliacea, en la toxicidad aguda y toxicidad subcrónica, hematocritos, niveles de glucosa en la sangre y motilidad intestinal del ratón macho albino NGP, con un peso promedio de 20 a 25g. En todos los casos los tratamientos fueron dosis de 1 000 y 2 000 mg/kg de peso del animal y un tratamiento control con 0.5 ml de agua destilada, usando 10 animales por tratamiento y administrado oralmente cinco días por semana. Los períodos experimentales fueron de 18 y 70 días para toxicidad aguda y toxicidad subcrónica, respectivamente. No se observaron signos de mortalidad ni de toxidad en ambas pruebas. Con la dosis de 1 000 mg/kg hubo un leve pero significativo incremento en los niveles de glucosa durante las primeras tres semanas, pero no con la dosis más alta de 2 000 mg/kg. Después de administrar las dosis luego de un período de hambre de seis horas, no se encontraron diferencias significativas en la motilidad intestinal

  7. Femtomolar level sensing of inorganic arsenic(III) in water and in living-systems using a non-toxic fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Biswajit; Mukherjee, Priyanka; Mondal, Ranjan Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Asoke Prasun; Hauli, Ipsit; Mukhopadhyay, Subhra Kanti; Fleck, Michel

    2014-12-14

    A highly selective femtomolar level sensing of inorganic arsenic(III) as arsenious acid has been accomplished in water medium and in living-systems (on pollen grains of Tecoma stans; Candida albicans cells (IMTECH No. 3018) and Peperomia pellucida stem section) using a non-toxic fluorescent probe of a Cu(II)-complex.

  8. Development of a numerical model for calculating exposure to toxic and nontoxic stressors in the water column and sediment from drilling discharges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rye, H.; Reed, M.; Frost, T.K.; Smit, M.G.D.; Durgut, S.

    2008-01-01

    Drilling discharges are complex mixtures of chemical components and particles which might lead to toxic and nontoxic stress in the environment. In order to be able to evaluate the potential environmental consequences of such discharges in the water column and in sediments, a numerical model was

  9. Final results of Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group ARCTIC study: an audit of raltitrexed for patients with cardiac toxicity induced by fluoropyrimidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, D; Wilson, K; Fournier, M; Simes, R J; Gebski, V; Yip, D; Tebbutt, N; Karapetis, C S; Ferry, D; Gordon, S; Price, T J

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity an uncommon but serious side-effect of some fluoropyrimides. Cardiac toxicity from raltitrexed is rarely reported. With this background, we initiated this study to investigate the incidence of cardiac events in patients who had switched to raltitrexed following cardiac toxicity from fluoropyrimidines (5-fluorouracil or capecitabine). Pharmacy records were used to identify patients receiving raltitrexed from January 2004 till March 2012. Medical records were then reviewed to confirm the use of raltitrexed after cardiac toxicity from 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. The primary end point was the rate of further cardiac events after commencing raltitrexed. Forty-two patients were identified and the majority had colorectal cancer. Prior regimens included 5-fluorouracil ± leucovorin, capecitabine alone, FOLFOX, FOLFIRI, epirubicin/cisplatin/5-fluorouracil, and capecitabine/oxaliplatin. Seven patients (17%) had bolus 5-fluorouracil regimens, 26 patients (62%) had infusion 5-fluorouracil regimens, and 9 patients (21%) had capecitabine alone or in combination. Angina was the most common cardiac toxicity from 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine and usually occurred in the first or the second cycle. Four patients after their first cardiac event continued with the same 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine regimen with the addition of nitrates and calcium antagonists but still had further cardiac events. After changing to raltitrexed, either as a single agent or a continuing combination regimen, no patients experienced further cardiac toxicity. Raltitrexed is associated with no significant cardiac toxicity in patients who have experienced prior cardiac toxicity from 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. Raltitrexed, alone or in combination with oxaliplatin or irinotecan, provides a safe option in terms of cardiac toxicity for such patients.

  10. Retrospective analysis of associations between water quality and toxic blooms of golden alga (Prymnesium parvum) in Texas reservoirs: Implications for understanding dispersal mechanisms and impacts of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Reynaldo; Dawson, D.; VanLandeghem, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Toxic blooms of golden alga (GA, Prymnesium parvum) in Texas typically occur in winter or early spring. In North America, they were first reported in Texas in the 1980s, and a marked range expansion occurred in 2001. Although there is concern about the influence of climate change on the future distribution of GA, factors responsible for past dispersals remain uncertain. To better understand the factors that influence toxic bloom dispersal in reservoirs, this study characterized reservoir water quality associated with toxic GA blooms since 2001, and examined trends in water quality during a 20-year period bracketing the 2001 expansion. Archived data were analyzed for six impacted and six nonimpacted reservoirs from two major Texas basins: Brazos River and Colorado River. Data were simplified for analysis by pooling spatially (across sampling stations) and temporally (winter, December-February) within reservoirs and generating depth-corrected (1 m) monthly values. Classification tree analysis [period of record (POR), 2001-2010] using salinity-associated variables (specific conductance, chloride, sulfate), dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, temperature, total hardness, potassium, nitrate+nitrite, and total phosphorus indicated that salinity best predicts the toxic bloom occurrence. Minimum estimated salinities for toxic bloom formation were 0.59 and 1.02 psu in Brazos and Colorado River reservoirs, respectively. Principal component analysis (POR, 2001-2010) indicated that GA habitat is best defined by higher salinity relative to nonimpacted reservoirs, with winter DO and pH also being slightly higher and winter temperature slightly lower in impacted reservoirs. Trend analysis, however, did not reveal monotonic changes in winter water quality of GA-impacted reservoirs during the 20-year period (1991-2010) bracketing the 2001 dispersal. Therefore, whereas minimum levels of salinity are required for GA establishment and toxic blooms in Texas reservoirs, the lack of trends in

  11. Surface Water Impacted by Rural Activities Induces Genetic Toxicity Related to Recombinagenic Events in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Lopes Soares Neto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This investigation assessed the interaction of surface water samples with DNA to quantitatively and qualitatively characterize their mutagenic and/or recombinagenic activity. Samples were obtained at three different sites along the Tocantins River (Tocantins State, Brazil. The area has withstood the impact mainly of rural activities, which release different chemical compounds in the environment. The Drosophila melanogaster Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART was performed in standard (ST and high bioactivation (HB crosses. SMART is useful for the detection of mutational and recombinational events induced by genotoxins of direct and indirect action. Results demonstrated that samples collected in both seasons were able to induce increments on the mutant spot frequencies in the larvae of the HB cross. Genotoxicity was related to a massive recombinagenic activity. The positive responses ascribed to only the HB cross means that it is linked to pro-genotoxins requiring metabolic activation. The SMART wing test in Drosophila melanogaster was shown to be highly sensitive to detect genotoxic agents present in the aquatic environment impacted by agriculture.

  12. Copper increases reductive dehalogenation of haloacetamides by zero-valent iron in drinking water: Reduction efficiency and integrated toxicity risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Bond, Tom; Gao, Naiyun; Bin, Xu; Wang, Qiongfang; Ding, Shunke

    2016-12-15

    The haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogen-containing disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs), are highly cytotoxic and genotoxic, and typically occur in treated drinking waters at low μg/L concentrations. Since many drinking distribution and storage systems contain unlined cast iron and copper pipes, reactions of HAcAms with zero-valent iron (ZVI) and metallic copper (Cu) may play a role in determining their fate. Moreover, ZVI and/or Cu are potentially effective HAcAm treatment technologies in drinking water supply and storage systems. This study reports that ZVI alone reduces trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) to sequentially form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) and then monochloroacetamide (MCAcAm), whereas Cu alone does not impact HAcAm concentrations. The addition of Cu to ZVI significantly improved the removal of HAcAms, relative to ZVI alone. TCAcAm and their reduction products (DCAcAm and MCAcAm) were all decreased to below detection limits at a molar ratio of ZVI/Cu of 1:1 after 24 h reaction (ZVI/TCAcAm = 0.18 M/5.30 μM). TCAcAm reduction increased with the decreasing pH from 8.0 to 5.0, but values from an integrated toxic risk assessment were minimised at pH 7.0, due to limited removal MCAcAm under weak acid conditions (pH = 5.0 and 6.0). Higher temperatures (40 °C) promoted the reductive dehalogenation of HAcAms. Bromine was preferentially removed over chlorine, thus brominated HAcAms were more easily reduced than chlorinated HAcAms by ZVI/Cu. Although tribromoacetamide was more easily reduced than TCAcAm during ZVI/Cu reduction, treatment of tribromoacetamide resulted in a higher integrated toxicity risk than TCAcAm, due to the formation of monobromoacetamide (MBAcAm). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Results of Water and Sediment Toxicity Tests and Chemical Analyses Conducted at the Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Waste Unit, January 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, W.L.

    1999-06-02

    The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Operable Unit consists of two inactive rubble pits (631-1G and 631-3G) that have been capped, and one active burning rubble pit (631-2G), where wooden pallets and other non-hazardous debris are periodically burned. The inactive rubble pits may have received hazardous materials, such as asbestos, batteries, and paint cans, as well as non-hazardous materials, such as ash, paper, and glass. In an effort to determine if long term surface water flows of potentially contaminated water from the 631-1G, 631-3G, and 631-2G areas have resulted in an accumulation of chemical constituents at toxic levels in the vicinity of the settling basin and wetlands area, chemical analyses for significant ecological preliminary constituents of concern (pCOCs) were performed on aqueous and sediment samples. In addition, aquatic and sediment toxicity tests were performed in accordance with U.S. EPA methods (U.S. EPA 1989, 1994). Based on the results of the chemical analyses, unfiltered water samples collected from a wetland and settling basins located adjacent to the CSBRP Operable Unit exceed Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) for aluminum, barium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and vanadium at one or more of the four locations that were sampled. The water contained very high concentrations of clay particles that were present as suspended solids. A substantial portion of the metals were present as filterable particulates, bound to the clay particles, and were therefore not biologically available. Based on dissolved metal concentrations, the wetland and settling basin exceeded TRVs for aluminum and barium. However, the background reference location also exceeded the TRV for barium, which suggests that this value may be too low, based on local geochemistry. The detection limits for both total and dissolved mercury were higher than the TRV, so it was not possible to determine if the TRV for mercury was exceeded. Dissolved metal levels of chromium, copper

  14. Toxic elements in free-living freshwater fish, water and sediments in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szkoda Józef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Samples for analysis were collected from 10 areas, including the major Polish rivers and lakes, with different sources of environmental pollution (industrial, municipal, and farming. The materials was taken from the lakes of Mazury, located in a non-industrialised region, from the Brda River, an area impacted by pig farms, from the lakes of Lipczyno Wielkie/Pomerania, from the Wkra River, an area impacted by poultry farms, from the Dunajec River at the Roznowski Reservoir, from the Vistula River at Cracow and Warsaw, from the Odra River at Wroclaw and the Warta River estuary, and also from Rybnik Power Station Reservoir. Concentrations of Pb, Cd, Hg, and As were analysed in 397 fish muscle and 128 sediment samples using an atomic absorption spectrometry technique. The analytical procedures were covered by a quality assurance programme. It was demonstrated that the average concentrations of lead, cadmium, and arsenic in fish were in the low hundredths and thousandths of a mg/kg and never exceeded permitted limits established for food. Higher values of these elements were found in fish from bodies of water located in the zone of influence of large urban agglomerations, especially the Cracow region. High concentrations of lead and cadmium were also found in Vistula River sediments near Cracow, where the maximum values were 134.10 mg/kg and 21.24 mg/kg dry weight for lead and cadmium respectively. The average concentration of mercury in a predatory fish muscle (0.179 mg/kg was almost twice as high as in the omnivorous fish (0.103 mg/kg. Only a single fish sample exceeded the maximum limit for this metal (0.50 mg/kg and did not present a risk to consumers’ health.

