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Sample records for water stress corrosion

  1. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of ferritic/martensitic steel in super critical pressurized water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, T. [Naka Fusion Research Institute, JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)]. E-mail: hirose.takanori@jaea.go.jp; Shiba, K. [Naka Fusion Research Institute, JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Enoeda, M. [Naka Fusion Research Institute, JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Akiba, M. [Naka Fusion Research Institute, JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2007-08-01

    A water-cooled solid breeder (WCSB) blanket cooled by high temperature SCPW (super critical pressurized water) is a practical option of DEMO reactor. Therefore, it is necessary to check the compatibility of the steel with SCPW. In this work, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H has been tested through slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in 23.5 MPa SCPW. And weight change behavior was measured up to 1000 h. F82H did not demonstrated stress corrosion cracking and its weight simply increased with surface oxidation. The weight change of F82H was almost same as commercial 9%-Cr steels. According to a cross-sectional analysis and weight change behavior, corrosion rate of F82H in the 823 K SCPW is estimated to be 0.04 mm/yr.

  2. The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking behavior of a novel alumina-forming austenitic stainless steel in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongying; Yang, Haijie; Wang, Man; Giron-Palomares, Benjamin; Zhou, Zhangjian; Zhang, Lefu; Zhang, Guangming

    2017-02-01

    The general corrosion and stress corrosion behavior of Fe-27Ni-15Cr-5Al-2Mo-0.4Nb alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) steel were investigated in supercritical water under different conditions. A double layer oxide structure was formed: a Fe-rich outer layer (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4) and an Al-Cr-rich inner layer. And the inner layer has a low growth rate with exposing time, which is good for improvement of corrosion resistance. Additionally, some internal nodular Al-Cr-rich oxides were also observed, which resulted in a local absence of inner layer. Stress corrosion specimens exhibited a combination of high strength, good ductility and low susceptibility. The stress strength and elongation was reduced by increasing temperature and amount of dissolved oxygen. In addition, the corresponding susceptibility was increased with decreased temperatures and increased oxygen contents.

  3. Synthetic sea water - An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    A major problem in evaluating the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys by alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) water is excessive pitting corrosion. Several methods were examined to eliminate this problem and to find an improved accelerated test medium. These included the addition of chromate inhibitors, surface treatment of specimens, and immersion in synthetic sea water. The results indicate that alternate immersion in synthetic sea water is a very promising stress corrosion test medium. Neither chromate inhibitors nor surface treatment (anodize and alodine) of the aluminum specimens improved the performance of alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water sufficiently to be classified as an effective stress corrosion test method.

  4. Influence of oxide films on primary water stress corrosion cracking initiation of alloy 600

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter, J.; Viguier, B.; Cloué, J.-M.; Foucault, M.; Combrade, P.; Andrieu, E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study alloy 600 was tested in simulated pressurised water reactor (PWR) primary water, at 360 °C, under an hydrogen partial pressure of 30 kPa. These testing conditions correspond to the maximum sensitivity of alloy 600 to crack initiation. The resulting oxidised structures (corrosion scale and underlying metal) were characterised. A chromium rich oxide layer was revealed, the underlying metal being chromium depleted. In addition, analysis of the chemical composition of the metal close to the oxide scale had allowed to detect oxygen under the oxide scale and particularly in a triple grain boundary. Implication of such a finding on the crack initiation of alloy 600 is discussed. Significant diminution of the crack initiation time was observed for sample oxidised before stress corrosion tests. In view of these results, a mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 600 in PWR primary water was proposed.

  5. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

    2014-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  6. Accelerated Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Tyler; Was, Gary S.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical and supercritical water. Tensile bars of Alloys 690 and 600 were strained in constant extension rate tensile experiments in hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 593 K to 723 K (320 °C to 450 °C), and the crack initiation behavior was characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy. Intergranular cracking was observed across the entire temperature range, and the morphology, structure, composition, and temperature dependence of initiated cracks in Alloy 690 were consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water. Crack initiation of Alloy 600 followed an Arrhenius relationship and did not exhibit a discontinuity or change in slope after crossing the critical temperature. The measured activation energy was 121 ± 13 kJ/mol. Stress corrosion crack initiation in Alloy 690 was fit with a single activation energy of 92 ± 12 kJ/mol across the entire temperature range. Cracks were observed to propagate along grain boundaries adjacent to chromium-depleted metal, with Cr2O3 observed ahead of crack tips. All measures of the SCC behavior indicate that the mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 is consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water.

  7. Accelerated Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Tyler; Was, Gary S.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical and supercritical water. Tensile bars of Alloys 690 and 600 were strained in constant extension rate tensile experiments in hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 593 K to 723 K (320 °C to 450 °C), and the crack initiation behavior was characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy. Intergranular cracking was observed across the entire temperature range, and the morphology, structure, composition, and temperature dependence of initiated cracks in Alloy 690 were consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water. Crack initiation of Alloy 600 followed an Arrhenius relationship and did not exhibit a discontinuity or change in slope after crossing the critical temperature. The measured activation energy was 121 ± 13 kJ/mol. Stress corrosion crack initiation in Alloy 690 was fit with a single activation energy of 92 ± 12 kJ/mol across the entire temperature range. Cracks were observed to propagate along grain boundaries adjacent to chromium-depleted metal, with Cr2O3 observed ahead of crack tips. All measures of the SCC behavior indicate that the mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 is consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water.

  8. Literature Survey on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of Low-Alloy Steels in High Temperature Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P

    2002-02-01

    The present report is a summary of a literature survey on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour/ mechanisms in low-alloy steels (LAS) in high-temperature water with special emphasis to primary-pressure-boundary components of boiling water reactors (BWR). A brief overview on the current state of knowledge concerning SCC of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel and piping steels under BWR conditions is given. After a short introduction on general aspects of SCC, the main influence parameter and available quantitative literature data concerning SCC of LAS in high-temperature water are discussed on a phenomenological basis followed by a summary of the most popular SCC models for this corrosion system. The BWR operating experience and service cracking incidents are discussed with respect to the existing laboratory data and background knowledge. Finally, the most important open questions and topics for further experimental investigations are outlined. (author)

  9. Corrosion and Corrosion Control in Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Barry M.

    2013-08-01

    Serious corrosion problems have plagued the light water reactor (LWR) industry for decades. The complex corrosion mechanisms involved and the development of practical engineering solutions for their mitigation will be discussed in this article. After a brief overview of the basic designs of the boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR), emphasis will be placed on the general corrosion of LWR containments, flow-accelerated corrosion of carbon steel components, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in BWRs, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in PWRs, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in both systems. Finally, the corrosion future of both plants will be discussed as plants extend their period of operation for an additional 20 to 40 years.

  10. Mechanical factors in primary water stress corrosion cracking of cold-worked stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammadi, Rashid Al, E-mail: rashid.alhammadi@fanr.gov.ae [Nuclear Security Division, Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Yi, Yongsun, E-mail: yongsun.yi@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Zaki, Wael, E-mail: wael.zaki@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Cho, Pyungyeon, E-mail: pyungyeon.cho@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Jang, Changheui, E-mail: chjang@kaist.ac.kr [Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • PWSCC of cold-worked austenitic stainless steel was studied. • Finite element analysis was performed on a compact tension specimen. • Mechanical fields near a crack tip were evaluated using FEA. • The dependence of mechanical factors on K{sub I} and yield stress was investigated. • The crack tip normal stress was identified as a main factor controlling PWSCC. - Abstract: Finite element analysis was performed on a compact tension specimen to determine the stress and strain distributions near a crack tip. Based on the results, the crack tip stain rates by crack advance and creep rates near crack tip were estimated. By comparing the dependence of the mechanical factors on the stress intensity factor and yield stress with that of the SCC crack growth rates, it was tried to identify the main mechanical factor for the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels. The analysis results showed that the crack tip normal stress could be the main mechanical factor controlling the PWSCC, suggesting that the internal oxidation mechanism might be the most probable PWSCC mechanism of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels.

  11. Misunderstanding and Understanding of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking of Structural Components in the Primary System of PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Dae Whan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    All the structural components in the primary system of pressurized water reactors that are in contact with primary water are made of austenitic Ni-Cr-Fe alloys which are known to be corrosion resistant. Nevertheless, these Ni-Cr-Fe alloys such as Alloy 600, weld 182/82, austenitic stainless steels suffer from intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) after their 10 year operation in reactors although the environment to which they have been exposed is almost pure water of pH 6.9 to 7.2, which is called primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Given that the underlying mechanism of PWSCC remains unidentified so far, there are many misunderstandings related to PWSCC of the structural components, which may lead to unreasonable mitigation measures. The aim of this work is to highlight understanding and misunderstanding of PWSCC related to austenitic Ni-Cr-Fe alloys.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of annealed and cold worked 316L stainless steel in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáez-Maderuelo, A., E-mail: alberto.saez@ciemat.es; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The alloy 316L is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in supercritical water. • The susceptibility of alloy 316L increases with temperature and plastic deformation. • Dynamic strain ageing processes may be active in the material. - Abstract: The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the more promising designs considered by the Generation IV International Forum due to its high thermal efficiency and improving security. To build this reactor, standardized structural materials used in light water reactors (LWR), like austenitic stainless steels, have been proposed. These kind of materials have shown an optimum behavior to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under LWR conditions except when they are cold worked. It is known that physicochemical properties of water change sharply with pressure and temperature inside of the supercritical region. Owing to this situation, there are several doubts about the behavior of candidate materials like austenitic stainless steel 316L to SCC in the SCWR conditions. In this work, alloy 316L was studied in deaerated SCW at two different temperatures (400 °C and 500 °C) and at 25 MPa in order to determine how changes in this variable influence the resistance of this material to SCC. The influence of plastic deformation in the behavior of alloy 316L to SCC in SCW was also studied at both temperatures. Results obtained from these tests have shown that alloy 316L is susceptible to SCC in supercritical water reactor conditions where the susceptibility of this alloy increases with temperature. Moreover, prior plastic deformation of 316L SS increased its susceptibility to environmental cracking in SCW.

  13. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 600 in PWR primary water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Ziqing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2017-07-01

    Stress corrosion crack (SCC) initiation of three mill-annealed (MA) alloy 600 heats in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water has been investigated using constant load tests equipped with in-situ direct current potential drop (DCPD) measurement capabilities. SCC initiation times were greatly reduced by a small amount of cold work. Shallow intergranular (IG) attack and/or cracks were found on most high-energy grain boundaries intersecting the surface with only a small fraction evolving into larger cracks and IGSCC growth. Crack depth profiles were measured and related to DCPD-detected initiation response. Processes controlling the SCC initiation in MA alloy 600 are discussed. IN PRESS, CORRECTED PROOF, 05/02/2017 - mfl

  14. Numerical investigation on stress corrosion cracking behavior of dissimilar weld joints in pressurized water reactor plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyan Zhao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There have been incidents recently where stress corrosion cracking (SCC observed in the dissimilar metal weld (DMW joints connecting the reactor pressure vessel (RPV nozzle with the hot leg pipe. Due to the complex microstructure and mechanical heterogeneity in the weld region, dissimilar metal weld joints are more susceptible to SCC than the bulk steels in the simulated high temperature water environment of pressurized water reactor (PWR. Tensile residual stress (RS, in addition to operating loads, has a great contribution to SCC crack growth. Limited experimental conditions, varied influence factors and diverging experimental data make it difficult to accurately predict the SCC behavior of DMW joints with complex geometry, material configuration, operating loads and crack shape. Based on the film slip/dissolution oxidation model and elastic-plastic finite element method (EPFEM, an approach is developed to quantitatively predict the SCC growth rate of a RPV outlet nozzle DMW joint. Moreover, this approach is expected to be a pre-analytical tool for SCC experiment of DMW joints in PWR primary water environment.

  15. Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Various Metallic Materials for the International Space Station Water Recycling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    A stress corrosion evaluation was performed on Inconel 625, Hastelloy C276, titanium commercially pure (TiCP), Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-4V extra low interstitial, and Cronidur 30 steel as a consequence of a change in formulation of the pretreatment for processing the urine in the International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Urine Processing Assembly from a sulfuric acid-based to a phosphoric acid-based solution. The first five listed were found resistant to stress corrosion in the pretreatment and brine. However, some of the Cronidur 30 specimens experienced reduction in load-carrying ability.

  16. A Study on the Residual Stress Improvement of PWSCC(Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking) in DMW(Dissimilar Metal Weld)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Sik; Kim, Seok Hun; Lee, Seung Gun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heung Bae [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Since 2000s, most of the cracks are found in welds, especially in (DMW) dissimilar metal welds such as pressurizer safety relief nozzle, reactor head penetration, reactor bottom mounted instrumentation (BMI), and reactor nozzles. Even the cracks are revealed as a primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), it is difficult to find the cracks by current non destructive examination. The PWSCC is occurred by three incident factors, such as susceptible material, environmental corrosive condition, and welding residual stress. If one of the three factors can be erased or decreased, the PWSCC could be prevented. In this study, we performed residual stress analysis for DMW and several residual stress improvement methods. As the preventive methods of PWSCC, we used laser peening(IP) method, inlay weld(IW) method, and induction heating stress improvement(IHSI) method. The effect of residual stress improvement for preventive methods was compared and discussed by finite element modeling and residual stress of repaired DMW

  17. Precursor Evolution and Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation of Cold-Worked Alloy 690 in Simulated Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Ziqing [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Toloczko, Mychailo [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Kruska, Karen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Bruemmer, Stephen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.

    2017-05-22

    Stress corrosion crack initiation of two thermally-treated, cold-worked (CW) alloy 690 (UNS N06690) materials was investigated in 360oC simulated PWR primary water using constant load tensile (CLT) tests and blunt notch compact tension (BNCT) tests equipped with direct current potential drop (DCPD) for in-situ detection of cracking. SCC initiation was not detected by DCPD for either the 21% or 31%CW CLT specimens loaded at their yield stress after ~9,220 hours, however intergranular (IG) precursor damage and isolated surface cracks were observed on the specimens. The two 31%CW BNCT specimens loaded at moderate stress intensity after several cyclic loading ramps showed DCPD-indicated crack initiation after 10,400 hours of exposure at constant stress intensity, which was resulted from significant growth of IG cracks. The 21%CW BNCT specimens only exhibited isolated small IG surface cracks and showed no apparent DCPD change throughout the test. Post-test cross-section examinations revealed many grain boundary (GB) nano-cavities in the bulk of all the CLT and BNCT specimens particularly for the 31%CW materials. Cavities were also found along GBs extending to the surface suggesting an important role in crack nucleation. This paper provides an overview of the evolution of GB cavities and discusses their effects on crack initiation in CW alloy 690.

  18. Research of stress corrosion cracking of T225NG titanium alloy in loop water of high temperature and high pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jijin; Yan Keng; Chen Ligong; Jiang Chengyu

    2006-01-01

    Double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were used to research the stress corrosion cracking of T225NG titanium alloy in loop water of high temperature and high pressure. DCB specimens were forced pre-stress, put into high pressure autoclave, and the stress corrosion and crack expansion of specimens were observed and measured in 500 h, 1 000 h and 2 000h respectively. The results show that small expansion occurred along the direction of pre-cracking. According to calculation,the speed of cracking expansion is lower than 10 -9 m/s in 500 h and the value of KIscc/KI is higher than 0. 75, which proves that T225NG has an excellent corrosion resistance in loop water. The main reason is that there is an oxide film on the surface of specimens. According to the analysis of energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), the oxide film consists of TiO2. Therefore, the oxide film at the crack tip impedes the hydrogen separating out from the cathode to penetrate into titanium alloy and resists hydrogen embrittlement.

  19. Characterizing the effect of creep on stress corrosion cracking of cold worked Alloy 690 in supercritical water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lefu; Chen, Kai; Du, Donghai; Gao, Wenhua; Andresen, Peter L.; Guo, Xianglong

    2017-08-01

    The effect of creep on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was studied by measuring crack growth rates (CGRs) of 30% cold worked (CW) Alloy 690 in supercritical water (SCW) and inert gas environments at temperatures ranging from 450 °C to 550 °C. The SCC crack growth rate under SCW environments can be regarded as the cracking induced by the combined effect of corrosion and creep, while the CGR in inert gas environment can be taken as the portion of creep induced cracking. Results showed that the CW Alloy 690 sustained high susceptibility to intergranular (IG) cracking, and creep played a dominant role in the SCC crack growth behavior, contributing more than 80% of the total crack growth rate at each testing temperature. The temperature dependence of creep induced CGRs follows an Arrhenius dependency, with an apparent activation energy (QE) of about 225 kJ/mol.

  20. Corrosion Fatigue in District Heating Water Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1996-01-01

    Three candidate materials for construction of buffer tanks for district heating water have been tested for corrosion fatigue properties in a district heating water environment. The investigation included Slow Strain Rate Testing of plain tensile specimens, crack initiation testing by corrosion...... fatigue of plain tensile specimens and crack growth rate determination for Compact Tensile Specimens under corrosion fatigue conditions. The three materials are equal with respect to stress corrosion sensibility and crack initiation. Crack growth rate is increased with a factor of 4-6 relative to an inert...

  1. The effects of cold rolling orientation and water chemistry on stress corrosion cracking behavior of 316L stainless steel in simulated PWR water environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junjie; Lu, Zhanpeng; Xiao, Qian; Ru, Xiangkun; Han, Guangdong; Chen, Zhen; Zhou, Bangxin; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking behaviors of one-directionally cold rolled 316L stainless steel specimens in T-L and L-T orientations were investigated in hydrogenated and deaerated PWR primary water environments at 310 °C. Transgranular cracking was observed during the in situ pre-cracking procedure and the crack growth rate was almost not affected by the specimen orientation. Locally intergranular stress corrosion cracks were found on the fracture surfaces of specimens in the hydrogenated PWR water. Extensive intergranular stress corrosion cracks were found on the fracture surfaces of specimens in deaerated PWR water. More extensive cracks were found in specimen T-L orientation with a higher crack growth rate than that in the specimen L-T orientation with a lower crack growth rate. Crack branching phenomenon found in specimen L-T orientation in deaerated PWR water was synergistically affected by the applied stress direction as well as the preferential oxidation path along the elongated grain boundaries, and the latter was dominant.

  2. Hydrogen embrittlement, grain boundary segregation, and stress corrosion cracking of alloy X-750 in low- and high-temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, W. J.; Lebo, M. R.; Kearns, J. J. [Bettis Atomic Power Lab., West Mifflin, PA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The nature of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of alloy X-750 was characterized in low- and high-temperature water by testing as-notched and precracked fracture mechanics specimens. Materials given the AH, BH, and HTH heat treatments were studied. While all heat treatments were susceptible to rapid low-temperature crack propagation (LTCP) below 150 C, conditions AH and BH were particularly susceptible. Low-temperature tests under various loading conditions (e.g., constant displacement, constant load, and increasing load) revealed that the maximum stress intensity factors (K{sub P{sub max}}) from conventional rising load tests provide conservative estimates of the critical loading conditions in highly susceptible heats, regardless of the load path history. For resistant heats, K{sub P{sub max}} provides a reasonable, but not necessarily conservative, estimate of the critical stress intensity factor for LTCP. Testing of as-notched specimens showed that LTCP will not initiate at a smooth surface or notch, but will readily occur if a cracklike defect is present. Comparison of the cracking response in water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air demonstrated that LTCP is associated with hydrogen embrittlement of grain boundaries. The stress corrosion crack initiation and growth does occur in high-temperature water (>250 C), but crack growth rates are orders of magnitude lower than LTCP rates. The SCC resistance of HTH heats is far superior to that of AH heats as crack initiation times are two to three orders of magnitude greater and growth rates are one to two orders of magnitude lower.

  3. Preliminary study for extension and improvement on modeling of primary water stress corrosion cracking at control rod drive mechanism nozzles of pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Omar F.; Mattar Neto, Miguel M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: ofaly@ipen.br, e-mail: mmattar@ipen.br; Schvartzman, Monica M.M.A.M. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: monicas@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    This study is for to extend, to improve the existing models, and to propose a local approach to assess the primary water stress corrosion cracking in nickel-based components. It is includes a modeling of new data for Alloy 182 and new considerations about initiation and crack growth according a developing method based on EPRI-MRP-115 (2004), and USNRC NUREG/CR-6964 (2008). The experimental data is obtained from CDTN-Brazilian Nuclear Technology Development Center, by tests through slow strain rate test (SSRT) equipment. The model conception assumed is a built diagram which indicates a thermodynamic condition for the occurrence of corrosion submodes in essayed materials, through Pourbaix diagrams, for Nickel Alloys in high temperature primary water. Over them, are superimposed different models, including a semi-empiric-probabilistic one to quantify the primary water stress corrosion cracking susceptibility, and a crack growth model. These constructed models shall be validated with the experimental data. This development aims to extent some of the models obtained to weld metals like the Alloy 182, and to improve the originals obtained according methodologies exposed in above referred reports. These methodologies comprise laboratory testing procedures, data collecting, data screening, modeling procedures, assembling of data from some laboratories in the world, plotting of results, compared analysis and discussion of these results. Preliminary results for Alloy 182 will be presented. (author)

  4. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR); Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua hirviente (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes C, P

    2003-07-01

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O{sub 2}; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  5. An overview of materials degradation by stress corrosion in PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, P. M. [Framatome ANP, Tour Areva, 92084 Paris La Defense Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    The aging of water cooled and moderated nuclear steam supply systems has given rise to many material corrosion problems of which stress corrosion cracking has proved to be one of the most serious. The aim of this paper is to review some examples of corrosion and particularly stress corrosion problems from the author's experience of interpreting and modelling these phenomena in PWR systems. Examples of stress corrosion cracking in PWR systems described include the major issue of Alloy 600 intergranular cracking in primary PWR coolants, for which it is generally perceived that both adequate life prediction models and remedial measures now exist. Intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 steam generator tubes that occur in occluded superheated crevices on the secondary side of steam generators due to hide-out and concentration of water borne impurities are also addressed. Rather less extensive or well known examples are discussed such as the stress corrosion cracking of carbon and low alloy steels and of stainless steels in occluded dead-leg situations where it is sometimes difficult to guarantee adequate control of water chemistry, particularly at plant start-up. Reference is also be made to the use of high strength fastener materials in PWR systems as well as to the emerging issue of the effect of high neutron doses on the stress corrosion resistance of core structural components fabricated from austenitic stainless steels. (authors)

  6. Effects of alloy chemistry, cold work, and water chemistry on corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of nickel alloys and welds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2001-04-01

    Reactor vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. The objective of this work is to evaluate and compare the resistance of Alloys 600 and 690 and their welds, such as Alloys 82, 182, 52, and 152, to EAC in simulated light water reactor environments. The existing crack growth rate (CGR) data for these alloys under cyclic and constant loads have been evaluated to establish the effects of alloy chemistry, cold work, and water chemistry. The experimental fatigue CGRs are compared with CGRs that would be expected in air under the same mechanical loading conditions to obtain a qualitative understanding of the degree and range of conditions for significant environmental enhancement in growth rates. The existing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) data on Alloys 600 and 690 and Alloy 82, 182, and 52 welds have been compiled and analyzed to determine the influence of key parameters on growth rates in simulated PWR and BWR environments. The SCC data for these alloys have been evaluated with correlations developed by Scott and by Ford and Andresen.

  7. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steels treated with inhibitive chemicals in high temperature pure water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, T.K. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing-Hua Univ. Taiwan (China); Lee, M.Y.; Tsai, C.H. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua Univ. Taiwan (China)

    2002-07-01

    Electrochemical potentiodynamic polarizations, electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) measurements and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted to investigate the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics of Type 304 stainless steels treated with inhibitive chemicals in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. A number of thermally sensitized specimens were prepared and were pre-oxidized in a 288 C environment with the presence of 300 ppb dissolved oxygen for 360 hours. Most of the specimens were then treated with various chemicals including powdered zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}), powdered titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}), and zirconyl nitrate [ZrO(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] via static immersion at 90 C, 150 C, and 200 C. Test environments were specifically designed in a circulation loop to create a dissolved oxygen concentration of 300 ppb. Test results showed that the corrosion current densities of all treated specimens were lower than that of the untreated, pre-oxidized specimen at ambient temperature in a solution mixed with 1 mM K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} and 1 mM K{sub 4}Fe(CN){sub 6}. The ECPs of the treated specimens could be lower or higher than that of the pre-oxidized one at 288 C, depending upon the type of treating chemical and the treating temperature. In addition, IGSCC was observed on all specimens (treated or untreated) in the same environment. However, the untreated specimen exhibited lower elongation, shorter failure time, and more secondary cracks on the side surfaces. It was therefore suggested that inhibitive chemicals such as ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, and ZrO(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} did provide a certain degree of enhancement in improving the mechanical behavior of the treated specimens and in prolonging the IGSCC initiation time. (authors)

  8. Corrosion behaviour of non-ferrous metals in sea water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, Jerzy; Skalski, Igor [Ship Design and Research Centre, Al. Rzeczypospolitej 8, 80-369 Gdansk (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    The most typical kinds of corrosion of brasses are selective corrosion (dezincification) and stress corrosion. Prevention against these kinds of corrosion lies in application of arsenic alloy addition and appropriate heat treatment removing internal stresses as well as in maintaining the arsenic and phosphorus contents on a proper level. The most typical corrosion of cupronickels is the local corrosion. Selective corrosion occurs less often and corrosion cracking caused by stress corrosion in sea water does not usually occur. Crevice corrosion is found especially in places of an heterogeneous oxidation of the surface under inorganic deposits or under bio-film. Common corrosive phenomena for brasses and cupronickels are the effects caused by sea water flow and most often the impingement attack. Alloy additions improve resistance to the action of intensive sea water flow but situation in this field requires further improvement, especially if the cheaper kinds of alloys are concerned. Contaminants of sea water such as ammonia and hydrogen sulphide are also the cause of common corrosion processes for all copper alloys. Corrosion of copper alloys may be caused also by sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB). Galvanic corrosion caused by a contact with titanium alloys e.g. in plate heat exchangers may cause corrosion of both kinds copper alloys. Bronzes belong to copper alloys of the highest corrosion resistance. Failures that sometimes occur are caused most often by the cavitation erosion, by an incorrect chemical composition of alloys or at last by their inadequate structure. The main problems of aluminium alloys service in sea water are following phenomena: local corrosion (pitting and crevice corrosion), galvanic corrosion, exfoliation and corrosion in the presence of OH- ions. The cause of local corrosion are caused by presence of passive film on the alloy's surface and presence of chlorides in sea water which are able to damage the passive film. Galvanic corrosion is

  9. An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Coston, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A laboratory test method that is only mildly corrosive to aluminum and discriminating for use in classifying the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys is presented along with the method used in evaluating the media selected for testing. The proposed medium is easier to prepare and less expensive than substitute ocean water.

  10. Materials Reliability Program Resistance to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloys 690, 52, and 152 in Pressurized Water Reactors (MRP-111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H. [Framatome ANP, Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Fyfitch, S. [Framatome ANP, Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Scott, P. [Framatome ANP, SAS, Paris (France); Foucault, M. [Framatome ANP, SAS, Le Creusot (France); Kilian, R. [Framatome ANP, GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Winters, M. [Framatome ANP, GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2004-03-01

    Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. Repairs and replacements have generally utilized wrought Alloy 690 material and its compatible weld metals (Alloy 152 and Alloy 52), which have been shown to be very highly resistant to PWSCC in laboratory experiments and have been free from cracking in operating reactors over periods already up to nearly 15 years. It is nevertheless prudent for the PWR industry to attempt to quantify the longevity of these materials with respect to aging degradation by corrosion in order to provide a sound technical basis for the development of future inspection requirements for repaired or replaced component items. This document first reviews numerous laboratory tests, conducted over the last two decades, that were performed with wrought Alloy 690 and Alloy 52 or Alloy 152 weld materials under various test conditions pertinent to corrosion resistance in PWR environments. The main focus of the present review is on PWSCC, but secondary-side conditions are also briefly considered.

  11. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for {sup 60}Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.) 127 refs.

  12. Stress-Assisted Corrosion in Boiler Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preet M Singh; Steven J Pawel

    2006-05-27

    A number of industrial boilers, including in the pulp and paper industry, needed to replace their lower furnace tubes or decommission many recovery boilers due to stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) on the waterside of boiler tubes. More than half of the power and recovery boilers that have been inspected reveal SAC damage, which portends significant energy and economic impacts. The goal of this project was to clarify the mechanism of stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) of boiler tubes for the purpose of determining key parameters in its mitigation and control. To accomplish this in-situ strain measurements on boiler tubes were made. Boiler water environment was simulated in the laboratory and effects of water chemistry on SAC initiation and growth were evaluated in terms of industrial operations. Results from this project have shown that the dissolved oxygen is single most important factor in SAC initiation on carbon steel samples. Control of dissolved oxygen can be used to mitigate SAC in industrial boilers. Results have also shown that sharp corrosion fatigue and bulbous SAC cracks have similar mechanism but the morphology is different due to availability of oxygen during boiler shutdown conditions. Results are described in the final technical report.

  13. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems using the mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP{sup R)} or underwater laser beam welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick, Grendys; Marc, Piccolino; Cunthia, Pezze [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, New York (United States); Badlani, Manu [Nu Vision Engineering, New York (United States)

    2009-04-15

    A current issue facing pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of bi metallic welds. PWSCC in a PWR requires the presence of a susceptible material, an aggressive environment and a tensile stress of significant magnitude. Reducing the potential for SCC can be accomplished by eliminating any of these three elements. In the U.S., mitigation of susceptible material in the pressurizer nozzle locations has largely been completed via the structural weld overlay (SWOL) process or NuVision Engineering's Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP{sup R)}, depending on inspectability. The next most susceptible locations in Westinghouse designed power plants are the Reactor Vessel (RV) hot leg nozzle welds. However, a full SWOL Process for RV nozzles is time consuming and has a high likelihood of in process weld repairs. Therefore, Westinghouse provides two distinctive methods to mitigate susceptible material for the RV nozzle locations depending on nozzle access and utility preference. These methods are the MSIP and the Underwater Laser Beam Welding (ULBW) process. MSIP applies a load to the outside diameter of the pipe adjacent to the weld, imposing plastic strains during compression that are not reversed after unloading, thus eliminating the tensile stress component of SCC. Recently, Westinghouse and NuVision successfully applied MSIP on all eight RV nozzles at the Salem Unit 1 power plant. Another option to mitigate SCC in RV nozzles is to place a barrier between the susceptible material and the aggressive environment. The ULBW process applies a weld inlay onto the inside pipe diameter. The deposited weld metal (Alloy 52M) is resistant to PWSCC and acts as a barrier to prevent primary water from contacting the susceptible material. This paper provides information on the approval and acceptance bases for MSIP, its recent application on RV nozzles and an update on ULBW development.

  14. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  15. Evaluation of primary water stress corrosion cracking growth rates by using the extended finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jun Lee

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Reliable CGR curves were obtained without complex environmental facilities or a high degree of experimental effort. The proposed method may be used to assess the PWSCC resistance of nuclear components subjected to high residual stresses such as those resulting from dissimilar metal welding parts.

  16. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 1. Investigation and evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in piping of boiling water reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    IGSCC in BWR piping is occurring owing to a combination of material, environment, and stress factors, each of which can affect both the initiation of a stress-corrosion crack and the rate of its subsequent propagation. In evaluating long-term solutions to the problem, one needs to consider the effects of each of the proposed remedial actions. Mitigating actions to control IGSCC in BWR piping must be designed to alleviate one or more of the three synergistic factors: sensitized material, the convention BWR environment, and high tensile stresses. Because mitigating actions addressing each of these factors may not be fully effective under all anticipated operating conditions, mitigating actions should address two and preferably all three of the causative factors; e.g., material plus some control of water chemistry, or stress reversal plus controlled water chemistry.

  17. Assessment of stress-corrosion cracking in a water-cooled ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.H.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1989-04-01

    Water-cooled, near-term reactors will operate under conditions at which SCC is possible; however, control of material purity and processing and coolant chemistry can either eliminate or greatly reduce the probability of this type of structural failure. This evaluation has focused on an assessment of water impurity effects on SCC of austenitic stainless steel at temperatures below 100{degree}C and on the conditions controlling sensitization in the fusion heat of Type 316 SS and the fusion materials heat of modified Type 316 SS designated as PCA. This assessment identifies the dominant effect of small concentrations of impurities in high-purity water on SCC such that crack growth rates at 25--75{degree}C in water with as little as 5--15 ppM Cl{sup {minus}} are equal to the crack growth rates at 200--300{degree}C in high-purity water. These effects are primarily for sensitized Type 304 SS, so analysis of sensitization behavior of fusion austenitic alloys was also undertaken. An SSDOS model developed at PNL was used to make these assessments, and correlation to experimental results for Type 316 SS was very good. Both the fusion heat of Type 316 SS and PCA can be severely sensitized but with proper thermal treatment it should be possible to avoid sensitization. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G.L.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-07-01

    SCC susceptibility of Alloy 600 in deaerated water at 360 C (statically loaded U-bend specimens) is dependent on microstructure and whether the material was cold-worked and annealed (CWA) or hot-worked and annealed (HWA). All cracking was intergranular, and materials lacking grain boundary carbides were most susceptible to SCC initiation. CWA tubing materials are more susceptible to SCC initiation than HWA ring-rolled forging materials with similar microstructures (optical metallography). In CWA tubing materials, one crack dominated and grew to a visible size. HWA materials with a low hot-working finishing temperature (<925 C) and final anneals at 1010-1065 C developed both large cracks (similar to those in CWA materials) and small intergranular microcracks detectable only by destructive metallography. HWA materials with a high hot-working finishing temperature (>980 C) and a high-temperature final anneal (>1040 C), with grain boundaries that are fully decorated, developed only microcracks in all specimens. These materials did not develop large, visually detectable cracks, even after more than 300 weeks exposure. A low-temperature thermal treatment (610 C for 7h), which reduces or eliminates SCC in Alloy 600, did not eliminate microcrack formation in high temperature processed HWA materials. Conventional metallographic and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) were done on selected materials to identify the factors responsible for the observed differences in cracking behavior. Major difference between high-temperature HWA and low-temperature HWA and CWA materials was that the high temperature processing and final annealing produced predominantly ``semi-continuous`` dendritic M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides along grain boundaries with a minimal amount of intragranular carbides. Lower temperature processing produced intragranular M7C3 carbides, with less intergranular carbides.

  19. Review on Stress Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Failure of Centrifugal Compressor Impeller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jiao; CHEN Songying; QU Yanpeng; LI Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  20. Chemical milling solution reveals stress corrosion cracks in titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braski, D. N.

    1967-01-01

    Solution of hydrogen flouride, hydrogen peroxide, and water reveals hot salt stress corrosion cracks in various titanium alloys. After the surface is rinsed in water, dried, and swabbed with the solution, it can be observed by the naked eye or at low magnification.

  1. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  2. Effect of cold work hardening on stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels in primary water of pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raquet, O.; Herms, E. [CEA/Saclay, DEN/DPC, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Vaillant, F.; Couvant, T.; Boursier, J.M. [EDF/Les Renardieres, R and D/MMC, 77250 Moret sur Loing (France)

    2004-07-01

    A R and D program is carried out in CEA and EDF laboratories to investigate separately the effects of factors which could contribute to IASCC mechanism. In the framework of this study, the influence of cold work on SCC of ASSs in primary water is studied to supply additional knowledge concerning the contribution of radiation hardening on IASCC of ASSs. Solution annealed ASSs, essentially of type AISI 304(L) and AISI 316(L), are generally considered very resistant to SCC in nominal primary water. However, Constant Extension Rate Tests (CERTs), performed on cold pressed humped specimens in nominal primary water at 360 deg. C, reveal that these materials can exhibit a high SCC susceptibility: deepest cracks reach 1 mm (mean crack growth rate about 1 {mu}m.h{sup -1}) and propagation is mainly intergranular for 304L and mainly transgranular for 316L. Indeed, work hardening in conjunction with high localized deformation can promote SCC. The influence of the nature of the cold work (shot peening, reaming, cold rolling, counter sinking, fatigue work hardening and tensile deformation) is investigated by means of screening CERTs performed with smooth specimens in 304L at 360 deg. C. For a given cold work hardening level, the susceptibility to crack initiation strongly depends on the cold working process, and no propagation is observed for a hardness level lower than 300 {+-}10 HV(0.49N). The propagation of cracks is observed only for dynamic loadings like CERT, traction/relaxation tests and crack growth rate tests performed with CT specimens under trapezoidal loading. Although crack initiation is observed for constant load and constant deformation tests, crack propagation do not seem to occur under these mechanical solicitations for 17000 hours of testing, even for hardness levels higher than 450 HV(0.49N). The mean crack growth rate increases when the hardness increases. An important R and D program is in progress to complement these results and to develop a SCC model for

  3. A rapid stress-corrosion test for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    Stressed alloy specimens are immersed in a salt-dichromate solution at 60 degrees C. Because of the minimal general corrosion of these alloys in this solution, stress corrosion failures are detected by low-power microscopic examination.

  4. Sensitization, intergranular attack, stress corrosion cracking, and irradiation effects on the corrosion of iron--chromium--nickel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, P.C.S.

    1978-04-01

    A literature review is presented on the sensitization, intergranular attack, and stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels with emphasis on dilute solutions at temperatures below the boiling point of water. An attempt is made to list the possible sources of contaminants during manufacture, shipping, construction and all phases of operation of the sodium containing components. The susceptibility of the different materials to stress corrosion cracking in the various contaminants is discussed and suggestions to prevent serious problems are made. (GHT)

  5. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Pipeline Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the differences between high pH and near-neutral pH stress corrosion cracking ofpipeline steels, influencing factors, and mechanisms. The characteristics and historical information on both forms ofSCC are discussed. The prospect for research in the future is also presented.

  6. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    In oil and gas production, internal corrosion of pipelines causes the highest incidence of recurring failures. Ensuring the integrity of ageing pipeline infrastructure is an increasingly important requirement. One of the most widely applied methods to reduce internal corrosion rates is the continuous injection of chemicals in very small quantities, called corrosion inhibitors. These chemical substances form thin films at the pipeline internal surface that reduce the magnitude of the cathodic and/or anodic reactions. However, the efficacy of such corrosion inhibitor films can be reduced by different factors such as multiphase flow, due to enhanced shear stress and mass transfer effects, loss of inhibitor due to adsorption on other interfaces such as solid particles, bubbles and droplets entrained by the bulk phase, and due to chemical interaction with other incompatible substances present in the stream. The first part of the present project investigated the electrochemical behavior of two organic corrosion inhibitors (a TOFA/DETA imidazolinium, and an alkylbenzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), with and without an inorganic salt (sodium thiosulfate), and the resulting enhancement. The second part of the work explored the performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase (gas/liquid, solid/liquid) flow. The effect of gas/liquid multiphase flow was investigated using small and large scale apparatus. The small scale tests were conducted using a glass cell and a submersed jet impingement attachment with three different hydrodynamic patterns (water jet, CO 2 bubbles impact, and water vapor cavitation). The large scale experiments were conducted applying different flow loops (hilly terrain and standing slug systems). Measurements of weight loss, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and adsorption mass (using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, EQCM) were used to quantify the effect of wall shear stress on the performance and integrity of corrosion inhibitor

  7. A comparison of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of commercially pure titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and in distilled water: a fracture mechanics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Michael D; Williamson, R Scott; Thomas, Joseph A; Griggs, Jason A; Zardiackas, Lyle D

    2014-01-01

    From the results of laboratory investigations reported in the literature, it has been suggested that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms may contribute to early failures in titanium alloys that have elevated oxygen concentrations. However, the susceptibility of titanium alloys to SCC in physiological environments remains unclear. In this study, a fracture mechanics approach was used to examine the SCC susceptibility of CP titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and distilled de-ionized (DI) water, at 37°C. The study duration was 26 weeks, simulating the non-union declaration of a plated fracture. Four wedge loads were used corresponding to 86-95% of the alloy's ligament yield load. The longest cracks were measured to be 0.18 mm and 0.10 mm in Ringer's solution and DI water, respectively. SEM analysis revealed no evidence of extensive fluting and quasi-cleavage fracture features which, in literature reports, were attributed to SCC. We thus postulate that the Ringer's solution accelerated the wedge-loaded crack growth without producing the critical stresses needed to change the fracture mechanism. Regression analysis of the crack length results led to a significant best-fit relationship between crack growth velocity (independent variable) and test electrolyte, initial wedge load, and time of immersion of specimen in electrolyte (dependent variables).

  8. Stress corrosion mechanisms of alloy-600 polycrystals and monocrystals in primary water: effect of hydrogen; Mecanismes de corrosion sous contrainte de l'alliage 600 polycristallin et monocristallin en milieu primaire: role de l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foct, F

    1999-01-08

    The aim of this study is to identify the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600 primary water stress corrosion cracking. Therefore, this work is mainly focussed on the two following points. The first one is to understand the influence of hydrogen on SCC of industrial Alloy 600 and the second one is to study the crack initiation and propagation on polycrystals and single crystals. A cathodic potential applied during slow strain rate tests does not affect crack initiation but increases the slow crack growth rate by a factor 2 to 5. Cathodic polarisation, cold work and 25 cm{sup 3} STP/kg hydrogen content increase the slow CGR so that the K{sub ISCC} (and therefore fast CGR) is reached. The influence of hydrogenated primary water has been studied for the first time on Alloy 600 single crystals. Cracks cannot initiate on tensile specimens but they can propagate on pre-cracked specimens. Transgranular cracks present a precise crystallographic aspect which is similar to that of 316 alloy in MgCl{sub 2} solutions. Moreover, the following results improve the description of the cracking conditions. Firstly, the higher the hydrogen partial pressure, the lower the Alloy 600 passivation current transients. Since this result is not correlated with the effect of hydrogen on SCC, cracking is not caused by a direct effect of dissolved hydrogen on dissolution. Secondly, hydrogen embrittlement of Alloy 600 disappears at temperatures above 200 deg.C. Thirdly, grain boundary sliding (GBS) does not directly act on SCC but shows the mechanical weakness of grain boundaries. Regarding the proposed models for Alloy 600 SCC, it is possible to draw the following conclusions. Internal oxidation or absorbed hydrogen effects are the most probable mechanisms for initiation. Dissolution, internal oxidation and global hydrogen embrittlement models cannot explain crack propagation. On the other hand, the Corrosion Enhanced Plasticity Model gives a good description of the SCC propagation. (author)

  9. Relativity between corrosion-induced stress and stress corrosion cracking of brass in an ammonia solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of brass in an ammonia solution with various pH values or under various applied potentials was measured at slow strain rate tests. The additive stress in the same solution was measured using two methods. The results indicate that the variation of the susceptibility to SCC with pH value or with potential is in an excellent agreement with the corrosion (passive film or dezincification layer)-induced stress. When pH ? 7, the corrosion-induced tensile stress and the susceptibility to SCC have maximum values and hardly change with increasing the pH value. However, when pH < 7, both the corrosion-induced tensile stress and the susceptibility to SCC reduce rapidly with decreasing the pH value. Both the corrosion-induced tensile stress and the susceptibility to SCC have maximum values at the open-circuit potential, decrease slightly under the anodic polarization, and reduce gradually to zero under the cathodic polarization.

  10. Stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Feeney, J. A.; Beck, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the light of research material published up to May 1970, the current understanding of the experimental variables involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Following a brief summary of the metallurgy and electrochemistry of titanium alloys, the mechanical, electrochemical, and metallurgical parameters influencing SCC behavior are explored with emphasis on crack growth kinetics. Macro- and microfeatures of fractures are examined, and it is shown that many transgranular SCC failures exhibit morphological and crystallographic features similar to mechanical cleavage failures. Current SCC models are reviewed with respect to their ability to explain the observed SCC behavior of titanium and its alloys. Possible methods for eliminating or minimizing stress corrosion hazards in titanium or titanium alloy components are described.

  11. Effect of sensitization and cold work on stress corrosion susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels in boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenninen, H.; Aho-Mantila, I.

    1981-05-01

    The influence of metallurgical variables on stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels, in particular AISI 304 and OX18H10T, was examined in O/sub 2/ enriched BWR conditions (8 ppm O/sub 2/) and in typical PWR conditions. Cracking susceptibility in BWR conditions is especially sensitive to alpha martensite content and sensitization. Cracking in alpha martensite compounds is intergranular and transgranular and it can not be related to sensitization. Sensitization induces cracking only in creviced conditions (double U-bend specimens) in AISI 304 steels. In creviced conditions OX18H10T steel exhibits cracking in solution annealed, stabilized and sensitized conditions. The sensitized material is most susceptible. Cracking in solution annealed and stabilized OX18H10T steel is intergranular and transgranular. In PWR conditions (O/sub 2/ content 2 ppb) no cracking is observed. (ESA)

  12. Study of alloy 600`S stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in high temperature water; Etude des mecanismes de corrosion sous contrainte de l`alliage 600 dans l`eau a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, R.

    1994-06-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600`s stress corrosion cracking in PWR environment, laboratory tests were performed. The influence of parameters pertinent to the mechanisms was studies : hydrogen and oxygen overpressures, local chemical composition, microstructure. The results show that neither hydrogen nor dissolution/oxidation, despite their respective roles in the process, are sufficient to account for experimental facts. SEM observation of micro-cleavage facets on specimens` fracture surfaces leads to pay attention to a new mechanism of corrosion/plasticity interactions. (author). 113 refs., 73 figs., 15 tabs., 4 annexes.

  13. The role of Hydrogen and Creep in Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 in PWR Primary Water Environments ? a Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B; Hua, F H

    2004-07-12

    Intergranular attack (IGA) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Alloy 600 in PWR steam generator environment has been extensively studied for over 30 years without rendering a clear understanding of the essential mechanisms. The lack of understanding of the IGSCC mechanism is due to a complex interaction of numerous variables such as microstructure, thermomechanical processing, strain rate, water chemistry and electrochemical potential. Hydrogen plays an important role in all these variables. The complexity, however, significantly hinders a clearer and more fundamental understanding of the mechanism of hydrogen in enhancing intergranular cracking via whatever mechanism. In this work, an attempt is made to review the role of hydrogen based on the current understanding of grain boundary structure and chemistry and intergranular fracture of nickel alloys, effect of hydrogen on electrochemical behavior of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 (e.g. the passive film stability, polarization behavior and open-circuit potential) and effect of hydrogen on PWSCC behavior of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690. Mechanistic studies on the PWSCC are briefly reviewed. It is concluded that further studies on the role of hydrogen on intergranular cracking in both inert and primary side environments are needed. These studies should focus on the correlation of the results obtained at different laboratories by different methods on materials with different metallurgical and chemical parameters.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  15. Monitoring corrosion rates and localised corrosion in low conductivity water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of low corrosion rates and localised corrosion in a media with low conductivity is a challenge. In municipal district heating, quality control may be improved by implementing on-line corrosion monitoring if a suitable technique can be identified to measure both uniform and localised...... corrosion. Electrochemical techniques (LPR, EIS, crevice corrosion current) as well as direct measurement techniques (high-sensitive electrical resistance, weight loss) have been applied in operating plants. Changes in the corrosion processes are best monitored in non-aggressive, low conductivity media...... with sensitive electrical resistance technique and crevice corrosion current measurements....

  16. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-08-21

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed.

  17. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracks in Nickel Alloy Dissimilar Metal Welds: Detection and Sizing Using Established and Emerging Nondestructive Examination Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braatz, Brett G.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Prokofiev, Iouri

    2012-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) as a follow-on to the international cooperative Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize surface-breaking primary water stress corrosion cracks in dissimilar-metal welds (DMW) in bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetrations and small-bore (≈400-mm diameter) piping components. A series of international blind round-robin tests were conducted by commercial and university inspection teams. Results from these tests showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound techniques provided the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in BMIs by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field. The goal of PARENT is to continue the work begun in PINC and apply the lessons learned to a series of open and blind international round-robin tests that will be conducted on a new set of piping components including large-bore (≈900-mm diameter) DMWs, small-bore DMWs, and BMIs. Open round-robin testing will engage universities and industry worldwide to investigate the reliability of emerging NDE techniques to detect and accurately size flaws having a wide range of lengths, depths, orientations, and locations. Blind round-robin testing will invite testing organizations worldwide, whose inspectors and procedures are certified by the standards for the nuclear industry in their respective countries, to investigate the ability of established NDE techniques to detect and size flaws whose characteristics range from easy to very difficult to detect and size. This paper presents highlights of PINC and reports on the plans and progress for

  18. Relationship among Parameters Evaluating Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The threshold stress, σc, for sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of seven pipeline steels and five other steels, the critical stress, SC, for seven pipeline steels and two drill rod steels with various strengths and the susceptibility to SCC, IRA or σf(SCC)/σf, for four pipeline steels, two drill rod steels and five other steels were measured. The results showed that there are no definite elationships among σc, SC and IRA or σf(SCC)/σf. The threshold stress for hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) during charging with loading in the H2SO4 solution, σc(H), decreased linearly with logarithm of the concentration of diffusible hydrogen c0, i.e., σC(H)=A-B Inc0 for four pipeline steels. σc(H) obtained with a special cathodic current ic, which was corresponding to the diffusible hydrogen concentration during immersing in the H2S solution, were consistent with σc for sulfide SCC for four pipeline steels.Therefore, σc for sulfide SCC can be measured using dynamically charging in the H2SO4 solution with the special cathodic current ic.

  19. Sizing stress corrosion cracks using laser ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Hamood; McNealy, Rick; Fingerhut, Martin [Applus-RTD. Houston, TX (United States); Klein, Marvin; Ansari, Homayoon [Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc. Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kania Richard [TransCanada. Calgary, AB (Canada); Rapp, Steve [Spectra Energy, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Despite various efforts, no reliable tools and techniques are available to enable an operator to quantify the impact of an SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking) colony on the safety and integrity of a pipeline. Reliable non-destructive detection and measurement tools are not available either. There is therefore a large gap between current technology and the needs of the pipeline industry. Recent developments promise that with a concentrated effort, a comprehensive solution can be devised. This paper describes technical work performed to develop and validate both the inspection tool and the time of flight diffraction (TOFD) technique for sizing the depth of SCC. It also presents preliminary results of work on a closely related project that provides, on the basis of this technology, an integrated approach and tool for mapping, sizing, and evaluating SCC, through which significant cracks are filtered from more benign cracks within an SCC colony.

  20. Threshold Stress Intensity of Hydrogen-Induced Cracking and Stress Corrosion Cracking of High Strength Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The threshold stress intensity of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for 40CrMo steel in 3.5 % NaCl solution decreased exponentially with the increase of yield strength. The threshold stress intensity of hydrogen-induced cracking during dynamical charging for 40CrMo steel decreased linearly with the logarithm of the concentration of diffusible hydrogen. This equation was also applicable to SCC of high strength steel in aqueous solution. The critical hydrogen enrichment concentration necessary for SCC of high strength steel in water decreased exponentially with the increase of yield strength. Based on the results, the relationship between KISCC and σys could be deduced.

  1. Online stress corrosion crack and fatigue usages factor monitoring and prognostics in light water reactor components: Probabilistic modeling, system identification and data fusion based big data analytics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jagielo, Bryan J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI (United States); Iverson, William I. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL (United States); Bhan, Chi Bum [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Soppet, William S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Majumdar, Saurin M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, Ken N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Nuclear reactors in the United States account for roughly 20% of the nation's total electric energy generation, and maintaining their safety in regards to key component structural integrity is critical not only for long term use of such plants but also for the safety of personnel and the public living around the plant. Early detection of damage signature such as of stress corrosion cracking, thermal-mechanical loading related material degradation in safety-critical components is a necessary requirement for long-term and safe operation of nuclear power plant systems.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking for 316 stainless steel clips in a condensate stabilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Awar, A.; Aldajah, S.; Harhara, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, United Arab Emirates University, P. O. Box 17555 Al-AIn 17555 (United Arab Emirates)

    2011-09-15

    In one of the gas processing facilities in Abu Dhabi, UAE; a case of 316L stainless steel material failure occurred in the fractionating column due to stress cracking corrosion twice in a cycle of less than 2 years. This paper studies the stress corrosion cracking behavior of the 316L stainless steel in an accelerated corrosion environment and compares it with a higher corrosion resistant nickel alloy (Inconel 625). The experimental work was designed according to ASTM G36 standard, the samples were immersed in a boiling magnesium chloride medium which provided the accelerated corrosion environment and the tested samples were shaped into U-bend specimens as they underwent both plastic and elastic stresses. The specimens were then tested to determine the time required for cracks to initiate. The results of the experimental work showed that the main mode of failure was stress corrosion cracking initiated by the proven presence of chlorides, hydrogen sulfide, and water at elevated temperatures. Inconel 625 samples placed in the controlled environment showed better corrosion resistance as it took them an average of 56 days to initiate cracks, whereas it took an average of 24 days to initiate cracks in the stainless steel 316L samples. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs showed that the cracks in the stainless steel 316L samples were longer, wider, and deeper compared to the cracks of Inconel 625. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. In Situ X-ray Microtomography of Stress Corrosion Cracking and Corrosion Fatigue in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Stannard, Tyler J.; Xiao, Xianghui; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2017-08-01

    Structural materials are subjected to combinations of stress and corrosive environments that work synergistically to cause premature failure. Therefore, studies on the combined effect of stress and corrosive environments on material behavior are required. Existing studies have been performed in two dimensions that are inadequate for full comprehension of the three-dimensional (3D) processes related to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion-fatigue (CF) behavior. Recently, x-ray synchrotron tomography has evolved as an excellent technique to obtain the microstructure in 3D. Moreover, being nondestructive in nature, x-ray synchrotron tomography is well suited to study the evolution of microstructure with time (4D, or fourth dimension in time). This article presents our recent 4D studies on SCC and CF of Al 7075 alloys using x-ray synchrotron tomography.

  4. De-alloying and stress-corrosion cracking. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieradzki, K.

    1998-09-01

    This research program has had two major areas of focus that are related: (1) alloy corrosion and (2) the role of selective dissolution in the stress corrosion cracking of alloy systems. These interrelated issues were examined using model systems such as Ag-Au and Cu-Au by conventional electrochemical techniques, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS), ultrahigh speed digital photography of fracture events, and computer simulations. The STM and SANS work were specifically aimed at addressing a roughening transition known to occur in alloy systems undergoing corrosion at electrochemical potentials greater than the so-called critical potential. Analytical models of de-alloying processes including the roughening transition were developed that specifically include curvature effects that are important in alloy corrosion processes. Stress-corrosion experiments were performed on the same model systems using rapid optical and electrochemical techniques on 50 {micro}m--250 {micro}m thick sheets and small diameter wires. The primary goal of this work was to develop a fundamental understanding of the corrosion and electrochemistry of alloys and the stress-corrosion cracking processes these alloys undergo. Computer simulations and analytical work identified surface stress and an important parameter in environmentally assisted fracture. The major results of the research on this program since the summer of 1993 are briefly summarized.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of brass in ammonia solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Brass foil with a protective layer formed on one side was deflected during corrosion in an ammonia solution under various applied potentials, and then corrosion-induced stress generated at brass/dezincification layer under different potentials could be measured. At the same time, susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking(SCC) of brass in the ammonia solution under various applied potentials was measured using a single-edge notched specimen. At open-circuit potential, both corrosion-induced tensile stress and susceptibility to SCC(Iσ) had a maximum value. Both tensile stress σp and susceptibility Iσ decreased slightly under anodic polarization, but reduced steeply with the decrease in potential of cathodic polarization. At the cathodic potential of -500  mV(vs SCE), corrosion-induced stress became compressive because of copper-plating layer, correspondingly, susceptibility to SCC was zero. Therefore, the variation of SCC susceptibility with potential is consistent with that of the corrosion-induced additive stress.

  6. Effect of cold work on the growth rates of stress corrosion cracks in structural materials of nuclear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdowski, R.; Speidel, M.O. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Metallurgy

    1996-10-01

    The growth rates of stress corrosion cracks in austenitic stainless steels and nickel base alloy 600 exposed to simulated boiling water reactor coolant were measured by fracture mechanics testing techniques. Cold work may increase the crack growth rates up to one hundred times. In both, the annealed condition and the cold worked condition, the stress corrosion crack growth rates are independent of stress intensity over a wide K-range and crack growth rates correlate well with yield strength and hardness. In the annealed condition the fracture path is intergranular, but higher degrees of cold work introduce higher proportions of transgranular stress corrosion cracking.

