WorldWideScience

Sample records for water solutions

  1. 2010 Water & Aqueous Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dor Ben-Amotz

    2010-08-13

    Water covers more than two thirds of the surface of the Earth and about the same fraction of water forms the total mass of a human body. Since the early days of our civilization water has also been in the focus of technological developments, starting from converting it to wine to more modern achievements. The meeting will focus on recent advances in experimental, theoretical, and computational understanding of the behavior of the most important and fascinating liquid in a variety of situations and applications. The emphasis will be less on water properties per se than on water as a medium in which fundamental dynamic and reactive processes take place. In the following sessions, speakers will discuss the latest breakthroughs in unraveling these processes at the molecular level: Water in Solutions; Water in Motion I and II; Water in Biology I and II; Water in the Environment I and II; Water in Confined Geometries and Water in Discussion (keynote lecture and poster winners presentations).

  2. No Watered Down Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Droughts and floods have plagued the Chinese people for the entire summer. Along with alarming news of toxic spills in rivers and polluted water, the current situation of China's water resources is extremely worrying. Threatened by global warming, water pollution and soil erosion, sustainable development in China is becoming more difficult to maintain as the precious water resources are threatened.

  3. The Water Cycle Solutions Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, P.; Belvedere, D.; Imam, B.; Schiffer, R.; Schlosser, C.; Gupta, H.; Welty, C.; Vörösmarty, C.; Matthews, D.; Lawford, R.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of the Water cycle Solutions Network is to improve and optimize the sustained ability of water cycle researchers, stakeholders, organizations and networks to interact, identify, harness, and extend research results to augment decision support tools and meet national needs. WaterNet will engage relevant NASA water cycle research resources and community-of-practice organizations, to develop what we term an "actionable database" that can be used to communicate and connect water cycle research results (WCRs) towards the improvement of water-related Decision Support Tools (DSTs). An actionable database includes enough sufficient knowledge about its nodes and their heritage so that connections between these nodes are identifiable and robust. Recognizing the many existing highly valuable water-related science and application networks, we will focus the balance of our efforts on enabling their interoperability in a solutions network context. We will initially focus on identification, collection, and analysis of the two end points, these being the WCRs and water related DSTs. We will then develop strategies to connect these two end points via innovative communication strategies, improved user access to NASA resources, improved water cycle research community appreciation for DST requirements, improved policymaker, management and stakeholder knowledge of NASA research and application products, and improved identification of pathways for progress. Finally, we will develop relevant benchmarking and metrics, to understand the network's characteristics, to optimize its performance, and to establish sustainability. The WaterNet will deliver numerous pre-evaluation reports that will identify the pathways for improving the collective ability of the water cycle community to routinely harness WCRs that address crosscutting water cycle challenges.

  4. Water Pollution (Causes, Mechanisms, Solution).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Carl

    Written for the general public, this book illustrates the causes, status, problem areas, and prediction and control of water pollution. Water pollution is one of the most pressing issues of our time and the author communicates the complexities of this problem to the reader in common language. The purpose of the introductory chapter is to show what…

  5. Water Pollution (Causes, Mechanisms, Solution).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Carl

    Written for the general public, this book illustrates the causes, status, problem areas, and prediction and control of water pollution. Water pollution is one of the most pressing issues of our time and the author communicates the complexities of this problem to the reader in common language. The purpose of the introductory chapter is to show what…

  6. Water & Aqueous Solutions. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-08-09

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Water & Aqueous Solutions was held at Holderness School, New Hampshire, 8/4/02 thru 8/9/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  7. Equilibrium solutions of the shallow water equations

    CERN Document Server

    Weichman, P B; Weichman, Peter B.; Petrich, Dean M.

    2000-01-01

    A statistical method for calculating equilibrium solutions of the shallow water equations, a model of essentially 2-d fluid flow with a free surface, is described. The model contains a competing acoustic turbulent {\\it direct} energy cascade, and a 2-d turbulent {\\it inverse} energy cascade. It is shown, nonetheless that, just as in the corresponding theory of the inviscid Euler equation, the infinite number of conserved quantities constrain the flow sufficiently to produce nontrivial large-scale vortex structures which are solutions to a set of explicitly derived coupled nonlinear partial differential equations.

  8. WaterNet: The NASA Water Cycle Solutions Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvedere, D. R.; Houser, P. R.; Imam, B.; Schiffer, R.; Schlosser, C. A.; Gupta, H. V.; Welty, C.; Vorosmarty, C.; Matthews, D.; Lawford, R.

    2006-05-01

    The water cycle is continuously being transformed by climate change, erosion, pollution, salinization, and engineering practices, and is central to drought, flood, and disease hazards. Therefore, it is a national priority is to use advancements in scientific observations and knowledge to develop solutions to society's water challenges. NASA's unique role in this national priority is to exploit its unique view from space to improve water and energy cycle monitoring and prediction. As such, NASA's Earth science programs have collected substantial water cycle information and knowledge that must be integrated and shared to develop solutions in all twelve national priority application areas. However, NASA alone cannot achieve the ultimate goal of improved operational environmental assessments, predictions and applications and therefore must establish collaborations and interoperability with existing networks and nodes of research organizations, operational agencies, the scientific community, and private industry. Therefore, we propose to develop WaterNet: The NASA Water Cycle Solutions Network whose goal is to improve and optimize the sustained ability of water cycle researchers, stakeholders, organizations and networks to interact, identify, harness, and extend NASA research results to augment decision support tools and meet national needs. We will develop WaterNet by engaging relevant NASA water and energy cycle resources and community-of-practice organizations to develop what we term an "actionable database" that can be used to communicate and connect NASA Water and energy cycle focus area research Results (NWRs) towards the improvement of water-related Decision Support Tools (DSTs). Recognizing the many existing highly valuable water-related science and application networks, we will focus a balance of our efforts to enable their interoperability in a solutions network context. We will initially focus on identifying, collecting information about, and analyzing the

  9. Structure of water and the thermodynamics of aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemethy, G.

    1970-10-26

    This report represents the summary of a series of lectures held at the Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Laboratori di Fisica, from 18 September to 26 October 1970. The topics discussed were: Intermolecular forces, the individual water molecule and the hydrogen bond, the structures of the solid phases of water, experimental information on the strucuture of liquid water, theoretical models of water structure, experimental properties and theoretical models of aqueous solutions of nonpolar solutes, polar solutes, and electrolytes, the conformational stability of biological macromolecules.

  10. "Switchable water": aqueous solutions of switchable ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Sean M; Jessop, Philip G

    2010-04-26

    "Salting out" is a standard method for separating water-soluble organic compounds from water. In this method, adding a large amount of salt to the aqueous solution forces the organic compound out of the aqueous phase. However, the method can not be considered sustainable because it creates highly salty water. A greener alternative would be a method that allows reversible salting out. Herein, we describe aqueous solutions of switchable ionic strength. Aqueous solutions of a diamine in water have essentially zero ionic strength but are converted by CO(2) into solutions of high ionic strength. The change is reversible. Application to the reversible salting out of THF from water is described.

  11. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  12. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  13. Molecular level water and solute transport in reverse osmosis membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Shen, Meng; Keten, Sinan

    2015-11-01

    The water permeability and rejection characteristics of six solutes, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, urea, Na+, and Cl-, were studied for a polymeric reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate that water flux increases with an increasing fraction of percolated free volume in the membrane polymer structure. Solute molecules display Brownian motion and hop from pore to pore as they pass through the membrane. The solute rejection depends on both the size of the solute molecule and the chemical interaction of the solute with water and the membrane. When the open spaces in the polymeric structure are such that solutes have to shed at least one water molecule from their solvation shell to pass through the membrane molecular structure, the water-solute pair interaction energy governs solute rejection. Organic solutes more easily shed water molecules than ions to more readily pass through the membrane. Hydrogen-bonding sites for molecules like urea also lead to a higher rejection. These findings underline the importance of the solute's solvation shell and solute-water-membrane chemistry in solute transport and rejection in RO membranes. Funded by the Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern with computing resources from XSEDE (NSF grant ACI-1053575).

  14. Hydrogen nanobubbles in a water solution of dietary supplement

    CERN Document Server

    Safonov, Vladimir L

    2013-01-01

    Using gas chromatography, proton nuclear magnetic resonance and qualitative experiments, we demonstrate that a water solution of dissolved dietary supplement, creating negative redox potential, contains invisible hydrogen nano-bubbles, which remain in the solution for several hours.

  15. Interactions between Asphaltenes and Water in Solutions in Toluene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khvostichenko, Daria; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    2008-01-01

    Binding of water by asphaltenes dissolved in toluene was investigated for two asphaltene samples, OMV1 and OMV2, from the same reservoir deposit. Solubility of water in asphaltene solutions in toluene was found to increase with an increasing asphaltene concentration, indicative of solubilization...... was determined for water-saturated solutions (OMV1 and OMV2) and for water-unsaturated solutions (OMV1 only). These numbers were found to decrease from several water molecules per asphaltene molecule to below unity upon an increase of the asphaltene concentration in toluene from 0.1 to 20 g/L, suggesting...

  16. [Anomalous Properties of Water and Aqueous Solutions at Low Temperatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    Water has many anomalous properties below the room temperature. The temperature range overlaps with that of the Earth's atmosphere and also with that natural life forms favor. We review the origin of the anomalous properties of water and aqueous solutions in association with the hypothetical second critical point and liquid-liquid phase separation of water hidden in the supercooled state of liquid water.

  17. Ions in water: the microscopic structure of concentrated hydroxide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imberti, S; Botti, A; Bruni, F; Cappa, G; Ricci, M A; Soper, A K

    2005-05-15

    Neutron-diffraction data on aqueous solutions of hydroxides, at solute concentrations ranging from 1 solute per 12 water molecules to 1 solute per 3 water molecules, are analyzed by means of a Monte Carlo simulation (empirical potential structure refinement), in order to determine the hydration shell of the OH- in the presence of the smaller alkali metal ions. It is demonstrated that the symmetry argument between H+ and OH- cannot be used, at least in the liquid phase at such high concentrations, for determining the hydroxide hydration shell. Water molecules in the hydration shell of K+ orient their dipole moment at about 45 degrees from the K+-water oxygen director, instead of radially as in the case of the Li+ and Na+ hydration shells. The K+-water oxygen radial distribution function shows a shallower first minimum compared to the other cation-water oxygen functions. The influence of the solutes on the water-water radial distribution functions is shown to have an effect on the water structure equivalent to an increase in the pressure of the water, depending on both ion concentration and ionic radius. The changes of the water structure in the presence of charged solutes and the differences among the hydration shells of the different cations are used to present a qualitative explanation of the observed cation mobility.

  18. NASA's Water Solutions Using Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA Water Resources works within Earth sciences to leverage investments of space-based observation, model results, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities into water resources management decision support tools for the sustainable use of water. Earth science satellite observations and modelling products provide a huge volume of valuable data in both near-real-time and extended back nearly 50 years about the Earth's land surface conditions such as land cover type, vegetation type and health, precipitation, snow, soil moisture, and water levels and radiation. Observations of this type combined with models and analysis enable satellite-based assessment of the water cycle. With increasing population pressure and water usage coupled with climate variability and change, water issues are being reported by numerous groups as the most critical environmental problems facing us in the 21st century. Competitive uses and the prevalence of river basins and aquifers that extend across boundaries engender political tensions between communities, stakeholders and countries. The NASA Water Resources Program has the objective to provide NASA products to help deal with these issues with the goal for the sustainable use of water. The Water Resources program organizes its projects under five functional themes: 1) stream-flow and flood forecasting; 2) water consumptive use (includes evapotranspiration) and irrigation; 3) drought; 4) water quality; and 5) climate and water resources. NASA primarily works with national and international groups such as other US government agencies (NOAA, EPA, USGS, USAID) and various other groups to maximize the widest use of the water products. A summary of NASA's water activities linked to helping solve issues for developing countries will be highlighted.

  19. Treatment for hydrazine-containing waste water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yade, N.

    1986-01-01

    The treatment for waste solutions containing hydrazine is presented. The invention attempts oxidation and decomposition of hydrazine in waste water in a simple and effective processing. The method adds activated charcoal to waste solutions containing hydrazine while maintaining a pH value higher than 8, and adding iron salts if necessary. Then, the solution is aerated.

  20. Water's structure around hydrophobic solutes and the iceberg model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, N

    2013-02-21

    The structure of water in the hydration shells of small hydrophobic solutes was investigated through molecular dynamics. The results show that a subset of water molecules in the first hydration shell of a nonpolar solute have a significantly enhanced tetrahedrality and a slightly larger number of hydrogen bonds, relative to the molecules in water at room temperature, consistent with the experimentally observed negative excess entropy and increased heat capacity of hydrophobic solutions at room temperature. This ordering results from the rearrangement of a small number of water molecules near the nonpolar solutes that occupy one to two vertices of the enhanced water tetrahedra. Although this structuring is not nearly like that often associated with a literal interpretation of the term "iceberg" in the Frank and Evans iceberg model, it does support a moderate interpretation of this model. Thus, the tetrahedral orientational order of this ensemble of water molecules is comparable to that of liquid water at ~10 °C, although not accompanied by the small contraction of the O-O distance observed in cold water. Further, we show that the structural changes of water in the vicinity of small nonpolar solutes cannot be inferred from the water radial distribution functions, explaining why this increased ordering is not observed through neutron diffraction experiments. The present results restore a molecular view where the slower translational and reorientational dynamics of water near hydrophobic groups has a structural equivalent resembling water at low temperatures.

  1. Lattice Model for water-solute mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Furlan, A. P.; Almarza, N. G.; M. C. Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    A lattice model for the study of mixtures of associating liquids is proposed. Solvent and solute are modeled by adapting the associating lattice gas (ALG) model. The nature of interaction solute/solvent is controlled by tuning the energy interactions between the patches of ALG model. We have studied three set of parameters, resulting on, hydrophilic, inert and hydrophobic interactions. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were carried out and the behavior of pure components and the excess proper...

  2. The state of Cs-137 in natural water solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toropova, V.V.; Toropov, I.G.; Davydov, Yu.P. [Institute of Radioecological, Minsk (Belarus); Efremenkov, V.M. [Institute of Power Engineering, Minsk (Belarus)

    1996-12-31

    The state of Cs radionuclides has been studied in natural water systems - waters of some rivers, water channel, marshes. Investigations were performed using methods of ultrafiltration, dialysis, ion exchange. Based on experimental results obtained conclusions were made on state of radiocaesium in natural waters. It was shown, that Cs in such solutions presents mainly in ionic form. It is shown, how Cs may change its dispersion conditions in natural waters.

  3. Effects of Water Solutions on Extracting Green Tea Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ying Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of water solutions on the antioxidant content of green tea leaf extracts. Green teas prepared with tap water and distilled water were compared with respect to four antioxidant assays: total phenol content, reducing power, DMPD assay, and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay. The results indicate that green tea prepared with distilled water exhibits higher antioxidant activity than that made with tap water. The high performance liquid chromatography showed that major constituents of green tea were found in higher concentrations in tea made with distilled water than in that made with tap water. This could be due to less calcium fixation in leaves and small water clusters. Water solutions composed of less mineralisation are more effective in promoting the quality of green tea leaf extracts.

  4. Rheology Behavior of Cellulose/NMMO/Water Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾广新; 胡赛珠; 邵惠丽; 沈弋弋; 胡学超

    2001-01-01

    Rheology properties of cellulose/NMMO/water solution are important parameters for spinning. The storage and loss modulus and viscosity of the solution decrease with increasing water concentration of solvent in certain range. Flow-activation energy of two kinds of cellulose solution is quite different in view of their molecular weight. The molecular weigh distribution of cellulose samples can be characterized by the value of Gc/c Since the different cellulose samples have different MWD and DP, the relations of the first normal stress difference N1 vs. shear rate are different. Moreover, the rheology properties of cellulose solution produced by twin-screw extruder process are also investigated.

  5. Discovery of Water Structural Transitions near Interfaces of Polarizable Solutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Matyushov, Dmitry

    2015-03-01

    The standard harmonic approximation describing polarization around the solute is expected to break down with increasing solute polarizability. The focus of this study is to investigate the structure of water around dipolar-polarizable solutes by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in the non-harmonic regime. We observe a structural transition in the water hydration shell and its condensation, which are driven by increasing the solute polarizability. There is also a crossover in the orientational structure near the point of breakdown of the harmonic approximation. At lower polarizabilities, waters in the hydration shell point their hydrogens toward the solute. The dipoles flip their orientations at the transition to the non-harmonic regime. Both the hydration shell compressibility and the electric field susceptibility display maxima in the transition region. Using the water electric field at the center of the polarizable solute as the order parameter, a Landau-type model is formulated. Its predictions are in reasonable agreement with MC simulations performed for hard sphere and Lennard Jones polarizable solutes in a TIP3P water model. The observed structural transition suggests a general crossover phenomenon driven by the stabilization energy required to polarize the solute. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation (CHE-1213288). CPU time was provided by the National Science Foundation through XSEDE resources (TG-MCB080116N).

  6. Enthalpy of solution of rubidium sulphate in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apelblat, A. (Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1984-11-01

    Molar enthalpies of solution of Rb/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in water at 298.15 K were measured in an LKB calorimeter. The molar enthalpy of solution extrapolated to infinite dilution is (23509 +- 38) J.mol/sup -1/.

  7. Production of silver nanoparticles in water solution by radiation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, M. A.; Korobeinikov, M. V.; Bryazgin, A. A.; Tolochko, B. P.

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-chemical synthesis of silver nanoparticles was studied. The silver nanoparticles in arabinogalactan (AG) water solution are stabilized in conglomerates, it is fixed by rise of additional bands in the optical absorption spectra. Pre-radiation treatment of AG causes crosslinking and oxidation. Pretreated AG solution increases the stability of conglomerates containing silver nanoparticles in case of dilution.

  8. Why water reorientation slows without iceberg formation around hydrophobic solutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laage, Damien; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Hynes, James T

    2009-02-26

    The dynamics of water molecules next to hydrophobic solutes is investigated, specifically addressing the recent controversy raised by the first time-resolved observations, which concluded that some water molecules are immobilized by hydrophobic groups, in strong contrast to previous NMR conclusions. Through molecular dynamics simulations and an analytic jump reorientation model, we identify the water reorientation mechanism next to a hydrophobic solute and provide evidence that no water molecules are immobilized by hydrophobic solutes. Their moderate rotational slowdown compared to bulk water (e.g., by a factor of less than 2 at low solute concentration) is mainly due to slower hydrogen-bond exchange. The slowdown is quantitatively described by a solute excluded volume effect at the transition state for the key hydrogen-bond exchange in the reorientation mechanism. We show that this picture is consistent with both ultrafast anisotropy and NMR experimental results and that the transition state excluded volume theory yields quantitative predictions of the rotational slowdown for diverse hydrophobic solutes of varying size over a wide concentration range. We also explain why hydrophobic groups slow water reorientation less than do some hydrophilic groups.

  9. Water--Problems and Solutions. A Report Concerning the Problems and Solutions of Negative Water Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Alan

    Outdoor leaders constantly face problems created by water shortage and, to act effectively, must thoroughly understand the body's use of water and the ways to delay dehydration when water shortage occurs. Dehydration begins when there is a negative water balance, or more water lost than ingested, and progresses from the stage of dryness, to the…

  10. Industrial Water Waste, Problems and the Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alif Noor Anna

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the long term development in Indonesia has changed agricultural sector to the industrial sector. This development can apparently harm our own people. This is due to the waste that is produced from factories. The waste from various factories seems to have different characteristics. This defference encourages us to be able to find out different of methods of managing waste so that cost can be reduced, especially in water treatment. In order that industrial development and environmental preservation can run together in balance, many institutions involved should be consider, especially in the industrial chain, the environment, and human resource, these three elements can be examined in terms of their tolerance to waste.

  11. QENS and NMR studies of 3-picoline-water solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Almasy, L; Bokor, M; Cser, L; Tompa, K; Zanotti, J M; Jancso, G

    2002-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements were performed on aqueous solutions of 3-picoline (3-methylpyridine) at room temperature. H-D substitution on both the solute and the water was used to separate the dynamics of the two species. The analysis of the translational diffusive motion at different concentrations shows that at high picoline content the diffusion coefficient of water decreases strongly and becomes similar to that of the solute, indicating strong coupling between the motions of the solute and the solvent. Activation energies characteristic of the dynamic behavior of the methyl group were determined from sup 1 H spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements for H sub 2 O and D sub 2 O solutions of 3-picoline above 310 K. (orig.)

  12. Dynamics of Hydration Water in Sugars and Peptides Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perticaroli, Stefania [ORNL; Nakanishi, Masahiro [ORNL; Pashkovski, Eugene [Unilever R& D Trumbull, Trumbull CT; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed solute and solvent dynamics of sugars and peptides aqueous solutions using extended epolarized light scattering (EDLS) and broadband dielectric spectroscopies (BDS). Spectra measured with both techniques reveal the same mechanism of rotational diffusion of peptides molecules. In the case of sugars, this solute reorientational relaxation can be isolated by EDLS measurements, whereas its ontribution to the dielectric spectra is almost negligible. In the presented analysis, we characterize the hydration water in terms of hydration number and retardation ratio between relaxation times of hydration and bulk water. Both techniques provide similar estimates of . The retardation imposed on the hydration water by sugars is 3.3 1.3 and involves only water molecules hydrogen-bonded (HB) to solutes ( 3 water molecules per sugar OH-group). In contrast, polar peptides cause longer range erturbations beyond the first hydration shell, and between 2.8 and 8, increasing with the number of chemical groups engaged in HB formation. We demonstrate that chemical heterogeneity and specific HB interactions play a crucial role in hydration dynamics around polar solutes. The obtained results help to disentangle the role of excluded volume and enthalpic contributions in dynamics of hydration water at the interface with biological molecules.

  13. Shallow water equations: viscous solutions and inviscid limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gui-Qiang; Perepelitsa, Mikhail

    2012-12-01

    We establish the inviscid limit of the viscous shallow water equations to the Saint-Venant system. For the viscous equations, the viscosity terms are more degenerate when the shallow water is close to the bottom, in comparison with the classical Navier-Stokes equations for barotropic gases; thus, the analysis in our earlier work for the classical Navier-Stokes equations does not apply directly, which require new estimates to deal with the additional degeneracy. We first introduce a notion of entropy solutions to the viscous shallow water equations and develop an approach to establish the global existence of such solutions and their uniform energy-type estimates with respect to the viscosity coefficient. These uniform estimates yield the existence of measure-valued solutions to the Saint-Venant system generated by the viscous solutions. Based on the uniform energy-type estimates and the features of the Saint-Venant system, we further establish that the entropy dissipation measures of the viscous solutions for weak entropy-entropy flux pairs, generated by compactly supported C 2 test-functions, are confined in a compact set in H -1, which yields that the measure-valued solutions are confined by the Tartar-Murat commutator relation. Then, the reduction theorem established in Chen and Perepelitsa [5] for the measure-valued solutions with unbounded support leads to the convergence of the viscous solutions to a finite-energy entropy solution of the Saint-Venant system with finite-energy initial data, which is relative with respect to the different end-states of the bottom topography of the shallow water at infinity. The analysis also applies to the inviscid limit problem for the Saint-Venant system in the presence of friction.

  14. MSWT-01, flood disaster water treatment solution from common ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananto, Gamawan; Setiawan, Albertus B.; Z, Darman M.

    2013-06-01

    Indonesia has a lot of potential flood disaster places with clean water problems faced. Various solution programs always initiated by Government, companies CSR, and people sporadical actions to provide clean water; with their advantages and disadvantages respectively. One solution is easy to operate for instance, but didn't provide adequate capacity, whereas the other had ideal performance but more costly. This situation inspired to develop a water treatment machine that could be an alternative favor. There are many methods could be choosed; whether in simple, middle or high technology, depends on water source input and output result quality. MSWT, Mobile Surface Water Treatment, is an idea for raw water in flood area, basically made for 1m3 per hour. This water treatment design adopted from combined existing technologies and related literatures. Using common ideas, the highlight is how to make such modular process put in compact design elegantly, and would be equipped with mobile feature due to make easier in operational. Through prototype level experiment trials, the machine is capable for producing clean water that suitable for sanitation and cooking/drinking purposes although using contaminated water input source. From the investment point of view, such machine could be also treated as an asset that will be used from time to time when needed, instead of made for project approach only.

  15. Barriers and Solutions to Smart Water Grid Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, So-Min; Choi, Gye-Woon; Lee, Ho-Sun

    2016-03-01

    This limited review of smart water grid (SWG) development, challenges, and solutions provides an initial assessment of early attempts at operating SWGs. Though the cost and adoption issues are critical, potential benefits of SWGs such as efficient water conservation and distribution sustain the development of SWGs around the world. The review finds that the keys to success are the new regulations concerning data access and ownership to solve problems of security and privacy; consumer literacy to accept and use SWGs; active private sector involvement to coordinate SWG development; government-funded pilot projects and trial centers; and integration with sustainable water management.

  16. Emerging solutions to the water challenges of an urbanizing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Tove A; Hoffmann, Sabine; Lüthi, Christoph; Truffer, Bernhard; Maurer, Max

    2016-05-20

    The top priorities for urban water sustainability include the provision of safe drinking water, wastewater handling for public health, and protection against flooding. However, rapidly aging infrastructure, population growth, and increasing urbanization call into question current urban water management strategies, especially in the fast-growing urban areas in Asia and Africa. We review innovative approaches in urban water management with the potential to provide locally adapted, resource-efficient alternative solutions. Promising examples include new concepts for stormwater drainage, increased water productivity, distributed or on-site treatment of wastewater, source separation of human waste, and institutional and organizational reforms. We conclude that there is an urgent need for major transdisciplinary efforts in research, policy, and practice to develop alternatives with implications for cities and aquatic ecosystems alike. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Evaporation kinetics of acetic acid-water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffey, K.; Wong, N.; Saykally, R.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The transport of water molecules across vapor-liquid interfaces in the atmosphere is a crucial step in the formation and evolution of cloud droplets. Despite decades of study, the effects of solutes on the mechanism and rate of evaporation and condensation remain poorly characterized. The present work aims to determine the effect of atmospherically-relevant solutes on the evaporation rate of water. In our experiments, we create a train of micron-sized droplets and measure their temperature via Raman thermometry as they undergo evaporation without condensation. Analysis of the cooling rate yields the evaporation coefficient (γ). Previous work has shown that inorganic salts have little effect on γ, with surface-adsorbing anions causing a slight reduction in the coefficient from that measured for pure water. Organic acids are ubiquitous in aqueous aerosol and have been shown to disrupt the surface structure of water. Here we describe measurements of the evaporation rate of acetic acid solutions, showing that acetic acid reduces γ to a larger extent than inorganic ions, and that γ decreases with increasing acetic acid concentration.

  18. FORECAST OF WATER TEMPERATURE IN RESERVOIR BASED ON ANALYTICAL SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Shun-wen; ZHU Yue-ming; QIANG Sheng; ZENG Deng-feng

    2008-01-01

    The water temperature in reservoirs is difficult to be predicted by numerical simulations. In this article, a statistical model of forecasting the water temperature was proposed. In this model, the 3-D thermal conduction-diffusion equations were converted into a system consisting of 2-D equations with the Fourier expansion and some hypotheses. Then the statistical model of forecasting the water temperature was developed based on the analytical solution to the 2-D thermal equations. The simplified statistical model can elucidate the main physical mechanism of the temperature variation much more clearly than the numerical simulation with the Navier-Stokes equations. Finally, with the presented statistical model, the distribution of water temperature in the Shangyoujiang reservoir was determined.

  19. Water implications in Mediterranean irrigation networks: Problems and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Romero Marrero, Modesto Pérez-Sánchez, P. Amparo López-Jiménez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture is a significant user of water and energy in Mediterranean coasts of Europe, such as Spanish Mediterranean regions. Water implications of such irrigations are well known but there are many problems that must be taken into account when designing each phase of the irrigation system, not only in the construction phase but in the exploitation, control and maintenance of all the elements in the network. All the possible problems in each part of the irrigation system will be analyzed in the following paper, proposing several solutions to avoid these problems or mitigate its consequences. These solutions go from the simple maintenance of pipes and valeus to the implementation of more sophisticated systems, such as SCADA, or management strategies, such as benchmarking.

  20. Enthalpy of solution of terfenadine in ethanol/water mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The enthalpy of solution of terfenadine in ethanol/water mixtures, 0-20.5 wt.% of water was determined by calorimetry. A Sudden increase of 1-2 kJ mol-1 in the enthalpy at a concentration value around 0.01 mol kg-1 is observed. This step in the enthalpy is interpreted as due to solute n-mer aggregates formation. The solubility of terfenadine in the cosolvent systems used in the calorimetric studies was determined. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6THV-3Y9X8C1-3/1/946cc8e5c8724...

  1. Effects of diaphragm discharge in water solutions containing humic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halamova, Ivana; Stara, Zdenka; Krcma, Frantisek

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary results of research focused on the applications of DC diaphragm discharge in water solutions containing humic substances are presented in this paper. Diaphragm discharge investigated by this work was created in the reactor using constant DC high voltage up to 2 kV that gave the total input power from 100 to 200 W. Presented work investigated decomposition of humic substances by the electric discharge in the dependence of discharge conditions (electrode polarity) as well as solution properties (electrolyte kind, pH). Especially substantial effect of pH on humic acid decomposition has been observed when acidic conditions stimulated the degradation process. Absorption spectroscopy in UV-VIS region together with fluorescence spectroscopy has been used for the detection of changes in humic solutions. Index of humification was calculated from obtained fluorescence spectra and a significant decrease of aromatic components in the humic mixture was determined during the discharge treatment.

  2. Global solutions to the shallow-water system

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeenko, Sergey N; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E

    2016-01-01

    The classical system of shallow-water (Saint--Venant) equations describes long surface waves in an inviscid incompressible fluid of a variable depth. Although shock waves are expected in this quasilinear hyperbolic system for a wide class of initial data, we find a sufficient condition on the initial data that guarantees existence of a global classical solution continued from a local solution. The sufficient conditions can be easily satisfied for the fluid flow propagating in one direction with two characteristic velocities of the same sign and two monotonically increasing Riemann invariants. We prove that these properties persist in the time evolution of the classical solutions to the shallow-water equations and provide no shock wave singularities formed in a finite time over a half-line or an infinite line. On a technical side, we develop a novel method of an additional argument, which allows to obtain local and global solutions to the quasilinear hyperbolic systems in physical rather than characteristic va...

  3. ICT Solutions for Highly-Customized Water Demand Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, M.; Cominola, A.; Castelletti, A.; Fraternali, P.; Guardiola, J.; Barba, J.; Pulido-Velazquez, M.; Rizzoli, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    The recent deployment of smart metering networks is opening new opportunities for advancing the design of residential water demand management strategies (WDMS) relying on improved understanding of water consumers' behaviors. Recent applications showed that retrieving information on users' consumption behaviors, along with their explanatory and/or causal factors, is key to spot potential areas where targeting water saving efforts, and to design user-tailored WDMS. In this study, we explore the potential of ICT-based solutions in supporting the design and implementation of highly customized WDMS. On one side, the collection of consumption data at high spatial and temporal resolutions requires big data analytics and machine learning techniques to extract typical consumption features from the metered population of water users. On the other side, ICT solutions and gamifications can be used as effective means for facilitating both users' engagement and the collection of socio-psychographic users' information. This latter allows interpreting and improving the extracted profiles, ultimately supporting the customization of WDMS, such as awareness campaigns or personalized recommendations. Our approach is implemented in the SmartH2O platform and demonstrated in a pilot application in Valencia, Spain. Results show how the analysis of the smart metered consumption data, combined with the information retrieved from an ICT gamified web user portal, successfully identify the typical consumption profiles of the metered users and supports the design of alternative WDMS targeting the different users' profiles.

  4. What happens to the structure of water in cryoprotectant solutions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towey, James J; Soper, Alan K; Dougan, Lorna

    2013-01-01

    Cryoprotectant molecules are widely utilised in basic molecular research through to industrial and biomedical applications. The molecular mechanisms by which cryoprotectants stabilise and protect molecules and cells, along with suppressing the formation of ice, are incompletely understood. To gain greater insight into these mechanisms, we have completed an experimental determination of the structure of aqueous glycerol. Our investigation combines neutron diffraction experiments with isotopic substitution and computational modelling to determine the atomistic level structure of the glycerol-water mixtures, across the complete concentration range at room temperature. We examine the local structure of the system focusing on water structure. By comparing our data with that from other studies of cryoprotectant solutions, we attempt to find general rules for the action of cryoprotectants on water structure. We also discuss how these molecular scale interactions may be related to the macroscopic properties of the system.