  15. Adsorptive Removal of Toxic Chromium from Waste-Water Using Wheat Straw and Eupatorium adenophorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dagang; Pan, Kaiwen; Tariq, Akash; Azizullah, Azizullah; Sun, Feng; Li, Zilong; Xiong, Qinli

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollution with heavy metals is a serious issue worldwide posing threats to humans, animals and plants and to the stability of overall ecosystem. Chromium (Cr) is one of most hazardous heavy metals with a high carcinogenic and recalcitrant nature. Aim of the present study was to select low-cost biosorbent using wheat straw and Eupatorium adenophorum through simple carbonization process, capable of removing Cr (VI) efficiently from wastewater. From studied plants a low cost adsorbent was prepared for removing Cr (VI) from aqueous solution following very simple carbonization method excluding activation process. Several factors such as pH, contact time, sorbent dosage and temperature were investigated for attaining ideal condition. For analysis of adsorption equilibrium isotherm data, Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin models were used while pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, external diffusion and intra-particle diffusion models were used for the analysis of kinetic data. The obtained results revealed that 99.9% of Cr (VI) removal was observed in the solution with a pH of 1.0. Among all the tested models Langmuir model fitted more closely according to the data obtained. Increase in adsorption capacity was observed with increasing temperature revealing endothermic nature of Cr (VI). The maximum Cr (VI) adsorption potential of E. adenophorum and wheat straw was 89.22 mg per 1 gram adsorbent at 308K. Kinetic data of absorption precisely followed pseudo-second-order model. Present study revealed highest potential of E. adenophorum and wheat straw for producing low cost adsorbent and to remove Cr (VI) from contaminated water. PMID:27911906

  16. Production test IP-750 raw water as a reactor coolant. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frymier, J.W.; Geier, R.G.

    1966-08-10

    Approximately ten years ago single-tube tests demonstrated the feasibility of using unfiltered river water as a reactor coolant from the standpoint of aluminum corrosion and film formation. However, some effluent activity penalty was indicated. Inasmuch as both current water plant operation and the characteristics of Columbia River water have changed, it was deemed appropriate to reinvestigate the use of partially treated water as a reactor coolant. This report summarizes the results of a half-reactor test carried out at F Reactor.

  17. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Water and Aqueous Solutions, Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2012-08-17

    Understanding the fundamental principles governing the structure and dynamics of water - and particularly how water mediates chemical interactions and processes - continues to pose formidable challenges and yield abundant surprises. The focus of this Gordon Research Conference is on identifying key questions, describing emerging understandings, and unveiling surprising discoveries related to water and aqueous solutions. The talks and posters at this meeting will describe studies of water and its interactions with objects such as interfaces, channels, electrons, oils, ions, and proteins; probed using optical, electrical, and particle experiments, and described using classical, quantum, and multi-scale theories.

  18. Larvicidal activity of the water extract of Moringa oleifera seeds against Aedes aegypti and its toxicity upon laboratory animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo M.P. Ferreira

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, biological effects of the water extract of Moringa oleifera seeds (WEMOS were assessed on eggs and 3rd instar larvae of Aedes aegypti and on its toxicity upon laboratory animals (Daphnia magna, mice and rats. Crude WEMOS showed a LC50 value of 1260µg/mL, causing 99.2 ± 2.9% larvae mortality within 24 h at 5200µg/mL, though this larvicidal activity has been lost completely at 80ºC/10 min. WEMOS did not demonstrate capacity to prevent egg hatching. After extensive dialyses of the crude WEMOS into watersoluble dialyzable (DF and nondyalizable (NDF fractions, only DF maintained its efficacy to kill larvae. Acute toxicity evaluations on daphnids (EC50 of 188.7µg/mL and mice (LD50 of 446.5 mg/kg body weight pointed out to low toxicity. Despite the thymus hypertrophy, WEMOS revealed to be harmless in orally and subacutelytreated rats. In conclusion, WEMOS has thermostable bioactive compounds against Ae. aegypti larvae with apparent molecular mass lower than 12 kDa and moderately toxic potential.Neste trabalho, o extrato aquoso das sementes de Moringaoleifera (EASMO foi avaliado quanto aos seus efeitos biológicos sobre ovos e larvas de Aedes aegypti no 3ºestágio de desenvolvimento e sua toxicidade sobre animais de laboratório(Daphnia magna, camundongos e ratos. O EASMO bruto revelou uma CL50 de 1.260 µg/mL, causando 99, 2 ± 2, 9% de mortalidade em 24 h na concentração de 5.200 µg/mL, embora o mesmo não tenha sido capaz de impedir a eclosão dos ovos. A atividade larvicida extinguiu-se após aquecimento do extrato a 80ºC/10 min. Diálises sucessivas do EASMO bruto resultaram em duas frações solúveis em água (Fração dializável, FD; Fração nãodializável, FND, dentre as quais apenas a FD mostrou ação larvicida. Testes de toxicidade aguda realizadosem dáfnias (CE50 de 188, 7 µg/mL e camundongos (DL50 de446,5 mg/kg de peso corpóreo evidenciaram baixa toxicidade. Apesar da hipertrofia tímica, o EASMO mostrou ser

  19. Toxicity of particles emitted by the traffic: follow-up and bibliographic synthesis final report; Toxicite des particules emises par la circulation automobile: suivi et synthese bibliographique rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tissot, S.

    1999-12-01

    This study compiles the data published recently concerning the diesel and petrol motor emissions toxicity and in particular the effects of the particles phase. The aim of the work is to give a synthetical overview of the state of knowledge in this domain to allow a scientific argumentation concerning the toxicity risks assessment from these pollutants. The data concern epidemiological studies and also experimental studies in vivo and in vitro. (A.L.B.)

  20. Health improvement of domestic hot tap water supply Gusev, Kaliningrad Region, Russia. Make-up water tank project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagaard, Joergen

    1998-07-01

    This report describes the project `Health Improvement of Domestic Hot Tap Water Supply, Gusev, Kaliningrad, Russia`, which was carried out in the autumn of 1996 and financed by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency, the Danish Energy Agency and Gusev Municipality. The project proposal and application outlined the following objectives: Erection of system so that hot tap water, which is tapped directly from the district heating system, obtains an acceptable quality in health terms; Complete training and education, so that the plant can be operated and maintained by the power station`s staff and rehabilitation projects within supply of domestic water and district heating can be promoted to the greatest possible extent; Systems for heat treatment of make-up water were implemented in less than three months; The project was carried out in close Danish-Russian co-operation from the beginning of engineering to the commissioning and resulted in transfer and demonstration of know-how and technology; Information was recorded on the existing domestic water and heat supply systems as well as on the treatment of sewage, and recommendations for rehabilitation projects were made. Previously, when the temperature in the district heating system was relatively high, a heat treatment apparently took place in the district heating system. However, due to the current poor economic situation there are no means with which to buy the fuel quantities necessary to maintain the previously normal district heating temperature. In the new concept the cold make-up water is heated to >80 deg. C as required by the health authorities before it is led to the district heating return system and subsequently heated to the actual supply temperature of 50-60 deg. C. The energy consumption in the two concepts is approximately the same. A 1,000 m{sup 3} tank with heating coils was erected between the make-up water system and the district heating system. The tank should equalise the daily capacity

  1. Influence of water quality on zinc toxicity to the Florida apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) and sensitivity of freshwater snails to zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tham C; Tong, Xin

    2015-03-01

    The present study characterized the influence of water-quality characteristics on zinc (Zn) toxicity to the Florida apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) and the sensitivity of freshwater snails to Zn. Standard 96-h renewal acute toxicity tests were conducted with Zn and juvenile P. paludosa under 3 conditions of pH and alkalinity, water hardness, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Median lethal effect concentrations (96-h LC50s), no-observed- effect concentrations, lowest-observed-effect concentrations, LC10s, and LC20s were determined for each test. The results showed that Zn toxicity to P. paludosa decreased linearly with increasing hardness, pH, and DOC. A multiple linear regression model based on pH, hardness, and DOC was able to explain 99% of the observed variability in LC50s. These results are useful for the development of a biotic ligand model (BLM) for P. paludosa and Zn. Zinc acute toxicity data were collected from the literature for 12 freshwater snail species in a wide range of water-quality characteristics for species sensitivity distribution analysis. The results showed that P. paludosa is the second most sensitive to Zn. The present study also suggested that aqueous ZnCO3 and ZnHCO3 (-) can be bioavailable to P. paludosa. Therefore, bioavailability models (e.g., BLM) should take these Zn species into consideration for bioavailability when applied to snails. © 2014 SETAC.

  2. Commercialization of air conditioning heat pump/water heater. Final technical report, Volume 2: Appendix A through E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-30

    This is the final technical report on a commercialization project for an air conditioning heat pump water heater. The objective of the project was to produce a saleable system which would be economically competitive with natural gas and cost effective with regard to initial cost versus annual operating costs. The development and commercialization of the system is described. Compiled data included in numerous figures, tables and graphs.

  3. Removal of the precursors of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), an emerging disinfection byproduct, in drinking water treatment process and its toxicity to adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian; Lin, Tao; Chen, Wei

    2018-01-01

    N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) is one of the emerging nitrogenous disinfection byproducts with probable cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and carcinogenesis. Its potential toxicological effects have received extensive attention but remain to be poorly understood. In this study, changes in NDEA precursors in drinking water treatment process were studied using the trial of its formation potential (FP), and the toxicity induced by NDEA to adult zebrafish was investigated. NDEA FP in the raw water of Taihu Lake ranged from 46.9 to 68.3 ng/L. The NDEA precursors were removed effectively by O3/BAC process. Hydrophilic fraction and low-molecular-weight fraction (water treatment process and its toxicity effect on zebrafish as a model animal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Health risk assessment of pentachlorophenol (pcp) in California drinking water. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, N.R.; Reed, W.A.; Encomienda, I.; Beltran, L.; Araba-Owoyele, L.