  7. Study on Resistance Against Stress Corrosion off Chlorine Ions of Cooling Water Stainless Steel Heat Exchangers%循环水不锈钢换热器抗氯离子应力腐蚀研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董绍平

    2012-01-01

    炼油、化工装置中换热器占总设备数量的40%左右,占总投资的30%-45%,换热设备中大约有1/3是水冷器,其中不锈钢换热器容易受循环冷却水中Cl-影响而发生应力腐蚀,这就制约着有污水回用的循环水系统提升浓缩倍数。通过调研得出这种腐蚀受Cl-的含量、温度影响较大,pH值也有一定的影响。文章提出了当温度为50-80℃及pH值大于8时,工业循环水的Cl一质量浓度最大可达1000mg/L。还介绍了列管式和盘管式换热器的应力腐蚀开裂情况,并依据对现场调研结果得出换热器易发生应力腐蚀的部位主要包括胀接部位、U形管的弯曲部位、折流挡板和换热管其它部位等。并建议在循环水系统内进行挂片试验进一步研究不同因素和换热器不同部位对应力腐蚀的影响,以便提出防护措施。%The heat exchangers in petroleum refineries and chemical plants account to about 40% of the total equipment quantity and 30% -45% of total equipment investment. In heat exchange equipment, one third is water cooler. The stainless steel heat exchangers are subject to stress corrosion caused by C1 - in cooling water, which will limit the increase of concentration of cooling water system. The investigation study confirms that the C1- content and temperate have a greater impact on the corrosion and pH value also has a certain influence. At a temperature of 50 - 80 ~C and pH value of 8, the maximum mass concentration of C1 - in industry cooling water can be as high as 1000 mg/L. The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of tube heat exchangers and coil heat exchangers is introduced. The field investigation has found that the locations which are subject to stress corrosion in heat exchanger are mainly expanded connections, bent of U tube, rod baffles, heat exchanger tubes, etc. It is suggested to have coupon testing in cooling water system to further study the impact of different factors

  8. The corrosive nature of manganese in drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Bastida, C. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca, Km. 14.5, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Paseo Colón y Tollocan s/n, C.P. 50000, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Martínez-Miranda, V.; Vázquez-Mejía, G. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca, Km. 14.5, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Solache-Ríos, M., E-mail: marcos.solache@inin.gob.mx [Departamento de Química, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, Col. Escandón, Delegación Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 México, D.F. (Mexico); Fonseca-Montes de Oca, G. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca, Km. 14.5, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Trujillo-Flores, E. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Cerro de Coatepec s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 50130, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico)

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion problems having to do with drinking water distribution systems are related to many processes and factors and two of them are ionic acidity and carbon dioxide, which were considered in this work. The corrosion character of water is determined by the corrosion indexes of Langelier, Ryznar, Larson, and Mojmir. The results show that pipes made of different materials, such as plastics or metals, are affected by corrosion, causing manganese to be deposited on materials and dissolved in water. The deterioration of the materials, the degree of corrosion, and the deposited corrosion products were determined by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. High levels of manganese and nitrate ions in water may cause serious damage to the health of consumers of water. Three wells were examined, one of them presented a high content of manganese; the others had high levels of nitrate ions, which increased the acidity of the water and, therefore, the amount of corrosion of the materials in the distribution systems. - Highlights: ► Corrosion of distribution systems affects the quality of drinking water. ► Corrosion in water distribution systems is related to acidity and carbon dioxide. ► Pipes are corroded and manganese is deposited on pipes and dissolved in water. ► The deterioration of the pipes and the corrosion products were determined. ► Nitrate ions increase the acidity of water in the wells.

  9. A Fundamental study of remedial technology development to prevent stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, In Gyu; Lee, Chang Soon [Sunmoon University, Asan (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    Most of the PWR Steam generators with tubes in Alloy 600 alloy are affected by Stress Corrosion Cracking, such as PWSCC(Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking) and ODSCC(Outside Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking). This study was undertaken to establish the background for remedial technology development to prevent SCC. in the report are included the following topics: (1) General: (i) water chemistry related factors, (ii) Pourbaix(Potential-pH) Diagram, (iii) polarization plot, (iv) corrosion mode of Alloy 600, 690, and 800, (v) IGA/SCC growth rate, (vi) material suspetibility of IGA/SCC, (vii) carbon solubility of Alloy 600 (2) Microstructures of Alloy 600 MA, Alloy 600 TT, Alloy 600 SEN Alloy 690 TT(Optical, SEM, and TEM) (3) Influencing factors for PWSCC initiation rate of Alloy 600: (i) microstructure, (ii) water chemistry(B, Li), (iii) temperature, (iv) plastic deformation, (v) stress relief annealing (4) Influencing factors for PWSCC growth rate of Alloy 600: (i) water chemistry(B, Li), (ii) Scott Model, (iii) intergranular carbide, (iv) temperature, (v) hold time (5) Laboratory conditions for ODSCC initiation rate: 1% NaOH, 316 deg C; 1% NaOH, 343 deg C; 50% NaOH, 288 deg C; 10% NaOH, 302 deg C; 10% NaOH, 316 deg C; 50% NaOH, 343 deg C (6) Sludge effects for ODSCC initiation rate: CuO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (7) Influencing factors for PWSCC growth rate of Alloy 600: (i) Caustic concentration effect, (ii) carbonate addition effect (8) Sulfate corrosion: (i) sulfate ratio and pH effect, (ii) wastage rate of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 (9) Crevice corrosion: (i) experimental setup for crevice corrosion, (ii) organic effect, (iii) (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + NaOH) effect (10) Remedial measures for SCC: (i) Inhibitors, (ii) ZnO effect. (author). 30 refs., 174 figs., 51 tabs.

  10. Corrosion mechanisms of candidate structural materials for supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lefu ZHANG; Fawen ZHU; Rui TANG

    2009-01-01

    Nickel-based alloys, austenitic stainless steel, ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels, and oxide dispersion strengthened steel are presently considered to be the candidate structural or fuel-cladding materials for supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), one of the promising generation IV reactor for large-scale electric power production. However, corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of these candidate alloys still remain to be a major problem in the selection of nuclear fuel cladding and other structural materials, such as water rod. Survey of literature and experimental results reveal that the general corrosion mechanism of those candidate materials exhibits quite complicated mechanism in high-temperature and high-pressure supercritical water. Formation of a stable protective oxide film is the key to the best corrosion-resistant alloys. This paper focuses on the mechanism of corrosion oxide film breakdown for SCWR candidate materials.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of copper canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada)); Newman, Roger (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    2010-12-15

    A critical review is presented of the possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper canisters in a deep geological repository in the Fennoscandian Shield. Each of the four main mechanisms proposed for the SCC of pure copper are reviewed and the required conditions for cracking compared with the expected environmental and mechanical loading conditions within the repository. Other possible mechanisms are also considered, as are recent studies specifically directed towards the SCC of copper canisters. The aim of the review is to determine if and when during the evolution of the repository environment copper canisters might be susceptible to SCC. Mechanisms that require a degree of oxidation or dissolution are only possible whilst oxidant is present in the repository and then only if other environmental and mechanical loading conditions are satisfied. These constraints are found to limit the period during which the canisters could be susceptible to cracking via film rupture (slip dissolution) or tarnish rupture mechanisms to the first few years after deposition of the canisters, at which time there will be insufficient SCC agent (ammonia, acetate, or nitrite) to support cracking. During the anaerobic phase, the supply of sulphide ions to the free surface will be transport limited by diffusion through the highly compacted bentonite. Therefore, no HS. will enter the crack and cracking by either of these mechanisms during the long term anaerobic phase is not feasible. Cracking via the film-induced cleavage mechanism requires a surface film of specific properties, most often associated with a nano porous structure. Slow rates of dissolution characteristic of processes in the repository will tend to coarsen any nano porous layer. Under some circumstances, a cuprous oxide film could support film-induced cleavage, but there is no evidence that this mechanism would operate in the presence of sulphide during the long-term anaerobic period because copper sulphide

  12. Corrosion of dissimilar metal crevices in simulated concentrated ground water solutions at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Quinn, M.J

    2003-01-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada is under consideration by the US Department of Energy. The proposed facility will be located in the unsaturated zone approximately 300 m below the surface and 300 m above the water table. The proposed waste container consists of an outer corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 shell surrounding a 316 NG stainless steel structural inner container that encapsulates the used nuclear fuel waste. A titanium drip shield is proposed to protect the waste container from ground water seepage arid rock-fail. A cycle of dripping/evaporation could result in the generation of concentrated aggressive solutions, which could contact the waste container. The waste container material could be susceptible to crevice corrosion from such solutions. The experiments described in this report support the modeling of waste package degradation processes. The intent was to provide parameter values that are required to model crevice corrosion chemistry, as it relates to hydrogen pick-up, and stress corrosion cracking for selected candidate waste package materials. The purpose of the experiments was to study the crevice corrosion behavior of various candidate materials under near freely corroding conditions and to determine the pH developed in crevice solutions. Experimental results of crevice corrosion of dissimilar metal pairs (Alloy 22, Grade-7 and -16 titanium and 316 stainless steel) immersed in a simulated concentrated ground water at {approx}90{sup o}C are reported. The corrosion potential was measured during exposure periods of between 330 and 630 h. Following the experiments, the pH of the crevice solution was measured. The results indicate that a limited degree of crevice acidification occurred during the experiment. The values for corrosion potential suggest that crevice corrosion may have initiated. The total corrosion was limited, with little visible evidence for crevice corrosion being observed on the sample coupon faces

  13. Evaluation of annual corrosion tests for aggressive water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubová, V.; Ilavský, J.; Barloková, D.

    2011-12-01

    Internal corrosion has a significant effect on the useful life of pipes, the hydraulic conditions of a distribution system and the quality of the water transported. All water is corrosive under some conditions, and the level of this corrosion depends on the physical and chemical properties of the water and properties of the pipe material. Galvanic treatment is an innovation for protecting against corrosion, and this method is also suitable for removal of water stone too. This method consists of the electrogalvanic principle, which is generated by the flowing of water between a zinc anode and the cupro-alloy cover of a column. This article presents experimental corrosion tests at water resource Pernek (This water resource-well marked as HL-1 is close to the Pernek of village), where the device is operating based on this principle.

  14. Effects of Solution Hydrodynamics on Corrosion Inhibition of Steel by Citric Acid in Cooling Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Asghari, E.; Mohammadi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in cooling water systems, which is often controlled using corrosion inhibitors. Solution hydrodynamics is one of the factors affecting corrosion inhibition of metals in these systems. The present work focuses on the study of the combined effects of citric acid concentration (as a green corrosion inhibitor) and fluid flow on corrosion of steel in simulated cooling water. Electrochemical techniques including Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used for corrosion studies. Laminar flow was simulated using a rotating disk electrode. The effects of solution hydrodynamics on inhibition performance of citric acid were discussed. The citric acid showed low inhibition performance in quiescent solution; however, when the electrode rotated at 200 rpm, inhibition efficiency increased remarkably. It was attributed mainly to the acceleration of inhibitor mass transport toward metal surface. The efficiencies were then decreased at higher rotation speeds due to enhanced wall shear stresses on metal surface and separation of adsorbed inhibitor molecules. This article is first part of authors' attempts in designing green inhibitor formulations for industrial cooling water. Citric acid showed acceptable corrosion inhibition in low rotation rates; thus, it can be used as a green additive to the corrosion inhibitor formulations.

  15. Film-induced stress enhancing stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金许; 陈浩; 王燕斌; 乔利杰; 褚武扬

    2001-01-01

    A constant deflection device designed for use within a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to investigate the change in dislocation configuration ahead of a crack tip during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of type 310 austenitic stainless steel in a boiling MgCl2 solution, and the initiation process of stress corrosion microcrack. Results showed that corrosion process during SCC enhanced dislocation emission, multiplication and motion. Microcracks of SCC were initiated when the corrosion-enhanced dislocation emission and motion reached critical state.   A passive film formed during corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in the boiling MgCl2 solution generated a tensile stress. During SCC, the additive tensile stress generated at the metal/passive film interface helps enhance dislocation emission and motion.

  16. Three-dimensional characterization of stress corrosion cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozano-Perez, S.; Rodrigo, P.; Gontard, Lionel Cervera

    2011-01-01

    Understanding crack propagation and initiation is fundamental if stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms are to be understood. However, cracking is a three-dimensional (3D) phenomenon and most characterization techniques are restricted to two-dimensional (2D) observations. In order to overcome...... the best spatial resolution. To illustrate the power of these techniques, different parts of dominant stress corrosion cracks in Ni-alloys and stainless steels have been reconstructed in 3D. All relevant microstructural features can now be studied in detail and its relative orientation respect...

  17. Galvanic and stress corrosion of copper canisters in repository environment. A short review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, H.P.; Koenig, M. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2001-02-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SKI, has studied different aspects of canister and copper corrosion as part of the general improvement of the knowledge base within the area. General and local corrosion has earlier been treated by experiments as well as by thermodynamic calculations. For completeness also galvanic and stress corrosion should be treated. The present work is a short review, intended to indicate areas needing further focus. The work consists of two parts, the first of which contains a judgement of statements concerning risk of galvanic corrosion of copper in the repository. The second part concerns threshold values for the stress intensity factor of stress corrosion in copper. A suggestion is given on how such values possibly could be measured for copper at repository conditions. In early investigations by SKB, galvanic corrosion is not mentioned or at least not treated. In later works it is treated but often in a theoretical way without indications of any further treatment or investigation. Several pieces of work indicate that further investigations are required to ensure that different types of corrosion, like galvanic, cannot occur in the repository environment. There are for example effects of grain size, grain boundary conditions, impurities and other factors that could influence the appearance of galvanic corrosion that are not treated. Those factors have to be considered to be completely sure that galvanic corrosion and related effects does not occur for the actual canister in the specific environment of the repository. The circumstances are so specific, that a rather general discussion indicating that galvanic corrosion is not probable just is not enough. Experiments should also be performed for verification. It is concluded that the following specific areas, amongst others, could benefit from further consideration. Galvanic corrosion of unbreached copper by inhomogeneities in the environment and in the copper metal should be addressed

  18. Corrosion of metals and alloys - Corrosion and fouling in industrial cooling water systems - Part 1: Guidelines for conducting pilot-scale evaluation of corrosion and fouling control additives for open recirculating cooling water systems

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Corrosion of metals and alloys - Corrosion and fouling in industrial cooling water systems - Part 1: Guidelines for conducting pilot-scale evaluation of corrosion and fouling control additives for open recirculating cooling water systems

  19. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  20. Effect of hydrogen on stress corrosion cracking of copper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-jie QIAO

    2008-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on electrochemical behavior and susceptibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of pure copper were studied. SCC susceptibility of pure copper in a 1 M NaNO2 solution was increased by pre-charged hydrogen. The effect of hydrogen on the sus-ceptibility is more obvious in the low stress region due to the longer fracture time, which resulted in a longer time for more hydrogen to diffuse toward the crack tip. Synergistic effects of hydrogen and stress on corrosion and SCC pro-cesses were discussed. The results showed that an inter-action between stress and hydrogen at the crack tip could increase the anodic dissolution rate remarkably.

  1. An evaluation of the susceptibility of V-4Cr-4Ti to stress corrosion cracking in room temperature DIII-D water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, R.J.; Jones, R.H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, W.R.

    1997-04-01

    Two fatigue precracked compact tension (CT) specimens of V-4Cr-4Ti were statically loaded to a stress intensity factor of about 30 MPa{radical}m in room temperature DIII-D water. The first specimen was tested for a period of about 30 days and the second specimen for about 54 days. At the conclusion of each test the specimens were fractured, and the fracture surfaces examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine if SCC had occurred. No SCC was found in either test specimen.

  2. Corrosion Behavior of Commercial Magnetic Refrigerant Gadolinium in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zeyu; Long Yi; Wen Da; Ye Rongchang; Wan Farong

    2004-01-01

    Gadolinium(Gd) used as magnetic refrigerant always works in water environment.However, its poor corrosion resistance is serious impediment against wider application of Gd.In this paper, the corrosion behavior of two types of commercial Gd ( A, B both are 98.9 at.% pure) with the same oxygen content has been studied.The results show that the corrosion rate of A is 3.226 times higher than that of B in deionized water and 6.039 times in tap water.According to SEM, the different corrosion rate is because of the different distribution of impurity in matrix.In addition,NaOH solution was chosen as inhibitor to prevent Gd from being corroded successfully.No pitting corrosion and weight loss were observed for commercial Gd even after immersion for nearly 2000 h in NaOH solution.

  3. Effect of Mixed Corrosion Inhibitors in Cooling Water System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Raheem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of mixed corrosion inhibitors in cooling system was evaluated by using carbon steel specimens and weight loss analysis. The carbon steel specimens immersed in mixture of sodium phosphate (Na2 HPO4 used as corrosion inhibitor and sodium glocunate (C6 H11 NaO7 as a scale dispersant at different concentrations (20,40, 60, 80 ppm and at different temperature (25,50,75 and 100ºC for (1-5 days. The corrosion inhibitors efficiency was calculated by using uninhibited and inhibited water to give 98.1%. The result of these investigations indicate that the corrosion rate decreases with the increase the corrosion inhibitors concentration at 80 ppm and at 100ºC for 5 days, (i.e, corrosion rate= 0.014gmd.

  4. Corrosion protection of steel in ammonia/water heat pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeld, Florian B.; Sun, Zhaoli

    2003-10-14

    Corrosion of steel surfaces in a heat pump is inhibited by adding a rare earth metal salt to the heat pump's ammonia/water working fluid. In preferred embodiments, the rare earth metal salt includes cerium, and the steel surfaces are cerated to enhance the corrosion-inhibiting effects.

  5. The corrosive nature of manganese in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Bastida, C; Martínez-Miranda, V; Vázquez-Mejía, G; Solache-Ríos, M; Fonseca-Montes de Oca, G; Trujillo-Flores, E

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion problems having to do with drinking water distribution systems are related to many processes and factors and two of them are ionic acidity and carbon dioxide, which were considered in this work. The corrosion character of water is determined by the corrosion indexes of Langelier, Ryznar, Larson, and Mojmir. The results show that pipes made of different materials, such as plastics or metals, are affected by corrosion, causing manganese to be deposited on materials and dissolved in water. The deterioration of the materials, the degree of corrosion, and the deposited corrosion products were determined by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. High levels of manganese and nitrate ions in water may cause serious damage to the health of consumers of water. Three wells were examined, one of them presented a high content of manganese; the others had high levels of nitrate ions, which increased the acidity of the water and, therefore, the amount of corrosion of the materials in the distribution systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of the stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength low alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance was studied for high strength alloy steels 4130, 4340, for H-11 at selected strength levels, and for D6AC and HY140 at a single strength. Round tensile and C-ring type specimens were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, salt spray, the atmosphere at Marshall Space Flight Center, and the seacoast at Kennedy Space Center. Under the test conditions, 4130 and 4340 steels heat treated to a tensile strength of 1240 MPa (180 ksi), H-11 and D6AC heat treated to a tensile strength of 1450 MPa (210 ksi), and HY140 (1020 MPa, 148 ksi) are resistant to stress corrosion cracking because failures were not encountered at stress levels up to 75 percent of their yield strengths. A maximum exposure period of one month for alternate immersion in salt water or salt spray and three months for seacoast is indicated for alloy steel to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking because of failure resulting from severe pitting.

  7. Stress corrosion-controlled rates of mode I fracture propagation in calcareous bedrock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigtlaender, Anne; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Surface bedrock on natural rock slopes is subject to constant and cyclic environmental stresses (wind, water, wave, ice, seismic or gravitational). Studies indicate that these stresses range up to several hundred kPa, generally too low to cause macroscopic changes in intact rock, although clear evidence of fracture generation, crack propagation and weathering of bedrock illustrates the effect of environmental stresses at the Earth's surface. We suggest that material degradation and its extent, is likely to be controlled by the rate of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Stress corrosion is a fluid-material reaction, where fluids preferentially react with strained atomic bonds at the tip of developing fractures. Stress corrosion in ferrous and siliceous materials is often accepted as the fracture propagation and degradation rate-controlling process where materials are subject to stresses and fluids. Although evidence for chemical weathering in propagating bedrock fractures is clear in natural environments, the physical system and quantification of stress corrosion in natural rocks is yet to be addressed. Here, we present preliminary data on the relationship between stresses at levels commonly present on natural rock slopes, and material damage resulting from stress corrosion under constant or cyclic tensile loading. We undertake single notch three-point bending tests (SNBT) on fresh calcareous bedrock specimens (1100x100x100mm) over a two-month period. Two beams containing an artificial notch are stressed to 75% of their ultimate strength, and a constant supply of weak acid is applied at the notch tip to enhance chemical reactions. A third, unloaded, beam is also exposed to weak acid in order to elucidate the contribution of stress corrosion cracking to the material degradation. Stresses at the tip of propagating cracks affect the kinetics of the chemical reaction in the specimen exposed to both loading and corrosion, leading to an increase in degradation, and greater

  8. Hydrogen-increased dezincification layer-induced stress and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of brass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李会录; 高克玮; 褚武扬; 刘亚萍; 乔利杰

    2003-01-01

    Dezincification layer formed during corrosion or stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of brass in an ammonia solution could induce an additive stress. The effect of hydrogen on the dezincification layer-induced stress and the susceptibility to SCC were studied. The dezincification layer-induced stress was measured using the deflection method and the flowing stress differential method, respectively. The latter measures the difference between the flowing stress of a specimen before unloading and the yield stress of the same specimen after unloading and forming a dezincification layer. The susceptibility to SCC was measured using slow strain rate test. Results show that both the dezincification layer-induced stress and the susceptibility to SCC increase with increasing hydrogen concentration in a specimen. This implies that hydrogen-enhanced dezincification layer-induced stress is consistence with the hydrogen-increased susceptibility to SCC of brass in the ammonia solution.

  9. The Effect of Welding Residual Stress for Making Artificial Stress Corrosion Crack in the STS 304 Pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Seong Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The stress corrosion crack is one of the fracture phenomena for the major structure components in nuclear power plant. During the operation of a power plant, stress corrosion cracks are initiated and grown especially in dissimilar weldment of primary loop components. In particular, stress corrosion crack usually occurs when the following three factors exist at the same time: susceptible material, corrosive environment, and tensile stress (residual stress included. Thus, residual stress becomes a critical factor for stress corrosion crack when it is difficult to improve the material corrosivity of the components and their environment under operating conditions. In this study, stress corrosion cracks were artificially produced on STS 304 pipe itself by control of welding residual stress. We used the instrumented indentation technique and 3D FEM analysis (using ANSYS 12 to evaluate the residual stress values in the GTAW area. We used the custom-made device for fabricating the stress corrosion crack in the inner STS 304 pipe wall. As the result of both FEM analysis and experiment, the stress corrosion crack was quickly generated and could be reproduced, and it could be controlled by welding residual stress.

  10. Susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking of 254SMO SS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Micheli Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC of solubilized and sensitized 254SMO SS was studied in sodium chloride, and sodium fluoride solutions at 80 °C and sulfuric acid solutions in presence of sodium chloride at 25 °C. The influence of salt concentration, pH values and the addition of thiosulfate was examined. The susceptibility to SCC was evaluated by Slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT, at 1.5 x 10-6 s-1 strain rate. The behavior of 254SMO was compared to those of AISI 316L SS and Hastelloy C276. 254SMO showed an excellent resistance to SCC in all conditions, except in the more acidic solutions (pH <= 1 where, in the sensitized conditions, intergranular stress corrosion cracking occurred.

  11. Three-dimensional characterization of stress corrosion cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano-Perez, S., E-mail: sergio.lozano-perez@materials.ox.ac.u [University of Oxford, Department of Materials, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Rodrigo, P. [Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Dpto. de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, c/ Tulipan s.n., 28933 Mostoles (Madrid) (Spain); Gontard, Lionel C. [Danish Technical University, Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Matematiktorvet Building 307, Room 115, 2800 Kogens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2011-01-31

    Understanding crack propagation and initiation is fundamental if stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms are to be understood. However, cracking is a three-dimensional (3D) phenomenon and most characterization techniques are restricted to two-dimensional (2D) observations. In order to overcome this problem, different approaches to extract 3D information have been used in the recent years. In this work we will present the benefits of using 3D focused ion beam (FIB) slicing and electron tomography. 3D FIB slicing offers a fast and high throughput characterization while electron tomography offers the best spatial resolution. To illustrate the power of these techniques, different parts of dominant stress corrosion cracks in Ni-alloys and stainless steels have been reconstructed in 3D. All relevant microstructural features can now be studied in detail and its relative orientation respect to the strain direction and grain boundary plane accurately measured.

  12. The effect of heat treatment and test parameters on the aqueous stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history and test technique, under sustained load in natural seawater, 3.3 percent NaCl solution, distilled water, and high humidity air was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, threshold, and the extension of corrosion fatigue data to sustained load conditions. Stress history effects were found to be most important in that they controlled incubation period, initial crack growth rates, and apparent threshold.

  13. Influence of localized deformation on A-286 austenitic stainless steel stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water; Influence de la localisation de la deformation sur la corrosion sous contrainte de l'acier inoxydable austenitique A-286 en milieu primaire des REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoie, M

    2007-01-15

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels is known to be a critical issue for structural components of nuclear reactor cores. The deformation of irradiated austenitic stainless steels is extremely heterogeneous and localized in deformation bands that may play a significant role in IASCC. In this study, an original approach is proposed to determine the influence of localized deformation on austenitic stainless steels SCC in simulated PWR primary water. The approach consists in (i) performing low cycle fatigue tests on austenitic stainless steel A-286 strengthened by {gamma}' precipitates Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Al) in order to shear and dissolve the precipitates in intense slip bands, leading to a localization of the deformation within and in (ii) assessing the influence of these {gamma}'-free localized deformation bands on A-286 SCC by means of comparative CERT tests performed on specimens with similar yield strength, containing or not {gamma}'-free localized deformation bands. Results show that strain localization significantly promotes A-286 SCC in simulated PWR primary water at 320 and 360 C. Moreover, A-286 is a precipitation-hardening austenitic stainless steel used for applications in light water reactors. The second objective of this work is to gain insights into the influence of heat treatment and metallurgical structure on A-286 SCC susceptibility in PWR primary water. The results obtained demonstrate a strong correlation between yield strength and SCC susceptibility of A-286 in PWR primary water at 320 and 360 C. (author)

  14. Some observations on use of siliceous mineral waters in reduction of corrosion in RCC structures

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venugopal, C.

    in the corrosion resistance performance of concrete exposed to sea water. Maximum reduction in the corrosion rate was observed in the concrete mixed with 10% gold tailing together with 10% flyash. The corrosion rate and polarisation resistance of the control...

  15. Corrosion in drinking water pipes: the importance of green rusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swietlik, Joanna; Raczyk-Stanisławiak, Urszula; Piszora, Paweł; Nawrocki, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Complex crystallographic composition of the corrosion products is studied by diffraction methods and results obtained after different pre-treatment of samples are compared. The green rusts are found to be much more abundant in corrosion scales than it has been assumed so far. The characteristic and crystallographic composition of corrosion scales and deposits suspended in steady waters were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The necessity of the examination of corrosion products in the wet conditions is indicated. The drying of the samples before analysis is shown to substantially change the crystallographic phases originally present in corrosion products. On sample drying the unstable green rusts is converted into more stable phases such as goethite and lepidocrocite, while the content of magnetite and siderite decreases. Three types of green rusts in wet materials sampled from tubercles are identified. Unexpectedly, in almost all corrosion scale samples significant amounts of the least stable green rust in chloride form was detected. Analysis of corrosion products suspended in steady water, which remained between tubercles and possibly in their interiors, revealed complex crystallographic composition of the sampled material. Goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite as well as low amounts of siderite and quartz were present in all samples. Six different forms of green rusts were identified in the deposits separated from steady waters and the most abundant was carbonate green rust GR(CO(3)(2-))(I).

  16. Mixing Corrosion of CaCO3 in Natural Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Hui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The methods of aqueous speciation calculation, pH calculation and the solubility (precipitability calculation of CaCO3 were used to study the mixing corrosion of CaCO3 in natural waters. Mixing processes were done between two unsaturated (with CaCO3 solutions, two oversaturated solutions and between an unsaturated solution and an oversaturated solution, respectively. Results show that the mixing corrosion can be divided into two different levels: mixing corrosion in strict sense and mixing corrosion in broad sense. When mixing corrosion occurs, the HCO3- concentration in one end member solution is usually higher than that in the other solution, and the Ca2+ concentration in the former solution is also usually higher than that in the latter one.

  17. Applied methods for mitigation of damage by stress corrosion in BWR type reactors; Metodos aplicados para la mitigacion del dano por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez C, R.; Diaz S, A.; Gachuz M, M.; Arganis J, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencia de Materiales, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    The Boiling Water nuclear Reactors (BWR) have presented stress corrosion problems, mainly in components and pipes of the primary system, provoking negative impacts in the performance of energy generator plants, as well as the increasing in the radiation exposure to personnel involucred. This problem has caused development of research programs, which are guided to find solution alternatives for the phenomena control. Among results of greater relevance the control for the reactor water chemistry stands out particularly in the impurities concentration and oxidation of radiolysis products; as well as the supervision in the materials selection and the stresses levels reduction. The present work presents the methods which can be applied to diminish the problems of stress corrosion in BWR reactors. (Author)

  18. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  19. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  20. Residual strain change resulting from stress corrosion in Carrara marble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigtlaender, Anne; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses and strains have been shown to play a fundamental role in determining the elastic behavior of engineering materials, yet the effect of these strains on brittle and elastic behavior of rocks remains unclear. In order to evaluate the impact of stored elastic strains on fracture propagation in rock, we undertook a four-month-long three-point bending test on three large 1100 x 100 x 100 mm Carrara Marble samples. This test induced stable low stress conditions in which strains were concentrated at the tip of a saw cut and pre-cracked notch. A corrosive environment was created at the tip of the notch on two samples (M2 and M4) by dripping calcite saturated water (pH ~ 7.5-8). Sample M5 was loaded in the same way, but kept dry. Samples were unloaded prior to failure, and along with an additional non-loaded reference sample (M0), cored into cylindrical subsamples (ø = 50 mm, h = 100 mm) before being tested for changes in residual elastic strains at the SALSA neutron diffractometer at the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble, France. Three diffraction peaks corresponding to crystallographic planes hkl (110), (104) and (006) were measured in all three spatial directions relative to the notch. Shifts in the diffraction peak position (d) with respect to a strain free state are indicative of intergranular strain, while changes in the width of the peak (FWHM) reflect changes in intragranular strain. We observe distinctly different patterns in residual and volumetric strains in hkℓ (104) and (006) for the dry M5 and wet tested samples (M2 and M4) indicating the presence of water changes the deformation mechanism, while (110) is strained in compression around 200 μstrain in all samples. A broadening of the diffraction peaks (006) and (110) in front of the crack tip is observed in M2 and M4, while M5 shows no changes in the peak width throughout the depth of the sample. We suggest water present at the crack tip increased the rate of corrosion, allowing a

  1. Corrosion behaviour and biocorrosion of galvanized steel water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunois, F; Tosar, F; Vitry, V

    2014-06-01

    Galvanized steel tubes are a popular mean for water distribution systems but suffer from corrosion despite their zinc or zinc alloy coatings. First, the quality of hot-dip galvanized (HDG) coatings was studied. Their microstructure, defects, and common types of corrosion were observed. It was shown that many manufactured tubes do not reach European standard (NBN EN 10240), which is the cause of several corrosion problems. The average thickness of zinc layer was found at 41μm against 55μm prescribed by the European standard. However, lack of quality, together with the usual corrosion types known for HDG steel tubes was not sufficient to explain the high corrosion rate (reaching 20μm per year versus 10μm/y for common corrosion types). Electrochemical tests were also performed to understand the corrosion behaviours occurring in galvanized steel tubes. Results have shown that the limiting step was oxygen diffusion, favouring the growth of anaerobic bacteria in steel tubes. EDS analysis was carried out on corroded coatings and has shown the presence of sulphur inside deposits, suggesting the likely bacterial activity. Therefore biocorrosion effects have been investigated. Actually sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) can reduce sulphate contained in water to hydrogen sulphide (H2S), causing the formation of metal sulphides. Although microbial corrosion is well-known in sea water, it is less investigated in supply water. Thus, an experimental water main was kept in operation for 6months. SRB were detected by BART tests in the test water main. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of surface stress states on the corrosion behavior of alloy 690

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Mo; Shim, Hee Sang; Seo, Myung Ji; Hur, Do Haeng [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The test environment simulated the primary water chemistry in PWRs. Dissolved oxygen (DO), dissolved hydrogen (DH), pH and conductivity were monitored at room temperature using sensors manufactured by Orbisphere and Mettler Toledo. The temperature and pressure were maintained at 330 .deg. C and 150 bars during the corrosion test. The condition of the test solution was lithium (LiOH) 2 ppm and boron (H3BO4) 1,200 ppm, DH 35 cc/kg (STP) and less than 5 ppb DO. The flow rate of the loop system was 3.8 L/hour. Corrosion tests were conducted for 500 hours. The corrosion release rate was evaluated by a gravimetric analysis method using a two-step alkaline permanganate-ammonium citrate (AP/AC) descaling process. Compressive residual stress is induced by shot peening treatment but its value reveals some different trend between the shot peening intensity on the surface of Alloy 690 TT. A higher shot peening intensity causes a reduction in the corrosion rate and it is considered that the compressive residual stress beneath the surface layer suppresses the metal ion transfer in an alloy matrix.

  3. Investigation Of Ballast Water Treatment’s Effect On Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    treatment methods on various alloys routinely encountered in ballast tanks and ballast water systems aboard both fresh water and ocean going vessels...Controlled laboratory tests were conducted using simulated chlorination, deoxygenation and chlorine dioxide disinfection. Materials were exposed to three...far as is practicable. 17. Key Words Corrosion, ballast water treatment, deoxygenation , chlorination, chlorine dioxide 18. Distribution

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  5. Ultrasonic inspection reliability for intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heasler, P G; Taylor, T T; Spanner, J C; Doctor, S R; Deffenbaugh, J D [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)

    1990-07-01

    A pipe inspection round robin entitled Mini-Round Robin'' was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory from May 1985 through October 1985. The research was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research under a program entitled Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors.'' The Mini-Round Robin (MRR) measured the intergranular stress corrosion (GSC) crack detection and sizing capabilities of inservice inspection (ISI) inspectors that had passed the requirements of IEB 83-02 and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) sizing training course. The MRR data base was compared with an earlier Pipe Inspection Round Robin (PIRR) that had measured the performance of inservice inspection prior to 1982. Comparison of the MRR and PIRR data bases indicates no significant change in the inspection capability for detecting IGSCC. Also, when comparing detection of long and short cracks, no difference in detection capability was measured. An improvement in the ability to differentiate between shallow and deeper IGSCC was found when the MRR sizing capability was compared with an earlier sizing round robin conducted by the EPRI. In addition to the pipe inspection round robin, a human factors study was conducted in conjunction with the Mini-Round Robin. The most important result of the human factors study is that the Relative Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves provide a better methodology for describing inspector performance than only probability of detection (POD) or single-point crack/no crack data. 6 refs., 55 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking in canistered waste package containers: Welds and base metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J.S.

    1998-03-01

    The current design of waste package containers include outer barrier using corrosion allowable material (CAM) such as A516 carbon steel and inner barrier of corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as alloy 625 and C22. There is concern whether stress corrosion cracking would occur at welds or base metals. The current memo documents the results of our analysis on this topic.

  7. SRNL SHELF LIFE STUDIES - SCC STUDIES AT ROOM TEMPERTURE [stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

    2014-11-12

    Phase II, Series 2 corrosion testing performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the Department of Energy 3013 container has been completed. The corrosion tests are part of an integrated plan conducted jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Savannah River Site. SRNL was responsible for conducting corrosion studies in small-scale vessels to address the influence of salt composition, water loading, and type of oxide/salt contact on the relative humidity inside a 3013 container and on the resulting corrosion of Type 304L and 316L stainless steel (304L and 316L). This testing was conducted in two phases: Phase I evaluated a broad spectrum of salt compositions and initial water loadings on the salt mixtures exposed to 304L and 316L and the resulting corrosion; Phase II evaluated the corrosion of 304L at specific water loadings and a single salt composition. During Phase I testing at high initial moisture levels (0.35 to 1.24 wt%)a, the roomtemperature corrosion of 304L exposed to a series of plutonium oxide/chloride salt mixtures ranged from superficial staining to pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). 304L teardrop coupons that exhibited SCC were directly exposed to a mixture composed of 98 wt % PuO2, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl2. Cracking was not observed in a 316L teardrop coupon. Pitting was also observed in this environment for both 304L and 316L with depths ranging from 20 to 100 μm. Neither pitting nor SCC was observed in mixtures with a greater chloride salt concentration (5 and 28 wt%). These results demonstrated that for a corrosive solution to form a balance existed between the water loading and the salt chloride concentration. This chloride solution results from the interaction of loaded water with the hydrating CaCl2 salt. In Phase II, Series 1 tests, the SCC results were shown to be reproducible with cracking occurring in as little as 85 days. The approximate 0.5 wt% moisture level was found to

  8. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chopra, O. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gruber, Eugene E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shack, William J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  9. Metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling alloy 718 stress corrosion cracking resistance in PWR primary water; Facteurs metallurgiques et mecaniques controlant l'amorcage de defauts de corrosion sous contrainte dans l'alliage 718 en milieu primaire des reacteurs a eau sous pression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleume, J

    2007-11-15

    Improving the performance and reliability of the fuel assemblies of the pressurized water reactors requires having a perfect knowledge of the operating margins of both the components and the materials. The choice of alloy 718 as reference material for this study is justified by the industrial will to identify the first order parameters controlling the excellent resistance of this alloy to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). For this purpose, a specific slow strain rate (SSR) crack initiation test using tensile specimen with a V-shaped hump in the middle of the gauge length was developed and modeled. The selectivity of such SSR tests in simulated PWR primary water at 350 C was clearly established by characterizing the SCC resistance of nine alloy 718 thin strip heats. Regardless of their origin and in spite of a similar thermo-mechanical history, they did not exhibit the same susceptibility to SCC crack initiation. All the characterized alloy 718 heats develop oxide scale of similar nature for various exposure times to PWR primary medium in the temperature range [320 C - 360 C]. {delta} phase precipitation has no impact on alloy 718 SCC initiation behavior when exposed to PWR primary water, contrary to interstitial contents and the triggering of plastic instabilities (PLC phenomenon). (author)

  10. Stress corrosion cracking and its anisotropy of a PZT ferroelectric ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of a PZT ferroelectric ceramics in various media, such as moist atmosphere, silicon oil, methanol, water and formamide, and its anisotropy have been investigated at constant load test using a single-edge notched tensile specimen. The results showed that SCC could occur in all media, and the threshold stress intensity factor of SCC in water and formamide, KISCC, revealed anisotropy. The KISCC for poling direction parallel to the crack plane, was greater than that perpendicular to the crack plane, similar to the anisotropy of fracture toughness KIC; however, the anisotropy factor of KISCC, which was =1.8 (in formamide) and 2.1 (in water), was larger than that of KIC, which is =1.4. The stress-induced 90° domain switching causes the anisotropy of KIC and KISCC, besides, the resistance of SCC also has anisotropy.

  11. Modeling Threshold of Stress Intensity Factor in Iodine Induced Stress Corrosion Crack of Zirconium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG; Xin-yuan; CHEN; Peng

    2013-01-01

    KISCC,which is the threshold of stress intensity factor of iodine induced stress corrosion crack(ISCC)of Zirconium,reflects the susceptibility of ISCC of zirconium.Once the stress intensity factor surpasses the threshold,the cracking propagation modality in material will transform to transgranular from intergranular immediately and the velocity of the cracking will increase rapidly.Four key factors that’s

  12. Long term corrosion of iron at the water logged site Nydam in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Henning; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Gregory, David;

    2005-01-01

    Long term corrosion of iron at the water logged site Nydam in Denmark; studies of enviroment, archaeological artefacts, and modern analogues, Prediction of long term corrosion behaviour in nuclear waste systems.......Long term corrosion of iron at the water logged site Nydam in Denmark; studies of enviroment, archaeological artefacts, and modern analogues, Prediction of long term corrosion behaviour in nuclear waste systems....

  13. Long term corrosion of iron at the water logged site Nydam in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Henning; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Gregory, David

    2005-01-01

    Long term corrosion of iron at the water logged site Nydam in Denmark; studies of enviroment, archaeological artefacts, and modern analogues, Prediction of long term corrosion behaviour in nuclear waste systems.......Long term corrosion of iron at the water logged site Nydam in Denmark; studies of enviroment, archaeological artefacts, and modern analogues, Prediction of long term corrosion behaviour in nuclear waste systems....

  14. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  15. Stress-corrosion cracking of steels in ammonia with consideration given to OTEC design: a survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teel, R.B.

    1980-03-01

    Carbon steel, alloy steel, and high-strength, quenched and tempered steel, when under applied or residual stress and especially when cold formed and/or welded without subsequent thermal stress relief, are subject to failure by stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in air-contaminated dry ammonia. Water as well as hydrazine when present in small amounts have been shown to be effective inhibitors in an all steel system. Galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals and/or accelerated failure by SCC of stressed steel as a result of galvanic coupling may be of concern. Where water has proven effective as an inhibitor of SCC in an all steel system, it may not be adequate in a mixed metal system. With aluminum tubes, the tube sheet will either have to be solid aluminum, aluminum clad steel or some nonconductive coating will be necessary to effectively remove the cathodic alloy from the galvanic circuit. Research is required to determine the severity of the coupling effect between dissimilar alloys in ammonia under OTEC conditions; especially the possibility of accelerated SCC failures of stressed steel where the presence of an inhibitor in the ammonia may not be sufficient to override the galvanic coupling effect.

  16. Corrosion of titanium in supercritical water oxidation environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢建树; 毛志远; 张九渊; 马淳安; 毛信表; 李肖华

    2002-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) can effectively destroy many kinds of civilian and military wastes. The high temperature and high pressure SCWO operation conditions generate very corrosive environment that many engineering materials fail to withstand. Preliminary test shows that titanium may be a promising material in most of SCWO conditions. Commercially pure titanium is tested in four kinds of SCWO environments. Phenol, sodium dodecyl-benzosulfonate, n-amine phenol, and chlorpyrifos were chosen as typical target pollutants. The results show that titanium is only superficially attacked in the first three SCWO environments while in chlorpyrifos SCWO medium titanium is corroded. The corrosion is temperature dependent, with heavier corrosion occurring at near critical temperature. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the corrosion products consist of titanium oxy- phosphates and titanium oxide, in which Ti5O4(PO4)4 is the main phase.

  17. Analysis of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 718 following commercial reactor exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Keith J.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Stevens, Jacqueline N.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-11-01

    Alloy 718 is generally considered a highly corrosion-resistant material but can still be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The combination of factors leading to SCC susceptibility in the alloy is not always clear enough. In the present work, alloy 718 leaf spring (LS) materials that suffered stress corrosion damage during two 24-month cycles in pressurized water reactor service, operated to >45 MWd/mtU burn-up, was investigated. Compared to archival samples fabricated through the same processing conditions, little microstructural and property changes occurred in the material with in-service irradiation, contrary to high dose rate laboratory-based experiments reported in literature. Though the lack of delta phase formation along grain boundaries would suggest a more SCC resistant microstructure, grain boundary cracking in the material was extensive. Crack propagation routes were explored through focused ion beam milling of specimens near the crack tip for transmission electron microscopy as well as in polished plan view and cross-sectional samples for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. It has been shown in this study that cracks propagated mainly along random high-angle grain boundaries, with the material around cracks displaying a high local density of dislocations. The slip lines were produced through the local deformation of the leaf spring material above their yield strength. The cause for local SCC appears to be related to oxidation of both slip lines and grain boundaries, which under the high in-service stresses resulted in crack development in the material.

  18. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 182 weld metal in primary coolant - Influence of chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calonne, O.; Foucault, M.; Steltzlen, F. [AREVA (France); Amzallag, C. [EDF SEPTEN (France)

    2011-07-01

    Nickel-base alloys 182 and 82 have been used extensively for dissimilar metal welds. Typical applications are the J-groove welds of alloy 600 vessel head penetrations, pressurizer penetrations, heater sleeves and bottom mounted instrumented nozzles as well as some safe end butt welds. While the overall performance of these weld metals has been good, during the last decade, an increasing number of cases of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 182 weld metal have been reported in PWRs. In this context, the role of weld defects has to be examined. Their contribution in the crack initiation mechanism requires laboratory investigations with small scale characterizations. In this study, the influence of both alloy composition and weld defects on PWSCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking in Primary Water) initiation was investigated using U-bend specimens in simulated primary water at 320 C. The main results are the following: -) the chemical compositions of the weld deposits leading to a large propensity to hot cracking are not the most susceptible to PWSCC initiation, -) macroscopically, superficial defects did not evolve during successive exposures. They can be included in large corrosion cracks but their role as 'precursors' is not yet established. (authors)

  19. Application of new experimental methods to pipeline stress corrosion cracking. Annual report, March 1992-February 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, C.G.; Kobayashi, T.; Becker, C.H.; Pound, B.G.; Simons, J.W.

    1993-04-01

    The objective of the investigation is to develop a physically based understanding of the mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in pipeline steels by applying advanced fracture surface and electrochemical characterization techniques to samples taken from fielded pipeline. The investigations found that the effect of pressure fluctuations on the propagation of stress corrosion cracks was readily evident from an analysis of the topographies of conjugate fracture surfaces. Substantial crack blunting was produced under normal pipeline operating conditions. Corrosion deposits were removed from the fracture surfaces of a stress corrosion crack in a pipeline specimen recovered from service. The topography of the underlying metal surface appears to be preserved with little corrosion damage after crack formation. This allowed the cracking process to be reconstructed from the surface topography. In some cases, deposits on the fracture surfaces of stress corrosion cracks contain significant concentrations of metallic elements that are not found in pipeline steels but are likely to be commonplace in the surrounding environment.

  20. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN MH

    2008-11-13

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program.

  1. Stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement of thick section high strength low alloy steel.

    OpenAIRE

    Needham, William Donald

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the corrosion performance of weldments of a high strength low alloy(HSLA) steel in a simulated seawater environment. This steel, designated HSLA80, was developed by the United States Navy for use in ship structural applications. Stress corrosion CRACKING(SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement(HEM) were investigated by conducting 42 Wedge-Opening load(WOL) tests as a function of stress intensity and corrosion potential and 33 Slow Strain Rate(SSR) tests...

  2. CORROSION RESISTANCE OF WATER-THINNABLE PAINT SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticorrosion protection on the basis of water-thinnable paint systems belongs among one of ecological ways of protection of metal parts. The aim of the experiment was to test corrosion resistance of water-thinnable systems Eternal antikor speciál V9503 and Colorlak aquarex V2115 in the salt spray environment according to the norm ČSN ISO 9227. Ductility of used paint systems in complience with the norm ČSN EN ISO 1520 will be also tested, it is a test according to Erichsen. At the end of the experiment measurement, the corrosion speed depending on paint coating thickness was analyzed.

  3. Electrochemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of incoloy-800 in caustic solution. Part II: Precracking samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a caustic medium may affect the secondary circuit tubing of a CANDU NPP cooled with river water, due to an accidental formation of a concentrated alkaline environment in the areas with restricted circulation, as a result of a leakage of cooling water from the condenser. To evaluate the susceptibility of Incoloy-800 (used to manufacture steam generator tubes for CANDU NPP to SCC, some accelerated corrosion tests were conducted in an alkaline solution (10% NaOH, pH = 13. These experiments were performed at ambient temperature and 85 °C. We used the potentiodynamic method and the potentiostatic method, simultaneously monitoring the variation of the open circuit potential during a time period (E corr/time curve. The C-ring method was used to stress the samples. In order to create stress concentrations, mechanical precracks with a depth of 100 or 250 μm were made on the outer side of the C-rings. Experimental results showed that the stressed samples were more susceptible to SCC than the unstressed samples whereas the increase in temperature and crack depth lead to an increase in SCC susceptibility. Incipient micro cracks of a depth of 30 μm were detected in the area of the highest peak of the mechanical precrack.

  4. Fundamental aspects of stress corrosion cracking of copper relevant to the Swedish deep geologic repository concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran, Ganesh; Carcea, Anatolie; Ulaganathan, Jagan; Wang, Shengchun; Huang, Yin; Newman, Roger C. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-03-15

    Phosphorus-doped oxygen-free copper will be used as the outer barrier in canisters that will contain spent nuclear fuel in the proposed Swedish underground repository. The possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a concern, in view of isolated reports of cracking or intergranular corrosion of pure copper in sulfide solutions. This concern was addressed in the present work using copper tensile specimens provided by SKB. Methods included slow strain rate testing, constant strain tensile testing, electrochemical and surface analytical studies of corrosion products, and electron backscatter diffraction analysis of grain orientation effects on corrosion. The base solutions were prepared from NaCl or synthetic sea water with addition of varying amounts of sodium sulfide at room temperature and 80 degree Celsius. No SCC was found in any of the testing, for a range of sulfide concentrations from 5-50 mM at room temperature or 8 C, including tests where small anodic or cathodic potential displacements were applied from the open-circuit (corrosion) potential. Neither was SCC found in constant-strain immersion testing with very large strain. The Cu2S corrosion product is generally very coarse, fragile, and easily spalled off in severe corrosion environments, i.e. high sulfide concentration, high temperature, less perfect de aeration, etc. But it could also consist of very fine grains, relatively compact and adherent, on particular grain orientations when it was formed on an electro polished surface in a very well-deaerated solution. These orientations have not yet been identified statistically, although some preference for thin, adherent films was noted on orientations close to (100). The notion that the corrosion reaction is always controlled by inward aqueous-phase diffusion of sulfide may thus not be unconditionally correct for this range of sulfide concentrations; however it is hard to distinguish the role of diffusion within pores in the film. In the actual

  5. Advances in research of stress-assisted corrosion fatigue problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhi-bo; LI Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Ceramic materials are notable for their rigidity, insulation and resistance to hostile environment. Nevertheless, if a stressed ceramic component is exposed to chemical attack, it may suffer from a form of delayed fracture known as static fatigue.From the point of view of a designer, it is clearly desirable to determine the behavior of sub-critical crack growth; the crack path and crack growth rate, as a function of material properties and loading conditions are of particular interest. This paper presents a review of advances in stress assisted corrosion problem in history and its corresponding numerical approaches in the last decades,and finally, comes up with consideration and crucial suggestions for future work.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking in low-pressure turbine discs in an NaCl solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitomi, Itoh [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago Research and Development Center (Japan); Takashi, Momoo [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago Machinery Works (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    From past research, it is known that stress corrosion cracking in low-pressure turbine discs occurs in an environment near that of deaerated pure water. Nevertheless, in units with molar ratio control, there is a possibility of NaCl concentrating as an impurity in the dry/wet boundary region. Long-term immersion tests were conducted at 373 K to 473 K with the NaCl concentration predicted to become 5%. It was found that, when FeCl{sub 3} or other oxidizer was added, corrosion increased remarkably and SCC was initiated. When cracks were initiated, they were primarily transgranular; as the test temperature was decreased, initiation was accelerated but conversely crack propagation was reduced. (author)

  7. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Alloy 22 in Multi-Ionic Aqueous Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.J. King; J.C. Estill; R.B. Rebak

    2002-07-15

    The US Department of Energy is characterizing a potential repository site for nuclear waste in Yucca Mountain (NV). In its current design, the nuclear waste containers consist of a double metallic layer. The external layer would be made of NO6022 or Alloy 22 (Ni-22Cr-13Mo-3W-3Fe). Since over their lifetime, the containers may be exposed to multi-ionic aqueous environments, a potential degradation mode of the outer layer could be environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In general, Alloy 22 is extremely resistant to SCC, especially in concentrated chloride solutions. Current results obtained through slow strain rate testing (SSRT) shows that Alloy 22 may suffer SCC in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at applied potentials approximately 400 mV more anodic than the corrosion potential (E{sub rr}).

  8. Fundamental understanding and life prediction of stress corrosion cracking in BWRs and energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, P.L.; Ford, F.P. [General Electric, Schenectady, NY (United States). Corporate Research and Development Center

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an approach for design and lifetime evaluation of environmental cracking based on experimental and fundamental modeling of the underlying processes operative in crack advance. In detailed this approach and its development and quantification for energy (hot water) systems, the requirements for a life prediction methodology will be highlighted and the shortcomings of the existing design and lifetime evaluation codes reviewed. Examples are identified of its use in a variety of cracking systems, such as stainless steels, low alloy steels, nickel base alloys, and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in boiling water reactor (BWR) water, as well as preliminary use for low alloy steel and Alloy 600 in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and turbine steels in steam turbines. Identification of the common aspects with environmental cracking in other hot water systems provides a secure basis for its extension to related energy systems. 166 refs., 49 figs.

  9. Evaluation of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of type 316 stainless steel irradiated in FBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, T. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Jitsukawa, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Shiba, K. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Sato, Y. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Shibahara, I. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Nakajima, H. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1993-12-01

    Type 316 stainless steel from the core of the experimental fast breeder reactor (FBR) JOYO was examined by the slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test in pure, oxygenated-water and air and by the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test to evaluate a susceptibility to the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) and the radiation-induced segregation (RIS). The solution annealed and 20% cold-worked materials had been irradiated at 425 C to a neutron fluence of 8.3x10[sup 26] n/m[sup 2] (> 0.1 MeV) which is equivalent to 40 displacement per atom (dpa). Intergranular cracking was induced by the SSRT in water at 200 and 300 C, but was not observed on specimen tested in water at 60 C and in air at 300 C. This indicates that irradiation increased a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in water. After the EPR test, grain boundary etching was observed in addition to grain face etching. This suggests Cr depletion may have occurred both at grain boundary and at defect clusters during the irradiation. The results are compared with the behavior of similar materials irradiated with different neutron spectrum. (orig.)

  10. Corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaowei

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels and Ni-based alloys in supercritical water (SCW) has been studied due to their potential applications in future nuclear reactor systems, fossil fuel power plants and waste treatment processes. 9˜12% chromium ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit good radiation resistance and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Ni-based alloys with an austenitic face-centered cubic (FCC) structure are designed to retain good mechanical strength and corrosion/oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Corrosion tests were carried out at three temperatures, 360°C, 500°C and 600°C, with two dissolved oxygen contents, 25 ppb and 2 ppm for up to 3000 hours. Alloys modified by grain refinement and reactive element addition were also investigated to determine their ability to improve the corrosion resistance in SCW. A duplex oxide structure was observed in the F/M steels after exposure to 25 ppb oxygen SCW, including an outer oxide layer with columnar magnetite grains and an inner oxide layer constituted of a mixture of spinel and ferrite phases in an equiaxed grain structure. An additional outermost hematite layer formed in the SCW-exposed samples when the oxygen content was increased to 2 ppm. Weight gain in the F/M steels increased with exposure temperatures and times, and followed parabolic growth kinetics in most of the samples. In Ni-based alloys after exposure to SCW, general corrosion and pitting corrosion were observed, and intergranular corrosion was found when exposed at 600°C due to formation of a local healing layer. The general oxide structure on the Ni-based alloys was characterized as NiO/Spinel/(CrxFe 1-x)2O3/(Fe,Ni). No change in oxidation mechanism was observed in crossing the critical point despite the large change in water properties. Corrosion resistance of the F/M steels was significantly improved by plasma-based yttrium surface treatment because of restrained outward diffusion of iron by the

  11. Realistic approach to corrosion protection of ballast water tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, G.M.; Buter, S.J.; Zhang, X.; Prent, C.S.W.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion protection of ballast water tanks is very precarious because of the aggressiveness of the environment and the difficult accessibility of the areas. Numerous accidents have led to regulation by the International Maritime Organization (IMO). Practical circumstances in yards are often not ide

  12. THE CORROSION CONTROL-WATER QUALITY SPIDER WEB

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation provides an overview of new research results and emerging research needs with respect to both corrosion control issues, (lead, copper, iron) and to issues of inorganic contaminants that can form or accumulate in distribution system, water, pipe scales and distri...