  5. Engineering solutions for polymer composites solar water heaters production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, S. E.; Arsatov, A. V.; Oshchepkov, M. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of engineering solutions aimed at a considerable decrease of solar water heaters cost via the use of polymer composites in heaters construction and solar collector and heat storage integration into a single device representing an integrated unit results are considered. Possibilities of creating solar water heaters of only three components and changing welding, soldering, mechanical treatment, and assembly of a complicate construction for large components molding of polymer composites and their gluing are demonstrated. Materials of unit components and engineering solutions for their manufacturing are analyzed with consideration for construction requirements of solar water heaters. Optimal materials are fiber glass and carbon-filled plastics based on hot-cure thermosets, and an optimal molding technology is hot molding. It is necessary to manufacture the absorbing panel as corrugated and to use a special paint as its selective coating. Parameters of the unit have been optimized by calculation. Developed two-dimensional numerical model of the unit demonstrates good agreement with the experiment. Optimal ratio of daily load to receiving surface area of a solar water heater operating on a clear summer day in the midland of Russia is 130‒150 L/m2. Storage tank volume and load schedule have a slight effect on solar water heater output. A thermal insulation layer of 35‒40 mm is sufficient to provide an efficient thermal insulation of the back and side walls. An experimental model layout representing a solar water heater prototype of a prime cost of 70‒90/(m2 receiving surface) has been developed for a manufacturing volume of no less than 5000 pieces per year.

  6. Utilising integrated urban water management to assess the viability of decentralised water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Stewart; Maheepala, Shiroma; Sharma, Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Cities worldwide are challenged by a number of urban water issues associated with climate change, population growth and the associated water scarcity, wastewater flows and stormwater run-off. To address these problems decentralised solutions are increasingly being considered by water authorities, and integrated urban water management (IUWM) has emerged as a potential solution to most of these urban water challenges, and as the key to providing solutions incorporating decentralised concepts at a city wide scale. To incorporate decentralised options, there is a need to understand their performance and their impact on a city's total water cycle under alternative water and land management options. This includes changes to flow, nutrient and sediment regimes, energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and the impacts on rivers, aquifers and estuaries. Application of the IUWM approach to large cities demands revisiting the fundamental role of water system design in sustainable city development. This paper uses the extended urban metabolism model (EUMM) to expand a logical definition for the aims of IUWM, and discusses the role of decentralised systems in IUWM and how IUWM principles can be incorporated into urban water planning.

  7. Systemic solutions for multi-benefit water and environmental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Mark; McInnes, Robert

    2013-09-01

    The environmental and financial costs of inputs to, and unintended consequences arising from narrow consideration of outputs from, water and environmental management technologies highlight the need for low-input solutions that optimise outcomes across multiple ecosystem services. Case studies examining the inputs and outputs associated with several ecosystem-based water and environmental management technologies reveal a range from those that differ little from conventional electro-mechanical engineering techniques through methods, such as integrated constructed wetlands (ICWs), designed explicitly as low-input systems optimising ecosystem service outcomes. All techniques present opportunities for further optimisation of outputs, and hence for greater cumulative public value. We define 'systemic solutions' as "…low-input technologies using natural processes to optimise benefits across the spectrum of ecosystem services and their beneficiaries". They contribute to sustainable development by averting unintended negative impacts and optimising benefits to all ecosystem service beneficiaries, increasing net economic value. Legacy legislation addressing issues in a fragmented way, associated 'ring-fenced' budgets and established management assumptions represent obstacles to implementing 'systemic solutions'. However, flexible implementation of legacy regulations recognising their primary purpose, rather than slavish adherence to detailed sub-clauses, may achieve greater overall public benefit through optimisation of outcomes across ecosystem services. Systemic solutions are not a panacea if applied merely as 'downstream' fixes, but are part of, and a means to accelerate, broader culture change towards more sustainable practice. This necessarily entails connecting a wider network of interests in the formulation and design of mutually-beneficial systemic solutions, including for example spatial planners, engineers, regulators, managers, farming and other businesses, and

  8. Removal of Metal Nanoparticles Colloidal Solutions by Water Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhovych, Olga; Svietlova, Nataliia; Konotop, Yevheniia; Karaushu, Olena; Hrechishkina, Svitlana

    2016-11-01

    The ability of seven species of aquatic plants ( Elodea canadensis, Najas guadelupensis, Vallisneria spiralis L., Riccia fluitans L., Limnobium laevigatum, Pistia stratiotes L., and Salvinia natans L.) to absorb metal nanoparticles from colloidal solutions was studied. It was established that investigated aquatic plants have a high capacity for removal of metal nanoparticles from aqueous solution (30-100%) which indicates their high phytoremediation potential. Analysis of the water samples content for elements including the mixture of colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles (Mn, Cu, Zn, Ag + Ag2O) before and after exposure to plants showed no significant differences when using submerged or free-floating hydrophytes so-called pleuston. However, it was found that the presence of submerged hydrophytes in aqueous medium ( E. canadensis, N. guadelupensis, V. spiralis L., and R. fluitans L.) and significant changes in the content of photosynthetic pigments, unlike free-floating hydrophytes ( L. laevigatum, P. stratiotes L., S. natans L.), had occur. Pleuston possesses higher potential for phytoremediation of contaminated water basins polluted by metal nanoparticles. In terms of removal of nanoparticles among studied free-floating hydrophytes, P. stratiotes L. and S. natans L. deserve on special attention.

  9. Water transfer as a solution to water shortage: A fix that can Backfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohari, Alireza; Eslamian, Saeid; Mirchi, Ali; Abedi-Koupaei, Jahangir; Massah Bavani, Alireza; Madani, Kaveh

    2013-05-01

    Zayandeh-Rud River Basin is one of the most important basins in central Iran, which has been continually challenged by water stress during the past 60 years. Traditionally, a supply-oriented management scheme has been prescribed as a reliable solution to water shortage problems in the basin, resulting in a number of water transfer projects that have more than doubled the natural flow of the river. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the reliability of inter-basin water transfer to meet the growing water demand in Zayandeh-Rud River Basin. A system dynamics model is developed to capture the interrelationships between different sub-systems of the river basin, namely the hydrologic, socioeconomic, and agricultural sub-systems. Results from simulating a range of possible policy options for resolving water shortage problems indicate that water is essentially the development engine of the system. Therefore, supplying more water to the basin without considering the dynamics of the interrelated problems will eventually lead to increased water demand. It is demonstrated that the Zayandeh-Rud River Basin management system has characteristics of the "Fixes that Backfire" system archetype, in which inter-basin water transfer is an inadequate water management policy, causing significant unintended side-effects. A comprehensive solution to the problem includes several policy options that simultaneously control the dynamics of the system, minimizing the risk of unintended consequences. In particular, policy makers should consider minimizing agricultural water demand through changing crop patterns as an effective policy solution for the basin's water problems.

  10. Near-infrared studies of glucose and sucrose in aqueous solutions: water displacement effect and red shift in water absorption from water-solute interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Youngeui; Hwang, Jungseek

    2013-02-01

    We used near infrared spectroscopy to obtain concentration dependent glucose absorption spectra in aqueous solutions in the near-infrared range (3800-7500 cm(-1)). Here we introduce a new method to obtain reliable glucose absorption bands from aqueous glucose solutions without measuring the water displacement coefficients of glucose separately. Additionally, we were able to extract the water displacement coefficients of glucose, and this may offer a new general method using spectroscopy techniques applicable to other water-soluble materials. We also observed red shifts in the absorption bands of water in the hydration shell around solute molecules, which comes from the contribution of the interacting water molecules around the glucose molecules in solutions. The intensity of the red shift gets larger as the concentration increases, which indicates that as the concentration increases more water molecules are involved in the interaction. However, the red shift in frequency does not seem to depend significantly on the concentration. We also performed the same measurements and analysis with sucrose instead of glucose as solute and compared.

  11. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    be very similar and likely functionally related. Our experimental field data were used for modelling water flow and solute transport in floating fens, using HYDRUS 2D. Fluctuations of surface water and root mat, as well as geometry and unsaturated zone parameters can have a major influence on groundwater fluctuations and the exchange between rain and surface water and the water in the root mats. In combination with the duration of salt pulses in surface water, and sensitivity of fen plants to salinity (Stofberg et al. 2014, submitted), risks for rare plants can be anticipated.

  12. WEB-GIS SOLUTIONS DEVELOPMENT FOR CITIZENS AND WATER COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Şercăianu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a web-GIS solution in which urban residents, from Buzau City, could be involved in decision-support process of water companies, in order to reduce water losses, by collecting information directly from citizens. In recent years, reducing material and economic losses, recorded in the entire municipal networks management process has become the main focus of public companies in Romania. Due to problems complexity that arise in collecting information from citizens and issues identified in urban areas, more analyzes were required related to web-GIS solutions used in areas such as local government, public utilities, environmental protection or financial management. Another important problem is the poor infrastructure development of spatial databases founded in public companies, and connection to web platforms. Developing the entire communication process between residents and municipal companies has required the use of concept "citizen-sensor" in the entire reporting process. Reported problems are related to water distribution networks with the possibility of covering the entire public utilities infrastructure.

  13. Web-Gis Solutions Development for Citizens and Water Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şercăianu, M.

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes the development of a web-GIS solution in which urban residents, from Buzau City, could be involved in decision-support process of water companies, in order to reduce water losses, by collecting information directly from citizens. In recent years, reducing material and economic losses, recorded in the entire municipal networks management process has become the main focus of public companies in Romania. Due to problems complexity that arise in collecting information from citizens and issues identified in urban areas, more analyzes were required related to web-GIS solutions used in areas such as local government, public utilities, environmental protection or financial management. Another important problem is the poor infrastructure development of spatial databases founded in public companies, and connection to web platforms. Developing the entire communication process between residents and municipal companies has required the use of concept "citizen-sensor" in the entire reporting process. Reported problems are related to water distribution networks with the possibility of covering the entire public utilities infrastructure.

  14. DC diaphragm discharge in water solutions of selected organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnankova, Edita J.; Hammer, Malte U.; Reuter, Stephan; Krcma, Frantisek

    2015-07-01

    Effect of four simple organic acids water solution on a DC diaphragm discharge was studied. Efficiency of the discharge was quantified by the hydrogen peroxide production determined by UV-VIS spectrometry of a H2O2 complex formed with specific titanium reagent. Automatic titration was used to study the pH behaviour after the plasma treatment. Optical emission spectroscopy overview spectra were recorded and detailed spectra of OH band and Hβ line were used to calculate the rotational temperature and comparison of the line profile (reflecting electron concentration) in the acid solutions. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  15. The ionic product of water in concentrated tetramethylammonium chloride solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, P; Bódi, I; May, P M; Hefter, G T

    1997-04-01

    The ionic product of water, pK(w) = - log[H(+)][OH(-)] has been determined in aqueous solutions of tetramethylammonium chloride over the concentration range of 0.1-5.5 M at 25 degrees C using high-precision glass electrode potentiometric titrations. pK(w) data relating to aqueous potassium and sodium chlorides at ionic strengths up to 5 M are markedly lower than the tetramethylammonium chloride results. These differences are almost certainly due to weak associations between potassium and (especially) sodium and hydroxide ions.

  16. Water and solute absorption from carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions in the human proximal small intestine: a review and statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaocai; Passe, Dennis H

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to summarize water, carbohydrate (CHO), and electrolyte absorption from carbohydrate-electrolyte (CHO-E) solutions based on all of the triple-lumen-perfusion studies in humans since the early 1960s. The current statistical analysis included 30 reports from which were obtained information on water absorption, CHO absorption, total solute absorption, CHO concentration, CHO type, osmolality, sodium concentration, and sodium absorption in the different gut segments during exercise and at rest. Mean differences were assessed using independent-samples t tests. Exploratory multiple-regression analyses were conducted to create prediction models for intestinal water absorption. The factors influencing water and solute absorption are carefully evaluated and extensively discussed. The authors suggest that in the human proximal small intestine, water absorption is related to both total solute and CHO absorption; osmolality exerts various impacts on water absorption in the different segments; the multiple types of CHO in the ingested CHO-E solutions play a critical role in stimulating CHO, sodium, total solute, and water absorption; CHO concentration is negatively related to water absorption; and exercise may result in greater water absorption than rest. A potential regression model for predicting water absorption is also proposed for future research and practical application. In conclusion, water absorption in the human small intestine is influenced by osmolality, solute absorption, and the anatomical structures of gut segments. Multiple types of CHO in a CHO-E solution facilitate water absorption by stimulating CHO and solute absorption and lowering osmolality in the intestinal lumen.

  17. Spontaneous Ignition of Hydrothermal Flames in Supercritical Ethanol Water Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.; Kojima, Jun J.

    2017-01-01

    Results are reported from recent tests where hydrothermal flames spontaneously ignited in a Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) Test Cell. Hydrothermal flames are generally categorized as flames that occur when appropriate concentrations of fuel and oxidizer are present in supercritical water (SCW); i.e., water at conditions above its critical point (218 atm and 374 C). A co-flow injector was used to inject fuel, comprising an aqueous solution of 30-vol to 50-vol ethanol, and air into a reactor held at constant pressure and filled with supercritical water at approximately 240 atm and 425 C. Hydrothermal flames auto-ignited and quickly stabilized as either laminar or turbulent diffusion flames, depending on the injection velocities and test cell conditions. Two orthogonal views, one of which provided a backlit shadowgraphic image, provided visual observations. Optical emission measurements of the steady state flame were made over a spectral range spanning the ultraviolet (UV) to the near infrared (NIR) using a high-resolution, high-dynamic-range spectrometer. Depending on the fuel air flow ratios varying degrees of sooting were observed and are qualitatively compared using light absorption comparisons from backlit images.

  18. WaterNet: The NASA water cycle solutions network - Danubian regional applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Dave; Brilly, Mitja; Kobold, Mira; Zagar, Mark; Houser, Paul

    2008-11-01

    WaterNet is a new international network of researchers, stakeholders, and end-users of remote sensing tools that will benefit the water resources management community. This paper provides an overview and it discusses the concept of solutions networks focusing on the WaterNet. It invites Danubian research and applications teams to join our WaterNet network. The NASA Water cycle Solutions Network's goal is to improve and optimize the sustained ability of water cycle researchers, stakeholders, organizations and networks to interact, identify, harness, and extend NASA research results to augment decision support tools and meet national needs. Our team will develop WaterNet by engaging relevant NASA water cycle research resources and community-of-practice organizations, to develop what we term an "actionable database" that can be used to communicate and connect NASA Water cycle research Results (NWRs) towards the improvement of water-related Decision Support Tools (DSTs). Recognizing that the European Commission and European Space Agency have also developed many related Water Research products (EWRs), we seek to learn about these and network with the EU teams to include their information in the WaterNet actionable data base and Community of Practice. WaterNet will then develop strategies to connect researchers and decision-makers via innovative communication strategies, improved user access to NASA and EU - Danubian resources, improved water cycle research community appreciation for user requirements, improved policymaker, management and stakeholder knowledge of research and application products, and improved identification of pathways for progress. Finally, WaterNet will develop relevant benchmarking and metrics, to understand the network's characteristics, to optimize its performance, and to establish sustainability. This paper provides examples of several NASA products based on remote sensing and land data assimilation systems that integrate remotely sensed and in

  19. WaterNet: The NASA water cycle solutions network - Danubian regional applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Dave [Hydromet DSS, LLC, Silverthorne, CO 80498-1848 (United States); Brilly, Mitja [FGG University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kobold, Mira; Zagar, Mark [Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Houser, Paul [Center for Research on Environment and Water and George Mason University, Calverton, MD 20705 (United States)], E-mail: hydrometdss@comcast.net

    2008-11-01

    WaterNet is a new international network of researchers, stakeholders, and end-users of remote sensing tools that will benefit the water resources management community. This paper provides an overview and it discusses the concept of solutions networks focusing on the WaterNet. It invites Danubian research and applications teams to join our WaterNet network. The NASA Water cycle Solutions Network's goal is to improve and optimize the sustained ability of water cycle researchers, stakeholders, organizations and networks to interact, identify, harness, and extend NASA research results to augment decision support tools and meet national needs. Our team will develop WaterNet by engaging relevant NASA water cycle research resources and community-of-practice organizations, to develop what we term an 'actionable database' that can be used to communicate and connect NASA Water cycle research Results (NWRs) towards the improvement of water-related Decision Support Tools (DSTs). Recognizing that the European Commission and European Space Agency have also developed many related Water Research products (EWRs), we seek to learn about these and network with the EU teams to include their information in the WaterNet actionable data base and Community of Practice. WaterNet will then develop strategies to connect researchers and decision-makers via innovative communication strategies, improved user access to NASA and EU - Danubian resources, improved water cycle research community appreciation for user requirements, improved policymaker, management and stakeholder knowledge of research and application products, and improved identification of pathways for progress. Finally, WaterNet will develop relevant benchmarking and metrics, to understand the network's characteristics, to optimize its performance, and to establish sustainability. This paper provides examples of several NASA products based on remote sensing and land data assimilation systems that integrate

  20. Exact Periodic Solitary Solutions to the Shallow Water Wave Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dong-Long; ZHAO Jun-Xiao

    2009-01-01

    Exact solutions to the shallow wave equation are studied based on the idea of the extended homoclinic test and bilinear method. Some explicit solutions, such as the one soliton solution, the doubly-periodic wave solution and the periodic solitary wave solutions, are obtained. In addition, the properties of the solutions are investigated.

  1. Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: part I. water and solute movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Breit, George N.; Healy, Richard W.; Zupancic, John W.; Hammack, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Water co-produced with coal-bed methane (CBM) in the semi-arid Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana commonly has relatively low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios that can degrade soil permeability where used for irrigation. Nevertheless, a desire to derive beneficial use from the water and a need to dispose of large volumes of it have motivated the design of a deep subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system capable of utilizing that water. Drip tubing is buried 92 cm deep and irrigates at a relatively constant rate year-round, while evapotranspiration by the alfalfa and grass crops grown is seasonal. We use field data from two sites and computer simulations of unsaturated flow to understand water and solute movements in the SDI fields. Combined irrigation and precipitation exceed potential evapotranspiration by 300-480 mm annually. Initially, excess water contributes to increased storage in the unsaturated zone, and then drainage causes cyclical rises in the water table beneath the fields. Native chloride and nitrate below 200 cm depth are leached by the drainage. Some CBM water moves upward from the drip tubing, drawn by drier conditions above. Chloride from CBM water accumulates there as root uptake removes the water. Year over year accumulations indicated by computer simulations illustrate that infiltration of precipitation water from the surface only partially leaches such accumulations away. Field data show that 7% and 27% of added chloride has accumulated above the drip tubing in an alfalfa and grass field, respectively, following 6 years of irrigation. Maximum chloride concentrations in the alfalfa field are around 45 cm depth but reach the surface in parts of the grass field, illustrating differences driven by crop physiology. Deep SDI offers a means of utilizing marginal quality irrigation waters and managing the accumulation of their associated solutes in the crop rooting zone.

  2. Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: Part I. Water and solute movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, Carleton R; Breit, George N; Healy, Richard W; Zupancic, John W; Hammack, Richard

    2013-02-01

    Water co-produced with coal-bed methane (CBM) in the semi-arid Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana commonly has relatively low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios that can degrade soil permeability where used for irrigation. Nevertheless, a desire to derive beneficial use from the water and a need to dispose of large volumes of it have motivated the design of a deep subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system capable of utilizing that water. Drip tubing is buried 92 cm deep and irrigates at a relatively constant rate year-round, while evapotranspiration by the alfalfa and grass crops grown is seasonal. We use field data from two sites and computer simulations of unsaturated flow to understand water and solute movements in the SDI fields. Combined irrigation and precipitation exceed potential evapotranspiration by 300–480 mm annually. Initially, excess water contributes to increased storage in the unsaturated zone, and then drainage causes cyclical rises in the water table beneath the fields. Native chloride and nitrate below 200 cm depth are leached by the drainage. Some CBM water moves upward from the drip tubing, drawn by drier conditions above. Chloride from CBM water accumulates there as root uptake removes the water. Year over year accumulations indicated by computer simulations illustrate that infiltration of precipitation water from the surface only partially leaches such accumulations away. Field data show that 7% and 27% of added chloride has accumulated above the drip tubing in an alfalfa and grass field, respectively, following 6 years of irrigation. Maximum chloride concentrations in the alfalfa field are around 45 cm depth but reach the surface in parts of the grass field, illustrating differences driven by crop physiology. Deep SDI offers a means of utilizing marginal quality irrigation waters and managing the accumulation of their associated solutes in the crop rooting zone.

  3. An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew Bruff; Ned Godshall; Karen Evans

    2011-04-30

    This Final Scientific/ Technical Report submitted with respect to Project DE-FE0000833 titled 'An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale' in support of final reporting requirements. This final report contains a compilation of previous reports with the most current data in order to produce one final complete document. The goal of this research was to provide an integrated approach aimed at addressing the increasing water resource challenges between natural gas production and other water stakeholders in shale gas basins. The objective was to demonstrate that the AltelaRain{reg_sign} technology could be successfully deployed in the Marcellus Shale Basin to treat frac flow-back water. That objective has been successfully met.

  4. The decisive role of free water in determining homogenous ice nucleation behavior of aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Lishan; Li, Chenxi; Cao, Zexian

    2016-05-26

    It is a challenging issue to quantitatively characterize how the solute and pressure affect the homogeneous ice nucleation in a supercooled solution. By measuring the glass transition behavior of solutions, a universal feature of water-content dependence of glass transition temperature is recognized, which can be used to quantify hydration water in solutions. The amount of free water can then be determined for water-rich solutions, whose mass fraction, Xf, is found to serve as a universal relevant parameter for characterizing the homogeneous ice nucleation temperature, the meting temperature of primary ice, and even the water activity of solutions of electrolytes and smaller organic molecules. Moreover, the effects of hydrated solute and pressure on ice nucleation is comparable, and the pressure, when properly scaled, can be incorporated into the universal parameter Xf. These results help establish the decisive role of free water in determining ice nucleation and other relevant properties of aqueous solutions.

  5. Approximate solutions for Forchheimer flow during water injection and water production in an unconfined aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Simon A.; Moutsopoulos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the hydraulics around injection and production wells in unconfined aquifers associated with rainwater and reclaimed water aquifer storage schemes is an issue of increasing importance. Much work has been done previously to understand the mathematics associated with Darcy's law in this context. However, groundwater flow velocities around injection and production wells are likely to be sufficiently large such as to induce significant non-Darcy effects. This article presents a mathematical analysis to look at Forchheimer's equation in the context of water injection and water production in unconfined aquifers. Three different approximate solutions are derived using quasi-steady-state assumptions and the method of matched asymptotic expansion. The resulting approximate solutions are shown to be accurate for a wide range of practical scenarios by comparison with a finite difference solution to the full problem of concern. The approximate solutions have led to an improved understanding of the flow dynamics. They can also be used as verification tools for future numerical models in this context.

  6. Excess chemical potential of small solutes across water--membrane and water--hexane interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    The excess chemical potentials of five small, structurally related solutes, CH4, CH3F, CH2F2, CHF3, and CF4, across the water-glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer and water-hexane interfaces were calculated at 300, 310, and 340 K using the particle insertion method. The excess chemical potentials of nonpolar molecules (CH4 and CF4) decrease monotonically or nearly monotonically from water to a nonpolar phase. In contrast, for molecules that possess permanent dipole moments (CH3F, CH2F, and CHF3), the excess chemical potentials exhibit an interfacial minimum that arises from superposition of two monotonically and oppositely changing contributions: electrostatic and nonelectrostatic. The nonelectrostatic term, dominated by the reversible work of creating a cavity that accommodates the solute, decreases, whereas the electrostatic term increases across the interface from water to the membrane interior. In water, the dependence of this term on the dipole moment is accurately described by second order perturbation theory. To achieve the same accuracy at the interface, third order terms must also be included. In the interfacial region, the molecular structure of the solvent influences both the excess chemical potential and solute orientations. The excess chemical potential across the interface increases with temperature, but this effect is rather small. Our analysis indicates that a broad range of small, moderately polar molecules should be surface active at the water-membrane and water-oil interfaces. The biological and medical significance of this result, especially in relation to the mechanism of anesthetic action, is discussed.

  7. Community of Practice Applications from WaterNet: The NASA Water Cycle Solutions Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, D.; Brilly, M.; Gregoric, G.; Polajnar, J.; Houser, P.; Rodell, M.; Lehning, M.

    2009-04-01

    WaterNet is a new international network of researchers, stakeholders, and end-users of remote sensing tools that will benefit the water resources management community. It addresses a means for enhancing the social and economic developments of nations by increased use of practical research products from the terrestrial water cycle for making informed decisions. This paper provides a summary of the Water Cycle Community of Practice (CoP) plans and examples of Land Surface Model (LSM) applications for extreme events - floods, droughts, and heavy snowstorms in Europe. It discusses the concept of NASA's solutions networks focusing on the WaterNet. It invites EGU teams to join our WaterNet network. The NASA Water cycle Solutions Network's goal is to improve and optimize the sustained ability of water cycle researchers, stakeholders, organizations and networks to interact, identify, harness, and extend NASA research results to augment decision support tools and meet national needs. Our team is developing WaterNet by engaging relevant NASA water cycle research and community-of-practice organizations, to develop what we term an "actionable database" that can be used to communicate and connect NASA Water cycle research Results (NWRs) towards the improvement of water-related Decision Support Tools (DSTs). Recognizing that the European Commission and European Space Agency have also developed many related research products (EWRs), we seek to learn about these and network with the EU teams to include their information in the WaterNet actionable data base. Recognizing the many existing highly valuable water-related science and application networks in the US and EU, we focus the balance of our efforts on enabling their interoperability - facilitating access and communications among decision-makers and scientists. We present results of our initial focus on identification, collection, and analysis of the two end points, these being the NWRs and EWRs and water related DSTs. We

  8. An Analytical Solution for One-Dimensional Water Infiltration and Redistribution in Unsaturated Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Quan-Jiu; R. HORTON; FAN Jun

    2009-01-01

    Soil infiltration and redistribution are important processes in field water cycle, and it is necessary to develop a simple model to describe the processes. In this study, an algebraic solution for one-dimensional water infiltration and redistribution without evaporation in unsaturated soil was developed based on Richards equation. The algebraic solution had three parameters, namely, the saturated water conductivity, the comprehensive shape coefficient of the soil water content distribution, and the soil suction allocation coefficient. To analyze the physical features of these parameters, a relationship between the Green-Ampt model and the algebraic solution was established. The three parameters were estimated based on experimental observations, whereas the soil water content and the water infiltration duration were calculated using the algebraic solution. The calculated soil water content and infiltration duration were compared with the experimental observations, and the results indicated that the algebraic solution accurately described the unsaturated soil water flow processes.

  9. Field-scale water flow and solute transport : Swap model concepts, parameter estimation and case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Water flow and solute transport in top soils are important elements in many environmental studies. The agro- and ecohydrological model SWAP (Soil-Water-Plant-Atmosphere) has been developed to simulate simultaneously water flow, solute transport, heat flow and crop growth at field scale level. The ma

  10. Hard paths, soft paths or no paths? Cross-cultural perceptions of water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutich, A.; White, A. C.; White, D. D.; Larson, K. L.; Brewis, A.; Roberts, C.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examine how development status and water scarcity shape people's perceptions of "hard path" and "soft path" water solutions. Based on ethnographic research conducted in four semi-rural/peri-urban sites (in Bolivia, Fiji, New Zealand, and the US), we use content analysis to conduct statistical and thematic comparisons of interview data. Our results indicate clear differences associated with development status and, to a lesser extent, water scarcity. People in the two less developed sites were more likely to suggest hard path solutions, less likely to suggest soft path solutions, and more likely to see no path to solutions than people in the more developed sites. Thematically, people in the two less developed sites envisioned solutions that involve small-scale water infrastructure and decentralized, community-based solutions, while people in the more developed sites envisioned solutions that involve large-scale infrastructure and centralized, regulatory water solutions. People in the two water-scarce sites were less likely to suggest soft path solutions and more likely to see no path to solutions (but no more likely to suggest hard path solutions) than people in the water-rich sites. Thematically, people in the two water-rich sites seemed to perceive a wider array of unrealized potential soft path solutions than those in the water-scarce sites. On balance, our findings are encouraging in that they indicate that people are receptive to soft path solutions in a range of sites, even those with limited financial or water resources. Our research points to the need for more studies that investigate the social feasibility of soft path water solutions, particularly in sites with significant financial and natural resource constraints.

  11. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of an absorbing leaky epithelium is developed for analysis of solute coupled water transport. The non-charged driving solute diffuses into cells and is pumped from cells into the lateral intercellular space (lis). All membranes contain water channels with the solute passing...... concentration of fluid emerging from lis is then significantly larger than the concentration in lis. Thus, in absence of external driving forces the model generates isotonic transport provided a component of the solute flux emerging downstream lis is taken up by cells through the serosal membrane and pumped...... back into lis, i.e., the solute would have to be recirculated. With input variables from toad intestine (Nedergaard, S., E.H. Larsen, and H.H. Ussing, J. Membr. Biol. 168:241-251), computations predict that 60-80% of the pumped flux stems from serosal bath in agreement with the experimental estimate...

  12. Thermal driven water treatment systems for full separation of solute-water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sahib

    This work encompasses the study of a novel thermal driven desalination system to accomplish full separation of water and solute. This process advantageous over other process because it involves zero recirculation and zero liquid discharge, thus having minimum environmental impact. Since this system provides full separation, salts and other valuable products can be obtained in addition to pure water. This system can operate at high energy efficiencies using medium temperature heat source like industrial reject or solar cells. This plant consists of two technologies, the full separation and multi effect distillation which when integrated together 8ive us water and salt separately. Three different configuration of the FS-MED system have been presented, naming concurrent feed, variable feed, and counter current feed. They vary depending on their flow and feed distribution. Numerical procedure has been developed to solve the energy and mass balance equation for steady state condition has been presented.

  13. Emerging solutions to the water challenges of an urbanizing world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, Tove A.; Hoffmann, Sabine; Lüthi, Christoph; Truffer, Bernhard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/6603148005; Maurer, Max

    2016-01-01

    The top priorities for urban water sustainability include the provision of safe drinking water, wastewater handling for public health, and protection against flooding. However, rapidly aging infrastructure, population growth, and increasing urbanization call into question current urban water

  14. Highly Water-Soluble Magnetic Nanoparticles as Novel Draw Solutes in Forward Osmosis for Water Reuse

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Ming Ming

    2010-06-16

    Highly hydrophilic magnetic nanoparticles have been molecularly designed. For the first time, the application of highly water-soluble magnetic nanoparticles as novel draw solutes in forward osmosis (FO) was systematically investigated. Magnetic nanoparticles functionalized by various groups were synthesized to explore the correlation between the surface chemistry of magnetic nanoparticles and the achieved osmolality. We verified that magnetic nanoparticles capped with polyacrylic acid can yield the highest driving force and subsequently highest water flux among others. The used magnetic nanoparticles can be captured by the magnetic field and recycled back into the stream as draw solutes in the FO process. In addition, magnetic nanoparticles of different diameters were also synthesized to study the effect of particles size on FO performance. We demonstrate that the engineering of surface hydrophilicity and magnetic nanoparticle size is crucial in the application of nanoparticles as draw solutes in FO. It is believed that magnetic nanoparticles will soon be extensively used in this area. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  15. The Destabilizing Effect of Water Ice Clouds in Mars Climate Models: Challenges and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottier, A.; Forget, F.; Montmessin, F.; Navarro, T.; Madeleine, J.-B.; Millour, E.; Spiga, A.

    2014-07-01

    Radiatively active water ice clouds in global climat models are very important to understand the martian climate and water cycle. However, challenges arise. Solution developed for the LMD GCM are presented: microphysics and subgrid scale nebulosity.

  16. Trends of solution technologies related to water quality; Suishitsu kanren solution no gijutsu no doko to tenbo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, H.; Kazama, K.; Fukuda, M. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-06-10

    This paper reviews essential problems of water environment and trends of solution technologies related to water quality problems promoted by Fuji Electric. They have developed a water quality safety monitor for high-sensitivity monitoring of river water and lake water, and a water quality control system for supporting river managers during water quality accidents. For the water quality safety monitor, nitrification bacteria sensitive to toxicants are fixed as bacterial membrane, and it is attached on the dissolved oxygen electrode. Toxicants mixed in the river water can be detected by determining the activity of nitrification bacteria from the change of dissolved oxygen consumption. This provides ten times of detecting sensibility compared with fish. A coagulation sensor has been also developed for the low turbidity operation during water purifying process and the optimal injection of coagulants. High-performance ozonizers have been developed for advanced treatment of purified water. Using this, nasty smell and precursors of trihalomethane in drinking water can be strongly decomposed. For the field of sewage water, a biosensor has been developed. It takes only 20 minutes to measure BOD, which took 5 days previously. For the treatment technology, a two-tank type intermittent aeration activated sludge process has been completed, which provides a remarkable removing effect of nitrogen and phosphorus in sewage water. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Delayed luminescence induced by complex domains in water and in aqueous solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Colleoni, C; Grasso, R; Gulino, M; Musumeci, F; Romeli, D; Rosace, G; Salesi, G; Scordino, A

    2016-01-01

    Many recent studies on water have conjectured a complex structure composed of hydrogen bonded low- and high-density domains. In this work the structure of pure water and aqueous solutions of silica gel (TEOS) has been investigated by using delayed luminescence, which previously have showed significant increase in aqueous salt solutions where low-density domain formation is expected. Photon emission shows an Arrhenius trend with an activation energy in water-TEOS solutions larger than in pure water and salt-water solutions. Moreover, delayed photon emission decay shows an intrinsic lifetime of about 5 microseconds both in solutions and in pure water that, along with secondary lifetimes induced by the presence of TEOS, could be related to the formation of different domains.