    1990-03-08

    The purpose of the document is to review the toxicology of PCP and to estimate the exposure of California residents to PCP found in drinking water. The information provided will help the California Dept. of Health Services develop drinking water standards for PCP.

  5. Investigation on the eco-toxicity of lake sediments with the addition of drinking water treatment residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Nannan; Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2016-08-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) have a potential to realize eutrophication control objectives by reducing the internal phosphorus (P) load of lake sediments. Information regarding the ecological risk of dewatered WTR reuse in aquatic environments is generally lacking, however. In this study, we analyzed the eco-toxicity of leachates from sediments with or without dewatered WTRs toward algae Chlorella vulgaris via algal growth inhibition testing with algal cell density, chlorophyll content, malondialdehyde content, antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase activity, and subcellular structure indices. The results suggested that leachates from sediments unanimously inhibited algal growth, with or without the addition of different WTR doses (10% or 50% of the sediment in dry weight) at different pH values (8-9), as well as from sediments treated for different durations (10 or 180days). The inhibition was primarily the result of P deficiency in the leachates owing to WTR P adsorption, however, our results suggest that the dewatered WTRs were considered as a favorable potential material for internal P loading control in lake restoration projects, as it shows acceptably low risk toward aquatic plants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Chlorine dioxide as an alternative antifouling biocide for cooling water systems: Toxicity to larval barnacle Amphibalanus reticulatus (Utinomi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatnarayanan, Srinivas; Sriyutha Murthy, P; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam; Venugopalan, Vayalam P

    2017-11-30

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is seen as an effective alternative to chlorine, which is widely used as an antifouling biocide. However, data on its efficacy against marine macrofoulants is scanty. In this study, acute toxicity of ClO2 to larval forms of the fouling barnacle Amphibalanus reticulatus was investigated. ClO2 treatment at 0.1mg/L for 20min elicited 45-63% reduction in naupliar metamorphosis, 70% inhibition of cyprid settlement and 80% inhibition of metamorphosis to juveniles. Increase in concentration to 0.2mg/L did not result in any significant difference in the settlement inhibition or metamorphosis. Treatment with 0.2mg/L of ClO2 elicited substantial reduction in the settlement of barnacle larvae compared to control. The study indicates the possibility of using ClO2 as an alternative antifouling biocide in power plant cooling water systems. However, more work needs to be done on the environmental effects of such switchover, which we are currently undertaking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hospital and urban effluent waters as a source of accumulation of toxic metals in the sediment receiving system of the Cauvery River, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Naresh; Laffite, Amandine; Ngelikoto, Patience; Elongo, Vicky; Prabakar, Kandasamy; Mubedi, Josué I; Piana, Pius T M; Wildi, Walter; Poté, John

    2015-09-01

    Hospital and urban effluents contain a variety of toxic and/or persistent substances in a wide range of concentrations, and most of these compounds belong to the group of emerging contaminants. The release of these substances into the aquatic ecosystem can lead to the pollution of water resources and may place aquatic organisms and human health at risk. Sediments receiving untreated and urban effluent waters from the city of Tiruchirappalli in the state of Tamil Nadu, India, are analyzed for potential environmental and human health risks. The sediment samples were collected from five hospital outlet pipes (HOP) and from the Cauvery River Basin (CRB) both of which receive untreated municipal effluent waters (Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, India). The samples were characterized for grain size, organic matter, toxic metals, and ecotoxicity. The results highlight the high concentration of toxic metals in HOP, reaching values (mg kg(-1)) of 1851 (Cr), 210 (Cu), 986 (Zn), 82 (Pb), and 17 (Hg). In contrast, the metal concentrations in sediments from CRB were lower than the values found in the HOP (except for Cu, Pb), with maximum values (mg kg(-1)) of 75 (Cr), 906 (Cu), 649 (Zn), 111 (Pb), and 0.99 (Hg). The metal concentrations in all sampling sites largely exceed the Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs) and the Probable Effect Concentration (PEC) for the Protection of Aquatic Life recommendation. The ecotoxicity test with ostracods exposed to the sediment samples presents a mortality rate ranging from 22 to 100 % (in sediments from HOP) and 18-87 % (in sediments from CRB). The results of this study show the variation of toxic metal levels as well as toxicity in sediment composition related to both the type of hospital and the sampling period. The method of elimination of hospital and urban effluents leads to the pollution of water resources and may place aquatic organisms and human health at risk.

  8. Sediment-quality and water-toxicity data from 10 sites on the Westside Creeks and San Antonio River, San Antonio, Texas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Cassi L.; Wilson, Jennifer T.; Kunz, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Sediment samples and samples for water-toxicity testing were collected during 2014 from several streams in San Antonio, Texas known locally as the Westside creeks (Alazán, Apache, Martínez, and San Pedro Creeks) and from the San Antonio River. Samples were collected once during base-flow and again after periods of storm-water runoff (post-storm conditions) to determine baseline sediment- and water-quality conditions. Streambed-sediment samples were analyzed for selected constituents, including trace elements and organic contaminants such as pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

  9. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are

  10. Patterns of fish assemblage structure and dynamics in waters of the Savannah River Plant. Comprehensive Cooling Water Study final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, J.M.; Anderson, C.S.; Floyd, K.B.; Negus, M.T.; Meador, M.R.

    1986-06-01

    Research conducted as part of the Comprehensive Cooling Water Study (CCWS) has elucidated many factors that are important to fish population and community dynamics in a variety of habitats on the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Information gained from these studies is useful in predicting fish responses to SRP operations. The overall objective of the CCWS was (1) to determine the environmental effects of SRP cooling water withdrawals and discharges and (2) to determine the significance of the cooling water impacts on the environment. The purpose of this study was to: (1) examine the effects of thermal plumes on anadromous and resident fishes, including overwintering effects, in the SRP swamp and associated tributary streams; (2) assess fish spawning and locate nursery grounds on the SRP; (3) examine the level of use of the SRP by spawning fish from the Savannah River, this objective was shared with the Savannah River Laboratory, E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company; and (4) determine impacts of cooling-water discharges on fish population and community attributes. Five studies were designed to address the above topics. The specific objectives and a summary of the findings of each study are presented.

  11. Research and development of an air-cycle heat-pump water heater. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieckmann, J.T.; Erickson, A.J.; Harvey, A.C.; Toscano, W.M.

    1979-10-01

    A prototype reverse Brayton air cycle heat pump water heater has been designed and built for residential applications. The system consists of a compressor/expander, an air-water heat exchanger, an electric motor, a water circulation pump, a thermostat, and fluid management controls. The prototype development program consisted of a market analysis, design study, and development testing. A potential residential market for the new high-efficiency water heater of approximately 480,000 units/y was identified. The retail and installation cost of this water heater is estimated to be between $500 and $600 which is approximately $300 more than a conventional electric water heater. The average payback per unit is less than 3-1/2 y and the average recurring energy cost savings after the payback period is approximately $105/y at the average seasonal coefficient of performance (COP) of 1.7. As part of the design effort, a thermodynamic parametric analysis was performed on the water heater system. It was determined that to obtain a coefficient of performance of 1.7, the isentropic efficiency of both the compressor and the expander must be at least 85%. The selected mechanical configuration is described. The water heater has a diameter of 25 in. and a height of 73 in. The results of the development testing of the prototype water heater system showed: the electrical motor maximum efficiency of 78%; the compressor isentropic efficiency is 95 to 119% and the volumetric efficiency is approximately 85%; the expander isentropic efficiency is approximately 58% and the volumetric efficiency is 92%; a significant heat transfer loss of approximately 16% occurred in the expander; and the prototype heat pump system COP is 1.26 which is less than the design goal of at least 1.7. Future development work is recommended.

  12. Determination of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane in river water and final effluent by headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparham, Chris; Van Egmond, Roger; O'Connor, Sean; Hastie, Colin; Whelan, Mick; Kanda, Rakesh; Franklin, Oliver

    2008-11-28

    A method is described for the analysis of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D(5)) in river water and treated waste water using headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Internal standard addition to samples and field blanks was carried out in the field to provide both a measure of recovery and to prevent any exposure of samples to laboratory air, which contained background levels of D(5). Measured levels of D(5) were typically in the range River Great Ouse (UK) with slightly higher levels in the River Nene (UK). The measured concentration of D(5) in treated waste water varied between 31 and 400ngL(-1), depending on the type of treatment process employed.

  13. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (daphnids). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) pilot study, ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a pilot study during the week of April 22--29, 1993, prior to initiation of CR-ERP Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis activities. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0 and Poplar Creek Kilometer 1.6 on April 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; Reference toxicant test information; and Personnel training documentation.

  14. Washoe County : Regional water supply and quality study : Phase II final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The major goal of this study was to help structure a solution to the fragmented responsibilities for conservation, resource management, water supply, wastewater,...

  15. Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement : Water rights acquisition for Lahontan Valley Wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Record of Decision (ROD) documents the decision and rationale for selecting a water rights acquisition strategy to sustain a long-term average of 25,000 acres...

  16. Final opportunity to rehabilitate an urban river as a water source for Mexico City.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Mazari-Hiriart

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount and quality of water in the Magdalena-Eslava river system and to propose alternatives for sustainable water use. The system is the last urban river in the vicinity of Mexico City that supplies surface water to the urban area. Historical flow data were analyzed (1973-2010, along with the physicochemical and bacteriological attributes, documenting the evolution of these variables over the course of five years (2008-2012 in both dry and rainy seasons. The analyses show that the flow regime has been significantly altered. The physicochemical variables show significant differences between the natural area, where the river originates, and the urban area, where the river receives untreated wastewater. Nutrient and conductivity concentrations in the river were equivalent to domestic wastewater. Fecal pollution indicators and various pathogens were present in elevated densities, demonstrating a threat to the population living near the river. Estimates of the value of the water lost as a result of mixing clean and contaminated water are presented. This urban river should be rehabilitated as a sustainability practice, and if possible, these efforts should be replicated in other areas. Because of the public health issues and in view of the population exposure where the river flows through the city, the river should be improved aesthetically and should be treated to allow its ecosystem services to recover. This river represents an iconic case for Mexico City because it connects the natural and urban areas in a socio-ecological system that can potentially provide clean water for human consumption. Contaminated water could be treated and reused for irrigation in one of the green areas of the city. Wastewater treatment plants and the operation of the existing purification plants are urgent priorities that could lead to better, more sustainable water use practices in Mexico City.