  13. Interplay of microbiological corrosion and alloy microstructure in stress corrosion cracking of weldments of advanced stainless steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Singh Raman

    2003-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the phenomenon of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of duplex stainless steels and their weldments in marine environments and the potential role of microbial activity in inducing SCC susceptibility. As a precursor to the topic the paper also reviews the performance of the traditional corrosion-resistant alloys and their weldments and the necessity of using duplex stainless steels (DSS), in order to alleviate corrosion problems in marine environments. Given that the performance of weldments of such steels is often unsatisfactory, this review also assesses the research needs in this area. In this context the paper also discusses the recent reports on the role of microorganisms in inducing hydrogen embrittlements and corrosion fatigue.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking in the fusion boundary region of an alloy 182 - A533B low alloy steel dissimilar weld joint in high temperature oxygenated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Q.; Xue, H.; Hou, J.; Takeda, Y.; Kuniya, J.; Shoji, T. [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    In this work, following a microstructural characterization of the fusion boundary (FB) region in an Alloy 182 - A533B LAS dissimilar weld joint, the SCC growth behaviour in the FB region of the dissimilar weld joint in 288 C degrees water was investigated by employing crevice bent beam (CBB) and crack growth rate (CGR) testing, in conjunction with a simulation by finite element method (FEM). The microstructure characterization showed that there is a narrow high hardness zone (HHZ) in the dilution zone (DZ) of the weld metal adjacent to the FB. Further, a sharp increase of the hardness was observed immediately adjacent to the FB, suggesting the existence of a hardness gradient in the HHZ. FEM simulation of the growth of a crack perpendicular to the FB in the DZ showed that there is a drop in crack tip strain rate as the crack entered the HHZ, suggesting a decreased crack growth rate can be expected for a crack propagating perpendicular to the FB in the high hardness zone where a continuous increase of the hardness with crack growth may exist. Cracking path observation on the cross-section of the CBB specimen suggested that a SCC propagating perpendicular to the FB in the DZ was blunted by pitting after it reached the FB, indicating that the FB is a barrier to SCC growth. However, reactivation of crack growth from the pitting in LAS by preferential oxidation along the grain boundary was observed as well, suggesting a combined effect of microstructure and the high sulphate concentration in the water used for the test. The effects of sulphate doping and DO on CGR in the DZ and FB region were further clarified by the results of the SCC-CGR test. At a DO of 0.25 ppm, the SCC growth rate was low in the FB region even with a sulphate addition of up to 50 ppb in water. The crack growth, however, was reactivated by increasing the DO to 2 ppm at both sulphate concentrations of 50 ppb and 20 ppb, indicating an important role of DO in SCC growth in the DZ. The existence of a

  15. Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domack, Marcia S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

  16. Corrosion behaviour of construction materials for high temperature water electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey

    2010-01-01

    proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysers (HTPEMWE). All samples were exposed to anodic polarisation in 85% phosphoric acid electrolyte solution. Platinum and gold plates were tested for the valid comparison. Steady-state voltammetry was used in combination with scanning electron microscopy......Different types of corrosion resistant stainless steels, Ni-based alloys as well as titanium and tantalum were evaluated as a possible metallic bipolar plate and construction material with respect to corrosion resistance under simulated conditions corresponding to the conditions in high temperature...

  17. Corrosion behavior of leaded-bronze alloys in sea water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zohdy, K.M., E-mail: khalzohdy@yahoo.com [Higher Technological Institute, 10" t" h of Ramadan City (Egypt); Sadawy, M.M. [Mining and Petroleum Engineering Department, Al-Azhar University, Nasr City, Cairo 11371 (Egypt); Ghanem, M. [Industrial Education, Suez University (Egypt)

    2014-10-15

    The corrosion behavior of leaded-bronze alloys (Cu–5Sn–5Zn–5Pb, Cu–8Sn–8Zn–8Pb and Cu–10Sn–10Zn–10Pb) in sea water was investigated using weight loss method, open-circuit potential measurements (OCP), polarization techniques and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The nature and morphology of the corrosion products were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the corrosion resistance decreases with decreasing copper content. The XRD indicated that the composition of patina depends on the concentration of Cu, Sn, Zn and Pb in each alloy. - Highlights: • The corrosion potential of leaded bronze shifts to more noble potential. • The corrosion resistance increases with increasing amount of copper content in leaded bronze alloys. • The patina formed on Cu–5Sn–5Zn–5Pb is more uniform and protective than other alloys. • The composition of patina formed on leaded bronze depends on the concentration of Cu, Sn, Zn and Pb in the alloy.

  18. Hierarchical petascale simulation framework for stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashishta, P.; Kalia, R. K.; Nakano, A.; Kaxiras, E.; Grama, A.; Lu, G.; Eidenbenz, S.; Voter, A. F.; Hood, R. Q.; Moriarty, J. A.; Yang, L. H.

    2008-07-01

    We are developing a scalable parallel and distributed computational framework consisting of methods, algorithms, and integrated software tools for multi-terascle-to-petascale simulations of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) with quantum-level accuracy. We have performed multimillion- to billion-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of deformation, flow, and fracture in amorphous silica with interatomic potentials and forces validated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Optimized potentials have been developed to study sulfur embrittlement of nickel with multimillion-to-multibillion atom MD simulations based on DFT and temperature dependent model generalized pseudopotential theory. We have also developed a quasi-continuum method embedded with quantum simulations based on DFT to reach macroscopic length scales and an accelerated molecular dynamics scheme to reach macroscopic time scales in simulations of solid-fluid interfaces that are relevant to SCC. A hybrid MD and mesoscale lattice Boltzmann simulation algorithm is being designed to study fluid flow through cracks.

  19. Behavior of Stress Corrosion Cracking in a Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Renguo; YANG Fanger; BLAWERT Carsten; DIETZEL Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was employed to study the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of ZE41 magnesium alloy in 0.01 M NaCl solution. Smooth tensile specimens with different thicknesses were strained dynamically in both longitudinal and transverse direction under permanent immersions at a strain rate of 10-6 s-1. It is found that ZE41 magnesium alloy is susceptible to SCC in 0.01 M NaCl solution. The SCC susceptibility of the thinner specimen is lower than that of the thicker specimen. Also, the longitudinal specimens are slightly more susceptible to SCC than the transverse specimens. The SCC mechanism of magnesium alloy is attributed to the combination of anodic dissolution with hydrogen embrittlement.

  20. Stress-Corrosion Interactions in Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre Flaviu Gostin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stress-corrosion interactions in materials may lead to early unpredictable catastrophic failure of structural parts, which can have dramatic effects. In Zr-based bulk metallic glasses, such interactions are particularly important as these have very high yield strength, limited ductility, and are relatively susceptible to localized corrosion in halide-containing aqueous environments. Relevant features of the mechanical and corrosion behavior of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses are described, and an account of knowledge regarding corrosion-deformation interactions gathered from ex situ experimental procedures is provided. Subsequently the literature on key phenomena including hydrogen damage, stress corrosion cracking, and corrosion fatigue is reviewed. Critical factors for such phenomena will be highlighted. The review also presents an outlook for the topic.

  1. Corrosion risk assessment and comprehensive evaluation of ship sea water pipe systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Guangfu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to propose a comprehensive corrosion risk evaluation model based on an analysis of the corrosion risk of sea water pipe systems of ships in service,the modes of potential corrosion and their causes were first analyzed by identifying the origins of the inner and outer corrosion of the sea water pipe systems. In accordance with the matrixes of corrosion occurrence possibility and corrosion risk consequence,a corrosion risk matrix was established for a sea water pipe system. The method for the quantitative evaluation value of each mode of corrosion possibly occurring in a sea water pipe system was then presented. The comprehensive evaluation model of the corrosion was first built using the Analytical Hierarchy Process(AHP,which can be used for the comprehensive corrosion evaluation. The results show that the comprehensive evaluation value will be expressed as the corrosion risk level and corrosion-induced consequence of the sea water pipe system. This will be very useful for accurately protecting the sea water pipe systems of ships in service from corrosion,thereby attaining the goals of economy,rationality and timeliness.

  2. A Fracture Probability Competition Mechanism of Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanliang HUANG

    2001-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel was studied via polarization,slow strain rate and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. Many SCC mechanisms have been proposed in which hydrogen embrittlement and passive film rupture-repassivation theories are generally accepted, but they can hardly explain the SCC mechanism of austenitic stainless steel in acidic chloride solution adequately, because the steel is in active dissolution state and cathodic polarization can prevent it from occurring. Our experiment shows that the anodic current increases the creep rate and decreases the plastic strength of the material on single smooth specimen as well as at the SCC crack tip. The fractured surface was characterized as brittle cleavage, while the surface crack of smooth specimen was almost vertical to the tensile strength, which can confirm that the cracks were caused by tensile stresses. A fracture probability competition mechanism of SCC was proposed on the basis of the experimental results combined with the viewpoint of ductile-brittle fracture competition. When the anodic dissolution current is increased to a certain degree, the probability of fracture by tensile stress will exceed that by shear stress, and the brittle fracture will occur. The proposed SCC mechanism can not only explain the propagation of SCC cracks but can explain the crack initiation as well. The strain on the surface distributes unevenly when a smooth specimen is deformed, so does the anodic current distribution. The crack will initiate at a point where the anodic current density is large enough to cause the material at a specific point to fracture in brittle manner.

  3. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Im, Kyung Soo

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the

  4. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Im, Kyung Soo

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the

  5. Corrosion Evaluation of Aluminum Alloys in Deionized Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VORMELKER, PHILIPR.

    2004-09-24

    Spent nuclear fuels from foreign and domestic research and test reactors being returned to SRS are now stored with other nuclear materials in the L-basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Recent efforts have consolidated the fuel storage systems and L-basin has become the SRS site for water storage of spent nuclear fuels. Corrosion surveillance of coupons in this basin is being performed to provide assurance of safe storage of spent fuel. This paper describes the highlights of recent studies on these aluminum coupons after immersion for more than 7 years in L-basin. Selected coupons were metallurgically characterized to establish the existence of general corrosion and pitting. Pitting was observed on galvanically coupled samples and also on intentionally creviced coupons, thus demonstrating that localized concentration cells were formed during the exposure period. In these cases, the susceptibility to pitting was not attributed to aggressive basin water chemistry but to local condition s (crevices and galvanic coupling) that allowed the development of oxygen and/or metal ion concentration cells that produced locally aggressive waters. General corrosion was also observed on some of the coupons that had not been treated to enhance the protective oxide prior to exposure in the basin water. These observations demonstrate that, even when the basin water chemistry is rigorously controlled, localized aggressive conditions can develop. Although this demonstration does not suggest significant deterioration of the stored spent nuclear fuels, it does illustrate the potential for corrosion induced degradation and thus the importance of a routine surveillance program.

  6. Computer Simulation of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking via Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.W.

    2000-04-01

    Computer simulation has been applied to the investigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in Ni-based alloys based on a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism. The simulation employs computational modules that address (a) transport and reactions of aqueous species giving rise to hydrogen generation at the liquid-metal interface, (b) solid state transport of hydrogen via intergranular and transgranular diffusion pathways, and (c) fracture due to the embrittlement of metallic bonds by hydrogen. A key focus of the computational model development has been the role of materials microstructure (precipitate particles and grain boundaries) on hydrogen transport and embrittlement. Simulation results reveal that intergranular fracture is enhanced as grain boundaries are weakened and that microstructures with grains elongated perpendicular to the stress axis are more susceptible to cracking. The presence of intergranular precipitates may be expected to either enhance or impede cracking depending on the relative distribution of hydrogen between the grain boundaries and the precipitate-matrix interfaces. Calculations of hydrogen outgassing and in gassing demonstrate a strong effect of charging method on the fracture behavior.

  7. Report on Status of Shipment of High Fluence Austenitic Steel Samples for Characterization and Stress Corrosion Crack Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Leonard, Keith J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the Mechanisms of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) task in the LWRS Program is to conduct experimental research into understanding how multiple variables influence the crack initiation and crack growth in materials subjected to stress under corrosive conditions. This includes understanding the influences of alloy composition, radiation condition, water chemistry and metallurgical starting condition (i.e., previous cold work or heat treatments and the resulting microstructure) has on the behavior of materials. Testing involves crack initiation and growth testing on irradiated specimens of single-variable alloys in simulated Light Water Reactor (LWR) environments, tensile testing, hardness testing, microstructural and microchemical analysis, and detailed efforts to characterize localized deformation. Combined, these single-variable experiments will provide mechanistic understanding that can be used to identify key operational variables to mitigate or control IASCC, optimize inspection and maintenance schedules to the most susceptible materials/locations, and, in the long-term, design IASCC-resistant materials.

  8. Water Vapor Corrosion in EBC Constituent Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Benjamin; Fox, Dennis; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) materials are sought after to protect ceramic matrix composites (CMC) in high temperature turbine engines. CMCs are particularly susceptible to degradation from oxidation, Ca-Al-Mg-Silicate (CMAS), and water vapor during high temperature operation which necessitates the use of EBCs. However, the work presented here focuses on water vapor induced recession in EBC constituent materials. For example, in the presence of water vapor, silica will react to form Si(OH)4 (g) which will eventually corrode the material away. To investigate the recession rate in EBC constituent materials under high temperature water vapor conditions, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) is employed. The degradation process can then be modeled through a simple boundary layer expression. Ultimately, comparisons are made between various single- and poly-crystalline materials (e.g. TiO2, SiO2) against those found in literature.

  9. The mechanism of stress-corrosion cracking in 7075 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Various aspects of stress-corrosion cracking in 7075 aluminum alloy are discussed. A model is proposed in which the continuous anodic path along which the metal is preferentially attacked consists of two phases which alternate as anodes.

  10. The role of stress in self-ordered porous anodic oxide formation and corrosion of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capraz, Omer Ozgur

    The phenomenon of plastic flow induced by electrochemical reactions near room temperature is significant in porous anodic oxide (PAO) films, charging of lithium batteries and stress-corrosion cracking (SCC). As this phenomenon is poorly understood, fundamental insight into flow from our work may provide useful information for these problems. In-situ monitoring of the stress state allows direct correlation between stress and the current or potential, thus providing fundamental insight into technologically important deformation and failure mechanisms induced by electrochemical reactions. A phase-shifting curvature interferometry was designed to investigate the stress generation mechanisms on different systems. Resolution of our curvature interferometry was found to be ten times more powerful than that obtained by state-of-art multiple deflectometry technique and the curvature interferometry helps to resolve the conflicting reports in the literature. During this work, formation of surface patterns during both aqueous corrosion of aluminum and formation of PAO films were investigated. Interestingly, for both cases, stress induced plastic flow controls the formation of surface patterns. Pore formation mechanisms during anodizing of the porous aluminum oxide films was investigated . PAO films are formed by the electrochemical oxidation of metals such as aluminum and titanium in a solution where oxide is moderately soluble. They have been used extensively to design numerous devices for optical, catalytic, and biological and energy related applications, due to their vertically aligned-geometry, high-specific surface area and tunable geometry by adjusting process variables. These structures have developed empirically, in the absence of understanding the process mechanism. Previous experimental studies of anodizing-induced stress have extensively focused on the measurement of average stress, however the measurement of stress evolution during anodizing does not provide

  11. Factors Affecting Corrosion in Gulf of Finland Brackish Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Aromaa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Baltic Sea is a relatively shallow inland sea surrounded by the countries of North-Eastern Europe and Scandinavia. The brackish water in the Baltic Sea has low salt concentration and it is typically one-sixth of the ocean seawater. The “nominal” amount of dissolved solids, upon which formulae for artificial seawater are based, is about 34,500 ppm, of which most is sodium chloride. The major constituents are those whose concentrations are greater than 1 mg/L and are not greatly affected by biological processes. The ratio of concentrations of these ions and molecules to each other is relatively constant. Corrosion rates were determined in long-term tests in Gulf of Finland brackish water off Helsinki. The water temperature varies through the year from about 0°C in January to 15-16°C in June to August. Salinity is 4–6‰, highest at the end of summer and lowest when ice melts. pH is between 7.0 and 8.1. Weight loss tests from one- to four-year tests for steel, stainless steel, copper, aluminium, zinc, and galvanized steel are reported and compared to short term laboratory tests in artificial seawater. Tests for passivation rates and crevice corrosion for stainless steel are discussed in terms of environment variation. The effect of corrosion on strength of steel is also discussed.

  12. Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong

    Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, most waterside tube cracks are found near heavy attachment welds on the outer surface and are typically blunt, with multiple bulbous features indicating a discontinuous growth. These types of tube failures are typically referred to as stress assisted corrosion (SAC). For recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry, these failures are particularly important as any water leak inside the furnace can potentially lead to smelt-water explosion. Metal properties, environmental variables, and stress conditions are the major factors influencing SAC crack initation and propagation in carbon steel boiler tubes. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted under boiler water conditions to study the effect of temperature, oxygen level, and stress conditions on crack initation and propagation on SA-210 carbon steel samples machined out of boiler tubes. Heat treatments were also performed to develop various grain size and carbon content on carbon steel samples, and SSRTs were conducted on these samples to examine the effect of microstructure features on SAC cracking. Mechanisms of SAC crack initation and propagation were proposed and validated based on interrupted slow strain tests (ISSRT). Water chemistry guidelines are provided to prevent SAC and fracture mechanics model is developed to predict SAC failure on industrial boiler tubes.

  13. Stress corrosion failure of large diameter pressure pipelines of prestressed concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valiente, A. [Universidad Politecnico de Madrid (Spain). Dpto. de Ciencia de Materiales

    2001-07-01

    The failure of a 1.5 m diameter prestressed concrete line for water supply was examined. The water pressure opened a hole of 0.5 m{sup 2} in the pipe wall by breaking the concrete into fragments and by tensile severing of a number of coils of the wire winding. Flexural and tensile testing of samples of the broken materials showed no damage to the concrete, but showed significant losses of strength and ductility in the prestressing steel wire. The SEM analysis of the external and fracture surfaces of the circumferential wires revealed shallow cracking and corroded areas as expected from a stress corrosion cracking process. The failure analysis presented in this paper shows that such a process was able to exhaust the damage tolerance of the affected tube until the pipeline burst under the work pressures. (author)

  14. Influence of Tensile Stresses on α+β – Titanium Alloy VT22 Corrosion Resistance in Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Puchkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tensile stresses and hydrogen render strong influence on the titanic alloys propensity for delayed fracture. The protective film serves аs a barrier for penetration in hydrogen alloy. Therefore to study the stress effect on its structure and protective properties is of significant interest.The aim of this work is to research the tensile stress influence on the passivation, indexes of corrosion, protective film structure and reveal reasons for promoting hydrogenation and emerging propensity for delayed fracture of titanium alloy VТ22 in the marine air atmosphere.The fulfillеd research has shown that:- there is а tendency to reduce the passivation abilities of the alloy VТ22 in synthetic marine water (3 % solution of NaCl with increasing tensile stresses up to 1170 МPа, namely to reduce the potential of free corrosion and the rate of its сhange, thus the alloy remains absolutely (rather resistant;- the protective film consists of a titanium hydroxide layer under which there is the titanium oxide layer adjoining to the alloy, basically providing the corrosion protection.- the factors providing hydrogenation of titanium alloys and formation in their surface zone fragile hydrides, causing the appearing propensity for delayed fracture, alongside with tensile stresses are:- substances promoting chemisorbtion of hydrogen available in the alloy and on its surface;- the cathodic polarization caused by the coupling;- the presence of the structural defects promoting the formation of pitting and local аcidifying of the environment surrounding the alloy.

  15. Intercrystalline Stress Corrosion of Inconel 600 Inspection Tubes in the Aagesta Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenwall, B.; Ljungberg, L.; Huebner, W.; Stuart, W.

    1966-08-15

    Intercrystalline stress corrosion cracking has occurred in the Aagesta reactor in three so-called inspection tubes made of Inconel 600. The tubes had been exposed to 217 deg C light water, containing 1-4 ppm LiOH (later KOH) but only small amounts of oxygen, chloride and other impurities. Some of the circumferential cracks developed in or at crevices on the outside surface. At these positions constituents dissolved in the water may have concentrated. The crevices are likely to have contained a gas phase, mainly nitrogen. Local boiling in the crevices may also have occurred. Some few cracks were also found outside the crevice region. Irradiation effects can be neglected. No surface contamination could be detected except for a very minor fluoride content (1 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}). The failed tubes had been subjected to high stresses, partly remaining from milling, partly induced by welding operations. The possibility that stresses slightly above the 0.2 per cent offset yield strength have occurred at the operating temperature cannot be excluded. The cracked tube material contained a large amount of carbide particles and other precipitates, both at grain boundaries and in the interior of grains. The particles appeared as stringers in circumferential zones. Zones depleted in precipitates were found along grain boundaries. The failed tube turned out to have an unusually high mechanical strength, likely due to a combination of some kind of ageing process and cold work (1.0 - 1.3 per cent plastic strain). Laboratory exposures of stressed surplus material in high purity water and in 1 M LiOH at 220 deg C showed some pitting but no cracking after 6800 h and 5900 h respectively. Though the encountered failures may have developed because of influence of some few or several of the above-mentioned detrimental factors, the actual cause cannot be stated with certainty. In the literature information is given concerning intercrystalline stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 both in

  16. Synthetic seawater as stress-corrosion test medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    Seawater minimizes pitting corrosion of aluminum-alloy test samples. Of three corrosion-inhibiting methods evaluated using (a) chromate inhibitors in saltwater, (b) surface treating sample via anodizing or alodine treatment, and (c) synthetic seawater, synthetic seawater was most effective test medium, since it is more uniform than fresh seawater.

  17. Computational modeling of the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendales, E. D.; Orjuela, F. A.; Chamarraví, O.

    2016-02-01

    In this article theoretical models and some existing data sets were examined in order to model the two main causes (hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion-cracking under stress) of the called environmentally assisted cracking phenomenon (EAC). Additionally, a computer simulation of flat metal plate subject to mechanical stress and cracking due both to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion was developed. The computational simulation was oriented to evaluate the effect on the stress-strain behavior, elongation percent and the crack growth rate of AISI SAE 1040 steel due to three corrosive enviroments (H2 @ 0.06MPa; HCl, pH=1.0; HCl, pH=2.5). From the computer simulation we conclude that cracking due to internal corrosion of the material near to the crack tip limits affects more the residual strength of the flat plate than hydrogen embrittlement and generates a failure condition almost imminent of the mechanical structural element.

  18. Tensile stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to very high dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.

    2001-09-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20--100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. The data bases and mechanistic understanding of, the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high dose, i.e., is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-commotion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-11 reactor after irradiation to {approximately}50 dpa at {approximately}370 C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microcopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at low ECP, and this susceptibility led to poor work-hardening capability and low ductility.

  19. Modeling of Stress Corrosion Cracking for High Level Radioactive-Waste Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, S C; Gordon, G M; Andresen, P L; Herrera, M L

    2003-06-20

    A stress corrosion cracking (SCC) model has been adapted for performance prediction of high level radioactive-waste packages to be emplaced in the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive-waste repository. SCC is one form of environmentally assisted cracking due to three factors, which must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. For waste packages of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository, the outer barrier material is Alloy 22, a highly corrosion resistant alloy, the environment is represented by the water film present on the surface of the waste package from dripping or deliquescence of soluble salts present in any surface deposits, and the stress is principally the weld induced residual stress. SCC has historically been separated into ''initiation'' and ''propagation'' phases. Initiation of SCC will not occur on a smooth surface if the surface stress is below a threshold value defined as the threshold stress. Cracks can also initiate at and propagate from flaws (or defects) resulting from manufacturing processes (such as welding). To account for crack propagation, the slip dissolution/film rupture (SDFR) model is adopted to provide mathematical formulas for prediction of the crack growth rate. Once the crack growth rate at an initiated SCC is determined, the time to through-wall penetration for the waste package can be calculated. The SDFR model relates the advance (or propagation) of cracks, subsequent to the crack initiation from bare metal surface, to the metal oxidation transients that occur when the protective film at the crack tip is continually ruptured and repassivated. A crack, however, may reach the ''arrest'' state before it enters the ''propagation'' phase. There exists a threshold stress intensity factor, which provides a criterion for determining if an initiated crack or pre

  20. Localized corrosion of LY12CZ under stress in chloride media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAO Si-xian; ZHANG Zheng; ZHU Li-qun; ZHONG Qun-peng

    2006-01-01

    Electrochemical methods were applied to investigate the corrosion behaviour of LY12CZ under applied stress in 3% sodium chloride aqueous solution. The experimental results indicate that LY12CZ shows two breakdown potentials on its polarization curve: one is related to the dissolution of the intermetallic particles and the other is related to the cracking of oxidation film and the dissolution of the matrix. When the stress is applied, it varies both breakdown potentials and makes the intermetallic particles and matrix dissolute at lower potentials. The relationship between the variation of the two breakdown potentials and applied stress was summarized. At the same time the influence of stress on the pitting and intergranular corrosion sensitivity of LY12CZ was also investigated. From the results it can be concluded that the stress can significantly affect the localized corrosion behaviour of LY12CZ in 3% NaCl solution.

  1. Effects of laser heat treatment on the fracture morphologies of X80 pipeline steel welded joints by stress corrosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-jun Kong; Cun-dong Ye

    2014-01-01

    The surfaces of X80 pipeline steel welded joints were processed with a CO2 laser, and the effects of laser heat treatment (LHT) on H2S stress corrosion in the National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) solution were analyzed by a slow strain rate test. The frac-ture morphologies and chemical components of corrosive products before and after LHT were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy, respectively, and the mechanism of LHT on stress corrosion cracking was discussed. Results showed that the fracture for welded joints was brittle in its original state, while it was transformed to a ductile fracture after LHT. The tendencies of hydro-gen-induced corrosion were reduced, and the stress corrosion sensitivity index decreased from 35.2%to 25.3%, indicating that the stress corrosion resistance of X80 pipeline steel welded joints has been improved by LHT.

  2. Corrosion induced clogging and plugging in water-cooled generator cooling circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, B.G.; Hwang, I.S. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, I.H. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Soonchunhyang Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K.T.; Chung, H.S. [Korea Electric Power Research Inst. (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Water-cooled electrical generators have been experienced corrosion-related problems that are restriction of flow through water strainers caused by collection of excessive amounts of copper corrosion products (''clogging''), and restriction of flow through the copper strands in the stator bars caused by growth or deposition of corrosion products on the walls of the hollow strands (''plugging''). These phenomena result in unscheduled shutdowns that would be a major concern because of the associated loss in generating capacity. Water-cooled generators are operated in one of two modes. They are cooled either with aerated water (dissolved oxygen >2 ppm) or with deaerated water (dissolved oxygen <50 ppb). Both modes maintain corrosion rates at satisfactorily low levels as long as the correct oxygen concentrations are maintained. However, it is generally believed that very much higher copper corrosion rates result at the intermediate oxygen concentrations of 100-1000 ppb. Clogging and plugging are thought to be associated with these intermediate concentrations, and many operators have suggested that the period of change from high-to-low or from low-to-high oxygen concentration is particularly damaging. In order to understand the detailed mechanism(s) of the copper oxide formation, release and deposition and to identify susceptible conditions in the domain of operating variables, a large-scale experiments are conducted using six hollow strands of full length connected with physico-chemically scaled generator cooling water circuit. To ensure a close simulation of thermal-hydraulic conditions in a generator stator, strands of the loop will be ohmically heated using AC power supply. Experiments is conducted to cover oxygen excursions in both high dissolved oxygen and low dissolved oxygen conditions that correspond to two representative operating condition at fields. A thermal upset condition is also simulated to examine the impact of

  3. The Application of Electrochemical and Surface Analysis Approaches to Studying Copper Corrosion in Water: Fundamentals, Limitations, and Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrosion control is a concern for many drinking water utilities. The Lead and Copper Rule established a regulatory need to maintain a corrosion control program. Other corrosion-related issues such as “red” water resulting from excessive iron corrosion and copper pinhole leaks ...

  4. Propagation of stress corrosion cracks in alpha-brasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beggs, Dennis Vinton [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Transgranular and intergranular stress corrosion cracks were investigated in alpha-brasses in a tarnishing ammoniacal solution. Surface observation indicated that the transgranular cracks propagated discontinuously by the sudden appearance of a fine crack extending several microns ahead of the previous crack tip, often associated with the detection of a discrete acoustic emission (AE). By periodically increasing the deflection, crack front markings were produced on the resulting fracture surfaces, showing that the discontinuous propagation of the crack trace was representative of the subsurface cracking. The intergranular crack trace appeared to propagate continuously at a relatively blunt crack tip and was not associated with discrete AE. Under load pulsing tests with a time between pulses, Δt greater than or equal to 3 s, the transgranular fracture surfaces always exhibited crack front markings which corresponded with the applied pulses. The spacing between crack front markings, Δx, decreased linearly with Δt. With Δt less than or equal to 1.5 s, the crack front markings were in a one-to-one correspondence with applied pulses only at relatively long crack lengths. In this case, Δx = Δx* which approached a limiting value of 1 μm. No crack front markings were observed on intergranular fracture surfaces produced during these tests. It is concluded that transgranular cracking occurs by discontinuous mechanical fracture of an embrittled region around the crack tip, while intergranular cracking results from a different mechanism with cracking occurring via the film-rupture mechanism.

  5. Standard practice for preparation and use of Bent-Beam stress-corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing, preparing, and using bent-beam stress-corrosion specimens. 1.2 Different specimen configurations are given for use with different product forms, such as sheet or plate. This practice applicable to specimens of any metal that are stressed to levels less than the elastic limit of the material, and therefore, the applied stress can be accurately calculated or measured (see Note 1). Stress calculations by this practice are not applicable to plastically stressed specimens. Note 1—It is the nature of these practices that only the applied stress can be calculated. Since stress-corrosion cracking is a function of the total stress, for critical applications and proper interpretation of results, the residual stress (before applying external stress) or the total elastic stress (after applying external stress) should be determined by appropriate nondestructive methods, such as X-ray diffraction (1). 1.3 Test procedures are given for stress-corrosion testing by ex...

  6. Stress corrosion of unalloyed steels in geological storage conditions; Corrosion sous contrainte des aciers non allies dans les conditions du stockage geologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didot, A.; Herms, E.; Bataillon, C.; Chene, J. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME/LECA), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Crusset, D. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2007-07-01

    The concept retained for high level and years living radioactive waste disposal is the underground storage. It is then necessary to know the behaviour in time (about 10000 years) of the different constituent elements of the containment. The storage site chosen is the Bures' ones, presenting a clay formation at 600 m of depth. Each compartment is separated of a sufficient distance in order to profit of the thermal dispersion effect in the rock for optimizing the cooling of the package. In this work, has been used an unalloyed steel sur-container. The aim is to understand the resistance of the material under corrosion and loading, and particularly the stress corrosion which is a particular case of cracking assisted by environment. The material studied is a weld of two unalloyed steels obtained by electron beam. Slow traction tests have been carried out in an autoclave in the following experimental conditions: interstitial water in equilibrium with a helium-CO{sub 2} mixture 5.4 per thousand under 50 bar and at a temperature of 90 C. The results show an influence of the hydrogen corrosion on the mechanical behaviour of the material and particularly a decrease of the size of the reduction in area, which is practically unexisting in the case of the melted zone. These results are explained into details. (O.M.)

  7. A Review of Evidence for Corrosion of Copper by water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apted, Michael J. (Monitor Scientific LLC (United Kingdom)); Bennett, David G. (TerraSalus Limited (United Kingdom)); Saario, Timo (VTT Materials and Building (Finland))

    2009-09-15

    The planned spent nuclear fuel repository in Sweden relies on a copper cast iron canister as the primary engineered barrier. The corrosion behaviour of copper in the expected environment needs to be thoroughly understood as a basis for the post-closure safety analysis. It has been shown that corrosion may indeed be the primary canister degradation process during the utilised assessment period of 1 million years (this period is the longest time for which risk calculations will be needed according guidelines issued by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority). Previous analysis work has been based on that copper is corroded during the initial oxic environment as well as by sulphide in groundwater once reducing conditions have been restored. The quantitative analyses of these processes consider upper-bound amounts of atmospheric oxidation as well as representative sulphide concentrations coupled with the transport limitation of the bentonite buffer and of the surrounding bedrock. A group of researchers at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden suggest, based on published experimental results, that disposed canisters will also be corroded by water itself under hydrogen evolution. The purpose of the project is to evaluate the findings of the KTH research group based on an assessment of their experimental methods and chemical analysis work, thermodynamic models, and a discussion of reaction mechanisms as well as comparison with the analogue behaviour of native copper. As a background, the authors also provide a brief overview of other corrosion processes and safety assessment significance. The authors conclude that the KTH researchers have not convincingly demonstrated that copper will indeed be corroded by pure water and that it is in any case very unlikely that this process will be dominant under the reducing chemical conditions that are expected in the repository environment. How-ever, the authors do not completely rule out that copper may corrode

  8. The influence of molybdenum on stress corrosion in Ultra Low Carbon Steels with copper addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazur

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of molybdenum content on the process of stress corrosion of ultra-low carbon structural steels with the addition of copper HSLA (High Strength Low Alloy was analyzed. The study was conducted for steels after heat treatment consisting of quenching andfollowing tempering at 600°C and it was obtained microstructure of the tempered martensite laths with copper precipitates and the phaseLaves Fe2Mo type. It was found strong influence of Laves phase precipitate on the grain boundaries of retained austenite on rate anddevelopment of stress corrosion processes. The lowest corrosion resistance was obtained for W3 steel characterized by high contents ofmolybdenum (2.94% Mo which should be connected with the intensity precipitate processes of Fe2Mo phase. For steels W1 and W2which contents molybdenum equals 1.02% and 1.88%, respectively were obtained similar courses of corrosive cracking.

  9. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of steam turbine materials for geothermal power plants in simulated geothermal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Haofeng [Shinshu Univ. (Japan). Graduate School; Niu Libin; Oishi, Shuji [Shinshu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Takaku, Hiroshi [Shinshu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Naigai Chemical Products Co. (Japan); Shiokawa, Kunio; Yamashita, Mitsuo; Sakai, Yoshihiro [Fuji Electric Advanced Technology Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    2007-08-15

    In order to evaluate the influence of chloride, sulfate and carbon dioxide in water on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of geothermal steam turbine materials, measurements of the anodic polarization and the pitting corrosion potential were conducted in simulated geothermal waters. The corrosion resistance of all materials tested was lowered by an increasing carbon dioxide content in the simulated geothermal waters. Higher chloride concentrations in the waters induced lower corrosion resistance and also lower pitting corrosion potentials for materials with higher chromium contents, suggesting the corrosion behavior was mainly controlled by the chromium content of the materials. The corrosion resistance of 9CrMoV and 13Cr steels was also influenced by the concentration of sulfate in the water. The improved heat-treated 16Cr-4Ni material for turbine blades showed excellent corrosion resistance. In the presence of sulfate, the corrosion reactions are mitigated due to a decreasing concentration of chloride (due to the presence of sulfate) in corrosion pits. (orig.)

  10. Boiler corrosion. Corrosion of boilers at low boiler water temperatures. Heizkessel-Korrosion. Korrosion von Heizkesseln bei tiefen Kesselwassertemperaturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koebel, M.; Elsener, M.

    1989-02-01

    Thermostatic cast iron and steel 35.8 specimens were inserted between the fire tubes of a test boiler and exposed to flue gases for a period of three weeks. The corrosion rates at material temperatures between 20 and 60deg C as well as the effects of continuous and intermittent boiler operation were determined. Details are given on the specimens alloying constituents, the testing and test conditions (schematic representation of the experimental set-up). Diagrams and tables facilitate access to test results informing about corrosion rates and corrosion product structure analyses for continuous burner operation. While low boiler water temperatures (below 60deg C in the case of extra light heating oils) are found to necessarily involve higher risks and shorter boiler service lives, low flue gas temperatures alone are considered not to be increasing the risk of boiler corrosion. (HWJ).

  11. Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Metallic Materials. Part III. Hydrogen Entry and Embrittlement in Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    Strength Steels," Stress Corrosion Cracking in High-Strength Steels and in Titanium and Altuninum Alloys, Naval Rasearch Laboratory, Washington, D.C...to pickling solutions. In all of these examples, the sulfide, cyanide, etc., caused a hydrogen-related problem that would not have existed in their...desorption reaction. In studying the pickling of low-carbon steel in various strong acids, Hudson’ 4 measured the corrosion rate and amount of hydr-ogen

  12. Laser Peening for Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking at Welds in Marine Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Second Reader: Joseph C. Farmer THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden...Advisor Joseph C. Farmer Second Reader Knox Millsaps Chair, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering iv THIS PAGE...Cruisers, in Defense News2010. p. 4. [4] K. N. Tran, M. R. Hill, et al., Welding Journal, 85 (2006) 28. [5] M. G. Fontana , Stress Corrosion, in Corrosion

  13. Corrosion problems and solutions in oil refining and petrochemical industry

    CERN Document Server

    Groysman, Alec

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses corrosion problems and their solutions at facilities in the oil refining and petrochemical industry, including cooling water and boiler feed water units. Further, it describes and analyzes corrosion control actions, corrosion monitoring, and corrosion management. Corrosion problems are a perennial issue in the oil refining and petrochemical industry, as they lead to a deterioration of the functional properties of metallic equipment and harm the environment – both of which need to be protected for the sake of current and future generations. Accordingly, this book examines and analyzes typical and atypical corrosion failure cases and their prevention at refineries and petrochemical facilities, including problems with: pipelines, tanks, furnaces, distillation columns, absorbers, heat exchangers, and pumps. In addition, it describes naphthenic acid corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen damages, sulfidic corrosion, microbiologically induced corrosion, erosion-corrosion, and corrosion...

  14. Corrosion behavior of F82H exposed to high temperature pressurized water with a rotating apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, A.; Kasada, R.; Nakajima, M.; Hirose, T.; Tanigawa, H.; Enoeda, M.; Konishi, S.

    2014-12-01

    The present study reports the corrosion behavior of a reduced-activation ferritic martensitic steel F82H exposed to high temperature pressurized water for 28 and 100 h using a rotating disk apparatus at rotation speeds of 500 and 1000 rpm at a temperature of 573 K under a water pressure of 15 MPa with corrosion and/or flow-accelerated corrosion of F82H under the rotating condition.

  15. Corrosion Control of Alloy 690 by Shot Peening and Electropolishing under Simulated Primary Water Condition of PWRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Mo Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work clarifies the effect of surface modifications on the corrosion rate of Alloy 690, a nickel-based alloy for steam generator tubes, under the simulated test conditions of the primary water chemistry in nuclear power plants. The surface stress was modified by the shot peening and electropolishing methods. The shot peening treatment was applied using ceramic beads with different intensities by varying the air pressure and projection angle. The corrosion rate was evaluated by gravimetric analysis and the surface was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The corrosion rate of Alloy 690 was evaluated from the influence of the stress state on the metal surface. Based on the observation of the surface after the corrosion test, the oxide composition and its structure were affected by the surface modifications. The corrosion behavior of Alloy 690 was distinguished by the shot peening intensity on the surface, and additional electropolishing was effective at reducing the dissolution of nickel ions from the metal surface.

  16. Characterization of corrosion scale formed on stainless steel delivery pipe for reclaimed water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Liu, Shuming; Smith, Kate; Yu, Kanghua; Hu, Hongying; Jiang, Wei; Li, Yuhong

    2016-01-01

    To reveal corrosion behavior of stainless steel delivery pipe used in reclaimed water treatment, this research focused on the morphological, mineralogical and chemical characteristics of stainless steel corrosion scale and corroded passive film. Corrosion scale and coupon samples were taken from a type 304 pipe delivering reclaimed water to a clear well in service for more than 12 years. Stainless steel corrosion scales and four representative pipe coupons were investigated using mineralogy and material science research methods. The results showed corrosion scale was predominantly composed of goethite, lepidocrocite, hematite, magnetite, ferrous oxide, siderite, chrome green and chromite, the same as that of corroded pipe coupons. Hence, corrosion scale can be identified as podiform chromite deposit. The loss of chromium in passive film is a critical phenomenon when stainless steel passive film is damaged by localized corrosion. This may provide key insights toward improving a better comprehension of the formation of stainless steel corrosion scale and the process of localized corrosion. The localized corrosion behavior of stainless steel is directly connected with reclaimed water quality parameters such as residual chlorine, DO, Cl(-) and SO4(2-). In particular, when a certain amount of residual chlorine in reclaimed water is present as an oxidant, ferric iron is the main chemical state of iron minerals.

  17. Passive Films, Surface Structure and Stress Corrosion and Crevice Corrosion Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    chelating inhibitor Introduction and its chemical nature can affect its performance in retarding coatinq failure. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author would like to...distinguer entre 1’ apparition de rugosite’ et la croissance d’un film ou la dissolution, enfin d’etudier le processus de corrosion se produlsant sur des

  18. The corrosion behavior of hafnium in high-temperature-water environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rishel, D.M.; Smee, J.D.; Kammenzind, B.F.

    1999-10-01

    The high-temperature-water corrosion performance of hafnium is evaluated. Corrosion kinetic data are used to develop correlations that are a function of time and temperature. The evaluation is based on corrosion tests conducted in out-of-pile autoclaves and in out-of-flux locations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at temperatures ranging from 288 to 360 C. Similar to the corrosion behavior of unalloyed zirconium, the high-temperature-water corrosion response of hafnium exhibits three corrosion regimes: pretransition, posttransition, and spalling. In the pretransition regime, cubic corrosion kinetics are exhibited, whereas in the posttransition regime, linear corrosion kinetics are exhibited. Because of the scatter in the spalling regime data, it is not reasonable to use a best fit of the data to describe spalling regime corrosion. Data also show that neutron irradiation does not alter the corrosion performance of hafnium. Finally, the data illustrate that the corrosion rate of hafnium is significantly less than that of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4.

  19. Unexpected corrosion of stainless steel in low chloride waters – microbial aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Carpén, Leena; Møller, Per

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Stainless steels EN 1.4301 and 1.4401/1.4404 are normally considered corrosion resistant in low chloride natural waters like drinking water. However, a number of corrosion failures have been observed in e.g. fire extinguisher systems and drinking water installations, where stagnant...... in drinking water qualities, due to the formation of a biofilm. In itself, this is not enough to initiate pitting in these water qualities, but combined with a geometrically or metallurgically vulnerable area, corrosion may accelerate. The mechanism is linked to the naturally occurring microbial activity...... conditions or periods of low water consumption have occurred prior to the failure. Typically the corrosion attacks appear within 2-3 years in weld nuggets, heat affected zones or in crevices like e.g. press fitting pipe connections. The failure mode is pitting and crevice corrosion leading to leaks and rust...

  20. Study of biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiya; Tian, Yimei; Wan, Jianmei; Zhao, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water was systemically studied using the weight loss method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results demonstrated that compared to sterile water, the existence of the biofilm in reclaimed water promoted the corrosion process significantly. The characteristics of biofilm on cast iron coupons were examined by the surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The bacterial counts in the biofilm were determined using the standard plate count method and the most probable number (MPN). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process was influenced by the settled bacteria, EPS, and corrosion products in the biofilm comprehensively. But, the corrosion mechanisms were different with respect to time and could be divided into three stages in our study. Furthermore, several corresponding corrosion mechanisms were proposed for different immersion times.

  1. Assessing corrosion problems in photovoltaic cells via electrochemical stress testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, H.

    1985-01-01

    A series of accelerated electrochemical experiments to study the degradation properties of polyvinylbutyral-encapsulated silicon solar cells has been carried out. The cells' electrical performance with silk screen-silver and nickel-solder contacts was evaluated. The degradation mechanism was shown to be electrochemical corrosion of the cell contacts; metallization elements migrate into the encapsulating material, which acts as an ionic conducting medium. The corrosion products form a conductive path which results in a gradual loss of the insulation characteristics of the encapsulant. The precipitation of corrosion products in the encapsulant also contributes to its discoloration which in turn leads to a reduction in its transparency and the consequent optical loss. Delamination of the encapsulating layers could be attributed to electrochemical gas evolution reactions. The usefulness of the testing technique in qualitatively establishing a reliability difference between metallizations and antireflection coating types is demonstrated.

  2. Effect of proton irradiation on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Ok; Hwang, Mi Jin; Kim, Sung Woo; Hwang, Seong Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) involves the cracking and failure of materials under irradiation environment in nuclear power plant water environment. The major factors and processes governing an IASCC are suggested by others. The IASCC of the reactor core internals due to the material degradation and the water chemistry change has been reported in high stress stainless steel components, such as fuel elements (Boiling Water Reactors) in the 1960s, a control rod in the 1970s, and a baffle former bolt in recent years of light water reactors (Pressurized Water Reactors). Many irradiated stainless steels that are resistant to inergranular cracking in 288 .deg. C argon are susceptible to IG cracking in the simulated BWR environment at the same temperature. Under the circumstances, a lot works have been performed on IASCC in BWR. Recent efforts have been devoted to investigate an IASCC in a PWR, but the mechanism in a PWR is not fully understood yet as compared with that in a BWR owing to a lack of data from laboratories and fields. Therefore, it is strongly necessary to review and analyze recent researches of an IASCC in both BWR and PWR for establishing a proactive management technology for the IASCC of core internals in Korean PWRs. The objective of this research to find IASCC behavior of proton irradiated 316 stainless steels in a high-temperature water chemistry environment. The IASCC initiation susceptibility on 1, 3, 5 DPA proton irradiated 316 austenite stainless steel was evaluated in PWR environment. SCC area ratio on the fracture surface was similar regardless of irradiation level. Total crack length on the irradiated surface increases in order of specimen 1, 3, 5 DPA. The total crack length at the side surface is a better measure in evaluating IASCC initiation susceptibility for proton-irradiated samples.

  3. A Comprehensive Investigation of Copper Pitting Corrosion in a Drinking Water Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copper pipe pitting is a complicated corrosion process for which exact causes and solutions are uncertain. This paper presents the findings of a comprehensive investigation of a cold water copper pitting corrosion problem in a drinking water distribution system, including a refi...

  4. Corrosion behavior of Hastelloy C-276 in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Qiang [National Key Laboratory for Nuclear Fuel and Materials, Nuclear Power Institute of China, P.O. Box 436, Chendu 610041 (China); Tang Rui [National Key Laboratory for Nuclear Fuel and Materials, Nuclear Power Institute of China, P.O. Box 436, Chendu 610041 (China)], E-mail: xajttr@163.com; Yin Kaiju; Luo Xin [National Key Laboratory for Nuclear Fuel and Materials, Nuclear Power Institute of China, P.O. Box 436, Chendu 610041 (China); Zhang Lefu [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2009-09-15

    The corrosion behavior of a nickel-based alloy Hastelloy C-276 exposed in supercritical water at 500-600 deg. C/25 MPa was investigated by means of gravimetry, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. An oxide scale with dual-layer structure, mainly consisting of an outer NiO layer and an inner Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}-mixed layer, developed on C-276 after 1000 h exposure. Higher temperature promoted oxidation, resulting in thicker oxide scale, larger weight gain and stronger tendency of oxide spallation. The oxide growth mechanism in SCW seems to be similar to that in high temperature water vapor, namely solid-state growth mechanism.

  5. Sea water corrosion behavior of plasma sprayed abradable coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, M.; Nanda, S. P.; Mishra, S. C.

    2017-02-01

    Aluminum based abradable coating is used for sealing purpose in compressor casing of aero engines to withstand up to a service temperature of 450°C. Al-BNSiO2 composite coating is deposited using thermal plasma spray technique. Coating thickness measured and porosity of the coating is evaluated.Coating morphology is observed and EDSanalysis is done with SEM (Jeol make). The effect of time on the sea water corrosion behavior of the coating is evaluated. It is observed that, there is a sharp increase in weight gain of the coating up to six weeks of immersion. This behavior is attributed to the adsorption/deposition of other elements/reactions taking place during interaction with sea water.

  6. The resistance of high frequency inductive welded pipe to grooving corrosion in salt water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, C.; Triess, E.; Herbsleb, G.

    1986-09-01

    When exposed to neutral, salt-containing waters, electric resistant welded pipe in carbon and low alloy steels with increased sulfur contents may suffer preferential corrosion attack in the weld area. Because of its appearance, this type of corrosion is called grooving corrosion. The susceptibility to grooving corrosion may be determined and quantitatively described by means of an accelerated potentiostatic exposure test. The importance of type, concentration, and temperature of the electrolytic solution; potential; test duration; and the sulfur content of the steel in the accelerated corrosion test and the susceptibility of steels to grooving corrosion are described. Line pipe in high frequency inductive (HFI) welded carbon and low alloy steels are resistant to grooving corrosion particularly because of their low sulfur content.

  7. Corrosion and Scaling Potential in Drinking Water Distribution of Babol, Northern Iran Based on the Scaling and Corrosion Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoliman Amouei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Corrosion and scaling play undesirable effects on transmission and distribution system of drinking water. The aim of this study was to assess the corrosion and scaling potential of drinking water resources in Babol city, Iran. Materials and Methods: Totally, 54 water samples were collected from 27 wells in spring and autumn. Calcium hardness, pH, total alkalinity, total dissolved solids, and temperature were measured, using standard methods. The Langelier, Rayzner, Puckhorius, Larson and aggressive indices were calculated and data were analyzed by SPSS 19. To compare the mean values of each index, the results were analyzed using t-test. Results: The range of temperature, pH, TDS, total alkalinity and calcium hardness were 16-24°c; 6.8-7.89; 445-1331 mg/l; 322.9-396 mg/l and 250.50-490 mg/l, respectively. The mean of Langelier and Ryznar indices in drinking water samples in spring and autumn was 0.14, 0.15; 7.28 and 7.35, respectively. The mean of Puckhorius and Larson indices in these seasons was 11.9, 11.95 and 0.95 and 0.93, respectively. The mean of aggressive index was 6.17 and 6.27, respectively. Overall, 82.2%, 100%, 94.6%, 100% and 85.7% of water samples were corrosive based on the Langelier, Ryznar, Puckhorius, Larson and aggressive indices, respectively. Conclusion: According to these results, drinking water of Babol city has corrosion potential. Therefore, the water quality should be controlled based on pH, alkalinity and hardness parameters, along with the use of corrosion resisting materials and pipes in drinking water distribution systems.

  8. Erosion-Corrosion Behavior of Power Plant Pipe Caused by Hot Feed Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Sungho; Lee, Jinwon; Kim, Taewon [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    In this study, we tried to define the erosion-corrosion behavior together with the resulting effects on a pipe that is a part of a feed water circulation system according to the pipe size and hot feed water environment. An erosion corrosion analysis was performed through the Hayduk and Minas model based on the chemical reaction between iron and oxygen, an essential corrosive factor. The erosion-corrosion rate against the pipe diameter and feed water temperature was then evaluated by means of finite element analysis using Abacus. As shown in the results, the feed water temperature was the main factor influencing the erosion-corrosion rate; in particular, it was expected that the thickness of 316 stainless steel would decrease by 2.59 {mu}m every year in a hot water environment at 290 .deg. C.

  9. Simulation of Deposition the Corrosion Waste in a Water Distribution System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peráčková Jana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In water distribution systems can be found particles of rust and other mechanical contaminants. The particles are deposited in locations where the low velocity of water flow. Where a can cause the pitting corrosion. Is a concern in the systems made of galvanized steel pipes. The contribution deals with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations of water flow and particles deposition in water distribution system. CFD Simulations were compared with the corrosive deposits in real pipeline. Corrosion is a spontaneous process of destruction of metal material due to electrochemical reactions of metal with the aggressive surrounding. Electrochemical corrosion is caused by the thermodynamic instability of metal and therefore can not be completely suppress, it can only influence the speed of corrosion. The requirement is to keep metal properties during the whole its lifetime. Requested service lifetime the water pipe according to EN 806-2 is 50 years.

  10. Probabilistic modeling of the corrosion of steel structures in marine water-development works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekker, A. T.; Lyubimov, V. S.; Kovalenko, R. G.; Aleksandrov, A. V.

    2011-09-15

    Considering that corrosion takes place as a random process over time, a a probabilistic approach was utilized in this paper. The corrosion of metallic sheet piling employed in the fascia wall of a bulwerk is considered as an example. A stochastic model is constructed on the base of a modified Weibull distribution function with consideration of parameters of the corrosion process as a function of time. One of the factors defining the corrosion rate of the sheet piling is the degree of access of a section of the wall to the zone of variable water level, or the underwater zone. The type of corrosion-continuous or local-is another factor. The accuracy of corrosion prediction in the underwater zone is higher than that in the zone of variable water level.

  11. Hydroxyl carboxylate based non-phosphorus corrosion inhibition process for reclaimed water pipeline and downstream recirculating cooling water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Dong; Hou, Deyin

    2016-01-01

    A combined process was developed to inhibit the corrosion both in the pipeline of reclaimed water supplies (PRWS) and in downstream recirculating cooling water systems (RCWS) using the reclaimed water as makeup. Hydroxyl carboxylate-based corrosion inhibitors (e.g., gluconate, citrate, tartrate) and zinc sulfate heptahydrate, which provided Zn(2+) as a synergistic corrosion inhibition additive, were added prior to the PRWS when the phosphate (which could be utilized as a corrosion inhibitor) content in the reclaimed water was below 1.7 mg/L, and no additional corrosion inhibitors were required for the downstream RCWS. Satisfactory corrosion inhibition was achieved even if the RCWS was operated under the condition of high numbers of concentration cycles. The corrosion inhibition requirement was also met by the appropriate combination of PO4(3-) and Zn(2+) when the phosphate content in the reclaimed water was more than 1.7 mg/L. The process integrated not only water reclamation and reuse, and the operation of a highly concentrated RCWS, but also the comprehensive utilization of phosphate in reclaimed water and the application of non-phosphorus corrosion inhibitors. The proposed process reduced the operating cost of the PRWS and the RCWS, and lowered the environmental hazard caused by the excessive discharge of phosphate. Furthermore, larger amounts of water resources could be conserved as a result.

  12. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? (a) Definition. Stress..., appendix A3, and remediate the threat in accordance with ASME/ANSI B31.8S, appendix A3, section A3.4....

  13. Corrosion of V and V-base alloys in high-temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purdy, I.M.; Toben, P.T.; Kassner, T.F. [Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Corrosion of nonalloyed V, V-5Cr-5Ti, and V-15Cr-5Ti were conducted in high-purity deoxygenated water at 230{degrees}C for up to {approx}4500h. The effects of Cr concentration in the alloy and temperature on the corrosion behavior were determined from weight-change measurements and microstructural observations. An expression was obtained for the kinetics of corrosion as a function of Cr content of the alloy and temperature.

  14. Standard Practice for Making and Using U-Bend Stress-Corrosion Test Specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for making and using U-bend specimens for the evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking in metals. The U-bend specimen is generally a rectangular strip which is bent 180° around a predetermined radius and maintained in this constant strain condition during the stress-corrosion test. Bends slightly less than or greater than 180° are sometimes used. Typical U-bend configurations showing several different methods of maintaining the applied stress are shown in Fig. 1. 1.2 U-bend specimens usually contain both elastic and plastic strain. In some cases (for example, very thin sheet or small diameter wire) it is possible to form a U-bend and produce only elastic strain. However, bent-beam (Practice G 39 or direct tension (Practice G 49)) specimens are normally used to study stress-corrosion cracking of strip or sheet under elastic strain only. 1.3 This practice is concerned only with the test specimen and not the environmental aspects of stress-corrosion testing which are discus...