  18. Detection of trace elements in DI water and comparison of several water solutions by using EF-FLRD chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, M.; Wang, C.

    2017-02-01

    Detection of trace elements in DI water and comparison of several types of water respons such as DI water, tap water, and ocean water were studied by using EF-FLRD chemical sensors. Solutions of Mg, Fe, P, and Cd elements with a concentration of 1000 µg/ml (1 mg/ml) which corresponds to 1000 ppm by weight were tested. DI water, tap water, and real ocean water were utilized as medium to observe refractive index difference of solutions. The EF sensing technique which is based on the EF scattering effect was employed for the detection of trace chemicals and recording of solution responses. Due to the refractive index differences between solutions, optical loss of the sensor was different when the sensor head was immersed into solutions of approximately 10 ml each. The differences of the refractive indices are presented by recording ringdown times when the sensor head was immersed into the solutions. Fast response (˜1s), high sensitive, and reproducible EF-FLRD chemical sensors were fabricated and tested in laboratory conditions. High sensitivity of the sensors due to being capability of detecting smaller differences between measurands without any additional components or treatment makes the EF-FLRD sensors more attractive. Enhanced sensitivity of the EF-FLRD chemical sensors as a result of the multi-pass nature of the FLRD technique has potential application in detecting of trace elements in monitoring of water quality.

  19. Modelling Water Flow and Solute Transport for Horticultural and Environmental Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feddes, R.A.; Dam, van J.C.

    2002-01-01

    During the past 10 years, the simulation model SWAP (Soil, Water, Atmosphere, Plant) was developed by the Sub-Department Water Resources of Wageningen University jointly with the Department Water and Environment of Alterra Green World Research. SWAP simulates vertical transport of water, solutes and

  20. Study on the Unfrozen Water Quantity of Maximally Freeze-Concentrated Solutions for Multicomponent Lyoprotectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengjie; Chen, Guangming; Zhang, Cunhai; Zhang, Shaozhi

    2017-01-01

    The concentration of maximally freeze-concentrated solutions [Formula: see text] and the corresponding glass transition temperature [Formula: see text] and ante-melting temperature [Formula: see text] of lyoprotectant solutions, are critical parameters for developing lyophilization process. Usually, the lyoprotectant solutions are multicomponent solutions composed of electrolytes, sugars, proteins, polymers, and other chemicals. In this article, the Wg(') values of several multicomponent solutions including trehalose/NaCl, bovine serum albumin/NaCl, and hydroxyethyl starch/NaCl with water were determined by differential scanning calorimetry. A linear relationship between the unfrozen water fraction Wun and the initial solute concentrations Wi was found: Wun = ∑(ai·Wi), which suggested that in the multicomponent solutions each solute could hydrate a certain amount of water ai (g water/g solute) that could not be frozen. The hypothesis was compared with more literature data. For the same solute in different solutions, variation in the fitted coefficient ai is noticed and discussed. If a "universal" value ai for each solute is adopted, both [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] for a multicomponent solution could be predicted if Couchman-Karasz equation is adopted for calculating glass transition temperature at the same time. The prediction discrepancies for [Formula: see text] with experimental data were less than 2°C. The finding is discussed about its molecular basis and applicability. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of water polyamorphism on the molecular vibrations of glycerol in its glassy aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshiharu; Mishima, Osamu

    2016-07-14

    A glassy dilute glycerol-water solution undergoes a mutual polyamorphic transition relating to the transition between high- and low-density amorphous ices of solvent water. The polyamorphic transition behavior depends on the glycerol concentration, indicating that the glycerol affects the water polyamorphism. Here, we used the glassy dilute glycerol-water solution of the solute molar fraction of 0.07 and examined the effect of the polyamorphic change in solvent water on the molecular vibrations of glycerol via Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the molecular vibration of glycerol in high-density liquid like solvent water is different from that in the low-density liquid like solvent water and that the change in the molecular vibration of glycerol is synchronized with the polyamorphic transition of solvent water. The dynamical change of the solute molecule relates to the polyamorphic state of solvent water. This result suggests that the polyamorphic fluctuation of water structure emanated from the presumed liquid-liquid critical point plays an important role for the function of aqueous solution under an ambient condition such as the conformational stability of solute, the functional expression of solute, and so on.

  2. Effect of water polyamorphism on the molecular vibrations of glycerol in its glassy aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshiharu; Mishima, Osamu

    2016-07-01

    A glassy dilute glycerol-water solution undergoes a mutual polyamorphic transition relating to the transition between high- and low-density amorphous ices of solvent water. The polyamorphic transition behavior depends on the glycerol concentration, indicating that the glycerol affects the water polyamorphism. Here, we used the glassy dilute glycerol-water solution of the solute molar fraction of 0.07 and examined the effect of the polyamorphic change in solvent water on the molecular vibrations of glycerol via Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the molecular vibration of glycerol in high-density liquid like solvent water is different from that in the low-density liquid like solvent water and that the change in the molecular vibration of glycerol is synchronized with the polyamorphic transition of solvent water. The dynamical change of the solute molecule relates to the polyamorphic state of solvent water. This result suggests that the polyamorphic fluctuation of water structure emanated from the presumed liquid-liquid critical point plays an important role for the function of aqueous solution under an ambient condition such as the conformational stability of solute, the functional expression of solute, and so on.

  3. Linking water age and solute dynamics in streamflow at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolo Benettin; Scott W. Bailey; John L. Campbell; Mark B. Green; Andrea Rinaldo; Gene E. Likens; Kevin J. McGuire; Gianluca Botter

    2015-01-01

    We combine experimental and modeling results from a headwater catchment at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF), New Hampshire, USA, to explore the link between stream solute dynamics and water age. A theoretical framework based on water age dynamics, which represents a general basis for characterizing solute transport at the catchment scale, is here applied to...

  4. 21 CFR 520.2261a - Sulfamethazine sodium drinking water solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... For treatment and control of diseases caused by organisms sensitive to sulfamethazine. (i) Beef and... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfamethazine sodium drinking water solution. 520....2261a Sulfamethazine sodium drinking water solution. (a) Sponsors. See Nos. 000010 and 061623 in §...

  5. Variable-suction multicompartment samplers to measure spatiotemporal unsaturated water and solute fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, E.; Hogervorst, F.A.N.; Rooij, de G.; Stagnitti, F.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the movement of water and solutes in soils, and the risk of groundwater contamination, we need water and solute flux observations distributed in space and time. We designed a new variable-suction multicompartment percolation sampler that can be buried below an undisturbed soil

  6. Variable-suction multicompartment samplers to measure spatiotemporal unsaturated water and solute fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, E.; Hogervorst, F.A.N.; Rooij, de G.; Stagnitti, F.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the movement of water and solutes in soils, and the risk of groundwater contamination, we need water and solute flux observations distributed in space and time. We designed a new variable-suction multicompartment percolation sampler that can be buried below an undisturbed soil v

  7. Effect of Honey Solution and Water Acquisition on Survival of Starved Solenopsis Mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fang; Wang, Feifei; Lu, Yaobin; Zhang, Pengjun; Zhang, Jinming; Zhang, Zhijun; Li, Weidi; Lin, Wencai; Bei, Yawei

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined the effects of honey solution and water access on feeding behavior and survival of starving solenopsis mealybugs, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae). The electrical penetration graph technique and an artificial membrane system were used to check whether P. solenopsis could imbibe free water or other liquid, such as the honey solution used here, in its natural environment. The recorded electrical penetration graph waveforms revealed that P. solenopsis could continuously imbibe water-honey solution for several hours, which indicated that honey solution and water acquisition could possibly occur when P. solenopsis had access to such liquids in its natural environment. Waveforms of water-honey solution feeding alternated between two distinct feeding phases in a regular pattern, which was assumed to reflect inherent habits of feeding attempts. The effects of honey solution and water acquisition on survival of P. solenopsis was also examined. Comparison between P. solenopsis in different treatments (starved, water feeding, honey solution feeding, and cotton plant feeding) suggested that 1) P. solenopsis could accept but did not favor feeding on water or the honey solution, and 2) this feeding could prolong its survival, but had no effect on body size. PMID:25373148

  8. Glass transition behavior of ternary disaccharide-ethylene glycol-water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tongxu; Zhao, Lishan; Wang, Qiang; Cao, Zexian

    2017-06-01

    Glass transition behavior of ternary disaccharide-ethylene glycol-water solutions, in reference to that of the binary combinations, has been investigated towards a better understanding of their cryoprotective ability. In water-deficient solutions, the disaccharides, including trehalose, sucrose and maltose, can associate with more than 100 ethylene glycol molecules to form amorphous complex, one order of magnitude larger than the corresponding hydration numbers. In water-rich solutions, a second glass transition emerges with increasing molar fraction of ethylene glycol, indicating the possible synergy of disaccharides and ethylene glycol in vitrification of the ternary aqueous solution.

  9. Evaluation of Polyuria: The Roles of Solute Loading and Water Diuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Bhavna; Velez, Juan Carlos Q

    2016-03-01

    Polyuria, defined as daily urine output in excess of 3.0 to 3.5L/d, can occur due to solute or water diuresis. Solute-induced polyuria can be seen in hospitalized patients after a high solute load from exogenous protein administration or following relief of urinary obstruction. Similar clinical scenarios are rarely encountered in the outpatient setting. We describe a case of polyuria due to high solute ingestion and excessive water intake leading to a mixed picture of solute and water diuresis. Restriction of the daily solute load and water intake resulted in complete resolution of polyuria. Determination of the daily excreted urinary osmoles may yield important clues to the cause of polyuria and should be included in the routine workup of polyuria.

  10. On the emergence of diel solute signals in flowing waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Robert T.; Cohen, Matthew J.

    2016-02-01

    Biota imprint their stoichiometry on relative rates of elemental cycling in the environment. Despite this coupling, producer-driven diel solute variation in rivers and streams is more apparent for some solutes (e.g., dissolved oxygen—DO) than others (e.g., nitrate—NO3-). We hypothesized that these differences arise from atmospheric equilibration, with signals emerging and evolving differently for gaseous and nongaseous solutes. Measurements of DO and NO3 in a spring-fed river, where constant inputs isolate in-stream processing, support this hypothesis, as do results from reactive transport modeling of river solute dynamics. Atmospheric equilibration dramatically shortens the benthic footprint over which signals integrate, facilitating emergence of diel DO signals in response to in-stream metabolism. In contrast, upstream influences persist much further downstream for nongaseous solutes, confounding and potentially obscuring the diel signals from in-stream assimilatory processing. Isolating diel NO3 signals from in-stream processing requires a two-station approach wherein metabolic impacts on solute variation are measured by difference between upstream and downstream sensors. Notably, two-station inference improves markedly when hydraulic controls on signal propagation such as dispersion and storage are explicitly considered. We conclude that the absence of diel signals at a single station for nongaseous solutes such as NO3- cannot be interpreted as lack of autotroph demand or element coupling. As advances in sensors enable the acquisition of an increasingly rich array of solute signals, controlling for differences in the emergence and downstream evolution of gaseous versus nongaseous solutes will dramatically improve inferences regarding the timing and magnitude of coupled elemental processing.

  11. Total phenol content and antioxidant activity of water solutions of plant extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Kopjar, Mirela; Piližota, Vlasta; Hribar, J.; Simčić, M.

    2009-01-01

    Water solutions of extracts were investigated for total phenol content, flavonoid content and antioxidant activity. Susceptibility to degradation of water solutions of plant extracts, under light and in the dark, during storage at room temperature was investigated in order to determine their stability prior to their application for fortification of food products. Large dispersion of total phenol (TP) content in the investigated model solutions of selected extracts (olive leaves, green tea, re...

  12. Molecular properties of aqueous solutions: a focus on the collective dynamics of hydration water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comez, L; Paolantoni, M; Sassi, P; Corezzi, S; Morresi, A; Fioretto, D

    2016-07-07

    When a solute is dissolved in water, their mutual interactions determine the molecular properties of the solute on one hand, and the structure and dynamics of the surrounding water particles (the so-called hydration water) on the other. The very existence of soft matter and its peculiar properties are largely due to the wide variety of possible water-solute interactions. In this context, water is not an inert medium but rather an active component, and hydration water plays a crucial role in determining the structure, stability, dynamics, and function of matter. This review focuses on the collective dynamics of hydration water in terms of retardation with respect to the bulk, and of the number of molecules whose dynamics is perturbed. Since water environments are in a dynamic equilibrium, with molecules continuously exchanging from around the solute towards the bulk and vice versa, we examine the ability of different techniques to measure the water dynamics on the basis of the explored time scales and exchange rates. Special emphasis is given to the collective dynamics probed by extended depolarized light scattering and we discuss whether and to what extent the results obtained in aqueous solutions of small molecules can be extrapolated to the case of large biomacromolecules. In fact, recent experiments performed on solutions of increasing complexity clearly indicate that a reductionist approach is not adequate to describe their collective dynamics. We conclude this review by presenting current ideas that are being developed to describe the dynamics of water interacting with macromolecules.

  13. Structure and dynamics of water in mixed solutions including laponite and PEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikubo, Satoshi; Sekine, Yurina; Ikeda-Fukazawa, Tomoko

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the structure and dynamics of water in mixed solutions including laponite clay particles and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), we measured the Raman spectra of the mixed solutions in the temperature range 283-313 K. The results show that the vibrational energies of the O-H stretching modes in the mixed solutions depend on the water content and temperature. The energy shifts of the O-H stretching modes are attributed to changes in the water structure. By applying a structural model of bulk water to the spectra in the O-H stretching region, the local structures of water in the solutions were analyzed. The result shows that the formation probability of hydrogen bonds in the solutions decreases as the water content decreases. Laponite and PEO have effects to disrupt the network structure of hydrogen bonds between water molecules. Further, it was found that laponite and PEO cause increase in the strength of hydrogen bonds of surrounding water,although the strength of the hydrogen bonds increases with the order water-laponite laponite-PEO mixed solutions has a less-networked structure with strong hydrogen bonds compared with bulk water.

  14. Water shells of diamond nanoparticles in colloidal solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsanov, Stepan S.; Lesnikov, Evgeny V.; Dan'kin, Dimitry A.; Balakhanov, Dimitry M.

    2014-03-01

    The refractive index of colloidal particles formed by nanodiamond in water (average diameters of 106, 122, and 854 nm) was measured by Fabry-Perot interferometry as n = 1.78, 1.74, and 1.79, respectively, which suggests the molar ratio of water to carbon within these particles of 0.16:1, and the effective thickness of interfacial (nano) water shells around a 5 nm diamond particle of 0.48(5) nm. Structural implications of this are discussed.

  15. Dynamics of water and aqueous solutions in geometrical confinement

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias, Sattig

    2016-01-01

    Water is one of the most vital substances for life, science, and technology. In many situations, water is confined to very narrow geometries, for example, in living cells it is severely confined in between biomolecules. The peculiarities of such systems are not yet understood and have drawn a lot of attention in current research. Additionally, the anomalous behavior of water in the bulk, e.g. the density anomaly, is not yet explained. The most common theories aiming to rationalize the beha...

  16. Is Storage a Solution to End Water Shortage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2009-12-01

    Water shortage is a problem of supply and demand. Some authors refer to it as Water Scarcity. The author has discussed this in his previous presentation at the 2008 AGU International Conference. Part of it is reproduced here for purposes of clarification. It is important to recognize that water is essential for the survival of all life on earth. Many water-rich states have thought of water conservation as an art that is practiced mainly in the arid states. But one has to recite the famous quote: “You will never miss water till the well runs dry.” Researchers have also concluded that quantity deficiency experienced by groundwater supplies are affecting many communities around the world. Furthermore federal regulations pertaining to the quality of potable or drinking water have become more stringent (Narayanan, 2008). One must observe that water conservation schemes and efficient utilization practices also benefit the environment to a large extent. These water conservation practicies indeed have a short payback period althought it may seem that there is a heavy initial investment is required. Research scientists have studied MARR (Mean Annual River Runoff) pattern over the years and have arrived at some significant conclusions. Vörsömarty and other scientists have indicated that water scarcity exists when the demand to supply ratio exceeds the number 0.4. (Vörsömarty, 2005). Furthermore other researchers claim to have documented a six-fold increase in water use in the United States during the last century. It is interesting to note that the population of the United States has hardly doubled during the last century. This obviously, is indicative of higher living standards. Nevertheless, it also emphasizes an urgent need for establishing a strong, sound, sensible and sustainable management program for utilizing the available water supplies efficiently (Narayanan, 2008). Author of the 1998 book, Last Oasis: Facing Water Scarcity, Dr. Sandra Postel predicts big

  17. Water chemistry at RBMK plants: Problems and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamet, V.; Yurmanov, V. [VNIIAES (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    After around 15 years of operation RBMK-1000 units undergo a major refit, which includes safety system upgrading, fuel tube replacement, etc. The above upgrading has created problems for water chemistry. In particular, in late 80's in-core insertion time of the portion of control rods was reduced 10-fold thanks to a transfer from water to filming cooling of scram channels. Scram channels are cooled with inner surface water film cooling and nitrogen is injected into heads via special pipelines. Such cooling system modernization ensures fast insertion of absorber rods. The above upgrade intensified nitric acid radiolytic generation in water coolant and pH{sub 25} value shift to acid conditions (up to 4.5). The results of corrosion tests in such conditions proved the necessity to improve water chemistry to ensure corrosion protection of scram/control rod and circuit components, especially those made out of aluminium alloy. Since 1990 the new revision of the RBMK-1000 water chemistry standard specified the new normal operational limit and action levels for possible temporary deviations of pH{sub 25} value. RBMK plant specific measures were implemented at RBMK plants to meet the above requirements of the 1990 revision of the RBMK-1000 water chemistry standard. Clean-up systems of the above circuit were upgraded to ensure intensive absorption of nitric acid from water and pH{sub 25} maintenance in a slightly acid area. (authors)

  18. The end of abundance. Economic solutions to water scarcity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetland, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    In a past of abundance, we had clean water to meet our demands for showers, pools, farms and rivers. Our laws and customs did not need to regulate or ration demand. Over time, our demand has grown, and scarcity has replaced abundance. We don't have as much clean water as we want. We can respond to t

  19. The effects of replacing the water model while decoupling water-water and water-solute interactions on computed properties of simple salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jicun; Wang, Feng

    2016-07-01

    The effects of decoupling the water-water and water-solute interactions are studied with selected mono-valent ions as the solute. Using the ion-water cross terms developed for the BLYPSP-4F water model, we replaced the water potential with WAIL, TIP4P, and TIP3P without changing the ion-water parameters. When the adaptive force matching (AFM) derived BLYPSP-4F model is replaced by the other AFM derived WAIL model, the difference in ion properties, such as hydration free energies, radial distribution functions, relative diffusion constants, is negligible, demonstrating the feasibility for combining AFM parameters from different sources. Interestingly, when the AFM-derived ion-water cross-terms are used with a non-AFM based water model, only small changes in the ion properties are observed. The final combined models with TIP3P or TIP4P water reproduce the salt hydration free energies within 6% of experiments. The feasibility of combining AFM models with other non-AFM models is of significance since such combinations allow more complex systems to be studied without specific parameterization. In addition, the study suggests an interesting prospect of reusing the cross-terms when a part of a general force field is replaced with a different model. The prevailing practice, which is to re-derive all cross-terms with combining rules, may not have been optimal.

  20. Solute leaching in a sandy soil with a water-repellent surface layer: a simulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, de G.H.; Vries, de P.

    1996-01-01

    Many sandy soils in the Netherlands have a water-repellent surface layer covering a wettable soil with a shallow groundwater table. Fingers form in the water-repellent surface layer and rapidly transport water and solutes to the wettable soil in which the streamlines diverge. Although several field

  1. Compatible solutes in lactic acid bacteria subjected to water stress.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kets, E.P.W.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the research project described in this thesis was to investigate the protective effect of compatible solutes on tactic acid bacteria subjected to drying. Dried preparations of lactic acid bacteria are applied as starter cultures in feed and food industries. Dried starter cultures compare

  2. Osmotic diuresis-induced hypernatremia: better explained by solute-free water clearance or electrolyte-free water clearance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popli, Subhash; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H; Ing, Todd S

    2014-01-01

    Hypernatremia may result from inadequate water intake, excessive water loss or a combination of the two. Osmotic diuresis leads to losses of both solute and water. The relationship between solute and water losses determines the resulting changes in serum osmolality and sodium concentration. Total solute loss is routinely higher than loss of water in osmotic diuresis. Theoretically, then, decreases in serum osmolality (and serum sodium concentration) should follow. In clinical situations of osmotic diuresis, however, reduction in osmolality can take place, but not reduction in serum sodium concentration. It is of note that serum sodium concentration changes are related to urinary losses of sodium and potassium but not to the loss of total solute. In osmotic diuresis, the combined loss of sodium and potassium per liter of urine is lower than the concurrent serum sodium level. Consequently, hypernatremia can ensue. A patient who presented with osmotic diuresis and hypernatremia is described here. In this patient, we have shown that electrolyte-free water clearance is a better index of the effect of osmotic diuresis on serum sodium concentration than the classic solute-free water clearance.

  3. Peculiar points in the phase diagram of the water-alcohol solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Chechko, V E; Malomuzh, M P

    2013-01-01

    The work is devoted to the investigation of nontrivial behavior of dilute water-alcohol solutions. The temperature and concentration dependencies of the contraction for aqueous solutions of ethanol and methanol are analyzed. The existence of a specific point, the so-called peculiar point, was established. It is shown that water-alcohol solutions of different types obey the principle of corresponding states if temperature and volume fraction are used as principal coordinates. In this case, the concentration of the peculiar point for different solutions is close to x_{\

  4. Changes of water solution properties under the processes of their ultrasonic atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopyan, V. B.; Bambura, M. V.; Davidov, E. R.; Stupin, A. Yu.; Chubatova, O. I.

    2009-10-01

    Transformation of diluted water solutions of medicines into medicinal aerosols in ultrasonic inhalers leads to variation of concentration ratios for solution components in an aerosol and appearance of new substances synthesized usually in the process of cavitation in water solutions. It is demonstrated that for the characteristic concentrations of solution components intended for aerosol therapy the effect of concentration of its surface-active components is most significant in the process of ultrasonic dispersion into an aerosol. This effect must be taken into account in medical practice.

  5. An investigation of spectral characteristics of water-glucose solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastovskaia, Elena A.; Gorbunova, Elena V.; Chertov, Aleksandr N.; Korotaev, Valery V.

    2016-04-01

    One of the problems of modern medical device engineering is the development of an instrument for non-invasive monitoring of glucose levels in the blood. The urgency of this task is ensured by the following facts: the increase in the incidence of diabetes, the need for regular monitoring of blood sugar, and pain of modern methods of glycemia measurement. The problem can be solved with the help of a spectrophotometric method. This report is devoted to the investigation of spectral characteristics of glucose solution with various molar concentrations. The authors proposed the methodology of experimental research and data processing algorithm. The results of the experimental studies confirmed potential opportunity of blood sugar control by spectrophotometric method. Further research is expected to continue by the way of complication of the composition of the object from an aqueous solution of glucose to biological object.

  6. Acute barium intoxication following ingestion of soap water solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandita Joshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case in which a young girl ingested a solution of a hair-removing soap. The ingestion resulted in profound hypokalemia and severe acidosis leading to flaccid paralysis, respiratory arrest and ventricular arrhythmias. Ultimately the patient made complete recovery. The soapwas found to contain barium sulfide. The degree of paralysis and acidosis appeared to be directly related to serum potassium levels.

  7. Nanofiltration: ion exchange system for effective surfactant removal from water solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kowalska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A system combining nanofiltration and ion exchange for highly effective separation of anionic surfactant from water solutions was proposed. The subjects of the study were nanofiltration polyethersulfone membranes and ion-exchange resins differing in type and structure. The quality of the treated solution was affected by numerous parameters, such as quality of the feed solution, membrane cut-off, resin type, dose and the solution contact time with the resin. A properly designed purification system made it possible to reduce the concentration of anionic surfactant below 1 mg L-1 from feed solutions containing surfactant in concentrations above the CMC value.

  8. Communication: Modeling of concentration dependent water diffusivity in ionic solutions: Role of intermolecular charge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yi; Berkowitz, Max L; Kanai, Yosuke

    2015-12-28

    The translational diffusivity of water in solutions of alkali halide salts depends on the identity of ions, exhibiting dramatically different behavior even in solutions of similar salts of NaCl and KCl. The water diffusion coefficient decreases as the salt concentration increases in NaCl. Yet, in KCl solution, it slightly increases and remains above bulk value as salt concentration increases. Previous classical molecular dynamics simulations have failed to describe this important behavior even when polarizable models were used. Here, we show that inclusion of dynamical charge transfer among water molecules produces results in a quantitative agreement with experiments. Our results indicate that the concentration-dependent diffusivity reflects the importance of many-body effects among the water molecules in aqueous ionic solutions. Comparison with quantum mechanical calculations shows that a heterogeneous and extended distribution of charges on water molecules around the ions due to ion-water and also water-water charge transfer plays a very important role in controlling water diffusivity. Explicit inclusion of the charge transfer allows us to model accurately the difference in the concentration-dependent water diffusivity between Na(+) and K(+) ions in simulations, and it is likely to impact modeling of a wide range of systems for medical and technological applications.

  9. Dynamics of water and solute transport in polymeric reverse osmosis membranes via molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Meng; Lueptow, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    The Angstrom-scale transport characteristics of water and six different solutes, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, urea, Na+, and Cl-, were studied for a polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membrane, FT-30, using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. Results indicate that water transport increases with an increasing fraction of connected percolated free volume, or water-accessible open space, in the membrane polymer structure. This free volume is enhanced by the dynamic structure of the membrane at the molecular level as it swells when hydrated and vibrates due to molecular collisions allowing a continuous path connecting the opposite membrane surfaces. The tortuous paths available for transport of solutes result in Brownian motion of solute molecules and hopping from pore to pore as they pass through the polymer network structure of the membrane. The transport of alcohol solutes decreases for solutes with larger Van der Waals volume, which corresponds to less available percolated free volume, or sol...

  10. Study of hydrogen bonding in ethanol-water binary solutions by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fabing; Men, Zhiwei; Li, Shuo; Wang, Shenghan; Li, Zhanlong; Sun, Chenglin

    2017-09-01

    Raman spectra of ethanol-water binary solutions have been observed at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. We find that with increasing ethanol concentration, the symmetric and asymmetric OH stretching vibrational mode (3286 and 3434cm(-1)) of water are shifted to lower frequency and the weak shoulder peak at 3615cm(-1) (free OH) disappears. These results indicate that ethanol strengthens hydrogen bonds in water. Simultaneously, our experiment shows that Raman shifts of ethanol reverses when the volume ratio of ethanol and the overall solution is 0.2, which demonstrates that ethanol-water structure undergoes a phase transition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Aggregation in Organic Solutions of Malonamides: Consequences for Water Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meridiano, Y.; Berthon, L.; Crozes, X.; Sorel, C. [CEA ValRho, DEN DRCP SCPS LCSE, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France); Dannus, P. [CEA Saclay, INSTN UEIN, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Antonio, M.R.; Chiarizia, R. [Argonne Natl Lab, CSE Div, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Zemb, T. [CEA CNRS UM2 ENSCM, Inst Chin Separat Marcoule, Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France)

    2009-07-01

    The molecular organization of N, N'-dimethyl-N, N'-dioctyl-hexyl-ethoxy-malonamide (DMDOHEMA), the current reference extractant for the DIAMEX (Diamide Extraction) process, is correlated with its water extraction properties from neutral media. The aggregation of DMDOHEMA in n-heptane was investigated by vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) and the aggregate speciation characterized by combined small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS, respectively). Two approaches were taken to model the aggregation of the diamide and the water extraction as a function of the diamide concentration by taking into account a single aggregation equilibrium with an average aggregation number N equal to 4.28 {+-} 0.05; and a competition between two types of aggregates in the organic phase, namely, aggregates of the reverse micelle type with 4 diamides per aggregate, and an oligomeric structure composed of about 10 diamide molecules which appears at high extractant concentration ({>=} 1 mol/L). In both cases, the supramolecular speciation representing the monomers/aggregates distribution was determined, and for each supramolecular organization, a solubilization parameter was calculated using the Sergievskii-Dannus relationship. Thus, the correlation between the two types of micellization of the diamide and the extraction of water into the organic phase was demonstrated. The larger aggregates can extract about five times more water than monomers. (authors)

  12. Cotransport of water and solutes in plant membranes: The molecular basis, and physiological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars H. Wegner

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Current concepts of plant membrane transport are based on the assumption that water and solutes move across membranes via separate pathways. According to this view, coupling between the fluxes is more or less exclusively constituted via the osmotic force that solutes exert on water transport. This view is questioned here, and experimental evidence for a cotransport of water and solutes is reviewed. The overview starts with ion channels that provide pathways for both ion and water transport, as exemplified for maxi K+ channels from cytoplasmic droplets of Chara corallina. Aquaporins are usually considered to be selective for water (just allowing for slippage of some other small, neutral molecules. Recently, however, a “dual function” aquaporin has been characterized from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPIP2.1 that translocates water and at the same time conducts cations, preferentially Na+. By analogy with mammalian physiology, other candidates for solute-water flux coupling are cation-chloride cotransporters of the CCC type, and transporters of sugars and amino acids. The last part is dedicated to possible physiological functions that could rely on solute-water cotransport. Among these are the generation of root pressure, refilling of embolized xylem vessels, fast turgor-driven movements of leaves, cell elongation (growth, osmoregulation and adjustment of buoyancy in marine algae. This review will hopefully initiate further research in the field.

  13. Aggregation of asbestos fibers in water: role of solution chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Ortiz, C. P.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Aggregation kinetics and stability of colloidal particles have been extensively studied using bulk techniques such as dynamic light scattering; these techniques involve large ensembles of particles and interpretation of results is difficult when particles are non-spherical and poorly characterized, as is always the case with non-ideal natural hazardous materials such as asbestos fibers. These difficulties hinder greatly progress on fundamental understanding of whether the classic colloidal aggregation theories can be applied to natural materials and how the heterogeneity of particles (e.g., shape) affects the colloidal aggregation kinetics and structure. By using in-situ microscopy and particle tracking techniques, we were able to observe the particle-by-particle growth of aggregated formed by elongated particles (synthetic glass rods and natural asbestos fibers) and demonstrated the rod-shaped geometry induced novel structures and growth dynamics that challenge existing theory. In this study, we continue to use asbestos as model system of elongated colloidal contaminant, and investigate the effects of changing solution chemistry (e.g., ionic strength, pH, and natural organic matter (NOM)), on growth dynamics and aggregates structure. The results show that aggregate growth curves are self-similar with a characteristic timescale that increases with increasing pH. By varying ionic strength for fixed pH values, we determine that the ccc is sensitive to pH. Fractal dimension decreases slightly with increasing pH and decreasing ionic strength, indicating that stronger inter-particle repulsion create sparser aggregates; however, the magnitude of the solution chemistry effects is much smaller than that of colloid shape. In monovalent solutions, regardless of their concentration, HA drastically reduces the aggregation kinetics of asbestos fiber. This work may lead to enhanced prediction of the colloidal contaminants' mobility in the environment, bioavailability, and

  14. Flow Data for Solute Transport Modeling from Tracer Experiments in a Stream Not Continuously Gaining Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencala, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2007-12-01

    In-stream tracer experiments are a well-established method for determining flow data to be incorporated in solute transport modeling. For a gaining stream, this method is implemented to provide spatial flow data at scales of minutes and tens of meters without physical disturbance to the flow of water, the streambed, or biota. Of importance for solute transport modeling, solute inflow loading along the stream can be estimated with this spatial data. The tracer information can also be interpreted to characterize hyporheic exchange time-scales for a stream with hyporheic exchange flowpaths (HEFs) that are short relative to the distance over which the stream gains water. The interpretation of tracer data becomes uncertain for a stream that is not gaining water continuously over intended study reach. We demonstrate, with straight-forward mass-balances, uncertainties for solute loading which arise in the analysis of streams locally losing water while predominantly gaining water (and solutes) over a larger scale. With field data from Mineral Creek (Silverton, Colorado) we illustrate the further uncertainty distinguishing HEFs from (locally) losing segments of the stream. Comparison of bromide tracer with ambient sulfate concentrations suggests that subsurface inflows and outflows, concurrent with likely HEFs, occur in a hydrogeochemical setting of multiple, dispersed and mixed, sources of water along a 64 m sub-reach of the predominately gaining, but locally losing, stream. To compute stream-reach mass-balances (the simplest of water quality models) there is a need to quantitatively define the character and source of contaminants entering streams from ground-water pathways, as well as the potential for changes in water chemistry and contaminant concentrations along flow paths crossing the sediment-water interface. Identification of inflow solute mass requires quantifying water gain, loss, and hyporheic exchange in addition to concentration.

  15. Traveling Wave Solutions of the Benjamin-Bona-Mahony Water Wave Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Seadawy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of unidirectional propagation of long water waves in dispersive media is presented. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV and Benjamin-Bona-Mahony (BBM equations are derived from water waves models. New traveling solutions of the KdV and BBM equations are obtained by implementing the extended direct algebraic and extended sech-tanh methods. The stability of the obtained traveling solutions is analyzed and discussed.