  17. Development and Validation of a Gas-Fired Residential Heat Pump Water Heater - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Garrabrant; Roger Stout; Paul Glanville; Janice Fitzgerald; Chris Keinath

    2013-01-21

    For gas-fired residential water heating, the U.S. and Canada is predominantly supplied by minimum efficiency storage water heaters with Energy Factors (EF) in the range of 0.59 to 0.62. Higher efficiency and higher cost ($700 - $2,000) options serve about 15% of the market, but still have EFs below 1.0, ranging from 0.65 to 0.95. To develop a new class of water heating products that exceeds the traditional limit of thermal efficiency, the project team designed and demonstrated a packaged water heater driven by a gas-fired ammonia-water absorption heat pump. This gas-fired heat pump water heater can achieve EFs of 1.3 or higher, at a consumer cost of $2,000 or less. Led by Stone Mountain Technologies Inc. (SMTI), with support from A.O. Smith, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), and Georgia Tech, the cross-functional team completed research and development tasks including cycle modeling, breadboard evaluation of two cycles and two heat exchanger classes, heat pump/storage tank integration, compact solution pump development, combustion system specification, and evaluation of packaged prototype GHPWHs. The heat pump system extracts low grade heat from the ambient air and produces high grade heat suitable for heating water in a storage tank for domestic use. Product features that include conventional installation practices, standard footprint and reasonable economic payback, position the technology to gain significant market penetration, resulting in a large reduction of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from domestic hot water production.

  18. Solar domestic hot water system installed at Texas City, Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    The Solar Energy System located at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas was designed to supply 63% of the total hot water load. The Solar Energy System consists of a 2100 square foot Raypack Liquid Flat Plate Collector Subsystem and a 2500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 3.67 x 10/sup 8/ Btu/y. Abstracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  19. Final Opportunity to Rehabilitate an Urban River as a Water Source for Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazari-Hiriart, Marisa; Pérez-Ortiz, Gustavo; Orta-Ledesma, María Teresa; Armas-Vargas, Felipe; Tapia, Marco A.; Solano-Ortiz, Rosa; Silva, Miguel A.; Yañez-Noguez, Isaura; López-Vidal, Yolanda; Díaz-Ávalos, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount and quality of water in the Magdalena-Eslava river system and to propose alternatives for sustainable water use. The system is the last urban river in the vicinity of Mexico City that supplies surface water to the urban area. Historical flow data were analyzed (1973–2010), along with the physicochemical and bacteriological attributes, documenting the evolution of these variables over the course of five years (2008–2012) in both dry and rainy seasons. The analyses show that the flow regime has been significantly altered. The physicochemical variables show significant differences between the natural area, where the river originates, and the urban area, where the river receives untreated wastewater. Nutrient and conductivity concentrations in the river were equivalent to domestic wastewater. Fecal pollution indicators and various pathogens were present in elevated densities, demonstrating a threat to the population living near the river. Estimates of the value of the water lost as a result of mixing clean and contaminated water are presented. This urban river should be rehabilitated as a sustainability practice, and if possible, these efforts should be replicated in other areas. Because of the public health issues and in view of the population exposure where the river flows through the city, the river should be improved aesthetically and should be treated to allow its ecosystem services to recover. This river represents an iconic case for Mexico City because it connects the natural and urban areas in a socio-ecological system that can potentially provide clean water for human consumption. Contaminated water could be treated and reused for irrigation in one of the green areas of the city. Wastewater treatment plants and the operation of the existing purification plants are urgent priorities that could lead to better, more sustainable water use practices in Mexico City. PMID:25054805

  20. Toxicity and transfer of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanowires in an aquatic food chain consisting of algae, water fleas, and zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Yooeun; An, Youn-Joo, E-mail: anyjoo@konkuk.ac.kr

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Trophic transfer of silver nanowires (AgNWs) was studied in an aquatic food chain. • The transfer of AgNWs from algae to fish via water fleas was observed. • Toxicity of long AgNWs on aquatic organisms is higher than that of short ones. • AgNWs damage the gut of water fleas and may cause undernourishment. • Quantity of lipid droplets increased with increasing exposure concentration. - Abstract: Nanomaterials of various shapes and dimensions are widely used in the medical, chemical, and electronic industries. Multiple studies have reported the ecotoxicological effects of nanaoparticles when released in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; however, information on the toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs) to freshwater organisms and their transfer through the food webs is limited. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the toxicity of 10- and 20-μm-long AgNWs to the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the water flea Daphnia magna, and the zebrafish and study their movement through this three-species food chain using a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods as well as optical techniques. We found that AgNWs directly inhibited the growth of algae and destroyed the digestive organs of water fleas. The results showed that longer AgNWs (20 μm) were more toxic than shorter ones (10 μm) to both algae and water fleas, but shorter AgNWs were accumulated more than longer ones in the body of the fish. Overall, this study suggests that AgNWs are transferred through food chains, and that they affect organisms at higher trophic levels, potentially including humans. Therefore, further studies that take into account environmental factors, food web complexity, and differences between nanomaterials are required to gain better understanding of the impact of nanomaterials on natural communities and human health.

  1. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (daphnids). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25--February 1, 1994. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; Meter calibrations; and Reference toxicant test information.

  2. Feasibility study of underground energy storage using high-pressure, high-temperature water. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, J.L.; Frost, G.P.; Gore, L.A.; Hammond, R.P.; Rawson, D.L.; Ridgway, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    A technical, operational and economic feasibility study on the storage of energy as heated high pressure water in underground cavities that utilize the rock overburden for containment is presented. Handling peak load requirements of electric utility power networks is examined in some detail. The cavity is charged by heating water with surplus steaming capacity during periods of low power requirement. Later this hot water supplies steam to peaking turbines when high load demands must be met. This system can be applied to either new or existing power plants of nuclear or fossil fuel type. The round trip efficiency (into storage and back) is higher than any other system - over 90%. Capital costs are competitive and the environmental impact is quite benign. Detailed installation and design problems are studied and costs are estimated. The continental United States is examined for the most applicable geology. Formations favorable for these large cavities exist in widespread areas.

  3. Final LDRD report :ultraviolet water purification systems for rural environments and mobile applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banas, Michael Anthony; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Ruby, Douglas Scott; Ross, Michael P.; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Boucher, Ray

    2005-11-01

    We present the results of a one year LDRD program that has focused on evaluating the use of newly developed deep ultraviolet LEDs in water purification. We describe our development efforts that have produced an LED-based water exposure set-up and enumerate the advances that have been made in deep UV LED performance throughout the project. The results of E. coli inactivation with 270-295 nm LEDs are presented along with an assessment of the potential for applying deep ultraviolet LED-based water purification to mobile point-of-use applications as well as to rural and international environments where the benefits of photovoltaic-powered systems can be realized.

  4. Development of Techniques for the Evaluation of Toxicant Impacts to Multispecies Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-28

    the physical and chemical structure of the SAM and MFC multispecies toxicity tests. The media are identical except for the addition of NaHCO3 in the...showing initial (day 11I) and final (day 63) peaks. due to volatization , photooxidation, biotransformation, and biodegradation. 3.2 Short-term toxicity...then soaked in 2N HCl for at least one hour, rinsed ten times with distilled water, dried and finally autoclaved for 30 minutes. Microcosm medium

  5. Repeated Intramuscular-dose Toxicity Test of Water-soluble Carthami Flos (WCF Pharmacopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo-min Choi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Water-soluble carthami flos (WCF is a new mixture of Carthami flos (CF pharmacopuncture. We conducted a 4-week toxicity test of repeated intramuscular injections of WCF in Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods: Forty male and 40 female rats were divided into 4 groups of 10 male and 10 female SD rats: The control group received 0.5 mL/animal/day of normal saline whereas the three experimental groups received WCF at doses of 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 mL/animal/day, respectively. For 4 weeks, the solutions were injected into the femoral muscle of the rats alternating from side to side. Clinical signs, body weights, and food consumption were observed; opthalmological examinations and urinalyses were performed. On day 29, blood samples were taken for hematological and clinical chemistry analyses. Then, necropsy was conducted in all animals to observe weights and external and histopathological changes in the bodily organs. All data were tested using a statistical analysis system (SAS. Results: No deaths were observed. Temporary irregular respiration was observed in male rats of the experimental group for the first 10 days. Body weights, food consumptions, opthalmological examinations, urinalyses, clinical chemistry analyses, organ weights and necropsy produced no findings with toxicological meaning. In the hematological analysis, delay of prothrombin time (PT was observed in male rats of the 0.25- and the 0.5-mL/animal/day groups. In the histopathological test, a dose-dependent inflammatory cell infiltration into the fascia and panniculitis in perimuscular tissues was observed in all animals of the experimental groups. However, those symptoms were limited to local injection points. No toxicological meanings, except localized changes, were noted. Conclusion: WCF solution has no significant toxicological meaning, but does produce localized symptoms. No observed adverse effect level (NOAEL of WCF in male and female rats is expected for doses over 0.5 mL/animal/day.

  6. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/wet FGD system. Final report, Volume 2 of 2 - appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This volume contains the appendices for a coal-fired power plant toxic emissions study. Included are Process data log sheets from Coal Creek, Auditing information, Sampling protocol, Field sampling data sheets, Quality assurance/quality control, Analytical protocol, and Uncertainty analyses.

  7. Sun light degradation of 4-chloroaniline in waters and its effect on toxicity. A high performance liquid chromatography - Diode array - Tandem mass spectrometry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosetti, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.gosetti@mfn.unipmn.i [University of Piemonte Orientale, DISAV Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e della Vita, viale T. Michel 11, 15121 Alessandria (Italy); Bottaro, Michela; Gianotti, Valentina; Mazzucco, Eleonora; Frascarolo, Paolo; Zampieri, Davide; Oliveri, Caterina; Viarengo, Aldo; Gennaro, Maria Carla [University of Piemonte Orientale, DISAV Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e della Vita, viale T. Michel 11, 15121 Alessandria (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    This paper studies the degradation reactions that 4-chloroaniline can naturally undergo in waters for the action of sun light. 10.00 mg L{sup -1} 4-chloroaniline aqueous solution, without any addition of organic solvent, are undergone to photoirradiation under conditions that simulate sun light. The degradation pathway, followed by HPLC-DAD-MS/MS methods, is complex since the pollutant gives rise to many photoproducts: the predominant species are characterized by m/z values of 217 (P5) and 218 (P6) and are compatible with dimeric structures of 4-chloroaniline. Vibrio fischeri tests indicate that the photoproducts of 4-chloroaniline are characterized by a toxicity level significantly greater than the precursor. - The study investigates the degradation of 4-chloroaniline in waters induced by the action of sun light, to evaluate a potential increase of toxicity due to the photodegradation effect.