  15. Corrosion Behavior of the Stressed Sensitized Austenitic Stainless Steels of High Nitrogen Content in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Almubarak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of high nitrogen content on corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in seawater under severe conditions such as tensile stresses and existence of sensitization in the structure. A constant tensile stress has been applied to sensitized specimens types 304, 316L, 304LN, 304NH, and 316NH stainless steels. Microstructure investigation revealed various degrees of stress corrosion cracking. SCC was severe in type 304, moderate in types 316L and 304LN, and very slight in types 304NH and 316NH. The electrochemical polarization curves showed an obvious second current peak for the sensitized alloys which indicated the existence of second phase in the structure and the presence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. EPR test provided a rapid and efficient nondestructive testing method for showing passivity, degree of sensitization and determining IGSCC for stainless steels in seawater. A significant conclusion was obtained that austenitic stainless steels of high nitrogen content corrode at a much slower rate increase pitting resistance and offer an excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking in seawater.

  16. Evaluation of oxygen corrosion in waterflood and disposal water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conger, H.C.

    1967-01-01

    The case histories presented illustrate how specially polished pipe nipples have been used and examined in the field to evaluate the seriousness of an oxygen corrosion problem. The case histories also illustrate how these test pipe nipples have been used to evaluate actual, not relative, effectiveness of a chemical treatment program to control oxygen corrosion. Data are presented and discussed showing the relationship between corrosion rates of test pipe nipples and actual in-service equipment. The case histories show how corrosion rates based on pipe test nipple data were used to project equipment life under no chemical treatment vs. chemical treatment. A comparative study of corrosion rates between the use of pipe nipples and coupons as a means of measuring oxygen corrosion is discussed. A further comparative study is made between coupon corrosion rates based on weight loss and pit depth penetration.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 using the constant strain rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulischeck, T. S.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-01-01

    The most recent corrosion problems experienced in nuclear steam generators tubed with Inconel alloy 600 is a phenomenon labeled ''denting''. Denting has been found in various degrees of severity in many operating pressurized water reactors. Laboratory investigations have shown that Inconel 600 exhibits intergranular SCC when subjected to high stresses and exposed to deoxygenated water at elevated temperatures. A research project was initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory in an attempt to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of factors influencing SCC in high temperature service-related environments. An effort is also being made to develop an accelerated test method which could be used to predict the service life of tubes which have been deformed or are actively denting. Several heats of commercial Inconel 600 tubing were procured for testing in deaerated pure and primary water at temperatures from 290 to 365/sup 0/C. U-bend type specimens were used to determine crack initiation times which may be expected for tubes where denting has occurred but is arrested and provide baseline data for judging the accelerating effects of the slow strain rate method. Constant extension rate tests were employed to determine the crack velocities experienced in the crack propagation stage and predict failure times of tubes which are actively denting. 8 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Corrosion control when using secondary treated municipal wastewater as alternative makeup water for cooling tower systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Li, Heng; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Monnell, Jason D; Chowdhury, Indranil; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2010-12-01

    Secondary treated municipal wastewater is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water, especially in arid regions. Laboratory and field testing was conducted in this study to evaluate the corrosiveness of secondary treated municipal wastewater for various metals and metal alloys in cooling systems. Different corrosion control strategies were evaluated based on varied chemical treatment. Orthophosphate, which is abundant in secondary treated municipal wastewater, contributed to more than 80% precipitative removal of phosphorous-based corrosion inhibitors. Tolyltriazole worked effectively to reduce corrosion of copper (greater than 95% inhibition effectiveness). The corrosion rate of mild steel in the presence of free chlorine 1 mg/L (as Cl2) was approximately 50% higher than in the presence of monochloramine 1 mg/L (as Cl2), indicating that monochloramine is a less corrosive biocide than free chlorine. The scaling layers observed on the metal alloys contributed to corrosion inhibition, which could be seen by comparing the mild steel 21-day average corrosion rate with the last 5-day average corrosion rate, the latter being approximately 50% lower than the former.

  19. Stress Corrosion Cracking in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Aluminum Alloys in Saline Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, N. J. Henry; Scamans, G. M.

    2013-03-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu (AA7xxx) aluminum alloys exposed to saline environments at temperatures ranging from 293 K to 353 K (20 °C to 80 °C) has been reviewed with particular attention to the influences of alloy composition and temper, and bulk and local environmental conditions. Stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth rates at room temperature for peak- and over-aged tempers in saline environments are minimized for Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys containing less than ~8 wt pct Zn when Zn/Mg ratios are ranging from 2 to 3, excess magnesium levels are less than 1 wt pct, and copper content is either less than ~0.2 wt pct or ranging from 1.3 to 2 wt pct. A minimum chloride ion concentration of ~0.01 M is required for crack growth rates to exceed those in distilled water, which insures that the local solution pH in crack-tip regions can be maintained at less than 4. Crack growth rates in saline solution without other additions gradually increase with bulk chloride ion concentrations up to around 0.6 M NaCl, whereas in solutions with sufficiently low dichromate (or chromate), inhibitor additions are insensitive to the bulk chloride concentration and are typically at least double those observed without the additions. DCB specimens, fatigue pre-cracked in air before immersion in a saline environment, show an initial period with no detectible crack growth, followed by crack growth at the distilled water rate, and then transition to a higher crack growth rate typical of region 2 crack growth in the saline environment. Time spent in each stage depends on the type of pre-crack ("pop-in" vs fatigue), applied stress intensity factor, alloy chemistry, bulk environment, and, if applied, the external polarization. Apparent activation energies ( E a) for SCC growth in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys exposed to 0.6 M NaCl over the temperatures ranging from 293 K to 353 K (20 °C to 80 °C) for under-, peak-, and over-aged low-copper-containing alloys (alloys (>~0.8 wt pct), they are typically

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X80 Pipeline Steel in Acid Soil Environment with SRB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Xie, Fei; Wu, Ming; Liu, Guangxin; Zong, Yue; Li, Xue

    2017-06-01

    Self-designed experimental device was adopted to ensure the normal growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sterile simulated Yingtan soil solution. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of X80 pipeline steel in simulated acid soil environment was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, slow strain rate test, and scanning electron microscope. Results show that the presence of SRB could promote stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. In a growth cycle, polarization resistance first presents a decrease and subsequently an increase, which is inversely proportional to the quantities of SRB. At 8 days of growth, SRB reach their largest quantity of 1.42 × 103 cells/g. The corrosion behavior is most serious at this time point, and the SCC mechanism is hydrogen embrittlement. In other SRB growth stages, the SCC mechanism of X80 steel is anodic dissolution. With the increasing SRB quantities, X80 steel is largely prone to SCC behavior, and the effect of hydrogen is considerably obvious.

  1. Effects of microbial redox cycling of iron on cast iron pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Lili; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial characteristics in corrosion products and their effect on the formation of dense corrosion scales on cast iron coupons were studied in drinking water, with sterile water acting as a reference. The corrosion process and corrosion scales were characterized by electrochemical and physico-chemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion was more rapidly inhibited and iron release was lower due to formation of more dense protective corrosion scales in drinking water than in sterile water. The microbial community and denitrifying functional genes were analyzed by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the bacteria in corrosion products played an important role in the corrosion process in drinking water. Nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga enhanced iron corrosion before 6 days. After 20 days, the dominant bacteria became NRB Dechloromonas (40.08%) with the protective corrosion layer formation. The Dechloromonas exhibited the stronger corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron, to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4. Subsequently, other minor bacteria appeared in the corrosion scales, including iron-respiring bacteria and Rhizobium which captured iron by the produced siderophores, having a weaker corrosion-inhibition effect. Therefore, the microbially-driven redox cycling of iron with associated microbial capture of iron caused more compact corrosion scales formation and lower iron release.

  2. Corrosion evaluation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Uh Chul; Han, Jeong Ho; Nho, Kye Ho; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo

    1997-09-01

    A multifrequency ACPD system was assembled which can measure very small crack. Stress corrosion cracking test system with SSRT operating high temperature was installed. Stress corrosion cracking test of newly developed alloy 600 and existing alloy 600 was carried out in steam atmosphere of 400 deg C. No crack was observed in both materials within a test period of 2,000 hrs. Corrosion fatigue test system operating at high temperature was installed in which fatigue crack was measured by CDPD. Lead enhanced the SCC of the Alloy 600 in high temperature water, had a tendency to modify a cracking morphology from intergranular to transgranular. Pit initiation preferentially occurred at Ti-rich carbide. Resistance to pit initiation decreased with increasing temperature up to 300 deg C. Test loop for erosion corrosion was designed and fabricated. Thin layer activation technique was very effective in measuring erosion corrosion. Erosion corrosion of a part of secondary side pipe was evaluated by the Check Family Codes of EPRI. Calculated values of pipe thickness by Check Family Codes coincided with the pipe thickness measured by UT with an error of {+-} 20%. Literature review on turbine failure showed that failure usually occurred in low pressure turbine rotor disc and causes of failure are stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. (author). 12 refs., 20 tabs., 77 figs.

  3. Corrosion behaviour of metals and alloys in the waters of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Wagh, A.B.

    Corrosion behaviour of metals and alloys the waters of the Arabian Sea· by S.S.Sawant and A.B.Wagh Marine Corrosion and Materials Research Division, National Institute of Oceanography, Goa, India F UR TYPES ofmetals (mild steel. brass. alum...!nium and stainlessst~el)were exposed during theI~eriodNovemb~r, 1987, to November, 1988, at depths exceedmg IOOOm In the Arabian Sea, m order to assess thezr behavIOur with respect to corrosion. The results indicated an increase of the corrosion rate ofmild steel...

  4. Effects of crystal defects on stress-corrosion susceptibility in aluminum alloy 7075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentle, G. G.; Jacobs, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Point defects were introduced into specimens of three heat-treated tempers of alloy 7075 by neutron irradiation. Continuous ultrasonic monitoring allowed crack growth to be observed. Effects on stress-corrosion susceptibility, elongation, hardness, and yield strength are noted and compared for the three tempers.

  5. ANTI-CORROSION PROPERTIES OF CARBOXYLIC ACID IN WATER-GLYCOL SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BASHKIRCEVA N.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium salts of carboxylic acids were investigated to evaluate the corrosion properties of the water-glycol solutions. Corrosion tests were performed by methods of gravimetry and galvanostatic dissolution with metals used in cooling systems. The compositions of anticorrosion systems and their concentration that provide the most effective inhibition of metals were determined.

  6. High Temperature Corrosion of Water Wall Materials T23 and T24 in Simulated Furnace Atmospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵钦新; 张知翔; 成丁南; 王云刚; 邓翔

    2012-01-01

    Candidate materials for water wall of supercritical and ultra-supercritical utility boilers,T23 and T24,were chosen as the experimental samples and exposed to oxidizing atmosphere,reducing atmosphere and oxidizing/reducing alternating atmosphere separately.The corrosion temperature was 450-550?C.The effects of oxygen con-tent and temperature on the corrosion in reducing atmosphere and alternating atmosphere were investigated.The scanning electron microscope(SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer(EDS) were used to examine the corroded samples.The results show that the corrosion kinetics of T23 and T24 can be described by the double logarithmic equation and parabolic equation respectively.To describe the corrosion of materials accurately it is not sufficient to analyze the macro-mass gain and the macro-thickness of the corroded layer only,but the EDS should be applied to examine the migration depth of corrosive elements O and S.It is revealed that the corrosion becomes more severe when H2S is present in the corrosive gas.S is more active than O,and Cr can reduce the migration of oxygen but not S.The combination corrosion of S and O and pure [S] has a stronger corrodibility than pure H2S.T24 suffers the most severe corrosion at oxygen content of 0.8%.Corrosion is aggravated when the corrosion temperature is above 450 ℃ in the alternating atmosphere.T23 has better corrosion resistance than T24 and W contributes a lot to the corrosion resistance of T23.

  7. A facility for studying irradiation accelerated corrosion in high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiman, Stephen S.; Flick, Alexander; Toader, Ovidiu; Wang, Peng; Samad, Nassim A.; Jiao, Zhijie; Was, Gary S.

    2014-08-01

    A facility for the study of irradiation accelerated corrosion in high temperature water using in situ proton irradiation has been developed and validated. A specially designed beamline and flowing-water corrosion cell added to the 1.7 MV tandem accelerator at the Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory provide the capability to study the simultaneous effects of displacement damage and radiolysis on corrosion. A thin sample serves as both a “window” into the corrosion cell through which the proton beam passes completely, and the sample for assessing irradiation accelerated corrosion. The facility was tested by irradiating stainless steel samples at beam current densities between 0.5 and 10 μA/cm2 in 130 °C and 320 °C deaerated water, and 320 °C water with 3 wppm H2. Increases in the conductivity and dissolved oxygen content of the water varied with the proton beam current, suggesting that proton irradiation was accelerating the corrosion of the sample. Conductivity increases were greatest at 320 °C, while DO increases were highest at 130 °C. The addition of 3 wppm H2 suppressed DO below detectable levels. The facility will enable future studies into the effect of irradiation on corrosion in high temperature water with in situ proton irradiation.

  8. Corrosion behaviour of construction materials for high temperature water electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey

    2010-01-01

    Different types of corrosion resistant stainless steels, Ni-based alloys as well as titanium and tantalum were evaluated as a possible metallic bipolar plate and construction material with respect to corrosion resistance under simulated conditions corresponding to the conditions in high temperature...... and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results show that stainless steels are the most inclined to corrosion under high anodic polarization. Among alloys, Ni-based showed the highest corrosion resistance under conditions, simulating HTPEMWE. In particular, Inconel625 is the most promising alloy...

  9. Assessment of NDE Technologies for Detection and Characterization of Stress Corrosion Cracking in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bond, Leonard J.; Montgomery, Robert O.

    2012-12-31

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in light water reactors (LWRs) has been a persistent form of degradation in the nuclear industry. Examples of SCC can be found for a range of materials in boiling and pressurized water reactor environments, including carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-base stainless alloys. The evolution of SCC is often characterized by a long initiation stage followed by a phase of more rapid crack growth to failure. This provides a relatively short window of opportunity to detect the start of observable SCC, and it is conceivable that SCC could progress from initiation to failure between subsequent examinations when managed by applying periodic in-service inspection techniques. Implementation of advanced aging management paradigms in the current fleet of LWRs will require adaptation of existing measurement technologies and development of new technologies to perform on-line measurements during reactor operation to ensure timely detection of material degradation and to support the implementation of advanced diagnostics and prognostics. This paper considers several non-destructive examination (NDE) technologies with known sensitivity to detection of indicators for SCC initiation and/or propagation, and assesses these technologies with respect to their ability to detect and accurately characterize the significance of an SCC flaw. Potential strategies to improve SCC inspection or monitoring performance are offered to benefit management of SCC degradation in LWRs.

  10. Effect of Nanostructure Changes on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Proton Irradiated Nuclear Energy Structural Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Lunika

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless alloys are used extensively as structural materials in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC is main degradation process that affects LWR internal components exposed to radiation. The existing data on proton irradiated austenitic alloys were reviewed to evaluate the effects of key parameters such as material composition, irradiation dose on IASCC susceptibility of these materials in LWR environments. The significance of deformation nanostructure and stacking fault energy (SFE changes in the material on IASCC susceptibility is also discussed. Results show that the IASCC susceptibility of the alloys increases with increasing irradiation dose and decreasing stacking fault energy. IASCC tends to initiate at locations where slip dislocation channels intersect grain boundaries. Localized deformation in the form of grain boundary sliding due to the interaction of slip channels and grain boundaries is likely the primary cause of the observed cracking initiation. It may play a key role in the underlying mechanism of IASCC in light water reactor core components.

  11. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Investigation of the Stress Corrosion Cracking in Nickel-Base Alloys, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this program is to evaluate the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of high chromium alloy 690 and its weld metals, establish quantitative measurements of crack-growth rates and determine relationships among cracking susceptibility, environmental conditions and metallurgical characteristics. Stress-corrosion, crack-growth rates have been determined for 12 alloy 690 specimens, 11 alloy 152/52/52M weld metal specimens, 4 alloy 52M/182 overlay specimens and 2 alloy 52M/82 inlay specimens in simulated PWR primary water environments. The alloy 690 test materials included three different heats of extruded control-rod-drive mechanism (CRDM) tubing with variations in the initial material condition and degree of cold work for one heat. Two cold-rolled (CR) alloy 690 plate heats were also obtained and evaluated enabling comparisons to the CR CRDM materials. Weld metal, overlay and inlay specimens were machined from industry mock ups to provide plant-representative materials for testing. Specimens have been tested for one alloy 152 weld, two alloy 52 welds and three alloy 52M welds. The overlay and inlay specimens were prepared to propagate stress-corrosion cracks from the alloy 182 or 82 material into the more resistant alloy 52M. In all cases, crack extension was monitored in situ by direct current potential drop (DCPD) with length resolution of about +1 µm making it possible to measure extremely low growth rates approaching 5x10-10 mm/s. Most SCC tests were performed at 325-360°C with hydrogen concentrations from 11-29 cc/kg; however, environmental conditions were modified during a few experiments to evaluate the influence of temperature, water chemistry or electrochemical potential on propagation rates. In addition, low-temperature (~50°C) cracking behavior was examined for selected alloy 690 and weld metal specimens. Extensive characterizations have been performed on material microstructures and stress-corrosion cracks by

  12. Water Stress Projection Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    facility. Stationing analysis done with climate forecasting in mind recognizes an unpredictable future, while striving to best prepare for the...to support additional growth. This attribute places a threshold ca- pacity on water supply and treatment, which may be related to treat- ment plant ...et al. 2013). 3.3 Military impacts reduced water Extreme weather events such as droughts, floods, snow, and ice storms have significant impacts on

  13. Time exposure studies on stress corrosion cracking of aluminum 2014-T6, 2219-T87, 2014-T651, 7075-T651, and titanium 6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, J.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of a constant applied stress in crack initiation of aluminum 2014-T6, 2219-T87, 2014-T651, 7075-T651 and titanium 6Al-4V has been investigated. Aluminum c-ring specimens (1-inch diameter) and u-band titanium samples were exposed continuously to a 3.5% NaCl solution (pH 7) and organic fluids of ethyl, methyl, and iso-propyl alcohol (reagent purity), and demineralized distilled water. Corrosive action was observed to begin during the first and second day of constant exposure as evidenced by accumulation of hydrogen bubbles on the surface of stressed aluminum samples. However, titanium stressed specimens showed no reactions to its environment. Results of this investigation seems to suggest that aluminum 2014-T6, aluminum 7075-T651 and aluminum 2014-T651 are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in chloride solution (NaCl), while aluminum 2219-T87 seem to resist stress corrosion cracking in sodium chloride at three levels of stress (25%, 50%, and 75% Y.S.). In organic fluids of methyl, ethyl, and iso-propyl alcohol, 2014-T6 and 7075-T651 did not fail by SCC; but 2014-T651 was susceptible to SCC in methly alcohol, but resistant in ethyl alcohol, iso-propyl alcohol and demineralized distilled water.

  14. Formation and Release Behavior of Iron Corrosion Products under the Influence of Bacterial Communities in a Simulated Water Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the effects of biofilm on the iron corrosion, iron release and associated corrosion by-products is critical for maintaining the water quality and the integrity of drinking water distribution system (DWDS). In this work, iron corrosion experiments under sterilized a...

  15. Hierarchical Petascale Simulation Framework For Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grama, Ananth

    2013-12-18

    A number of major accomplishments resulted from the project. These include: • Data Structures, Algorithms, and Numerical Methods for Reactive Molecular Dynamics. We have developed a range of novel data structures, algorithms, and solvers (amortized ILU, Spike) for use with ReaxFF and charge equilibration. • Parallel Formulations of ReactiveMD (Purdue ReactiveMolecular Dynamics Package, PuReMD, PuReMD-GPU, and PG-PuReMD) for Messaging, GPU, and GPU Cluster Platforms. We have developed efficient serial, parallel (MPI), GPU (Cuda), and GPU Cluster (MPI/Cuda) implementations. Our implementations have been demonstrated to be significantly better than the state of the art, both in terms of performance and scalability. • Comprehensive Validation in the Context of Diverse Applications. We have demonstrated the use of our software in diverse systems, including silica-water, silicon-germanium nanorods, and as part of other projects, extended it to applications ranging from explosives (RDX) to lipid bilayers (biomembranes under oxidative stress). • Open Source Software Packages for Reactive Molecular Dynamics. All versions of our soft- ware have been released over the public domain. There are over 100 major research groups worldwide using our software. • Implementation into the Department of Energy LAMMPS Software Package. We have also integrated our software into the Department of Energy LAMMPS software package.

  16. Hierarchical Petascale Simulation Framework For Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grama, Ananth

    2013-12-18

    A number of major accomplishments resulted from the project. These include: • Data Structures, Algorithms, and Numerical Methods for Reactive Molecular Dynamics. We have developed a range of novel data structures, algorithms, and solvers (amortized ILU, Spike) for use with ReaxFF and charge equilibration. • Parallel Formulations of ReactiveMD (Purdue ReactiveMolecular Dynamics Package, PuReMD, PuReMD-GPU, and PG-PuReMD) for Messaging, GPU, and GPU Cluster Platforms. We have developed efficient serial, parallel (MPI), GPU (Cuda), and GPU Cluster (MPI/Cuda) implementations. Our implementations have been demonstrated to be significantly better than the state of the art, both in terms of performance and scalability. • Comprehensive Validation in the Context of Diverse Applications. We have demonstrated the use of our software in diverse systems, including silica-water, silicon-germanium nanorods, and as part of other projects, extended it to applications ranging from explosives (RDX) to lipid bilayers (biomembranes under oxidative stress). • Open Source Software Packages for Reactive Molecular Dynamics. All versions of our soft- ware have been released over the public domain. There are over 100 major research groups worldwide using our software. • Implementation into the Department of Energy LAMMPS Software Package. We have also integrated our software into the Department of Energy LAMMPS software package.

  17. Near-neutral pH Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation under Simulated Coating Disbondment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Abdoulmajid

    This research is aimed at understanding near-neutral pH SCC initiation under disbonded coatings of pipeline steels, and the effect of different environmental and operational factors on crack initiation. Understanding near-neutral pH stress corrosion cracking (SCC) could answer many of the primary questions on crack initiation of SCC which have not yet been answered. It could also assist the development of effective mitigative measures dealing with thousands of kilometer of pipelines containing this form of cracking, in addition to preventive action for future pipeline installations. Near-neutral pH SCC usually occurs under polyethylene tape (PE tape) coated pipelines, at locations where the coating becomes disbonded and/or damaged. Ground water can then penetrate under the damaged/disbonded coating, become trapped and form a suitable environment for corrosion and cracking. Despite extensive studies on this topic the details of crack initiation mechanisms in addition to the exact role of environmental and operational factors on crack initiation are not thoroughly understood. Most previous laboratory tests have been done in aggressive loading conditions and ignored the effect of coatings and cathodic protections (CP). In order to simulate the conditions responsible for crack initiation, a novel testing setup capable of simulating the synergistic effects of coating disbondment, cathodic protection and cyclic loading was implemented. Using this setup and long term laboratory tests near-neutral pH SCC initiation mechanisms and the effect of some environmental and operational factors on crack initiation were investigated. It was found that near-neutral pH SCC initiation does not necessarily occur in near-neutral pH environments as commonly believed. Depending on the level of CP and CO2 in the underground environment, different localized environments with varying pH values from near-neutral to high values above 10 can form under the disbonded coatings. This significantly

  18. Cluster analysis of stress corrosion mechanisms for steel wires used in bridge cables through acoustic emission particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Wenyao

    2017-01-18

    Stress corrosion is the major failure type of bridge cable damage. The acoustic emission (AE) technique was applied to monitor the stress corrosion process of steel wires used in bridge cable structures. The damage evolution of stress corrosion in bridge cables was obtained according to the AE characteristic parameter figure. A particle swarm optimization cluster method was developed to determine the relationship between the AE signal and stress corrosion mechanisms. Results indicate that the main AE sources of stress corrosion in bridge cables included four types: passive film breakdown and detachment of the corrosion product, crack initiation, crack extension, and cable fracture. By analyzing different types of clustering data, the mean value of each damage pattern's AE characteristic parameters was determined. Different corrosion damage source AE waveforms and the peak frequency were extracted. AE particle swarm optimization cluster analysis based on principal component analysis was also proposed. This method can completely distinguish the four types of damage sources and simplifies the determination of the evolution process of corrosion damage and broken wire signals.

  19. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Singh Raman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT in 30 wt. % MgCl2 solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  20. Identification of key factors in Accelerated Low Water Corrosion through experimental simulation of tidal conditions: influence of stimulated indigenous microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marty, F.; Gueuné, H.; Malard, E.; Sánchez-Amaya, J.M.; Sjögren, L.; Abbas, B.; Quillet, L.; van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Muyzer, G.

    2014-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors favoring Accelerated Low Water Corrosion (ALWC) on harbor steel structures remain unclear warranting their study under controlled experimental tidal conditions. Initial stimulation of marine microbial consortia by a pulse of organic matter resulted in localized corrosion

  1. SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL STORAGE BASIN WATER CHEMISTRY: ELECTROCHEMICAL EVALUATION OF ALUMINUM CORROSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, D

    2007-10-30

    The factors affecting the optimal water chemistry of the Savannah River Site spent fuel storage basin must be determines in order to optimize facility efficiency, minimize fuel corrosion, and reduce overall environmental impact from long term spent nuclear fuel storage at the Savannah River Site. The Savannah River National Laboratory is using statistically designed experiments to study the effects of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, and Cl{sup -} concentrations on alloys commonly used not only as fuel cladding, but also as rack construction materials The results of cyclic polarization pitting and corrosion experiments on samples of Al 6061 and 1100 alloys will be used to construct a predictive model of the basin corrosion and its dependence on the species in the basin. The basin chemistry model and corrosion will be discussed in terms of optimized water chemistry envelope and minimization of cladding corrosion.

  2. Inhibition of Copper Pitting Corrosion in Aggressive Potable Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Sarver

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper pitting corrosion can lead to premature plumbing failures, and can be caused by aggressive potable waters characterized by high pH, free chlorine residual and low alkalinity. In such waters and under continuous flow, certain inhibitors including phosphate, silica or natural organic matter may greatly reduce pitting occurrence. In the current work, 1 mg/L phosphate (as P completely prevented initiation of pits, and 5 mg/L silica (as Si significantly decelerated pitting. However, much lower doses of these inhibitors had little benefit and actually accelerated the rate of attack in some cases. Effects of organic matter were dependent on both the type (e.g., natural versus ozonated humic substances and dosage. Dose-response effects of free chlorine and alkalinity were also investigated. Based on electrochemical data, pits initiated more rapidly with increased free chlorine, but even moderate levels of chlorine (~0.4 mg/L eventually caused severe pitting. High alkalinity decreased pit propagation rates but did not prevent pit formation.

  3. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steels applicable to LWR core internals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    This report summarizes work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels that were irradiated in the Halden reactor in simulation of irradiation-induced degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) core internal components. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests in BWR-like oxidizing water were conducted on 27 austenitic stainless steel alloys that were irradiated at 288 C in helium to 0.4, 1.3, and 3.0 dpa. Fractographic analysis was conducted to determine the fracture surface morphology. Microchemical analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy was performed on BWR neutron absorber tubes to characterize grain-boundary segregation of important elements under BWR conditions. At 0.4 and 1.4 dpa, transgranular fracture was mixed with intergranular fracture. At 3 dpa, transgranular cracking was negligible, and fracture surface was either dominantly intergranular, as in field-cracked core internals, or dominantly ductile or mixed. This behavior indicates that percent intergranular stress corrosion cracking determined at {approx}3 dpa is a good measure of IASCC susceptibility. At {approx}1.4 dpa, a beneficial effect of a high concentration of Si (0.8-1.5 wt.%) was observed. At {approx}3 dpa, however, such effect was obscured by a deleterious effect of S. Excellent resistance to IASCC was observed up to {approx}3 dpa for eight heats of Types 304, 316, and 348 steel that contain very low concentrations of S. Susceptibility of Types 304 and 316 steels that contain >0.003 wt.% S increased drastically. This indicates that a sulfur related critical phenomenon plays an important role in IASCC. A sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% is the primary material factor necessary to ensure good resistance to IASCC. However, for Types 304L and 316L steel and their high-purity counterparts, a sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% alone is not a sufficient condition to ensure good resistance to IASCC. This is in distinct contrast to

  4. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steels applicable to LWR core internals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    This report summarizes work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels that were irradiated in the Halden reactor in simulation of irradiation-induced degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) core internal components. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests in BWR-like oxidizing water were conducted on 27 austenitic stainless steel alloys that were irradiated at 288 C in helium to 0.4, 1.3, and 3.0 dpa. Fractographic analysis was conducted to determine the fracture surface morphology. Microchemical analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy was performed on BWR neutron absorber tubes to characterize grain-boundary segregation of important elements under BWR conditions. At 0.4 and 1.4 dpa, transgranular fracture was mixed with intergranular fracture. At 3 dpa, transgranular cracking was negligible, and fracture surface was either dominantly intergranular, as in field-cracked core internals, or dominantly ductile or mixed. This behavior indicates that percent intergranular stress corrosion cracking determined at {approx}3 dpa is a good measure of IASCC susceptibility. At {approx}1.4 dpa, a beneficial effect of a high concentration of Si (0.8-1.5 wt.%) was observed. At {approx}3 dpa, however, such effect was obscured by a deleterious effect of S. Excellent resistance to IASCC was observed up to {approx}3 dpa for eight heats of Types 304, 316, and 348 steel that contain very low concentrations of S. Susceptibility of Types 304 and 316 steels that contain >0.003 wt.% S increased drastically. This indicates that a sulfur related critical phenomenon plays an important role in IASCC. A sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% is the primary material factor necessary to ensure good resistance to IASCC. However, for Types 304L and 316L steel and their high-purity counterparts, a sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% alone is not a sufficient condition to ensure good resistance to IASCC. This is in distinct contrast to

  5. Stainless steel corrosion scale formed in reclaimed water: Characteristics, model for scale growth and metal element release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Liu, Shuming; Smith, Kate; Hu, Hongying; Tang, Fusheng; Li, Yuhong; Yu, Kanghua

    2016-10-01

    Stainless steels generally have extremely good corrosion resistance, but are still susceptible to pitting corrosion. As a result, corrosion scales can form on the surface of stainless steel after extended exposure to aggressive aqueous environments. Corrosion scales play an important role in affecting water quality. These research results showed that interior regions of stainless steel corrosion scales have a high percentage of chromium phases. We reveal the morphology, micro-structure and physicochemical characteristics of stainless steel corrosion scales. Stainless steel corrosion scale is identified as a podiform chromite deposit according to these characteristics, which is unlike deposit formed during iron corrosion. A conceptual model to explain the formation and growth of stainless steel corrosion scale is proposed based on its composition and structure. The scale growth process involves pitting corrosion on the stainless steel surface and the consecutive generation and homogeneous deposition of corrosion products, which is governed by a series of chemical and electrochemical reactions. This model shows the role of corrosion scales in the mechanism of iron and chromium release from pitting corroded stainless steel materials. The formation of corrosion scale is strongly related to water quality parameters. The presence of HClO results in higher ferric content inside the scales. Cl(-) and SO4(2-) ions in reclaimed water play an important role in corrosion pitting of stainless steel and promote the formation of scales. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Effect of Stress on Corrosion at Crack Tip on Pipeline Steel in a Near-Neutral pH Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the local corrosion at crack tip on an API 5L X46 pipeline steel specimens was investigated under various applied loads in a near-neutral pH solution. Electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, combined with micro-electrochemical technique and surface characterization, were conducted to investigate the effect of stress on local anodic solution of the steel at the crack tip. The stress corrosion cracking of the steel was dominated by an anodic dissolution mechanism, while the effect of hydrogen was negligible. The applied load (stress) increased the corrosion rate at the crack tip, contributing to crack propagation. The deposit of corrosion products at the crack tip could protect somewhat from further corrosion. At sufficiently large applied loads such as 740 N in the work, it was possible to generate separated cathode and anode, further accelerating the crack growth.

  7. Effect of Stress on Corrosion at Crack Tip on Pipeline Steel in a Near-Neutral pH Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the local corrosion at crack tip on an API 5L X46 pipeline steel specimens was investigated under various applied loads in a near-neutral pH solution. Electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, combined with micro-electrochemical technique and surface characterization, were conducted to investigate the effect of stress on local anodic solution of the steel at the crack tip. The stress corrosion cracking of the steel was dominated by an anodic dissolution mechanism, while the effect of hydrogen was negligible. The applied load (stress) increased the corrosion rate at the crack tip, contributing to crack propagation. The deposit of corrosion products at the crack tip could protect somewhat from further corrosion. At sufficiently large applied loads such as 740 N in the work, it was possible to generate separated cathode and anode, further accelerating the crack growth.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic chloride solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yanliang Huang

    2002-02-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic chloride solution was studied by slow strain rate (SSR) technique and fracture mechanics method. The fractured surface was characterized by cleavage fracture. In order to clarify the SCC mechanism, the effects of inhibitor KI on SCC behaviour were also included in this paper. A study showed that the inhibition effects of KI on SCC were mainly attributed to the anodic reaction of the corrosion process. The results of strain distribution in front of the crack tip of the fatigue pre-cracked plate specimens in air, in the blank solution (acidic chloride solution without inhibitor KI) and in the solution added with KI measured by speckle interferometry (SPI) support the unified mechanism of SCC and corrosion fatigue cracking (CFC).

  9. Role of pH on the stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, M. I.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experiments were conducted on Ti-8-1-1 wire specimens in hydrochloric and sulfuric acids of variable pH in order to determine the effect of pH on the susceptibility to cracking. The alloy exhibited increasing susceptibility with decreasing pH. By varying the applied potential, it was observed that susceptibility zones exist both in the cathodic and the anodic ranges. In the cathodic range, susceptibility also increased with decreasing applied potential. Corrosion potential-time data in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.7) and sulfuric acid (pH 1.7) indicate that chloride ions lower the corrosion potential of the specimen which, in turn, increases the susceptibility.

  10. Role of pH on the stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, M. I.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experiments were conducted on Ti-8-1-1 wire specimens in hydrochloric and sulfuric acids of variable pH in order to determine the effect of pH on the susceptibility to cracking. The alloy exhibited increasing susceptibility with decreasing pH. By varying the applied potential, it was observed that susceptibility zones exist both in the cathodic and the anodic ranges. In the cathodic range, susceptibility also increased with decreasing applied potential. Corrosion potential-time data in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.7) and sulfuric acid (pH 1.7) indicate that chloride ions lower the corrosion potential of the specimen which, in turn, increases the susceptibility.

  11. Pitting Corrosion of 316L Stainless Steel under Low Stress below Yield Strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Shengjie; CHENG Xuequn; LI Xiaogang

    2012-01-01

    Pitting corrosion of 316L stainless steel (316L SS) under various stress was studied by potentiodynamic polarization,electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Mott-Schottky (M-S) analysis in 3.5% NaCl solution.The results of polarization curves show that,with the increase of the stress,the pitting potentials and the passive current density markedly decrease firstly (180 MPa),and then increase greatly (200 MPa).The corresponding surface morphologies of the samples after the polarization test well correspond to the results.Mott-Schottky analysis proved the least Cl- adsorbed to the surface of passive film with more positive flat potential,indicating that a moderate stress could increase the pitting corrosion resistance of 316L SS in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  12. Diffusion-Coupled Cohesive Interface Simulations of Stress Corrosion Intergranular Cracking in Polycrystalline Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Chao; Gao, Yanfei; Wang, Yanli; Sham, T.-L.

    2017-09-01

    To study the stress corrosion intergranular cracking mechanism, a diffusion-coupled cohesive zone model (CZM) is proposed for the simulation of the stress-assisted diffusional process along grain boundaries and the mechanical response of grain boundary sliding and separation. This simulation methodology considers the synergistic effects of impurity diffusion driven by pressure gradient and degradation of grain boundary strength by impurity concentration. The diffusion-coupled CZM is combined with crystal plasticity finite element model (CPFEM) to simulate intergranular fracture of polycrystalline material under corrosive environment. Significant heterogeneity of the stress field and extensive impurity accumulation is observed at grain boundaries and junction points. Deformation mechanism maps are constructed with respect to the grain boundary degradation factor and applied strain rate, which dictate the transition from internal to near-surface intergranular fracture modes under various strain amplitudes and grain sizes.

  13. Characterization of Copper Corrosion Products in Drinking Water by Combining Electrochemical and Surface Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study focuses on the application of electrochemical approaches to drinking water copper corrosion problems. Applying electrochemical approaches combined with copper solubility measurements, and solid surface analysis approaches were discussed. Tafel extrapolation and Electro...

  14. Characterization of Copper Corrosion Products Formed in Drinking Water by Combining Electrochemical and Surface Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study focuses on the application of electrochemical approaches to drinking water copper corrosion problems. Applying electrochemical approaches combined with copper solubility measurements, and solid surface analysis approaches were discussed. Tafel extrapolation and Electro...

  15. Unexpected corrosion of stainless steel in low chloride waters – microbial aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Carpén, Leena; Møller, Per

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Stainless steels EN 1.4301 and 1.4401/1.4404 are normally considered corrosion resistant in low chloride natural waters like drinking water. However, a number of corrosion failures have been observed in e.g. fire extinguisher systems and drinking water installations, where stagnant...... stains on the outside of the installation. Corrosion may occur in water qualities with rather low chloride contents and fairly low conductivity, which would usually not be considered especially corrosive towards stainless steel. One key parameter is the ennoblement documented on stainless steel...... of iron facilitates the growth of iron oxidising bacteria. A number of failure cases from Danish and Finnish stainless steel installations are discussed with the objective to identify key parameters, suggest possible mechanisms and discuss whether prediction is possible. The paper includes a short...

  16. Bio-corrosion of water pipeline by sulphate-reducing bacteria in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    esiri

    2013-11-13

    Nov 13, 2013 ... African Journal of Biotechnology. Full Length ... of heavy metals. Mining and industrial drainage con- ... and sulphate-rich waste water, reducing sulphate to sulphide to ..... European Federation of Corrosion (15), Portugal.

  17. Copper Tube Pitting in Santa Fe Municipal Water Caused by Microbial Induced Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D. Burleigh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many copper water lines for municipal drinking water in Santa Fe, New Mexico USA, have developed pinhole leaks. The pitting matches the description of Type I pitting of copper, which has historically been attributed to water chemistry and to contaminants on the copper tubing surface. However, more recent studies attribute copper pitting to microbial induced corrosion (MIC. In order to test for microbes, the copper tubing was fixed in hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS, then the tops of the corrosion mounds were broken open, and the interior of the corrosion pits were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The analysis found that microbes resembling actinobacteria were deep inside the pits and wedged between the crystallographic planes of the corroded copper grains. The presence of actinobacteria confirms the possibility that the cause of this pitting corrosion was MIC. This observation provides better understanding and new methods for preventing the pitting of copper tubing in municipal water.

  18. Assessment of tap water quality and corrosion scales from the selected distribution systems in northern Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Shams Ali; Lou, Zimo; Baig, Muzaffar Ali; Qasim, Muhammad; Shams, Dilawar Farhan; Mahmood, Qaisar; Xu, Xinhua

    2017-04-01

    Corrosion deposits formed within drinking water distribution systems deteriorate drinking water quality and resultantly cause public health consequences. In the present study, an attempt was made to investigate the concurrent conditions of corrosion scales and the drinking water quality in selected water supply schemes (WSS) in districts Chitral, Peshawar, and Abbottabad, northern Pakistan. Characterization analyses of the corrosion by-products revealed the presence of α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, Fe3O4, and SiO2 as major constituents with different proportions. The constituents of all the representative XRD peaks of Peshawar WSS were found insignificant as compared to other WSS, and the reason could be the variation of source water quality. Well-crystallized particles in SEM images indicated the formation of dense oxide layer on corrosion by-products. A wider asymmetric vibration peak of SiO2 appeared only in Chitral and Abbottabad WSS, which demonstrated higher siltation in the water source. One-way ANOVA analysis showed significant variations in pH, turbidity, TDS, K, Mg, PO4, Cl, and SO4 values, which revealed that these parameters differently contributed to the source water quality. Findings from this study suggested the implementation of proper corrosion prevention measures and the establishment of international collaboration for best corrosion practices, expertise, and developing standards.

  19. Countermeasures to corrosion on water walls. Part 2; Aatgaerder mot eldstadskorrosion paa panntuber. Etapp 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, Jan; Elger, Ragna; Nordling, Magnus; Viklund, Peter

    2011-01-15

    Background: The problems with water wall corrosion have been accelerating over the last years. There are a number of reasons for this. Originally mild steels were successfully used in power plant water walls. The magnetite layer that forms at the fire side of the tubes when the boiler is taken into operation protected from corrosion attack. The fuels at that time (oil, coal, gas) were not able to break down the magnetite by corrosion. In addition, there were no restrictions for pollutions and for the combustion itself that could contribute to corrosion attack. The usage of fossil fuels has decreased substantially over the last 25 years, not least by environmental reasons. As a replacement a number of different kinds of bio mass fuels are used. These are typically more or less corrosive and the magnetite layers are attacked. The corrosion is often supported by reducing conditions as a result of the restrictions of the NO{sub x}-pollution. Also the waste fuelled boilers have huge corrosion problems. This has been the case for the last 25 years but nowadays the number of such plants is so much higher and the service data have been turned up. Corrosion protection of the water wall tubes started to be successful in the beginning of the seventies by the introduction of the composite tube. Such tubes are fabricated by mild steel or a low alloy core and corrosion resistant austenite steel or nickel base as an about 2 mm thick corrosion protective coating. Weld cladding of the water wall tubes was introduced in the 1980's as a significantly cheaper alternative to the composite tubes. Thermal spraying and refractory protection are other methods. These corrosion protection methods have not always been effective. For example, depending on incorrect materials selection, incorrect performance and incorrect method selection for the current corrosion or erosion attack. Therefore, there is a need for increased knowledge of which protection method and material that will work

  20. Countermeasures to corrosion on water walls. Part 2; Aatgaerder mot eldstadskorrosion paa panntuber. Etapp 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, Jan; Elger, Ragna; Nordling, Magnus; Viklund, Peter

    2011-01-15

    Background: The problems with water wall corrosion have been accelerating over the last years. There are a number of reasons for this. Originally mild steels were successfully used in power plant water walls. The magnetite layer that forms at the fire side of the tubes when the boiler is taken into operation protected from corrosion attack. The fuels at that time (oil, coal, gas) were not able to break down the magnetite by corrosion. In addition, there were no restrictions for pollutions and for the combustion itself that could contribute to corrosion attack. The usage of fossil fuels has decreased substantially over the last 25 years, not least by environmental reasons. As a replacement a number of different kinds of bio mass fuels are used. These are typically more or less corrosive and the magnetite layers are attacked. The corrosion is often supported by reducing conditions as a result of the restrictions of the NO{sub x}-pollution. Also the waste fuelled boilers have huge corrosion problems. This has been the case for the last 25 years but nowadays the number of such plants is so much higher and the service data have been turned up. Corrosion protection of the water wall tubes started to be successful in the beginning of the seventies by the introduction of the composite tube. Such tubes are fabricated by mild steel or a low alloy core and corrosion resistant austenite steel or nickel base as an about 2 mm thick corrosion protective coating. Weld cladding of the water wall tubes was introduced in the 1980's as a significantly cheaper alternative to the composite tubes. Thermal spraying and refractory protection are other methods. These corrosion protection methods have not always been effective. For example, depending on incorrect materials selection, incorrect performance and incorrect method selection for the current corrosion or erosion attack. Therefore, there is a need for increased knowledge of which protection method and material that will work

  1. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M

    2008-06-15

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants.

  2. Embrittlement and anodic process in stress corrosion cracking: study of the influent micro-mechanical parameters; Fragilisation et processus anodiques en corrosion sous contrainte: etude des parametres micro-mecaniques influents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinnes, J.Ph

    2006-11-15

    We study the influence of local mechanical parameters on crack propagation in Stress Corrosion Cracking, at the scale of the microstructure. Two systems are compared: the CuAl{sub 9}Ni{sub 3}Fe{sub 2} copper-aluminium alloy in synthetic sea water under cathodic polarization, where the crack propagation mechanism is related to strain-assisted anodic dissolution, and the 316L austenitic stainless steel in MgCl{sub 2} solution, where embrittlement mechanisms related to hydrogen effects prevail. We use micro-notched tensile specimen that allow to study isolated short cracks. These experiments are modelled by means of finite elements calculations, and further characterized by Electron Back scattered Diffraction (EBSD) in the case of the 316L alloy. In terms of the local mechanical parameters that control propagation, fundamental differences are outlined between the two systems. They are discussed from the viewpoint of the available models of Stress Corrosion Cracking. (author)

  3. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of

  4. Time exposure studies on stress corrosion cracking of aluminum 2014-T6, aluminum 7075-T651, and titanium 6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, J.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of a constant applied stress in crack initiation of aluminum 2014-T6, 7075-T651 and titanium 6A1-4V has been investigated. Aluminum c-ring specimens (1-inch diameter) and u-band titanium samples were exposed continuously to a 3.5% NaCl solution (pH 6) and organic fluids of ethyl, methyl, and iso-propyl alcohol (reagent purity). Corrosive action was observed to begin during the first and second day of constant exposure as evidenced by accumulation of hydrogen bubbles on the surface of stressed aluminum samples. However, a similar observation was not noted for titanium stressed specimens. Results of this investigation seems to suggest that aluminum 2014-T6, aluminum 7075-T651 are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in chloride solution (NaCl); while they (both alloys) seem to resist stress corrosion cracking in methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol, iso-propyl alcohol, and demineralized distilled water. Titanium 6A1-4V showed some evidence of susceptibility to SCC in methanol, while no such susceptibility was exhibited in ethanol, iso-propyl alcohol and demineralized distilled water.

  5. Microelectrodes Based investigation of the Impacts of Water Chemistry on Copper and Iron Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of bulk drinking water quality on copper and iron pipe corrosion has been extensively studied. Despite past research, many have argued that bulk water quality does not necessarily reflect water quality near the water-metal interface and that such knowledge is necessary...

  6. High-Performance Laser Peening for Effective Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackel, L; Hao-Lin, C; Wong, F; Hill, M

    2002-10-02

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the Yucca Mountain waste package closure welds is believed to be the greatest threat to long-term containment. Use of stress mitigation to eliminate tensile stresses resulting from welding can prevent SCC. A laser technology with sufficient average power to achieve high throughput has been developed and commercially deployed with high peak power and sufficiently high average power to be an effective laser peening system. An appropriately applied version of this process could be applied to eliminate SCC in the waste package closure welds.

  7. Status report: Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of BWR core shrouds and other internal components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    On July 25, 1994, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 94-03 to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements regarding the structural integrity of core shrouds in domestic boiling water reactors (BWRs). This report begins with a brief description of the safety significance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as it relates to the design and function of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. It then presents a brief history of shroud cracking events both in the US and abroad, followed by an indepth summary of the industry actions to address the issue of IGSCC in BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report summarizes the staff`s basis for issuing GL 94-03, as well as the staff`s assessment of plant-specific responses to GL 94-03. The staff is continually evaluating the licensee inspection programs and the results from examinations of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1995. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

  8. Microstructural and Stress Corrosion Cracking Characteristics of Austenitic Stainless Steels Containing Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Peter L.; Chou, Peter H.; Morra, Martin M.; Lawrence Nelson, J.; Rebak, Raul B.

    2009-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) core internal components in nuclear light water reactors (LWRs) are susceptible to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). One of the effects of irradiation is the hardening of the SS and a change in the dislocation distribution in the alloy. Irradiation may also alter the local chemistry of the austenitic alloys; for example, silicon may segregate and chromium may deplete at the grain boundaries. The segregation or depletion phenomena at near-grain boundaries may enhance the susceptibility of these alloys to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the present work was to perform laboratory tests in order to better understand the role of Si in the microstructure, properties, electrochemical behavior, and susceptibility to EAC of austenitic SSs. Type 304 SS can dissolve up to 2 pct Si in the bulk while maintaining a single austenite microstructure. Stainless steels containing 12 pct Cr can dissolve up to 5 pct bulk Si while maintaining an austenite structure. The crack growth rate (CGR) results are not conclusive about the effect of the bulk concentration of Si on the EAC behavior of SSs.

  9. A state of the art on primary side stress corrosion cracking in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. P.; Kim, J. S.; Han, J. H.; Lee, D. H.; Lim, Y. S.; Suh, J. H.; Hwang, S. S.; Hur, D. H

    1999-09-01

    A state of art on primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of alloy 600 used as steam generator tubing of nuclear power plant and remedial action on the PWSCC were reviewed and analyzed. One of the major metallurgical factors which have effect on PWSCC is Cr carbide distribution. A semicontinuous intergranular Cr carbide distribution enhance PWSCC of alloy 600. PWSCC rate is reported to be reported to be proportional to exp(-50 cal/RT) {sigma}{sup 4}. PWSCC rate also increase with increase in hydrogen partial pressure from 0 to 150 ppm and then decreased with further increase in hydrogen partial pressure to 757 ppm. Development of PWSCC prediction technology which takes into account tubing material, fabrication process and operating history of steam generator is needed to manage PWSCC of domestic nuclear power plant. PWSCC has mainly occurred at expansion irregularities within tubesheet, expansion transitions, dented tube support plate intersections and transition and apex of U bend. Remedial actions to PWSCC are sleeving, plugging, temperature reduction, Ni plating, Ni sleeving, shot peening and steam generator replacement in worst case. Option to remedial actions depend on plant specific such as plant age, leak rate from primary to secondary, density and progression of PWSCC. Ni sleeving developed in Framatome seems to be a powerful method because it never subject to PWSCC. Remedial action should be developed and evaluated for possible PWSCC of domestic nuclear power plant. (author)

  10. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  11. The effect of flow and chemical corrosion in reverse osmosis over desalinated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jae [Chunnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Pak, Byung Gu [Doosan Heavy Industry Co., Tongyoung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Desalinated water produced by a reverse osmosis (RO) filtering method forms about 22% of total production of desalinated water in the world. However, the RO environment is very corrosive due to the presence of various chemicals for water treatment and the flow of sand particles leading to corrosion. Recently, there has been much effort to substitute cheaper and more corrosion resistant stainless steels for copper based alloys as a valve material in RO. Nevertheless, the effects of chemicals and particles on the corrosion of stainless steels have rarely been studied. Erosion phenomenon was detected under the condition with the flow rate of more than 8ms{sup -1} in spite of the absence of sand particles. In seawater containing sand particles, the erosion in stainless steels was accelerated further.

  12. Drinking water quality assessment and corrosion mitigation in the hospital water supply system of Chacas Village (Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Bigoni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rural hospitals in developing countries often lack appropriate water treatments to assure their water needs. In these facilities, due to water different uses and its use with medical equipment, water quality problems can cause very hazardous situations. In particular, corrosion of water distribution systems is a common issue that can cause unwanted changes in water quality and failures of the distribution system’s pipes. These considerations suggest that a complete monitoring program and water treatments to control and guarantee the water quality would be required in each health-care facility. This study assessed the quality of the water at the rural hospital of Chacas (Peru as measured via specific physical-chemical and microbiological parameters. The results show that the chemical and microbiological qualities of the water generally worsen from catchment to the hospital’s taps. Moreover, this work investigated the effects of a dolomite limestone filter installed to adjust the quality of the water distributed at the hospital and thereby mitigate the water’s corrosiveness. Corrosion indices were calculated to provide useful information on the water’s corrosiveness and positive results were obtained in reducing corrosiveness after the installation of the dolomite filter.

  13. Global monthly water stress: 2. Water demand and severity of water stress

    OpenAIRE

    Wada, Yoshihide; Van Beek, L. P. H.; Viviroli, Daniel; Dürr, Hans H.; Weingartner, Rolf; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper assesses global water stress at a finer temporal scale compared to conventional assessments. To calculate time series of global water stress at a monthly time scale, global water availability, as obtained from simulations of monthly river discharge from the companion paper, is confronted with global monthly water demand. Water demand is defined here as the volume of water required by users to satisfy their needs. Water demand is calculated for the benchmark year of 2000 and contras...

  14. Global monthly water stress: 2. Water demand and severity of water stress

    OpenAIRE

    Wada, Yoshihide; Beek, L. P. H.; Viviroli, Daniel; Dürr, Hans H; Weingartner, Rolf; Bierkens, Marc F.P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper assesses global water stress at a finer temporal scale compared to conventional assessments. To calculate time series of global water stress at a monthly time scale, global water availability, as obtained from simulations of monthly river discharge from the companion paper, is confronted with global monthly water demand. Water demand is defined here as the volume of water required by users to satisfy their needs. Water demand is calculated for the benchmark year of 2000 and contras...

  15. Research on General Corrosion Property of 304L and 304NG Stainless Steels in Simulated PWR Primary Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG; De-quan; HU; Shi-lin; ZHANG; Ping-zhu; WANG; Hui

    2012-01-01

    <正>The general corrosion behaviors of 304L and 304NG grade stainless steels in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary loop were studied using still autoclave, respectively, the corrosion test lasted for 1 680 hours. The corrosion oxide films were analyzed macroscopically and microscopically. The results are shown in Figs. 1, 2.

  16. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloy 7000 series after two-step aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdić Bore V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of one step-and a new (short two-step aging on the resistance to stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy 7000 series was investigated, using slow strain rate test and fracture mechanics method. Aging level in the tested alloy was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy and measurements of electrical resistivity. It was shown that the alloy after the new two-step aging is significantly more resistant to stress corrosion cracking. Values of tensile properties and fracture toughness are similar for both thermal states. Processes that take place at the crack tip have been considered. The effect of the testing solution temperature on the crack growth rate on the plateau was determined. Two values of the apparent activation energy were obtained. These values correspond to different processes that control crack growth rate on the plateau at higher and lower temperatures. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34028 i br. TR 34016

  17. Analytical assessment for stress corrosion fatigue of CANDU fuel elements under load following conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horhoianu, Grigore; Ionescu, Drags; Pauna, Eduard [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania). Nuclear Fuel Engineering Lab.

    2012-03-15

    When nuclear power reactors are operated in a load following (LF) mode, the nuclear fuel may be subjected to step changes in power on weekly, daily, or even hourly basis, depending on the grid's needs. Two load following tests performed in TRIGA Research Reactor of Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti were simulated with finite elements computer codes in order to evaluate Stress Corrosion Fatigue (SCF) of the sheath arising from expansion and contraction of the pellets in the corrosive environment. The 3D finite element analyses show that the cyclic strains give highly multiaxial stresses in the sheath at ridge region. This paper summarizes the results of the analytical assessment for SCF and their relation to CANDU fuel performance in LF tests conditions. (orig.)

  18. Characteristics of iron corrosion scales and water quality variations in drinking water distribution systems of different pipe materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Manjie; Liu, Zhaowei; Chen, Yongcan; Hai, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Interaction between old, corroded iron pipe surfaces and bulk water is crucial to the water quality protection in drinking water distribution systems (WDS). Iron released from corrosion products will deteriorate water quality and lead to red water. This study attempted to understand the effects of pipe materials on corrosion scale characteristics and water quality variations in WDS. A more than 20-year-old hybrid pipe section assembled of unlined cast iron pipe (UCIP) and galvanized iron pipe (GIP) was selected to investigate physico-chemical characteristics of corrosion scales and their effects on water quality variations. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze micromorphology and chemical composition of corrosion scales. In bench testing, water quality parameters, such as pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), oxidation reduction potential (ORP), alkalinity, conductivity, turbidity, color, Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Zn(2+), were determined. Scale analysis and bench-scale testing results demonstrated a significant effect of pipe materials on scale characteristics and thereby water quality variations in WDS. Characteristics of corrosion scales sampled from different pipe segments show obvious differences, both in physical and chemical aspects. Corrosion scales were found highly amorphous. Thanks to the protection of zinc coatings, GIP system was identified as the best water quality stability, in spite of high zinc release potential. It is deduced that the complicated composition of corrosion scales and structural break by the weld result in the diminished water quality stability in HP system. Measurement results showed that iron is released mainly in ferric particulate form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment study of the stresses induced by corrosion in the Advanced Cold Process Canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoch, A.R.; Sharland, S.M. [Chemical Studies Department, Radwaste Disposal Division, AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell Laboratory, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    1993-10-01

    The Advanced Cold Process Canister (ACPC) is a concept for the encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel for geological disposal. The basic design of the ACPC consists of an outer oxygen free copper overpack covering a carbon steel inner container. In this report the stresses exerted on the copper overpack as a result of an early failure of the canister and the subsequent corrosion of the steel are calculated. 4 figs, 8 refs, 2 tabs.