  16. Field-testing of a Passive Surface Water Flux Meter for the Direct Measurement of Water and Solute Mass Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, E. C.; Jawitz, J. W.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Hatfield, K.

    2007-05-01

    The measurement of water and solute mass discharges in surface water flow systems is a fundamental hydrologic task for ecological and economic decision making. However, due to the extensive monetary, labor, and time costs of traditional monitoring devices and methods, many water quality monitoring programs lack the resources necessary to provide comprehensive descriptions of surface water impairments. The Passive Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM) is a recently developed passive sampling device that measures water and solute fluxes within flowing surface water bodies. Devoid of mechanical components and power supply requirements, the relatively low-maintenance, low-cost design of the PSFM gives it considerable potential as a tool for extensive, large-scale surface water quality characterization and monitoring. The novelty of the PSFM extends to its direct mass-based approach to solute flux measurement, as compared to conventional, indirect concentration-based approaches. During this field-testing campaign, the PSFM was deployed in flowing surface water bodies of north- central Florida. The device contained a dual-packed porous media cartridge that performed simultaneous ion exchange to determine phosphate mass flux and equilibrium tracer desorption to determine water flux within the stream. The PSFM demonstrated accurate measurement of steady-state water and phosphate mass fluxes to within 15% over a range of stream velocities, solute concentrations, and deployment durations. The PSFM design described here was found to perform well in steady-flow conditions. The device was also shown to be effective under transient conditions of limited variability, but full transient testing remains for future work.

  17. An analytical solution of Shallow Water system coupled to Exner equation

    CERN Document Server

    Berthon, Christophe; Le, Minh H; Delestre, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an exact smooth solution for the equations modeling the bedload transport of sediment in Shallow Water is presented. This solution is valid for a large family of sedimentation laws which are widely used in erosion modeling such as the Grass model or those of Meyer-Peter & Muller. One of the main interest of this solution is the derivation of numerical benchmarks to valid the approximation methods.

  18. The rejection of anionic dyes and salt from water solutions using a polypropylene microfilter

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Arlindo Caniço; Porter, John Jefferson

    2010-01-01

    Previous work reported by this laboratory showed that inorganic membranes such as stainless steel and ceramic microfilters were capable of rejecting anionic dyes and sodium nitrate from water solutions. It was of interest of see if this were possible with organic membranes such as propylene micrifilters. Experimental data are presented showing that propylene microfilter will reject both salt and Direct Red 2 from aqueous solutions when the conductivity of the solution is below 500 microS. The...

  19. Enhancing user comfort models for Demand Response solutions for domestic water heating systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belov, Alexander; Vasenev, Alexandr; Havinga, Paul J.M.; Meratnia, Nirvana

    2016-01-01

    Demand Side Management (DSM) solutions for domestic Water Heaters (WHs) can assist consumers benefit financially by optimizing their energy usage. However, users’ dissatisfaction caused by negative impact of DSM on their comfort may force them to reject the provided solutions. To facilitate DSM adop

  20. Enhancing user comfort models for Demand Response solutions for domestic water heating systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belov, A.; Vasenev, Alexandr; Havinga, Paul J.M.; Meratnia, Nirvana

    2016-01-01

    Demand Side Management (DSM) solutions for domestic Water Heaters (WHs) can assist consumers benefit financially by optimizing their energy usage. However, users’ dissatisfaction caused by negative impact of DSM on their comfort may force them to reject the provided solutions. To facilitate DSM

  1. Concepts and dimensionality in modeling unsaturated water flow and solute transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.; Rooij, de G.H.; Heinen, M.; Stagnitti, F.

    2004-01-01

    Many environmental studies require accurate simulation of waterand solute fluxes in the unsaturated zone. This paper evaluatesone- and multi-dimensional approaches for soil water flow as wellas different spreading mechanisms to model solute behavior atdifferent scales. For quantification of soil wat

  2. Solute mass exchange between water phase and biofilm for a single pore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, C. Z.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there are no tractable approaches available for modeling non-equilibrium mass exchange of a solute between water phase and biofilm in porous media. The present work contributes to a quantitative description of the mass exchange of a solute over a single pore domain under a wide range of p

  3. An integrated engineering solution in treating tailings pond water (TPW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Z. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation described the progress that has been made in the treatment of tailings pond water (TPW). Several treatment technologies were examined for their potential use. Any valid treatment methods must be technically practicable and economically feasible in treating TPW. An integrated TPW treatment process was proposed in this paper after reviewing recent published literature related to TPW treatment. The process was proposed based on knowledge and experience gained from municipal and other industrial water and wastewater treatment operations. This engineered treatment process consists of bioadsorption, bioflocculation, suspended sludge blanket filtration, clarification, ozonation, and coke assisted hybrid biodegradation. The proposed treatment process was aiming at environmental release and/or further reuse of the treated TPW. This proposed treatment process features the reuse of 2 waste materials in order to enhance the treatment efficiency, to increase financial feasibility, and to maximize environmental benefits of the treatment. tabs., figs.

  4. Influence of organobentonite structure on toluene adsorption from water solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Vidal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to increase water pollution by organic compound derived from hydrocarbons such as toluene, several alternative technologies for remediation of polluted water have been originated. In this work natural bentonites were modified with cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA+ for obtaining organophilic bentonites. The obtained CTMA-bentonites would be suitable for use as adsorbents of toluene present in water. The influence of structural characteristics of CTMA-bentonites on their adsorption capacity was studied. It was shown that adsorption of toluene depended on homogeneous interlayer space associated with arrangements of CTMA+ paraffin-monolayer and bilayer models, accompanied by a high degree ordering of the carbon chain of organic cation in both arrangements. However, packing density would not have an evident influence on the retention capacity of these materials. The solids obtained were characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffractions and infrared spectroscopy. Toluene adsorption was measured by UV-visible spectrophotometer. Adsorption capacity was studied by determining adsorption isotherms and adsorption coefficient calculation. The adsorption isotherms were straight-line indicating a partition phenomenon of toluene between the aqueous and organic phase present in organophilic bentonites.

  5. Recrystallization of freezable bound water in aqueous solutions of medium concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishan, Zhao; Liqing, Pan; Ailing, Ji; Zexian, Cao; Qiang, Wang

    2016-07-01

    For aqueous solutions with freezable bound water, vitrification and recrystallization are mingled, which brings difficulty to application and misleads the interpretation of relevant experiments. Here, we report a quantification scheme for the freezable bound water based on the water-content dependence of glass transition temperature, by which also the concentration range for the solutions that may undergo recrystallization finds a clear definition. Furthermore, we find that depending on the amount of the freezable bound water, different temperature protocols should be devised to achieve a complete recrystallization. Our results may be helpful for understanding the dynamics of supercooled aqueous solutions and for improving their manipulation in various industries. Project supported by the Knowledge Innovation Project of Chinese Academy of Sciences on Water Science Research (Grant No. KJZD-EW-M03) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474325 and 11290161).

  6. Hazard development mechanism and deformation estimation of water solution mining area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Yue-guang; LI Zhi-wei; YANG Xiao-li

    2006-01-01

    Based on the hazard development mechanism, a water solution area is closely related to the supporting effect of pressure-bearing water, the relaxing and collapsing effect of orebody interlayer, the collapsing effect of thawless material in orebody,filling effect caused by cubical expansibility of hydrate crystallization and uplifting effect of hard rock layer over cranny belt. The movement and deformation of ground surface caused by underground water solution mining is believed to be much weaker than that caused by well lane mining, which can be predicted by the stochastic medium theory method. On the basis of analysis on the engineering practice of water solution mining, its corresponding parameters can be obtained from the in-site data of the belt water and sand filling mining in engineering analog approach.

  7. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. Hydrated electron, supplemental data. [Reactions with transients from water, with inorganic solutes, and with solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, A.B.

    1975-06-01

    A compilation of rates of reactions of hydrated electrons with other transients and with organic and inorganic solutes in aqueous solution appeared in NSRDS-NBS 43, and covered the literature up to early 1971. This supplement includes additional rates which have been published through July 1973.

  8. Boron sorption from aqueous solution by hydrotalcite and its preliminary application in geothermal water deboronation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qinghai; Zhang, Yin; Cao, Yaowu; Wang, Yanxin; Yan, Weide

    2013-11-01

    Hydrotalcite and its calcination product were used to treat pure water spiked with various concentrations of boron and geothermal water containing boron as a major undesirable element. The kinetics process of boron sorption by uncalcined hydrotalcite is controlled by the diffusion of boron from bulk solution to sorbent-solution boundary film and its exchange with interlayer chloride of hydrotalcite, whereas the removal rate of boron by calcined hydrotalcite rests with the restoration process of its layered structure. The results of isotherm sorption experiments reveal that calcined hydrotalcite generally has much stronger ability to lower solution boron concentration than uncalcined hydrotalcite. The combination of adsorption of boron on the residue of MgO-Al2O3 solid solution and intercalation of boron into the reconstructed hydrotalcite structure due to "structural memory effect" is the basic mechanism based on which the greater boron removal by calcined hydrotalcite was achieved. As 15 geothermal water samples were used to test the deboronation ability of calcined hydrotalcite at 65 °C, much lower boron removal efficiencies were observed. The competitive sorption of the other anions in geothermal water, such as HCO3-, SO4(2-), and F-, is the reason why calcined hydrotalcite could not remove boron from geothermal water as effectively as from pure boron solution. However, boron removal percents ranging from 89.3 to 99.0% could be obtained if 50 times of sorbent were added to the geothermal water samples. Calcined hydrotalcite is a good candidate for deboronation of geothermal water.

  9. Blast furnace slags as sorbents of phosphate from water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostura, Bruno; Kulveitová, Hana; Lesko, Juraj

    2005-05-01

    The paper is focused on the sorption of phosphorus from aqueous solutions by crystalline and amorphous blast furnace slags. Slag sorption kinetics were measured, adsorption tests were carried out and the effect of acidification on the sorption properties of slags was studied. The kinetic measurements confirmed that the sorption of phosphorus on crystalline as well as amorphous slags can be described by a model involving pseudo-second-order reactions. For all slag types, phosphorus sorption follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The acid neutralizing capacities of crystalline and amorphous slags were determined. In the case of the crystalline slags, buffering intervals were found to exist during which the slag minerals dissolve in the sequence bredigite-gehlenite-diaspor. There is a high correlation (R2=0.9989) between ANC3.8 and the saturation capacities of crystalline and amorphous slags.

  10. Solute-induced dissolution of hydrophobic ionic liquids in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickert, Paul G; Stepinski, Dominique C; Rausch, David J; Bergeron, Ruth M; Jakab, Sandrine; Dietz, Mark L

    2007-04-15

    Significant solubilization of ostensibly water-immiscible ionic liquids (ILs) in acidic aqueous phases is induced by the presence of any of a variety of neutral extractants, the apparent result of the formation of the protonated form of the extractant and its subsequent exchange for the cationic component of the IL. The extent of this solubilization is shown to diminish with increasing hydrophobicity of the IL cation and decreasing extractant basicity. These observations raise concerns as to the viability of ILs as "drop in replacements" for traditional organic solvents in the solvent extraction of metal ions.

  11. Alternative Solution for Consumption Hot Water Recirculation for the Civil Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodor Mateescu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The sanitary comfort and the effective cost of maintenance in the civil buildings (block of flats are badly affected by the absence of the consumption hot water recirculation. From the technical point of view, the classical solution imposes the doubling of the transport and distribution pipes on the entire route, between the source and the consumption points. The materialization of the solution requires important financial investment, discouraging most of the time and the postponement of the problem solving with important consequences. This paper proposes an alternative technical solution which limits to a minimum the intervention, only in the interior hot water distribution system.

  12. Investigation of water and saline solution drops evaporation on a solid substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlova Evgenija G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigation water and saline solution drops evaporation on a solid substrate made of anodized aluminum is presented in the paper. Parameters characterizing drop profile have been obtained (contact angle, contact diameter, height. The specific evaporation rate has been calculated from obtained values. It was found that water and saline solution drops with concentration up to 9.1% evaporate in the pinning mode. However, with increasing the salt concentration in the solution up to 16.7% spreading mode was observed. Two stages of drop evaporation depending on change of the evaporation rate have been separated.

  13. Structure of Fullerene Aggregates in Pyridine/Water Solutions by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Aksenov, V L; Belushkin, A V; Mihailovic, D; Mrzel, A; Rosta, L; Serdyuk, I N; Timchenko, A A

    2001-01-01

    Results of small-angle neutron scattering experiments on fullerenes (Co_{60}) in pyridine/water solutions are reported. They confirm conclusions of the previous studies, in particular, dynamic light scattering experiments. Aggregates with characteristic radius of about 20 nm are formed in the solutions. The contrast variation using different combinations of protonated/deuterated components (water and pyridine) of the solutions points to the small pyridine content inside the aggregates. This fact testifies that the aggregates consist of a massive fullerene core covered by a thin pyridine shell.

  14. NMR relaxation and water self-diffusion studies in whey protein solutions and gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colsenet, Roxane; Mariette, François; Cambert, Mireille

    2005-08-24

    The changes in water proton transverse relaxation behavior induced by aggregation of whey proteins are explained in terms of the simple molecular processes of diffusion and chemical exchange. The water self-diffusion coefficient was measured in whey protein solutions and gels by the pulsed field gradient NMR method. As expected, water self-diffusion was reduced with increased protein concentrations. Whatever the concentration, the water molecules were free to diffuse over distances varying from 15 to 47 mum. Water diffusion was constant over these distances, demonstrating that no restrictions were found to explain the water hindrance. The modification in protein structure by gelation induced a decrease in water diffusion. The effects of protein concentration on water diffusion are discussed and modeled. Two approaches were compared, the obstruction effect induced by a spherical particle and the cell model, which considered two water compartments with specific self-diffusion coefficients.

  15. A thermodynamic approach to assess organic solute adsorption onto activated carbon in water

    KAUST Repository

    De Ridder, David J.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, the hydrophobicity of 13 activated carbons is determined by various methods; water vapour adsorption, immersion calorimetry, and contact angle measurements. The quantity and type of oxygen-containing groups on the activated carbon were measured and related to the methods used to measure hydrophobicity. It was found that the water-activated carbon adsorption strength (based on immersion calorimetry, contact angles) depended on both type and quantity of oxygen-containing groups, while water vapour adsorption depended only on their quantity. Activated carbon hydrophobicity measurements alone could not be related to 1-hexanol and 1,3-dichloropropene adsorption. However, a relationship was found between work of adhesion and adsorption of these solutes. The work of adhesion depends not only on activated carbon-water interaction (carbon hydrophobicity), but also on solute-water (solute hydrophobicity) and activated carbon-solute interactions. Our research shows that the work of adhesion can explain solute adsorption and includes the effect of hydrogen bond formation between solute and activated carbon. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of Soil Water Flux on Vadose Zone Solute Transport Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The transport processes of solutes in two soil columns filled with undisturbed soil material collected from an unsaturated sandy aquifer formation in Belgium subjected to a variable upper boundary condition were identified from breakthrough curves measured by means of time domain refiectometry (TDR). Solute breakthrough was measured with 3 TDR probes inserted into each soil column at three different depths at a 10 minutes time interval. In addition, soil water content and pressure head were measured at 3 different depths. Analytical solute transport models were used to estimate the solute dispersion coefficient and average pore-water velocity from the observed breakthrough curves. The results showed that the analytical solutions were suitable in fitting the observed solute transport. The dispersion coefficient was found to be a function of the soil depth and average pore-water velocity, imposed by the soil water flux. The mobile moisture content on the other hand was not correlated with the average pore-water velocity and the dispersion coefficient.

  17. Similarity solution of the shock wave propagation in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller M.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the possibility of calculation of propagation of a shock wave generated during the bubble collapse in water including the dissipation effect. The used semi-empirical model is based on an assumption of similarity between the shock pressure time profiles in different shock wave positions. This assumption leads to a system of two ordinary differential equations for pressure jump and energy at the shock front. The NIST data are used for the compilation of the equation of state, which is applied to the calculation of the shock wave energy dissipation. The initial conditions for the system of equations are obtained from the modified method of characteristics in the combination with the differential equations of cavitation bubble dynamics, which considers viscous compressible liquid with the influence of surface tension. The initial energy of the shock wave is estimated from the energy between the energies of the bubble growth to the first and second maximum bubble radii.

  18. Travelling wave solutions for some two-component shallow water models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutykh, Denys; Ionescu-Kruse, Delia

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we perform a unified analysis of travelling wave solutions to three different two-component systems which appear in shallow water theory. Namely, we analyze the celebrated Green-Naghdi equations, the integrable two-component Camassa-Holm equations and a new two-component system of Green-Naghdi type. In particular, we are interested in solitary and cnoidal-type solutions, as two most important classes of travelling waves that we encounter in applications. We provide a complete phase-plane analysis of all possible travelling wave solutions which may arise in these models. In particular, we show the existence of new type of solutions.

  19. [Chemical form changes of exogenous water solution fluoride and bioavailability in tea garden soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hui-Mei; Peng, Chuan-Yi; Chen, Jing; Hou, Ru-Yan; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2013-11-01

    Pot experiments and the sequential extraction method were conducted to study the chemical form changes of exogenous water solution fluoride in tea garden soil and their contribution to fluoride accumulation of tea plant. The results showed that the background concentration of all chemical forms of fluoride had little changes with time treatment, which was in a relatively stable state. The exogenous water solution fluoride adding to the soils was rapidly transformed to other fractions. Under the 10 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment, the concentration of water solution fluoride increased firstly and then decreased with time treatment, the concentration of organic matter fluoride and Fe/Mn oxides fluoride decreased, the concentration of exchangeable fluoride was not different before and after the treatment (P > 0.05), and the concentration of residual fluoride was in a relatively stable state; under the 200 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment, the concentration of water solution fluoride, Fe/Mn oxides fluoride and organic matter fluoride decreased with time treatment, the concentration of exchangeable fluoride increased firstly and then decreased, showed no difference before and after the treatment (P > 0.05), and the concentration of residual fluoride increased, with some differences compared with 10 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment. The concentration of total fluoride in root, stem and leaf had significant differences under 0-10 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment (P 0.05). Step regression analysis suggested the contribution of all chemical forms of fluoride to the concentration of water solution fluoride and total fluoride of root, stem and leaf had some differences, there was a remarkable regression relationship among the content of total fluoride in leaf and water solution fluoride, organic matter fluoride, Fe/Mn oxides fluoride and residual fluoride in soil, however, no significant difference for water solution fluoride of leaf was found.

  20. Recrystallization of freezable bound water in aqueous solutions of medium concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵立山; 潘礼庆; 纪爱玲; 曹则贤; 王强

    2016-01-01

    For aqueous solutions with freezable bound water, vitrification and recrystallization are mingled, which brings diffi-culty to application and misleads the interpretation of relevant experiments. Here, we report a quantification scheme for the freezable bound water based on the water-content dependence of glass transition temperature, by which also the concentra-tion range for the solutions that may undergo recrystallization finds a clear definition. Furthermore, we find that depending on the amount of the freezable bound water, different temperature protocols should be devised to achieve a complete recrys-tallization. Our results may be helpful for understanding the dynamics of supercooled aqueous solutions and for improving their manipulation in various industries.

  1. Microstructure variations with concentration of propylene glycol-water solution probed by NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Hu, Kai; Shen, Junfeng; Wu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Gongzhen

    2009-03-01

    The solution microstructure variations with concentration of propylene glycol (PG)-water mixture were investigated using NMR technique. PG has an apparent critical point at around χPG = 0.3, this biphasic behavior of alkyl protons in PG-water mixture is different from the monotonous increase or decrease of other alcohol-water mixtures. At water-rich region, water molecules are in the vicinity of PG, forming weak C-H⋯O H-bonds with PG alkyl protons and strong O-H⋯O H-bonds with PG hydroxyls. PG gradually aggregates in the order of CH 3, CH and CH 2 with PG concentration increasing. At PG-rich region, the solution forms regions enriched in either hydrocarbons or hydroxyl groups, which results in the formation of microheterogeneous solution, where water is expelled from alkyl tail and accumulated in the region of PG hydroxyls head. In addition, the T1 and NOE results of PG aqueous solutions also support the weak hydrogen bond and microheterogeneous structural variations with concentration at molecular level. These results offer not only new insights into the mechanism of the outstanding capability of PG as cryoprotectant, but also provide possible reason of the anomalous thermodynamic behavior in the PG-water mixture.

  2. Environmental and Water Resources Management: Problems and Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Wenger; Zhifeng Yang

    2011-01-01

    Environmental problems and issues have no geographical bounds.Many are global in scale;others may be bounded in some manner to a particular region,yet share features with similar problems in other locales throughout the world.It is important,then,for environmental researchers,policymakers,and practitioners to reach across national and cultural boundaries to discuss these issues and learn from each other.For more than 25 years an ongoing international seminar-study tour program initiated by the Environmental and Water Resources Institute (EWRI),a specialty institute within the American Society of Civil Engineers,has provided such a learning opportunity for engineers and scientists from throughout the world.Under the auspices of EWRI,seminar-study tours are scheduled approximately biennially at various locations around the world.Recent locations for seminar-study tour events have been Mexico (2006),Viet Nam (2008),Peru (2010),and China (2011).The Beijing seminar-study tour was held from October 26th to 31st and was hosted and co-sponsored by the School of Environment at Beijing Normal University.In addition to publicity support provided by EWRI,the Beijing seminarstudy tour received financial support from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay,Green Bay,Wisconsin,USA,with the latter also serving as cosponsor.

  3. NMR Water Self-Diffusion and Relaxation Studies on Sodium Polyacrylate Solutions and Gels in Physiologic Ionic Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Basser, Peter J; Briber, Robert M; Horkay, Ferenc

    2014-03-15

    Water self-diffusion coefficients and longitudinal relaxation rates in sodium polyacrylate solutions and gels were measured by NMR, as a function of polymer content and structure in a physiological concentration range of monovalent and divalent cations, Ca(2+) and Na(+). Several physical models describing the self-diffusion of the solvent were applied and compared. A free-volume model was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results over a wide range of polymer concentrations. The longitudinal relaxation rate exhibited linear dependence on polymer concentration below a critical concentration and showed non-linear behavior at higher concentrations. Both the water self-diffusion and relaxation were less influenced by the polymer in the gel state than in the uncrosslinked polymer solutions. The effect of Na(+) on the mobility of water molecules was practically undetectable. By contrast, addition of Ca(2+) strongly increased the longitudinal relaxation rate while its effect on the self-diffusion coefficient was much less pronounced.

  4. Modeling Global Water Use for the 21st Century: Water Futures and Solutions (WFaS) Initiative and Its Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y.; Florke, M.; Hanasaki, N.; Eisner, S.; Fischer, G.; Tramberend, S.; Satoh, Y.; van Vliet, M. T. H.; Yillia, P.; Ringler, C.; Burek, P.; Wiberg, D.

    2016-01-01

    To sustain growing food demand and increasing standard of living, global water use increased by nearly 6 times during the last 100 years, and continues to grow. As water demands get closer and closer to the water availability in many regions, each drop of water becomes increasingly valuable and water must be managed more efficiently and intensively. However, soaring water use worsens water scarcity conditions already prevalent in semi-arid and arid regions, increasing uncertainty for sustainable food production and economic development. Planning for future development and investments requires that we prepare water projections for the future. However, estimations are complicated because the future of the world's waters will be influenced by a combination of environmental, social, economic, and political factors, and there is only limited knowledge and data available about freshwater resources and how they are being used. The Water Futures and Solutions (WFaS) initiative coordinates its work with other ongoing scenario efforts for the sake of establishing a consistent set of new global water scenarios based on the shared socio-economic pathways (SSPs) and the representative concentration pathways (RCPs). The WFaS "fast track" assessment uses three global water models, namely H08, PCR-GLOBWB, and WaterGAP. This study assesses the state of the art for estimating and projecting water use regionally and globally in a consistent manner. It provides an overview of different approaches, the uncertainty, strengths and weaknesses of the various estimation methods, types of management and policy decisions for which the current estimation methods are useful. We also discuss additional information most needed to be able to improve water use estimates and be able to assess a greater range of management options across the water-energy-climate nexus.

  5. Modeling global water use for the 21st century: Water Futures and Solutions (WFaS) initiative and its approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y.; Flörke, M.; Hanasaki, N.; Eisner, S.; Fischer, G.; Tramberend, S.; Satoh, Y.; van Vliet, M. T. H.; Yillia, P.; Ringler, C.; Wiberg, D.

    2015-08-01

    To sustain growing food demand and increasing standard of living, global water use increased by nearly 6 times during the last 100 years and continues to grow. As water demands get closer and closer to the water availability in many regions, each drop of water becomes increasingly valuable and water must be managed more efficiently and intensively. However, soaring water use worsens water scarcity condition already prevalent in semi-arid and arid regions, increasing uncertainty for sustainable food production and economic development. Planning for future development and investments requires that we prepare water projections for the future. However, estimations are complicated because the future of world's waters will be influenced by a combination of environmental, social, economic, and political factors, and there is only limited knowledge and data available about freshwater resources and how they are being used. The Water Futures and Solutions initiative (WFaS) coordinates its work with other on-going scenario efforts for the sake of establishing a consistent set of new global water scenarios based on the Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs) and the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). The WFaS "fast-track" assessment uses three global water models, namely H08, PCR-GLOBWB, and WaterGAP. This study assesses the state of the art for estimating and projecting water use regionally and globally in a consistent manner. It provides an overview of different approaches, the uncertainty, strengths and weaknesses of the various estimation methods, types of management and policy decisions for which the current estimation methods are useful. We also discuss additional information most needed to be able to improve water use estimates and be able to assess a greater range of management options across the water-energy-climate nexus.

  6. Modeling global water use for the 21st century: Water Futures and Solutions (WFaS initiative and its approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wada

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available To sustain growing food demand and increasing standard of living, global water use increased by nearly 6 times during the last 100 years and continues to grow. As water demands get closer and closer to the water availability in many regions, each drop of water becomes increasingly valuable and water must be managed more efficiently and intensively. However, soaring water use worsens water scarcity condition already prevalent in semi-arid and arid regions, increasing uncertainty for sustainable food production and economic development. Planning for future development and investments requires that we prepare water projections for the future. However, estimations are complicated because the future of world's waters will be influenced by a combination of environmental, social, economic, and political factors, and there is only limited knowledge and data available about freshwater resources and how they are being used. The Water Futures and Solutions initiative (WFaS coordinates its work with other on-going scenario efforts for the sake of establishing a consistent set of new global water scenarios based on the Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs and the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs. The WFaS "fast-track" assessment uses three global water models, namely H08, PCR-GLOBWB, and WaterGAP. This study assesses the state of the art for estimating and projecting water use regionally and globally in a consistent manner. It provides an overview of different approaches, the uncertainty, strengths and weaknesses of the various estimation methods, types of management and policy decisions for which the current estimation methods are useful. We also discuss additional information most needed to be able to improve water use estimates and be able to assess a greater range of management options across the water-energy-climate nexus.

  7. Modeling phase distribution of water-soluble organics in aqueous solutions using surface tension data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, B.; Hiatt, J.; Aumann, E.; Cabrera, J.; Tabazadeh, A.

    2006-12-01

    A good fraction (greater than 30 percent) of submicron particle mass in the atmosphere is often composed of water-soluble organic carbon. Identifiable, water-miscible organics, such as, known sugars, small alcohols, small diacids, etc. comprise only a small fraction of the water-soluble mass (about 1-2 percent). Most of the water-soluble mass is often composed of unidentifiable, humic-like materials, which are commonly refereed to as HULIS. Humic substances are known to form colloids in aqueous solutions at very low aqueous concentrations. Thus, it is likely for HULIS to also be colloid-forming in aqueous solutions. Here, we present surface tension measurements of water-miscible and colloid-forming organics, using methanol and sodium laurate as analogs, respectively. By relating the change in surface tension to chemical potential of the solution, we determine a relationship between surface tension and the surface excess of solute; that is, the number of molecules of solute adsorbed at the surface. Assuming surface acts as a monolayer, we model the adsorption with a Langmuir isotherm to extract the surface excess as a function of solute mole fraction. This relationship allows us to calculate the solute's distribution between bulk and surface phases for methanol, and in bulk, surface and colloid phases for sodium laurate. A colloid of sodium laurate contains approximately 100 laurate anions in a spherical cluster. We present adsorption constants for methanol and sodium laurate (derived from our surface tension data), critical micelle concentration for sodium laurate (derived from our surface tension data), and all the other thermocehmical constants (obtained from the literature) required to constrain a model for determining phase partitioning of organics in aqueous solutions.

  8. Water and solute balances as a basis for sustainable irrigation agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso

    2015-04-01

    The growing development of irrigated agriculture is necessary for the sustainable production of the food required by the increasing World's population. Such development is limited by the increasing scarcity and low quality of the available water resources and by the competitive use of the water for other purposes. There are also increasing problems of contamination of surface and ground waters to be used for other purposes by the drainage effluents of irrigated lands. Irrigation and drainage may cause drastic changes in the regime and balance of water and solutes (salts, sodium, contaminants) in the soil profile, resulting in problems of water supply to crops and problems of salinization, sodification and contamination of soils and ground waters. This is affected by climate, crops, soils, ground water depth, irrigation and groundwater composition, and by irrigation and drainage management. In order to predict and prevent such problems for a sustainable irrigated agriculture and increased efficiency in water use, under each particular set of conditions, there have to be considered both the hydrological, physical and chemical processes determining such water and solute balances in the soil profile. In this contribution there are proposed the new versions of two modeling approaches (SOMORE and SALSODIMAR) to predict those balances and to guide irrigation water use and management, integrating the different factors involved in such processes. Examples of their application under Mediterranean and tropical climate conditions are also presented.

  9. Simulating water, solute, and heat transport in the subsurface with the VS2DI software package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    The software package VS2DI was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for simulating water, solute, and heat transport in variably saturated porous media. The package consists of a graphical preprocessor to facilitate construction of a simulation, a postprocessor for visualizing simulation results, and two numerical models that solve for flow and solute transport (VS2DT) and flow and heat transport (VS2DH). The finite-difference method is used to solve the Richards equation for flow and the advection-dispersion equation for solute or heat transport. This study presents a brief description of the VS2DI package, an overview of the various types of problems that have been addressed with the package, and an analysis of the advantages and limitations of the package. A review of other models and modeling approaches for studying water, solute, and heat transport also is provided. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  10. Tracking solutes and water from subsurface drip irrigation application of coalbed methane–produced waters, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engle, Mark A. [U.S. Geological Survey. Reston, VA (United States); Bern, Carleton R. [U.S. Geological Survey. Denver, CO (United States); Healy, Richard W. [U.S. Geological Survey. Denver, CO (United States); Sams, James I. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Zupancic, John W. [BeneTerra LLC. Sheridan, WY (United States); Schroeder, Karl T. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2011-09-01

    One method to beneficially use water produced from coalbed methane (CBM) extraction is subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) of croplands. In SDI systems, treated CBM water (injectate) is supplied to the soil at depth, with the purpose of preventing the buildup of detrimental salts near the surface. The technology is expanding within the Powder River Basin, but little research has been published on its environmental impacts. This article reports on initial results from tracking water and solutes from the injected CBM-produced waters at an SDI system in Johnson County, Wyoming. In the first year of SDI operation, soil moisture significantly increased in the SDI areas, but well water levels increased only modestly, suggesting that most of the water added was stored in the vadose zone or lost to evapotranspiration. The injectate has lower concentrations of most inorganic constituents relative to ambient groundwater at the site but exhibits a high sodium adsorption ratio. Changes in groundwater chemistry during the same period of SDI operation were small; the increase in groundwater-specific conductance relative to pre-SDI conditions was observed in a single well. Conversely, groundwater samples collected beneath another SDI field showed decreased concentrations of several constituents since the SDI operation. Groundwater-specific conductance at the 12 other wells showed no significant changes. Major controls on and compositional variability of groundwater, surface water, and soil water chemistry are discussed in detail. Findings from this research provide an understanding of water and salt dynamics associated with SDI systems using CBM-produced water.