  8. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at Kansas City, Fire Station, Kansas City, Missouri. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    This document is the final report of the solar energy heating and hot water system installed at the Kansas City Fire Station, Number 24, 2309 Hardesty Street, Kansas City, Missouri. The solar system was designed to provide 47 percent of the space heating, 8800 square feet area and 75 percent of the domestic hot water (DHW) load. The solar system consists of 2808 square feet of Solaron, model 2001, air, flat plate collector subsystem, a concrete box storage subsystem which contains 1428 cubic feet of 1/2 inch diameter pebbles weighing 71 1/2 tons, a DHW preheat tank, blowers, pumps, heat exchangers, air ducting, controls and associated plumbing. Two 120-gallon electric DHW heaters supply domestic hot water which is preheated by the solar system. Auxiliary space heating is provided by three electric heat pumps with electric resistance heaters and four 30-kilowatt electric unit heaters. There are six modes of system operation. This project is part of the Department of Energy PON-1 Solar Demonstration Program with DOE cost sharing $154,282 of the $174,372 solar system cost. The Final Design Review was held March 1977, the system became operational March 1979 and acceptance test was completed in September 1979.

  9. Final Technical Report: The Water-to-Wire (W2W) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lissner, Daniel N. [Free Flow Power Corporation, Boston, MA (United States); Edward, Lovelace C. [Free Flow Power Corporation, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-12-24

    The purpose of the Free Flow Power (FFP) Water-to-Wire Project (Project) was to evaluate and optimize the performance, environmental compatibility, and cost factors of FFP hydrokinetic turbines through design analyses and deployments in test flumes and riverine locations.

  10. Economic comparison of hydrogen production using sulfuric acid electrolysis and sulfur cycle water decomposition. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farbman, G.H.; Krasicki, B.R.; Hardman, C.C.; Lin, S.S.; Parker, G.H.

    1978-06-01

    An evaluation of the relative economics of hydrogen production using two advanced techniques was performed. The hydrogen production systems considered were the Westinghouse Sulfur Cycle Water Decomposition System and a water electrolysis system employing a sulfuric acid electrolyte. The former is a hybrid system in which hydrogen is produced in an electrolyzer which uses sulfur dioxide to depolarize the anode. The electrolyte is sulfuric acid. Development and demonstration efforts have shown that extremely low cell voltages can be achieved. The second system uses a similar sulfuric acid electrolyte technology in water electrolysis cells. The comparative technoeconomics of hydrogen produced by the hybrid Sulfur Cycle and by water electrolysis using a sulfuric acid electrolyte were determined by assessing the performance and economics of 380 million SCFD plants, each energized by a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). The evaluation concluded that the overall efficiencies of hydrogen production, for operating parameters that appear reasonable for both systems, are approximately 41% for the sulfuric acid electrolysis and 47% for the hybrid Sulfur Cycle. The economic evaluation of hydrogen production, based on a 1976 cost basis and assuming a developed technology for both hydrogen production systems and the VHTRs, indicated that the hybrid Sulfur Cycle could generate hydrogen for a total cost approximately 6 to 7% less than the cost from the sulfuric acid electrolysis plant.

  11. Real-time discriminatory sensors for water contamination events :LDRD 52595 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III (; ); Carrejo-Simpkins, Kimberly; Wheeler, David Roger; Adkins, Douglas Ray; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Irwin, Adriane Nadine; Lewis, Patrick Raymond; Goodin, Andrew M.; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Dirk, Shawn M.; Chambers, William Clayton; Mowry, Curtis Dale (1722 Micro-Total-Analytical Systems); Showalter, Steven Kedrick

    2005-10-01

    The gas-phase {mu}ChemLab{trademark} developed by Sandia can detect volatile organics and semi-volatiles organics via gas phase sampling . The goal of this three year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to adapt the components and concepts used by the {mu}ChemLab{trademark} system towards the analysis of water-borne chemicals of current concern. In essence, interfacing the gas-phase {mu}ChemLab{trademark} with water to bring the significant prior investment of Sandia and the advantages of microfabrication and portable analysis to a whole new world of important analytes. These include both chemical weapons agents and their hydrolysis products and disinfection by-products such as Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). THMs and HAAs are currently regulated by EPA due to health issues, yet water utilities do not have rapid on-site methods of detection that would allow them to adjust their processes quickly; protecting consumers, meeting water quality standards, and obeying regulations more easily and with greater confidence. This report documents the results, unique hardware and devices, and methods designed during the project toward the goal stated above. It also presents and discusses the portable field system to measure THMs developed in the course of this project.

  12. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low

  13. Treatment techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. Final report of the TENAWA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annanmaeki, M.; Turtiainen, T. [eds.

    2000-01-01

    TENAWA project (Treatment Techniques for Removing Natural Radionuclides from Drinking Water) was carried out on a cost-shared basic with the European Commission (CEC) under the supervision of Directorate-General XII, Radiation Protection Unit. TENAWA project was started because in several European countries ground water supplies may contain high amounts of natural radionuclides. During the project both laboratory and field research was performed in order to test the applicability of different equipment and techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. The measurable objectives of the project were: to give recommendations on the most suitable methods for removing radon ({sup 222}Rn), uranium ({sup 238,234}U), radium ({sup 226}, {sup 228}Ra), lead ({sup 210}Pb) and polonium ({sup 210}Po) from drinking water of different qualities (i.e. soft, hard, iron-, manganese- and humus-rich, acidic) to test commercially available equipment for its ability to remove radionuclides; to find new materials, absorbents and membranes effective in the removal of radionuclides and to issue guidelines for the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in water treatment. Radon could be removed efficiently (>95%) from domestic water supplies by both aeration and granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Defects in technical reliability or radon removal efficiency were observed in some aerators. The significant drawback of GAC filtration was the elevated gamma dose rates (up to 120 {mu}Sv/h) near the filter and the radioactivity of spent GAC. Aeration was found to be a suitable method for removing radon at waterworks, too. The removal efficiencies at waterworks where the aeration process was designed to remove radon or carbon dioxide were 67-99%. If the aeration process was properly designed, removal efficiencies higher than 95% could be attained. Uranium could best be removed (>95%) with strong basic anion exchange resins and radium by applying strong

  14. Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project: Final report. [October 21, 1992-April, 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, M.D. [Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (US); Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc., Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (US); Nielson, D.L.; Lutz, S.J. [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City (US)

    1996-11-01

    The objectives were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. Comprehensive reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations of the Monument Butte, Travis and Boundary units were presented in the two published project yearly reports. The primary and the secondary production from the Monument Butte unit were typical of oil production from an undersaturated oil reservoir close to its bubble point. The water flood in the smaller Travis unit appeared affected by natural and possibly by large interconnecting hydraulic fractures. Water flooding the boundary unit was considered more complicated due to the presence of an oil water contact in one of the wells. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter c ore, Formation Micro Imaging logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir characterization efforts identified new reservoirs in the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2000 barrels per day.

  15. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during

  16. Pharmaceuticals, hormones, personal-care products, and other organic wastewater contaminants in water resources: Recent research activities of the U.S. Geological Survey's toxic substances hydrology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focazio, Michael J.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Buxton, Herbert T.

    2003-01-01

    Recent decades have brought increasing concerns for potential contamination of water resources that could inadvertently result during production, use, and disposal of the numerous chemicals offering improvements in industry, agriculture, medical treatment, and even common household products. Increasing knowledge of the environmental occurrence or toxicological behavior of these contaminants from various studies in Europe, United States, and elsewhere has resulted in increased concern for potential adverse environmental and human health effects (Daughton and Ternes, 1999). Ecologists and public health experts often have incomplete understandings of the toxicological significance of many of these contaminants, particularly long-term, low-level exposure and when they occur in mixtures with other contaminants (Daughton and Ternes, 1999; Kümmerer, 2001). In addition, these ‘emerging contaminants’ are not typically monitored or assessed in ambient water resources. The need to understand the processes controlling the transport and fate of these contaminants in the environment, and the lack of knowledge of the significance of long-term exposures have increased the need to study environmental occurrence down to trace (nanogram per liter) levels. Furthermore, the possibility that mixtures of environmental contaminants may interact synergistically or antagonistically has increased the need to characterize the types of mixtures that are found in our waters. The U.S. Geological Survey’s Toxic Substances Hydrology Program (Toxics Program) is developing information and tools on emerging water-quality issues that will be used to design and improve water-quality monitoring and assessment programs of the USGS and others, and for proactive decision-making by industry, regulators, the research community, and the public (http://toxics.usgs.gov/regional/emc.html). This research on emerging water-quality issues includes a combination of laboratory work to develop new analytical

  17. Toxicity and transfer of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanowires in an aquatic food chain consisting of algae, water fleas, and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Yooeun; An, Youn-Joo

    2016-04-01

    Nanomaterials of various shapes and dimensions are widely used in the medical, chemical, and electronic industries. Multiple studies have reported the ecotoxicological effects of nanaoparticles when released in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; however, information on the toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs) to freshwater organisms and their transfer through the food webs is limited. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the toxicity of 10- and 20-μm-long AgNWs to the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the water flea Daphnia magna, and the zebrafish and study their movement through this three-species food chain using a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods as well as optical techniques. We found that AgNWs directly inhibited the growth of algae and destroyed the digestive organs of water fleas. The results showed that longer AgNWs (20μm) were more toxic than shorter ones (10μm) to both algae and water fleas, but shorter AgNWs were accumulated more than longer ones in the body of the fish. Overall, this study suggests that AgNWs are transferred through food chains, and that they affect organisms at higher trophic levels, potentially including humans. Therefore, further studies that take into account environmental factors, food web complexity, and differences between nanomaterials are required to gain better understanding of the impact of nanomaterials on natural communities and human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Sensitized photoelectrolysis of water with sunlight. Final report, June 1, 1977-December 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, A.K.; Maruska, H.P.

    1978-12-01

    A study was made of solar driven water photoelectrolysis cells employing semiconductor electrodes. An extensive review of the literature was undertaken, and the three major problem areas for these devices were identified: corrosion, poor sunlight absorption, and external bias requirement. Although many semiconductors had been tested, none had proven free of all three defects. Two approaches were thus followed for the experimental studies: impurity sensitization of wide band gap stable oxides, and heterostructure formation between unstable sunlight absorbers and corrosion resistant oxides. Water decomposition was achieved with visible light excitation of Cr-doped TiO/sub 2/. Transport properties were studies for TiO/sub 2/ and SrTiO/sub 3/ electrodes doped with V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni. The correlation between bias requirement and electron affinity of oxides was identified. Performance of heterostructure electrodes was shown to be limited either by pin hole problems or by potential barriers between the valence bands.

  19. Water Treatment Using Advanced Ultraviolet Light Sources Final Report CRADA No. TC02089.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppes, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Oster, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Teknichal Services, LLC (TkS), to develop water treatment systems using advanced ultraviolet light sources. The Russian institutes involved with this project were The High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) and Russian Institute of Technical Physics-Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). HCEI and VNIIEF developed and demonstrated the potential commercial viability of short-wavelength ultraviolet excimer lamps under a Thrust 1 Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) Program. The goals of this collaboration were to demonstrate both the commercial viability of excilampbased water disinfection and achieve further substantial operational improvement in the lamps themselves; particularly in the area of energy efficiency.