  20. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in High Strength Steels and in Titanium and Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    widely throughout the technical community and is not available in collected form, the authors of the chapter on titanium have included a much higher...Elements................ 22 Derivation of KI by Specimen Compliance.............. 23 Experiental Determination of Comll-!hlncc........... 24 Theoretical...101. R. T. Ault, Republic Steel Corp., private communication . 102. S. R. Novak and S. T. Rolfe, Kt, Stress-Corrosion Tests of l2Ni-5Cr-3Mo and l8Ni

  1. Surface Chemistry and Structural Effects in the Stress Corrosion of Glass and Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-15

    the strength and fatigue characteristics of ZBLAN (zirconium barium-lanthanum-aluminum-sodium fluoride) optical glass fiber obtained from British...Surface Chemistry and Structural Effects in the Stress Corrosion of Glass and Ceramic Materlals 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Carlo G. Pantano 13a. TYPE OF...fluorozirconate glasses . °. DTICS ELEC T E DEC 09 I 20. DISTRIBUTION/ AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21.-A% RACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION [BUNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED

  2. Study of the Effect of Swelling on Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the methodology used to study the effect of swelling on the crack growth rate of an irradiation-assisted stress corrosion crack that is propagating in highly irradiated stainless steel 304 material irradiated to 33 dpa in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. The material selection, specimens design, experimental apparatus and processes are described. The results of the current test are presented.

  3. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy 600 to optimize resistance to intergranular stress corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, A.F.; Bibb, A.E.

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprises heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cooling the alloy body, and heating the cooled body to a temperature between 1100 to 1500/sup 0/F for about 1 to 30 hours.

  4. 奥氏体不锈钢和镍基合金在550℃/25MPa超临界水中的应力腐蚀开裂敏感性%Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steels and Nickel-based Alloy in Supercritical Water at 550℃/25 MPa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李力; 张乐福; 唐睿

    2012-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking(SCC) susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels 316Ti, HR3C, TP347 and nickel-based alloy 718 in supercritical water(SCW)at 550℃/25 MPa was studied. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were used to obtain tile stress-strain curves. The results show that the yield strength and tensile strength of 718 were much higher than those of the other three austenitic stainless steels while the elongation of 718 was significantly lower. Scanning electron microscopy observations of fracture surfaces reveal, that the failure mode of 316Ti and TP347 was transgranular ductile fracture, the failure mode of HR3C was both intergranular and transgranular ductile fracture and the failure mode of 718 was almost intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC).%研究了奥氏体不锈钢316Ti、HR3C、TP347和镍基合金718在550℃/25MPa超临界水中的应力腐蚀开裂(SCC)敏感性。通过慢应变速率拉伸试验得到相应的应力-应变曲线。结果表明,在本次试验工况下三种奥氏体不锈钢的屈服强度、抗拉强度和延伸率都非常接近,但镍基合金718的强度远高出其他材料,同时延伸率也大幅降低。扫描电镜对试样侧面以及断口形貌的观察分析发现:316Ti和TP347的失效模式均为穿晶韧性断裂;HR3C则表现为沿晶和穿晶的混合型韧性断裂;718的失效模式则几乎全是沿晶的脆性断裂。

  5. Speciation and distribution of vanadium in drinking water iron pipe corrosion by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Tammie L; Scheckel, Kirk G; Maynard, J Barry

    2010-11-01

    Vanadium (V) when ingested from drinking water in high concentrations (>15 μg L(-1)) is a potential health risk and is on track to becoming a regulated contaminant. High concentrations of V have been documented in lead corrosion by-products as Pb(5)(V(5+)O(4))(3)Cl (vanadinite) which, in natural deposits is associated with iron oxides/oxyhydroxides, phases common in iron pipe corrosion by-products. The extent of potential reservoirs of V in iron corrosion by-products, its speciation, and mechanism of inclusion however are unknown. The aim of this study is to assess these parameters in iron corrosion by-products, implementing synchrotron-based μ-XRF mapping and μ-XANES along with traditional physiochemical characterization. The morphologies, mineralogies, and chemistry of the samples studied are superficially similar to typical iron corrosion by-products. However, we found V present as discrete grains of Pb(5)(V(5+)O(4))(3)Cl likely embedded in the surface regions of the iron corrosion by-products. Concentrations of V observed in bulk XRF analysis ranged from 35 to 899 mg kg(-1). We calculate that even in pipes with iron corrosion by-products with low V concentration, 100 mg kg(-1), as little as 0.0027% of a 0.1-cm thick X 100-cm long section of that corrosion by-product needs to be disturbed to increase V concentrations in the drinking water at the tap to levels well above the 15 μg L(-1) notification level set by the State of California and could adversely impact human health. In addition, it is likely that large reservoirs of V are associated with iron corrosion by-products in unlined cast iron mains and service branches in numerous drinking water distribution systems.

  6. Impact of chlorinated disinfection on copper corrosion in hot water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, J. Castillo; Hamdani, F.; Creus, J.; Touzain, S.; Correc, O.

    2014-09-01

    In France, hot water quality control inside buildings is occasionally ensured by disinfection treatments using temperature increases or addition of sodium hypochlorite (between 0.5 ppm and 1 ppm residual free chlorine). This disinfectant is a strong oxidiser and it could interact with metallic pipes usually used in hot water systems. This work deals with the study of the impact of these treatments on the durability of copper pipes. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of sodium hypochlorite concentration and temperature on the copper corrosion mechanism. Copper samples were tested under dynamic and static conditions of ageing with sodium hypochlorite solutions ranging from 0 to 100 ppm with temperature at 50 °C and 70 °C. The efficiency of a corrosion inhibitor was investigated in dynamic conditions. Visual observations and analytical analyses of the internal surface of samples was studied at different ageing duration. Corrosion products were characterised by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Temperature and disinfectant were found to considerably affect the copper corrosion mechanism. Surprisingly, the corrosiveness of the solution was higher at lower temperatures. The temperature influences the nature of corrosion products. The protection efficiency is then strongly depend on the nature of the corrosion products formed at the surface of copper samples exposed to the aggressive solutions containing different concentration of disinfectant.

  7. Assessment of scale formation and corrosion of drinking water supplies in Ilam city (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabihollah Yousefi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scaling and corrosion are the two most important indexes in water quality evaluation. Pollutants are released in water due to corrosion of pipelines. The aim of this study is to assess the scale formation and corrosion of drinking water supplies in Ilam city (Iran. Methods: This research is a descriptive and cross-sectional study which is based on the 20 drinking water sources in Ilam city. Experiments were carried out in accordance with the Water and Wastewater Co. standard methods for water and wastewater experiment. The data were analyzed by using Microsoft Excel and GraphPad Prism 5. The results were compared with national and international standards. Results: The mean and standard deviation (SD values of Ryznar, Langelier, Aggressive, Puckorius and Larson-Skold indices in year 2009 were equal to 7.833 (±0.28, -0.102 (±0.35, 11.88 (±0.34, 7.481 (±0.22 and 0.801 (±0.44, respectively, and were 7.861 (±0.28, -0.175 (±0.34, 11.84 (±0.37, 7.298(±0.32 and 0.633 (±0.47, for year 2013 respectively. The average of Langelier, Ryznar, Aggression, and Puckorius indices indicate that potable water resources in Ilam city have the tendency to be corrosive. Statistical analysis and figures carried out by GraphPad Prism version 5.04. Conclusion: The results of different indices for water resources of Ilam city revealed that water supplies of Ilam city were corrosive. Water quality control and replacement of distribution pipes in development of water network should be carried out. Moreover, water pipelines should be preserved with several modes of corrosion inhibition.

  8. Hydrogen-related stress corrosion cracking in line pipe steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    1997-01-01

    A correlation between hydrogen concentration (C0) and the critical stress intensity factor for propagation of hydrogen-related cracks has been established by fracture mechanical testing of CT-specimens for the heat affected zone of an X-70 pipeline steel. This has been compared with field...

  9. Effect of water radiolysis on corrosion: steel, cobalt and nickel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musa, A.Y.; Behazin, M.; Knapp, Q.W.; Mizzi, D.; Wren, J.C., E-mail: jcwren@uwo.ca [Western Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Steel, cobalt and nickel alloys are used in the coolant system (or primary heat transport system) of a nuclear power plant. To understand the effect of γ-radiation on the corrosion mechanism of these alloys, a combination of electrochemical measurements and surface analyses as a function of the water chemistry, with and without γ-radiation present, were performed.Results to date have shown that γ-radiation has a major impact on the corrosion process by changing the corrosion potential in a system. This determines the nature of the oxide phase (chemical state and morphology) that forms on a corroding alloy surface. (author)

  10. Influence of Friction Stir Welding on Corrosion Properties of Aw-7020M Alloy in Sea Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudzik K.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW, provides an alternative to MIG and TIG welding methods for joining aluminium alloys. The article presents the results of electrochemical corrosion resistance test of alloy AW- 7020M and its joints welded by FSW. The study was performed using the method of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Impedance spectroscopy studies showed that both, the FSW welded joint and base material AW-7020M has a good resistance to electrochemical corrosion in sea water environment, wherein the welded joint has a higher susceptibility to this type of corrosion. Research has indicated the desirability of applying the FSW method for joining AW-7020M alloy in shipbuilding industry.

  11. Allowing for surface preparation in stress corrosion cracking modelling; Prise en compte de l`etat de surface dans la modelisation de la fissuration par corrosion sous contrainte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, P.; Buisine, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France); Gelpi, A. [FRAMATOME, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France)

    1997-12-31

    When a 600 alloy component is significantly deformed during installation, by welding, rolling, bending, its stress corrosion cracking in Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactor`s primary coolant, is significantly changed by the initial surface treatment. Therefore, the crack initiated time may be reduced by several orders of magnitude for certain surfaces preparations. Allowing for cold working of the surface, for which modelling is proposed, depends less on the degree of cold work then on the depths of the hardened layers. Honing hardens the metal over depths of about one micron for vessel head penetrations, for example, and has little influence on subsequent behaviour after the part deforms. On the other hand, coarser turning treatment produces cold worked layers which can reach several tens of microns and can very significantly reduce the initiation time compared to fine honing. So evaluation after depths of hardening is vital on test pieces for interpreting laboratory results as well as on service components for estimating their service life. Suppression by mechanical or chemical treatment of these layers, after deformation, seems to be the most appropriate solution for reducing over-stressing connected with surface treatment carried out before deformation. (author). 14 refs.

  12. Effect of cold work and processing orientation on stress corrosion cracking behavior of alloy 600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moshier, W.C.; Brown, C.M.

    2000-03-01

    Cold work accelerates stress corrosion cracking (SCC) growth rates in Alloy 600 (UNS N06600). However, the variation in crack growth rates generated from cold-worked material has been significant, and the effect has been difficult to quantify. A study was performed in hydrogenated water adjusted to pH 10.2 to evaluate systematically the effect of cold work on Alloy 600 as a function of temperature, amount of cold work, stress intensity factor, and processing orientation. Cold work was introduced into the material by tensile prestraining or cold-rolling plate product. Crack growth rates were determined between 252 C and 360 C, stress intensity factors between 21 MPa{radical}m and 55 MPa{radical}m, and yield strengths between 201 MPa and 827 MPa. The material with the highest yield strength was cold-rolled and tested in the longitudinal-transverse (LT) and short-transverse (ST) orientations. Crack growth rates increased with increasing temperature, stress intensity factor, and yield strength. Furthermore, crack growth rates were a strong function of the processing orientation in the cold-rolled plate, with growth rates approximately an order of magnitude greater in the ST orientation compared to the LT orientation. Crack growth rates in the LT orientation were measured between 0.003 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s and 1.95 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s and between 0.066 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s and 6.3 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s in the ST orientation. Activation energies were slightly greater in the ST orientation, ranging from 154 kcal/mol to 191 kcal/mol, compared to activation energies between 126 kJ/mol and 157 kJ/mol in the LT orientation. Results of this study demonstrated that, although cold work can be used to accelerate SCC, the orientation of crack growth significantly can affect the results and must be taken into account when analyzing data from cold-worked material.

  13. Effect of titanium nitride/titanium coatings on the stress corrosion of nickel-titanium orthodontic archwires in artificial saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Kuang; Liu, I.-Hua; Liu, Cheng; Chang, Chen-Jung; Kung, Kuan-Chen; Liu, Yen-Ting; Lee, Tzer-Min; Jou, Jin-Long

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop titanium nitride (TiN)/titanium (Ti) coating on orthodontic nickel-titanium (NiTi) wires and to study the stress corrosion of specimens in vitro, simulating the intra-oral environment in as realistic a manner as possible. TiN/Ti coatings were formed on orthodontic NiTi wires by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The characteristics of untreated and TiN/Ti-coated NiTi wires were evaluated by measurement of corrosion potential (Ecorr), corrosion current densities (Icorr), breakdown potential (Eb), and surface morphology in artificial saliva with different pH and three-point bending conditions. From the potentiodynamic polarization and SEM results, the untreated NiTi wires showed localized corrosion compared with the uniform corrosion observed in the TiN/Ti-coated specimen under both unstressed and stressed conditions. The bending stress influenced the corrosion current density and breakdown potential of untreated specimens at both pH 2 and pH 5.3. Although the bending stress influenced the corrosion current of the TiN/Ti-coated specimens, stable and passive corrosion behavior of the stressed specimen was observed even at 2.0 V (Ag/AgCl). It should be noted that the surface properties of the NiTi alloy could determine clinical performance. For orthodontic application, the mechanical damage destroys the protective oxide film of NiTi; however, the self-repairing capacity of the passive film of NiTi alloys is inferior to Ti in chloride-containing solutions. In this study, the TiN coating was found able to provide protection against mechanical damage, while the Ti interlayer improved the corrosion properties in an aggressive environment.

  14. Research on mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knorr, D.B.; Pelloux, R.M.

    1981-06-01

    The results of internal gas pressurization tests, primarily at 320/sup 0/C, on cladding tubes from two suppliers, Supplier A and Supplier B, are presented. The two lots show a substantial difference in iodine SCC susceptibility so a test matrix is used to resolve the relative contributions of surface condition, residual stress, and texture. Additional tests with constant deflection split-ring specimens and with unstressed cladding segments are used to understand crack initiation and the early crack growth stages of SCC. The difference in SCC susceptibility is due to crystallographic texture. Other variables such as surface finish, stress relief temperature, and residual stress have little or no effect. Mechanical properties, crack initiation, and crack propagation all depend on texture. Both initiation and propagation features are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A mechanism for crack initiation consistent with most observations in this study and with the work of other investigators is proposed. At 320/sup 0/C, lifetime is crack initiation limited while several tests at 390/sup 0/C indicate that lifetime is less initiation limited at higher temperature. 31 figures, 9 tables.

  15. Water corrosion of spent nuclear fuel: radiolysis driven dissolution at the UO2/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springell, Ross; Rennie, Sophie; Costelle, Leila; Darnbrough, James; Stitt, Camilla; Cocklin, Elizabeth; Lucas, Chris; Burrows, Robert; Sims, Howard; Wermeille, Didier; Rawle, Jonathan; Nicklin, Chris; Nuttall, William; Scott, Thomas; Lander, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    X-ray diffraction has been used to probe the radiolytic corrosion of uranium dioxide. Single crystal thin films of UO(2) were exposed to an intense X-ray beam at a synchrotron source in the presence of water, in order to simultaneously provide radiation fields required to split the water into highly oxidising radiolytic products, and to probe the crystal structure and composition of the UO(2) layer, and the morphology of the UO(2)/water interface. By modeling the electron density, surface roughness and layer thickness, we have been able to reproduce the observed reflectivity and diffraction profiles and detect changes in oxide composition and rate of dissolution at the Ångström level, over a timescale of several minutes. A finite element calculation of the highly oxidising hydrogen peroxide product suggests that a more complex surface interaction than simple reaction with H(2)O(2) is responsible for an enhancement in the corrosion rate directly at the interface of water and UO(2), and this may impact on models of long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel.

  16. Effect of Stress Ratio and Loading Frequency on the Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Smooth Steel Wire in Different Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songquan Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of loading condition and corrosion solution on the corrosion fatigue behavior of smooth steel wire were discussed. The results of polarization curves and weight loss curves showed that the corrosion of steel wire in acid solution was more severe than that in neutral and alkaline solutions. With the extension of immersion time in acid solution, the cathodic reaction of steel wire gradually changed from the reduction of hydrogen ion to the reduction of oxygen, but was always the reduction of hydrogen ion in neutral and alkaline solutions. The corrosion kinetic parameters and equivalent circuits of steel wires were also obtained by simulating the Nyquist diagrams. In corrosion fatigue test, the effect of stress ratio and loading frequency on the crack initiation mechanism was emphasized. The strong corrosivity of acid solution could accelerate the nucleation of crack tip. The initiation mechanism of crack under different conditions was summarized according to the side and fracture surface morphologies. For the crack initiation mechanism of anodic dissolution, the stronger the corrosivity of solution was, the more easily the fatigue crack source formed, while, for the crack initiation mechanism of deformation activation, the lower stress ratio and higher frequency would accelerate the generation of corrosion fatigue crack source.

  17. Impact of chlorinated disinfection on copper corrosion in hot water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, J. Castillo [Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment Nantes, 11 rue Henri Picherit, BP 82341, 44323 Nantes Cedex 03 (France); Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Hamdani, F. [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Creus, J., E-mail: jcreus@univ-lr.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Touzain, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Correc, O. [Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment Nantes, 11 rue Henri Picherit, BP 82341, 44323 Nantes Cedex 03 (France)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Impact of disinfectant treatment on the durability of copper pipes. • Synergy between disinfectant concentration and temperature. • Pitting corrosion of copper associated to the corrosion products formation on copper. - Abstract: In France, hot water quality control inside buildings is occasionally ensured by disinfection treatments using temperature increases or addition of sodium hypochlorite (between 0.5 ppm and 1 ppm residual free chlorine). This disinfectant is a strong oxidiser and it could interact with metallic pipes usually used in hot water systems. This work deals with the study of the impact of these treatments on the durability of copper pipes. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of sodium hypochlorite concentration and temperature on the copper corrosion mechanism. Copper samples were tested under dynamic and static conditions of ageing with sodium hypochlorite solutions ranging from 0 to 100 ppm with temperature at 50 °C and 70 °C. The efficiency of a corrosion inhibitor was investigated in dynamic conditions. Visual observations and analytical analyses of the internal surface of samples was studied at different ageing duration. Corrosion products were characterised by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Temperature and disinfectant were found to considerably affect the copper corrosion mechanism. Surprisingly, the corrosiveness of the solution was higher at lower temperatures. The temperature influences the nature of corrosion products. The protection efficiency is then strongly depend on the nature of the corrosion products formed at the surface of copper samples exposed to the aggressive solutions containing different concentration of disinfectant.

  18. Benefits of thread rolling process to the stress corrosion cracking and fatigue resistance of high strength fasteners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kephart, A.R.; Hayden, S.Z.

    1993-05-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of cut (machined) vice thread rolled Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625 fasteners in a simulated high temperature primary water environment has been evaluated. SCC testing at 360 and 338C included 157 small and 40 large 60{degree} Vee thread studs. Thread rolled fasteners had improved resistance relative to cut fasteners. Tests of fatigue resistance in air at room temperature and both air and primary water at 315C were conducted on smaller studs with both cut and rolled threads. Results showed rolled threads can have significantly improved fatigue lives over those of cut threads in both air and primary water. Fasteners produced by two different thread rolling methods, in-feed (radial) and through-feed (axial), revealed similar SCC initiation test results. Testing of thread rolled fasteners revealed no significant SCC or fatigue growth of rolling induced thread crest laps typical of the thread rolling process. While fatigue resistance differed between the two rolled thread supplier`s studs, neither of the suppliers studs showed SCC initiation at exposure times beyond that of cut threads with SCC. In contrast to rolling at room temperature, warm rolled (427C) threads showed no improvement over cut threads in terms of fatigue resistance. The observed improved SCC and fatigue performance of rolled threads is postulated to be due to interactive factors, including beneficial residual stresses in critically stressed thread root region, reduction of plastic strains during loading and formation of favorable microstructure.

  19. Employment of Electrochemical Sensors in Determination of Corrosion Rate In Situ in Formation Water Petroleum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Hilario Davis Harriett

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical corrosion is a spontaneous process that causes deterioration or destruction of aninstallation or pipes, shortening therefore the useful life of the same ones. So, it is necessary to know themechanism of electrochemical corrosion that is developed, and subsequently monitored the corrosionrate in the facilities. The purpose of this investigation was to determine “in situ” the corrosion of the ductsconstruction steel which is in contact with the accompanying water of the petroleum. In the determinationof the corrosion rate a sensor of three electrodes was used and with the help of the electrochemical techniqueof resistance of lineal polarization (LPR the kinetics of corrosion was valued. The tests were carriedout under dynamic conditions with a fl ow velocity of the formation water of 100 m3/h and the temperatureof 70 oC and pH 10. The electrochemical technique of LPR allowed to obtain through the parameterof polarization resistance, the value of the corrosion rate of the steel of the ducts in the formation water.

  20. Study on H2S stress corrosion test of welded joint for X65 pipeline steel and numerical analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金晓军; 霍立兴; 张玉凤; 白秉仁; 李晓巍; 曹军

    2004-01-01

    The susceptibility of welded joint for the X65 pipeline steel to H2S stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is investigated. SCC tests on the steel are carried out in the environment based on NACE TM-01-77 solution with saturated gaseous H2S. The threshold stress intensity factor and crack propagation velocity are calculated according to wedge-opening loading (WOL) specimens. The three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis of WOL specimens is performed by using the FEM programming package ANSYS. Stress field and concentration of hydrogen distribution property ahead of the crack tip are obtained. This paper surveyed the microstructure of welded joint and studied on the mechanical properties of X65 pipeline steel. It provides experimental basis for studying stress corrosion. The results of numerical analysis are consistent with conclusions of stress corrosion test.

  1. Study of corrosion of aluminium alloys of nuclear purity in ordinary water, пart one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milan P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of corrosion of aluminum alloys of nuclear purity in ordinary water of the spent fuel storage pool of the RA research reactor at VINČA Institute of Nuclear Sciences has been examined in the frame work of the International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Project "Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminum-Clad Spent Fuel in Water" since 2002. The study presented in this paper comprises activities on determination and monitoring of chemical parameters and radio activity of water and sludge in the RA spent fuel storage pool and results of the initial study of corrosion effects obtained by visual examinations of surfaces of various coupons made of aluminum alloys of nuclear purity of the test racks exposed to the pool water for a period from six months to six years.

  2. Models of Al-, Fe-, Cu- and Zr-alloys corrosion based on thermodynamic estimates of corrosion product solubilities in water coolants of nuclear power units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritskij, V.G. [VNIPIET, S.-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    In this report an effort is made to provide thermodynamic explanation of the data on the corrosion of Fe-, Cu-, Zr- and Al-based construction materials in water-cooled circuits of NPPs at concrete water chemistry conditions. Physicochemical models of corrosion in chemically desalinized water are also presented using a complete set of equilibrium conditions in the system CPs - water coolant. At the 1st stage of the problem solution the solubility was defined for the system `corrosion products (Me{sub n}O{sub m}; Me(OH){sub k})) - water (H{sub 2}O) - gas (H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}) - additives (HCl, KOH) for pH correction` in the range of 25-350degC. The 2nd stage of our work includes the formation of the database on the kinetics and rate of metal corrosion in water - parabolic uniform process for Fe-, Cu- and Al-alloys; linear `post-transitional` process for Zr-alloys. The results obtained allow to establish a correlation between the corrosion parameters and the equilibrium solubility of that phase of CPs which remains stable during corrosion tests. (author)

  3. LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

  4. Simulation of Mechanical Stress on Stainless Steel for Pb-Bi Corrosion Test by Using ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwanto, D.; Mustari, A. P. A.; Budiman, B. A.

    2017-03-01

    Pb-Bi eutectic with its advantageous is proposed to be utilized as a coolant in the GEN IV type of rSeactor. However, high temperature corrosion when contact with stainless steels is one of the issues of Pb-Bi eutectic utilization. It is known that in the environment of high temperature Pb-Bi, mechanical strength of stainless steel may decrease. Thus, simulation of mechanical stress working on stainless steel during in-situ bending test by using ABAQUS was conducted. Several bending degrees were simulated at high temperature to obtain the mechanical stress information. Temperature condition was strongly affect the stress vs. displacement profile. The reported mechanical strength reduction percentage was used to draw predicted mechanical stress under high temperature Pb-Bi environment.

  5. General and Localized corrosion of Austenitic and Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Fix; J. Estill; L. Wong; R. Rebak

    2004-05-28

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  6. General and Localized Corrosion of Austenitic And Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estill, J C; Rebak, R B; Fix, D V; Wong, L L

    2004-03-11

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  7. Survey of chemical quality and corrosion and scaling potential of drinking water distribution network of Bushehr city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorban Asgari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Determination of water corrosion indexes is one of the affecting approaches on drinking water management. Corrosion can causes economical problems, reduce the useful life of water facilities, and health damages to consumers. The aim of this study was to survey of chemical quality and determination of the corrosion potential of the water distribution system in Bushehr city. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, the sampling was carried out during one year from 7 stations. Values of Langelier, Ryznar, corrosivity and Puckorius indexes were calculated by using such parameters as pH, total dissolved solids, temperature, permanent and temporary hardness, and alkalinity. Results: The average values for pH, total dissolved solids, temperature, and alkalinity was obtained 7.5, 586.82 mg/L, 66.92 mg/L CaCO3. The corrosion indexes were calculated Langelier 0.28, Ryznar 7.24, corrosivity 12.02, and Puckorius 7.81. Conclusion: Bushehr city water is tends to be slightly scaling based on Ryznar index and corrosive based on other studied indexes. Overall, the water quality was tending to corrosive and, therefore, recommended to use corrosion resistance pipes in water transmission and network or lining the inner wall of pipes or correction the water quality.

  8. Lead-induced stress-corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in plausible steam generator crevice environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, M.D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Manolescu, A. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mirzai, M. [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-03-01

    Laboratory stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) test environments were developed to simulate crevice chemistries representative of Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A (BNPD A) steam generators (SGs); these test environments were used to determine the susceptibility of Alloy 600 to lead-induced SCC under plausible SG conditions. Test environments were based on plant SG hideout return data and analysis of removed tubes and deposits. Deviations from the normal near-neutral crevice pH environment were considered to simulate possible faulted excursion crevice chemistry and to bound the postulated crevice pH range of 3 to 9 (at temperature). The effect of lead contamination up to 1000 ppm, but with an emphasis on the 100- to 500-ppm range, was determined. SCC susceptibility was investigated using constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests and encapsulated C-ring tests. CERT tests were performed at 305 degrees C on tubing representative of BNPD A SG U-bends. The C-ring test method allowed a wider test matrix, covering 3 temperatures (280 degrees C, 304 degrees C and 315 degrees C), 3 strain levels (0.2%, 2% and 4%), and tubing representative of U-bends plus tubing given a simulated stress relief to represent material at the tube sheet. The results of this test program confirmed that in the absence of lead contamination, cracking does not occur in these concentrated, 3.3 to 8.9 pH range, crevice environments. Also, it appears that the concentrated crevice environments suppress lead-induced cracking relative to that seen in all-volatile-treatment (AVT) water. For the (static) C-ring tests, lead-induced SCC was only produced in the near-neutral crevice environment and was more severe at 500 ppm than at 100 ppm PbO. This trend was also observed in CERT tests, but some cracking-grain boundary attack occurred in acidic (pH 3.3) and alkaline (pH 8.9) environments. The C-ring tests indicated that a certain amount of resistance to cracking was imparted by simulated stress relief of

  9. Some important considerations in the development of stress corrosion cracking test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, R. P.; Novak, S. R.; Williams, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of some of the precaution needs the development of fracture-mechanics based test methods for studying stress corrosion cracking involves. Following a review of pertinent analytical fracture mechanics considerations and of basic test methods, the implications for test corrosion cracking studies of the time-to-failure determining kinetics of crack growth and life are examined. It is shown that the basic assumption of the linear-elastic fracture mechanics analyses must be clearly recognized and satisfied in experimentation and that the effects of incubation and nonsteady-state crack growth must also be properly taken into account in determining the crack growth kinetics, if valid data are to be obtained from fracture-mechanics based test methods.

  10. Nickel Alloy Primary Water Bulk Surface and SCC Corrosion Film Analytical Characterization and SCC Mechanistic Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, D.; Lewis, N.; Hanson, M.; Rice, S.; Sanders, P.

    2007-04-18

    Alloy 600 corrosion coupon tests were performed: (1) to quantify the temperature dependency of general corrosion and (2) to characterize the composition and structure of bulk surface corrosion films for comparison with ongoing primary water SCC (PWSCC) crack tip corrosion film analyses. Results suggest that the thermal activation energy of Alloy 600 corrosion is consistent with the thermal activation energy of nickel alloy PWSCC. Analytical investigations of the structure and composition of Alloy 600 bulk surface corrosion oxides revealed a duplex (inner and outer) oxide layer structure. The outer layer is discontinuous and comprised of relatively large (1 to 3 {micro}m) nickel ferrite crystals and smaller ({approx}0.1 {micro}m) chromium containing nickel ferrite crystals. The inner layer consists of a relatively continuous chromite spinel (major phase) and chromia (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} minor phase) which formed through non-selective oxidation. Chromia and dealloyed Alloy 600 (highly Ni enriched metal) were only observed at 337 C (640 F) and only along the boundaries of deformation induced fine grains and subcells. Specimens having deformation free surfaces exhibited continuous uniform inner chromite spinel oxide layers. Specimens with machining induced surface deformation produced non-uniform inner layer oxides (chromite spinel, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and unoxidized material). PWSCC crack tip oxides, in contrast, were fine grain (no duplex structure) and consisted of both chromium rich spinels and ''NiO'' structure oxides. Generally, nickel rich oxides were more abundant under more oxidized conditions (reduced coolant hydrogen) and spinel rich crack tip oxides were favored under more reducing conditions (increased coolant hydrogen). Bulk surface corrosion film thickness did not correlate with observed SCC growth rates. These results suggest that corrosion is not the rate controlling step of PWSCC but rather that PWSCC and corrosion have a common rate

  11. The influence of sodium hypochlorite biocide on the corrosion of carbon steel in reclaimed water used as circulating cooling water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Weina; Tian, Yimei; Peng, Sen, E-mail: pengsen@tju.edu.cn

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • The changes of polarisation curves and EIS over time were investigated. • Protective layers consist of microorganism metabolites and scale in the presence of microorganisms. • NaClO decreases the corrosion in circulating cooling water, whereas it promotes the corrosion in sterile water. • NaClO kills the microorganisms simultaneously along with the inhibition of corrosion and scaling in circulating cooling water. - Abstract: In this paper, we investigated the influence of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) biocide on the corrosion of carbon steel in four different conditions during one dosing cycle. The results from the polarisation curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) indicated that NaClO could affect the activity of microorganisms, leading to corrosion inhibition. The equivalent circuits had two time constants in the presence of biocide, which suggested that an oxide layer of NaClO was formed on the carbon steel surface. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were both employed to demonstrate that NaClO produced a good antibacterial activity, thereby indirectly retarding corrosion while simultaneously inhibiting scaling.

  12. Galvanic Corrosion of Lead by Iron (Oxyhydr)Oxides: Potential Impacts on Drinking Water Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueman, Benjamin F; Sweet, Gregory A; Harding, Matthew D; Estabrook, Hayden; Bishop, D Paul; Gagnon, Graham A

    2017-06-20

    Lead exposure via drinking water remains a significant public health risk; this study explored the potential effects of upstream iron corrosion on lead mobility in water distribution systems. Specifically, galvanic corrosion of lead by iron (oxyhydr)oxides was investigated. Coupling an iron mineral cathode with metallic lead in a galvanic cell increased lead release by 531 μg L(-1) on average-a 9-fold increase over uniform corrosion in the absence of iron. Cathodes were composed of spark plasma sintered Fe3O4 or α-Fe2O3 or field-extracted Fe3O4 and α-FeOOH. Orthophosphate immobilized oxidized lead as insoluble hydroxypyromorphite, while humic acid enhanced lead mobility. Addition of a humic isolate increased lead release due to uniform corrosion by 81 μg L(-1) and-upon coupling lead to a mineral cathode-release due to galvanic corrosion by 990 μg L(-1). Elevated lead in the presence of humic acid appeared to be driven by complexation, with (208)Pb and UV254 size-exclusion chromatograms exhibiting strong correlation under these conditions (R(2)average = 0.87). A significant iron corrosion effect was consistent with field data: lead levels after lead service line replacement were greater by factors of 2.3-4.7 at sites supplied by unlined cast iron distribution mains compared with the alternative, lined ductile iron.

  13. Influence of rare earth elements on corrosion behavior of Al-brass in marine water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Gaoyong; ZHOU Yuxiong; ZENG Juhua; ZOU Yanming; LIU Jian; SUN Liping

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion behaviors of Al-brass in stagnant and flowing marine water as a function of combinative rare earths (Ce and La) addition were investigated by electrochemical techniques,X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).It was demonstrated that RE elements could make the corrosion product layer more protective and strengthen the cohesion between the film and matrix in stagnant seawater.The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis confirmed that a duplex layer,which was mainly composed of an inner A12O3 with trace amounts of RE compounds and an outer basic chloride of copper or zinc like (Cu,Zn)2Cl(OH)3,Cu(OH)Cl and CuCl2·3Cu(OH)2 layer was formed on RE-contained Al-brass surface and that the inner layer was responsible for the good corrosion resistance of the alloy.While only a porous and non-protective corrosion product layer was formed on the Al-brass alloy without RE addition,which made small values of the corrosion resistance.Additionally,in flowing marine water with velocity about 2 m/s,pitting corrosion occurred on the M-brass surface and RE addition could availably decrease pitting sensitivity of the alloy.

  14. Corrosion Inhibition of the Galvanic Couple Copper-Carbon Steel in Reverse Osmosis Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Carrillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the electrochemical behaviour of corrosion inhibition of the copper-carbon steel galvanic couple (Cu-CS, exposed to reverse osmosis water (RO used for rinsing of heat exchangers for heavy duty machinery, during manufacture. Molybdate and nitrite salts were utilized to evaluate the inhibition behaviour under galvanic couple conditions. Cu-CS couple was used as working electrodes to measure open circuit potential (OCP, potentiodynamic polarization (PP, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. The surface conditions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The most effective concentration ratio between molybdate and nitrite corrosion inhibitors was determined. The morphological study indicated molybdate deposition on the anodic sites of the galvanic couple. The design of molybdate-based corrosion inhibitor developed in the present work should be applied to control galvanic corrosion of the Cu-CS couple during cleaning in the manufacture of heat exchangers.

  15. Study on an Eco-Friendly Corrosion and Scale Inhibitor in Simulated cooling water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defang Zeng1

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a composite eco-friendly phosphate-free corrosion and scale inhibitor used in simulated cooling water has been developed by sodium polyacrylate, zinc sulfate, sodium tungstate, sodium gluconate and triethanolamine . The corrosion and scale inhibition rate were respectively evaluated by weight loss experiment , the static scale inhibition test and electrochemical test. The results indicated that the corrosion and scale inhibitor was consisted of polyacrylate 14ppm,zinc sulfate 3ppm,sodium tungstate 7ppm,sodium gluconate 2ppm and triethanolamine12ppm.The corrosion inhibition rate could reached 92.79%, and anti-scaling inhibition rate could reached 96.01%. The formula was efficient , phosphate-free and environmental, it would be widely used

  16. Effect of coating and surface modification on the corrosion resistance of selected alloys in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J.; Zheng, W. [CANMET, Materials Technology Lab., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Cook, W. [Univ. of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick (Canada); Toivonen, A.; Penttila, S. [VTT Technical Research Center of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Guzonas, D.; Woo, O.T. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Liu, P.; Bibby, D. [CANMET, Materials Technology Lab., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Materials selection is one of the key tasks in Gen-IV reactor development. There is no known material that can meet the expected core outlet conditions of the Canadian SCWR concept (625{sup o}C core outlet temperature). High-Cr steels with excellent corrosion resistance are often susceptible to embrittlement due to the precipitation of sigma and other phases in the microstructure. Low-Cr steels such as P91 and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels exhibit good high-temperature mechanical properties, but the lack of sufficient Cr content makes this group alloy corrode too fast. Improvement in this alloy is needed in order for it to be considered as a piping construction material. In this report, the development of a metallic coating on a P91 substrate is discussed. Recent effort on selection of in-core cladding alloys has focused on heat-resistant 3xx series stainless steels. These alloys have higher strength at high-temperature ranges, but corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking resistance are a concern. Metallic coating and surface modification are considered as possible solutions to overcome this challenge. The effects of surface modification on the corrosion rate of austenitic steels were also reported in this paper. As-machined surface showed much better corrosion resistance than polished surface and advanced surface analyses showed distinct differences in the nature and the morphology of the surface layer metal. Possible mechanisms for improved corrosion performance are discussed. (author)

  17. Microstructural investigation of vintage pipeline steels highly susceptible to stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Monica

    The use of pipelines for the transmission of gas offers not only efficiency, but a number of economic advantages. Nevertheless, pipelines are subject to aggressive operating conditions and environments which can lead to in-service degradation [1] and thus to failures. These failures can have catastrophic consequences, such as environmental damage and loss of life [2]. One of the most dangerous threats to pipeline integrity is stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Despite the substantial progress that has been achieved in the field, due to the complex nature of this phenomenon there is still not a complete understanding of this form of external corrosion. This makes its detection and prevention a challenge and therefore a risk to pipeline integrity, and most importantly, to the safety of the population. SCC cracks are the result of the interaction between a corrosive environment, applied stresses, and a susceptible microstructure. To date, what defines a susceptible microstructure remains ambiguous, as SCC has been observed in a range of steel grades, microstructures, chemical composition, and grain sizes. Therefore, in order to be able to accurately predict and prevent this hazardous form of corrosion, it is imperative to advance our knowledge on the subject and gain a better understanding on the microstructural features of highly susceptible pipeline materials, especially in the subsurface zone where crack nucleation must take place. Therefore, a microstructural characterization of the region near the surface layer was carried-out utilizing TEM. TEM analysis revealed the dislocation character, ferrite morphology, and apparent carbide precipitation in some grain boundaries. Furthermore, light microscopy, SEM, and hardness testing were performed to expand our knowledge on the microscopical features of highly SCC susceptible service components. This investigation presents a new approach to SCC characterization, which exposed the sub-surface region microscopical

  18. Effect of Water Vapor on High-Temperature Corrosion under Conditions Mimicking Biomass Firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    The variable flue gas composition in biomass-fired plants, among other parameters, contributes to the complexityof high-temperature corrosion of materials. Systematic parameter studies are thus necessary to understand the underlyingcorrosion mechanisms. This paper investigates the effect of water...... previouslyreported findings suggest that an increase in the water vapor content will cause competitive adsorption on active sites....

  19. Strontium Concentrations in Corrosion Products from Residential Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    thoroughly mixed with 2.25 g of cellulose and pressed into 31 mm pellets for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. Two representative iron corrosion products...events in reticulation systems and evaluation of flushing methods to remove deposited particles: A review. Water Sci. Technol.: Water Supply 2003, 3 (1

  20. Corrosion Fatigue of High-Strength Titanium Alloys Under Different Stress Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baragetti, Sergio; Villa, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    Ti-6Al-4V is the most widely used high strength-to-mass ratio titanium alloy for advanced engineering components. Its adoption in the aerospace, maritime, automotive, and biomedical sectors is encouraged when highly stressed components with severe fatigue loading are designed. The extents of its applications expose the alloy to several aggressive environments, which can compromise its brilliant mechanical characteristics, leading to potentially catastrophic failures. Ti-6Al-4V stress-corrosion cracking and corrosion-fatigue sensitivity has been known since the material testing for pressurized tanks for Apollo missions, although detailed investigations on the effects of harsh environment in terms of maximum stress reduction have been not carried out until recent times. In the current work, recent experimental results from the authors' research group are presented, quantifying the effects of aggressive environments on Ti-6Al-4V under fatigue loading in terms of maximum stress reduction. R = 0.1 axial fatigue results in laboratory air, 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, and CH3OH methanol solution at different concentrations are obtained for mild notched specimens ( K t = 1.18) at 2e5 cycles. R = 0.1 tests are also conducted in laboratory air, inert environment, 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution for smooth, mild and sharp notched specimens, with K t ranging from 1 to 18.65, highlighting the environmental effects for the different load conditions induced by the specimen geometry.

  1. Reactions of plutonium dioxide with water and oxygen-hydrogen mixtures: Mechanisms for corrosion of uranium and plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, John M.; Allen, Thomas H.; Morales, Luis A.

    1999-06-18

    Investigation of the interactions of plutonium dioxide with water vapor and with an oxygen-hydrogen mixture show that the oxide is both chemically reactive and catalytically active. Correspondence of the chemical behavior with that for oxidation of uranium in moist air suggests that similar catalytic processes participate in the mechanism of moisture-enhanced corrosion of uranium and plutonium. Evaluation of chemical and kinetic data for corrosion of the metals leads to a comprehensive mechanism for corrosion in dry air, water vapor, and moist air. Results are applied in confirming that the corrosion rate of Pu in water vapor decreases sharply between 100 and 200 degrees C.

  2. Role of {delta}-ferrite in stress corrosion cracking retardation near fusion boundary of 316NG welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiroshi.abe@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Watanabe, Yutaka [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) near the fusion boundary of a 316NG stainless steel (SS) welded joint in high-temperature water was investigated with emphasis on the relation to the microstructural characteristics. {delta}-Ferrite islands were distributed on the crack paths (grain boundary in the partially melted zone and cell boundary in the unmixed zone) near the fusion boundary of 316NG SS piping. SCC retardation near the fusion boundary was clearly observed in our experiments. The relative crack growth rate (CGR) at the {delta}-{gamma} interface was estimated to be 0.043 times lower than that at the {gamma}-{gamma} interface. The cracks remained for a considerable period of time just after they reached the {delta}-ferrite islands. Even those cracks that passed through an initial set of {delta}-ferrite islands were retarded when they encountered a subsequent set of {delta}-ferrite islands. High corrosion resistance due to the presence of large amounts of Cr and the island-shaped morphology of {delta}-ferrite are dominant factors in SCC retardation.

  3. Corrosion behavior of magnetic refrigeration material La-Fe-Co-Si in distilled water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Min, E-mail: zhmn9459@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 XueYuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Long Yi; Ye Rongchang; Chang Yongqin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 XueYuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2011-02-24

    Research highlights: > In this paper, we study the corrosion behavior of La(Fe{sub 0.94}Co{sub 0.06}){sub 11.7}Si{sub 1.3} compound in distilled water and report an unexpected discovery that corrosion occurs at matrix phase rather than rare earth rich phase, which is different from other rare earth materials. The corrosion has decreased the maximum magnetic entropy change of the compound. - Abstract: The corrosion behavior of magnetic refrigeration material La(Fe{sub 0.94}Co{sub 0.06}){sub 11.7}Si{sub 1.3} in distilled water has been studied using X-ray diffraction analysis, weight loss method, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results show that La(Fe{sub 0.94}Co{sub 0.06}){sub 11.7}Si{sub 1.3} compound suffers electrochemical preferential corrosion in distilled water. La(Fe{sub 0.94}Co{sub 0.06}){sub 11.7}Si{sub 1.3} compound contains three phases which are matrix phase, a small amount of {alpha}-Fe phase and La-rich phase. The matrix phase with NaZn{sub 13} structure works as anode to be corroded. The final corrosion products on sample surface are La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gamma}-Fe(OOH), Co(OH){sub 2} and H{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}, respectively. Corrosion has decreased the maximum magnetic entropy change of the compound.

  4. Effect of hydrogen in Inconel Alloy 600 on corrosion in high temperature oxygenated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, J. [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01, Aramaki Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Peng, Q.J. [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01, Aramaki Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)], E-mail: qpeng@rift.mech.tohoku.ac.jp; Sakaguchi, K.; Takeda, Y.; Kuniya, J.; Shoji, T. [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01, Aramaki Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    Corrosion test on hydrogen charged and uncharged coupons of Inconel Alloy 600 in high temperature oxygenated water showed more weight loss of charged coupon. Observation of the oxide film by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed a defective, thicker oxide layer on charged coupon. Analyses of the oxide film by TEM-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated enrichment of Ni but depletion of Cr in the oxide film on charged coupon. The changes in corrosion behavior and microstructure of the oxide film were most likely due to the hydrogen enhanced preferential dissolution of Cr cations in the water.

  5. Effect of layerwise structural inhomogeneity on stress- corrosion cracking of steel tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovich, Yu A.; Krymskaya, O. A.; Isaenkova, M. G.; Morozov, N. S.; Fesenko, V. A.; Ryakhovskikh, I. V.; Esiev, T. S.

    2016-04-01

    Based on X-ray texture and structure analysis data of the material of main gas pipelines it was shown that the layerwise inhomogeneity of tubes is formed during their manufacturing. The degree of this inhomogeneity affects on the tendency of tubes to stress- corrosion cracking under exploitation. Samples of tubes were cut out from gas pipelines located under various operating conditions. Herewith the study was conducted both for sections with detected stress-corrosion defects and without them. Distributions along tube wall thickness for lattice parameters and half-width of X-ray lines were constructed. Crystallographic texture analysis of external and internal tube layers was also carried out. Obtained data testifies about considerable layerwise inhomogeneity of all samples. Despite the different nature of the texture inhomogeneity of gas pipeline tubes, the more inhomogeneous distribution of texture or structure features causes the increasing of resistance to stress- corrosion. The observed effect can be explained by saturation with interstitial impurities of the surface layer of the hot-rolled sheet and obtained therefrom tube. This results in rising of lattice parameters in the external layer of tube as compared to those in underlying metal. Thus, internal layers have a compressive effect on external layers in the rolling plane that prevents cracks opening at the tube surface. Moreover, the high mutual misorientation of grains within external and internal layers of tube results in the necessity to change the moving crack plane, so that the crack growth can be inhibited when reaching the layer with a modified texture.

  6. Relationship between localized strain and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in an austenitic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMurtrey, M.D., E-mail: mdmcm@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Was, G.S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Patrick, L.; Farkas, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2011-04-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Austenitic steel is more susceptible to intergranular corrosion after irradiation. {yields} Simulation and experiment used to study cracking in irradiated austentic steel. {yields} Cracking occurs at random high angle boundaries normal to the tensile stress. {yields} Cracking at boundaries with high normal stress and inability to accommodate strain. {yields} Boundary type, angle, and Taylor and Schmid factors affect strain accommodation. - Abstract: Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking may be linked to the local slip behavior near grain boundaries that exhibit high susceptibility to cracking. Fe-13Cr-15Ni austenitic steel was irradiated with 2 MeV protons at 360 deg. C to 5 dpa and strained in 288 deg. C simulated BWR conditions. Clusters of grains from the experiment were created in an atomistic simulation and then virtually strained using molecular dynamic simulation techniques. Cracking and grain orientation data were characterized in both the experiment and the simulation. Random high angle boundaries with high surface trace angles with respect to the tensile direction were found to be the most susceptible to cracking. Grain boundary cracking susceptibility was also found to correlate strongly with slip continuity, indicating that the strain accommodation at the boundary is related to cracking resistance. Higher cracking susceptibility was also found at grain boundaries adjacent to grains with low Schmid factor or high Taylor factor. The basic trends reported here are supported by both the experiments and the simulations.

  7. Laboratory evaluation of soil stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement of API grade steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, A.H.S.; Castro, B.B.; Ponciano, J.A.C. [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). COPPE

    2004-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in carbon steels is a form of deterioration that can occur during the service life of a pipeline that is exposed to mechanical stress and strains. A study was conducted to investigate SCC and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of API grade steels in contact with soil. The physical, chemical and bacteriological characteristics of different soil samples were determined. Slow strain rate tests were performed using electrolytes obtained in the soil samples taken from different points near buried pipelines. Stress versus strain curves were obtained at different electrode potentials for API X46, X60 and X80 steels. The results showed the conjoint incidence of SCC and HE, depending on the potential imposed. It was revealed that HE contributes to the initiation of cracking and crack propagation. Cracking morphology was similar to the SCC found in field situations where transgranular cracking was detected in a pipeline that had collapsed as a result of land creeping. The material exhibited signs of secondary cracking and lower ductility, even under cathodic potentials. It was noted that the methodology used in this study was not able to reproduce the possible effect of microbial induced corrosion. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  8. Organic Contaminants and Treatment Chemicals in Steam-Water Cycles: Thermal stability, decomposition products and flow-accelerated corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moed, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    Boiler feedwater and steam have to be of high purity, because of the susceptibility of the steam-water cycle to corrosion. Organic contaminants break down in boilers by hydrothermolysis, leading to the formation of organic acid anions, which are suspected to cause corrosion of steam-water cycle

  9. Organic Contaminants and Treatment Chemicals in Steam-Water Cycles: Thermal stability, decomposition products and flow-accelerated corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moed, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    Boiler feedwater and steam have to be of high purity, because of the susceptibility of the steam-water cycle to corrosion. Organic contaminants break down in boilers by hydrothermolysis, leading to the formation of organic acid anions, which are suspected to cause corrosion of steam-water cycle comp

  10. Development of a iron pipe corrosion simulation model for a water supply network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bernats

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion in water supply networks is unwanted process that causes pipe material loss and subsequent pipe failures. Nowadays pipe replacing strategy most often is based on pipe age, which is not always the most important factor in pipe burst rate. In this study a methodology for developing a mathematical model to predict the decrease of pipe thickness in a large cast iron networks is presented. The quality of water, the temperature and the water flow regime were the main factors taken into account in the corrosion model. The water quality and flow rate effect were determined by measuring corrosion rate of metals coupons over the period of one year at different flow regimes. The obtained constants were then introduced in a calibrated hydraulic model (Epanet and the corrosion model was validated by measuring the decrease of wall thickness in the samples that were removed during the regular pipe replacing event. The validated model was run for 30 yr to simulate the water distribution system of Riga (Latvia. Corrosion rate in the first year was 8.0–9.5 times greater than in all the forthcoming years, an average decrease of pipe wall depth being 0.013/0.016 mm per year in long term. The optimal iron pipe exploitation period was concluded to be 30–35 yr (for pipe wall depth 5.50 mm and metal density 7.5 m3 t−1. The initial corrosion model and measurement error was 33%. After the validation of the model the error was reduced to below 15%.

  11. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended form of Dirichlet energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harry Yosh

    2013-12-01

    The mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been discussed for decades. Here I propose a model of SCC reflecting the feature of fracture in brittle manner based on the variational principle under approximately supposed thermal equilibrium. In that model the functionals are expressed with extended forms of Dirichlet energy, and Dirichlet principle is applied to them to solve the variational problem that represents SCC and normal extension on pipe surface. Based on the model and the maximum entropy principle, the statistical nature of SCC colony is discussed and it is indicated that the crack has discrete energy and length under ideal isotropy of materials and thermal equilibrium.

  12. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended form of Dirichlet energy: Part 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HARRY YOSH

    2016-10-01

    In the previous paper ({\\it Pramana – J. Phys.} 81(6), 1009 (2013)), the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) based on non-quadratic form of Dirichlet energy was proposed and its statistical features were discussed. Following those results, we discuss here how SCC propagates on pipe wall statistically. It reveals that SCC growth distribution is described with Cauchy problem of time-dependent first-order partial differential equation characterized by the convolution of the initial distribution of SCC over time. We also discuss the extension of the above results to the SCC in two-dimensional space and its statistical features with a simple example.

  13. INHIBITION OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL STORAGE TANKS AT HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-01-31

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of A537 tank steel was investigated in a series of environments designed to simulate the chemistry of legacy nuclear weapons production waste. Tests consisted of both slow strain rate tests using tensile specimens and constant load tests using compact tension specimens. Based on the tests conducted, nitrite was found to be a strong SCC inhibitor. Based on the test performed and the tank waste chemistry changes that are predicted to occur over time, the risk for SCC appears to be decreasing since the concentration of nitrate will decrease and nitrite will increase.

  14. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of welded ferritic stainless steels in high temperature aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuzuka, Toshio; Shimogori, Kazutoshi; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Tomari, Haruo (Kobe Steel Ltd. (Japan). Central Research and Development Lab.); Kanda, Masao

    1982-07-01

    In considering the application of ferritic stainless steels to heat exchanger tubing materials for moisture separator-reheaters in LWRs, the effects of environmental conditions (temperature, chloride, dissolved oxygen, pH), thermal history, and steel composition (content of C, N, Cr and Ti) on the Inter-Granular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) in high temperature aqueous environments, were studied. The IGSCC was proved to depend on steel composition and thermal history rather than environment. From these results, a steel was designed to prevent IGSCC of the welding HAZ for 18Cr and 13Cr steels.

  15. Oil field chemicals synergistic effects on the corrosion rate of L-80 steel in sea and formation waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Hashem, A.; Carew, J. [Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, P.O. Box 24885, 13109 Safat Kuwait (Kuwait); Al-Borno, A. [Charter Coating Service (2000) Ltd., no 6, 4604, 13 Street N.E., Calgary, AB T2E 6P1 (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The corrosion rate of tubular grade L-80 carbon steel under downhole conditions of a northern oil field of Kuwait was investigated. This was done using the injection seawater, formation water and a 50:50 mixture of both waters in the presence of commercially available corrosion inhibitor, scale inhibitor, and biocide products separately and in combination with each other. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the corrosion inhibitor and its interaction with the scale inhibitor and the biocide, as seen in the corrosion rate of L80 carbon steel. This was done using the manufacturers' recommended dosage levels of the corrosion inhibitor, scale inhibitor and biocide. The corrosion rates were measured by linear polarization. Tests were conducted using the rotating cylinder electrode method with rotational speeds of 1000 and 2000 rpm at 80 deg. C. The seawater results indicated that the corrosion-scale inhibitor and biocide-scale inhibitor combinations provided the best protection at both rotation speeds. In formation water, the effects of rotation speed were more apparent with higher corrosion rates of L-80 carbon steel accompanying higher shear forces. In the 50: 50 mix waters and the formation water, the corrosion-scale inhibitors-biocide combination provided the best protection at both rotational speeds under downhole conditions of a northern oil field of Kuwait. (authors)

  16. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the

  17. Electro chemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of Incoloy-800 in caustic solution, part I: As received samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many non-volatile impurities accidentally introduced into the steam generator tend to Concentrate on its surface in restricted flow areas. In this way these impurities can lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC on stressed tubes of the steam generator. Such impurities can be strong alkaline or acid solutions. To evaluate the effect of alkaline concentrated environments on SCC of steam generator tubes, the tests were con ducted on stressed samples of Incoloy-800 in 10% NaOH solution. To accelerate the SCC process, stressed specimens were anodically polarised in a caustic solution in an electro chemical cell. The method of stressing of Incoloy-800 tubes used in our experiments was the C-ring. Using the cathodic zone of the potentiodynamic curves it was possible to calculate the most important electrochemical parameters: the corrosion current, the corrosion rate, and the polarization resistance. We found that the value of the corrosion potential to initiate the SCC microcracks was -100 mV. The tested samples were examined using the metallographic method. The main experimental results showed that the in crease of the stress state promoted the in crease of the SCC susceptibility of Incoloy-800 samples tested under the same conditions, and that the length of the SCC-type microcracks in creased with the growth of the stress value.