  11. The Modification of Sodium Polyacrylate Water Solution Cooling Properties by AL2O3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Gęstwa

    2010-01-01

    Based on cooling curves, it can be concluded that for the water solution of sodium polyacrylate with AL2O3 nanoparticles in comparison to water and 10% polymer water solution lower cooling speed is obtained. The cooling medium containing nanoparticles provides lower cooling speed in the smallest surface austenite occurance (500–600 C in the charts of the CTP for most nonalloy structural steels and low-alloy steels. However lower cooling temperature at the beginning of martensitic transformation causes the formation of smaller internal stresses, leading to smaller dimensional changes and hardening deformation. For the quenching media the wetting angle was appointed by the drop-shape method. These studies showed the best wettability of polymer water solution (sodium polyacrylate with the addition of AL2O3 nanoparticles, whose wetting angle was about 65 degrees. Obtaining the smallest wetting angle for the medium containing nanoparticles suggests that the heat transfer to the cooling medium is larger. This allows slower cooling at the same time ensuring its homogeneity. The obtained values of wetting angle confirm the conclusions drawn on the basis of cooling curves and allowus to conclude that in the case of the heat transfer rate it will have a lower value than for water and 10% polymer water solution. In the research on hardened carburized steel samples C10 and 16MnCr5 surface hardness, impact strength and changes in the size of cracks in Navy C-ring sample are examined. On this basis of the obtained results it can be concluded that polymer water solution with nanoparticles allows to obtain a better impact strength at comparable hardness on the surface. Research on the dimensional changes on the basis of the sample of Navy C-ring also shows small dimensional changes for samples carburized and hardened in 10% polymer water solution with the addition of nanoparticles AL2O3. Smaller dimensional changes were obtained for samples of steel 16MnCr5 thanfar C10. The

  12. Experimental testing and modeling analysis of solute mixing at water distribution pipe junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yu; Jeffrey Yang, Y; Jiang, Lijie; Yu, Tingchao; Shen, Cheng

    2014-06-01

    Flow dynamics at a pipe junction controls particle trajectories, solute mixing and concentrations in downstream pipes. The effect can lead to different outcomes of water quality modeling and, hence, drinking water management in a distribution network. Here we have investigated solute mixing behavior in pipe junctions of five hydraulic types, for which flow distribution factors and analytical equations for network modeling are proposed. First, based on experiments, the degree of mixing at a cross is found to be a function of flow momentum ratio that defines a junction flow distribution pattern and the degree of departure from complete mixing. Corresponding analytical solutions are also validated using computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) simulations. Second, the analytical mixing model is further extended to double-Tee junctions. Correspondingly the flow distribution factor is modified to account for hydraulic departure from a cross configuration. For a double-Tee(A) junction, CFD simulations show that the solute mixing depends on flow momentum ratio and connection pipe length, whereas the mixing at double-Tee(B) is well represented by two independent single-Tee junctions with a potential water stagnation zone in between. Notably, double-Tee junctions differ significantly from a cross in solute mixing and transport. However, it is noted that these pipe connections are widely, but incorrectly, simplified as cross junctions of assumed complete solute mixing in network skeletonization and water quality modeling. For the studied pipe junction types, analytical solutions are proposed to characterize the incomplete mixing and hence may allow better water quality simulation in a distribution network. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Sorption of substituted indoles on highly cross-linked polystyrene from water-acetonitrile solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafigulin, R. V.; Myakishev, A. A.; Il'Ina, E. A.; Il'in, M. M.; Davankov, V. A.; Bulanova, A. V.

    2011-07-01

    The sorption of first synthesized indole derivatives by highly cross-linked polystyrenes from water-acetonitrile solutions was studied by high-performance liquid chromatography. The retention factors and differences in the Gibbs energy of adsorption from infinite diluted solutions were calculated, and the applicability of the Snyder-Soczewinski and Scott-Kucera models for describing the chromatographic retention of sorbates on a polymer network of highly cross-linked polystyrene was shown.

  14. Enthalpies of Solution of Complexes of Rare Earth Nitrate with L-α-Histidine in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洋; 房艳; 高胜利; 陈三平; 史启祯

    2002-01-01

    The enthalpies of solution in water of complexes of RE(NO3)3 (RE=La~Nd, Sm~Lu, Y) with L-α-Histidine (His) were measured at 298.15 K. The standard enthalpies of formation of RE(His)3+(aq) were calculated. The "tetrad effect" regularity was observed from the curve, which is the enthalpies of solution plotted against the atomic numbers of the elements in lanthanide series.

  15. Separation of water-ethanol solutions with carbon nanotubes and electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarto; Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2016-12-07

    Bioethanol has been used as an alternative energy source for transportation vehicles to reduce the use of fossil fuels. The separation of water-ethanol solutions from fermentation processes is still an important issue in the production of anhydrous ethanol. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of axial electric fields on the separation of water-ethanol solutions with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In the absence of an electric field, CNT-ethanol van der Waals interactions allow ethanol to fill the CNTs in preference to water, i.e., a separation effect for ethanol. However, as the CNT diameter increases, this ethanol separation effect significantly decreases owing to a decrease in the strength of the van der Waals interactions. In contrast, under an electric field, the energy of the electrostatic interactions within the water molecule structure induces water molecules to fill the CNTs in preference to ethanol, i.e., a separation effect for water. More importantly, the electrostatic interactions are dependent on the water molecule structure in the CNT instead of the CNT diameter. As a result, the separation effect observed under an electric field does not diminish over a wide CNT diameter range. Moreover, CNTs and electric fields can be used to separate methanol-ethanol solutions too. Under an electric field, methanol preferentially fills CNTs over ethanol in a wide CNT diameter range.

  16. Non-linear effects on solute transfer between flowing water and a sediment bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Makoto; Stefan, Heinz G

    2011-11-15

    A previously developed model of periodic pore water flow in space and time, and associated solute transport in a stream bed of fine sand is extended to coarse sand and fine gravel. The pore water flow immediately below the sediment/water interface becomes intermittently a non-Darcy flow. The periodic pressure and velocity fluctuations considered are induced by near-bed coherent turbulent motions in the stream flow; they penetrate from the sediment/water interface into the sediment pore system and are described by a wave number (χ) and a period (T) that are given as functions of the shear velocity (U(∗)) between the flowing water and the sediment bed. The stream bed has a flat surface without bed forms. The flow field in the sediment pore system is described by the continuity equation and a resistance law that includes both viscous (Darcy) and non-linear (inertial) effects. Simulation results show that non-linear (inertial) effects near the sediment/water interface increase flow resistance and reduce mean flow velocities. Compared to pure Darcy flow, non-linear (inertial) effects reduce solute exchange rates between overlying water and the sediment bed but only by a moderate amount (less than 50%). Turbulent coherent flow structures in the stream flow enhance solute transfer in the pore system of a stream bed compared to pure molecular diffusion, but by much less than standing surface waves or bed forms.

  17. Approximate analytical solution to the Boussinesq equation with a sloping water-land boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuehao; Jiang, Qinghui; Zhou, Chuangbing

    2016-04-01

    An approximate solution is presented to the 1-D Boussinesq equation (BEQ) characterizing transient groundwater flow in an unconfined aquifer subject to a constant water variation at the sloping water-land boundary. The flow equation is decomposed to a linearized BEQ and a head correction equation. The linearized BEQ is solved using a Laplace transform. By means of the frozen-coefficient technique and Gauss function method, the approximate solution for the head correction equation can be obtained, which is further simplified to a closed-form expression under the condition of local energy equilibrium. The solutions of the linearized and head correction equations are discussed from physical concepts. Especially for the head correction equation, the well posedness of the approximate solution obtained by the frozen-coefficient method is verified to demonstrate its boundedness, which can be further embodied as the upper and lower error bounds to the exact solution of the head correction by statistical analysis. The advantage of this approximate solution is in its simplicity while preserving the inherent nonlinearity of the physical phenomenon. Comparisons between the analytical and numerical solutions of the BEQ validate that the approximation method can achieve desirable precisions, even in the cases with strong nonlinearity. The proposed approximate solution is applied to various hydrological problems, in which the algebraic expressions that quantify the water flow processes are derived from its basic solutions. The results are useful for the quantification of stream-aquifer exchange flow rates, aquifer response due to the sudden reservoir release, bank storage and depletion, and front position and propagation speed.

  18. Slowdown of water diffusion around protein in aqueous solution with ectoine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, I.; Nagaoka, M.

    2004-04-01

    Ectoine is one of the most common compatible solutes found in halophilic bacteria, and has an effect to introduce a tolerance to high salt concentration or high temperature. By analyzing 1 ns molecular dynamics simulations at 370 K, we have shown that, in the ectoine aqueous solution, the water diffusion slows down around a protein (chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2)), keeping the protein hydration structure essentially unchanged. It is concluded that the slowdown of water diffusion around the backbone amide protons must be one of the decisive factors in reducing the exchange rate of the backbone amide protons, whose reduction is experimentally believed closely related to the tolerance effect.

  19. The Water to Solute Permeability Ratio Governs the Osmotic Volume Dynamics in Beetroot Vacuoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Victoria; Sutka, Moira; Amodeo, Gabriela; Chara, Osvaldo; Ozu, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell vacuoles occupy up to 90% of the cell volume and, beyond their physiological function, are constantly subjected to water and solute exchange. The osmotic flow and vacuole volume dynamics relies on the vacuole membrane -the tonoplast- and its capacity to regulate its permeability to both water and solutes. The osmotic permeability coefficient (Pf) is the parameter that better characterizes the water transport when submitted to an osmotic gradient. Usually, Pf determinations are made in vitro from the initial rate of volume change, when a fast (almost instantaneous) osmolality change occurs. When aquaporins are present, it is accepted that initial volume changes are only due to water movements. However, in living cells osmotic changes are not necessarily abrupt but gradually imposed. Under these conditions, water flux might not be the only relevant driving force shaping the vacuole volume response. In this study, we quantitatively investigated volume dynamics of isolated Beta vulgaris root vacuoles under progressively applied osmotic gradients at different pH, a condition that modifies the tonoplast Pf. We followed the vacuole volume changes while simultaneously determining the external osmolality time-courses and analyzing these data with mathematical modeling. Our findings indicate that vacuole volume changes, under progressively applied osmotic gradients, would not depend on the membrane elastic properties, nor on the non-osmotic volume of the vacuole, but on water and solute fluxes across the tonoplast. We found that the volume of the vacuole at the steady state is determined by the ratio of water to solute permeabilites (Pf/Ps), which in turn is ruled by pH. The dependence of the permeability ratio on pH can be interpreted in terms of the degree of aquaporin inhibition and the consequently solute transport modulation. This is relevant in many plant organs such as root, leaves, cotyledons, or stems that perform extensive rhythmic growth movements

  20. The water to solute permeability ratio governs the osmotic volume dynamics in beetroot vacuoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Vitali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell vacuoles occupy up to 90% of the cell volume and, beyond their physiological function, are constantly subjected to water and solute exchange. The osmotic flow and vacuole volume dynamics relies on the vacuole membrane -the tonoplast- and its capacity to regulate its permeability to both water and solutes. The osmotic permeability coefficient (Pf is the parameter that better characterizes the water transport when submitted to an osmotic gradient. Usually, Pf determinations are made in vitro from the initial rate of volume change, when a fast (almost instantaneous osmolality change occurs. When aquaporins are present, it is accepted that initial volume changes are only due to water movements. However, in living cells osmotic changes are not necessarily abrupt but gradually imposed. Under these conditions, water flux might not be the only relevant driving force shaping the vacuole volume response. In this study, we quantitatively investigated volume dynamics of isolated Beta vulgaris root vacuoles under progressively applied osmotic gradients at different pH, a condition that modifies the tonoplast Pf. We followed the vacuole volume changes while simultaneously determining the external osmolality time-courses and analyzing these data with mathematical modelling. Our findings indicate that vacuole volume changes, under progressively applied osmotic gradients, would not depend on the membrane elastic properties, nor on the non-osmotic volume of the vacuole, but on water and solute fluxes across the tonoplast. We found that the volume of the vacuole at the steady state is determined by the ratio of water to solute permeabilites (Pf/Ps, which in turn is ruled by pH. The dependence of the permeability ratio on pH can be interpreted in terms of the degree of aquaporin inhibition and the consequently solute transport modulation. This is relevant in many plant organs such as root, leaves, cotyledons or stems that perform extensive rhythmic

  1. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of water activities for a selection of aqueous organic solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ganbavale

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents experimental data of the temperature dependence of water activity in aqueous organic solutions relevant for tropospheric conditions (200–273 K. Water activity (aw at low temperatures (T is a crucial parameter for predicting homogeneous ice nucleation. We investigated temperature dependent water activities, ice freezing and melting temperatures of solutions, and vapour pressures of a selection of atmospherically relevant aqueous organic systems. To measure aw over a wide composition range and with a focus on low temperatures, we use various aw measurement techniques and instruments: a dew point water activity meter, an electrodynamic balance (EDB, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and a setup to measure the total gas phase pressure at equilibrium over aqueous solutions. Water activity measurements were performed for aqueous multicomponent and multifunctional organic mixtures containing the functional groups typically found in atmospheric organic aerosols, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, ketone, ether, ester, and aromatic groups. The aqueous organic systems studied at several fixed compositions over a considerable temperature range differ significantly in their temperature dependence. Aqueous organic systems of 1,4-butanediol and methoxyacetic acid show a moderate decrease in aw with decreasing temperature. The aqueous M5 system (a multicomponent system containing five different dicarboxylic acids and aqueous 2-(2-ethoxyethoxyethanol solutions both show a strong increase of water activity with decreasing temperature at high solute concentrations for TTaw can be reversed at low temperatures and that linear extrapolations of high temperature data may lead to erroneous predictions. To avoid this, experimentally determined aw at low temperature are needed to improve thermodynamic models towards lower temperatures and for improved predictions of the ice nucleation ability of organic–water systems.

  2. On the integrability and quasi-periodic wave solutions of the Boussinesq equation in shallow water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pan-Li; Tian, Shou-Fu; Tu, Jian-Min; Xu, Mei-Juan

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the complete integrability of the Boussinesq equation in shallow water is systematically investigated. By using generalized Bell's polynomials, its bilinear formalism, bilinear Bäcklund transformations, Lax pairs of the Boussinesq equation are constructed, respectively. By virtue of its Lax equations, we find its infinite conservation laws. All conserved densities and fluxes are obtained by lucid recursion formulas. Furthermore, based on multidimensional Riemann theta functions, we construct periodic wave solutions of the Boussinesq equation. Finally, the relations between the periodic wave solutions and soliton solutions are strictly constructed. The asymptotic behaviors of the periodic waves are also analyzed by a limiting procedure.

  3. Multi-Order Exact Solutions for a generalized shallow water wave equation and other nonlinear PDEs

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Bijan; Ganguly, Asish

    2011-01-01

    We seek multi-order exact solutions of a generalized shallow water wave equation along with those corresponding to a class of nonlinear systems described by the KdV, modified KdV, Boussinesq, Klein-Gordon and modified Benjamin-Bona-Mahony equation. We employ a modified version of a generalized Lame equation and subject it to a perturbative treatment identifying the solutions order by order in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. Our solutions are new and hold the key feature that they are expressible in terms of an auxiliary function f in a generic way. For appropriate choices of f we recover the previous results reported in the literature.

  4. Water age and stream solute dynamics at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (US)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botter, Gianluca; Benettin, Paolo; McGuire, Kevin; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The contribution discusses experimental and modeling results from a headwater catchment at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (New Hampshire, USA) to explore the link between stream solute dynamics and water age. A theoretical framework based on water age dynamics, which represents a general basis for characterizing solute transport at the catchment scale, is used to model both conservative and weathering-derived solutes. Based on the available information about the hydrology of the site, an integrated transport model was developed and used to estimate the relevant hydrochemical fluxes. The model was designed to reproduce the deuterium content of streamflow and allowed for the estimate of catchment water storage and dynamic travel time distributions (TTDs). Within this framework, dissolved silicon and sodium concentration in streamflow were simulated by implementing first-order chemical kinetics based explicitly on dynamic TTD, thus upscaling local geochemical processes to catchment scale. Our results highlight the key role of water stored within the subsoil glacial material in both the short-term and long-term solute circulation at Hubbard Brook. The analysis of the results provided by the calibrated model allowed a robust estimate of the emerging concentration-discharge relationship, streamflow age distributions (including the fraction of event water) and storage size, and their evolution in time due to hydrologic variability.

  5. Melting of the precipitated ice IV in LiCl aqueous solution and polyamorphism of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Osamu

    2011-12-08

    Melting of the precipitated ice IV in supercooled LiCl-H(2)O solution was studied in the range of 0-0.6 MPa and 160-270 K. Emulsified solution was used to detect this metastable transition. Ice IV was precipitated from the aqueous solution of 2.0 mol % LiCl (or 4.8 mol % LiCl) in each emulsion particle at low-temperature and high-pressure conditions, and the emulsion was decompressed at different temperatures. The melting of ice IV was detected from the temperature change of the emulsified sample during the decompression. There was an apparently sudden change in the slope of the ice IV melting curve (liquidus) in the pressure-temperature diagram. At the high-pressure and high-temperature side of the change, the solute-induced freezing point depression was observed. At the low-pressure and low-temperature side, ice IV transformed into ice Ih on the decompression, and the transition was almost unrelated to the concentration of LiCl. These experimental results were roughly explained by the presumed existence of two kinds of liquid water (low-density liquid water and high-density liquid water), or polyamorphism in water, and by the simple assumption that LiCl dissolved maily in high-density liquid water.

  6. Impact of water repellency on infiltration of differently concentrated ethanol solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlapa, Pavel; Hrabovský, Andrej; Hriník, Dávid; Kuric, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Infiltration experiments were carried out on an extremely (WDPT > 3600 s) water repellent forest soil in the Little Carpathians Mts (SW Slovakia). Measurements were performed following a long dry warm period using the Mini Disk Infiltrometer (Decagon). Replicated infiltration experiments were conducted with water and five different ethanol solutions. The infiltrometer was set to a capillary pressure head of -2 cm and filled with solutions containing 0, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 95% of ethanol by volume, respectively. Solutions used in infiltration experiments differed in density, viscosity, and surface tension. Combined effect of solution properties on infiltration into soil is strongly dependent on soil surface properties. This may lead to a decrease of infiltration rate with increasing ethanol concentration. Such behaviour should be observable in wettable soils. However, the infiltration experiments revealed a significant increase in the rate of infiltration for increasing concentrations of ethanol. The solutions showed infiltration rates of 10-4, 10-3, and 10-2 cm/s for the 5, 20, and 95% ethanol solutions, respectively. This trend suggests the dominant influence of contact angle (affected by ethanol concentration) on infiltration process. Measurements allow quantifying changes of various infiltration parameters as a function of the solution properties. The obtained results showed that similar approach can be a valuable alternative to other methods used for the evaluation of severity of soil repellency and impacts to hydrological processes.

  7. Study on the sound absorption mechanism in gradient water-soluble polymer solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuansheng; YANG Xue; ZHU Jinhua; YAO Shuren

    2006-01-01

    Attention was paid to the study on the sound absorption mechanism of watersoluble polymer during dissolving. A specially designed water-soluble polymer coating was synthesized in our lab. The sound attenuation property was measured in sound tube. The results showed that the sound attenuation of the gradient polymer solution was larger than that of the uniform. Depending on the experimental result and the theory of sound wave propagation in layered medium, a mechanism of gradient water-soluble polymer solution was developed. This mechanism can be described as follows: a water-soluble polymer coating formed a concentration gradient layer when it was dissolved in water. This gradient layer led to multiple reflection and absorption of sound. Finally the sound energy was transferred into heat.

  8. Exact traveling wave solutions and L1 stability for the shallow water wave model of moderate amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Guo, Yunxi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we developed, for the first time, the exact expressions of several periodic travelling wave solutions and a solitary wave solution for a shallow water wave model of moderate amplitude. Then, we present the existence theorem of the global weak solutions. Finally, we prove the stability of solution in L1(R) space for the Cauchy problem of the equation.

  9. Exact traveling wave solutions and L1 stability for the shallow water wave model of moderate amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Guo, Yunxi

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we developed, for the first time, the exact expressions of several periodic travelling wave solutions and a solitary wave solution for a shallow water wave model of moderate amplitude. Then, we present the existence theorem of the global weak solutions. Finally, we prove the stability of solution in L1(R) space for the Cauchy problem of the equation.

  10. Behavior of Supercooled Aqueous Solutions Stemming from Hidden Liquid-Liquid Transition in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Biddle, John W.; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2014-01-01

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two...

  11. Linking water age and solute dynamics in streamflow at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benettin, Paolo; Bailey, Scott W.; Campbell, John L.; Green, Mark B.; Rinaldo, Andrea; Likens, Gene E.; McGuire, Kevin J.; Botter, Gianluca

    2015-11-01

    We combine experimental and modeling results from a headwater catchment at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF), New Hampshire, USA, to explore the link between stream solute dynamics and water age. A theoretical framework based on water age dynamics, which represents a general basis for characterizing solute transport at the catchment scale, is here applied to conservative and weathering-derived solutes. Based on the available information about the hydrology of the site, an integrated transport model was developed and used to compute hydrochemical fluxes. The model was designed to reproduce the deuterium content of streamflow and allowed for the estimate of catchment water storage and dynamic travel time distributions (TTDs). The innovative contribution of this paper is the simulation of dissolved silicon and sodium concentration in streamflow, achieved by implementing first-order chemical kinetics based explicitly on dynamic TTD, thus upscaling local geochemical processes to catchment scale. Our results highlight the key role of water stored within the subsoil glacial material in both the short-term and long-term solute circulation. The travel time analysis provided an estimate of streamflow age distributions and their evolution in time related to catchment wetness conditions. The use of age information to reproduce a 14 year data set of silicon and sodium stream concentration shows that, at catchment scales, the dynamics of such geogenic solutes are mostly controlled by hydrologic drivers, which determine the contact times between the water and mineral interfaces. Justifications and limitations toward a general theory of reactive solute circulation at catchment scales are discussed.

  12. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R

    2013-03-21

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F(-) and a Na(+) ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na(+) and F(-) ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity ΔC(p) stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na(+) ion, it decreases upon charging the F(-) ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q = -0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  13. Effects of radiation damping for biomolecular NMR experiments in solution: a hemisphere concept for water suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-09-01

    Abundant solvent nuclear spins, such as water protons in aqueous solution, cause radiation damping in NMR experiments. It is important to know how the effect of radiation damping appears in high-resolution protein NMR because macromolecular studies always require very high magnetic field strengths with a highly sensitive NMR probe that can easily cause radiation damping. Here, we show the behavior of water magnetization after a pulsed-field gradient (PFG) using nutation experiments at 900 MHz with a cryogenic probe: when water magnetization is located in the upper hemisphere (having +Z component, parallel to the external magnetic field), dephasing of the magnetization by a PFG effectively suppresses residual water magnetization in the transverse plane. In contrast, when magnetization is located in the lower hemisphere (having -Z component), the small residual transverse component remaining after a PFG is still sufficient to induce radiation damping. Based on this observation, we designed (1)H-(15)N HSQC experiments in which water magnetization is maintained in the upper hemisphere, but not necessarily along Z, and compared them with the conventional experiments, in which water magnetization is inverted during the t1 period. The result demonstrates moderate gain of signal-to-noise ratio, 0-28%. Designing the experiments such that water magnetization is maintained in the upper hemisphere allows shorter pulses to be used compared to the complete water flip-back and, thereby, is useful as a building block of protein NMR pulse programs in solution.

  14. Removal of copper from copper-contaminated river water and aqueous solutions using Methylobacterium extorquens modified Erzurum clayey soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neslihan Celebi; Hayrunnisa Nadaroglu; Ekrem Kalkan; Recep Kotan

    2016-01-01

    ... adsorbent materials for the removal of copper from aqueous solution. The copper concentrations in the samples of the polluted river water and CuCl solutions treated by the natural and bacteria-modified Erzurum clayey soil (ECS...

  15. Potential of Nanotechnology based water treatment solutions for the improvement of drinking water supplies in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Joydeep; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Bundschuh, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades explosive population growth in the world has led to water scarcity across the globe putting additional pressure already scarce ground water resources and is pushing scientists and researchers to come up with new alternatives to monitor and treat water for use by mankind and for food security. Nearly 4 billion people around the world are known to lack access to clean water supply. Systematic water quality data is important for the assessment of health risks as well as for developing appropriate and affordable technologies for waste and drinking water treatments, and long-term decision making policy against water quality management. Traditional water treatment technologies are generally chemical-intensive processes requiring extremely large infrastructural support thus limiting their effective applications in developing nations which creates an artificial barrier to the application of technological solutions for the provision of clean water. Nanotechnology-based systems are in retrospect, smaller, energy and resource efficient. Economic impact assessment of the implementation of nanotechnology in water treatment and studies on cost-effectiveness and environmental and social impacts is of key importance prior to its wide spread acceptance. Government agencies and inter-governmental bodies driving research and development activities need to measure the effective potential of nanotechnology as a solution to global water challenges in order to effectively engage in fiscal, economic and social issues at national and international levels for different types of source waters with new national and international initiatives on nanotechnology and water need to be launched. Environmental pollution and industrialization in global scale is further leading to pollution of available water sources and thus hygienically friendly purification technologies are the need of the hour. Thus cost-effective treatment of pollutants for the transformation of hazardous

  16. Spontaneous formation of γ-hydroxybutyric acid from γ-butyrolactone in tap water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlén, Johan; Lundquist, Per; Jonsson, Malin

    2011-07-15

    The spontaneous conversion of γ-butyrolactone (GBL) to γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in seven different Swedish tap waters was investigated. The waters used in the study were selected to represent the diversity among Swedish tap waters as well as possible, which was enabled by principal component analysis (PCA) of a number of water quality parameters. GBL solutions (5, 25 and 50% v/v) were prepared in each of the tap waters and in deionized water and the formation of GHB was followed over time. The GHB quantifications were made using a CZE method, employing a carrier electrolyte consisting of 25mM benzoic acid, 54mM tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) and 1.7mM tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB), which was developed as a part of the current study. Data evaluation showed that the formation of GHB was largely dependent on the type of tap water. For example, there was a negative correlation between the kinetics of the GHB formation and the alkalinity of the tap waters (r(2)=0.990). This could be explained by a faster decrease in pH in the waters with low buffering capacity (i.e. low alkalinity), which catalysed the hydrolysis of GBL. Equilibrium was reached after 40-250 days depending on the initial GBL concentration and the type of tap water. The level of the equilibrium appeared to be dependent on the initial GBL concentration and ranged from 26 to 37%. Gained knowledge on the levels of the GHB/GBL equilibrium and the kinetics of the formation of GHB in tap water solutions of GBL, including the influence of the tap water quality, may be useful information for casework with the GHB/GBL problem in focus.

  17. On Classical Solutions to 2D Shallow Water Equations with Degenerate Viscosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yachun; Pan, Ronghua; Zhu, Shengguo

    2017-03-01

    2D shallow water equations have degenerate viscosities proportional to surface height, which vanishes in many physical considerations, say, when the initial total mass, or energy are finite. Such a degeneracy is a highly challenging obstacle for development of well-posedness theory, even local-in-time theory remains open for a long time. In this paper, we will address this open problem with some new perspectives, independent of the celebrated BD-entropy (Bresch et al in Commun Math Phys 238:211-223, 2003, Commun Part Differ Eqs 28:843-868, 2003, Analysis and Simulation of Fluid Dynamics, 2007). After exploring some interesting structures of most models of 2D shallow water equations, we introduced a proper notion of solution class, called regular solutions, and identified a class of initial data with finite total mass and energy, and established the local-in-time well-posedness of this class of smooth solutions. The theory is applicable to most relatively physical shallow water models, broader than those with BD-entropy structures. We remark that our theory is on the local strong solutions, while the BD entropy is an essential tool for the global weak solutions. Later, a Beale-Kato-Majda type blow-up criterion is also established. This paper is mainly based on our early preprint (Li et al. in 2D compressible Navier-Stokes equations with degenerate viscosities and far field vacuum, preprint. arXiv:1407.8471, 2014).

  18. Water solubility enhancements of pyrene by single and mixed surfactant solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Water solubility enhancements of pyrene by both single-surfactant and mixed-surfactant solutions were compared andevaluated. The solubility of pyrene in water was greatly enhanced by each of Triton X-100 (TX100), Triton X-405 (TX405), Brij 35 and SDS, in which the water solubility enhancements increased with increasing surfactant concentrations. The extent of solubility enhancements at surfactant concentrations below the CMC is the order of TX100 > Brij 35 > TX405 > SDS; the sequence at surfactantconcentrations above the CMC is TX100 > Brij 35 > SDS > TX405. Pyrene was solubilized synergistically by anionic-nonionic mixed surfactant solutions, especially at low surfactant concentrations. The synergistic power of the mixed surfactants is SDS-TX405 > SDS-Brij 35 > SDS-TX100. The synergism as noted is attributed to increasing Kmc and/or decreasing the CMC of the mixed surfactan solution. For SDS-TX405 and SDS-Brij 35 mixed surfactant solutions, an increase in Kmc is coupled with a decrease in the CMC; for SDS-TX100, only a decreased in the CMC value is noted. Mixed-surfactant solutions may improve the performance of the surfactant-enhanced remediation (SER) of soils by increasing the bioavailability and biodegradation of non-aqueous-phase organic pollutants and reducing the level of surfactant pollution and remediation expenses.

  19. A potential model for sodium chloride solutions based on the TIP4P/2005 water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, A. L.; Portillo, M. A.; Chamorro, V. C.; Espinosa, J. R.; Abascal, J. L. F.; Vega, C.

    2017-09-01

    Despite considerable efforts over more than two decades, our knowledge of the interactions in electrolyte solutions is not yet satisfactory. Not even one of the most simple and important aqueous solutions, NaCl(aq), escapes this assertion. A requisite for the development of a force field for any water solution is the availability of a good model for water. Despite the fact that TIP4P/2005 seems to fulfill the requirement, little work has been devoted to build a force field based on TIP4P/2005. In this work, we try to fill this gap for NaCl(aq). After unsuccessful attempts to produce accurate predictions for a wide range of properties using unity ionic charges, we decided to follow recent suggestions indicating that the charges should be scaled in the ionic solution. In this way, we have been able to develop a satisfactory non-polarizable force field for NaCl(aq). We evaluate a number of thermodynamic properties of the solution (equation of state, maximum in density, enthalpies of solution, activity coefficients, radial distribution functions, solubility, surface tension, diffusion coefficients, and viscosity). Overall the results for the solution are very good. An important achievement of our model is that it also accounts for the dynamical properties of the solution, a test for which the force fields so far proposed failed. The same is true for the solubility and for the maximum in density where the model describes the experimental results almost quantitatively. The price to pay is that the model is not so good at describing NaCl in the solid phase, although the results for several properties (density and melting temperature) are still acceptable. We conclude that the scaling of the charges improves the overall description of NaCl aqueous solutions when the polarization is not included.

  20. Plant vitrification solution 2 lowers water content and alters freezing behavior in shoot tips during cryoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Gayle M; Walters, Christina

    2006-02-01

    Plant shoot tips do not survive exposure to liquid nitrogen temperatures without cryoprotective treatments. Some cryoprotectant solutions, such as plant vitrification solution 2 (PVS2), dehydrate cells and decrease lethal ice formation, but the extent of dehydration and the effect on water freezing properties are not known. We examined the effect of a PVS2 cryoprotection protocol on the water content and phase behavior of mint and garlic shoot tips using differential scanning calorimetry. The temperature and enthalpy of water melting transitions in unprotected and recovering shoot tips were comparable to dilute aqueous solutions. Exposure to PVS2 changed the behavior of water in shoot tips: enthalpy of melting transitions decreased to about 40 J g H2O(-1) (compared to 333 J g H2O(-1) for pure H2O), amount of unfrozen water increased to approximately 0.7 g H2O g dry mass(-1) (compared to approximately 0.4 g H2Og dry mass(-1) for unprotected shoot tips), and a glass transition (T(g)) at -115 degrees C was apparent. Evaporative drying at room temperature was slower in PVS2-treated shoot tips compared to shoot tips receiving no cryoprotection treatments. We quantified the extent that ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide components permeate into shoot tips and replace some of the water. Since T(g) in PVS2-treated shoot tips occurs at -115 degrees C, mechanisms other than glass formation prevent freezing at temperatures between 0 and -115 degrees C. Protection is likely a result of controlled dehydration or altered thermal properties of intracellular water. A comparison of thermodynamic measurements for cryoprotection solutions in diverse plant systems will identify efficacy among cryopreservation protocols.

  1. Fluid replacement during sustained activity in the heat: nutrient solution vs. water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, L; Rose, M S; Francesconi, P; Neufer, P D; Sawka, M N

    1991-06-01

    This study examined the thermoregulatory and hydrational status of men during sustained activity in a hot-dry (37 degrees C, 20% rh) environment while they consumed only a nutrient solution (nutrient), or consumed only colored, flavored water (control). Eleven heat acclimated young men attempted 24-h sustained activity experiments. These experiments consisted of alternating 45-min bouts of treadmill walking (410 W, approximately 30% VO2max) and rest (including sedentary activity). Data were analyzed through 13 h (after 13 h subjects began to discontinue testing). No significant differences between trials were observed for metabolic rate, fluid intake, skin or rectal temperature, sweating rate, plasma volume (as indicated by hemoglobin concentration) or plasma glucose concentrations. By the 8th h plasma osmolality was higher and by the 11th h plasma free fatty acids were lower during the nutrient trial compared to the control. In separate experiments with nine different men, the gastric emptying rates of the nutrient solution and water were compared during exercise (55% VO2max) in the heat (35 degrees C, 20% rh). The gastric emptying rates of the nutrient solution and water were similar (approximately 20 ml.min-1). These data indicate that during 13 h of sustained activity in a hot environment, the nutrient solution and water provided similar thermoregulatory and hydrational benefits.