  20. East Saint Louis and Vicinity, Illinois. Blue Waters Ditch Improvements. Final Environmental Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-01

    2.2.3.2 Hunting 20 2.2.3.3 Endangered Species 21 2.2.4 PEST SPECIES 21 2.2.4.1 Insects 21 2.2.4.2 Arachnids 22 2.2.4.3 Rodents 22 2.3 SOCIO-CULTURA...and the presence of standing water. 2.2.4.2 Arachnids Two tick-vectored diseases, tularemia and Rocky Mountain spotted fever are known from this area

  1. Solar space and water heating system at Stanford University Central Food Services Building. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    This active hydronic domestic hot water and space heating system was 840 ft/sup 2/ of single-glazed, liquid, flat plate collectors and 1550 gal heat storage tanks. The following are discussed: energy conservation, design philosophy, operation, acceptance testing, performance data, collector selection, bidding, costs, economics, problems, and recommendations. An operation and maintenance manual and as-built drawings are included in appendices. (MHR)

  2. Detection of Oil in Water Column, Final Report: Detection Prototype Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    however, PSDs seemed to shift to larger droplets over time, which may be an indication of droplet coalescence over time and/or droplets scavenging... droplet size and density of the entrained oil. Both systems demonstrated the qualitative ability to detect and/or map oil suspended in the water...the oil plume, however, was not possible due to difficulties with correlating and validating the submerged plumes’ specific droplet size and

  3. Oxidation of substituted phenols in supercritical water. Final technical report, September 1992--August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, P.E.

    1996-11-01

    Wastewaters from coal-conversion processes contain phenolic compounds in appreciable concentrations. These compounds need to be removed so that the water can be discharged or reused. Oxidation in supercritical water is one potential means of treating coal-conversion wastewaters, and this project examined the reactions of model pollutants in supercritical water. The decomposition of cresols, hydroxybenzaidehydes, nitrophenols, and benzenediols was studied in dilute aqueous solutions in both the presence and absence of oxygen at 460{degrees}C and 250 atm. Experimental data from the oxidation of these compounds were fit to global, power-law rate expressions. The resulting rate laws showed that the reactivity of the different isomers at 460{degrees}C was in the order of ortho > para > meta for cresols and hydroxybenzaldehydes. Moreover, the CHO-substituted phenol was more reactive than the analogous CH{sub 3}-substituted phenol, and all of these substituted phenols were more reactive than phenol itself. Identifying and quantifying the reaction products of incomplete oxidation allowed us to assemble a general reaction network for the oxidation of cresols in supercritical water. This network comprises parallel primary paths to phenol, to a hydroxybenzaldehyde, and to ring-opening products. The hydroxybenzaldehyde reacts through parallel paths to phenol and to ring-opening products. Phenol also reacts via two parallel paths, but these lead to phenol dimers; and ring-opening products. The dimers are eventually converted to ring-opening products, and the ring-opening products are ultimately converted to CO{sub 2} The relative rates of the different paths in the reaction network are strong functions of the location of the substituent on the phenolic ring.

  4. Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. The fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. This volume of the report contains the appendices: (A) abbreviations and definitions, glossary; (B) 4.5 MWe utility demonstrator power plant study information; (C) rejected heat utilization; (D) availability; (E) conceptual design specifications; (F) details of the economic analysis; (G) detailed description of the selected configuration; and (H) fuel cell power plant penetration analysis. (WHK)

  5. Feasibility evaluation solar heated textile process water. Volume II. Appendices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hester, J. C.; Beard, J. N.; Robinson, G. F.; Harnett, R. M.

    1977-02-01

    The general objectives of this study are to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the use of solar energy for heating waters in the textile industry and to develop a plan for efforts beyond this feasibility study phase. Specific objectives include (1) determine the industry requirements for heated process water, (2) assess particular schemes and their economic impact, (3) study the total cost environment for solar water heating in this industry, and (4) recommend future experiments. This volume contains the appendices: (A) fiber distribution and end use data; (B) computer model description for textile plant energy balances; (C) computer model description to generate local solar potential; (D) computer model description for system synthesis and analysis; (E) computer model to determine pressure drop, flow distribution and plumbing components; (F) area requirement plots for various use rates, temperature levels, seasons, orientations and collector types for textile operations; (G) computer model description of economic variables for COSMO1 and COSMO2; (H) rate of return plots for various textile applications and energy cost scenerios; and (I) data base for efficiency curves for six collector types. (WHK)

  6. Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. In this particular application, the fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. The displacement of oil and coal resulting from the Bergen County Utilities Authority application was determined. A demonstration program based on the selected configuration was prepared to describe the scope of work, organization, schedules, and costs from preliminary design through actual tests and operation. The potential market for nationwide application of the concept was projected, along with the equivalent oil displacement resulting from estimated commercial application.

  7. Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana open bays. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1996-03-22

    The US Department of Energy (USDOE) has a program of research in the environmental aspects of oil and gas extraction. This sampling project will characterize the environmental impacts associated with the discharge of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), metals and organics in produced water. This report is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico, supported by the USDOE. These assessments are being coordinated with the field study, using the collected data to perform human health and ecological risk assessments. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the development and use of appropriate discharge practices. The initial human health and ecological risk assessments consist of conservative screening analyses meant to identify potentially important contaminants, and to eliminate others from further consideration. More quantitative assessments were done for contaminants identified, in the screening analysis, as being of potential concern. Section 2 gives an overview of human health and ecological risk assessment to help put the analyses presented here in perspective. Section 3 provides the hazard assessment portion of the risk assessment, and identifies the important receptors and pathways of concern. Section 3 also outlines the approach taken to the risk assessments presented in the rest of the report. The remaining sections (4 through 9) present the human health and ecological risk assessments for discharges of produced water to open bays in Louisiana.

  8. Acute toxicity of copper, lead, cadmium, and zinc to early life stages of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) in laboratory and Columbia River water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardy, David W; Santore, Robert; Ryan, Adam; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Populations of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) are in decline in North America. This is attributed, primarily, to poor recruitment, and white sturgeon are listed as threatened or endangered in several parts of British Columbia, Canada, and the United States. In the Columbia River, effects of metals have been hypothesized as possible contributing factors. Previous work has demonstrated that early life stage white sturgeon are particularly sensitive to certain metals, and concerns over the level of protectiveness of water quality standards are justified. Here we report results from acute (96-h) toxicity tests for copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), and lead (Pb) from parallel studies that were conducted in laboratory water and in the field with Columbia River water. Water effect ratios (WERs) and sensitivity parameters (i.e., median lethal accumulations, or LA50s) were calculated to assess relative bioavailability of these metals in Columbia River water compared to laboratory water, and to elucidate possible differences in sensitivity of early life stage white sturgeon to the same concentrations of metals when tested in the different water sources. For Cu and Pb, white sturgeon toxicity tests were initiated at two life stages, 8 and 40 days post-hatch (dph), and median lethal concentrations (LC50s) ranged between 9-25 μg Cu/L and 177-1,556 μg Pb/L. LC50s for 8 dph white sturgeon exposed to Cd in laboratory water and river water were 14.5 and 72 μg/L, respectively. Exposure of 8 dph white sturgeon to Zn in laboratory and river water resulted in LC50s of 150 and 625 μg/L, respectively. Threshold concentrations were consistently less in laboratory water compared with river water, and as a result, WERs were greater than 1 in all cases. In addition, LA50s were consistently greater in river water exposures compared with laboratory exposures in all paired tests. These results, in combination with results from the biotic ligand model, suggest that the observed

  9. Peptide-based ambidextrous bifunctional gelator: applications in oil spill recovery and removal of toxic organic dyes for waste water management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Kingshuk; Nandi, Nibedita; Mondal, Biplab; Dehsorkhi, Ashkan; Hamley, Ian W; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-12-06

    A low molecular weight peptide-based ambidextrous gelator molecule has been discovered for efficient control of water pollution. The gelator molecules can gel various organic solvents with diverse polarity, e.g. n-hexane, n-octane, petroleum ether, petrol, diesel, aromatic solvents like chlorobenzene, toluene, benzene, o-xylene and even aqueous phosphate buffer of pH 7.5. These gels have been thoroughly characterized using various techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction analysis, small angle X-ray scattering and rheological experiments. Interestingly, hydrogel obtained from the gelator molecule has been found to absorb toxic organic dyes (both cationic and anionic dyes) from dye-contaminated water. The gelator molecule can be reused for several cycles, indicating its possible future use in waste water management. Moreover, this gelator can selectively gel petrol, diesel, pump oil from an oil-water mixture in the presence of a carrier solvent, ethyl acetate, suggesting its efficient application for oil spill recovery. These results indicate that the peptide-based ambidextrous gelator produces soft materials (gels) with dual function: (i) removal of toxic organic dyes in waste water treatment and (ii) oil spill recovery.

  10. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant: Niles Station Boiler No. 2. Volume 1, Sampling/results/special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This study was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE-PETC) during 1993. The motivation for those assessments was the mandate in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments that a study be made of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electrical utilities. The results of this study will be used by the US Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate whether regulation of HAPs emissions from utilities is warranted. This report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1: Sampling/Results/Special Topics describes the sampling effort conducted as the basis for this study, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in the several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations conducted with those data. The Special Topics section of Volume 1 reports on issues such as comparison of sampling methods and vapor/particle distributions of toxic chemicals. Volume 2: Appendices include field sampling data sheets, quality assurance results, and uncertainty calculations. The chemicals measured at Niles Boiler No. 2 were the following: five major and 16 trace elements, including mercury, chromium, cadmium, lead, selenium, arsenic, beryllium, and nickel; acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate); ammonia and cyanide; elemental carbon; radionuclides; volatile organic compounds (VOC); semivolatile compounds (SVOC) including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and polychlorinated dioxins and furans; and aldehydes.

  11. Final report on the developmental toxicity of naphthalene (CAS No. 91-20-3) in New Zealand White (trade name) rabbits. Rept. for 26 Mar-1 Aug 91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, H.A.; Price, C.J.; Marr, M.C.; Myers, C.B.; Heindel, J.J.

    1992-07-13

    Naphthalene (NAP) is a polyaromatic hydrocarbon produced from petroleum and coal tar. NAP is widely used in the manufacture of dyes, synthetic tanning agents, and lubricants; it is also a common constituent of mothballs. Exposure to NAP can occur in the home and workplace, and ingestion or inhalation can cause severe toxicity in humans, especially in infants and individuals with a deficiency in the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because of the large population at risk, and since NAP readily crosses the placenta, it was evaluated as a developmental toxicant. Accordingly, NAP (0, 20, 80, or 120 mg/kg/day) was administered in corn oil by gavage to pregnant rabbits during the major period of organogenesis (gd 6-19). Maternal clinical signs, weight, and food consumption were monitored from gd 0 to 30. On gd 30, fetuses were removed from the does and examined for effects of NAP on growth, viability, and morphological development. The results from the study provide no definitive evidence for NAP being toxic to the fetus or doe at doses as high as 120 mg/kg/day. Higher doses were not examined in the study due to the reported incidence of 40% maternal mortality following administration of 150 mg/kg/day NAP to pregnant rabbits in a range-finding study.