  18. Screening and Quantification of Aliphatic Primary Alkyl Corrosion Inhibitor Amines in Water Samples by Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Maher, Simon; Damon, Deidre E; Barrett, Richard M; Syed, S U; Heeren, Ron M A; Taylor, Stephen; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K

    2016-01-19

    Direct analysis and identification of long chain aliphatic primary diamine Duomeen O (n-oleyl-1,3-diaminopropane), corrosion inhibitor in raw water samples taken from a large medium pressure water tube boiler plant water samples at low LODs (corrosion inhibitors in an industrial water boiler plant and other related samples in the water treatment industry. This approach was applied for the analysis of three complex water samples including feedwater, condensate water, and boiler water, all collected from large medium pressure (MP) water tube boiler plants, known to be dosed with varying amounts of polyamine and amine corrosion inhibitor components. Polyamine chemistry is widely used for example in large high pressure (HP) boilers operating in municipal waste and recycling facilities to prevent corrosion of metals. The samples used in this study are from such a facility in Coventry waste treatment facility, U.K., which has 3 × 40 tonne/hour boilers operating at 17.5 bar.

  19. Practical Impacts of Galvanic Corrosion in Water Service Lines and Premise Plumbing

    OpenAIRE

    StClair, Justin Monroe

    2013-01-01

    There is emerging concern about the potential for elevated lead in water after water utilities conduct EPA mandated (or voluntary) partial replacements of existing lead service lines. Connections between dissimilar metals results in the accelerated corrosion of the less noble metal via galvanic attack, increasing metal concentrations in water and posing potential public health risks. Many practical problems associated with stopping galvanic attack between copper:galvanized iron and copper:lea...

  20. Effect of hydrazine on general corrosion of carbon and low-alloyed steels in pressurized water reactor secondary side water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Järvimäki, Sari [Fortum Ltd, Loviisa Power Plant, Loviisa (Finland); Saario, Timo; Sipilä, Konsta [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., Nuclear Safety, P.O. Box 1000, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Bojinov, Martin, E-mail: martin@uctm.edu [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Kl. Ohridski Blvd, 8, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • The effect of hydrazine on the corrosion of steel in secondary side water investigated by in situ and ex situ techniques. • Oxide grown on steel in 100 ppb hydrazine shows weaker protective properties – higher corrosion rates. • Possible explanation of the accelerating effect of higher concentrations of hydrazine on flow assisted corrosion offered. - Abstract: The effect of hydrazine on corrosion rate of low-alloyed steel (LAS) and carbon steel (CS) was studied by in situ and ex situ techniques under pressurized water reactor secondary side water chemistry conditions at T = 228 °C and pH{sub RT} = 9.2 (adjusted by NH{sub 3}). It is found that hydrazine injection to a maximum level of 5.06 μmol l{sup −1} onto surfaces previously oxidized in ammonia does not affect the corrosion rate of LAS or CS. This is confirmed also by plant measurements at Loviisa NPP. On the other hand, hydrazine at the level of 3.1 μmol l{sup −1} decreases markedly the amount and the size of deposited oxide crystals on LAS and CS surface. In addition, the oxide grown in the presence of 3.1 μmol l{sup −1} hydrazine is somewhat less protective and sustains a higher corrosion rate compared to an oxide film grown without hydrazine. These observations could explain the accelerating effect of higher concentrations of hydrazine found in corrosion studies of LAS and CS.

  1. Corrosion behavior of 2195 and 1420 Al-Li alloys in neutral 3.5% NaCl solution under tensile stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jin-feng; CHEN Wen-jing; ZHAO Xu-shan; REN Wen-da; ZHENG Zi-qiao

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion behaviors of 1420 and 2195 Al-Li alloys under 308 and 490 MPa tensile stress respectively in neutral 3.5% NaCl solution were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy(EIS) and scanning electron microscope(SEM). It is found that the unstressed 1420 alloy is featured with large and discrete pits, while general corrosion and localized corrosion including intergranular corrosion and pitting corrosion occur on the unstressed 2195 alloy. As stress is applied to 1420 alloy, the pit becomes denser and its size is decreased. While, for the stressed 2195 alloy, intergranular corrosion is greatly aggravated and severe general corrosion is developed from connected pits. The EIS analysis shows that more severe general corrosion and localized corrosion occur on the stressed 2195 Al-Li alloy than on 1420 Al-Li alloy. It is suggested that tensile stress has greater effect on the corrosion of 2195 Al-Li alloy than on 1420 Al-Li alloy.

  2. POTENTIAL FOR STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS CONTAINING HIGHLY CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.; Stripling, C.; Fisher, D.; Elder, J.

    2010-04-26

    The evaporator recycle streams of nuclear waste tanks may contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that exceeds the current corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history found that two of these A537 carbon steel tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved tanks of similar construction. Therefore, it appears that the efficacy of stress relief of welding residual stress is the primary corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test A537 carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (30.48 x 30.38 x 2.54 cm) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in these nuclear waste tanks. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test was completed after 12 weeks of immersion in a similar solution at 125 C except that the aluminate concentration was reduced to 0.3 M. Visual inspection of the plate revealed that stress corrosion cracking had not initiated from the machined crack tips in the weld or in the heat affected zone. NDE ultrasonic testing also confirmed subsurface cracking did not occur. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the environmental condition of these tests was unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the test periods for the small welded U-bends and for the large plates, which were welded with an identical procedure as used in the construction of the actual nuclear waste tanks in the 1960s. The

  3. Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galdenzi Sandro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the weight loss in limestone tablets placed in the Grotta del Fiume (Frasassi, Italy provided data on the rate of limestone dissolution due to the sulfidic water and on the influence of local environmental conditions.A linear average corrosion rate of 24 mm ka-1 was measured in stagnant water, while the values were higher (68-119 mm ka-1 where the hydrologic conditions facilitate water movement and gas exchanges. In these zones the increase in water aggressivity is due to mixing with descending, O2-rich, seepage water and is also favored by easier gas exchange between ground-water and the cave atmosphere. Very intense corrosion was due to weakly turbulent flow, which caused evident changes in the tablets shape in few months. A comparison between the measured corrosion rates and the cave features showed that the values measured in the pools with stagnant water are too low to account for the largest solutional cave development, while the average values measured in the zones with moving water are compatible with the dimension of the cave rooms in the main cave levels, that must have developed when the base level was stable and hydrologic conditions favored the increase of water aggressivity.

  4. Uncertainty quantification methodologies development for stress corrosion cracking of canister welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This letter report presents a probabilistic performance assessment model to evaluate the probability of canister failure (through-wall penetration) by SCC. The model first assesses whether environmental conditions for SCC – the presence of an aqueous film – are present at canister weld locations (where tensile stresses are likely to occur) on the canister surface. Geometry-specific storage system thermal models and weather data sets representative of U.S. spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage sites are implemented to evaluate location-specific canister surface temperature and relative humidity (RH). As the canister cools and aqueous conditions become possible, the occurrence of corrosion is evaluated. Corrosion is modeled as a two-step process: first, pitting is initiated, and the extent and depth of pitting is a function of the chloride surface load and the environmental conditions (temperature and RH). Second, as corrosion penetration increases, the pit eventually transitions to a SCC crack, with crack initiation becoming more likely with increasing pit depth. Once pits convert to cracks, a crack growth model is implemented. The SCC growth model includes rate dependencies on both temperature and crack tip stress intensity factor, and crack growth only occurs in time steps when aqueous conditions are predicted. The model suggests that SCC is likely to occur over potential SNF interim storage intervals; however, this result is based on many modeling assumptions. Sensitivity analyses provide information on the model assumptions and parameter values that have the greatest impact on predicted storage canister performance, and provide guidance for further research to reduce uncertainties.

  5. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SUSCEPTIBILITY OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS DURING SLUDGE MASS REDUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, K

    2007-10-18

    Aluminum is a principal element in alkaline nuclear sludge waste stored in high level waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site. The mass of sludge in a HLW tank can be reduced through the caustic leaching of aluminum, i.e. converting aluminum oxides (gibbsite) and oxide-hydroxides (boehmite) into soluble hydroxides through reaction with a hot caustic solution. The temperature limits outlined by the chemistry control program for HLW tanks to prevent caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC) in concentrated hydroxide solutions will potentially be exceeded during the sludge mass reduction (SMR) campaign. Corrosion testing was performed to determine the potential for CSCC under expected conditions. The experimental test program, developed based upon previous test results and expected conditions during the current SMR campaign, consisted of electrochemical and mechanical testing to determine the susceptibility of ASTM A516 carbon steel to CSCC in the relevant environment. Anodic polarization test results indicated that anodic inhibition at the temperatures and concentrations of interest for SMR is not a viable, consistent technical basis for preventing CSCC. However, the mechanical testing concluded that CSCC will not occur under conditions expected during SMR for a minimum of 35 days. In addition, the stress relief for the Type III/IIIA tanks adds a level of conservatism to the estimates. The envelope for corrosion control is recommended during the SMR campaign is shown in Table 1. The underlying assumption is that solution time-in-tank is limited to the SMR campaign. The envelope recommends nitrate/aluminate intervals for discrete intervals of hydroxide concentrations, although it is recognized that a continuous interval may be developed. The limits also sets temperature limits.

  6. Quantifying Water Stress Using Total Water Volumes and GRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, A. S.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Druffel-Rodriguez, R.

    2011-12-01

    Water will follow oil as the next critical resource leading to unrest and uprisings globally. To better manage this threat, an improved understanding of the distribution of water stress is required today. This study builds upon previous efforts to characterize water stress by improving both the quantification of human water use and the definition of water availability. Current statistics on human water use are often outdated or inaccurately reported nationally, especially for groundwater. This study improves these estimates by defining human water use in two ways. First, we use NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to isolate the anthropogenic signal in water storage anomalies, which we equate to water use. Second, we quantify an ideal water demand by using average water requirements for the domestic, industrial, and agricultural water use sectors. Water availability has traditionally been limited to "renewable" water, which ignores large, stored water sources that humans use. We compare water stress estimates derived using either renewable water or the total volume of water globally. We use the best-available data to quantify total aquifer and surface water volumes, as compared to groundwater recharge and surface water runoff from land-surface models. The work presented here should provide a more realistic image of water stress by explicitly quantifying groundwater, defining water availability as total water supply, and using GRACE to more accurately quantify water use.

  7. Flaw growth of 7075, 7475, 7050 and 7049 aluminum alloy plate in stress corrosion environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1976-01-01

    Marine atmosphere and laboratory stress corrosion test results on smooth and precracked specimens from 7075, 7475, 7050, and 7049 alloy plates (1.25 and 3.0-in. thick) are presented. It is shown that for a given strength level, alloys 7050-T7X and 7049-T7X have superior short-transverse stress corrosion resistance (SCR) to 7X75-T7X. At typical strength levels above the minimum, for example, SCR of these alloys is considerably better than that of 7075-T76, and approaches that of 7075-T73. Alloy 7475 maintains an advantage in the area of fracture toughness, however, because it can be thermally processed to give particularly clean microstructures. Results from precracked specimens are in good qualitative agreement with those obtained from smooth specimens. Although both specimen types are capable of distinguishing between -T6, -T76 and -T73 tempers in relatively short time periods the precracked specimen provides more information about crack growth rates.

  8. Mitigation of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking in Al-Mg by Electrochemical Potential Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, M. E.; Scully, J. R.; Burns, J. T.

    2017-08-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking in the Al-Mg alloy AA5456-H116 is suppressed via cathodic polarization in 0.6 M NaCl, saturated (5.45 M) NaCl, 2 M MgCl2, and saturated (5 M) MgCl2. Three zones of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IG-SCC) susceptibility correlate with pitting potentials of unsensitized AA5456-H116 and pure β phase (Al3Mg2) in each solution. These critical potentials reasonably describe the influence of α Al matrix and β phase dissolution rates on IG-SCC severity. Complete inhibition occurred at applied potentials of -1.0 V and -1.1 V versus saturated calomel electrode ( V SCE) in 0.6 M NaCl. Whereas only partial mitigation of IG-SCC was achieved at -0.9 V SCE in 0.6 M NaCl and at -0.9, -1.0, and -1.1 V SCE in the more aggressive environments. Correlation of pitting potentials in bulk environments with IG-SCC behavior suggests an effect of bulk environment [Cl-] and pH on the stabilized crack tip chemistry.

  9. Effect of Water Vapor on High-Temperature Corrosion under Conditions Mimicking Biomass Firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming;

    2015-01-01

    The variable flue gas composition in biomass-fired plants, among other parameters, contributes to the complexityof high-temperature corrosion of materials. Systematic parameter studies are thus necessary to understand the underlyingcorrosion mechanisms. This paper investigates the effect of water...

  10. Optimizaton of corrosion control for lead in drinking water using computational modeling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational modeling techniques have been used to very good effect in the UK in the optimization of corrosion control for lead in drinking water. A “proof-of-concept” project with three US/CA case studies sought to demonstrate that such techniques could work equally well in the...

  11. Corrosion behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenhua; Guo, Xianglong; Shen, Zhao; Zhang, Lefu

    2017-04-01

    The corrosion resistance of three different Cr content oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels in supercritical water (SCW) and their passive films formed on the surface have been investigated. The results show that the dissolved oxygen (DO) and chemical composition have significant influence on the corrosion behavior of the ODS ferritic steels. In 2000 ppb DO SCW at 650 °C, the 14Cr-4Al ODS steel forms a tri-layer oxide film and the surface morphologies have experienced four structures. For the tri-layer oxide film, the middle layer is mainly Fe-Cr spinel and the Al is gradually enriched in the inner layer.

  12. Photoelectrochemical Study of Corrosion Resisting Property of Cupronickel B10 in Simulated Cooling Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Qunjie; WAN Zongyue; ZHOU Guoding; YIN Renhe; CAO Weimin; LIN Changjian

    2009-01-01

    The corrosion behavior for cupronickel B10 electrode in simulated cooling water has been studied by using cyclic voltammetry, a photocurrent response method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The cupronickel electrode shows a p-type photoresponse to positive and negative potential scan, which comes from Cu2O layer on its surface, but its Iph.max is less than that in borax buffer solution. The corrosion resisting property of the cupronickel B10 electrode appeared worse with the increase in the concentrations of Cl-, SO2-4 and S2 ions, as well as with increasing pH. The rise in the temperature may result in a photoresponse changes from p-type to n-type, and the corrosion resisting property fell simultaneously. The results of the EIS measurement agree well with those obtained by a photoelectrochemical method.

  13. Corrosion behavior of a 14Cr-ODS steel in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, H.L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhou, Z.J., E-mail: zhouzhangjianustb@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liao, L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, L.F. [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang, M.; Li, S.F.; Ge, C.C. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2013-06-15

    The corrosion behavior of a 14Cr-ODS steel in the supercritical water was investigated using a variety of characterization techniques. Compared with 316L austenitic steel, the 14Cr-ODS steel had better corrosion resistant property. As the increasing of the exposure time, the weight gain increased, but the corrosion rates decreased. The curve of weight gain as a function of time followed a parabolic law. The general weight gain was 0.3476 mg/(dm{sup 2} h). A triple layer was observed which consisted of an outer layer, an inner layer and a diffusion layer. The outer layer was iron rich and contained Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, on which pores were observed. The inner layer and diffusion layer contained mainly (Fe,Cr{sub 2})O{sub 4}. The oxidation mechanism was also discussed.

  14. Prevention for possible microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in RHLWE flush water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, T.C.; Jenkins, C.F.

    1995-07-10

    This report is in response to the request to provide a recommendation for the prevention of possible microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) for the RHLWE (Replacement High-Level Waste Evaporator) flush water (FW) system. The recent occurrences of MIC at DWPF prompted HLWE to evaluate the possibility of MIC occurring in this 304L stainless steel RHLWE flush water system. Concern was heightened by the fact that the well water used and the other conditions at H-Tank Farm are similar to those at DWPF. However, only one known leak has occurred in the existing 304L evaporator flush water systems in either tank farm (in 1H system), and no MIC Corrosion has been confirmed in the tank farm area. The design of the RHLWE flush water system (completed long before the occurrence of MIC at DWPF) was modeled after the existing evaporator flush water systems and did not specifically include MIC prevention considerations. Therefore, MIC prevention was not specifically considered during the design phase of this flush water system. The system is presently being installed. After an extensive evaluation, a task team concluded that the best biocide to prevent the occurrence of MIC would be NaOH at fairly low concentration. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is optimal in this application, because of its effectiveness, low cost, and familiarity to the Operations personnel (see Appendix A). However, it is the opinion of the task group that application should be withheld until MIC corrosion is demonstrated in the system.

  15. Safe corrosion inhibitor for treating cooling water on heat power engineering plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, L. A.; Khasanova, D. I.; Mukhutdinova, E. R.; Safin, D. Kh.; Sharifullin, I. G.

    2017-08-01

    Heat power engineering (HPE) consumes significant volumes of water. There are, therefore, problems associated with corrosion, biological fouling, salt deposits, and sludge formation on functional surfaces of heat power equipment. One of the effective ways to solve these problems is the use of inhibitory protection. The development of new Russian import-substituting environmentally friendly inhibitors is very relevant. This work describes experimental results on the OPC-800 inhibitor (TU 2415-092-00206 457-2013), which was produced at Karpov Chemical Plant and designed to remove mineral deposits, scale, and biological fouling from the surfaces of water-rotation node systems on HPE objects. This reagent is successfully used as an effective corrosion inhibitor in the water recycling systems of Tatarstan petrochemical enterprises. To save fresh make-up water, the circulating system is operated in a no-blow mode, which is characterized by high evaporation and salt content coefficients. It was experimentally found that corrosion rate upon treatment of recycled water with the OPC-800 inhibitor is 0.08-0.10 mm/year. HPE mainly uses inhibitors based on oxyethylidene diphosphonic (OEDPA) and nitrilotrimethylphosphonic (NTMPA) acids. The comparative characteristic of inhibition efficiency for OPC-800 and OEDF-Zn-U2 is given. The results obtained indicate that OPC-800 can be used as an inhibitor for treatment of cooling water in HPE plants. In this case, it is necessary to take into account the features of water rotation of a thermal power plant.

  16. Countermeasures to corrosion on water walls; Aatgaerder mot eldstadskorrosion paa panntuber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, Jan; Sund, Goeran; Pettersson, Rachel; Nordling, Magnus; Hoegberg, Jan

    2007-12-15

    Corrosion of water walls is becoming a problem for an increasing number of boilers. Wider use of biomass and waste for fuel, as well as requirements of reduced NO{sub x} emissions, makes it much more difficult to avoid combustion in a reducing atmosphere adjacent to the water walls. This has increased the need for corrosion protection in many existing boilers. In addition, biomass and waste fuelled plants currently being planned or built require well-functioning water wall protection from the start. The traditional water wall materials - ferritic low alloyed steels - are not easy to replace because of their outstanding heat transfer properties, ability to form a protective oxide layer on the inside of the tubes and low thermal expansion. For this reason, corrosion protection generally involves the use of some kind of coating on the tubes. In this report, the state-of-the-art regarding water wall corrosion protection is described in a literature survey. Methods covered are the use of refractories, overlay weld cladding, composite tubes and thermal spraying. The interest for overlay welding has increased recently since it can offer similar corrosion protection to composite tubes at a significantly reduced cost. Test panels have been exposed and monitored in different boilers. Six weld overlay materials were tested: the well-proven Alloy 625, a modified Alloy 625 in which niobium has been replaced by tungsten, Alloy 59, Alloy 22, a cheaper nickel base alloy 650 which contains some iron and a 310 grade stainless steel. A total of six panels were exposed in the most vulnerable positions in three different boilers. These included waste and biomass combustion as well as different steam data, sizes and types of boilers. Two further facilities, in which the test materials Alloy 625 and Sanicro 28 had already been installed, were also included in the investigation. The duration of service exposure was one operating season. The weld cladding was measured with a thickness

  17. Modeling of stresses at grain boundaries with respect to occurrence of stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozaczek, K.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sinharoy, A.; Ruud, C.O. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); McIlree, A.R. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The distributions of elastic stresses/strains in the grain boundary regions were studied by the analytical and the finite element models. The grain boundaries represent the sites where stress concentration occurs as a result of discontinuity of elastic properties across the grain boundary and the presence of second phase particles elastically different from the surrounding matrix grains. A quantitative analysis of those stresses for steels and nickel based alloys showed that the stress concentrations in the grain boundary regions are high enough to cause a local microplastic deformation even when the material is in the macroscopic elastic regime. The stress redistribution as a result of such a plastic deformation was discussed.

  18. Improved stress corrosion cracking resistance of a novel biodegradable EW62 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification, in simulated electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakimi, O.; Aghion, E. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Goldman, J., E-mail: jgoldman@mtu.edu [Biomedical Engineering Department, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, 49931 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The high corrosion rate of magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys precludes their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigated the potential for rapid solidification (RS) to increase the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of a novel Mg alloy, Mg–6%Nd–2%Y–0.5%Zr (EW62), in comparison to its conventionally cast (CC) counterpart. RS ribbons were extrusion consolidated in order to generate bioimplant-relevant geometries for testing and practical use. Microstructural characteristics were examined by SEM. Corrosion rates were calculated based upon hydrogen evolution during immersion testing. The surface layer of the tested alloys was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by slow strain rate testing and fractography. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of the RS alloy is significantly improved relative to the CC alloy due to a supersaturated Nd enrichment that increases the Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} content in the external oxide layer, as well as a more homogeneous structure and reduced grain size. These improvements contributed to the reduced formation of hydrogen gas and hydrogen embrittlement, which reduced the SCC sensitivity relative to the CC alloy. Therefore, EW62 in the form of a rapidly solidified extruded structure may serve as a biodegradable implant for biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Here we have evaluated the corrosion resistance of a novel Mg alloy (EW62). • Rapid solidification reduces the hydrogen gas evolution and hydrogen embrittlement. • Rapid solidification increases the stress corrosion cracking resistance of EW62. • Improvement is due to enrichment with supersaturated Nd in the external oxide film. • Rapidly solidified and extruded EW62 may serve as a biodegradable medical implant.

  19. Flat growth of 7075, 7475, 7050 and 7049 aluminum alloy plate in stress corrosion environments: 2-year marine atmosphere results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    Marine atmospheric exposure of smooth and precracked specimens from 7075, 7475, 7050 and 7049 plates support the conclusion that for a given strength level, the short transverse stress corrosion resistance of 7050-T7X and 7049-T7X is superior to that of 7075-T7X. The threshold stress intensity (K sub Iscc) for these alloys is about 25 MPa square root m at a yield strength of about 460 MPa; the corresponding yield strength level for 7075-T7X at this SCR level is about 425 MPa. Additional tests on two lots of high-toughness 7475 plate indicate that this alloy is capable of achieving K sub Iscc values of about 35 MPa square root m at yield strengths of 400-450 MPa. Precracked specimens from all these 7XXX-series alloys are subject to self loading from corrosion product wedging. This effect causes stress corrosion cracks to continue growing at very low apparent stress intensities, and should therefore be considered a potential driving force for stress corrosion in design and materials selection.

  20. Developing a program to identify and track corrosion in nuclear plant raw water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spires PE, G.V. [KTA - Tator Inc., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Pickles PE, S.B. [Senior Engineer, Ontario Power Generation, Ontario (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    Findings derived from a comprehensive plant performance survey at Ontario Power Generation's (OPG) nuclear units convinced management that it would be prudent to expand the ongoing power piping Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) induced wall thinning base-lining and tracking program to encompass the raw cooling water systems as well. Such systems are subject to a distinctly different class of pipe wall thinning (PWT) mechanisms than the FAC that degrades high-energy power piping. This paper describes the PWT corrosion assessment and tracking program that has been developed and is currently being implemented by OPG for the raw cooling water (i.e., Service Water) systems within it's nuclear generating stations. Interim databases are used prior to initial inspection rounds to catalogue the prospective locations. For each piping system being surveyed, these interim databases include physical coordinates for the candidate locations, the type and wall thickness of the components comprising each location, ranking indications and recommended NDE methodologies as a function of the anticipated corrosion mechanisms. Rationales for assessing corrosion susceptibility and ranking prospective inspection sites are expounded by way of notations built into the database. (authors)

  1. INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL FOR CAUSTIC STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.

    2009-10-15

    The evaporator recycle streams contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that may be outside of the current waste tank corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history (1998-2008) of Tanks 30 and 32 showed that these tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved F-Area tanks. Therefore, for the Type III/IIIA waste tanks the efficacy of the stress relief of welding residual stress is the only corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (12 x 12 x 1 in.) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in Tanks 30 and 32. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test is currently in progress, but no cracking has been observed after 9 weeks of immersion. Based on the preliminary results, it appears that the environmental conditions of the tests are unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the duration of these tests.

  2. Investigation into the stress corrosion cracking properties of AA2099, an aluminum-lithium-copper alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Barbara Nicole

    Recently developed Al-Li-Cu alloys show great potential for implementation in the aerospace industry because of the attractive mix of good mechanical properties and low density. AA2099 is an Al-Li-Cu alloy with the following composition Al-2.69wt%Cu-1.8wt%Li-0.6wt%Zn-0.3wt%Mg-0.3wt%Mn-0.08wt%Zr. The environmental assisted cracking and localized corrosion behavior of the AA2099 was investigated in this thesis. The consequences of uncontrolled grain boundary precipitation via friction stir welding on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of AA2099 was investigated first. Using constant extension rate testing, intergranular corrosion immersion experiments, and potentiodynamic scans, the heat-affected zone on the trailing edge of the weld (HTS) was determined to be most susceptible of the weld zones. The observed SCC behavior for the HTS was linked to the dissolution of an active phase (Al2CuLi, T1) populating the grain boundary. It should be stated that the SCC properties of AA2099 in the as-received condition were determined to be good. Focus was then given to the electrochemical behavior of precipitate phases that may occupy grain and sub-grain boundaries in AA2099. The grain boundary micro-chemistry and micro-electrochemistry have been alluded to within the literature as having significant influence on the SCC behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys. Major precipitates found in this alloy system are T1 (Al 2CuLi), T2 (Al7.5Cu4Li), T B (Al6CuLi3), and theta (Al2 Cu). These phases were produced in bulk form so that the electrochemical nature of each phase could be characterized. It was determined T1 was most active electrochemically and theta was least. When present on grain boundaries in the alloy, electrochemical behavior of the individual precipitates aligned with the observed corrosion behavior of the alloy (e.g. TB was accompanied by general pitting corrosion and T 1 was accompanied by intergranular corrosion attack). In addition to the electrochemical behavior of

  3. Molecular Characterization of Microbial Communities Associated with Accelerated Low-water Corrosion (ALWC) on European Harbour Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marty, F.; van Loosdrecht, M.; Muyzer, G.; Skovhus, T.L.; Caffrey, S.M.; Hubert, C.R.J.

    2014-01-01

    The microbial communities associated with different corrosion deposit layers retrieved from a harbour steel structure affected by ALWC (Accelerated Low Water Corrosion) were determined by 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE analysis. Comparative analysis of populations associated with ALWC layers and NLWC (Normal Low

  4. The role of local strains from prior cold work on stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaganathan, Jaganathan

    Several studies have recently reported that cold working exacerbates stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of materials in various environments, including those in which they were previously thought to be immune. While these studies usually consider cold work as a homogeneous effect, the presence of grain boundaries results in local strain concentrations that are inhomogeneously distributed within the microstructure. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms by which the local strains generated by cold work influences SCC, α-brass and Alloy 600 were used in this study. The microscopic changes in the local strains caused by cold work and by SCC were measured using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction (PXM). While the plastic strains were qualitatively expressed through the local misorientation calculated from the orientation data measured by both EBSD and PXM, the elastic strains were determined from the Laue patterns measured by PXM. The interaction between the local strains, and the crack initiation and propagation during SCC was studied by comparing the strain distribution from the same area measured before cold work, after cold work, and again after SCC. In this way, apart from obtaining insights on the interaction, the relative importance of pre-existing strain concentrations and those created by crack propagation can be identified. Additionally, statistical analysis of the EBSD data from uncracked and cracked grain boundaries in Alloy 600 showed the susceptibility of the boundaries to increase when they were surrounded by high local strain concentrations and when the grains sharing the boundary had similar deformation tendency, but to be independent of the grain boundary angle. Finally, one of the contributors for the changes in the strain distribution during SCC can be the corrosion process itself which was examined by intermittently measuring the changes in local strains caused by intergranular corrosion on an

  5. Development and validation of an experimental procedure for studying the biaxial stress corrosion. Application to the systems: alloy-600/air and 316L/MgCl{sub 2}; Developpement et validation d'une procedure experimentale pour l'etude de la corrosion sous contrainte biaxiale. Application aux couples alliage 600 / air et 316L / MgCl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farre, M.Th

    1998-07-15

    One of the main preoccupation for maintaining EdF's nuclear pressurised water reactors is intergranular stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing (alloy 600: NC 15Fe). The most affected areas (first row U-bend and roll transition zone) are in biaxial stress state. The crack propagation is often axial and sometimes circumferential. The actual life prediction criterion for these structures depends on the maximal principal stress. The purpose of this study is to determine whether it is safe to use such a criterion in a case of biaxial stress state. A procedure is proposed and experimentally validated for designing specimen in a controlled biaxial stress state when submitted to traction. Quadrants I an IV of the stress space are the only ones explored. The aim is to use these specimens in order to realize stress corrosion tests in primary water with alloy 600. The procedure involves studying the biaxial behavior of the material. This shows the effect of hardening on the shape of the yield stress surface. The hardening of alloy 600 is mainly kinematic. The yield stress surface becomes concave in the hardening stress direction and flat in the opposite direction. The geometry of the specimen stems from parameterized shape optimisation. An elasto-viscoplastic behavior law is identified for alloy 600. Use of the law for calculating the strain state of one specimen is experimentally validated. This entire procedure has been successfully validated with biaxial stress corrosion cracking tests, using 316L and MgCl{sub 2} boiling at 154 deg C. In this case it is difficult to determine a life time criterion. It is shown that the criterion of the maximal principal stress is invalid in case of a biaxial stress state. (author)

  6. A study of the effects of phosphates on copper corrosion in drinking water: Copper release, electrochemical, and surface analysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young C.

    The following work is the study to evaluate the impact of corrosion inhibitors on the copper metal in drinking water and to investigate the corrosion mechanism in the presence and absence of inhibitors. Electrochemical experiments were conducted to understand the effect of specific corrosion inhibitors in synthetic drinking water which was prepared with controlled specific water quality parameters. Water chemistry was studied by Inductively Coupled Plasma--Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP--AES) to investigate the copper leaching rate with time. Surface morphology, crystallinity of corrosion products, copper oxidation status, and surface composition were characterized by various solid surface analysis methods, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy--Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM/EDS), Grazing-Incidence-angle X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The purpose of the first set of experiments was to test various electrochemical techniques for copper corrosion for short term before studying a long term loop system. Surface analysis techniques were carried out to identify and study the corrosion products that form on the fresh copper metal surface when copper coupons were exposed to test solutions for 2 days of experiments time. The second phase of experiments was conducted with a copper pipe loop system in a synthetic tap water over an extended period of time, i.e., 4 months. Copper release and electrochemically measured corrosion activity profiles were monitored carefully with and without corrosion inhibitor, polyphosphate. A correlation between the copper released into the solution and the electrochemically measured corrosion activities was also attempted. To investigate corrosion products on the copper pipe samples, various surface analysis techniques were applied in this study. Especially, static mass spectra acquisition and element distribution mapping were carried out

  7. A STUDY OF LEAKAGE OF TRACE METALS FROM CORROSION OF THE MUNICIPAL DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R SHA MANSOURI

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A high portion of lead and copper concentration in municipal drinking water is related to the metallic structure of the distribution system and facets. The corrosive water in pipes and facets cause dissolution of the metals such as Pb, Cu, Cd, Zn, Fe and Mn into the water. Due to the lack of research work in this area, a study of the trace metals were performed in the drinking water distribution system in Zarin Shahr and Mobareke of Isfahan province. Methods: Based on the united states Environmental protection Agency (USEPA for the cities over than 50,000 population such as Zarin Shahr and Mobareke, 30 water samples from home facets with the minimum 6 hours retention time of water in pipes, were collected. Lead and cadmium concentration were determined using flameless Atomic Absorption. Cupper, Zinc, Iron and Manganese were determined using Atomic Absorption. Results: The average concentration of Pb, Cd, Zn, Fe and Mn in water distribution system fo Zarin Shahr were 5.7, 0.1, 80, 3042, 23065 and in Mobareke were 7.83, 0.8,210,3100, 253, 17µg respectively. The cocentration of Pb, Cd and Zn were zero at the beginning of the water samples from the municipal drinking water distribution system for both cities. Conclusion: The study showed that the corrosion by products (such as Pb, Cd and Zn was the results of dissolution of the galvanized pipes and brass facets. Lead concentration in over that 10 percent of the water samples in zarin shahr exceeded the drinking water standard level, which emphasize the evaluation and control of corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

  8. Corrosive Effect of Formation Water in Petroleum with High Contents of CO2 on Steel Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Cueli Corugedo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of the carbon steel pipelines of petroleum, is a serious problem, because big economic and material losses take place and in some cases damages to productive lands. The purpose of this work is to determine the aggressiveness of the formation water of the petroleum contaminated with CO2 (g, on the construction steel of the pipelines, keeping in mind the variations of temperature that happens during the course of petroleum. The Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR was used to determine the corrosion rate of the steel. It was demonstrated that the increase of the temperature and the saturation condition of CO2 in the formation water of the petroleum, increase the corrosion in the steel. The spectra of electrochemical noise results and the localization index calculated demonstrate the presence of corrosion located in the API 5L X - 52 steel surface. This result was complemented by the Optic Microscopy technique that allowed corroborating the poor adherence of the layers that were deposited on the metal and the appearance of located events increases in the environment that was investigated with the increment of the temperature and CO2 concentration.

  9. Effect of sensitization and cold work on stress corrosion susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels in BWR and PWR conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenninen, H.; Aho-Mantila, I.

    1981-05-01

    The influence of metallurgical variables on stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels, in particular AISI 304 and OX18H10T, has been examined both in O2-enriched BWR-conditions (8 ppm O2) and in typical PWR-conditions.

  10. Behavior of tritium permeation induced by water corrosion of alpha iron around room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, T.; Hashizume, K. [Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Tritium (T) permeation leakage to surroundings is a great safety concern in fission and fusion reactor systems. T permeation potentially occurs from T contaminated water through cooling tubes or storage tank made of metals which dissolve some T evolved by water corrosion. In order to understand behaviors of hydrogen uptake and permeation in pure α-iron (αFe) during water corrosion around room temperature, hydrogen permeation experiments for an αFe membrane have been conducted by means of tritium tracer techniques. The present study suggests that hydrogen produced by water corrosion of αFe is trapped in product oxide layers to delay hydrogen uptake in αFe for a moment. However, the oxide layers do not work as a sufficient barrier for hydrogen uptake. Some of hydrogen dissolved in αFe normally diffuses and permeates through the bulk in the early stage of permeation. In a later stage, hydrogen permeation could be apparently stopped by the disappearance of concentration difference of tritium. Hydrogen partial pressure at the water/αFe interface could be ranged from 0.7 to 9.5 kPa around room temperature.

  11. Improved stress corrosion cracking resistance of a novel biodegradable EW62 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification, in simulated electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, O; Aghion, E; Goldman, J

    2015-06-01

    The high corrosion rate of magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys precludes their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigated the potential for rapid solidification (RS) to increase the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of a novel Mg alloy, Mg-6%Nd-2%Y-0.5%Zr (EW62), in comparison to its conventionally cast (CC) counterpart. RS ribbons were extrusion consolidated in order to generate bioimplant-relevant geometries for testing and practical use. Microstructural characteristics were examined by SEM. Corrosion rates were calculated based upon hydrogen evolution during immersion testing. The surface layer of the tested alloys was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by slow strain rate testing and fractography. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of the RS alloy is significantly improved relative to the CC alloy due to a supersaturated Nd enrichment that increases the Nd2O3 content in the external oxide layer, as well as a more homogeneous structure and reduced grain size. These improvements contributed to the reduced formation of hydrogen gas and hydrogen embrittlement, which reduced the SCC sensitivity relative to the CC alloy. Therefore, EW62 in the form of a rapidly solidified extruded structure may serve as a biodegradable implant for biomedical applications.

  12. Effects of sulfate on heavy metal release from iron corrosion scales in drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huifang; Shi, Baoyou; Yang, Fan; Wang, Dongsheng

    2017-05-01

    Trace heavy metals accumulated in iron corrosion scales within a drinking water distribution system (DWDS) could potentially be released to bulk water and consequently deteriorate the tap water quality. The objective of this study was to identify and evaluate the release of trace heavy metals in DWDS under changing source water conditions. Experimental pipe loops with different iron corrosion scales were set up to simulate the actual DWDS. The effects of sulfate levels on heavy metal release were systemically investigated. Heavy metal releases of Mn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Cr and As could be rapidly triggered by sulfate addition but the releases slowly decreased over time. Heavy metal release was more severe in pipes transporting groundwater (GW) than in pipes transporting surface water (SW). There were strong positive correlations (R(2) > 0.8) between the releases of Fe and Mn, Fe and Ni, Fe and Cu, and Fe and Pb. When switching to higher sulfate water, iron corrosion scales in all pipe loops tended to be more stable (especially in pipes transporting GW), with a larger proportion of stable constituents (mainly Fe3O4) and fewer unstable compounds (β-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, FeCO3 and amorphous iron oxides). The main functional iron reducing bacteria (IRB) communities were favorable for the formation of Fe3O4. The transformation of corrosion scales and the growth of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) accounted for the gradually reduced heavy metal release with time. The higher metal release in pipes transporting GW could be due to increased Fe6(OH)12CO3 content under higher sulfate concentrations.

  13. In vivo oxide-induced stress corrosion cracking of Ti-6Al-4V in a neck-stem modular taper: Emergent behavior in a new mechanism of in vivo corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeremy L; Mali, Sachin; Urban, Robert M; Silverton, Craig D; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2012-02-01

    In vivo modular taper corrosion in orthopedic total joint replacements has been documented to occur for head-neck tapers, modular-body tapers, and neck-stem tapers. While the fretting corrosion mechanism by which this corrosion occurs has been described in the literature, this report shows new and as yet unreported mechanisms at play. A retrieved Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V neck-stem taper interface, implanted for 6 years is subjected to failure analysis to document taper corrosion processes that lead to oxide driven crack formation on the medial side of the taper. Metallurgical sectioning techniques and scanning electron microscopy analysis are used to document the taper corrosion processes. The results show large penetrating pitting attack of both sides of the taper interface where corrosion selectively attacks the beta phase of the microstructure and eventually consumes the alpha phase. The pitting attack evolves into plunging pits that ultimately develop into cracks where the crack propagation process is one of corrosion resulting in oxide formation and subsequent reorganization. This process drives open the crack and advances the front by a combination of oxide-driven crack opening stresses and corrosion attack at the tip. The oxide that forms has a complex evolving structure including a network of transport channels that provide access of fluid to the crack tip. This emergent behavior does not appear to require continued fretting corrosion to propagate the pitting and cracking. This new mechanism is similar to stress corrosion cracking where the crack tip stresses arise from the oxide formation in the crack and not externally applied tensile stresses.

  14. Parameters influencing the transgranular stress corrosion cracking behaviour of austenitic stainless steels in systems conveying reactor coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, R.; Wesseling, U. [Framatome ANP (Germany); Wachter, O. [E.ON Kernkraft (Germany); Widera, M. [RWE Power (Germany); Brummer, G. [HEW - (Germany); Ilg, U. [EnBW - (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    During replacement of an auxiliary system in the German PWR KKS (NPP Stade) a damage was detected in a valve housing and in the connected piping both made from stabilised austenitic stainless steel. During operation stagnant conditions are present in this area. Based on the failure analysis chloride induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was found as the dominating root cause. In the open literature many cases of corrosion observed in the water/steam interface in valve components as well as in adjacent portions of auxiliary circuits made of un-stabilized stainless steels are mentioned. A common feature of the reported cases is that transgranular cracking was found. Extensive laboratory investigations revealed that non-stabilised austenitic stainless steels are also sensitive to transgranular cracking in boric acid solutions particularly in concentrated solutions. Often these solutions are contaminated with chlorides and/or oxygen is present. Taking into account the literature data the question could arise whether the above mentioned cracking may be also caused by boric acid attack. Thus, for stabilised stainless steels laboratory exposure tests at 80 C in saturated aerated boric acid solution and at 300 C in (at 100 C) saturated, oxygen free boric acid solution have been performed. Double-U-bend specimens and wedge loaded 1T-CT specimens made of Ti- and Nb-stabilised austenitic stainless steels were used. The results revealed no evidence of crack initiation and crack growth. Based on the laboratory results and the literature data an attempt is undertaken to separate parameters influencing chloride induced SCC from the effect of boric acid. (authors)

  15. Investigations of the corrosion fatigue behaviour at a super pure martensitic stainless steel (X 5 CrNiCuNb 17 4 PH) in comparison to the soft martensitic stainless steel X 4 CrNiMo 16 5 1 ESR in chloride containing aqueous media. Pt. 1. Corrosion investigations and stress corrosion tests to optimize the heat treatment according to the stress corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt-Thomas, K.G.; Wunderlich, R.; Happle, T.

    1989-06-01

    The stress corrosion was investigated for all heat-treatments of the 17-4 PH in 22% NaCl(pH3) solution. The precipitation hardening steel was most resistant to stress corrosion in concentrated NaCl-solution after a three-stage heat-treatment. There was no improvement of corrosion fatigue resistance after metallurgical aftertreatment of soft martensitic steel compared to the untreated material. This is due to the instable passive behaviour of the material which led to crack initiation, especially during the 150/sup 0/C experiments, at chloride-induced places of pitting. The investigation of the electrochemical corrosion behaviour of both materials showed that the pH-value hardly influences corrosion resistance. An increase of the salt content leads to higher pitting induction. At temperatures of 80/sup 0/C in a saturated NaCl-solution the material showed no corrosion resistance. In potentiokinetic investigations, a direct transition from the active area to the pitting potential was observed. In accordance with both the corrosion fatigue and the stress corrosion cracking investigations, it was found that pitting at the martensite precipitator starts primarily around Cu-containing or oxidic inclusions. (orig./MM).

  16. Characterization of biofilm and corrosion of cast iron pipes in drinking water distribution system with UV/Cl2 disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Wang, Haibo; Li, Xiaoxiao; Hu, Chun; Yang, Min; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-09-01

    The effect of UV/Cl2 disinfection on the biofilm and corrosion of cast iron pipes in drinking water distribution system were studied using annular reactors (ARs). Passivation occurred more rapidly in the AR with UV/Cl2 than in the one with Cl2 alone, decreasing iron release for higher corrosivity of water. Based on functional gene, pyrosequencing assays and principal component analysis, UV disinfection not only reduced the required initial chlorine dose, but also enhanced denitrifying functional bacteria advantage in the biofilm of corrosion scales. The nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Dechloromonas exhibited the greatest corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4 in the AR with UV/Cl2, while the rhizobia Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium, and the NRB Sphingomonas, Brucella producing siderophores had weaker corrosion-inhibition effect by capturing iron in the AR with Cl2. These results indicated that the microbial redox cycling of iron was possibly responsible for higher corrosion inhibition and lower effect of water Larson-Skold Index (LI) changes on corrosion. This finding could be applied toward the control of water quality in drinking water distribution systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zircaloy-4 in Halide Solutions: Effect of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farina S.B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Zircaloy-4 was found to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in 1 M NaCl, 1 M KBr and 1 M KI aqueous solutions at potentials above the pitting potential. In all the solutions tested crack propagation was initially intergranular and then changed to transgranular. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the SCC propagation was investigated. An increase in the strain rate was found to lead to an increase in the crack propagation rate. The crack propagation rate increases in the three solutions tested as the temperatures increases between 20 and 90 °C. The Surface-Mobility SCC mechanism accounts for the observation made in the present work, and the activation energy predicted in iodide solutions is similar to that found in the literature.

  18. Modelling of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in CANDU fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.; Kleczek, M. R.; Shaheen, K.; Juhas, M.; Iglesias, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) is a recognized factor for fuel-element failure in the operation of nuclear reactors requiring the implementation of mitigation measures. I-SCC is believed to depend on certain factors such as iodine concentration, oxide layer type and thickness on the fuel sheath, irradiation history, metallurgical parameters related to sheath like texture and microstructure, and the mechanical properties of zirconium alloys. This work details the development of a thermodynamics and mechanistic treatment accounting for the iodine chemistry and kinetics in the fuel-to-sheath gap and its influence on I-SCC phenomena. The governing transport equations for the model are solved with a finite-element technique using the COMSOL Multiphysics® commercial software platform. Based on this analysis, this study also proposes potential remedies for I-SCC.

  19. Chloride stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in boric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, Ph. [Electricite de France, 92 - Paris la Defense (France); Noel, D.; Gras, J.M.; Prieux, B. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret-sur-Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    1997-10-01

    The high nickel austenitic alloys are generally considered to have good resistance to chloride stress corrosion cracking. In the standard boiling magnesium chloride solution tests, alloys with more than 40% nickel are immune. Nevertheless, more recent data show that cracking can occur in both Alloys 600 and 690 if the solution is acidified. In other low pH media, such as boric acid solution at 100 deg C, transgranular and intergranular cracking are observed in Alloy 600 in the presence of minor concentrations of sodium chloride (2g/I). In concentrated boric acid at higher temperatures (250 and 290 deg C), intergranular cracking also occurs, either when the chloride concentration is high, or at low chloride contents and high oxygen levels. The role of pH and a possible specific action of boric acid are discussed, together with the influence of electrochemical potential. (author) 21 refs.

  20. Standard Test Method for Stress-Corrosion of Titanium Alloys by Aircraft Engine Cleaning Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method establishes a test procedure for determining the propensity of aircraft turbine engine cleaning and maintenance materials for causing stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloy parts. 1.2 The evaluation is conducted on representative titanium alloys by determining the effect of contact with cleaning and maintenance materials on tendency of prestressed titanium alloys to crack when subsequently heated to elevated temperatures. 1.3 Test conditions are based upon manufacturer's maximum recommended operating solution concentration. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see and .

  1. Localized Deformation as a Primary Cause of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary S. Was

    2009-03-31

    The objective of this project is to determine whether deformation mode is a primary factor in the mechanism of irradiation assisted intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys in light watert reactor core components. Deformation mode will be controlled by both the stacking fault energy of the alloy and the degree of irradiation. In order to establish that localized deformation is a major factor in IASCC, the stacking fault energies of the alloys selected for study must be measured. Second, it is completely unknown how dose and SFE trade-off in terms of promoting localized deformation. Finally, it must be established that it is the localized deformation, and not some other factor that drives IASCC.

  2. Stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless steel by sulfur-containing compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Vyas, B.; Kendig, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel in thiosulfate solutions has been studied using constant extension rate tests. Very low concentrations of about 6.10/sup -7/M Na/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (0.1ppm) gave cracking. With boric acid added, higher concentrations (1ppm) were required. The SCC was shown to be electrochemically controlled. Below -0.5v/sub SCE/ (-0.75/sub SHE/) no SCC took place; above this potential the rate of SCC increased with potential. An induction period was required before SCC continued above -0.5v if the potential was held at or below this value for extended times. This period was associated with the build up of an aggressive solution of thiosulfate decomposition products within the crack. The cracking process has been considered to be controlled by rupture of a salt layer and not a passivating oxide.

  3. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Fatigue Crack Growth Studies Pertinent to Spacecraft and Booster Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was divided into two parts. The first part evaluated stress corrosion cracking in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI) titanium alloy plate and weld metal. Both uniform height double cantilever beam and surface flawed specimens were tested in environments normally encountered during the fabrication and operation of pressure vessels in spacecraft and booster systems. The second part studied compatibility of material-environment combinations suitable for high energy upper stage propulsion systems. Surface flawed specimens having thicknesses representative of minimum gage fuel and oxidizer tanks were tested. Titanium alloys 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI), 6Al-4V annealed, and 6Al-4V STA were tested in both liquid and gaseous methane. Aluminum alloy 2219 in the T87 and T6E46 condition was tested in fluorine, a fluorine-oxygen mixture, and methane. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  4. Influence of plastic strain localization on the stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels; Influence de la localisation de la deformation plastique sur la CSC d'aciers austenitiques inoxydables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cisse, S.; Tanguy, B. [CEA Saclay, DEN, SEMI, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Andrieu, E.; Laffont, L.; Lafont, M.Ch. [Universite de Toulouse. CIRIMAT, UPS/INPT/CNRS, 31 - Toulous (France)

    2010-03-15

    The authors present a research study of the role of strain localization on the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of vessel steel in PWR-type (pressurized water reactor) environment. They study the interaction between plasticity and intergranular corrosion and/or oxidation mechanisms in austenitic stainless steels with respect to sublayer microstructure transformations. The study is performed on three austenitic stainless grades which have not been sensitized by any specific thermal treatment: the A286 structurally hardened steel, and the 304L and 316L austenitic stainless steels

  5. Dissolution of copper in chloride/ammonia mixtures and the implications for the stress corrosion cracking of copper containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F.; Greidanus, G.; Jobe, D.J

    1999-05-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking is a possible failure mechanism for copper nuclear fuel waste disposal containers. One species known to cause the stress corrosion of copper alloys is ammonia. It is conceivable that ammonia could be produced in a disposal vault under certain, very specific conditions. There are a number of conditions, however, that mitigate against container failure by stress corrosion, one of which is the presence of chloride ions in deep Canadian Shield groundwaters. There are a number of reports in the literature that suggest that Cl{sup -} has an inhibitive effect on the stress corrosion of Cu alloys in ammonia solutions. The electrochemical behaviour of Cu in Cl{sup -}/ammonia solutions has been studied as a function of ammonia concentration, pH, the rate of mass transport and electrochemical potential. In particular, the effects of these parameters on the formation Of Cu{sub 2}O films and the steady-state dissolution behaviour have been determined. All experiments were carried out in 0.1 mol{center_dot}dm{sup -3} NaC1 as a base solution. A series of aqueous speciation and equilibrium potential/pH diagrams are also presented for the quaternary system Cu-C1{sup -}NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 4{sup +}}H{sub 2}O. These diagrams are used to interpret the results of the electrochemical experiments reported here. In addition, it is demonstrated how these diagrams could be used to predict the time-dependence of the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of Cu containers in a disposal vault. (author)

  6. Flint Water Crisis Caused By Interrupted Corrosion Control: Investigating "Ground Zero" Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Kelsey J; Tang, Min; Edwards, Marc A

    2017-02-21

    Flint, Michigan switched to the Flint River as a temporary drinking water source without implementing corrosion control in April 2014. Ten months later, water samples collected from a Flint residence revealed progressively rising water lead levels (104, 397, and 707 μg/L) coinciding with increasing water discoloration. An intensive follow-up monitoring event at this home investigated patterns of lead release by flow rate-all water samples contained lead above 15 μg/L and several exceeded hazardous waste levels (>5000 μg/L). Forensic evaluation of exhumed service line pipes compared to water contamination "fingerprint" analysis of trace elements, revealed that the immediate cause of the high water lead levels was the destabilization of lead-bearing corrosion rust layers that accumulated over decades on a galvanized iron pipe downstream of a lead pipe. After analysis of blood lead data revealed spiking lead in blood of Flint children in September 2015, a state of emergency was declared and public health interventions (distribution of filters and bottled water) likely averted an even worse exposure event due to rising water lead levels.

  7. Dissolution Condensation Mechanism of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Liquid Metals: Driving Force and Crack Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Evgeny E.

    2011-02-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aqueous solution is driven by exothermic reactions of metal oxidation. This stimulus, as well as classical mechanisms of SCC, does not apply to SCC in liquid metals (LMs). In the framework of the dissolution-condensation mechanism (DCM), we analyzed the driving force and crack kinetics for this nonelectrochemical mode of SCC that is loosely called "liquid metal embrittlement" (LME). According to DCM, a stress-induced increase in chemical potential at the crack tip acts as the driving force for out-of-the-tip diffusion mass transfer that is fast because diffusion in LMs is very fast and surface energy at the solid-liquid interface is small. In this article, we review two versions of DCM mechanism, discuss the major physics behind them, and develop DCM further. The refined mechanism is applied then to the experimental data on crack velocity V vs stress intensity factor, the activation energy of LME, and alloying effects. It is concluded that DCM provides a good conceptual framework for analysis of a unified kinetic mechanism of LME and may also contribute to SCC in aqueous solutions.

  8. Report on Status of Shipment of High Fluence Austenitic Steel Samples for Characterization and Stress Corrosion Crack Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Leonard, Keith J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the Mechanisms of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) task in the LWRS Program is to conduct experimental research into understanding how multiple variables influence the crack initiation and crack growth in materials subjected to stress under corrosive conditions. This includes understanding the influences of alloy composition, radiation condition, water chemistry and metallurgical starting condition (i.e., previous cold work or heat treatments and the resulting microstructure) has on the behavior of materials. Testing involves crack initiation and growth testing on irradiated specimens of single-variable alloys in simulated Light Water Reactor (LWR) environments, tensile testing, hardness testing, microstructural and microchemical analysis, and detailed efforts to characterize localized deformation. Combined, these single-variable experiments will provide mechanistic understanding that can be used to identify key operational variables to mitigate or control IASCC, optimize inspection and maintenance schedules to the most susceptible materials/locations, and, in the long-term, design IASCC-resistant materials. In support of this research, efforts are currently underway to arrange shipment of “free” high fluence austenitic alloys available through Électricité de France (EDF) for post irradiation testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and IASCC testing at the University of Michigan. These high fluence materials range in damage values from 45 to 125 displacements per atom (dpa). The samples identified for transport to the United States, which include nine, no-cost, 304, 308 and 316 tensile bars, were relocated from the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad, Ulyanovsk Oblast, Russia, and received at the Halden Reactor in Halden, Norway, on August 23, 2016. ORNL has been notified that a significant amount of work is required to prepare the samples for further shipment to Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The

  9. Influence factors on stress corrosion cracking of P110 tubing steel under CO2 injection well annulus environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘然克; 贾静焕; 杜翠薇; 李晓刚

    2016-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of P110 tubing steel in simulated CO2 injection well annulus environments was investigated through three-point bent tests, potentiodynamic polarization and EIS measurements. The results demonstrate that SCC of P110 tubing steel could occur in acidulous simulated environment, and the sensitivity of SCC increases with the decrease of pH, as well as increase of sulfide concentration and total environmental pressure. Both anodic dissolution and hydrogen embrittlement make contributions to the SCC. Adequate concentration of corrosion inhibitor can inhibit the occurrence of SCC on account of the inhibition of localized anodic dissolution and cathodic hydrogen evolution.

  10. Electrochemical investigation on the hydrogen permeation behavior of 7075-T6 Al alloy and its influence on stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chuan-bo; Yan, Bing-hao; Zhang, Ke; Yi, Guo

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen permeation behavior and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of precharged 7075-T6 Al alloy were investigated in this paper. Devanthan-Stachurski (D-S) cell tests were used to measure the apparent hydrogen diffusivity and hydrogen permeation current density of specimens immersed in 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Electrochemical experiment results show that the SCC susceptibility is low during anodic polarization. Both corrosion pits and hydrogen-induced cracking are evident in scanning electron microscope images after the specimens have been charging for 24 h.

  11. Internal Corrosion Control of Water Supply Systems Code of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Code of Practice is part of a series of publications by the IWA Specialist Group on Metals and Related Substances in Drinking Water. It complements the following IWA Specialist Group publications: 1. Best Practice Guide on the Control of Lead in Drinking Water 2. Best Prac...

  12. Internal Corrosion Control of Water Supply Systems Code of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Code of Practice is part of a series of publications by the IWA Specialist Group on Metals and Related Substances in Drinking Water. It complements the following IWA Specialist Group publications: 1. Best Practice Guide on the Control of Lead in Drinking Water 2. Best Prac...

  13. Characterization of the Corrosive Action of Mineral Waters from Thermal Sources: A Case Study at Azores Archipelago, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Cristina Vasconcelos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Waters from natural sources of the São Miguel Island in the Azores archipelago have been investigated regarding their corrosive action on metallic materials. The corrosive and encrusting characteristics of the waters have been established in terms of relevant chemical parameters (namely pH, conductivity, total dissolved solids (TDS, and concentrations of bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, chloride, and sulfate ions and their temperature by using Langelier, Ryznar, Puckorius and Larson–Skold indexes. The validity of this methodology has been tested by measuring the corrosion rates of various metals exposed to various waters using electrochemical methods. The materials of industrial interest under investigation were carbon and galvanized steel, zinc, 304 and 316L grade stainless steels, brass, and Cr–Ni alloys. The greater aggressiveness of these waters was found for the less noble materials, and they experienced high corrosion rates.