  2. ELUTION OF ORGANIC SOLUTES FROM DIFFERENT POLARITY SORBENTS USING SUBCRITICAL WATER. (R825394)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The intermolecular interactions between organic solutes and sorbent matrices under subcritical water conditions have been investigated at a pressure of 50 bar and temperatures ranging from 50 to 250°C. Both polar and nonpolar organics (chlorophenols, amines, n-alkanes...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Water Proton Relaxation in Protein Solutions and Tissue: T1ρ Dispersion Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Enn-Ling; Kim, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Image contrast in clinical MRI is often determined by differences in tissue water proton relaxation behavior. However, many aspects of water proton relaxation in complex biological media, such as protein solutions and tissue are not well understood, perhaps due to the limited empirical data. Principal Findings Water proton T1, T2, and T1ρ of protein solutions and tissue were measured systematically under multiple conditions. Crosslinking or aggregation of protein decreased T2 and T1ρ, but did not change high-field T1. T1ρ dispersion profiles were similar for crosslinked protein solutions, myocardial tissue, and cartilage, and exhibited power law behavior with T1ρ(0) values that closely approximated T2. The T1ρ dispersion of mobile protein solutions was flat above 5 kHz, but showed a steep curve below 5 kHz that was sensitive to changes in pH. The T1ρ dispersion of crosslinked BSA and cartilage in DMSO solvent closely resembled that of water solvent above 5 kHz but showed decreased dispersion below 5 kHz. Conclusions Proton exchange is a minor pathway for tissue T1 and T1ρ relaxation above 5 kHz. Potential models for relaxation are discussed, however the same molecular mechanism appears to be responsible across 5 decades of frequencies from T1ρ to T1. PMID:20052404

  4. Forward and pressure retarded osmosis: potential solutions for global challenges in energy and water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaysom, Chalida; Cath, Tazhi Y; Depuydt, Tom; Vankelecom, Ivo F J

    2013-08-21

    Osmotically driven membrane processes (ODMP) have gained renewed interest in recent years and they might become a potential solution for the world's most challenging problems of water and energy scarcity. Though the concept of utilizing osmotic pressure difference between high and low salinity streams across semipermeable membranes has been explored for several decades, lack of optimal membranes and draw solutions hindered competition between forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) with existing water purification and power generation technologies, respectively. Driven by growing global water scarcity and by energy cost and negative environmental impacts, novel membranes and draw solutions are being developed for ODMPs, mass and heat transfer in osmotic process are becoming better understood, and new applications of ODMPs are emerging. Therefore, OMDPs might become promising green technologies to provide clean water and clean energy from abundantly available renewable resources. This review focuses primarily on new insights into osmotic membrane transport mechanisms and on novel membranes and draw solutions that are currently being developed. Furthermore, the effects of operating conditions on the overall performance of osmotic membranes will be highlighted and future perspectives will be presented.

  5. Computer Simulation of the Process of Quenching Large-Size Parts in Water and Aqueous Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.I.Kobasko; W.S.Morhuniuk; V.V.Dobrivecher; A.M.Weinov

    2004-01-01

    The article presents results of the computer simulation of quenching large-size parts in water and aqueous solutions. It has been shown that the main attention should be paid to eliminating film boiling and providing uniform cooling at the surface of the part to be quenched. Simplified formulas for calculating the optimal time of cooling large-size steel parts are presented.

  6. Analytical solution to transient Richards' equation with realistic water profiles for vertical infiltration and parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    A general analytical model for one-dimensional transient vertical infiltration is presented. The model is based on a combination of the Brooks and Corey soil water retention function and a generalized hydraulic conductivity function. This leads to power law diffusivity and convective term for which the exponents are functions of the inverse of the pore size distribution index. Accordingly, the proposed analytical solution covers many existing realistic models in the literature. The general form of the analytical solution is simple and it expresses implicitly the depth as function of water content and time. It can be used to model infiltration through semi-infinite dry soils with prescribed water content or flux boundary conditions. Some mathematical expressions of practical importance are also derived. The general form solution is useful for comparison between models, validation of numerical solutions and for better understanding the effect of some hydraulic parameters. Based on the analytical expression, a complete inverse procedure which allows the estimation of the hydraulic parameters from water content measurements is presented.

  7. Characterization of bis-[triethoxysilylpropyl] tetrasulfide layers on aluminum based on water-based silanization solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Minghao [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); He Deliang, E-mail: delianghe@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Xie Hui; Fu Liqun; Yu Yan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang Quan [College of Civil Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China)

    2012-06-30

    In this work, a water-based silanization solution was prepared using a biphasic hydrolysis system composed of 85% (V/V) water and 15% (V/V) bis-[triethoxysilylpropyl] tetrasulfide (BTESPT)/n-heptane/ethanol mixture for efficiently coating aluminum with silane layer against corrosion. The BTESPT-based coatings on several pretreated aluminum samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, and their electrochemical behaviors were assessed in 0.1 M NaCl neutral solution by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and Tafel polarization. The BTESPT-based coating of about 180 nm thick was found to be uniform and compact, and the maximum corrosion resistance of 10{sup 6} Ohm-Sign of the BTESPT-treated aluminum samples was observed, which is larger than that of bare aluminum by two orders of magnitude. Durability tests in NaCl solution demonstrated that the BTESPT coating can provide superior protection of alumina substrate from corrosion for 10-day immersion in the corrosive media. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water-based silanization solution prepared using a biphasic hydrolysis system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silane layers with thickness of about 180 nm were uniform and compact. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water-based silane layers as alternative to anticorrosion chromate coatings for Al. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excellent anticorrosion protection observed after 10-day immersion in corrosive medium.

  8. ANTI-CORROSION PROPERTIES OF CARBOXYLIC ACID IN WATER-GLYCOL SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BASHKIRCEVA N.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium salts of carboxylic acids were investigated to evaluate the corrosion properties of the water-glycol solutions. Corrosion tests were performed by methods of gravimetry and galvanostatic dissolution with metals used in cooling systems. The compositions of anticorrosion systems and their concentration that provide the most effective inhibition of metals were determined.

  9. Water, solute and heat transport in the soil: the Australian connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John

    2016-04-01

    The interest of Peter Raats in water, solute and heat transport in the soil has led to scientific and/or personal interactions with several Australian scientists such as John Philip, David Smiles, Greg Davis and John Knight. Along with John Philip and Robin Wooding, Peter was an early user of the Gardner (1958) linearised model of soil water flow, which brought him into competition with John Philip. I will discuss some of Peter's solutions relevant to infiltration from line and point sources, cavities and basins. A visit to Canberra, Australia in the early 1980s led to joint work on soil water flow, and on combined water and solute movement with David Smiles and others. In 1983 Peter was on the PhD committee for Greg Davis at the University of Wollongong, and some of the methods in his thesis 'Mathematical modelling of rate-limiting mechanisms of pyritic oxidation in overburden dumps' were later used by Peter's student Sjoerd van der Zee. David Smiles and Peter wrote a survey article 'Hydrology of swelling clay soils' in 2005. In the last decade Peter has been investigating the history of groundwater and vadose zone hydrology, and recently he and I have been bringing to light the largely forgotten work of Lewis Fry Richardson on finite difference solution of the heat equation, drainage theory, soil physics, and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum.

  10. MARSOL: Demonstrating Managed Aquifer Recharge as a Solution to Water Scarcity and Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueth, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Southern Europe and the Mediterranean region are facing the challenge of managing its water resources under conditions of increasing scarcity and concerns about water quality. Already, the availability of fresh water in sufficient quality and quantity is one of the major factors limiting socio economic development. Innovative water management strategies such as the storage of reclaimed water or excess water from different sources in Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) schemes can greatly increase water availability and therefore improve water security. Main objective of the proposed project MARSOL is to demonstrate that MAR is a sound, safe and sustainable strategy that can be applied with great confidence and therefore offering a key approach for tackling water scarcity in Southern Europe. For this, eight field sites were selected that will demonstrate the applicability of MAR using various water sources, ranging from treated wastewater to desalinated seawater, and a variety of technical solutions. Targets are the alleviation of the effect of climate change on water resources, the mitigation of droughts, to countermeasure temporal and spatial misfit of water availability, to sustain agricultural water supply and rural socio-economic development, to combat agricultural related pollutants, to sustain future urban and industrial water supply and to limit seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers. Results of the demonstration sites will be used to develop guidelines for MAR site selection, technical realization, monitoring strategies, and modeling approaches, to offer stakeholders a comprehensive, state of the art and proven toolbox for MAR implementation. Further, the economic and legal aspects of MAR will be analyzed to enable and accelerate market penetration. The MARSOL consortium combines the expertise of consultancies, water suppliers, research institutions, and public authorities, ensuring high practical relevance and market intimacy.

  11. Dielectric spectra broadening as the signature of dipole-matrix interaction. I. Water in nonionic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Evgeniya; Puzenko, Alexander; Kaatze, Udo; Ishai, Paul Ben; Feldman, Yuri

    2012-03-21

    Whenever water interacts with another dipolar entity, a broadening of its dielectric relaxation occurs. Often this broadening can be described by the Cole-Cole (CC) spectral function. A new phenomenological approach has been recently presented [A. Puzenko, P. Ben Ishai, and Y. Feldman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 037601 (2010)] that illustrates a physical mechanism of the dipole-matrix interaction underlying the CC behavior in complex systems. By considering the relaxation amplitude Δε, the relaxation time τ, and the broadening parameter α, one can construct a set of 3D trajectories, representing the dynamic behavior of different systems under diverse conditions. Our hypothesis is that these trajectories will contribute to a deeper understanding of the dielectric properties of complex systems. The paper demonstrates how the model describes the state of water in aqueous solutions of non-ionic solutes. For this purpose complex dielectric spectra for aqueous solutions of D-glucose and D-fructose are analyzed.

  12. Water rotational jump driven large amplitude molecular motions of nitrate ions in aqueous potassium nitrate solution

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Puja; Bagchi, Biman

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous potassium nitrate solution reveal a highly complex rotational dynamics of nitrate ions where, superimposed on the expected continuous Brownian motion, are large amplitude angular jumps that are coupled to and at least partly driven by similar large amplitude jump motions in water molecules which are associated with change in the hydrogen bonded water molecule. These jumps contribute significantly to rotational and translational motions of these ions. We explore the detailed mechanism of these correlated (or, coupled) jumps and introduce a new time correlation function to decompose the coupled orientational- jump dynamics of solvent and solute in the aqueous electrolytic solution. Time correlation function provides for the unequivocal determination of the time constant involved in orientational dynamics originating from making and breaking of hydrogen bonds. We discover two distinct mechanisms-both are coupled to density fluctuation but are of different types.

  13. Factors influencing HPAM solution viscosity prepared by produced water using orthogonal method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康万利; 王志伟; 周阳; 孟令伟; 刘述忍; 白宝君

    2008-01-01

    The effect of temperature and metal ion components on the viscosity of HPAM solution was studied by means of orthogonal method.Five factors and 4 levels were considered for the orthogonal design.The five factors included temperature,contents of Na+,Mg2+,Ca2+ and S2-,and the four levels mainly considered the level of produced water components in main oilfields in China.The experiment results show that temperature is the most important factor to control HPAM solution viscosity prepared by produced water.The effect of ions was in order of Na+>S2->Mg2+>Ca2+.The mechanism of each factor influencing viscosity was also discussed.Based on the actual condition of Nanyang oilfield,the desulfurization was used to improve the solution viscosity,and satisfactory result was obtained.

  14. Dielectric spectroscopy of solutions of amino silicone emulsion in distilled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, K. N.; Rana, V. A.; Trivedi, C. M.; Vankar, H. P.

    2016-05-01

    Complex permittivity spectra ɛ*(ω) = ɛ' - jɛ″ of solutions of amino silicone emulsion in distilled water in the frequency range 100 Hz to 2 MHz were obtained using precision LCR meter. Complex permittivity data is used to find out complex impedance z*(ω) and complex electric conductivity σ*(ω). All these spectra are used to gain information about various polarization processes taking place in the solutions of amino silicone emulsion in distilled water under the effect of ac electric field. The frequency and concentration dependent behavior of the solutions of amino silicone emulsion in distilled waterhave beenalso investigated. Density and refractive index of the samples are also measured and are reported.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Diffusion of Vitamin C in Water Solution%Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Diffusion of Vitamin C in Water Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾建平; 王爱民; 贡雪东; 陈景文; 陈松; 薛锋

    2012-01-01

    Under different temperatures and concentrations, the diffusion of Vitamin C (VC) in water solution was exam- ined by molecular dynamics simulation. The diffusion coefficients were calculated based on the Einstein equation. The influences of temperature, concentration, and simulation time on the diffusion coefficient were discussed. The results showed that at higher temperature and lower concentration the normal diffusions appear relatively late, but the linear range of mean square displacement curves continues longer than that at lower temperature and higher concentration. At the same temperature, the normal diffusion time increases and the diffusion coefficient decreases as the simulation concentration increases. These simulation results are in good agreement with experiments. Analyses of the pair correlation functions of the simulation systems showed that hydrogen bonds are mainly formed be- tween the hydrogen atoms of VC molecules and oxygen atoms of H20 molecules, rather than between the O atoms of VC molecules and H atoms of H20 molecules. The diffusion coefficient is higher as the interaction between water molecules and VC molecules is stronger when VC concentration is lower. The water in the model systems affects the diffusion of VC molecules by the short-range repulsion of O(H20)-O(H20) pairs and the non-bond interaction of H(H20)-H(H20) pairs. The short-range repulsion of O(H20)-O(H20) pairs is greater when VC concentration is higher, the diffusion of VC is weaker. The greater the non-bond interaction of H(H20)-H(H20) pairs is, the higher the VC diffusion is. It is expected that this study can provide a theoretical direction for the experiments on the mass transfer of VC in water solution.

  16. Water activity of aqueous solutions of ethylene oxide-propylene oxide block copolymers and maltodextrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. D. Carareto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The water activity of aqueous solutions of EO-PO block copolymers of six different molar masses and EO/PO ratios and of maltodextrins of three different molar masses was determined at 298.15 K. The results showed that these aqueous solutions present a negative deviation from Raoult's law. The Flory-Huggins and UNIFAC excess Gibbs energy models were employed to model the experimental data. While a good agreement was obtained with the Flory-Huggins equation, discrepancies were observed when predicting the experimental behavior with the UNIFAC model. The water activities of ternary systems formed by a synthetic polymer, maltodextrin and water were also measured and used to test the predictive capability of both models.

  17. Dielectric spectra broadening as the signature of dipole-matrix interaction. II. Water in ionic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Evgeniya; Puzenko, Alexander; Kaatze, Udo; Ben Ishai, Paul; Feldman, Yuri

    2012-03-21

    In this, the second part of our series on the dielectric spectrum symmetrical broadening of water, we consider ionic aqueous solutions. If in Part I, dipole-dipole interaction was the dominant feature, now ion-dipole interplay is shown to be the critical element in the dipole-matrix interaction. We present the results of high-frequency dielectric measurements of different concentrations of NaCl/KCl aqueous solutions. We observed Cole-Cole broadening of the main relaxation peak of the solvent in the both electrolytes. The 3D trajectory approach (described in detail in Part I) is applied in order to highlight the differences between the dynamics and structure of solutions of salts on one hand and dipolar solutes on the other hand.

  18. Improved prediction of octanol-water partition coefficients from liquid-solute water solubilities and molar volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, C.T.; Schmedding, D.W.; Manes, M.

    2005-01-01

    A volume-fraction-based solvent-water partition model for dilute solutes, in which the partition coefficient shows a dependence on solute molar volume (V??), is adapted to predict the octanol-water partition coefficient (K ow) from the liquid or supercooled-liquid solute water solubility (Sw), or vice versa. The established correlation is tested for a wide range of industrial compounds and pesticides (e.g., halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkylbenzenes, halogenated benzenes, ethers, esters, PAHs, PCBs, organochlorines, organophosphates, carbamates, and amidesureas-triazines), which comprise a total of 215 test compounds spanning about 10 orders of magnitude in Sw and 8.5 orders of magnitude in Kow. Except for phenols and alcohols, which require special considerations of the Kow data, the correlation predicts the Kow within 0.1 log units for most compounds, much independent of the compound type or the magnitude in K ow. With reliable Sw and V data for compounds of interest, the correlation provides an effective means for either predicting the unavailable log Kow values or verifying the reliability of the reported log Kow data. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  19. [Method for study of phase transitions in evaporating drop and its application for evaluation of physical-chemical properties of water and water solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakhno, T A; Sanin, A G; Sanina, O A; Iakhno, V G

    2012-01-01

    Spatial-temporal crystallization features of inorganic chlorides in evaporating drops of water solutions, considering solid surface wettability, were studied using a microscopic technique and the acoustical impedansometry. Physical-chemical mechanisms responsible for the difference in "dynamical portraits" of distilled water and salt solutions, as well as relaxation effects in water were discussed. The study demonstrated the potential use of a drying drop method in registration of changes in water properties under the action of physical and chemical factors.

  20. A Computational Approach to the New Type Solutions of Whitham-Broer-Kaup Equation in Shallow Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Fu-Ding; GAO Xiao-Shan

    2004-01-01

    Based on computerized symbolic computation, a new method and its algorithm are proposed for searching for exact travelling wave solutions of the nonlinear partial differential equations. Making use of our approach, we investigate the Whitham-Broer-Kaup equation in shallow water and obtain new families of exact solutions, which include soliton-like solutions and periodic solutions. As its special cases, the solutions of classical long wave equations and modified Boussinesq equations can also be found.

  1. Using UCST ionic liquid as a draw solute in forward osmosis to treat high-salinity water

    KAUST Repository

    Zhong, Yujiang

    2015-12-09

    The concept of using a thermo-responsive ionic liquid (IL) with an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) as a draw solute in forward osmosis (FO) was successfully demonstrated here experimentally. A 3.2 M solution of protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Hbet][Tf2N]) was obtained by heating and maintaining the temperature above 56°C. This solution successfully drew water from high-salinity water up to 3.0 M through FO. When the IL solution cooled to room temperature, it spontaneously separated into a water-rich phase and an IL-rich phase: the water-rich phase was the produced water that contained a low IL concentration, and the IL-rich phase could be used directly as the draw solution in the next cycle of the FO process. The thermal stability, thermal-responsive solubility and UV-vis absorption spectra of the IL were also studied in detail.

  2. The vapour pressure of water as a function of solute concentration above aqueous solutions of fructose, sucrose, raffinose, erythritol, xylitol, and sorbitol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, S.A.; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Westh, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The vapour pressure of water above an aqueous solution of sucrose at T = 298.06 K has been measured for 9 sucrose mole fractions up to 0.12. Vapour pressure measurements have also been made on aqueous solutions of meso-erythritol, xylitol, sorbitol, fructose, and raffinose at T = 317.99 K...

  3. The vapour pressure of water as a function of solute concentration above aqueous solutions of fructose, sucrose, raffinose, erythritol, xylitol, and sorbitol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, S.A.; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Westh, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The vapour pressure of water above an aqueous solution of sucrose at T = 298.06 K has been measured for 9 sucrose mole fractions up to 0.12. Vapour pressure measurements have also been made on aqueous solutions of meso-erythritol, xylitol, sorbitol, fructose, and raffinose at T = 317.99 K. The ex...

  4. Conductivity and Viscosity Measurements for Binary Lysozyme Chloride Aqueous Solution and Ternary Lysozyme-Salt-Water Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Buzatu, D; Buzatu, F D

    2004-01-01

    We use the conductimetric method, adequate to electrolytes, to determine the lysozyme charge in lys-water and ternary lys-salt-water systems. We measured also the viscosities for the above binary and ternary systems in the same conditions at pH$=4.5$ and T$=298$ K, measurements that allow us to see any effect of viscosity on cations mobilities and implicitly on the lysozyme charge. The method is illustrated for the lysozyme chloride aqueous solution system at 25$^o$ C, using the data reported here for pH$=4.5$ at 0.15, 0.6, 0.8, 1., 1.5, 2., 2.5, 3., 3.5 mM (mg/mL) lysozyme chloride concentrations. The method was also applied to ternary lys-salt-water systems in the same conditions at pH$=4.5$ and T$=25^o$ C. Ternary conductivities are reported for a mean concentration 0.6 mM of lysozyme chloride in all systems and a mean concentration 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.175, 0.2, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, 1.2, 1.3 and 1.4 M for NaCl; 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.175, 0.2, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5 M for KCl; 0.005, 0.01,...

  5. Accurate integral equation theory for the central force model of liquid water and ionic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiye, Toshiko; Haymet, A. D. J.

    1988-10-01

    The atom-atom pair correlation functions and thermodynamics of the central force model of water, introduced by Lemberg, Stillinger, and Rahman, have been calculated accurately by an integral equation method which incorporates two new developments. First, a rapid new scheme has been used to solve the Ornstein-Zernike equation. This scheme combines the renormalization methods of Allnatt, and Rossky and Friedman with an extension of the trigonometric basis-set solution of Labik and co-workers. Second, by adding approximate ``bridge'' functions to the hypernetted-chain (HNC) integral equation, we have obtained predictions for liquid water in which the hydrogen bond length and number are in good agreement with ``exact'' computer simulations of the same model force laws. In addition, for dilute ionic solutions, the ion-oxygen and ion-hydrogen coordination numbers display both the physically correct stoichiometry and good agreement with earlier simulations. These results represent a measurable improvement over both a previous HNC solution of the central force model and the ex-RISM integral equation solutions for the TIPS and other rigid molecule models of water.

  6. EXPERIENCE OF SEA WATER HYPERTONIC SOLUTION APPLICATION FOR TOPICAL TREATMENT OF CHRONIC TONSILLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Karpova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the effectiveness of sea water hypertonic solution (Aqua Maris troath and oral cavity spray, Jadran, Croatia medication to treat chronic tonsillitis of the compensated form on 84 children aged between 5 and 15. All children had their tonsil lacunae rinsed in a day № 6–8. 64 children had them rinsed with the sea water hypertonic solution (main group, while 20 children had them rinsed with the nitrofural solution (comparison group. Treatment effectiveness was determined according to dynamics of main symptoms (odynophagia, dysphagia, hyperemia and mucosa infiltration of pillars of the fauces, as well as the degree of tonsil bacterial number before and after treatment (by the 14th day. The dynamic analysis of subjective data during treatment revealed more significant and positive changes among the children of the main group if compared with patients from the comparison group. After treatment the researchers noticed reduction of tonsil bacterial number among 90,62% of children from the main group, whereas this rate made up 60% in the comparison group. Acquired data allowed recommending this medication for the multimodality therapy of infant adenoid disease.Key words: chronic tonsillitis, treatment, children, sea water hypertonic solution.

  7. Dynamics of biological water: insights from molecular modeling of light scattering in aqueous trehalose solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Laura; Comez, Lucia; Paolantoni, Marco; Fioretto, Daniele; Ladanyi, Branka M

    2012-06-28

    Extended depolarized light scattering (EDLS) measurements have been recently employed to investigate the dynamics of water solvating biological molecules, giving evidence of the presence of two different dynamical regimes among water molecules. An interpretation of EDLS has been proposed that provides an independent estimate of the retardation factor of slowdown with respect to fast water molecules and of the number of solvent molecules affected by this slowing down. Nevertheless this measure is an inherently complex one, due to the collective nature of the physical property probed. In the present work a molecular dynamics (MD) approach has been used to more deeply understand experimental results. Time correlation functions of the collective polarizability anisotropy have been calculated for the prototype disaccharide trehalose in aqueous solutions as a function of concentration. The unique capability of MD to disentangle the contributions to the dynamics arising from solute, solvent, and cross terms between the two allowed us to check the reliability of an interpretation that assumes a spectral separation of water and sugar dynamics, as well as to highlight the very presence of two distinct relaxation processes in water. The two processes have been attributed to the dynamics of bulk and hydration water, respectively. A retardation factor of ~5 and concentration dependent hydration numbers have been observed, in good agreement with experimental results [Paolantoni, M.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 7874-7878].

  8. The composite water and solute transport of barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots: effect of suberized barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranathunge, Kosala; Kim, Yangmin X; Wassmann, Friedrich; Kreszies, Tino; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas

    2017-03-01

    Roots have complex anatomical structures, and certain localized cell layers develop suberized apoplastic barriers. The size and tightness of these barriers depend on the growth conditions and on the age of the root. Such complex anatomical structures result in a composite water and solute transport in roots. Development of apoplastic barriers along barley seminal roots was detected using various staining methods, and the suberin amounts in the apical and basal zones were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectometry (GC-MS). The hydraulic conductivity of roots ( Lp r ) and of cortical cells ( Lp c ) was measured using root and cell pressure probes. When grown in hydroponics, barley roots did not form an exodermis, even at their basal zones. However, they developed an endodermis. Endodermal Casparian bands first appeared as 'dots' as early as at 20 mm from the apex, whereas a patchy suberin lamellae appeared at 60 mm. The endodermal suberin accounted for the total suberin of the roots. The absolute amount in the basal zone was significantly higher than in the apical zone, which was inversely proportional to the Lp r . Comparison of Lp r and Lp c suggested that cell to cell pathways dominate for water transport in roots. However, the calculation of Lp r from Lp c showed that at least 26 % of water transport occurs through the apoplast. Roots had different solute permeabilities ( P sr ) and reflection coefficients ( σ sr ) for the solutes used. The σ sr was below unity for the solutes, which have virtually zero permeability for semi-permeable membranes. Suberized endodermis significantly reduces Lp r of seminal roots. The water and solute transport across barley roots is composite in nature and they do not behave like ideal osmometers. The composite transport model should be extended by adding components arranged in series (cortex, endodermis) in addition to the currently included components arranged in parallel (apoplastic, cell to cell pathways).

  9. Tracking solutes and water from subsurface drip irrigation application of coalbed methane-produced waters, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, M.A.; Bern, C.R.; Healy, R.W.; Sams, J.I.; Zupancic, J.W.; Schroeder, K.T.

    2011-01-01

    One method to beneficially use water produced from coalbed methane (CBM) extraction is subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) of croplands. In SDI systems, treated CBMwater (injectate) is supplied to the soil at depth, with the purpose of preventing the buildup of detrimental salts near the surface. The technology is expanding within the Powder River Basin, but little research has been published on its environmental impacts. This article reports on initial results from tracking water and solutes from the injected CBM-produced waters at an SDI system in Johnson County, Wyoming. In the first year of SDI operation, soil moisture significantly increased in the SDI areas, but well water levels increased only modestly, suggesting that most of the water added was stored in the vadose zone or lost to evapotranspiration. The injectate has lower concentrations of most inorganic constituents relative to ambient groundwater at the site but exhibits a high sodium adsorption ratio. Changes in groundwater chemistry during the same period of SDI operation were small; the increase in groundwater-specific conductance relative to pre-SDI conditions was observed in a single well. Conversely, groundwater samples collected beneath another SDI field showed decreased concentrations of several constituents since the SDI operation.Groundwater-specific conductance at the 12 other wells showed no significant changes. Major controls on and compositional variability of groundwater, surface water, and soil water chemistry are discussed in detail. Findings from this research provide an understanding of water and salt dynamics associated with SDI systems using CBM-produced water. Copyright ??2011. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  10. Modeling the effects of different irrigation water salinity on soil water movement, uptake and multicomponent solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekakis, E. H.; Antonopoulos, V. Z.

    2015-11-01

    Simulation models can be important tools for analyzing and managing irrigation, soil salinization or crop production problems. In this study a mathematical model that describes the water movement and mass transport of individual ions (Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+) and overall soil salinity by means of the soil solution electrical conductivity, is used. The mass transport equations of Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+ have been incorporated as part of the integrated model WANISIM and the soil salinity was computed as the sum of individual ions. The model was calibrated and validated against field data, collected during a three year experiment in plots of maize, irrigated with three different irrigation water qualities, at Thessaloniki area in Northern Greece. The model was also used to evaluate salinization and sodification hazards by the use of irrigation water with increasing electrical conductivity of 0.8, 3.2 and 6.4 dS m-1, while maintaining a ratio of Ca2+:Mg2+:Na+ equal to 3:3:2. The qualitative and quantitative procedures for results evaluation showed that there was good agreement between the simulated and measured values of the water content, overall salinity and the concentration of individual soluble cations, at two soil layers (0-35 and 35-75 cm). Nutrient uptake was also taken into account. Locally available irrigation water (ECiw = 0.8 dS m-1) did not cause soil salinization or sodification. On the other hand, irrigation water with ECiw equal to 3.2 and 6.4 dS m-1 caused severe soil salinization, but not sodification. The rainfall water during the winter seasons was not sufficient to leach salts below the soil profile of 110 cm. The modified version of model WANISIM is able to predict the effects of irrigation with saline waters on soil and plant growth and it is suitable for irrigation management in areas with scarce and low quality water resources.

  11. Molecular-dynamics of water transport through membranes - water from solvent to solute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BERENDSEN, HJC; MARRINK, SJ

    1993-01-01

    An application of Molecular Dynamics computer simulation (MD) to the process of transport of water through a lipid bilayer membrane is described. The permeation process is far too slow to be modeled by straightforward MD. In stead the inverse of the permeability coefficient is expressed as an

  12. Transport of water and solutes in wettable and water repellent sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.

    1996-01-01

    The research yielded the following conclusions and results: preferential flow can be expected in recently deposited, loosely packed, wettable dune sands; preferential flow is common in most water-repellent sandy soils; distribution flow in topsoils isa process of major importance, resulting in a

  13. Subtle Effects of Aliphatic Alcohol Structure on Water Extraction and Solute Aggregation in Biphasic Water/ n -Dodecane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, Andrew W.; Qiao, Baofu; Chiarizia, Renato; Ferru, Geoffroy; Forbes, Tori; Ellis, Ross J.; Soderholm, L.

    2017-04-03

    Organic phase aggregation behavior of 1-octanol and its structural isomer, 2-ethylhexanol, in a biphasic n-dodecane water system is studied with a combination of physical measurement, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and atomistic molecular dynamic simulations. Physical properties of the organic phases are probed following their mixing and equilibration with immiscible water phases. Studies reveal that the interfacial tension decreases as a function of increasing alcohol concentration over the solubility range of the alcohol with no evidence for a critical aggregate concentration (cac). An uptake of water into the organic phases is quantified, as a function of alcohol content, by Karl Fischer titrations. The extraction of water into dodecane was further assessed as a function of alcohol concentration via the slope-analysis method sometimes employed in chemical separations. This provides a qualitative understanding of solute (water/alcohol) aggregation in the organic phase. The physical results are supported by analyses of SAXS data that reveals an emergence of aggregates in n-dodecane at elevated alcohol concentrations. The observed aggregate structure is dependent on the alcohol tail group geometry, consistent with surfactant packing parameter. The formation of these aggregates is discussed at a molecular level, where alcohol-alcohol and alcohol-water H-bonding interactions likely dominate the occurrence and morphology of the aggregates.

  14. The evaporation of the water-sodium chlorides solution droplets on the heated substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Evgenija; Kuznetsov, Geniy; Feoktistov, Dmitriy

    2014-08-01

    This work presents an experimental study of the evaporation of a sessile water- sodium chlorides solution drop to open atmosphere on the solid substrate (anodized aluminum) under the varying heat flux. The main parameters defining drop profile were obtained: contact diameter, contact angle, height of the drop. The specific evaporation rate was calculated. The influence of the initial concentration of the evaporated solution to a value of the specific evaporation rate has been found out. The specific evaporation rate decreases with increasing of the concentration.

  15. On the influence of molecular structure on the conductivity of electrolyte solutions - sodium nitrate in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Krienke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical calculations of the conductivity of sodium nitrate in water are presented and compared with experimental measurements. The method of direct correlation force in the framework of the interionic theory is used for the calculation of transport properties in connection with the associative mean spherical approximation (AMSA. The effective interactions between ions in solutions are derived with the help of Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics calculations on the Born-Oppenheimer level. This work is based on earlier theoretical and experimental studies of the structure of concentrated aqueous sodium nitrate solutions.

  16. Pin Hole Discharge Creation in Na2SO4 Water Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Lucie Hlavatá; Rodica Serbanescu; Lenka Hlochová; Zdenka Kozáková; František Krčma

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the diaphragm discharge generated in water solutions containing Na2SO4 as a supporting electrolyte. The solution conductivity was varied in the range of 270 ÷ 750 µScm-1. The batch plasma reactor with volume of 100 ml was divided into two electrode spaces by the Shapal-MTM ceramics dielectric barrier with a pin-hole (diameter of 0.6 mm). Three variable barrier thicknesses (0.3; 0.7 and 1.5 mm) and non-pulsed DC voltage up to 2 kV were used for the discharge creation. Each...

  17. Review of Various Solutions for avoiding critical levels of Legionella Bacteria in Domestic Hot Water System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Li, Hongwei; Svendsen, Svend

    2013-01-01

    , electric boiler, compact heat exchanger, water filter, chlorine dioxide, Monochloramine, UV sterilization, copper and silver electrodes. The implementary conditions, effect, limits as well as economic performance of them are demonstrated. For buildings with complicated networks and large volume, chemical...... approach is widely used, and oxidizing disinfectants have a better effect and economic performance. For buildings with DHW volume less than 3 liters, implementation of compact heat exchangers is an effective solution. By reviewing the efficacy of each method, the optimal solution for low temperature...