  12. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Stanley D. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Nowak, Robert S. [University of Nevada, Reno

    2007-11-30

    Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypothesis include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production thorugh an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plan production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plan and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plan-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform.

  13. Final Report: Water-Based Neutron Detector Technology for Material Characterization Well Counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dazeley, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Asghari, Alexandra [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, Adam [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowden, Nathaniel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mozin, Vladimir [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-01-09

    Coincidence counting of neutron pairs is an effective way to non-destructively determine the amount of fissile material within a sample of special nuclear material (SNM) [1]. Multiplicity counting is more versatile and precise, but also more demanding, requiring the detection of three or more neutrons per single fission event. Detecting a triple coincidence of neutrons depends on the 3rd power of the detection efficiency and so on. The detection efficiency quickly becomes the critical determining factor in evaluating the utility of a particular neutron multiplicity detection technique. The purpose of this feasibility study was to characterize the performance of an LLNLdesigned water Cherenkov based Multiplicity Well counter.

  14. Analysis of the impact of energy crops on water quality. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatfield, J.L.; Gale, W.J.

    1993-04-16

    This report consists of two separate papers. The first, ``The potential use of agricultural simulation models in predicting the fate of nitrogen and pesticides applied to switchgrass and poplars,`` describes three models (CREAMS, GLEAMS, and EPIC) for the evaluation of the relationships which determine water quality in the agroecosystem. Case studies are presented which demonstrate the utility of these models in evaluating the potential impact of alternative crop management practices. The second paper, ``Energy crops as part of a sustainable landscape,`` discusses concepts of landscape management and the linkage among agricultural practices and environmental quality.

  15. Final Report - Energy Reduction and Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, John; Fanselow, Dan; Abbas, Charles; Sammons, Rhea; Kinchin, Christopher

    2014-08-06

    3M and Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and demonstrate a novel membrane solvent extraction (MSE) process that can substantially reduce energy and water consumption in ethanol production, and accelerate the fermentation process. A cross-flow membrane module was developed, using porous membrane manufactured by 3M. A pilot process was developed that integrates fermentation, MSE and vacuum distillation. Extended experiments of 48-72 hours each were conducted to develop the process, verify its performance and begin establishing commercial viability.

  16. Water-molten uranium hazard analysis. Final report. LATA report No. 92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, P.S.; Rigdon, L.D.; Donham, B.J.

    1979-08-21

    The hazard potential of cooling water leakage into the crucible of molten uranium in the MARS laser isotope separation experiment was investigated. A vapor-phase explosion is highly unlikely in any of the scenarios defined for MARS. For the operating basis accident, the gas pressure transient experienced by the vessel wall is 544 psia peak with a duration of 200 ..mu..s, and the peak hoop stress is about 20,000 psi in a 0.5-in. wall. Design and procedural recommendations are given for reducing the hazard. (DLC)

  17. Final Results of Local-Regional Control and Late Toxicity of RTOG 9003: A Randomized Trial of Altered Fractionation Radiation for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitler, Jonathan J., E-mail: jjbeitl@emory.edu [Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Zhang, Qiang [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Fu, Karen K. [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Trotti, Andy [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center at the University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida (United States); Spencer, Sharon A. [University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Garden, Adam S. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Shenouda, George [McGill University, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Harris, Jonathan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ang, Kian K. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To test whether altered radiation fractionation schemes (hyperfractionation [HFX], accelerated fractionation, continuous [AFX-C], and accelerated fractionation with split [AFX-S]) improved local-regional control (LRC) rates for patients with squamous cell cancers (SCC) of the head and neck when compared with standard fractionation (SFX) of 70 Gy. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage III or IV (or stage II base of tongue) SCC (n=1076) were randomized to 4 treatment arms: (1) SFX, 70 Gy/35 daily fractions/7 weeks; (2) HFX, 81.6 Gy/68 twice-daily fractions/7 weeks; (3) AFX-S, 67.2 Gy/42 fractions/6 weeks with a 2-week rest after 38.4 Gy; and (4) AFX-C, 72 Gy/42 fractions/6 weeks. The 3 experimental arms were to be compared with SFX. Results: With patients censored for LRC at 5 years, only the comparison of HFX with SFX was significantly different: HFX, hazard ratio (HR) 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.62-1.00), P=.05; AFX-C, 0.82 (95% confidence interval 0.65-1.05), P=.11. With patients censored at 5 years, HFX improved overall survival (HR 0.81, P=.05). Prevalence of any grade 3, 4, or 5 toxicity at 5 years; any feeding tube use after 180 days; or feeding tube use at 1 year did not differ significantly when the experimental arms were compared with SFX. When 7-week treatments were compared with 6-week treatments, accelerated fractionation appeared to increase grade 3, 4 or 5 toxicity at 5 years (P=.06). When the worst toxicity per patient was considered by treatment only, the AFX-C arm seemed to trend worse than the SFX arm when grade 0-2 was compared with grade 3-5 toxicity (P=.09). Conclusions: At 5 years, only HFX improved LRC and overall survival for patients with locally advanced SCC without increasing late toxicity.

  18. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING/FEASIBILTY SUDIES FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPRITZER.M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The key potential advantage of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reacting and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carried out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an activated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical

  19. Environmental impact of coal ash on tributary streams and nearshore water or Lake Erie. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, K.G.

    1978-08-01

    The environmental impact of coal ash disposal at a landfill site in north-central Chautauqua County, New York was studied from June 1975 through July 1977. Water samples taken from wells, ponds, and streams at 67 sites were analyzed for specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, arsenic, calcium, cadmium, chloride, chromium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, selenium, sodium, sulfate and zinc. Evidence suggests that ponds at the landfill were high in Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, and SO/sub 4/ compared to control pands. A stream adjacent to the site contained greater Mn (207 ug/1) and SO/sub 4/ (229 ppm) than control streams. Shallow alkaline test wells in the landfill had elevated As, Ca, and Se. Acid-neutral test wells had elevated As, Ca, Cr, Mg and Mn. Household wells in the vicinity of the landfill showed no evident contamination from the landfill. Average iron concentrations in the biota were tripled, and manganese concentrations doubled in biota affected by the coal ash dump. However, any effects of the disposal area on the distribution of the biota could not be separated from effects of varying environment factors such as water movements, substrate composition and food availability. No harmful effects could be demonstrated on the biota in the creek which flowed past the disposal area.

  20. Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Daniel

    1987-08-01

    The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council calls for wildlife mitigation at hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River System. Beginning April, 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration funded a study of the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse and Kerr Dams on the western Canada goose (Branta canadensis moffittii) inhabitating the Flathead Valley of northwest Montana. The study was conducted by personnel of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MDFWP), to: (1) identify the size and productivity of this population, (2) identify current habitat conditions and losses of nesting and brood-rearing areas, (3) describe the effects of water level fluctuations on nesting and brood-rearing, and (4) identify mitigation alternatives to offset these effects. Annual pair and nest surveys were used to document the location and fate of goose nests. The number of known nesting attempts varied from 44 in 1984 to 108 in 1985, to 136 in 1986 and 134 in 1987. Fifty-four percent of the annual meeting nesting effort took place on elevated sites which were secure from the flooding and dewatering effects of fluctuating water levels. An average of 15 nests were found on stumps in the remnant Flathead River delta, however, an area strongly influenced by the operation of Kerr Dam. Annual nest losses to flooding and predation attributable to fluctuations caused by the dam were recorded. 53 refs., 24 figs., 35 tabs.

  1. Solar heating, cooling, and hot water systems installed at Richland, Washington. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    Project Sunburst is a demonstration system for solar space heating and cooling and solar hot water heating for a 14,400 square foot office building in Richland, Washington. The project is part of the US Department of Energy's solar demonstration program, and became operational in April 1978. The solar system uses 6,000 square feet of flat-plate liquid collectors in a closed loop to deliver solar energy through a liquid--liquid heat exchanger to the building heat-pump duct work or 9,000-gallon thermal energy storage tank. A 25-ton Arkla solar-driven absorption chiller provides the cooling, in conjunction with a 2,000 gallon chilled water storage tank and reflective ponds on three sides of the building to reject surplus heat. A near-by building is essentially identical except for having conventional heat-pump heating and cooling, and can serve as an experimental control. An on-going public relations program has been provided from the beginning of the program and has resulted in numerous visitors and tour groups.

  2. Combustion of ultrafine coal/water mixtures and their application in gas turbines: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toqan, M.A.; Srinivasachar, S.; Staudt, J.; Varela, F.; Beer, J.M.

    1987-10-01

    The feasibility of using coal-water fuels (CWF) in gas turbine combustors has been demonstrated in recent pilot plant experiments. The demands of burning coal-water fuels with high flame stability, complete combustion, low NO/sub x/ emission and a resulting fly ash particle size that will not erode turbine blades represent a significant challenge to combustion scientists and engineers. The satisfactory solution of these problems requires that the variation of the structure of CWF flames, i.e., the fields of flow, temperature and chemical species concentration in the flame, with operating conditions is known. Detailed in-flame measurements are difficult at elevated pressures and it has been proposed to carry out such experiments at atmospheric pressure and interpret the data by means of models for gas turbine combustor conditions. The research was carried out in five sequential tasks: cold flow studies; studies of conventional fine-grind CWF; combustion studies with ultrafine CWF fuel; reduction of NO/sub x/ emission by staged combustion; and data interpretation-ignition and radiation aspects. 37 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Final Report: Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana open bays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1996-03-01

    Potential human health and environmental impacts from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico are of concern to regulators at the State and Federal levels, the public, environmental interest groups and industry. Current and proposed regulations require a zero discharge limit for coastal facilities, based primarily on studies in low energy, poorly flushed environments. However, produced water discharges in coastal Louisiana include a number of open bay sites, where potential human health and environmental impacts are likely to be smaller than those demonstrated for low energy canal environments, but greater than the minimal impacts associated with offshore discharges. Additional data and assessments are needed to support risk managers at the State and Federal levels in the development of regulations that protect human health and the environment without unnecessary cost to the economic welfare of the region and the nation. This project supports the Natural Gas and Oil Initiative objectives to: (1) improve coordination on environmental research; (2) streamline State and Federal regulation; (3) enhance State, and Federal regulatory decision making capability; (4) enhance dialogue through industry/government/public partnerships; and (5) work with States and Native American Tribes.