  14. Effect of ETA treatment on corrosion fatigue in rotors and blades and stress corrosion cracking in 3.5 NiCrMoV steel low-pressure turbine discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitomi, Itoh [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago Research and Development Center (Japan); Takashi, Momoo [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago Machinery Works (Japan); Takayuki, Shiomi [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    In recent years, to increase the reliability and reduce the amount of feed water iron to prevent of fouling of steam generator tubes, ethanolamine (ETA) treatment has been adopted into the secondary system. In this investigation, the authors verified that ethanolamine treatment does not adversely affect the susceptibility of either stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the turbine discs that are the principal units in the secondary system or corrosion fatigue (CF) in rotors and blades. In the first stage, a laboratory investigation was made of (1) SCC initiation and propagation in 3,5 NiCrMoV steel and (2) CF in 3,5 NiCrMoV steel and blade steels, in both cases using deaerated water to which had been added ethanolamine with few organic acids that is 10 times the estimated concentration. It was confirmed that the ethanolamine treatment had almost no effect. In the second stage, test pieces (removed from the disc steel inserted into the turbine extraction chamber before the ethanolamine treatment was started) were used to observe the initiation and propagation of SCC. Even after long-term observation, ethanolamine treatment into the secondary system was found to have almost no effect on the susceptibility of SCC in discs. (author)

  15. Natural COnvective Heat and Mass Transfer on a Vertical Heated Plate for Water Flow Containing Metal Corrosion Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-xueJiang; Ze-peiRen; 等

    1992-01-01

    Corrosion products of structural materials when contained in water usually are in two states:soluble state and colloidal particles with dimeter about 10-3-10-1um,Deposits of such corrosion products on tube surfaces under high pressure will jeopardize the operating economy of power plant equipment and even esult in accidents.A numerical study is reported in this paper of the natural convective heat and mass transfer on a vertical heated plate subject to the flrst or mixed kind of boundary conditions for high-pressure water(P=17MPa) containing metal corrosion products with consideration of varialbe thermophysical properties.

  16. Corrosion resistant three-dimensional nanotextured silicon for water photo-oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Rachel; Chatterjee, Shahana; Gordon, Evan; Share, Keith; Erwin, William R.; Cohn, Adam P.; Bardhan, Rizia; Pint, Cary L.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate the ability to chemically transform bulk silicon into a nanotextured surface that exhibits excellent electrochemical stability in aqueous conditions for water photo-oxidation. Conformal defective graphene coatings on nanotextured silicon formed by thermal treatment enable over 50× corrosion resistance in aqueous electrolytes based upon Tafel analysis and impedance spectroscopy. This enables nanotextured silicon as an effective oxygen-evolution photoanode for water splitting with saturation current density measured near 35 mA cm-2 under 100 mW cm-2 (1 sun) illumination. Our approach builds upon simple and scalable processing techniques with silicon to develop corrosion resistant electrodes that can benefit a broad range of catalytic and photocatalytic applications.We demonstrate the ability to chemically transform bulk silicon into a nanotextured surface that exhibits excellent electrochemical stability in aqueous conditions for water photo-oxidation. Conformal defective graphene coatings on nanotextured silicon formed by thermal treatment enable over 50× corrosion resistance in aqueous electrolytes based upon Tafel analysis and impedance spectroscopy. This enables nanotextured silicon as an effective oxygen-evolution photoanode for water splitting with saturation current density measured near 35 mA cm-2 under 100 mW cm-2 (1 sun) illumination. Our approach builds upon simple and scalable processing techniques with silicon to develop corrosion resistant electrodes that can benefit a broad range of catalytic and photocatalytic applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (i) Experimental details, (ii) Nyquist plot from EIS data, (iii) FTIR of H-terminated silicon, (iv) reflectance measurements to quantify light trapping in nanotextured silicon, (v) LSV from Tafel analysis, and (vi) J-V curves for H-terminated flat samples, (vii) stability test of photoanode, and (viii) forward and reverse scans for each sample type. See DOI: 10

  17. The Nature of Surface Oxides on Corrosion-Resistant Nickel Alloy Covered by Alkaline Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gervasio DF

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A nickel alloy with high chrome and molybdenum content was found to form a highly resistive and passive oxide layer. The donor density and mobility of ions in the oxide layer has been determined as a function of the electrical potential when alkaline water layers are on the alloy surface in order to account for the relative inertness of the nickel alloy in corrosive environments.

  18. Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Behavior of Titanium Alloy/Bioactive Glasses Sandwiches in Simulated Human Physiological Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on a series of newly developed bioactive glasses having suitable thermo-mechanical properties to allow application as fixation agents between bone and titanium alloy biomedical implants, the stress corrosion crack growth(SCCG) behavior of their interfaces with Ti6Al4V was investigated in simulated body fluid (SBF) with the objectiveof discerning the salient mechanisms of crack advance and to assess the reliability of the bonds. Results indicatedthat crack growth rates in Ti6Al4V/glass/Ti6Al4V sandwich specimens were nearly the same as or slightly lowerthan those in the bulk glasses at comparable stress intensities; indeed, cracks would prefer to propagate off theinterface, suggesting that the Ti6Al4V/glass interface has relatively good crack-growth resistance. Mechanistically,interfacial crack growth appears to be controlled by the classic stress corrosion mechanisms for silicate glasses, withno discernible effect of bioactivity on the SCCG behavior being observed.

  19. Corrosion rate of API 5L Gr. X60 multipurpose steel pipeline under combined effect of water and crude oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jian; Wang, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Multipurpose pipeline is often seriously corroded during its service life, and the phenomenon is more prominent once the transportation medium is changed. Electrochemical polarization curves and impedance spectroscopy of the API 5L Gr. X60 steel pipeline's corrosion process in sedimentary water with different ion types and their concentrations have been studied in this work. The results showed that the corrosion rates were found to be 0.00418 and 0.00232 mm/a for pure water and crude oil, respectively. However, for the mixtures of water and crude oil (with water content increased from 0.2 vol% to 10 vol%), the corrosion rate increased consistently and reached a maximum value of 0.15557 mm/a for 10 vol% water in crude oil. The effect of the concentration of various ions, namely, chloride, bicarbonate and sulfate in (oil/water) mixtures on the corrosion rate was characterized by weight-loss method. The results showed that with increasing the ions' concentrations, the corresponding exchange current density increased significantly. The results were further supported by the observations of corrosion morphology using scanning electron microscopy and are helpful in devising guidelines which would help in reducing corrosion in multipurpose transport pipelines involving a change of transported medium during their service life.

  20. Electrochemical and Sulfide Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviors of Tubing Steels in a H2S/CO2 Annular Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. Y.; Wang, X. Z.; Liu, R. K.; Du, C. W.; Li, X. G.

    2014-04-01

    The electrochemical and sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) behaviors of 13Cr stainless steel and P110 steel were investigated in a simulated acidic annular environment with low-temperature and high-pressure H2S/CO2 using electrochemical methods, U-bend immersion tests, and scanning electron microscopy. In the solution containing high pressure CO2, 13Cr, and P110 steels exhibited general corrosion and severe pitting, respectively. Compared with sweet corrosion, additional H2S in the solution enhanced the corrosion of 13Cr steel but inhibited the corrosion of P110 steel. By contrast, in a solution containing 4 MPa CO2 and different (0-0.3 MPa), the susceptibility of both 13Cr stainless steel and P110 steel toward SSCC was significantly promoted by increases in H2S partial pressure. The 13Cr stainless steel exhibited higher susceptibility toward SSCC than P110 steel under a H2S/CO2 environment but lower susceptibility under a pure CO2 environment.

  1. Corrosion of copper in aerated synthetic sea water solutions and its inhibition by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, El-Sayed M; Erasmus, R M; Comins, J D

    2007-05-15

    Corrosion of copper in aerated synthetic sea water (3.5% NaCl) solutions and its inhibition by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATA) have been studied using electrochemical, gravimetric, and pH measurements, along with Raman spectroscopy. Electrochemical measurements indicated that the presence of ATA and the increase of its concentration suppress the corrosion process on the copper surface. This effect decreases cathodic, anodic, and corrosion (jcorr) currents and corrosion rates (Kcorr), while increasing polarization resistance (Rp), surface coverage (theta), and inhibition efficiency (IE%). Weight loss measurements indicated that the dissolution of copper and the accompanying change of pH decreased to a minimum even after 24 days immersion due to the presence of ATA and the increase of its concentration. Raman investigations revealed that the inhibition of copper corrosion is achieved by strong adsorption of ATA molecules onto the copper surface, preventing it from being corroded easily.

  2. Characterization of the Resistance of Alloy 22 to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, K J; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2002-05-30

    In its current design, the high-level nuclear waste containers include an external layer of Alloy 22 (Ni-22Cr-13Mo-3W-3Fe). Since over their lifetime, the containers may be exposed to multi-ionic aqueous environments, a potential degradation mode of the outer layer could be environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the current research was to characterize the effect of applied potential and temperature on the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to EAC in simulated concentrated water (SCW) using the slow strain rate test (SSRT). Results show that Alloy 22 may suffer EAC at applied potentials approximately 400 mV more anodic than the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}).

  3. Corrosion resistance of FeAl intermetallic phase based alloy in water solution of NaCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cebulski

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Recognizing of corrosion mechanisms in liquid mediums can lead to obtain corrosion-proof material e.g. by applying passivation phenomenon. In this paper attention was paid to determine the corrosion resistance of Fe40Al intermetallic phase based alloy in corrosive medium of liquid NaCl. Research of material susceptibility to surface activation in the pipeline of corrosion processes are conducted.Design/methodology/approach: In the corrosion research electrolyser, potentiostat „Solartron 1285” and computer with „CorrWare 2” software were used. Results of the research were worked out with „CorrView” software. The potentials values were determined in relation to normal hydrogen electrode (NEW. The recording of potential/density of current - time curve was conducted for 300 s. Polarization of samples were conducted in range of potential from 300 mV lower than stationary to Ecor + 1500 mV. Potential change rate amounted 10 mV/min every time.Findings: The results of research conducted in 3% NaCl solution, the best electrochemical corrosion resistance were showed by samples after annealing during 72 hours. It was confirmed by the lowest value of corrosion current density, low value of passive current density, pitting corrosion resistance much higher than in other samples.Practical implications: The last feature is the reason to conduct the research for this group of materials as corrosion resistance materials. Especially FeAl intermetallic phase based alloys are objects of research in Poland and all world during last years.Originality/value: The goal of this work was to determine the influence of passivation in water solutions of H2SO4 and HNO3 on corrosion resistance of Fe40Al intermetallic phase based alloy in 3% NaCl solutions.

  4. Corrosion of Steel Reinforcements in Fly Ash- and Kaolin-based Geopolymer Concrete Immersed in Distilled Water and ASTM Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astutiningsih S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion behavior of steel bar in fly ash- and kaolin-based geopolymer concrete immersed in aggressive media of distilled water and ASTM seawater was compared to Portland cement concrete having similar mix design. An accelerated corrosion by applying 3 V potential on the steel bar was performed to obtain reasonable test results in a relatively short time. The potential and pH of the immersing media were measured from day 1 to day 10 and then plotted on Pourbaix diagram to predict passivation or corrosion state. At day 10, steel bar in Portland cement concrete were in corroded state both in distilled water and seawater. The best corrosion performance was for kaolin- based geopolymer concrete in which at day-10 the steel bar was passivated in both media. Steel bar in fly ash- based geopolymer concrete was passivated in distilled water but corroded in seawater.

  5. Proposition of Corrosion Expertise method for water pumping stations Application to the case of northern station of Fez city - Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iatimad AKHRIF

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In a constant progress of a regulatory and environmental context, the diagnostic and the expertise of the corrosion, the determination of its causes and factors, and the proposed solutions to this phenomenon represent a real challenge for all stakeholders of industry. We propose in this paper to a complete study of the corrosion risk in the case of water pumping stations, based on some industrial methods of risk analysis (FMEA and multiple laboratory tests and analysis. Finally we have proposed a masterplan (chart as perspectives, indicating the encounter corrosion problems in the case of the northern pumping station of Fez city (as case study. The masterplan includes also the corresponding solutions, that can stop or minimize degradation of the focused equipments by the various mechanisms of corrosion. Our proposals will serve as reference during futur installation of new water equipments, or during the study and choice of appropriate materials in the Water Studies Department.

  6. Pitting corrosion in austenitic stainless steel water tanks of hotel trains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The water storage tanks of hotel trains suffered pitting corrosion. To identify the cause, the tanks were subjected to a detailed metallographic study and the chemical composition of the austenitic stainless steels used in their construction was determined. Both the tank water and the corrosion products were further examined by physicochemical and microbiological testing. Corrosion was shown to be related to an incompatibility between the chloride content of the water and the base and filler metals of the tanks. These findings formed the basis of recommendations aimed at the prevention and control of corrosion in such tanks.

    Se han detectado problemas de corrosión por picaduras en los depósitos de agua de trenes hotel. Para identificar las causas se llevó a cabo un detallado estudio metalográfico así como de la composición química de los aceros inoxidables austeníticos utilizados en su construcción. También se realizaron estudios fisicoquímicos y microbiológicos de los productos de corrosión. Se ha encontrado que los problemas de corrosión están relacionados con la incompatibilidad entre el contenido en cloruros del agua y los metales base y de aporte de la soldadura de los tanques. En base a estos hallazgos se proponen una serie de recomendaciones encaminadas a la prevención y control de la corrosión de dichos depósitos.

  7. Corrosion of combustion-synthesized {beta}-SiAlONs in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Xuemei [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Yamauchi, Akira; Kurokawa, Kazuya [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Akiyama, Tomohiro, E-mail: takiyama@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion of {beta}-Si{sub 6-z}Al{sub z}O{sub z}N{sub 8-z}s (z = 1, 2, and 3) has been investigated in SCW under 400 Degree-Sign C/35 MPa for 100 h. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion behavior of these materials is studied using XRD, SEM, and EDS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reaction mechanism of {beta}-Si{sub 6-z}Al{sub z}O{sub z}N{sub 8-z}s in supercritical water is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results in this study could present a valuable example for similar studies. - Abstract: The corrosion of {beta}-Si{sub 6-z}Al{sub z}O{sub z}N{sub 8-z}s (z = 1, 2, and 3) prepared by combustion synthesis (CS) followed by spark plasma sintering (SPS) was investigated in supercritical water at 400 Degree-Sign C/30 MPa for 100 h. The corrosion behavior was studied by means of gravimetry, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). The mass loss and corroded layer decreased with the increasing in z value, and the results of XRD showed the oxide formed on {beta}-SiAlONs (z = 1, 2, and 3) is aluminum silicate (Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}). Finally, we proposed the reaction mechanism of these materials in supercritical water.

  8. Water Replacement Schedules in Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londeree, Ben R.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Although early ingestion of cold water appears to lead to greater relief from heat stress during physical exertion than late ingestion, this difference is reduced toward the end of an hour's work in high heat and humidity. (CK)

  9. Evaluation of biological stability and corrosion potential in drinking water distribution systems: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, C C; Kao, C M; Chen, C W; Dong, C D; Chien, H Y

    2009-06-01

    The appearance of assimilable organic carbon (AOC), microbial regrowth, disinfection by-products (DBPs), and pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems are among those major safe drinking water issues in many countries. The water distribution system of Cheng-Ching Lake Water Treatment Plant (CCLWTP) was selected in this study to evaluate the: (1) fate and transport of AOC, DBPs [e.g., trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs)], and other organic carbon indicators in the selected distribution system, (2) correlations between AOC (or DBPs) and major water quality parameters [e.g. dissolved oxygen (DO), free residual chlorine, and bacteria, and (3) causes and significance of corrosion problems of the water pipes in this system. In this study, seasonal water samples were collected from 13 representative locations in the distribution system for analyses of AOC, DBPs, and other water quality indicators. Results indicate that residual free chlorine concentrations in the distribution system met the drinking water standards (0.2 to 1 mg l(-1)) established by Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (TEPA). Results show that AOC measurements correlated positively with total organic carbon (TOC) and UV-254 (an organic indicator) values in this system. Moreover, AOC concentrations at some locations were higher than the 50 microg acetate-C l(-1) standard established by Taiwan Water Company. This indicates that the microbial regrowth might be a potential water quality problem in this system. Higher DO measurements (>5.7 mg l(-1)) might cause the aerobic biodegradation of THMs and HAAs in the system, and thus, low THMs (water distribution system for maintaining a safe drinking water quality.

  10. Humidifier prevents corrosion and legionella and saves water and energy; Bevochtigingssysteem voorkomt corrosie en legionella en bespaart water en energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huizinga, H.T. [Heat Transfer Holland, Zuidwolde (Netherlands)

    2009-04-15

    The renewal of the central water humidifier in the laboratory of DSM-Resins (chemical industry) in Zwolle, Netherlands, leads to a better air conditioning system and prevents corrosion and legionella. At the same time, water and energy consumption are substantially reduced. This renewal fits perfectly within DSM's company policy to decrease the annual energy consumption by 2 %. [Dutch] Het vernieuwen van het centrale waterbevochtigingssysteem in het laboratorium van DSM-Resins te Zwolle verbetert het luchtbehandelingssysteem en voorkomt corrosie en legionella. Tevens vindt er een besparing plaats in water en energiegebruik. Deze vernieuwing past in de beleidsdoelstelling van DSM om iedere jaar 2% minder energie te gebruiken.

  11. Prevention of stress-corrosion cracking in nuclear waste storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondrejcin, R S

    1984-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has occurred in the early versions of carbon steel primaries of nuclear waste tanks at the Savannah River Plant. (Secondary containment was provided by a vessel surrounding the lower portion of the primary tank.) Evaporated alkaline nitrate wastes in the form of crystallized salts are being dissolved from some of these tanks for transfer to new tanks of a different design. To prevent the SCC sequence from occurring during salt dissolution, the levels of inhibitors required to prevent cracking at yield stresses were determined. Special statistically designed experiments were performed to evaluate the probability of cracking under the combined influences of nitrate, nitrite, hydroxide, and temperature. Experimentlly, samples were tested by a potentially controlled constant extension rate test and by wedge opening loaded samples. Two equations were derived by multivariable regression analyses that correlated probability of cracking as the dependent variable to nitrate, nitrite, and hydroxide concentrations and temperature as the independent variables. From these equations, simple operating standards were developed by setting the probability of cracking equal to zero and solving for the four independent variables. 15 references, 15 figures, 8 tables.

  12. Public inquiry concerning stress corrosion cracking on Canadian oil and gas pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollman, K.W.; Cote-Verhaaf, A.; Illing, R.

    1996-11-01

    An comprehensive inquiry was conducted into the serious problem of near-neutral pH stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in Canada`s buried oil and gas pipelines. The inquiry was prompted by evidence of the widespread nature of SCC and awareness that research was producing new insights into the problem. Two major ruptures and fires occurred on the TransCanada system in February and July of 1995. The July rupture was in a location where it was believed SCC could not occur. SCC on pipelines occurs when small cracks develop on the outside surface of the buried pipeline. With time the cracks grow large enough until the pipeline fails or ruptures. SCC results from an interaction of the following three conditions: a potent environment at the pipe surface, a susceptible pipe material, and a tensile stress. Recommendations to resolve the problem included implementation of an SCC management program by pipeline companies, changes to the design of the pipeline, continued research, establishment of an SCC database, improved emergency response practices, and information sharing. 84 refs., 8 tabs., 67 figs.

  13. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties evaluation for the LBB concept in VVERs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Karnik, D.

    1997-04-01

    One of the conditions required for Leak Before Break application is the verification that the influence of corrosion environment on the material of the component can be neglected. Both the general corrosion and/or the initiation and, growth of corrosion-mechanical cracks must not cause the degradation. The primary piping in the VVER nuclear power plant is made from austenitic steels (VVER 440) and low alloy steels protected with the austenitic cladding (VVER 1000). Inspection of the base metal and heterogeneous weldments from the VVER 440 showed that the crack growth rates are below 10 m/s if a low oxygen level is kept in the primary environment. No intergranular cracking was observed in low and high oxygen water after any type of testing, with constant or periodic loading. In the framework of the LBB assessment of the VVER 1000, the corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties were also evaluated. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical testing was oriented predominantly to three types of tests: stress corrosion cracking tests corrosion fatigue tests evaluation of the resistance against corrosion damage. In this paper, the methods used for these tests are described and the materials are compared from the point of view of response on static and periodic mechanical stress on the low alloyed steel 10GN2WA and weld metal exposed in the primary circuit environment. The slow strain rate tests and static loading of both C-rings and CT specimens were performed in order to assess the stress corrosion cracking characteristics. Cyclic loading of CT specimens was done to evaluate the kinetics of the crack growth under periodical loading. Results are shown to illustrate the approaches used. The data obtained were evaluated also from the point of view of comparison of the influence of different structure on the stress corrosion cracking appearance. The results obtained for the base metal and weld metal of the piping are presented here.

  14. Root water extraction under combined water and osmotic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong van Lier, de Q.; Dam, van J.C.; Metselaar, K.

    2009-01-01

    Using a numerical implicit model for root water extraction by a single root in a symmetric radial flow problem, based on the Richards equation and the combined convection-dispersion equation, we investigated some aspects of the response of root water uptake to combined water and osmotic stress. The

  15. Effect of deteriorated microstructures on stress corrosion cracking of X70 pipeline steel in acidic soil environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of X70 pipeline steel and its weld joint area in acidic soil environmeat in China,two simulating methods were used: one was to obtain bad mierostructures in heat affected zone by annealing at 1300℃ for 10 rain and then,quenching in water; the other was to get different simulating solutions of acidic soil in Yingtan in southeast China.The SCC susceptibilities of X70 pipeline steel before and after quenching in the simulating solutions were analyzed using slow stain rate test (SSRT) and poteatiodynamic polarization technique to investigate the SCC electrochemical mechanism of different mierostruetures further.The results show that SCC appears in the original mierostrueture and the quenched mierostructure as the polarization potential decreases.Hydrogen revolution accelerates SCC of the two tested materials within the range of-850 mV to -1200 mV vs.SCE.Microstructural hardening and grain coarsening also increase SCC.The SCC mechanisms are different,anodic dissolution is the key of causing SCC as the polarization potential is higher than the null eurreat potential,and hydrogen embrittlemeat will play a more important role to SCC as the polarization potential lower than the null current potential.

  16. Preliminary stress corrosion cracking modeling study of a dissimilar material weld of alloy (INCONEL) 182 with Stainless Steel 316

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Omar F.; Mattar Neto, Miguel, E-mail: ofaly@ipen.br, E-mail: mmattar@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M., E-mail: monicas@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Dissimilar welds (DW) are normally used in many components junctions in structural project of PWR (Pressurized Water Reactors) in Nuclear Plants. One had been departed of a DW of a nozzle located at a Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) of a PWR reactor, that joins the structural vessel material with an A316 stainless steel safe end. This weld is basically done with Alloy 182 with a weld buttering of Alloy 82. It had been prepared some axial cylindrical specimens retired from the Alloy 182/A316 weld end to be tested in the slow strain rate test machine located at CDTN laboratory. Based in these stress corrosion susceptibility results, it was done a preliminary semi-empirical modeling application to study the failure initiation time evolution of these specimens. The used model is composed by a deterministic part, and a probabilistic part according to the Weibull distribution. It had been constructed a specific Microsoft Excel worksheet to do the model application of input data. The obtained results had been discussed according with literature and also the model application limits. (author)

  17. The susceptibility of 90Cu-10Ni alloy to stress corrosion cracking in seawater polluted by sulfide ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domiaty, A. El; Alhajji, J. N.

    1997-08-01

    Electrochemical polarization measurements and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of a 90Cu-10Ni alloy in highly sulfide polluted seawater were conducted to investigate stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior. The severity of the SCC depends on the sulfide concentration in the seawater. The severity increases as the concentration increases. Because the major time in SCC is spent in the initiation process of the propagating crack, the fracture toughness has only a minor effect in the component life failed by SCC. The SCC behavior of CDA706 is strictly linked to sulfide concentration in the range of 100 to 1000 ppm. The general corrosion of Cu-Ni alloys in low (100 ppm) sulfide polluted seawater increases due to the selective copper dissolution. Cyclic polarization measurements confirmed that the corrosion rate decreases slightly as the sulfide concentration increases. Pitting tendency was high in the low concentration range of sulfide and low in the high concentration range. The presence of stresses in SCC removes the protective layer as it increases during testing of the specimen or during the actual service of a component. The authors propose that film rupture occurred, and two proposed SCC mechanisms were operational, namely sulfide stress cracking associated with the anodic dissolution in the low sulfide concentration range and hydrogen embrittlement, which was dominant in the high sulfide concentration range. It was found that a synergism exists between sulfide and stress that enhances the effect of the latter.

  18. Determining optimal corrosion control techniques for small water systems: A unique and systematic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarallo, S.M.; Beardsley, E. [Camp Dresser & McKee Inc., Povidence, RI (United States); Pytel, D.; Chaplin, T. [Rhode Island Department of Health, Providence, RI (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The Lead and Copper Rule represents one of the most complex rules currently in effect for small water treatment systems. In an effort to attain timely compliance by small systems with limited technical and financial resources, the Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDOH) Division of Drinking Water Quality initiated a study to recommend appropriate corrosion control approaches. The study encompassed three goals: to continue a good compliance record, to help small systems reduce their lead and copper levels, and to avoid unnecessary safety risks to operators and customers.

  19. Corrosion of AISI 4130 Steel Alloy under Hydrodynamic Condition in Ethylene Glycol + Water + NO2-Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I. Danaee; M. Niknejad Khomami; A.A. Attar

    2013-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of steel alloy in ethylene glycol-water mixture at different solution rotating speeds was investigated by polarization curves and AC impedance measurements (EIS).The results obtained showed that corrosion rate was not changed significantly at different rotating speeds and was decreased with increasing ethylene glycol concentration.The effect of nitrite as an inhibitor was studied and high inhibition efficiency was obtained.It was found that surface passivation occurred in the presence of inhibitor.The inhibiting effect of the nitrite was explained on the basis of the competitive adsorption between the inorganic anions and the aggressive Cl-ions and the adsorption isotherm basically obeys the Flory-Huggins adsorption isotherm.Thermodynamic parameters for steel corrosion and inhibitor adsorption were determined,which revealed that the adsorption process is spontaneous.

  20. Formation and release behavior of iron corrosion products under the influence of bacterial communities in a simulated water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huifang; Shi, Baoyou; Lytle, Darren A; Bai, Yaohui; Wang, Dongsheng

    2014-03-01

    To understand the formation and release behavior of iron corrosion products in a drinking water distribution system, annular reactors (ARs) were used to investigate the development processes of corrosion products and biofilm community as well as the concomitant iron release behavior. Results showed that the formation and transformation of corrosion products and bacterial community are closely related to each other. The presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB, e.g. Desulfovibrio and Desulfotomaculum), sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB, e.g. Sulfuricella), and iron-oxidizing bacteria (IOB, e.g. Acidovorax, Gallionella, Leptothrix, and Sphaerotilus) in biofilms could speed up iron corrosion; however, iron-reducing bacteria (IRB, e.g. Bacillus, Clostridium, and Pseudomonas) could inhibit iron corrosion and iron release. Corrosion scales on iron coupons could develop into a two-layered structure (top layer and inner layer) with time. The relatively stable constituents such as goethite (α-FeOOH) and magnetite (Fe3O4) mainly existed in the top layers, while green rust (Fe6(OH)12CO3) mainly existed in the inner layers. The IOB (especially Acidovorax) contributed to the formation of α-FeOOH, while IRB and the anaerobic conditions could facilitate the formation of Fe3O4. Compared with the AR test without biofilms, the iron corrosion rate with biofilms was relatively higher (p iron release with biofilms was obviously lower both at the initial stage and after 3 months. Biofilm and corrosion scale samples formed under different water supply conditions in an actual drinking water distribution system verified the relationships between the bacterial community and corrosion products.

  1. Recent progress to understand stress corrosion cracking in sodium borosilicate glasses: linking the chemical composition to structural, physical and fracture properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Cindy L.

    2017-08-01

    This topical review is dedicated to understanding stress corrosion cracking in oxide glasses and specifically the SiO_2{\\text-B_2O_3{\\text-}Na_2O} (SBN) ternary glass systems. Many review papers already exist on the topic of stress corrosion cracking in complex oxide glasses or overly simplified glasses (pure silica). These papers look at how systematically controlling environmental factors (pH, temperature...) alter stress corrosion cracking, while maintaining the same type of glass sample. Many questions still exist, including: What sets the environmental limit? What sets the velocity versus stress intensity factor in the slow stress corrosion regime (Region I)? Can researchers optimize these two effects to enhance a glass’ resistance to failure? To help answer these questions, this review takes a different approach. It looks at how systemically controlling the glass’ chemical composition alters the structure and physical properties. These changes are then compared and contrasted to the fracture toughness and the stress corrosion cracking properties. By taking this holistic approach, researchers can begin to understand the controlling factors in stress corrosion cracking and how to optimize glasses via the initial chemical composition.

  2. Influence of ph on corrosion control of carbon steel by peroxide injection in sour water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Martins Magda; Baptista, Walmar; Joia, Carlos Jose Bandeira de Mello [PROTEMP - PETROBRAS/CENPES, Cidade Universitaria, Quadra 7, Rio de Janeiro, CEP 21949-900 (Brazil); Ponciano, Gomes Jose Antonio da Cunha [Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais-COPPE/UFRJ, Cidade Universitaria, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Sour hydrogen damage is considered the most important corrosive process in the light-ends recovery section of Fluid Catalytic Cracking Units (FCCU). Corrosion in this condition is due to heavy gas oil that originates great amount of contaminants, such as H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3} and HCN. Hydrogen absorption is promoted by the presence of free cyanides in the environment. The attenuation of this process requires the use of some inhibitors, such as oxygen, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) or commercial polysulfides. The effect of these compounds is to neutralize free cyanides (CN{sup -}) into thio-sulfides (SCN{sup -}). When peroxide injection is selected, cyanide concentration in sour water has been used as key parameter to start the peroxide introduction. However, the importance of pH in this system has been pointed out by many authors. The aim of this work is to investigate the influence of pH when peroxide injection is carried out in less alkaline conditions of sour water. Electrochemical techniques - like anodic polarization and hydrogen permeation tests - and weight loss measurements were used to evaluate the effectiveness of corrosion control of carbon steel. It was concluded that at pH 7.5 peroxide injection can drive to an increment of the corrosion rate. Besides that, it was concluded that hydrogen permeation into the metal is promoted. Both detrimental effects were due to elemental sulfur generation in this pH range. The adoption of pH as a key parameter for peroxide injection is then suggested. (authors)

  3. [Influence of EPS on silicate corrosion inhibition for copper pipe in soft water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Yin

    2008-10-01

    The effects of sodium alginate on silicate corrosion inhibition for copper pipe in simulated soft water were investigated. The results showed that more soluble copper release was occurred when low concentration sodium alginate was in presence. The 1 a aged copper pipe released more soluble copper than the 3 a and 10 a aged copper pipe. The sequence of concentration of soluble copper release was c 1 a > c 3 a, > c 10 a. However, compared to the low concentration sodium alginate, soluble copper released from the 1 a aged copper pipe increased, and the 3 a and 10 a aged copper pipe were inverse when high level sodium alginate was in presence. These phenomena showed that the effect of silicate corrosion inhibition decreased when extracellular polymer substances was dissolved in soft water. Under the conditions of pH 7.5 and sodium alginate 16 mg/L, soluble copper release tend was gradually increase-decrease-gradually run-up which due to the absorption of sodium alginate on the surface of copper surface and the complex interaction between sodium alginate, silicate and copper ions. When the initial pH value was low, compared to the system of no sodium alginate, the soluble copper release distinctly increased in the presence of sodium alginate. The amount of soluble copper released from 1 a copper pipe is higher than that from 3 a and 10 a aged copper pipe, which due to the different components of copper corrosion by-products on the surface of different aged copper pipes and the different solubility of different corrosion by-products.

  4. Water stress in global transboundary river basins: significance of upstream water use on downstream stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munia, H.; Guillaume, J. H. A.; Mirumachi, N.; Porkka, M.; Wada, Y.; Kummu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing population and water demand have increased pressure on water resources in various parts of the globe, including many transboundary river basins. While the impacts of upstream water use on downstream water availability have been analysed in many of these international river basins, this has not been systematically done at the global scale using coherent and comparable datasets. In this study, we aim to assess the change in downstream water stress due to upstream water use in the world’s transboundary river basins. Water stress was first calculated considering only local water use of each sub-basin based on country-basin mesh, then compared with the situation when upstream water use was subtracted from downstream water availability. We found that water stress was generally already high when considering only local water use, affecting 0.95-1.44 billion people or 33%-51% of the population in transboundary river basins. After accounting for upstream water use, stress level increased by at least 1 percentage-point for 30-65 sub-basins, affecting 0.29-1.13 billion people. Altogether 288 out of 298 middle-stream and downstream sub-basin areas experienced some change in stress level. Further, we assessed whether there is a link between increased water stress due to upstream water use and the number of conflictive and cooperative events in the transboundary river basins, as captured by two prominent databases. No direct relationship was found. This supports the argument that conflicts and cooperation events originate from a combination of different drivers, among which upstream-induced water stress may play a role. Our findings contribute to better understanding of upstream-downstream dynamics in water stress to help address water allocation problems.

  5. Water Stress in Global Transboundary River Basins: Significance of Upstream Water Use on Downstream Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munia, H.; Guillaume, J. H. A.; Mirumachi, N.; Porkka,M.; Wada, Yoshihide; Kummu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing population and water demand have increased pressure on water resources in various parts of the globe, including many transboundary river basins. While the impacts of upstream water use on downstream water availability have been analyzed in many of these international river basins, this has not been systematically done at the global scale using coherent and comparable datasets. In this study, we aim to assess the change in downstream water stress due to upstream water use in the world's transboundary river basins. Water stress was first calculated considering only local water use of each sub-basin based on country-basin mesh, then compared with the situation when upstream water use was subtracted from downstream water availability. Wefound that water stress was generally already high when considering only local water use, affecting 0.95-1.44 billion people or 33%-51% of the population in transboundary river basins. After accounting for upstream water use, stress level increased by at least 1 percentage-point for 30-65 sub-basins, affecting 0.29-1.13 billion people. Altogether 288 out of 298 middle-stream and downstream sub-basin areas experienced some change in stress level. Further, we assessed whether there is a link between increased water stress due to upstream water use and the number of conflictive and cooperative events in the transboundary river basins, as captured by two prominent databases. No direct relationship was found. This supports the argument that conflicts and cooperation events originate from a combination of different drivers, among which upstream-induced water stress may play a role. Our findings contribute to better understanding of upstream-downstream dynamics in water stress to help address water allocation problems.

  6. Analysis of the magnetic corrosion product deposits on a boiling water reactor cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlov, Andrey [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Degueldre, Claude, E-mail: claude.degueldre@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Wilfried [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt, Leibstadt (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    The buildup of corrosion product deposits (CRUD) on the fuel cladding of the boiling water reactor (BWR) before and after zinc injection has been investigated by applying local experimental analytical techniques. Under the BWR water chemistry conditions, Zn addition together with the presence of Ni and Mn induce the formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}] spinel solid solutions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion ratios of cation distribution in spinels deposited from the solid solution. Based on this information, a two-site ferrite spinel solid solution model is proposed. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) findings suggest the zinc-rich ferrite spinels formation on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin. - Graphical Abstract: Analysis of spinels in corrosion product deposits on boiling water reactor fuel rod. Combining EPMA and XAFS results: schematic representation of the ferrite spinels in terms of the end members and their extent of inversion. Note that the ferrites are represented as a surface between the normal (upper plane, M[Fe{sub 2}]O{sub 4}) and the inverse (lower plane, Fe[MFe]O{sub 4}). Actual compositions red Black-Small-Square for the specimen at low elevation (810 mm), blue Black-Small-Square for the specimen at mid elevation (1800 mm). The results have an impact on the properties of the CRUD material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Buildup of corrosion product deposits on fuel claddings of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under BWR water conditions, Zn addition with Ni and Mn induced formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}]. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-Ray Adsorption Spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion of cations in spinel solid solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc-rich ferrite spinels are formed on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin elevations.

  7. Corrosion of steel in concrete in cooling water walls. Report part 3 - Corrosion of steel in water saturated concrete; Korrosion paa staal i betong i kylvattenvaegar. Delprojekt 3 - Korrosion paa staal i vattenmaettad betong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandberg, Bertil; Ahlstroem, Johan; Tidblad, Johan; Sederholm, Bror

    2009-11-15

    It is a well known fact that for concrete structures exposed to water the splash zone exhibit the greatest risk for corrosion on the reinforcement. Chloride ions are enriched and the supply of oxygen is good. Below the water table reported corrosion damages are few. The threshold for chloride content is in most cases exceeded but the propagation rate is low due to slow diffusion rate of oxygen in water saturated concrete. Despite this, ongoing corrosion of reinforcement has been observed in cooling water systems at the Swedish nuclear power plants. The aim of this project has been to identify and qualitatively quantify the importance of different possible mechanisms involved in corrosion of reinforcement in water saturated concrete. This has been achieved by collecting experiences, literature survey, modelling, theoretical calculations, experimental investigations as well as field measurements. The investigations have resulted in several new findings. The following have been concluded: In water saturated concrete, without the existence of macro cells, the reinforcement corrodes in an active state but with a very low rate. This active corrosion proceeds independently of the chloride content of the concrete. The corrosion rate is low even with thin concrete cover and most probably even if the concrete has been leached. Nor does high velocity of the cooling water create serious attacks. Inspections have unveiled attacks of reinforcement corrosion in the splash zone, in walls externally exposed to air and in the vicinity to pumps. In the splash zone the attacks occur above the water level. The absence of a macro cell resulting in increased corrosion on parts below the water line is of subordinate importance and is judged being without practical influence. The corrosion takes place where the environmental conditions are optimal. The same is valid for walls externally exposed to air. The macro cell is of subordinate importance. In the vicinity of pumps, observed

  8. Irradiation accelerated corrosion of 316L stainless steel in simulated primary water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiman, Stephen S.

    The objective of this work is to understand the effects of irradiation on the corrosion of 316L stainless steel in simulated primary water. 316L stainless steel samples were irradiated with a proton beam while simultaneously exposed to simulated PWR primary water to study the effects of radiation on corrosion. A 3.2 MeV proton beam was transmitted through a 37 microm thick sample that served as a "window" into a corrosion cell containing flowing 320° C water with 3 wppm H2. This design permitted radiolysis and displacement damage to occur on the sample surface in contact with the simulated primary water environment. Samples were irradiated for 4, 12, 24, and 72 hrs at dose rates between 400 and 4000 kGy/s, corresponding to damage rates of 7x10-7 to 7x10-6 dpa/s respectively. The structure and composition of the oxide films were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, STEM, and SEM. Sample areas exposed to direct proton irradiation had inner oxide films that were thinner, more porous, and were deficient in chromium when compared to unirradiated oxides. Outer oxides on irradiated samples exhibited a smaller particle size, and had a significant amount of hematite, which was not found on unirradiated samples. The presence of hematite on irradiated samples indicates an increase in electrochemical potential due to irradiation. Dissolution of chromium-rich spinels due to the elevated potential is identified as a likely mechanism behind the loss of inner oxide chromium. It is suggested that the loss of inner-oxide chromium leads to a less protective inner oxide, and a higher rate of oxide dissolution. Sample areas that were not irradiated, but were exposed to the flow of radiolyzed water, exhibited most of the same phenomena found on irradiated areas including loss of Cr and thinner more porous oxides, indicating that water radiolysis is the primary mechanism. When a sample with a pre-formed oxide was irradiated in the same conditions, the region exposed to radiolyzed

  9. Flaw growth of 7075, 7475, 7050 and 7049 aluminum alloy plate in stress corrosion environments: 4-year marine atmosphere results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    After nearly 53 months of exposure to marine atmosphere, crack growth in SL DCB specimens from 7075, 7475, 7050, and 7049-T7X plate has slowed to the arbitrary 10 to the -10 power m/sec used to define threshold stress intensity. Because some specimens appear to be approaching crack arrest, the importance of self-loading from corrosion product wedging as a significant driving force for crack propagation in overaged materials is questioned. Crack length-time data were analyzed using a computer curve fitting program which minimized the effects of normal data scatter, and provided a clearer picture of material performance. Precracked specimen data are supported by the results of smooth specimen tests. Transgranular stress corrosion cracking was observed in TL DCB specimens from all four alloys. This process is extremely slow and is characterized by a striated surface morphology.

  10. Methodology to evaluate the crack growth rate by stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metals weld in simulated environment of PWR nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Raphael G.; Figueiredo, Celia A.; Rabelo, Emerson G., E-mail: raphaelmecanica@gmail.com, E-mail: caf@cdtn.br, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Inconel alloys weld metal is widely used to join dissimilar metals in nuclear reactors applications. It was recently observed failures of weld components in plants, which have triggered an international effort to determine reliable data on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of this material in reactor environment. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology to determine the crack growth rate caused by stress corrosion in Inconel alloy 182, using the specimen (Compact Tensile) in simulated PWR environment. (author)

  11. Effects of disinfectant and biofilm on the corrosion of cast iron pipes in a reclaimed water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Hu, Xuexiang; Yang, Min; Qu, Jiuhui

    2012-03-15

    The effects of disinfection and biofilm on the corrosion of cast iron pipe in a model reclaimed water distribution system were studied using annular reactors (ARs). The corrosion scales formed under different conditions were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the bacterial characteristics of biofilm on the surface were determined using several molecular methods. The corrosion scales from the ARs with chlorine included predominantly α-FeOOH and Fe2O3, while CaPO3(OH)·2H2O and α-FeOOH were the predominant phases after chloramines replaced chlorine. Studies of the consumption of chlorine and iron release indicated that the formation of dense oxide layers and biofilm inhibited iron corrosion, causing stable lower chlorine decay. It was verified that iron-oxidizing bacteria (IOB) such as Sediminibacterium sp., and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) such as Shewanella sp., synergistically interacted with the corrosion product to prevent further corrosion. For the ARs without disinfection, α-FeOOH was the predominant phase at the primary stage, while CaCO3 and α-FeOOH were predominant with increasing time. The mixed corrosion-inducing bacteria, including the IRB Shewanella sp., the IOB Sediminibacterium sp., and the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) Limnobacter thioxidans strain, promoted iron corrosion by synergistic interactions in the primary period, while anaerobic IRB became the predominant corrosion bacteria, preventing further corrosion via the formation of protective layers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Electrochemical corrosion of grinding media and effect of anions present in industrial waters; Corrosion electroquimica de medios de molienda y efecto de aniones presentes en aguas industriales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magne, L.; Navarro, P.; Vargas, C.; Carrasco, S.

    2001-07-01

    The steel used in the minerals processing as grinding media (balls or bars), is an important input in terms of cost of the process. Considering the importance of the steel consumption in these processes, this work is guided to evaluate to laboratory scale the effect of the anions present in the industrial waters on the electrochemical corrosion of grinding media. Tests in electrochemical cell, were accomplished measuring potential and corrosion current to four electrodes that were manufactured using sufficiently pure sample of chalcopyrite, bornite, enargite and steel ball. The ions used in the tests were chlorides, sulfates, nitrates and carbonates in concentrations from 1 to 180 ppm in individual form or in mixtures, according to the levels measurement of these in industrial waters. (Author) 10 refs.

  13. Effect of temperature on corrosion behavior of 3003 aluminum alloy in ethylene glycol-water solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xin; Tian Wenming; Li Songmei; Yu Mei; Liu Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of 3003 aluminum alloy in ethylene glycol–water solution was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impe-dance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The surface characterization was observed and determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and energy dispersive spec-trometer (EDS). The results demonstrate that the anodic aluminum dissolution and the cathodic oxygen reduction were accelerated by the increased temperature. However, as temperature was over 60 °C, the solubility and concentration of oxygen decreased, resulting in the inhibition of cathodic reaction. The cathodic reaction rate of 3003 aluminum alloy rose to the maximum at 60 °C. The Warburg impedance in Nyquist diagram diminished and then was replaced by a negative capaci-tance caused by the absorption of intermediate corrosion product on electrode. On the other hand, after potentiodynamic measurements, 3003 aluminum alloy suffered pitting corrosion. The dissolu-tion of aluminum alloy around secondary phase particles expanded both horizontally and vertically. © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd. on behalf of Chinese Society of Aeronautics and Astronautics. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic weld deposits in a salt spray environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, J. B.; Yu, C.; Shiue, R. K.; Tsay, L. W.

    2015-10-01

    ER 308L and 309LMo were utilized as the filler metals for the groove and overlay welds of a 304L stainless steel substrate, which was prepared via a gas tungsten arc-welding process in multiple passes. U-bend and weight-loss tests were conducted by testing the welds in a salt spray containing 10 wt% NaCl at 120 °C. The dissolution of the skeletal structure in the fusion zone (FZ) caused the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the weld. The FZ in the cold-rolled condition showed the longest single crack length in the U-bend tests. Moreover, sensitization treatment at 650 °C for 10 h promoted the formation of numerous fine cracks, which resulted in a high SCC susceptibility. The weight loss of the deposits was consistent with the SCC susceptibility of the welds in a salt spray. The 309LMo deposit was superior to the 308L deposit in the salt spray.

  15. The stress-corrosion behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys: A comparison of test methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1982-01-01

    Two powder metallurgy processed (Al-Li-Cu) alloys with and without Mg addition were studied in aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution during the alternate immersion testing of tuning fork specimens, slow crack growth tests using fracture mechanics specimens, and the slow strain rate testing of straining electrode specimens. Scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography were used to demonstrate the character of the interaction between the Al-Li-Cu alloys and the selected environment. Both alloys are susceptible to SC in an aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution under the right electrochemical and microstructural conditions. Each test method yields important information on the character of the SC behavior. Under all conditions investigated, second phase particles strung out in rows along the extrusion direction in the alloys were rapidly attacked, and played principal role in the SC process. With time, larger pits developed from these rows of smaller pits and under certain electrochemical conditions surface cracks initiated from the larger pits and contributed directly to the fracture process. Evidence to support slow crack growth was observed in both the slow strain rate tests and the sustained immersion tests of precracked fracture mechanics specimens. The possible role of H2 in the stress corrosion cracking process is suggested.

  16. Reconstruction of stress corrosion cracks using signals of pulsed eddy current testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Xie, Shejuan; Chen, Zhenmao; Li, Yong; Wang, Xiaowei; Takagi, Toshiyuki

    2013-06-01

    A scheme to apply signals of pulsed eddy current testing (PECT) to reconstruct a deep stress corrosion crack (SCC) is proposed on the basis of a multi-layer and multi-frequency reconstruction strategy. First, a numerical method is introduced to extract conventional eddy current testing (ECT) signals of different frequencies from the PECT responses at different scanning points, which are necessary for multi-frequency ECT inversion. Second, the conventional fast forward solver for ECT signal simulation is upgraded to calculate the single-frequency pickup signal of a magnetic field by introducing a strategy that employs a tiny search coil. Using the multiple-frequency ECT signals and the upgraded fast signal simulator, we reconstructed the shape profiles and conductivity of an SCC at different depths layer-by-layer with a hybrid inversion scheme of the conjugate gradient and particle swarm optimisation. Several modelled SCCs of rectangular or stepwise shape in an SUS304 plate are reconstructed from simulated PECT signals with artificial noise. The reconstruction results show better precision in crack depth than the conventional ECT inversion method, which demonstrates the validity and efficiency of the proposed PECT inversion scheme.

  17. Utilizing various test methods to study the stress corrosion behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to aluminum-lithium alloys because of rather substantial specific-strength and specific-stiffness advantages offered over commercial 2000and 7000-series aluminum alloys. An obstacle to Al-Li alloy development has been inherent limited ductility. In order to obtain a more refined microstructure, powder metallurgy (P/M) has been employed in alloy development programs. As stress corrosion (SC) of high-strength aluminum alloys has been a major problem in the aircraft industry, the possibility of an employment of Al-Li alloys has been considered, taking into account a use of Al-Li-Cu alloys. Attention is given to a research program concerned with the evaluation of the relative SC resistance of two P/M processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. The behavior of the alloys, with and without an addition of magnesium, was studied with the aid of three test methods. The susceptibility to SC was found to depend on the microstructure of the alloys.

  18. Mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in HAZ for super-martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Yukio; Kimura, Mitsuo [Tubular Products and Casting Research Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Handa (Japan); Nakamichi, Haruo; Sato, Kaoru [Analysis and Characterization Research Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 1-1, Minamiwatarida-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki (Japan); Itakura, Noritsugu [Products Service and Development Dept., Chita Works, JFE Steel Corporation. 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Handa (Japan); Masamura, Katsumi [Tubular Products Business Planning Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 2-2-3, Uchisaiwai-sho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) for heat affected zone (HAZ) of super-martensitic stainless steel was studied using two types of the steel. One was a lean grade, which was Mo free and low Ni, and the other was a high grade, which was Mo added and high Ni. Specimens received heat treatments simulating welding thermal cycles were applied to SCC tests. Cracks were observed in some specimens after U-bend SCC test under low pH environments. Thermal cycle conditions with sensitization were verified from the results. No crack was observed in the specimen with the thermal cycle simulating post welding heat treatment (PWHT) after sensitizing conditions. Therefore, PWHT was clarified to be effective to prevent the cracking. Cr carbides were observed along prior austenite grain boundary intermittently, and Cr depleted zone was confirmed on the grain boundary adjacent to carbides that precipitated on the grain boundary. It is, therefore, concluded that the cracking results from Cr depletion on prior austenite grain boundary accompanied by precipitation of Cr carbides under specific welding conditions. (authors)

  19. Stress state reassessment of Romanian offshore structures taking into account corrosion influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joavină, R.; Zăgan, S.; Zăgan, R.; Popa, M.

    2017-08-01

    Progressive degradation analysis for extraction or exploration offshore structure, with appraisal of failure potential and the causes that can be correlated with the service age, depends on the various sources of uncertainty that require particular attention in design, construction and exploitation phases. Romanian self erecting platforms are spatial lattice structures consist of tubular steel joints, forming a continuous system with an infinite number of dynamic degrees of freedom. Reassessment of a structure at fixed intervals of time, recorrelation of initial design elements with the actual situation encountered in location and with structural behaviour represents a major asset in lowering vulnerabilities of offshore structure. This paper proposes a comparative reassessment of the stress state for an offshore structure Gloria type, when leaving the shipyard and at the end of that interval corresponding to capital revision, taking into account sectional changes due to marine environment corrosion. The calculation was done using Newmark integration method on a 3D model, asses of the dynamic loads was made through probabilistic spectral method.

  20. Inhibition of Ce3+ on Stress Corrosion Crack of High Strength Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Wen-ting

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The stress corrosion cracking (SCC susceptibility of 7A04 high strength aluminum alloy in 3.5% (mass fraction NaCl solution and the Ce3+ inhibition of SCC were investigated by slow stress rate test(SSRT, using constant current polarization, electrochemical noise (ECN and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS techniques. The inhibition mechanism of Ce3+ ions on the initiation and propagation of cracking was also analyzed. The results indicate that both anodic and cathodic galvanostatic polarizations can accelerate the SCC of 7A04, the former increases anodic dissolution but the latter accelerates hydrogen embrittlement of crack tip. SCC susceptibility of 7A04 can be reduced effectively by the addition of cerium ions, the fracture time is delayed and slowed down, but only during the initiation other than the propagation stage of cracking. Ce3+ ions can restrain the initiation of metastable pitting on the surface of 7A04 specimen, which therefore increase the induction time of the cracking since that the micro pits are usually the source of cracking.However, once the crack begins to propagate or the specimen is notched, the addition of cerium ions can rarely inhibit the cracking process. This is possibly attributed to that the radius of Ce3+ ion is too large to diffuse into the crack tip or it is hard to form protective CeO2 layer, Ce3+ ion therefore fails to rehabilitate the active alloy at the crack tip and further reduce the SCC developing rate of 7A04. SEM also indicates that the crack initiation of smooth 7A04 specimens is mainly induced by metastable or stable pits.

  1. Development of Modified 304 Stainless Steel Resistant to Stress Corrosion Cracking in Chloride Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This was a feasibility study for a modified 304 steel resistant to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aqueous environment containing chloride. SCC tests were conducted potentiostaticaly with spot-welded specimens, which had both crevice and residual stress, mainly in 3 % NaCl solution at various temperatures to determine the critical temperature for SCC at and below which the steel would not suffer from SCC. The effects of individual alloying element of silicon, manganese and copper on SCC of 18Cr-14Ni steels which phosphor content is 0.002 % and molybdenum content is 0.01 % were examined. Addition of 1 or 2 % of copper has beneficial effect on resistance to SCC, while increasing silicon or manganese content has no significant effect. Critical temperature of the steel with 0.002 % of phosphor and 2 % of copper is 150 ℃, which is markedly higher than 50 ℃ of 304L steel. However, the beneficial effect of copper is reduced with increasing phosphor content. From practical viewpoint, the modified steel with good SCC resistance should have 0.01 %-0.015 % of phosphor and 0.3 % or more of molybdenum, because it is very difficult to reduce phosphor content below 0.008 % industrially and such molybdenum content is inevitably introduced through cost-saving melting process using return steel. Aluminium is to be added as another alloying element and 3 % of aluminium combined with 2 % of copper has been found to negate the deleterious effects of increased phosphor and molybdenum content. As a candidate steel at this stage, 14Cr-16Ni-0.013P-2Cu-1Al-(0.3-1)Mo steel has critical temperature of 110 ℃.