  18. On the Classical Solutions of Two Dimensional Inviscid Rotating Shallow Water System

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Bin

    2009-01-01

    We prove global existence and asymptotic behavior of classical solutions for two dimensional inviscid Rotating Shallow Water system with small initial data subject to the zero-relative-vorticity constraint. One of the key steps is a reformulation of the problem into a symmetric quasilinear Klein-Gordon system, for which the global existence of classical solutions is then proved with combination of the vector field approach and the normal forms. We also probe the case of general initial data and reveal a lower bound for the lifespan that is almost inversely proportional to the size of the initial relative vorticity.

  19. Measurement of Solubilities of o-Phenylphenol in Petroleum Ether and DDP in Acetone + Water Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-sheng; LONG Bing-wen; XIONG You-qing; WU Jun-sheng; KANG Hui-bao

    2006-01-01

    [(6-oxide-6H-dibenze(c, e)(1, 2) oxaphosphorin-6-yl) methyl]-butanedioic acid (DDP) was prepared and characterized. Solubilities of o-phenylphenol(OPP) in petroleum ether and DDP in acetone + water solution were measured by a gravimetrical method. The solubility data of OPP were well correlated using Francis equation. For the solubility of DDP in acetone aqueous solution, it was found that at each fixed temperature there existed a maximum when the acetone mass fraction in the solvent reached a certain concentration. The experiment shows that the fraction is approximately 0.6. The solubility data would be helpful for their industrial crystallization process.

  20. A coupled model of soil water-heat-solute movement under the mulched drip irrigation condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H.; Tian, F.; Gao, L.; Hu, H.

    2010-12-01

    : The mulched drip irrigation (MDI), first developed in northwestern part of China (Xinjiang Province) in the cotton field in 1996, can obtain higher yield while at the lower cost of water consumption and thus becomes popular rapidly. However, it has the potential risk of salinizing the arable soil. Also, plastic film can alter the energy balance at the ground surface and invoke the regime shifting of soil heat transfer. It is, therefore, necessary to simulate the inter-related movement of water, heat, and dissolvable solute in the soil under the MDI condition for the purpose of sustainable agricultural production as well as of climate change issue. With the different boundary condition and irrigation rate, the transportation and distribution features of water-heat-salt under the MDI condition are significantly different from those under the other irrigation methods. The existing tools such as HYDRUS and VS2DH(T) could not set up the special boundary condition relevant to MDI, e.g., the moving ponded area. A new two-dimensional numerical model of Richard’s equation and Convection-Dispersion equations was developed which coupled soil water, solute, and heat together. For the homogenous and isotropic porous media, the soil water-heat-solute movement under the MDI condition is considered as 2D problem. The Richards and solute convection-diffusive equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations (ODEs) through spatial semi-discretization, and so do the corresponding boundary conditions. The resultant ODEs are solved using a state-of-the-art solver, CVODE developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The model is validated against the numerical examples as well as the field data. The results show the high numerical efficiency, the high simulation accuracy, and the flexibility of the model to mimic changing boundary conditions. Key words: numerical model, Richard’s equation, Convection-Diffusive equation, CVODE

  1. Glass transition and relaxation dynamics of propylene glycol-water solutions confined in clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, Khalid; Björklund, Jimmy; Nyhlén, Fredrik; Yttergren, Madeleine; Mârtensson, Lena; Swenson, Jan

    2014-07-01

    The molecular dynamics of aqueous solutions of propylene glycol (PG) and propylene glycol methylether (PGME) confined in a two-dimensional layer-structured Na-vermiculite clay has been studied by broadband dielectric spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. As typical for liquids in confined geometries the intensity of the cooperative α-relaxation becomes considerably more suppressed than the more local β-like relaxation processes. In fact, at high water contents the calorimetric glass transition and related structural α-relaxation cannot even be observed, due to the confinement. Thus, the intensity of the viscosity related α-relaxation is dramatically reduced, but its time scale as well as the related glass transition temperature Tg are for both systems only weakly influenced by the confinement. In the case of the PGME-water solutions it is an important finding since in the corresponding bulk system a pronounced non-monotonic concentration dependence of the glass transition related dynamics has been observed due to the growth of hydrogen bonded relaxing entities of water bridging between PGME molecules [J. Sjöström, J. Mattsson, R. Bergman, and J. Swenson, Phys. Chem. B 115, 10013 (2011)]. The present results suggest that the same type of structural entities are formed in the quasi-two-dimensional space between the clay platelets. It is also observed that the main water relaxation cannot be distinguished from the β-relaxation of PG or PGME in the concentration range up to intermediate water contents. This suggests that these two processes are coupled and that the water molecules affect the time scale of the β-relaxation. However, this is most likely true also for the corresponding bulk solutions, which exhibit similar time scales of this combined relaxation process below Tg. Finally, it is found that at higher water contents the water relaxation does not merge with, or follow, the α-relaxation above Tg, but instead crosses the

  2. SHALLOW WATER EQUATION SOLUTION IN 2D USING FINITE DIFFERENCE METHOD WITH EXPLICIT SCHEME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuraini Nuraini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Modeling the dynamics of seawater typically uses a shallow water model. The shallow water model is derived from the mass conservation equation and the momentum set into shallow water equations. A two-dimensional shallow water equation alongside the model that is integrated with depth is described in numerical form. This equation can be solved by finite different methods either explicitly or implicitly. In this modeling, the two dimensional shallow water equations are described in discrete form using explicit schemes. Keyword: shallow water equation, finite difference and schema explisit. REFERENSI  1. Bunya, S., Westerink, J. J. dan Yoshimura. 2005. Discontinuous Boundary Implementation for the Shallow Water Equations. Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids. 47: 1451-1468. 2. Kampf Jochen. 2009. Ocean Modelling For Beginners. Springer Heidelberg Dordrecht. London New York. 3. Rezolla, L 2011. Numerical Methods for the Solution of Partial Diferential Equations. Trieste. International Schoolfor Advanced Studies. 4. Natakussumah, K. D., Kusuma, S. B. M., Darmawan, H., Adityawan, B. M. Dan  Farid, M. 2007. Pemodelan Hubungan Hujan dan Aliran Permukaan pada Suatu DAS  dengan Metode Beda Hingga. ITB Sain dan Tek. 39: 97-123. 5. Casulli, V. dan Walters, A. R. 2000. An unstructured grid, three-dimensional model based on the shallow water equations. Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids. 32: 331-348. 6. Triatmodjo, B. 2002. Metode Numerik  Beta Offset. Yogyakarta.

  3. Some Interaction Solutions of a Reduced Generalised (3+1)-Dimensional Shallow Water Wave Equation for Lump Solutions and a Pair of Resonance Solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Chen, Mei-Dan; Li, Xian; Li, Biao

    2017-05-01

    Through Hirota bilinear transformation and symbolic computation with Maple, a class of lump solutions, rationally localised in all directions in the space, to a reduced generalised (3+1)-dimensional shallow water wave (SWW) equation are prensented. The resulting lump solutions all contain six parameters, two of which are free due to the translation invariance of the SWW equation and the other four of which must satisfy a nonzero determinant condition guaranteeing analyticity and rational localisation of the solutions. Then we derived the interaction solutions for lump solutions and one stripe soliton and the result shows that the particular lump solutions with specific values of the involved parameters will be drowned or swallowed by the stripe soliton. Furthermore, we extend this method to a more general combination of positive quadratic function and hyperbolic functions. Especially, it is interesting that a rogue wave is found to be aroused by the interaction between lump solutions and a pair of resonance stripe solitons. By choosing the values of the parameters, the dynamic properties of lump solutions, interaction solutions for lump solutions and one stripe soliton and interaction solutions for lump solutions and a pair of resonance solitons, are shown by dynamic graphs.

  4. Comparision of Incidental Reflection From Containerized Maintenance/Housekeeping Solutions and One Inch of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Bryan Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); MacQuigg, Michael Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wysong, Andrew Russell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-15

    This document addresses the incidental reflector reactivity worth of containerized maintenance/housekeeping fluids for use in PF-4 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The intent of the document is to analyze containerized maintenance/housekeeping fluids which will be analyzed as water that may be present under normal conditions of an operation. The reactivity worth is compared to the reactivity worth due to I-inch of close-fitting 4n water reflection and I-inch of close-fitting radial water reflection. Both have been used to bound incidental reflection by 2-liter bottles in criticality safety evaluations. The conclusion is that, when the maintenance/housekeeping fluids are containerized the reactivity increase from a configuration which is bounding of normal conditions (up to eight bottles modeled with 2-liters of solution at varying diameter) is bound by I-inch of close fitting 4n water relection.

  5. Quasi-elastic laser light scattering study of polyacrylamide hydrogel immersed in water and salt solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sivanantham; B V R Tata

    2010-12-01

    Polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels immersed in water and aqueous NaCl solutions were investigated for their structure and dynamics using static and quasi-elastic laser light scattering (QELS) techniques. Ensemble-averaged electric field correlation function (, ) obtained from the non-ergodic analysis of intensity-autocorrelation function for PAAm gel immersed in water and in 5 M NaCl showed an exponential decay to a plateau with an initial decay followed by saturation at long times. The value of the plateau was found to depend on NaCl concentration and was higher than that of water. Collective diffusion coefficient, , of the polymer network of the hydrogel immersed in water and in different concentrations of NaCl was determined by analysing (, ). The measured diffusion coefficient showed linear decrease with increase in concentration of NaCl. The characteristic network parameters were obtained by analyzing (, ) with harmonically bound Brownian particle model and from static light scattering studies.

  6. SWASHES: a library of Shallow Water Analytic Solutions for Hydraulic and Environmental Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Delestre, Olivier; Pierre-Antoine, Ksinant; Darboux, Frédéric; Christian, Laguerre; Vo, Thi Ngoc Tuoi; James, Francois; Cordier, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    A significant number of analytic solutions to the Shallow Water equations is discribed in a unified formalism. They encompass a wide variety of flow conditions (supercritical, subcritical, shock, etc.), in 1 or 2 space dimensions, with or without rain and soil friction, for transitory flow or steady state. An original feature is that the corresponding source codes are made available to the community (http://www.univ-orleans.fr/mapmo/soft/SWASHES), so that users of Shallow Water based models can easily find an adaptable benchmark library to validate numerical methods.

  7. Interactions between crystal violet and AOT in aqueous solutions and in AOT/isooctane/water microemulsions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Xiaojuan; AN Xueqin; CHEN Zhiyun; SHEN Weiguo

    2004-01-01

    The absorbance of crystal violet (CV) in a series of aqueous solutions and a series of sodium bis(2-ethyl- hexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/isooctane/water microemulsions has been determined. Association models have been used to analyse the experimental data to obtain the association constants of CV and AOT in the above two media. It was found that about up to 57% CV was associated by AOT in AOT/ isooctane/water microemulsions, which reduced the reaction rate of alkaline fading of crystal violet in the microemulsions.

  8. Review of Various Solutions for avoiding critical levels of Legionella Bacteria in Domestic Hot Water System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Li, Hongwei; Svendsen, Svend

    2013-01-01

    reproduces rapidly at the temperature around 25oC- 45 oC. After several outbreaks of pheumonia and fever caused by legionella bacteria, most countries require 60 oC in the network and 50-55 oC at the faucets with periodic flush by hot water above 60 oC as disinfection solution. That makes obstacles of low...... temperature DH implementation. Therefore, effective solution of legionella bacteria is in urgent demand. To select optimal disinfection treatments for certain cases which are quite different in dimension or purpose of use, various methods were reviewed, including shock hyperchlorination, super heating......, electric boiler, compact heat exchanger, water filter, chlorine dioxide, Monochloramine, UV sterilization, copper and silver electrodes. The implementary conditions, effect, limits as well as economic performance of them are demonstrated. For buildings with complicated networks and large volume, chemical...

  9. Biologically Pre-Treated Habitation Waste Water as a Sustainable Green Urine Pre-Treat Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Thompson, Bret; Sevanthi, Ritesh; Morse, Audra; Meyer, Caitlin; Callahan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The ability to recover water from urine and flush water is a critical process to allow long term sustainable human habitation in space or bases on the moon or mars. Organic N present as urea or similar compounds can hydrolyze producing free ammonia. This reaction results in an increase in the pH converting ammonium to ammonia which is volatile and not removed by distillation. The increase in pH will also cause precipitation reactions to occur. In order to prevent this, urine on ISS is combined with a pretreat solution. While use of a pretreatment solution has been successful, there are numerous draw backs including: storage and use of highly hazardous solutions, limitations on water recovery (less than 85%), and production of brine with pore dewatering characteristics. We evaluated the use of biologically treated habitation wastewaters (ISS and early planetary base) to replace the current pretreat solution. We evaluated both amended and un-amended bioreactor effluent. For the amended effluent, we evaluated "green" pretreat chemicals including citric acid and citric acid amended with benzoic acid. We used a mock urine/air separator modeled after the urine collection assembly on ISS. The urine/air separator was challenged continually for >6 months. Depending on the test point, the separator was challenged daily with donated urine and flushed with amended or un-amended reactor effluent. We monitored the pH of the urine, flush solution and residual pH in the urine/air separator after each urine event. We also evaluated solids production and biological growth. Our results support the use of both un-amended and amended bioreactor effluent to maintain the operability of the urine /air separator. The ability to use bioreactor effluent could decrease consumable cost, reduce hazards associated with current pre-treat chemicals, allow other membrane based desalination processes to be utilized, and improve brine characteristics.

  10. The magnetoviscous effect of micellar solutions doped with water based ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arantes, Fabiana R., E-mail: farantes@if.usp.br [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Technische Universität Dresden (Germany); Odenbach, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.odenbach@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Technische Universität Dresden (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    This work presents a magnetorheological study of micellar solutions of potassium laurate and water doped with magnetite nanoparticles, accompanied by auxiliary dynamic light scattering measurements. An increase in the viscosity of the samples under applied field was observed and, furthermore, a considerable magnetoviscous effect was revealed even at magnetic particles' concentrations as low as 0.005–0.01 vol%. This indicates that the rheological behavior of the micelles is changed by the interaction of the magnetic particles with the applied field, leading to different microscopic arrangements in the micellar solutions. - Highlights: • We study the magnetorheological behavior of micellar solutions doped with ferrofluids. • We observe an increase in the viscosity of the samples under an applied field. • We find a large magnetoviscous effect even at low magnetic particles' concentration. • Interaction of particles with the field changes the micelles' rheological behavior.

  11. The ionic product of water in highly concentrated sodium perchlorate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turonek, M L; Hefter, G T; May, P M

    1998-03-01

    The ionic product of water, pK(w)=-log[H(+)][OH(-)], has been determined in aqueous solutions of sodium perchlorate over the concentration range of 1.0-8.0 M at 25 degrees C from high-precision potentiometric titrations carried out in cells with liquid junction using both glass and hydrogen electrodes. The glass electrode results are systematically lower probably as a result of interference by Na(+) ions.

  12. Existence of global strong solutions for the shallow-water equations with large initial data

    CERN Document Server

    Haspot, Boris

    2011-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a viscous shallow-water system with friction and capillarity term. We prove in this paper the existence of global strong solutions for this system with some choice of large initial data when $N\\geq 2$ in critical spaces for the scaling of the equations. More precisely, we introduce as in \\cite{Hprepa} a new unknown,\\textit{a effective velocity} $v=u+\\mu\

  13. SOLUTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Hoyos Guajardo, Ph.D. Candidate, M.Sc., B.Eng.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory that is presented below aims to conceptualise how a group of undergraduate students tackle non-routine mathematical problems during a problem-solving course. The aim of the course is to allow students to experience mathematics as a creative process and to reflect on their own experience. During the course, students are required to produce a written ‘rubric’ of their work, i.e., to document their thoughts as they occur as well as their emotionsduring the process. These ‘rubrics’ were used as the main source of data.Students’ problem-solving processes can be explained as a three-stage process that has been called ‘solutioning’. This process is presented in the six sections below. The first three refer to a common area of concern that can be called‘generating knowledge’. In this way, generating knowledge also includes issues related to ‘key ideas’ and ‘gaining understanding’. The third and the fourth sections refer to ‘generating’ and ‘validating a solution’, respectively. Finally, once solutions are generated and validated, students usually try to improve them further before presenting them as final results. Thus, the last section deals with‘improving a solution’. Although not all students go through all of the stages, it may be said that ‘solutioning’ considers students’ main concerns as they tackle non-routine mathematical problems.

  14. Approximate solutions of some problems of scattering of surface water waves by vertical barriers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A CHOUDHARY; S C MARTHA

    2017-05-01

    A class of mixed boundary value problems (bvps), occurring in the study of scattering of surface water waves by thin vertical rigid barriers placed in water of finite depth, is examined for their approximate solutions. Two different placings of vertical barriers are analyzed, namely, (i) a partially immersed barrier and(ii) a bottom standing barrier. The solutions of the bvps are obtained by utilizing the eigenfunction expansion method, leading to a mathematical problem of solving over-determined systems of linear algebraic equations. The methods of analytical least-square approximation as well as algebraic least-square approximation are employed to solve the corresponding over-determined system of linear algebraic equations and thereby evaluate the physical quantities, namely, the reflection and transmission coefficients. Further, the absolute values of the reflection coefficients are compared to the known results obtained by utilizing a Galerkin type of approximate method after reducing the bvps to integral equations whose complete solutions are difficult to be determined.Various combinations of discretization of the resulting dual series relations obtained in the present analysis are employed to determine the least-square solution.

  15. The structure and terahertz dynamics of water confined in nanoscale pools in salt solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, David A; Corsaro, Carmelo; Candelaresi, Marco; Brownlie, Angela; Seddon, Ken R; Mallamace, Francesco; Wynne, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    The behaviour of liquid water below its melting point is of great interest as it may hold clues to the properties of normal liquid water and of water in and on the surfaces of biomolecules. A second critical point, giving rise to a polyamorphic transition between high and low density water, may be hidden in the supercooled region but cannot be observed directly. Here it is shown that water can be locked up in nano-pools or worm-like structures using aqueous LiCl salt solutions and can be studied with terahertz spectroscopies. Very high dynamic range ultrafast femtosecond optical Kerr effect (OKE) spectroscopy is used to study the temperature-dependent behaviour of water in these nano-pools on timescales from 10 fs to 4 ns. These experiments are complemented by temperature-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion measurements, concentration-dependent Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) measurements, and temperature-dependent rheology. It is found that liquid water in the nanoscale pools undergoes a fragile-to-strong transition at about 220 K associated with a sharp increase in the inhomogeneity of translational dynamics.

  16. Effect of simple solutes on the long range dipolar correlations in liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baul, Upayan; Kanth, J. Maruthi Pradeep; Anishetty, Ramesh; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2016-03-01

    Intermolecular correlations in liquid water at ambient conditions have generally been characterized through short range density fluctuations described through the atomic pair distribution functions. Recent numerical and experimental results have suggested that such a description of order or structure in liquid water is incomplete and there exist considerably longer ranged orientational correlations in water that can be studied through dipolar correlations. In this study, using large scale classical, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations using TIP4P-Ew and TIP3P models of water, we show that salts such as sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), caesium chloride (CsCl), and magnesium chloride (MgCl2) have a long range effect on the dipolar correlations, which cannot be explained by the notion of structure making and breaking by dissolved ions. Observed effects are explained through orientational stratification of water molecules around ions and their long range coupling to the global hydrogen bond network by virtue of the sum rule for water. The observations for single hydrophilic solutes are contrasted with the same for a single methane (CH4) molecule. We observe that even a single small hydrophobe can result in enhancement of long range orientational correlations in liquid water, contrary to the case of dissolved ions, which have been observed to have a reducing effect. The observations from this study are discussed in the context of hydrophobic effect.

  17. Effects of Solution Hydrodynamics on Corrosion Inhibition of Steel by Citric Acid in Cooling Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Asghari, E.; Mohammadi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in cooling water systems, which is often controlled using corrosion inhibitors. Solution hydrodynamics is one of the factors affecting corrosion inhibition of metals in these systems. The present work focuses on the study of the combined effects of citric acid concentration (as a green corrosion inhibitor) and fluid flow on corrosion of steel in simulated cooling water. Electrochemical techniques including Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used for corrosion studies. Laminar flow was simulated using a rotating disk electrode. The effects of solution hydrodynamics on inhibition performance of citric acid were discussed. The citric acid showed low inhibition performance in quiescent solution; however, when the electrode rotated at 200 rpm, inhibition efficiency increased remarkably. It was attributed mainly to the acceleration of inhibitor mass transport toward metal surface. The efficiencies were then decreased at higher rotation speeds due to enhanced wall shear stresses on metal surface and separation of adsorbed inhibitor molecules. This article is first part of authors' attempts in designing green inhibitor formulations for industrial cooling water. Citric acid showed acceptable corrosion inhibition in low rotation rates; thus, it can be used as a green additive to the corrosion inhibitor formulations.

  18. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid-liquid transition in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, John W.; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2014-08-01

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H2O-NaCl and H2O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid-liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of "reaction" between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases.

  19. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid–liquid transition in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddle, John W.; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A., E-mail: anisimov@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2014-08-21

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid–liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid–liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H{sub 2}O-NaCl and H{sub 2}O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid–liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of “reaction” between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases.

  20. Droplet evaporation of pure water and protein solution on nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces of varying heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Jin C J

    2009-07-07

    Evaporation of liquids on substrates is important for many applications including lab-on-a-chip, especially when they are in droplets. Unlike on planar substrates, droplet evaporation on micropatterned substrates has been studied only recently and none so far on nanopatterns. Driven by the applicability of nanostructured surfaces to biomaterials and tissue engineering, we report on the evaporative process of sessile droplets of pure water and a protein solution on superhydrophobic surfaces of sharp-tip post structures in a submicrometer pitch (230 nm) and varying heights (100-500 nm). We find that the nanotopographical three-dimensionalities such as structural height and sidewall profile affect the surface superhydrophobicity in such a way that only tall and slender nanostructures provide the surface with great superhydrophobicity (a contact angle more than 170 degrees). The evaporation process was different between the pure water and the protein solution; unlike pure water, a significant contact-line spreading and pinning effect was observed in a droplet of a protein solution with an intermediate transition from a dewetting (Cassie) to a wetting (Wenzel) state. Enabled by well-defined nanostructures, our results highlight that the surface superhydrophobicity and the droplet evaporation are significantly affected by the three-dimensional nanometric topography and the surface fouling such as protein adsorption.

  1. Two-step recrystallization of water in concentrated aqueous solution of poly(ethylene glycol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmei-Ide, Makoto; Motonaga, Tetsuya; Kasai, Ryosuke; Kitano, Hiromi

    2013-02-21

    Crystallization behavior of water in a concentrated aqueous solution of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with a water content of 37.5 wt % was investigated by temperature variable mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectroscopy in a temperature range of 298-170 K. The mid-IR spectrum of water at 298 K showed that a large water cluster was not formed and that most of the water molecules were associated with the PEG chain. Ice formation, however, occurred as found in previous studies by differential scanning calorimetory. Ice formations were grouped into three types: crystallization at 231 K during cooling, that at 198 K during heating, and that at 210 K during heating. The latter two were just recrystallization. These ice formations were the direct transition from hydration species to ice without condensation regardless of crystallization or recrystallization. This means that the recrystallized water in the present system was not generated from low-density amorphous solid water. At a low cooling rate, nearly complete crystallization at 231 K during cooling and no recrystallization were observed. At a high cooling rate, no crystallization and two-step recrystallization at 198 and 210 K were observed. The former and latter recrystallizations were found to be generated from water associated with the PEG chains with ttg (the sequence -O-CH(2)-CH(2)-O- having a trans (t) conformation about the -C-O- bond and a gauche (g) conformation about the -C-C- bond) and random conformations, respectively. These results indicate that recrystallizable water does not have a single specific water structure.

  2. Engaging the creative to better build science into water resource solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, P. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Psychological thought suggests that social engagement with an environmental problem requires 1) cognitive understanding of the problem, 2) emotional engagement with the problem, and 3) perceived efficacy that there is something we can do to solve the problem. Within the water sciences, we form problem-focused, cross-disciplinary teams to help address complex water resource problems, but often we only seek teammates from other disciplines within the realms of engineering and the natural/social sciences. Here I argue that this science-centric focus fails to fully solve these water resource problems, and often the science goes unheard because it is heavily cognitive and lacks the ability to effectively engage the audience through crucial social-psychological aspects of emotion and efficacy. To solve this, future cross-disciplinary collaborations that seek to include creative actors from the worlds of art, humanities, and design can begin to provide a much stronger overlap of the cognition, emotion, and efficacy needed to communicate the science, engage the audience, and create the solutions needed to solve or world's most complex water resource problems. Disciplines across the arts, sciences, and engineering all bring unique strengths that, through collaboration, allow for uniquely creative modes of art-science overlap that can engage people through additions of emotion and efficacy that compliment the science and go beyond the traditional cognitive approach. I highlight examples of this art-science overlap in action and argue that water resource collaborations like these will be more likely to have their hydrologic science accepted and applied by those who decide on water resource solutions. For this Pop-up Talk session, I aim to share the details of this proposed framework in the context of my own research and the work of others. I hope to incite discussion regarding the utility and relevance of this framework as a future option for other water resource

  3. Water and Solute Transport in the Shallow Subsurface of a Natural Levee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, A.; Keim, R.

    2008-12-01

    In riverine wetlands, river channels are separated from backswamps by natural levees that form adjacent to the channel by sediment deposition during floods. The conventional conceptual framework is that backswamp water is impounded and disconnected from surface flow; however, layered sediments, shrink-swell clays, roots and decayed organic matter, and animal burrows likely form preferential pathways for subsurface flow and may substantially affect water and solute exchange between wetlands and river channels. To test the hypothesis that preferential flow is an important pathway of subsurface water movement through natural levees, we measured hydraulic gradients and solute tracers in a 5 x 5 m grid of 19 shallow (2m) monitoring wells within a large representative elementary volume (300 m3) of natural levee in the Atchafalaya Basin, Louisiana. In addition to measuring transient responses to precipitation, we constructed a small reservoir on the backswamp side of the levee to simulate a seasonal hydraulic gradient from the swamp to the adjacent river channel. Results indicate rapid response of water levels in all monitoring wells to the imposed hydraulic gradient as well as rain events, which included two tropical cyclones. In contrast, tracer response was highly variable, both spatially and across events, indicating a complex relationship between subsurface flow processes and water chemistry. Groundwater chemistry indicated spatially variable flowpaths. In some wells, hydraulic response coincided with a chemical shift toward low-conductivity surface water; however, other wells showed similar hydraulic responses but no change in tracer concentrations or even a shift toward higher-conductivity water that was presumably stored in the soil matrix. This spatial variation in tracer response indicates multiple mechanisms of hydraulic response, each of which has important implications for biogeochemical interactions between backswamps and channels in the shallow subsurface

  4. Changes in water storage in Australia as resolved using GRACE gravity field solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Kevin; Awange, Joseph; Anjasmara, Ira; Kuhn, Michael; Featherstone, Will; Sarukkalige, Priyantha

    2010-05-01

    The GRACE gravity field solutions have been used in several studies to provide some constraint on how terrestrial water storage in Australia is changing, especially given the recent drought that has afflicted much of the country for most of the past decade. In this study we look at four regions of Australia, and compare/contrast how GRACE describes the behaviour of the terrestrial water storage. These areas are the Murray-Darling River Basin (MDRB) in the southeast corner of Australia, one of the primary agricultural regions that have been seriously afflicted by the drought, monsoonal Northern Australia, which has seen an increase in terrestrial water storage, the southwest corner of Western Australia (SWWA), another area of regional agricultural importance and the Lake Eyre district, an area that is usually extremely dry, but experiences occasional flooding. We make use of the mascon solutions from the Goddard Space Science Laboratory, and apply principle component analysis to identify the most important spatial and temporal trend variability in the GRACE solutions. These are in turn compared to other datasets, namely ground truth data such as groundwater levels and river gauges from various government agencies (e.g. the Western Australian Department of Water), as well as precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission. Loss of mass, interpreted as a decrease in stored terrestrial water, is identified from the GRACE time series for the MRDB and SWWA, while an increase is seen in the monsoonal north, with significant mass fluctuations noted around Lake Eyre which are correlated with flooding events in other parts of Australia, e.g. Queensland.

  5. Supercooling of aqueous dimethylsulfoxide solution at normal and high pressures: Evidence for the coexistence of phase-separated aqueous dimethylsulfoxide solutions of different water structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, H; Kajiwara, K; Miyata, K

    2010-05-21

    Supercooling behavior of aqueous dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution was investigated as a function of DMSO concentration and at high pressures. A linear relationship was observed for T(H) (homogeneous ice nucleation temperature) and T(m) (melting temperature) for the supercooling of aqueous DMSO solution at normal pressure. Analysis of the DTA (differential thermal analysis) traces for homogeneous ice crystallization in the bottom region of the T(H) curve for a DMSO solution of R=20 (R: moles of water/moles of DMSO) at high pressures supported the contention that the second critical point (SCP) of liquid water should exist at P(c2)= approximately 200 MPa and at T(c2)temperature of SCP). The presence of two T(H) peaks for DMSO solutions (R=15, 12, and 10) suggests that phase separation occurs in aqueous DMSO solution (Rtemperatures (different liquid water structures [LDL-like and HDL-like structures (LDL: low-density liquid water, HDL: high-density liquid water)] in the pressure range of 120-230 MPa.

  6. Solution transformation of Cu₂O into CuInS₂ for solar water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingshan; Tilley, S David; Steier, Ludmilla; Schreier, Marcel; Mayer, Matthew T; Fan, Hong Jin; Grätzel, Michael

    2015-02-11

    Though Cu2O has demonstrated high performance as a photocathode for solar water splitting, its band gap is too large for efficient use as the bottom cell in tandem configurations. Accordingly, copper chalcopyrites have recently attracted much attention for solar water splitting due to their smaller and tunable band gaps. However, their fabrication is mainly based on vacuum evaporation, which is an expensive and energy consuming process. Here, we have developed a novel and low-cost solution fabrication method, and CuInS2 was chosen as a model material due to its smaller band gap compared to Cu2O and relatively simple composition. The nanostructured CuInS2 electrodes were synthesized at low temperature in crystalline form by solvothermal treatment of electrochemically deposited Cu2O films. Following the coating of overlayers and decoration with Pt catalyst, the as-fabricated CuInS2 electrode demonstrated water splitting photocurrents of 3.5 mA cm(-2) under simulated solar illumination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest performance yet reported for a solution-processed copper chalcopyrite electrode for solar water splitting. Furthermore, the electrode showed good stability and had a broad incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) response to wavelengths beyond 800 nm, consistent with the smaller bandgap of this material.

  7. Organic solutes in coconut palm seedlings under water and salt stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre R. A. da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to investigate the biochemical mechanisms associated with isolated and/or concurrent actions of drought and soil salinity in seedlings of coconut tree, through the accumulation of organic solutes (soluble carbohydrates, soluble amino N and free proline in leaves and roots. The experiment, conducted in a protected environment, in Fortaleza, Brazil, in a randomized block design, in a split-plot arrangement, evaluated the effects of different levels of water stress (plots by imposing distinct percentages of replacement of water losses through crop potential evapotranspiration - ETpc (20, 40, 60, 80 and 100%, associated with subplots consisting of increasing levels of soil salinity in saturation extract (1.72, 6.25, 25.80 and 40.70 dS m-1 provided by the soils collected in the Irrigated Perimeter of Morada Nova. Salinity did not change the concentration of organic solutes; however, there were increases in leaf and root levels of free proline in response to water stress, which contributes to the osmoregulation and/or osmoprotection of the species under adverse conditions of water supply.

  8. Hydrologic and biogeochemical controls of river subsurface solutes under agriculturally enhanced ground water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildman, R.A.; Domagalski, J.L.; Hering, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    The relative influences of hydrologic processes and biogeochemistry on the transport and retention of minor solutes were compared in the riverbed of the lower Merced River (California, USA). The subsurface of this reach receives ground water discharge and surface water infiltration due to an altered hydraulic setting resulting from agricultural irrigation. Filtered ground water samples were collected from 30 drive point locations in March, June, and October 2004. Hydrologic processes, described previously, were verified by observations of bromine concentrations; manganese was used to indicate redox conditions. The separate responses of the minor solutes strontium, barium, uranium, and phosphorus to these influences were examined. Correlation and principal component analyses indicate that hydrologic processes dominate the distribution of trace elements in the ground water. Redox conditions appear to be independent of hydrologic processes and account for most of the remaining data variability. With some variability, major processes are consistent in two sampling transects separated by 100 m. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  9. Hammerhead ribozyme activity and oligonucleotide duplex stability in mixed solutions of water and organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Nakano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids are useful for biomedical targeting and sensing applications in which the molecular environment is different from that of a dilute aqueous solution. In this study, the influence of various types of mixed solutions of water and water-soluble organic compounds on RNA was investigated by measuring the catalytic activity of the hammerhead ribozyme and the thermodynamic stability of an oligonucleotide duplex. The compounds with a net neutral charge, such as poly(ethylene glycol, small primary alcohols, amide compounds, and aprotic solvent molecules, added at high concentrations changed the ribozyme-catalyzed RNA cleavage rate, with the magnitude of the effect dependent on the NaCl concentration. These compounds also changed the thermodynamic stability of RNA base pairs of an oligonucleotide duplex and its dependence on the NaCl concentration. Specific interactions with RNA molecules and reduced water activity could account for the inhibiting effects on the ribozyme catalysis and destabilizing effects on the duplex stability. The salt concentration dependence data correlated with the dielectric constant, but not with water activity, viscosity, and the size of organic compounds. This observation suggests the significance of the dielectric constant effects on the RNA reactions under molecular crowding conditions created by organic compounds.