  4. Acute and subacute toxicity of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 1-methylnaphthalene to the shallow-water coral Porites divaricata: Application of a novel exposure protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renegar, D Abigail; Turner, Nicholas R; Riegl, Bernhard M; Dodge, Richard E; Knap, Anthony H; Schuler, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    Previous research evaluating hydrocarbon toxicity to corals and coral reefs has generally focused on community-level effects, and results often are not comparable between studies because of variability in hydrocarbon exposure characterization and evaluation of coral health and mortality during exposure. Toxicity of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 1-methylnaphthalene to the coral Porites divaricata was assessed in a constant exposure toxicity test utilizing a novel toxicity testing protocol uniquely applicable to shallow-water corals, which considered multiple assessment metrics and evaluated the potential for post-exposure mortality and/or recovery. Acute and subacute effects (gross morphological changes, photosynthetic efficiency, mortality, and histologic cellular changes) were evaluated during pre-exposure (4 wk), exposure (48 h), and post-exposure recovery (4 wk) periods. Coral condition scores were used to determine a 48-h median effective concentration of 7442 μg/L. Significant physical and histological changes resulted from exposure to 640 μg/L and 5427 μg/L 1-methylnaphthalene, with a 1-d to 3-d delay in photosynthetic efficiency effects (ΔF/Fm). Pigmented granular amoebocyte area was found to be a potentially useful sublethal endpoint for this species. Coral mortality was used to estimate a 48-h median lethal concentration of 12 123 μg/L. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:212-219. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  5. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Stanley, D.; Nowak, Robert S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn, F.; Young, Michael,H.

    2007-11-30

    In order to anticipate the effects of global change on ecosystem function, it is essential that predictive relationships be established linking ecosystem function to global change scenarios. The Mojave Desert is of considerable interest with respect to global change. It contains the driest habitats in North America, and thus most closely approximates the world’s great arid deserts. In order to examine the effects of climate and land use changes, in 2001 we established a long-term manipulative global change experiment, called the Mojave Global Change Facility. Manipulations in this study include the potential effects of (1) increased summer rainfall (75 mm over three discrete 25 mm events), (2) increased nitrogen deposition (10 and 40 kg ha-1), and (3) the disturbance of biological N-fixing crusts . Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypotheses include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production through an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plant production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plant and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most

  6. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Zooplankton responses. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhofer, G.A.

    1992-09-25

    This study sought to determine and understand the major processes governing the abundance, distribution, composition and eventual fate of zooplankton on the southeastern shelf of the US in relation to water circulation. Over much of the shelf circulation is dominated by the Gulf Stream and/or atmospheric forcing. Most of our studies concentrated on processes on the middle and outer shelf. On the latter, pronounced biological production occurs year-round at frequent intervals and is due to Gulf Stream eddies which move by at an average frequency of one every week. These eddies are rich in nutrients which, when upwelled into the euphoric zone, lead to pronounced primary production which then triggers zooplankton production.

  7. Cyclone reburn using coal-water fuel: Pilot-scale development and testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckhart, C.F.; DeVault, R.F.

    1991-10-01

    There is an ongoing effort to develop retrofit technologies capable of converting oil- and/or gas-fired boilers to coal combustion. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an improved portion of a previously developed retrofit system designed for the purpose of converting oil/gas boilers. This improvement would almost entirely eliminate the use of premium fuels, thereby significantly increasing the economical attractiveness of the system. Specifically, the goals in this program were to replace natural gas as a reburning fuel with coal-water fuel (CWF). The advantages of such a system include: (1) increased return on investment (ROI) for conversions; (2) nearly complete elimination of premium oil or gas fuel; (3) a more integrated approach to the conversion of oil- or gas-designed boilers to CWF.

  8. Copper toxicity to bioluminescent Nitrosomonas europaea in soil is explained by the free metal ion activity in pore water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ore, S; Mertens, J; Brandt, K K; Smolders, E

    2010-12-01

    The terrestrial biotic ligand model (BLM) for metal toxicity in soil postulates that metal toxicity depends on the free metal ion activity in solution and on ions competing for metal sorption to the biotic ligand. Unequivocal evidence for the BLM assumptions is most difficult to obtain for native soil microorganisms because the abiotic and biotic compartments cannot be experimentally separated. Here, we report copper (Cu) toxicity to a bioluminescent Nitrosomonas europaea reporter strain that was used in a solid phase-contact assay and in corresponding soil extracts and artificial soil solutions. The Cu(2+) ion activities that halve bioluminescence (EC50) in artificial solutions ranged 10(-5) to 10(-7) M and increased with increasing activities of H(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) according to the BLM concept. The solution based Cu(2+) EC50 values of N. europaea in six contaminated soils ranged 2 × 10(-6) to 2 × 10(-9) M and these thresholds for both solid phase or soil extract based assays were well predicted by the ion competition model fitted to artificial solution data. In addition, solution based Cu(2+) EC50 of the solid phase-contact assay were never smaller than corresponding values in soil extracts suggesting no additional solid phase toxic route. By restricting the analysis to the same added species, we show that the Cu(2+) in solution represents the toxic species to this bacterium.

  9. Final report for the Light Water Breeder Reactor proof-of-breeding analytical support project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graczyk, D.G.; Hoh, J.C.; Martino, F.J.; Nelson, R.E.; Osudar, J.; Levitz, N.M.

    1987-05-01

    The technology of breeding /sup 233/U from /sup 232/Th in a light water reactor is being developed and evaluated by the Westinghouse Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL) through operation and examination of the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR). Bettis is determining the end-of-life (EOL) inventory of fissile uranium in the LWBR core by nondestructive assay of a statistical sample comprising approximately 500 EOL fuel rods. This determination is being made with an irradiated-fuel assay gauge based on neutron interrogation and detection of delayed neutrons from each rod. The EOL fissile inventory will be compared with the beginning-of-life fissile loading of the LWBR to determine the extent of breeding. In support of the BAPL proof-of-breeding (POB) effort, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) carried out destructive physical, chemical, and radiometric analyses on 17 EOL LWBR fuel rods that were previously assayed with the nondestructive gauge. The ANL work included measurements on the intact rods; shearing of the rods into pre-designated contiguous segments; separate dissolution of each of the more than 150 segments; and analysis of the dissolver solutions to determine each segment's uranium content, uranium isotopic composition, and loading of selected fission products. This report describes the facilities in which this work was carried out, details operations involved in processing each rod, and presents a comprehensive discussion of uncertainties associated with each result of the ANL measurements. Most operations were carried out remotely in shielded cells. Automated equipment and procedures, controlled by a computer system, provided error-free data acquisition and processing, as well as full replication of operations with each rod. Despite difficulties that arose during processing of a few rod segments, the ANL destructive-assay results satisfied the demanding needs of the parent LWBR-POB program.

  10. Removal of toxic chromium from aqueous solution, wastewater and saline water by marine red alga Pterocladia capillacea and its activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed El Nemr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pterocladia capillacea, a red marine macroalgae, was tested for its ability to remove toxic hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. A new activated carbon obtained from P. capillacea via acid dehydration was also investigated as an adsorbent for toxic chromium. The experiments were conducted to study the effect of important parameters such as pH, chromium concentration and adsorbent weight. Batch equilibrium tests at different pH conditions showed that at pH 1.0, a maximum chromium uptake was observed for both inactivated dried red alga P. capillacea and its activated carbon. The maximum sorption capacities for dried red alga and its activated carbon were about 12 and 66 mgg−1, respectively, as calculated by Langmuir model. The ability of inactivated red alga P. capillacea and developed activated carbon to remove chromium from synthetic sea water, natural sea water and wastewater was investigated as well. Different isotherm models were used to analyze the experimental data and the models parameters were evaluated. This study showed that the activated carbon developed from red alga P. capillacea is a promising activated carbon for removal of toxic chromium.

  11. Ecological risk assessment of toxic organic pollutant and heavy metals in water and sediment from a landscape lake in Tianjin City, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Liu, Yuanyuan; Niu, Zhiguang; Jin, Shaopei

    2017-05-01

    To estimate the ecological risk of toxic organic pollutant (formaldehyde) and heavy metals (mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), and chromium (Cr)) in water and sediment from a landscape Lake in Tianjin City, an ecological risk assessment was performed. The risk quotient (RQ) method and the AQUATOX model were used to assess the ecological risk of formaldehyde in landscape water. Meanwhile, the RQ method and the potential ecological risk index method were used to assess the ecological risk of four heavy metals in water and sediment from the studied landscape lake, respectively. The results revealed that the maximum concentration of formaldehyde in landscape water was lower than the environmental quality standards of surface water in China. The maximum simulated concentrations of formaldehyde in phytoplankton and invertebrates were 3.15 and 22.91 μg/L, respectively, which were far less than its toxicity data values (1000 and 510 μg/L, respectively), suggesting that formaldehyde in landscape water was at a safe level for aquatic organisms. The RQ model indicated that the risks of phytoplankton and invertebrates were higher than that of fish posed by Hg and Cd in landscape water, and the risks from As and Cr were acceptable for all test organisms. Cd is the most important pollution factor among all heavy metals in sediment from studied landscape lake, and the pollution factor sequence of heavy metals was Hg > As > Cr > Cd. The values of risk index (RI) for four heavy metals in samples a and b were 43.48 and 72.66, which were much lower than the threshold value (150), suggesting that the ecological risk posed by heavy metals in sediment was negligible.

  12. Effects of sequential ozonation and adsorption in the removal of water-soluble fraction of crude oil, leading to total organic carbon and toxicity reduction for rainbow trout larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Sadani

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Primarily ozonation of crude oil polluted waters followed by adsorption by activated carbon can increase the removal efficiency of the process, which results in significant TOC and toxicity reduction.

  13. Effects of water temperature and pH on toxicity of terbufos, trichlorfon, 4-nitrophenol and 2,4- dinitrophenol to the amphipod Gammarus pseudolimnaeus and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, G.E.; Marking, L.L.; Bills, T.D.; Rach, J.J.; Mayer, F.L.

    1994-01-01

    Acute toxicity tests were conducted to determine (a) the individual and interactive effects of water temperature (7, 12, 17 degree C), pH (6.5, 7.5, 8.5, 9.5), and time on the toxicity of terbufos, trichlorfon, 4- nitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrophenol to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and the amphipod Gammarus pseudolimnaeus, and (b) the individual and interactive effects of water temperature and pH on chemical bioconcentration during acute tests with rainbow trout and Gammarus exposed to terbufos, 4-nitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrophenol. The toxicity of all four chemicals was significantly affected by pH in all tests, except for Gammarus exposed to terbufos. The toxicity of terbufos to rainbow trout and Gammarus was less at pH 7.5 than at higher or lower pH. The toxicity of both nitrophenols decreased as pH increased, whereas the toxicity of trichlorfon increased with pH. The effect of pH on trichlorfon toxicity decreased with temperature. Temperature significantly affected the toxicity of all four chemicals to both species. Toxicity increased with temperature in all tests, exce