  2. Effect of heat treatment on the stress corrosion resistance of a microalloyed pipeline steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albarran, J.L. [UNAM, Inst. de Fisica, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Martinez, L. [UNAM, Inst. de Fisica, Cuernavaca (Mexico)]|[U.A.C., Programa de Corrosion del Golfo de Mexico (Mexico); Lopez, H.F. [Wisconsin Univ., Materials Dept., Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1999-11-01

    In this work, the effect of heat treating on a pipeline steel exposed to a sulfide stress cracking (SSC) environment was investigated using LEFM compact specimens. In the as-received condition, specimens with crack orientations parallel and normal to the rolling direction were exposed to H{sub 2}S saturated synthetic sea water at an applied stress intensity (K{sub 1}) of 30 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}. In both cases, crack propagation rates were very close to each other (da/dt = 8.77 x 10{sup -9}m/s). as the microstructure was modified by heat treating, the rates of crack growth exhibited appreciable differences under similar applied stress intensities. In the martensitic (as-quenched) condition, crack growth was relatively fast (da/dt = 4.72 x 10{sup -7}m/s) indicating severe hydrogen embrittlement. In the water sprayed, and in the quenched and tempered conditions, the LEFM specimens exhibited crack arrest events. This, in turn, enabled the determination of threshold stress intensity values (K{sub issc}) for the water sprayed, and for the quenched and tempered conditions of 26 and 32 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}, respectively. In addition, favourable paths for microcrack growth were found to be provided by globular inclusions and grain boundary precipitates. (Author)

  3. Microstructure, mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking of Al–Zn–Mg–Zr alloy sheet with trace amount of Sc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Pan, Qinglin, E-mail: pql1964@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, Bo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu, Zhiming; Huang, Zhiqi [Guangdong Fenglu Aluminum Co., Ltd, Foshan 528133 (China); Yin, Zhimin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2015-11-25

    Microstructural and property evolution of the Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy sheet during its preparation were investigated in detail by means of optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Vickers micro-hardness test and room temperature tensile test. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of the Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy under different heat treatments was studied using slow strain rate test. The results showed that serious dendritic segregation existed in as-cast condition. The suitable homogenization treatment for Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy was 470 °C/24 h. After homogenization treatment, dissoluble Zn and Mg enriched non-equilibrium phases dissolved into α-Al matrix completely. The suitable solid solution-aging treatment for Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy was solution treated at 470 °C for 60 min, followed by water quenching and then aged at 120 °C for 24 h. Under this aging temper, the grain structures were composed of sub-grains, η′ phases and nanometer-sized, spherical Al{sub 3}(Sc, Zr) particles. Grain boundary precipitates (GBPs) area fraction was found to be an important parameter to evaluate the SCC susceptibility. The improved corrosion resistance from increasing aging temperature or prolonging aging time was due to the discontinuous η precipitates along the grain boundary and the high area fraction of GBPs. The main strengthening mechanisms of Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy are precipitation strengthening derived from η′ precipitates, dispersion strengthening, sub-grain strengthening and grain refinement caused by coherent Al{sub 3}(Sc, Zr) particles. - Highlights: • The suitable homogenization treatment of the alloy has been identified. • Evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties is investigated. • Strengthening mechanisms of the alloy has been established. • The basic mechanism has

  4. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  5. Effect of impurities on the corrosion behavior of CO2 transmission pipeline steel in supercritical CO2-water environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Seok; Nesic, Srdjan; Young, David

    2010-12-01

    The corrosion property of carbon steel was evaluated using an autoclave under CO(2)-saturated water phase and water-saturated CO(2) phase with impurities (O(2) and SO(2)) at 80 bar CO(2) and 50 °C to simulate the condition of CO(2) transmission pipeline in the carbon capture and storage (CCS) applications. The results showed that the corrosion rate of carbon steel in CO(2)-saturated water was very high and it increased with adding O(2) in the system due to the inhibition effect of O(2) on the formation of protective FeCO(3). It is noteworthy that corrosion took place in the water-saturated CO(2) phase under supercritical condition when no free water is present. The addition of O(2) increased the corrosion rates of carbon steel in water-saturated CO(2) phase. The addition of 0.8 bar SO(2) (1%) in the gas phase dramatically increased the corrosion rate of carbon steel from 0.38 to 5.6 mm/y. This then increased to more than 7 mm/y with addition of both O(2) and SO(2). SO(2) can promote the formation of iron sulfite hydrate (FeSO(3)·3H(2)O) on the steel surface which is less protective than iron carbonate (FeCO(3)), and it is further oxidized to become FeSO(4) and FeOOH when O(2) is present with SO(2) in the CO(2)-rich phase. The corrosion rates of 13Cr steel were very low compared with carbon steel in CO(2)-saturated water environments with O(2), whereas it was as high as carbon steel in a water-saturated CO(2) phase with O(2) and SO(2).

  6. Effects of hydrogen water chemistry on corrosion fatigue behavior of cold-worked 304L stainless steel in simulated BWR coolant environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, M.F., E-mail: mfchiang@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Division of Nuclear Fuels and Materials, Lungtan, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China); Young, M.C.; Huang, J.Y. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Division of Nuclear Fuels and Materials, Lungtan, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-15

    Corrosion fatigue behavior of stainless steel 304L (SS304L) in a simulated BWR coolant with hydrogen injection was investigated. Hydrogen water chemistry slightly mitigated the corrosion fatigue degradation of the as-received SS304L specimens, but, on the contrary, it slightly increased the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates (CFCGRs) of the cold-worked specimens. All the CFCGR-tested specimens showed similar fracture features, except for the amounts of deposited corrosion debris. The results indicated that decreasing the oxygen concentration of water environment is not an effective measure to suppress the fatigue crack growth rate of cold-worked SS304L. The CFCGRs of the SS304L were determined by an interaction between corrosion, oxide-induced crack closure and cold work in corrosive environments. At a specific level of reduction, cold work could enhance the corrosion fatigue resistance of SS304 both in the air-saturated and HWC coolant environments.

  7. Effects of hydrogen water chemistry on corrosion fatigue behavior of cold-worked 304L stainless steel in simulated BWR coolant environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, M. F.; Young, M. C.; Huang, J. Y.

    2011-04-01

    Corrosion fatigue behavior of stainless steel 304L (SS304L) in a simulated BWR coolant with hydrogen injection was investigated. Hydrogen water chemistry slightly mitigated the corrosion fatigue degradation of the as-received SS304L specimens, but, on the contrary, it slightly increased the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates (CFCGRs) of the cold-worked specimens. All the CFCGR-tested specimens showed similar fracture features, except for the amounts of deposited corrosion debris. The results indicated that decreasing the oxygen concentration of water environment is not an effective measure to suppress the fatigue crack growth rate of cold-worked SS304L. The CFCGRs of the SS304L were determined by an interaction between corrosion, oxide-induced crack closure and cold work in corrosive environments. At a specific level of reduction, cold work could enhance the corrosion fatigue resistance of SS304 both in the air-saturated and HWC coolant environments.

  8. New and Green Multi-component Scaling and Corrosion Inhibitor for the Cooling Water of Central Air Conditioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maodong; Dai, Chenlin; Yang, Bo; Qiao, Yue; Zhu, Zhiping

    2016-12-01

    A green multi-component inhibitor was developed in this study to obtain suitable scale and corrosion inhibitor for the cooling water treatment of central air conditioners. The inhibitor formulation consisted of hydrolyzed polymaleic anhydride/Tween-80/sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate/tolyltriazole (named 4-HTSA). Weight loss test and electrochemical method were used to investigate the corrosion inhibition performance of 4-HTSA on A3 carbon steel and T2 red copper in synthetic cooling water, and the scale inhibition performance of 4-HTSA was studied by the calcium carbonate precipitation method. The influence of parameters, such as pH, temperature, scaling and corrosive ion, on 4-HTSA was researched. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction were used for examination of the scale, and corrosion coupons were analyzed by SEM/energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Results showed that 4-HTSA had excellent scale and corrosion inhibition performance and wide tolerance to pH, temperature and the concentration of scaling and corrosive ion. Polarization curves indicated that 4-HTSA was anodic inhibitor.

  9. Kinetics of Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum in Acidic Media by Water-Soluble Natural Polymeric Pectates as Anionic Polyelectrolyte Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refat M. Hassan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion inhibition of aluminum (Al in hydrochloric acid by anionic polyeletrolyte pectates (PEC as a water-soluble natural polymer polysaccharide has been studied using both gasometric and weight loss techniques. The results drawn from these two techniques are comparable and exhibit negligible differences. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing inhibitor concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The inhibition action of PEC on Al metal surface was found to obey the Freundlich isotherm. Factors such as the concentration and geometrical structure of the inhibitor, concentration of the corrosive medium, and temperature affecting the corrosion rates were examined. The kinetic parameters were evaluated and a suitable corrosion mechanism consistent with the kinetic results is discussed in the paper.

  10. Effect of Water Nutrient Pollution on Long-Term Corrosion of 90:10 Copper Nickel Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Melchers

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their good corrosion resistance, copper and copper alloys such as 90:10 Cu-Ni are used extensively in high-quality marine and industrial piping systems and also in marine, urban, and industrial environments. Their corrosion loss and pitting behaviour tends to follow a bi-modal trend rather than the classic power law. Field data for 90:10 copper nickel immersed in natural seawater are used to explore the effect of water pollution and in particular the availability of critical nutrients for microbiologically induced corrosion. It is shown, qualitatively, that increased dissolved inorganic nitrogen increases corrosion predominantly in the second, long-term, mode of the model. Other, less pronounced, influences are salinity and dissolved oxygen concentration.

  11. Corrosion control using hydroxide and bicarbonate alkalising agents in water drinking processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Torres-Lozada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The water supply industry is faced with three phenomena of great importance: the aggressiveness, corrosion, and incrustation of water distribution systems (WDS, which are primarily due to the low alkalinity of water sources and the addition of chemicals used in water treatment processes, which require pH adjustments during the last stage of the treatment process before going into the WDS. This article presents the results of using Ca(OH2 and NaOH with doses between 2 and 20 mg L−1 and NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 between 10 and 250 mg L−1 to adjust the pH of water treated from the Cauca River, which is located in Cali, Colombia, using stabilisation indices normally used in water treatment plants for pH monitoring processes and to better predict the behaviour of water in the WDS. The results indicate that for the case of the surface water source studied, which exhibits low alkalinity levels, the evaluated alkalising agents, with the exception of NaHCO3, can create conditions that lead to the precipitation of a~protective calcium carbonate film. Because the pH values that guarantee an adequate pH adjustment are higher (8.7–9.0 than those specified by the Colombian water code and because other international rules indicate that these values do not compromise the health of consumers, it is advisable to review and adjust the code in this respect.

  12. 40 CFR 141.81 - Applicability of corrosion control treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems. 141.81 Section 141.81 Protection of... to small, medium-size and large water systems. (a) Systems shall complete the applicable corrosion...) or (b)(3) of this section. (2) A small system (serving ≤3300 persons) and a medium-size system...

  13. H2S Stress Corrosion Tests of Welded Joint for X65 Pipeline Steel and Finite Element Numerical Analysis of Crack Tip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金晓军; 霍立兴; 张玉凤; 白秉仁; 李小巍; 曹军

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure of welded joint is surveyed and the mechanical properties of X65 pipeline steel are studied in this paper, which provides experimental basis of performance effect on stress corrosion. H2S stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests on the steel are carried out in the environment based on NACE TM-01-77 solution. The threshold stress intensity factor and crack propagation velocity for base metal and HAZ are obtained. The susceptibility of welded joint for X65 pipeline steel to H2S stress corrosion cracking is investigated. The programming package ANSYS of finite element model (FEM) is used to perform the three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis of WOL specimens. Stress field and concentration of hydrogen distribution property of the crack tip are obtained.

  14. Stress corrosion study of PH13-8Mo stainless steel using the Slow Strain Rate Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Pablo D.

    1989-01-01

    The need for a fast and reliable method to study stress corrosion in metals has caused increased interest in the Slow Strain Rate Technique (SSRT) during the last few decades. PH13-8MoH950 and H1000 round tensile specimens were studied by this method. Percent reduction-in-area, time-to-failure, elongation at fracture, and fracture energy were used to express the loss in ductility, which has been used to indicate susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Results from a 3.5 percent salt solution (corrosive medium) were compared to those in air (inert medium). A tendency to early failure was found when testing in the vicinity of 1.0 x 10(-6) mm/mm/sec in the 3.5 percent salt solution. PH13-8Mo H1000 was found to be less likely to suffer SCC than PH13-8Mo H950. This program showed that the SSRT is promising for the SCC characterization of metals and results can be obtained in much shorter times (18 hr for PH steels) than those required using conventional techniques.

  15. Layer texture of hot-rolled BCC metals and its significance for stress-corrosion cracking of main gas pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovich, Yu. A.; Isaenkova, M. G.; Krymskaya, O. A.; Morozov, N. S.

    2016-10-01

    Based on data of X-ray texture analysis of hot-rolled BCC materials it was shown that the layerwise texture inhomogeneity of products is formed during their manufacturing. The effect can be explained by saturation with interstitial impurities of the surface layer, resulting in dynamical deformation aging (DDA). DDA prevents the dislocation slip under rolling and leads to an increase of lattice parameters in the external layer. The degree of arising inhomogeneity correlates with the tendency of hot-rolled sheets and obtained therefrom tubes to stress-corrosion cracking under exploitation, since internal layers have a compressive effect on external layers, and prevents opening of corrosion cracks at the tube surface.

  16. Assessment of susceptibility of Type 304 stainless steel to intergranular stress corrosion cracking in simulated Savannah River Reactor environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; Caskey, C.R. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Type 304 stainless steel rate tests (CERT) of specimens machined was evaluated by constant extension from Savannah River Plant (SRP) decontaminated process water piping. Results from 12 preliminary CERT tests verified that IGSCC occurred over a wide range of simulated SRP envirorments. 73 specimens were tested in two statistical experimental designs of the central composite class. In one design, testing was done in environments containing hydrogen peroxide; in the other design, hydrogen peroxide was omitted but oxygen was added to the environment. Prediction equations relating IGSCC to temperature and environmental variables were formulated. Temperature was the most important independent variable. IGSCC was severe at 100 to 120C and a threshold temperature between 40C and 55C was identified below which IGSCC did not occur. In environments containing hydrogen peroxide, as in SRP operation, a reduction in chloride concentration from 30 to 2 ppB also significantly reduced IGSCC. Reduction in sulfate concentration from 50 to 7 ppB was effective in reducing IGSCC provided the chloride concentration was 30 ppB or less and temperature was 95C or higher. Presence of hydrogen peroxide in the environment increased IGSCC except when chloride concentration was 11 ppB or less. Actual concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen and carbon dioxide did not affect IGSCC. Large positive ECP values (+450 to +750 mV Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE)) in simulated SRP environments containing hydrogen peroxide and were good agreement with ECP measurements made in SRP reactors, indicating that the simulated environments are representative of SRP reactor environments. Overall CERT results suggest that the most effective method to reduce IGSCC is to reduce chloride and sulfate concentrations.

  17. Assessment of susceptibility of Type 304 stainless steel to intergranular stress corrosion cracking in simulated Savannah River Reactor environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; Caskey, C.R. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Type 304 stainless steel rate tests (CERT) of specimens machined was evaluated by constant extension from Savannah River Plant (SRP) decontaminated process water piping. Results from 12 preliminary CERT tests verified that IGSCC occurred over a wide range of simulated SRP envirorments. 73 specimens were tested in two statistical experimental designs of the central composite class. In one design, testing was done in environments containing hydrogen peroxide; in the other design, hydrogen peroxide was omitted but oxygen was added to the environment. Prediction equations relating IGSCC to temperature and environmental variables were formulated. Temperature was the most important independent variable. IGSCC was severe at 100 to 120C and a threshold temperature between 40C and 55C was identified below which IGSCC did not occur. In environments containing hydrogen peroxide, as in SRP operation, a reduction in chloride concentration from 30 to 2 ppB also significantly reduced IGSCC. Reduction in sulfate concentration from 50 to 7 ppB was effective in reducing IGSCC provided the chloride concentration was 30 ppB or less and temperature was 95C or higher. Presence of hydrogen peroxide in the environment increased IGSCC except when chloride concentration was 11 ppB or less. Actual concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen and carbon dioxide did not affect IGSCC. Large positive ECP values (+450 to +750 mV Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE)) in simulated SRP environments containing hydrogen peroxide and were good agreement with ECP measurements made in SRP reactors, indicating that the simulated environments are representative of SRP reactor environments. Overall CERT results suggest that the most effective method to reduce IGSCC is to reduce chloride and sulfate concentrations.

  18. Corrosion Failures in Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Krishnan

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a brief description of typical marine environments and the most common form of corrosion of materials used in this environment. Some typical case histories of failures pertaining to pitting, bimetallic corrosion, dealloying, cavitation and stress corrosion cracking are illustrated as typical examples of corrosion failures.

  19. Atomic Layer Deposited Coatings on Nanowires for High Temperature Water Corrosion Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersak, Alexander S; Lewis, Ryan J; Liew, Li-Anne; Wen, Rongfu; Yang, Ronggui; Lee, Yung-Cheng

    2016-11-30

    Two-phase liquid-cooling technologies incorporating micro/nanostructured copper or silicon surfaces have been established as a promising thermal management solution to keep up with the increasing power demands of high power electronics. However, the reliability of nanometer-scale features of copper and silicon in these devices has not been well investigated. In this work, accelerated corrosion testing reveals that copper nanowires are not immune to corrosion in deaerated pure hot water. To solve this problem, we investigate atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO2 coatings grown at 150 and 175 °C. We measured no difference in coating thickness for a duration of 12 days. Using a core/shell approach, we grow ALD TiO2/Al2O3 protective coatings on copper nanowires and demonstrate a preservation of nanoengineered copper features. These studies have identified a critical reliability problem of nanoscale copper and silicon surfaces in deaerated, pure, hot water and have successfully demonstrated a reliable solution using ALD TiO2/Al2O3 protective coatings.

  20. Critical review of the literature on the corrosion of copper by water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada))

    2010-12-15

    The conventional belief that copper is thermodynamically stable in oxygen-free water has been questioned by a research group from the Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm lead by Dr. Gunnar Hultquist. A critical review of the literature both in support of the proposed mechanism and that which argues against it has been conducted. The critical review has been supported by supplementary analyses, with particular focus on the scientific validity of the reported observations and their significance for the corrosion of a copper canister. It is found that: - the scientific evidence in support of the suggestion that water oxidises copper is not conclusive and there are many aspects which are unclear and contradictory, - despite a number of attempts, no other researchers have been able to reproduce the observations of Hultquist and co-workers, - even if correct, the mechanism is not important for copper canisters in a repository, both because of differences in the environmental conditions and because, even if corrosion did occur by this mechanism, it would quickly stop, and - there is no adverse impact on the lifetime of copper canisters due to this proposed, but unproven, mechanism

  1. An effective and novel pore sealing agent to enhance the corrosion resistance performance of Al coating in artificial ocean water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han-Seung; Singh, Jitendra Kumar; Ismail, Mohamed A.

    2017-02-01

    A new technique was accepted to fill the porosity of Al coating applied by arc thermal spray process to enhance corrosion resistance performance in artificial ocean water. The porosity is the inherent property of arc thermal spray coating process. In this study, applied coating was treated with different concentrations of ammonium phosphate mono basic (NH4H2PO4: AP) solution thereafter dried at room temperature and kept in humidity chamber for 7d to deposit uniform film. The corrosion resistance of Al coating and treated samples have been evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic techniques with exposure periods in artificial ocean water. Electrochemical techniques, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicated that phosphate ion would have been retarding corrosion of Al coating effectively. The formation of AHP (Ammonium Aluminum Hydrogen Phosphate Hydrate: NH4)3Al5H6(PO4)8.18H2O) on Al coating surface after treatment with AP is nano sized, crystalline and uniformly deposited but after exposure them in artificial ocean water, they form AHPH (Aluminum hydroxide phosphate hydrate Al3(PO4)2(OH)3(H2O)5) that is very protective, adherent, uniform and plate like morphology of corrosion products. The AHPH is sparingly soluble and adherent to surface and imparted improved corrosion resistance.

  2. An effective and novel pore sealing agent to enhance the corrosion resistance performance of Al coating in artificial ocean water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han-Seung; Singh, Jitendra Kumar; Ismail, Mohamed A.

    2017-01-01

    A new technique was accepted to fill the porosity of Al coating applied by arc thermal spray process to enhance corrosion resistance performance in artificial ocean water. The porosity is the inherent property of arc thermal spray coating process. In this study, applied coating was treated with different concentrations of ammonium phosphate mono basic (NH4H2PO4: AP) solution thereafter dried at room temperature and kept in humidity chamber for 7d to deposit uniform film. The corrosion resistance of Al coating and treated samples have been evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic techniques with exposure periods in artificial ocean water. Electrochemical techniques, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicated that phosphate ion would have been retarding corrosion of Al coating effectively. The formation of AHP (Ammonium Aluminum Hydrogen Phosphate Hydrate: NH4)3Al5H6(PO4)8.18H2O) on Al coating surface after treatment with AP is nano sized, crystalline and uniformly deposited but after exposure them in artificial ocean water, they form AHPH (Aluminum hydroxide phosphate hydrate Al3(PO4)2(OH)3(H2O)5) that is very protective, adherent, uniform and plate like morphology of corrosion products. The AHPH is sparingly soluble and adherent to surface and imparted improved corrosion resistance. PMID:28157233

  3. Quantitative characterization of initiation and propagation in stress corrosion cracking. An approach of a phenomenological model; Caracterisation quantitative de l`amorcage et de la propagation en corrosion sous contrainte. Approche d`une modelisation phenomenologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raquet, O.

    1994-11-25

    A purely phenomenological study of stress corrosion cracking was performed using the couple Z2CN 18.10 (304L) austenitic stainless steel/boiling MgCl{sub 2} aqueous solution. The exploitation of the morphological information (shape of the cracks and size distribution) available after constant elongation rate tests led to the proposal of an analytical expression of the crack initiation and growth rates. This representation allowed to quantitatively characterize the influence of the applied strain rate as well as the effect of corrosion inhibitors on the crack initiation and propagation phases. It can be used in the search for the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms as a `riddle` for the determination of the rate controlling steps. As a matter of fact, no mechanistic hypothesis has been used for its development. (author).

  4. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhujie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bartels, David [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  5. Effect of Caffeine-Zn2+ System in Preventing Corrosion of Carbon Steel in Well Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rajam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition efficiency (IE of caffeine in controlling corrosion of carbon steel in well water in the absence and presence of Zn2+ has been evaluated by mass loss method. The formulation, consisting of 200 ppm of caffeine and 50 ppm Zn2+, offers 82% inhibition efficiency to carbon steel immersed in well water. Addition of malic acid increases inhibition efficiency of the caffeine-Zn2+ system. The inhibition efficiency of caffeine-Zn2+ and caffeine-Zn2+-malic acid system decreases with the increase in immersion period and increases with the increase in pH from 3 to 11. AC impedance spectra, SEM micrographs, and AFM studies reveal the formation of protective film on the metal surface. The film is found to be UV fluorescent.

  6. Investigation of Amourphous Deposits and Potential Corrosion Mechanisms in Offshore Water Injection Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eroini, Violette; Oehler, Mike Christian; Graver, Britt Kathrine

    2017-01-01

    , composed of both organic and inorganic compounds, has caused concerns within operating assets due to the detrimental effect on production and injection, in addition to challenges with intervention and integrity. The variety of deposits and poor understanding of their nature has led to confusion......Increasing incidence of amorphous deposits in both production and water injection systems has caused considerable problems for offshore oil fields. Amorphous deposits, which are a widely recognized, but often poorly explained phenomenon, are typically comprised of both organic (biological...... or hydrocarbons) and inorganic material, but with compositions that vary considerably. One recurrent form of deposits, found in offshore water injection flowlines and wells, consisting mainly of magnetite as the corrosion product, was further investigated with the objectives of explaining its formation...

  7. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, The Waste Package Outer Barrier and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stephen

    2000-04-17

    One of the potential failure modes of the drip shield (DS), the waste package (WP) outer barrier, and the stainless structural material is the initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) induced by the WP environment and various types of stresses that can develop in the DSs or the WPs. For the current design of the DS and WP, however, the DS will be excluded from the SCC evaluation because stresses that are relevant to SCC are insignificant in the DS. The major sources of stresses in the DS are loadings due to backfill and earthquakes. These stresses will not induce SCC because the stress caused by backfill is generally compressive stress and the stress caused by earthquakes is temporary in nature. The 316NG stainless steel inner barrier of the WP will also be excluded from the SCC evaluation because the SCC performance assessment will not take credit from the inner barrier. Therefore, the purpose of this document is to provide a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of the material (i.e., Alloy 22) used for the WP outer barrier subjected to the effects of SCC. As already mentioned in the development plan for the WP PMR (CRWMS M and O 1999e), this Analyses and Models Report (AMR) is to serve as a feed to the Waste Package Degradation (WPD) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) and Process Model Report (PMR).

  8. Effects of Surface State and Applied Stress on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 690TT in Lead-containing Caustic Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiming Zhang; Jianqiu Wang; En-Hou Han; Wei Ke

    2012-01-01

    The effects of surface state and applied stress on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors of thermally treated (TT) Alloy 690 in 10 wt% NaOH solution with 100 mg/L litharge at 330 ℃ were investigated using C-ring samples with four kinds of surface states and two different stress levels. Sample outer surfaces of the first three kinds were ground to 400 grit (ground), shot-peened (SP) and electro-polished (EP) and the last one was used as the as-received state. Two samples of every kind were stressed to 100% and 200% yield stress of Alloy 690TT, respectively. The results showed that the oxide film consisted of three layers whereas continuous layer rich in Cr was not found. The poor adhesive ability indicated that the oxide film could not protect the matrix from further corrosion. Lead was found in the oxide film and the oxides at the crack paths and accelerated the dissolution of thermodynamically unstable Cr in these locations and also in the matrix. The crack initiation and propagation on Alloy 690TT were effectively retarded by SP and EP treatments but were enhanced by grinding treatment, compared with the cracks on the as-received surface. The cracking severity was also enhanced by increasing the externally applied stress. The accelerated dissolution of Cr and the local tensile stress concentration in the near-surface layer caused by cold-working and higher applied stress reduced the SCC-resistance of Alloy 690TT in the studied solution.

  9. Some observations on use of siliceous mineral waters in reduction of corrosion in RCC structures

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venugopal, C.

    The corrosion-resisting characteristics of reinforcement in cement blended with siliceous mineral wastes viz. gold tailing and flyash have been evaluated by using an accelerated corrosion technique. The additions of these mineral admixtures...

  10. Investigation on carbon dioxide corrosion behaviour of HP13Cr110 stainless steel in simulated stratum water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, L.J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)], E-mail: mulijunxjtu@126.com; Zhao, W.Z. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2010-01-15

    The carbon dioxide corrosion behaviour of HP13Cr110 stainless steel in simulated stratum water is studied by potentiodynamic curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS); the micro-structure and composition of the corrosion scale formed at high-temperature and high-pressure are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that 13Cr stainless steel is in passive state in the stratum water, the passive current density increases and the passive potential region decreases with increasing temperature. The corrosion scale formed at high-temperature and high-pressure is mainly composed of iron/chromium oxides and a little amount of FeCO{sub 3}.

  11. Coating Layer and Corrosion Protection Characteristics in Sea Water with Various Thermal Spray Coating Materials for STS304

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Jong; Woo, Yong-Bin

    We investigated the optimal method of application and the anticorrosive abilities of Zn, Al, and Zn + 15%Al spray coatings in protecting stainless steel 304 (STS304) in sea water. If a defect such as porosity or an oxide layer, causes STS304 to be exposed to sea water, and the thermal spray coating material will act as the cathode and anode, respectively. The Tafel experiments revealed that Al-coated specimens among applied coating methods had the lowest corrosion current densities. As the corrosion potential decreases with increasing corrosion current density, we estimated the characteristics and lifetime of the protective thermal spray coating layer in the galvanic cell formed by the thermal spray coating layer and STS304.

  12. Global monthly water stress: II. Water demand and severity of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wada, Y.; Beek, L.P.H. van; Viviroli, D.; Dürr, H.H.; Weingartner, R.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper assesses global water stress at a finer temporal scale compared to conventional assessments. To calculate time series of global water stress at a monthly time scale, global water availability, as obtained from simulations of monthly river discharge from the companion paper, is confronted

  13. Global monthly water stress: II. Water demand and severity of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wada, Y.; Beek, L.P.H. van; Viviroli, D.; Dürr, H.H.; Weingartner, R.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper assesses global water stress at a finer temporal scale compared to conventional assessments. To calculate time series of global water stress at a monthly time scale, global water availability, as obtained from simulations of monthly river discharge from the companion paper, is confronted

  14. Methyl Jasmonate Reduces Water Stress in Strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang

    1999-11-01

    The effect of methyl jasmonate (MJ) on changes of oxygen-scavenging enzyme activities and membrane lipid composition was studied in strawberry leaves under water stress. Under water stress, MJ treatment reduced the increase of peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7; POD) activity, maintained higher catalase (EC 1.11.1.6; CAT) and superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1; SOD) activities, and ascorbic acid content. In addition, MJ treatment reduced transpiration and membrane-lipid peroxidation as expressed by malondialdehyde (MDA) content, lessened the reduction of membrane lipids, glycolipids [monogalactosyl diglyceride (MGDG), digalactosyl diglyceride (DGDG)], and phospholipids [phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylinositol (PI)]. In water-deficit conditions, MJ treatment also alleviated the decline in the degree of fatty acid unsaturation and the ratio of linolenic (18:3) to linoleic acid (18:2). These results indicate that MJ treatment appears to alter the metabolism of strawberry plants rendering the tissue better able to withstand water stress.

  15. Optimum temperature on corrosion resistance for plasma ion nitrided 316L stainless steel in sea water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Sang-Ok; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the optimum plasma ion nitriding temperature on corrosion resistance in natural sea water for plasma ion nitrided 316L stainless steel. Plasma ion nitriding was conducted at different temperatures of 350, 400, 450, and 500 °C with a mixture of 75% of nitrogen and 25% of hydrogen during 10 h. In conclusion of anodic polarization test, a wide passive potential region and a high corrosion potential were observed at a plasma ion nitriding temperature of 450 °C. Moreover, relatively less damage depth and clean surface micrographs were observed at 450 °C as results of observation of three-dimensional (3D) microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) after polarization experiments. In addition, higher corrosion potential and lower corrosion current density were indicated at plasma ion nitrided samples than the value of untreated substrate after Tafel analysis. Hence, plasma ion nitrided at 450 °C in sea water solution represented optimum corrosion resistance among the all the plasma ion nitriding temperature parameters.

  16. Long-Term Stability of Residual Stress Improvement by Water Jet Peening Considering Working Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Osawa, Yusuke; Itoh, Shinsuke; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2013-06-01

    To prevent primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), water jet peening (WJP) has been used on the welds of Ni-based alloys in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Before WJP, the welds are machined and buffed in order to conduct a penetrant test (PT) to verify the weld qualities to access, and microstructure evolution takes place in the target area due to the severe plastic deformation. The compressive residual stresses induced by WJP might be unstable under elevated temperatures because of the high dislocation density in the compressive stress layer. Therefore, the stability of the compressive residual stresses caused by WJP was investigated during long-term operation by considering the microstructure evolution due to the working processes. The following conclusions were made: The compressive residual stresses were slightly relaxed in the surface layers of the thermally aged specimens. There were no differences in the magnitude of the relaxation based on temperature or time. The compressive residual stresses induced by WJP were confirmed to remain stable under elevated temperatures. The stress relaxation at the surface followed the Johnson-Mehl equation, which states that stress relaxation can occur due to the recovery of severe plastic strain, since the estimated activation energy agrees very well with the self-diffusion energy for Ni. By utilizing the additivity rule, it was indicated that stress relaxation due to recovery is completed during the startup process. It was proposed that the long-term stability of WJP under elevated temperatures must be assessed based on compressive stresses with respect to the yield stress. Thermal elastic-plastic creep analysis was performed to predict the effect of creep strain. After 100 yr of simulated continuous operation at 80% capacity, there was little change in the WJP compressive stresses under an actual operating temperature of 623 K. Therefore, the long-term stability of WJP during actual operation was

  17. Critical assessment of precracked specimen configuration and experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domack, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to critically assess the effects of precracked specimen configuration, stress intensity solutions, compliance relationships and other experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate. Modified compact and double beam wedge-loaded specimens were tested and analyzed to determine the threshold stress intensity factor and stress corrosion crack growth rate. Stress intensity solutions and experimentally determined compliance relationships were developed and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Crack growth data suggests that more effective crack length measurement techniques are necessary to better characterize stress corrosion crack growth. Final load determined by specimen reloading and by compliance did not correlate well, and was considered a major source of interlaboratory variability. Test duration must be determined systematically, accounting for crack length measurement resolution, time for crack arrest, and experimental interferences. This work was conducted as part of a round robin program sponsored by ASTM committees G1.06 and E24.04 to develop a standard test method for stress corrosion testing using precracked specimens.

  18. Export of calcium carbonate corrosive waters from the East Siberian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Leif G.; Ek, Jörgen; Ericson, Ylva; Humborg, Christoph; Semiletov, Igor; Sundbom, Marcus; Ulfsbo, Adam

    2017-04-01

    The Siberian shelf seas are areas of extensive biogeochemical transformation of organic matter, both of marine and terrestrial origin. This in combination with brine production from sea ice formation results in a cold bottom water of relative high salinity and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2). Data from the SWERUS-C3 expedition compiled on the icebreaker Oden in July to September 2014 show the distribution of such waters at the outer shelf, as well as their export into the deep central Arctic basins. Very high pCO2 water, up to ˜ 1000 µatm, was observed associated with high nutrients and low oxygen concentrations. Consequently, this water had low saturation state with respect to calcium carbonate down to less than 0.8 for calcite and 0.5 for aragonite. Waters undersaturated in aragonite were also observed in the surface in waters at equilibrium with atmospheric CO2; however, at these conditions the cause of under-saturation was low salinity from river runoff and/or sea ice melt. The calcium carbonate corrosive water was observed all along the continental margin and well out into the deep Makarov and Canada basins at a depth from about 50 m depth in the west to about 150 m in the east. These waters of low aragonite saturation state are traced in historic data to the Canada Basin and in the waters flowing out of the Arctic Ocean north of Greenland and in the western Fram Strait, thus potentially impacting the marine life in the North Atlantic Ocean.

  19. Potential mechanisms for corrosion and stress corrosion cracking failure of 3013 storage containers composed of 316 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolman, D.G.; Butt, D.P.

    1998-03-01

    The degradation of 316 stainless steel (SS) storage container materials is a potential problem for radioactive waste disposition. Container materials will be exposed to significant ionizing radiation, elevated temperatures, embrittling and/or alloying agents (e.g., gallium), chloride-containing compounds (as much as 20 wt% Cl or Cl{sup {minus}}), oxidizing compounds, and a limited quantity of moisture. Additionally, containers will contain welds that have heterogeneous composition due to solute segregation and that may retain significant residual stress. All of the above-listed environmental and material conditions have been shown to be deleterious to material integrity under certain conditions. Unfortunately, the precise conditions within each container and environment is unknown and may vary widely from container to container. Thus, no single test or set of tests will be able mimic the broad range of storage container conditions. Additionally, material behavior cannot be predicted because the synergistic effects of temperature, time, chloride, moisture, sensitization, weldments, salt formation, etc., have not been fully studied. The complexity and uncertainty of storage conditions precludes any detailed recommendations. This document attempts to detail selected previous studies and to suggest some general guidelines for storage of radioactive waste. Because of the voluminous research in this area, this review cannot be considered to be comprehensive. Readers are directed to references that contain detailed reviews of particular processes for more information. Note that the effect of gallium on the degradation of SS storage containers has been discussed elsewhere and will not be discussed here.

  20. 焊接工艺对奥氏体不锈钢应力腐蚀行为的影响%Effect of Welding Procedure on Stress Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵尔冰; 张亦良; 陈鴒志

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult to release residual stress for welding of austenitic stainless steel, therefore, its chlorine stress corrosion always occurs in engineering. The stress corrosion testing was done on different welding procedures of three different materials (304, 316 L of China, and 304 of German). The welding procedure includes shielded metal arc welding and flux cored CO2 shielded are welding through air cooling and water cooling after welding. The base metal, starting point and ending point of welding arc were tested. The better procedure is obtained through 100 samples, and the stress-life relationship of stress corrosion in boiled MgCl2 of two types of materials are formulated. The conclusion is that life of stress corrosion of 316 L is 15 times of 304, life of the starting point is longer than the ending point of welding arc, life of the butt weld is longer than the fillet weld, and faster cooling after welding is efficient for life of stress corrosion.%针对氯离子环境中奥氏体不锈钢焊缝较高的焊接残余应力极易引发应力腐蚀开裂的普遍性工程难题,对国产304、316L、德国304钢3种材料的不同焊接工艺进行了系列应力腐蚀实验研究.焊接工艺包括手工焊条电弧焊及CO2保护药芯电弧焊、焊后空冷及浇水速冷,取样位置包括母材、焊缝起弧及收弧.通过100多个试样的应力腐蚀对比实验,研究了各种工艺之间的优劣,拟合了2种材料在沸腾氯化镁环境中应力一寿命的数学关系.结果表明,对应力腐蚀寿命而言,316L是304钢的15倍以上、焊接起弧点高于收弧点、对接焊缝高于角焊缝;焊后速冷工艺可提高焊接接头抗应力腐蚀能力.

  1. Influence of nitrogen on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of austenitic stainless steels in chloride environment; Influence de l'azote sur la resistance a la corrosion sous contrainte d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu chlorure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, S

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of nitrogen additions on the Stress Corrosion Cracking (SSC) resistance of austenitic stainless steel in chloride environment. The investigation was carried out in two part: first, an experimental investigation with model industrial steels was carried out and secondly, numerical simulations based on the Corrosion Enhanced Plasticity Model were developed. Both slow strain rate tensile tests and constant load test of the different steels in boiling MgCl{sub 2} (153 deg C) at free potential show that, for a given plastic strain rate, nitrogen addition increases the critical stress for crack initiation without influencing the crack propagation rate. We observed that the creep rate under constant load was affected by the nitrogen content. As a consequence, the SCC behaviour (cracks density and propagation rate) depends on the nitrogen content. We thus confirm that the nitrogen content influences the corrosion - deformation interaction mechanisms via its positive contribution to the flow stress. These experimental results are reproduced semi-quantitatively by means of numerical simulations at the scale of crack. - dislocation interactions. The presence of nitrogen is modelled by an increased lattice friction stress, which in turn affects the dynamics of crack tip shielding by dislocation pile-ups. We conclude that nitrogen addition in austenitic stainless steels increases the SC crack initiation stress in proportion of the increased flow stress, without penalty in terms of SC crack propagation rate. (author)

  2. Scanning reference electrode techniques in localized corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Vyas, B.

    1979-04-01

    The principles, advantages, and implementations of scanning reference electrode techniques are reviewed. Data related to pitting, intergranular corrosion, welds and stress corrosion cracking are presented. The technique locates the position of localized corrosion and can be used to monitor the development of corrosion and changes in the corrosion rate under a wide range of conditions.

  3. Corrosion of metals and alloys in the coastal and deep waters of the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Venkat, K.; Wagh, A.B.

    Corrosion rate of mild steel (MS), stainless steel (SS), copper, brass and cupro-nickel has been determinEd. by exposing metallic coupons in coastal and oceanic waters of the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. Amongst the metals and alloys under study...

  4. Influence of Heat Treatments on the Corrosion Resistance of Medium -Carbon Steel using Sulfuric Spring Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhlas Basheer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion is one of the important problems that may be occur to the parts of machinery and equipment after manufactured and when used as a result of exposure to corrosive media. Plain-carbon steel is considered as one of the most common minerals used in industrial applications. Some of heat treatments can have direct effect on the corrosion rate of steel by building up galvanic corrosion cells between its microscopic phases. Therefore, to adopt one of kinds of the plain-carbon steel and the most commonly used in industry to be study subject, that is medium carbon steel and took samples of this steel has been treated thermally in three methods which the normalising, annealing, and hardening .The corrosive media used in the research is Sulfuric Spring, it contains many chemical compounds to show its influence on the corrosion of steel. The weight loss method is used to determine corrosion rate and to compare between the results obtained, show that the greatest corrosion resistance of the annealed steel and the corrosion resistance of the hardened steel is the lowest while the corrosion  resistance of the normalised steel is in-between them.         Calcium carbonate was formed on the metal surface which acts as an isolating layer which decrease corrosion rate with time

  5. Pilot-scale cooling tower to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies for cooling system makeup water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, S H; Hsieh, M K; Li, H; Monnell, J; Dzombak, D; Vidic, R

    2012-02-01

    Pilot-scale cooling towers can be used to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies when using particular cooling system makeup water and particular operating conditions. To study the potential for using a number of different impaired waters as makeup water, a pilot-scale system capable of generating 27,000 kJ∕h heat load and maintaining recirculating water flow with a Reynolds number of 1.92 × 10(4) was designed to study these critical processes under conditions that are similar to full-scale systems. The pilot-scale cooling tower was equipped with an automatic makeup water control system, automatic blowdown control system, semi-automatic biocide feeding system, and corrosion, scaling, and biofouling monitoring systems. Observed operational data revealed that the major operating parameters, including temperature change (6.6 °C), cycles of concentration (N = 4.6), water flow velocity (0.66 m∕s), and air mass velocity (3660 kg∕h m(2)), were controlled quite well for an extended period of time (up to 2 months). Overall, the performance of the pilot-scale cooling towers using treated municipal wastewater was shown to be suitable to study critical processes (corrosion, scaling, biofouling) and evaluate cooling water management strategies for makeup waters of complex quality.

  6. Integrated Computational Modeling of Water Side Corrosion in Zirconium Metal Clad Under Nominal LWR Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanfar, Asghar; Thomas, John; Van der Ven, Anton; Xu, Donghua; Youssef, Mostafa; Yang, Jing; Yildiz, Bilge; Marian, Jaime

    2016-10-01

    A mesoscopic chemical reaction kinetics model to predict the formation of zirconium oxide and hydride accumulation light-water reactor (LWR) fuel clad is presented. The model is designed to include thermodynamic information from ab initio electronic structure methods as well as parametric information in terms of diffusion coefficients, thermal conductivities and reaction constants. In contrast to approaches where the experimentally observed time exponents are captured by the models by design, our approach is designed to be predictive and to provide an improved understanding of the corrosion process. We calculate the time evolution of the oxide/metal interface and evaluate the order of the chemical reactions that are conducive to a t 1/3 dependence. We also show calculations of hydrogen cluster accumulation as a function of temperature and depth using spatially dependent cluster dynamics. Strategies to further cohesively integrate the different elements of the model are provided.

  7. Corrosion Inhibition Effect of Carbon Steel in Sea Water by L-Arginine-Zn2+ System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gowri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition efficiency of L-Arginine-Zn2+ system in controlling corrosion of carbon steel in sea water has been evaluated by the weight-loss method. The formulation consisting of 250 ppm of L-Arginine and 25 ppm of Zn2+ has 91% IE. A synergistic effect exists between L-Arginine and Zn2+. Polarization study reveals that the L-Arginine-Zn2+ system functions as an anodic inhibitor and the formulation controls the anodic reaction predominantly. AC impedance spectra reveal that protective film is formed on the metal surface. Cyclic voltammetry study reveals that the protective film is more compact and stable even in a 3.5% NaCl environment. The nature of the protective film on a metal surface has been analyzed by FTIR, SEM, and AFM analysis.

  8. Integrated Computational Modeling of Water Side Corrosion in Zirconium Metal Clad Under Nominal LWR Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanfar, Asghar; Thomas, John; Van der Ven, Anton; Xu, Donghua; Youssef, Mostafa; Yang, Jing; Yildiz, Bilge; Marian, Jaime

    2016-11-01

    A mesoscopic chemical reaction kinetics model to predict the formation of zirconium oxide and hydride accumulation light-water reactor (LWR) fuel clad is presented. The model is designed to include thermodynamic information from ab initio electronic structure methods as well as parametric information in terms of diffusion coefficients, thermal conductivities and reaction constants. In contrast to approaches where the experimentally observed time exponents are captured by the models by design, our approach is designed to be predictive and to provide an improved understanding of the corrosion process. We calculate the time evolution of the oxide/metal interface and evaluate the order of the chemical reactions that are conducive to a t 1/3 dependence. We also show calculations of hydrogen cluster accumulation as a function of temperature and depth using spatially dependent cluster dynamics. Strategies to further cohesively integrate the different elements of the model are provided.

  9. Corrosion inhibition of low phosphonic multipolymer water treatment agent of industry circulating on brass in aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In response to environmental guidelines, a low phosphonic multipolymer was synthesized and its corrosion inhibition efficiency to brass in synthetic water was investigated through weight loss measurements and electrochemical tests.It showed that the synthesized inhibitor decreased corrosion under the conditions tested.Potentiodynamic polarization curves indicated that the new inhibitor acted as an anodic inhibitor, reducing metal dissolution.The composition of protective films formed on the brass was studied by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX).The inhibition effects were due to the formation of a protective film of the multipolymer inhibitor on the metal surface.

  10. Inhibition of La-Fe-Co-Si compound corrosion in distilled water by sodium molybdate and disodium hydrogen phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Min; YE Rongchang; LONG Yi; CHANG Yongqin

    2011-01-01

    A comparative study of Na2MoO4·2H2O and Na2HPO4·12H2O as inhibitors for magnetic refrigeration material La-Fe-Co-Si comments were applied to study the corrosion behavior of the compound in the absence or presence of different concentrations of these inhibitors studied compounds acted as anodic inhibitors. The potential of zero charge (PZC) of La-Fe-Co-Si compound was determined in distilled water in the absence of the studied inhibitors. Corrosion inhibition mechanisms for inhibitors were proposed in this work.

  11. Sulfide stress corrosion study of a super martensitic stainless steel in H2S sour environments: Metallic sulfides formation and hydrogen embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnot, Martin; Nogueira, Ricardo P.; Roche, Virginie; Berthomé, Grégory; Chauveau, Eric; Estevez, Rafael; Mantel, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their high corrosion resistance, super martensitic stainless steels are commonly used in the oil and gas industry, particularly in sour environments. Some grades are however susceptible to undergo hydrogen and mechanically-assisted corrosion processes in the presence of H2S, depending on the pH. The martensitic stainless steel EN 1.4418 grade exhibits a clear protective passive behavior with no sulfide stress corrosion cracking when exposed to sour environments of pH ≥ 4, but undergoes a steep decrease in its corrosion resistance at lower pH conditions. The present paper investigated this abrupt loss of corrosion resistance with electrochemical measurements as well as different physicochemical characterization techniques. Results indicated that below pH 4.0 the metal surface is covered by a thick (ca 40 μm) porous and defect-full sulfide-rich corrosion products layer shown to be straightforwardly related to the onset of hydrogen and sulfide mechanically-assisted corrosion phenomena.

  12. Calculation of Radioactivity and Dose Rate of Activated Corrosion Products in Water-Cooled Fusion Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In water-cooled reactor, the dominant radioactive source term under normal operation is activated corrosion products (ACPs, which have an important impact on reactor inspection and maintenance. A three-node transport model of ACPs was introduced into the new version of ACPs source term code CATE in this paper, which makes CATE capable of theoretically simulating the variation and the distribution of ACPs in a water-cooled reactor and suitable for more operating conditions. For code testing, MIT PWR coolant chemistry loop was simulated, and the calculation results from CATE are close to the experimental results from MIT, which means CATE is available and credible on ACPs analysis of water-cooled reactor. Then ACPs in the blanket cooling loop of water-cooled fusion reactor ITER under construction were analyzed using CATE and the results showed that the major contributors are the short-life nuclides, especially Mn-56. At last a point kernel integration code ARShield was coupled with CATE, and the dose rate around ITER blanket cooling loop was calculated. Results showed that after shutting down the reactor only for 8 days, the dose rate decreased nearly one order of magnitude, which was caused by the rapid decay of the short-life ACPs.

  13. Corrosion fatigue studies on F82H mod. martensitic steel in reducing water coolant environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maday, M.F.; Masci, A. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Centro Ricerche Energia

    1998-03-01

    Load-controlled low cycle fatigue tests have been carried out on F82H martensitic steel in 240degC oxygen-free water with and without dissolved hydrogen, in order to simulate realistic coolant boundary conditions to be approached in DEMO. It was found that water independently of its hydrogen content, determined the same fatigue life reduction compared to the base-line air results. Water cracks exhibited in their first propagation stages similar fracture morphologies which were completely missing on the air cracks, and were attributed to the action of an environment related component. Lowering frequency gave rise to an increase in F82H fatigue lifetimes without any change in cracking mode in air, and to fatigue life reduction by microvoid coalescence alone in water. The data were discussed in terms of (i) frequency dependent concurrent processes for crack initiation and (ii) frequency-dependent competitive mechanisms for crack propagation induced by cathodic hydrogen from F82H corrosion. (author)

  14. EFFECTS OF STRUCTURE AND INTERNAL STRESSES IN OXIDE FILMS ON CORROSION MECHANISM OF NEW ZIRCONIUM ALLOY%氧化膜结构及内应力对新锆合金腐蚀机理的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章海霞; 李中奎; 周廉; 许并社; 王永祯

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of new zirconium alloys containing Nb,used as the fuel cladding materials in water-cooled nuclear power reactors,is closely related to the characteristics of the oxide films,including the internal stresses and the crystal structure.However,the relation of the corrosion kinetics to the internal stresses and the crystal structure of the oxide films has not been well understood,also the corrosion mechanism of new zirconium alloys has not been confirmed.Therefore,it is helpful to solve the above problems,furthermore improve the corrosion resistance of new zirconium alloys,to characterize the internal stresses and the crystal structure of the oxide films accurately.The internal stresses and the crystal structure of the oxide films of NZ2 zirconium alloy,corroded in 360 ℃,18.6 MPa lithiated water and 400 ℃,10.3 MPa steam,were tested by XRD and Raman spectroscopy,and the microstructure of the oxide films was investigated by SEM.The results of the crystal structure show that tetragonal ZrO2 (t-ZrO2) content in the oxide films of NZ2 alloy decreases,monoclinic ZrO2 (m-ZrO2) content increases with the prolongation of the corrosion time,t-ZrO2 transforms into m-ZrO2.And cubic ZrO2 (c-ZrO2) appears in the oxide films when the thickness of the oxide films reaches 2 μm.Corrosion resistance of NZ2 alloy is improved when the content of t-ZrO2 in the oxide films increases.The results of the internal stresses and the microstructure of the oxide films indicate that the high compressive stresses exist in the oxide films.At the beginning of the corrosion,the compressive stresses in the oxide films increase with the corrosion time.When the thickness of the oxide films reaches 2 μm,the compressive stresses exceed the critical value and the stresses are released.The stress relaxation leads to the formation of the cracks,which reduces the protection of the oxide films,therefore the corrosion transition occurs.After the transition,the compressive stresses of

  15. Adsorption and inhibitive properties of a Schiff base for the corrosion control of carbon steel in saline water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samide, Adriana; Tutunaru, Bogdan

    2011-01-01

    A Schiff base, namely N-(2-hydroxybenzylidene) thiosemicarbazide (HBTC), was investigated as inhibitor for carbon steel in saline water (SW) using electrochemical measurements such as: potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The morphology of the surfaces before and after corrosion was examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The results showed that HBTC acts as corrosion inhibitor in SW by suppressing simultaneously the cathodic and anodic processes via adsorption on the surface which followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm; the polarization resistance (R(p)) and inhibition efficiency (IE) increased with each HBTC concentration increase. SEM/EDS analysis showed at this stage that the main product of corrosion is a non-stoichiometric amorphous Fe(3+) oxyhydroxide, consisting of a mixture of Fe(3+) oxyhydroxides, α-FeOOH and/or γ-FeOOH, α-FeOOH/γ-FeOOH and Fe(OH)(3).

  16. Preparation Femtosecond Laser Prevention for the Cold-Worked Stress Corrosion Crackings on Reactor Grade Low Carbon Stainless Steel

    CERN Document Server

    John Minehara, Eisuke

    2004-01-01

    We report here that the femtosecond lasers like low average power Ti:Sapphire lasers, the JAERI high average power free-electron laser and others could peel off and remove two stress corrosion cracking (SCC) origins of the cold-worked and the cracking susceptible material, and residual tensile stress in hardened and stretched surface of low-carbon stainless steel cubic samples for nuclear reactor internals as a proof of principle experiment except for the third origin of corrosive environment. Because a 143 °C and 43% MgCl2 hot solution SCC test was performed for the samples to simulate the cold-worked SCC phenomena of the internals to show no crack at the laser-peered off strip on the cold-worked side and ten-thousands of cracks at the non-peeled off on the same side, it has been successfully demonstrated that the femtosecond lasers could clearly remove the two SCC origins and could resultantly prevent the cold-worked SCC.

  17. The Effect of Sensitization on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of Aluminum Alloy 5456

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    electrochemically active particles. (From Jones, [26]) ....................................23 Figure 16. Illustration of corrosion tunnel model. (a) Schematic of...46 Table 6. Grinding and Polishing Conditions...approaches continuity along grain boundaries. The β phase is more anodic than the surrounding material matrix and therefore is electrochemically more

  18. Studies of Composition and Structure of CO2 Corrosion Film of X56 Steel in the Medium of CO2 and Salt Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIChun-fu; DAIJia-lin; WANGBing; ZHANGYing; ZHANGXian-ju; LUDong-li; LUOPing-ya

    2004-01-01

    The X56 steel samples was corroded in the medium of salt water solution at the conditions of CO2 partial pressure Pco2 0.5 to 2.0 MPa. temperature 80℃ and flow rate 1.4m/s. Corrosion weigh loss, composition and strutcture, morphology and phase of corrosion films of the samples were investigate by SEM, EDS, XRD and XPS. The results indicated that the corrosion degree was accelerated with increasing Pco2. The intense localised corrosion occurred on the surface of samples. The corrosion films mainly comprised of FeCO3 and complex phase products (Fe. Ca,...)CO3. There exists serious pitting on the metal substrates under the corrosion film. The theoretic and experimental analyses indicate this is caused by existed micropores or micro holes in films, which have the function of mass transportation.

  19. Studies of Composition and Structure of CO2 Corrosion Film of X56 Steel in the Medium of CO2 and Salt Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chun-fu; DAI Jia-lin; WANG Bing; ZHANG Ying; ZHANG Xian-ju; LU Dong-li; LUO Ping-ya

    2004-01-01

    The X56 steel samples was corroded in the medium of salt water solution at the conditions of CO2 partial pressure PCo2 0.5 to 2.0 MPa, temperature 80 ℃ and flow rate 1.4m/s. Corrosion weigh loss, composition and structure, morphology and phase of corrosion films of the samples were investigate by SEM, EDS, XRD and XPS. The results indicated that the corrosion degree was accelerated with increasing PCo2. The intense localised corrosion occurred on the surface of samples.The corrosion films mainly comprised of FeCO3 and complex phase products (Fe, Ca....)CO3. There exists serious pitting on the metal substrates under the corrosion film. The theoretic and experimental analyses indicate this is caused by existed micropores or micro holes in films, which have the function of mass transportation.

  20. Impact of pH, dissolved inorganic carbon, and polyphosphates for the initial stages of water corrosion of copper surfaces investigated by AFM and NEXAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanoscale studies at the early stages of the exposure of copper surfaces after systematic treatments in synthesized water solutions can provide useful information about corrosion processes. The corrosion and passivation of copper surfaces as influenced by pH, dissolved inorganic ...

  1. Corrosion and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Water Dispersed with Carboxylate Additives and Multi Walled Carbon Nano Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Chellapilla V. K. N. S. N.; Srinivas, Vadapalli

    2016-10-01

    This paper summarizes a recent work on anti-corrosive properties and enhanced heat transfer properties of carboxylated water based nanofluids. Water mixed with sebacic acid as carboxylate additive found to be resistant to corrosion and suitable for automotive environment. The carboxylated water is dispersed with very low mass concentration of carbon nano tubes at 0.025, 0.05 and 0.1 %. The stability of nanofluids in terms of zeta potential is found to be good with carboxylated water compared to normal water. The heat transfer performance of nanofluids is carried out on an air cooled heat exchanger similar to an automotive radiator with incoming air velocities across radiator at 5, 10 and 15 m/s. The flow Reynolds number of water is in the range of 2500-6000 indicating developing flow regime. The corrosion resistance of nanofluids is found to be good indicating its suitability to automotive environment. There is a slight increase in viscosity and marginal decrease in the specific heat of nanofluids with addition of carboxylate as well as CNTs. Significant improvement is observed in the thermal conductivity of nanofluids dispersed with CNTs. During heat transfer experimentation, the inside heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient has also improved markedly. It is also found that the velocity of air and flow rate of coolant plays an important role in enhancement of the heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient.

  2. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour. PMID:27403638

  3. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W.; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour.

  4. Effect of heat input on the microstructure, residual stresses and corrosion resistance of 304L austenitic stainless steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul, E-mail: rahulunnikrishnannair@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Idury, K.S.N. Satish, E-mail: satishidury@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Ismail, T.P., E-mail: tpisma@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Bhadauria, Alok, E-mail: alokbhadauria1@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Shekhawat, S.K., E-mail: satishshekhawat@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IITB), Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India); Khatirkar, Rajesh K., E-mail: rajesh.khatirkar@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Sapate, Sanjay G., E-mail: sgsapate@yahoo.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high performance pressure vessels, nuclear, chemical, process and medical industry due to their very good corrosion resistance and superior mechanical properties. However, austenitic stainless steels are prone to sensitization when subjected to higher temperatures (673 K to 1173 K) during the manufacturing process (e.g. welding) and/or certain applications (e.g. pressure vessels). During sensitization, chromium in the matrix precipitates out as carbides and intermetallic compounds (sigma, chi and Laves phases) decreasing the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the present investigation, 304L austenitic stainless steel was subjected to different heat inputs by shielded metal arc weldi