  10. Intelligent complete solution for heating and hot water; Intelligente Komplettloesung fuer Heizung und Warmwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haegler, W.

    2002-07-01

    This article describes an integrated space-heating and hot-water heating system that is suitable for apartment buildings and housing estates. The concept, developed by a heating system planner in the Swiss Bernese Oberland, is described. The principles behind the system, which features centralised heat generation and decentralised hot-water storage, are discussed. The advantages offered by the system are compared with conventional solutions, whereby savings in investments and the use of standard components are commented on. The functioning of the decentralised hot-water boilers, which are heated up via the centralised heat distribution system at times when space-heating demands are low, is described. One of the many possibilities for the centralised generation of heat - a heat pump - is examined and the use of programmable controllers in the operation of the system is described.

  11. Blue-Green solutions for improving water quality in an urbanizing catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Zahra; Sha, Bo; Ferreira, Carla Sofia; Sjöstedt, Carin

    2017-04-01

    With increasing urban population and expanding urban areas, cities have demonstrated great influences on natural resources and the surrounding environment. Urbanization process is generally accompanied by noticeable land use/cover change, such as turning permeable forest area and agricultural land into impervious landscapes like roads, parking lots, commercial and residential areas, leading to major environmental impacts on both the hydrological processes and water quality of the local catchment. Urban areas usually act as major diffuse pollution sources in a catchment. On the one hand, human activities increase the generation and accumulation of pollutants on urban surface; on the other hand, large impervious urban landscape improves the mobilization and transport of pollutants to receiving water body by increasing surface runoff and hydraulic efficiency. This study focuses on how different urbanization patterns would affect surface water quality, in order to examine whether the heterogeneity of urban areas would be an important factor that influencing surface water quality and what impacts it would induce. Furthermore, using coupled hydrological and water quality models, the effect of different blue green solutions including nature remnants and parks, gardens, small forests, wetlands and ponds; on improving the water quality will be investigated.

  12. Vadose Zone Monitoring of Dairy Green Water Lagoons using Soil Solution Samplers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brainard, James R.; Coplen, Amy K

    2005-11-01

    Over the last decade, dairy farms in New Mexico have become an important component to the economy of many rural ranching and farming communities. Dairy operations are water intensive and use groundwater that otherwise would be used for irrigation purposes. Most dairies reuse their process/green water three times and utilize lined lagoons for temporary storage of green water. Leakage of water from lagoons can pose a risk to groundwater quality. Groundwater resource protection infrastructures at dairies are regulated by the New Mexico Environment Department which currently relies on monitoring wells installed in the saturated zone for detecting leakage of waste water lagoon liners. Here we present a proposal to monitor the unsaturated zone beneath the lagoons with soil water solution samplers to provide early detection of leaking liners. Early detection of leaking liners along with rapid repair can minimize contamination of aquifers and reduce dairy liability for aquifer remediation. Additionally, acceptance of vadose zone monitoring as a NMED requirement over saturated zone monitoring would very likely significantly reduce dairy startup and expansion costs. Acknowledgment Funding for this project was provided by the Sandia National Laboratories Small Business Assistance Program

  13. Removal of Crystal Violet dye from aqueous solution using water hyacinth: Equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rajeswari Kulkarni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Effluent water from dyeing industries has now for long been a taxing issue. Of the various dyes which are extremely toxic, Crystal Violet which is used in the dyeing industry is known for its mutagenic and mitotic poisoning nature. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes is a perennial aquatic plant notorious for its rapid invasive growth on the surface of water bodies causing ill-effects on the biodiversity. The potential of powdered roots of water hyacinth was studied for decolorization of Crystal Violet dye. Influence of parameters such as initial pH (2.0–10.0, initial dye concentration (100–500 ppm, biosorbent dosage (0.5–5 g/l, contact time (10–240 min and temperature (300–323 K were examined. Maximum removal of dye was observed at pH 7.8. The obtained data were fit into different kinetic models and the biosorption was found to follow pseudo second order kinetic model. The Langmuir monolayer biosorption capacity of water hyacinth was estimated as 322.58 mg/g. The study has demonstrated water hyacinth as a potential low cost biosorbent for effective removal of Crystal Violet dye from aqueous solution.

  14. Corrosion of dissimilar metal crevices in simulated concentrated ground water solutions at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Quinn, M.J

    2003-01-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada is under consideration by the US Department of Energy. The proposed facility will be located in the unsaturated zone approximately 300 m below the surface and 300 m above the water table. The proposed waste container consists of an outer corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 shell surrounding a 316 NG stainless steel structural inner container that encapsulates the used nuclear fuel waste. A titanium drip shield is proposed to protect the waste container from ground water seepage arid rock-fail. A cycle of dripping/evaporation could result in the generation of concentrated aggressive solutions, which could contact the waste container. The waste container material could be susceptible to crevice corrosion from such solutions. The experiments described in this report support the modeling of waste package degradation processes. The intent was to provide parameter values that are required to model crevice corrosion chemistry, as it relates to hydrogen pick-up, and stress corrosion cracking for selected candidate waste package materials. The purpose of the experiments was to study the crevice corrosion behavior of various candidate materials under near freely corroding conditions and to determine the pH developed in crevice solutions. Experimental results of crevice corrosion of dissimilar metal pairs (Alloy 22, Grade-7 and -16 titanium and 316 stainless steel) immersed in a simulated concentrated ground water at {approx}90{sup o}C are reported. The corrosion potential was measured during exposure periods of between 330 and 630 h. Following the experiments, the pH of the crevice solution was measured. The results indicate that a limited degree of crevice acidification occurred during the experiment. The values for corrosion potential suggest that crevice corrosion may have initiated. The total corrosion was limited, with little visible evidence for crevice corrosion being observed on the sample coupon faces

  15. Influence of soil water repellency on runoff and solute loss from New Zealand pasture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyakumar, P.; Müller, K.; Deurer, M.; van den Dijssel, C.; Mason, K.; Green, S.; Clothier, B. E.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) has been reported in New Zealand, but knowledge on its importance for the country's economy and environment is limited. Our recent survey on the occurrence of SWR under pasture across the North Island of New Zealand showed that most soils exhibited SWR when dry independent of climate but influenced by the soil order. SWR is discussed as an important soil surface condition enhancing run-off and the transfer of fertilizers and pesticides from agricultural land into waterways. So far, the impact of SWR on run-off has rarely been measured. We developed a laboratory-scale run-off measurement apparatus (ROMA) to quantify directly the impact of SWR on run-off from undisturbed soil slabs. We compared the run-off resulting from the run-on of water with that resulting from an ethanol (30% v/v) solution, which is a fully-wetting liquid even in severely hydrophobic soils. Thus, the experiments with the ethanol solution can be understood as a proxy measure of the wetting-up behaviour of hydrophilic soils. We conducted ROMA run-off experiments with air-dried soil slabs (460 mm long x 190 mm wide x 50 mm deep) collected from pastoral sites, representing three major soil orders in the North Island: Recent Soil (Fluvisol), Gley Soil (Gleysol), and Organic Soil (Histosol), with water followed by the ethanol solution at a run-on rate of 60 mm/h. Bromide was applied at 80 kg KBr/ha prior to the water experiments to assess potential solute losses via run-off. The air-dried soils had a high degree and persistence of SWR (contact angles, 97, 98 and 104° , and potential water drop penetration times, 42, 54 and 231 min for the Fluvisol, Gleysol and Histosol, respectively). Under identical soil and experimental conditions, water generated run-off from all soils, but in the experiments with the ethanol solution, the entire ethanol solution infiltrated into the soils. The ranking of the run-off coefficients of the soils directly reflected their ranking in

  16. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering study on water and polymer dynamics in thermo/pressure sensitive polymer solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Noboru; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2009-10-01

    Dynamics of water and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPA) in concentrated aqueous solutions, where the majority of water molecules are attached to polymer chains, has been investigated with use of incoherent quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements as functions of temperature, T, and hydrostatic pressure, P. It was observed by QENS that the self-diffusion coefficient, D(water), of water in PNIPA/H(2)O solutions increased by P at temperatures below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPA aqueous solutions. However, above the LCST, D(water) decreased by P, as is often reported in non-hydrogen bonding solutions. In isobaric heating runs, therefore, the jump in D(water) at LCST decreased with increasing pressure. On the other hand, the mean-square displacement, , of the local vibrational motion of PNIPA in PNIPA/D(2)O solutions, where the incoherent scattering signal of PNIPA was predominantly observed, was reduced due to the aggregation behavior of PNIPA by pressurizing, which was also confirmed by using DLS. The jump in at the LCST became gradual by pressurizing, which was consistent with the changes of the dynamics of water obtained in PNIPA/H(2)O solutions.

  17. Co-Optimizing Solutions for Water and Food – Scoping the Nexus Challenges in the Agro-Sector and finding Scalable Business Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gain Animesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Water-Energy-Food (WEF Nexus approach has an opportunity to create sustainable business solutions, especially in the agricultural sector. This report provides a clear understanding of challenges for the most promising and scalable solutions to the interconnected water, energy and food/feed/fiber problems, allowing combined co-optimization. Searching solutions for nexus challenges, a model based assessment of WEF nexus at global scale and a theoretical perspective of integrating economic and ecological objectives are presented. This study explores the opportunities for the global community to develop robust partnerships and cross sector collaboration to foster water security and increase resource use efficiency, particularly in agriculture and food industry, as part of corporate environmental and financial performance goals.

  18. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  19. Cation effects on rotational dynamics of anions and water molecules in alkali (Li+, Na+, K+, Cs+) thiocyanate (SCN-) aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Hongtao; Chen, Hailong; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Jiebo; Wen, Xiewen; Zhuang, Wei; Zheng, Junrong

    2013-07-03

    Waiting time dependent rotational anisotropies of SCN(-) anions and water molecules in alkali thiocyanate (XSCN, X = Li, Na, K, Cs) aqueous solutions at various concentrations were measured with ultrafast infrared spectroscopy. It was found that cations can significantly affect the reorientational motions of both water molecules and SCN(-) anions. The dynamics are slower in a solution with a smaller cation. The reorientational time constants follow the order of Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+) ~/= Cs(+). The changes of rotational time constants of SCN(-) at various concentrations scale almost linearly with the changes of solution viscosity, but those of water molecules do not. In addition, the concentration-dependent amplitudes of dynamical changes are much more significant in the Li(+) and Na(+) solutions than those in the K(+) and Cs(+) solutions. Further investigations on the systems with the ultrafast vibrational energy exchange method and molecular dynamics simulations provide an explanation for the observations: the observed rotational dynamics are the balanced results of ion clustering and cation/anion/water direct interactions. In all the solutions at high concentrations (>5 M), substantial amounts of ions form clusters. The structural inhomogeneity in the solutions leads to distinct rotational dynamics of water and anions. The strong interactions of Li(+) and Na(+) because of their relatively large charge densities with water molecules and SCN(-) anions, in addition to the likely geometric confinements because of ion clustering, substantially slow down the rotations of SCN(-) anions and water molecules inside the ion clusters. The interactions of K(+) and Cs(+) with water or SCN(-) are much weaker. The rotations of water molecules inside ion clusters of K(+) and Cs(+) solutions are not significantly different from those of other water species so that the experimentally observed rotational relaxation dynamics are only slightly affected by the ion concentrations.

  20. PREDICTING WATER ACTIVITY IN ELECTROLYTE SOLUTIONS WITH THE CISTERNAS-LAM MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REYNOLDS JG; GREER DA; DISSELKAMP RL

    2011-03-01

    Water activity is an important parameter needed to predict the solubility of hydrated salts in Hanford nuclear waste supernatants. A number of models available in the scientific literature predict water activity from electrolyte solution composition. The Cisternas-Lam model is one of those models and has several advantages for nuclear waste application. One advantage is that it has a single electrolyte specific parameter that is temperature independent. Thus, this parameter can be determined from very limited data and extrapolated widely. The Cisternas-Lam model has five coefficients that are used for all aqueous electrolytes. The present study aims to determine if there is a substantial improvement in making all six coefficients electrolyte specific. The Cisternas-Lam model was fit to data for six major electrolytes in Hanford nuclear waste supernatants. The model was first fit to all data to determine the five global coefficients, when they were held constant for all electrolytes it yielded a substantially better fit. Subsequently, the model was fit to each electrolyte dataset separately, where all six coefficients were allowed to be electrolyte specific. Treating all six coefficients as electrolyte specific did not make sufficient difference, given the complexity of applying the electrolyte specific parameters to multi-solute systems. Revised water specific parameters, optimized to the electrolytes relevant to Hanford waste, are also reported.

  1. Characteristics of ac capillary discharge produced in electrically conductive water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBaerdemaeker, F.; Simek, M.; Schmidt, J.; Leys, C.

    2007-05-01

    Basic electrical, optical and calorimetric characteristics of an ac (50 Hz) driven capillary discharge produced in a water solution were studied for initial water solution conductivity in the range 50-1000 µS cm-1. Typical current and voltage waveforms and emission intensities produced by several electronically excited species were recorded with high time resolution. The evolution of the electrical current, power and capillary resistance was inspected during positive ac half-cycle for various operational regimes. A fast relaxation of the discharge following a breakdown event was observed. Optical measurements indicate that radiative species are mostly generated during the first few hundreds of nanoseconds of plasma generation and that the average duration of plasma emission induced by a discharge pulse is of the order of a few microseconds. Results of calorimetric measurements are in good agreement with average electrical measurements and support the assumption that the discharge is a constant source of heat delivered to the liquid. Assuming that only a fraction of the heat released inside the capillary can be transported by conduction through the capillary wall and via its orifices, the processes of bubble formation, expulsion and re-filling the capillary with 'fresh' water must play a key role in maintaining a thermal balance during long-time steady-state operation of the device. Furthermore, a simplified numerical model and a first order energy deposition calculation prove the plausibility of the bubble breakdown mechanism.

  2. Sedimentation of DNA in ethanol-water solutions within the interval of B to A transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potaman, V N; Bannikov, Y A; Shlyachtenko, L S

    1980-02-11

    Sedimentation of DNA ethanol-water solutions has been studied over the range of ethanol concentrations corresponding to the B to A transition (65-80% ethanol, v/v). High ethanol concentrations (more than 75%) have been found to promote aggregate formation in solution. The molecular weight of DNA under fixed ionic conditions in solution (5x10(-4)M NaCl) has been shown to influence the value of ethanol concentration at which aggregates appear. On the other hand, the fact that DNA molecular weight has not been found to exert any influence on B to A transition curves obtained from CD measurements suggests that the changes observed in DNA CD spectra on adding ethanol to the solution are independent of aggregate formation. The date obtained show that, first, aggregation is not a necessary condition for the DNA transition from the B to the A-conformation and, second, changes in CD spectra of DNA under the influence of ethanol are not related to the process of aggregation.

  3. Adsorption of HMF from water/DMSO solutions onto hydrophobic zeolites: experiment and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ruichang; León, Marta; Nikolakis, Vladimiros; Sandler, Stanley I; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), DMSO, and water from binary and ternary mixtures in hydrophobic silicalite-1 and dealuminated Y (DAY) zeolites at ambient conditions was studied by experiments and molecular modeling. HMF and DMSO adsorption isotherms were measured and compared to those calculated using a combination of grand canonical Monte Carlo and expanded ensemble (GCMC-EE) simulations. A method based on GCMC-EE simulations for dilute solutions combined with the Redlich-Kister (RK) expansion (GCMC-EE-RK) is introduced to calculate the isotherms over a wide range of concentrations. The simulations, using literature force fields, are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. In HMF/water binary mixtures, large-pore hydrophobic zeolites are much more effective for HMF adsorption but less selective because large pores allow water adsorption because of H2 O-HMF attraction. In ternary HMF/DMSO/water mixtures, HMF loading decreases with increasing DMSO fraction, rendering the separation of HMF from water/DMSO mixtures by adsorption difficult. The ratio of the energetic interaction in the zeolite to the solvation free energy is a key factor in controlling separation from liquid mixtures. Overall, our findings could have an impact on the separation and catalytic conversion of HMF and the rational design of nanoporous adsorbents for liquid-phase separations in biomass processing.

  4. Removal of metals from aqueous solution and sea water by functionalized graphite nanoplatelets based electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashish Kumar; Ramaprabhu, S

    2011-01-15

    In the present wok, we have demonstrated the simultaneous removal of sodium and arsenic (pentavalent and trivalent) from aqueous solution using functionalized graphite nanoplatelets (f-GNP) based electrodes. In addition, these electrodes based water filter was used for multiple metals removal from sea water. Graphite nanoplatelets (GNP) were prepared by acid intercalation and thermal exfoliation. Functionalization of GNP was done by further acid treatment. Material was characterized by different characterization techniques. Performance of supercapacitor based water filter was analyzed for the removal of high concentration of arsenic (trivalent and pentavalent) and sodium as well as for desalination of sea water, using cyclic voltametry (CV) and inductive coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) techniques. Adsorption isotherms and kinetic characteristics were studied for the simultaneous removal of sodium and arsenic (both trivalent and pentavalent). Maximum adsorption capacities of 27, 29 and 32 mg/g for arsenate, arsenite and sodium were achieved in addition to good removal efficiency for sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium from sea water.

  5. Thermal reversible gelation during phase separation of poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)/water solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾钫[1; 刘新星[2; 童真[3; 杨燕银[4; 吴水珠[5

    2000-01-01

    By dynamic viscoelastic measurement for PNIPAM/water solution it has been found that below the phase separation temperature (about 32 ℃), the system is homogeneous fluid; while upon being heated to about 32 ℃, the solution undergoes phase separation and the storage modulus G’ increases sharply and exceeds the loss modulus G", indicating the physical network formation during the phase separation. Based on the percolation model, the gel points Tgel, were obtained by applying the dynamic scaling theory (DST) and winter’s criterion. The critical exponent n was also obtained to be 0.79 through DST, which is different from 0.67, the critical point of chemically crosslinked network predicted through DST. The obtained n value reflects the special property of physical network being different from chemical network.

  6. Self-Similar Blowup Solutions to the 2-Component Degasperis-Procesi Shallow Water System

    CERN Document Server

    Yuen, Manwai

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we study the self-similar solutions of the 2-component Degasperis-Procesi water system:% [c]{c}% \\rho_{t}+k_{2}u\\rho_{x}+(k_{1}+k_{2})\\rho u_{x}=0 u_{t}-u_{xxt}+4uu_{x}-3u_{x}u_{xx}-uu_{xxx}+k_{3}\\rho\\rho_{x}=0. By the separation method, we can obtain a class of self-similar solutions,% [c]{c}% \\rho(t,x)=\\max(\\frac{f(\\eta)}{a(4t)^{(k_{1}+k_{2})/4}},\\text{}0),\\text{}u(t,x)=\\frac{\\overset{\\cdot}{a}(4t)}{a(4t)}x \\overset{\\cdot\\cdot}{a}(s)-\\frac{\\xi}{4a(s)^{\\kappa}}=0,\\text{}a(0)=a_{0}% \

  7. Pin Hole Discharge Creation in Na2SO4 Water Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Hlavatá

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the diaphragm discharge generated in water solutions containing Na2SO4 as a supporting electrolyte. The solution conductivity was varied in the range of 270 ÷ 750 µScm-1. The batch plasma reactor with volume of 100 ml was divided into two electrode spaces by the Shapal-MTM ceramics dielectric barrier with a pin-hole (diameter of 0.6 mm. Three variable barrier thicknesses (0.3; 0.7 and 1.5 mm and non-pulsed DC voltage up to 2 kV were used for the discharge creation. Each of the current–voltage characteristic can be divided into three parts: electrolysis, bubble formation and discharge operation. The experimental results showed that the discharge ignition moment in the pin-hole was significantly dependent on the dielectric diaphragm thickness. Breakdown voltage increases with the increase of the dielectric barrier thickness.

  8. Thermal reversible gelation during phase separation of poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)/water solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    By dynamic viscoelastic measurement for PNIPAM/water solution it has been found that below the phase separation temperature (about 32℃), the system is homogeneous fluid; while upon being heated to about 32℃, the solution undergoes phase separation and the storage modulus G′ increases sharply and exceeds the loss modulus G″, indicating the physical network formation during the phase separation. Based on the percolation model, the gel points Tgel were obtained by applying the dynamic scaling theory (DST) and Winter's criterion. The critical exponent n was also obtained to be 0.79 through DST, which is different from 0.67, the critical point of chemically crosslinked network predicted through DST. The obtained n value reflects the special property of physical network being different from chemical network.

  9. Kinetic, isotherm and thermodynamic studies of amaranth dye biosorption from aqueous solution onto water hyacinth leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Coronilla, Imelda; Morales-Barrera, Liliana; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2015-04-01

    The present study explored the kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of amaranth (acid red 27) anionic dye (AD) biosorption to water hyacinth leaves (LEC). The effect of LEC particle size, contact time, solution pH, initial AD concentration and temperature on AD biosorption was studied in batch experiments. AD biosorption increased with rising contact time and initial AD concentration, and with decreasing LEC particle size and solution pH. Pseudo-second-order chemical reaction kinetics provided the best correlation for the experimental data. Isotherm studies showed that the biosorption of AD onto LEC closely follows the Langmuir isotherm, with a maximum biosorption capacity of about 70 mg g(-1). The thermodynamic parameters confirm that AD biosorption by LEC is non-spontaneous and endothermic in nature. Results indicate that LEC is a strong biosorbent capable of effective detoxification of AD-laden wastewaters.

  10. Structure of water + acetonitrile solutions from acoustic and positron annihilation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerie, Kazimierz [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of WrocIaw, WrocIaw (Poland); Baranowski, Andrzej [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of WrocIaw, WrocIaw (Poland); Koziol, Stan [Waters Corp., 34 Maple St., Milford, MA 01757 (United States); Glinski, Jacek [Faculty of Chemistry, University of WrocIaw, WrocIaw (Poland)]. E-mail: glin@wchuwr.chem.uni.wroc.pl; Burakowski, Andrzej [Faculty of Chemistry, University of WrocIaw, WrocIaw (Poland)

    2005-03-14

    We report the results of acoustic and positron annihilation measurements in aqueous solutions of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN). Hydrophobicity of the solute is discussed, as well as the possibility of describing the title system in terms of hydrophobic solvation. A new method of calculating the 'ideal' positronium lifetimes is proposed, based on the mean volume of cavities (holes) in liquid structure available for positronium pseudoatom. The results are almost identical with those obtained from molar volumes using the concept of Levay et al. On the other hand, the same calculations performed using the 'bubble' model of annihilation yield very different results. It seems that either acetonitrile forms with water clathrate-like hydrates of untypical architecture, or it is too weak hydrophobic agent to form clathrate-like hydrates at all. The former interpretation seems to be more probable.

  11. Structure of water + acetonitrile solutions from acoustic and positron annihilation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerie, Kazimierz; Baranowski, Andrzej; Koziol, Stan; Gliński, Jacek; Burakowski, Andrzej

    2005-03-01

    We report the results of acoustic and positron annihilation measurements in aqueous solutions of acetonitrile (CH 3CN). Hydrophobicity of the solute is discussed, as well as the possibility of describing the title system in terms of hydrophobic solvation. A new method of calculating the "ideal" positronium lifetimes is proposed, based on the mean volume of cavities (holes) in liquid structure available for positronium pseudoatom. The results are almost identical with those obtained from molar volumes using the concept of Levay et al. On the other hand, the same calculations performed using the "bubble" model of annihilation yield very different results. It seems that either acetonitrile forms with water clathrate-like hydrates of untypical architecture, or it is too weak hydrophobic agent to form clathrate-like hydrates at all. The former interpretation seems to be more probable.

  12. A Holistic ICT Solution to Improve Matching between Supply and Demand over the Water Supply Distribution Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Anzaldi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While many water management tools exist, these systems are not usually interconnected and therefore cannot communicate between one another, preventing Integrated Water Resources Management to be fully achieved. This paper presents the solution proposed by WatERP project* where a novel solution enables better matching between water supply and demand from holistic perspective. Subsystems that control the production, management and consumption of water will be interconnected through both information architecture and intelligent infrastructure. The main outcome will consist of, a web-based Open Management Platform integrating near real-time knowledge on water supplies and demand, from sources to users, across geographic and organizational scales and supported by a knowledge base where information will be structured in water management ontology to ensure interoperability and maximize usability. WatERP will thus provide a major contribution to: 1 Improve coordination among actors, 2 Foster behavioural change, 3 Reduce water and energy consumption, 4 Optimize water accountability.

  13. Stability of nano-/microsized particles in deionized water and electroless nickel solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necula, B S; Apachitei, I; Fratila-Apachitei, L E; Teodosiu, C; Duszczyk, J

    2007-10-15

    A major problem in the co-deposition of nano- and microsized particles within electroless NiP coatings is particle dispersion in the electroless nickel solution because of the strong tendency of particles toward agglomeration and sedimentation. The stability of colloidal Al(2)O(3), CeO(2), and BN particles and Al(2)O(3)CeO(2) and Al(2)O(3)BN particle mixtures in deionized water and electroless nickel solution was investigated by zeta potential measurements and sedimentation tests. Dispersions of Al(2)O(3) and CeO(2) particles showed good stability in deionized water with zeta potential values of 55 and 39 mV, respectively. BN dispersion in deionized water was found to be relatively unstable at pH 4 with zeta potential values of -13 mV, but at higher pH (i.e., pH 5.5), the values decreased up to about -40 mV. When the dispersions were made in electroless nickel solution, a significant decrease of the zeta potential values was observed for both single particles and mixtures of particles, indicating a change in the surface charge from high positive to low negative with detrimental effects on dispersion stability. Further, the findings suggested that the stability of particle mixtures is dominated by one type of particle, i.e., the Al(2)O(3)CeO(2) dispersion is governed by the single CeO(2) particles, whereas the Al(2)O(3)BN dispersion is governed by the Al(2)O(3) particles. All the zeta potential measurements were in line with the results of the sedimentation tests (i.e., low zeta potential values corresponded to short settling times, whereas high zeta potential values corresponded to long settling times).

  14. Fluoride release of six restorative materials in water and pH-cycling solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Viana de Bragança Garcez

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The fluoride release of restorative materials in deionized water has been the subject of many studies, but the behavior of these materials under conditions of acid challenge that simulates the oral cavity, needs to be further explored. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of restorative materials in two storage protocols: deionized water and pH-cycling system (demineralizing solution-pH 4.3 and remineralizing solution-pH 7.0 for 15 days. Eight disks of each material (Vitremer™-positive control, Dyract AP, Ariston pHc, Definite®, Tetric®Ceram and Z100-negative control were prepared (11.0 mm x 1.5 mm and suspended individually in 4.0 mL of each solution, which were daily changed. Daily fluoride release was analyzed with an ion specific electrode (Orion 9609 by the direct method or after HMDS-facilitated diffusion, following 1, 7 and 15 days. The values obtained were converted into µgF/mm² and the data analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (p< 0.05. The results showed that all materials released more fluoride in the pH-cycling system, except for Ariston pHc which maintained a constant release during the experiment. The highest fluoride release was presented by the positive control, Vitremer™ in pH-cycling and by Ariston pHc, in deionized water. The negative control Z100 and the resins Definite® and Tetric®Ceram did not present statistically significant differences.

  15. Hydrolysis and Photolysis of Herbicide Clomazone in Aqueous Solutions and Natural Water Under Abiotic Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Jia; DIAO Xiao-ping; HU Ji-ye

    2013-01-01

    The hydrolysis and photolysis of clomazone in aqueous solutions and natural water were assessed under natural and controlled conditions. Kinetics of hydrolysis and photolysis of clomazone were determined by HPLC-DAD. Photoproducts were identiifed by HPLC-MS. No noticeable hydrolysis occurred in aqueous buffer solutions ((25±2)°C, pH (4.5±0.1), pH (7.4±0.1), pH (9.0±0.1);(50±2)°C, pH (4.5±0.1), pH (7.4±0.1)) or in natural water up to 90 d. At pH (9.0±0.1) and (50±2)°C the half-life of clomazone was 50.2 d. Clomazone photodecomposition rate in aqueous solutions under UV radiation and natural sunlight followed ifrst-order kinetics. Degradation rates were faster under UV light (half-life of 51-59 min) compared to sunlight (half-life of 87-136 d). Under UV light, four major photoproducts were detected and tentatively identiifed according to HPLC-MS spectral information such as 2-chlorobenzamide, N-hydroxy-(2-benzyl)-2-methylpropan-amide, 2-[2-phenol]-4,4-dimethyl-3-isoxazolidinone and 2-[(4,6-dihydroxyl-2-chlorine phenol)]-4,4-dimethyl-3-isoxazolidinone. These results suggested that clomazone photodegradation proceeds via several reaction pathways:1) dehalogenation;2) substitution of chlorine group by hydroxyl;3) cleavage of the side chain. Photosensitizers, such as H2O2 and ribolfavin, could enhance photolysis of clomazone in natural sunlight. In summary, we found that photoreaction is an important dissipation pathway of clomazone in natural water systems.

  16. Benchmark calculation for water reflected STACY cores containing low enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Takemi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    In order to validate the availability of criticality calculation codes and related nuclear data library, a series of fundamental benchmark experiments on low enriched uranyl nitrate solution have been performed with a Static Experiment Criticality Facility, STACY in JAERI. The basic core composed of a single tank with water reflector was used for accumulating the systematic data with well-known experimental uncertainties. This paper presents the outline of the core configurations of STACY, the standard calculation model, and calculation results with a Monte Carlo code and JENDL 3.2 nuclear data library. (author)

  17. WATSFAR: numerical simulation of soil WATer and Solute fluxes using a FAst and Robust method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevoisier, David; Voltz, Marc

    2013-04-01

    To simulate the evolution of hydro- and agro-systems, numerous spatialised models are based on a multi-local approach and improvement of simulation accuracy by data-assimilation techniques are now used in many application field. The latest acquisition techniques provide a large amount of experimental data, which increase the efficiency of parameters estimation and inverse modelling approaches. In turn simulations are often run on large temporal and spatial domains which requires a large number of model runs. Eventually, despite the regular increase in computing capacities, the development of fast and robust methods describing the evolution of saturated-unsaturated soil water and solute fluxes is still a challenge. Ross (2003, Agron J; 95:1352-1361) proposed a method, solving 1D Richards' and convection-diffusion equation, that fulfil these characteristics. The method is based on a non iterative approach which reduces the numerical divergence risks and allows the use of coarser spatial and temporal discretisations, while assuring a satisfying accuracy of the results. Crevoisier et al. (2009, Adv Wat Res; 32:936-947) proposed some technical improvements and validated this method on a wider range of agro- pedo- climatic situations. In this poster, we present the simulation code WATSFAR which generalises the Ross method to other mathematical representations of soil water retention curve (i.e. standard and modified van Genuchten model) and includes a dual permeability context (preferential fluxes) for both water and solute transfers. The situations tested are those known to be the less favourable when using standard numerical methods: fine textured and extremely dry soils, intense rainfall and solute fluxes, soils near saturation, ... The results of WATSFAR have been compared with the standard finite element model Hydrus. The analysis of these comparisons highlights two main advantages for WATSFAR, i) robustness: even on fine textured soil or high water and solute

  18. A Novel Experimental Technique to Monitor the Time-Dependent Water and Ions Uptake when Shale Interacts with Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Bazali, Talal

    2013-09-01

    The time-dependent water and ions uptake when shale interacts with aqueous solutions is quantified using a combination of immersion and gravimetric techniques. Results show that when shale interacts with salt solutions, water uptake into shale goes through three distinct stages; water movement out of shale (due to chemical osmosis), water movement into shale (due to diffusion osmosis) and stationary state (equilibrium stage). This work shows that chemical osmosis dominates water movement in early times while diffusion osmosis takes over later. In addition, it is shown that the amount of water movement due to chemical osmosis depends on the chemical potential gradient while the amount of water movement due to diffusion osmosis is highly related to the ionic concentration imbalance. In addition, the amount of ions uptake into shale at equilibrium is shown to depend on the type and concentration of salt solution. Furthermore, this work shows that potassium ion has a strengthening effect on shale while sodium and calcium ions have a weakening effect on shale. Results also show that the shale's compressive strength alteration is greatly influenced by the type and concentration of the salt solution. Furthermore, the shale's compressive strength alteration is shown to be time dependent and correlates very well with the time-dependent flux of water and ions. Finally, it is shown that chemical osmosis and diffusion osmosis take place simultaneously when shale interacts with water-based muds. The overall impact on shale stability is governed by the net water flow resulting from chemical osmosis and diffusion osmosis.

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of sol-gel transition of gelatin in terms of water activity in various solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Osato; Omote, Chiaki; Matsuhira, Keiko

    2015-12-01

    Sol-gel transition of gelatin was analyzed as a multisite stoichiometric reaction of a gelatin molecule with water and solute molecules. The equilibrium sol-gel transition temperature, Tt , was estimated from the average of gelation and melting temperature measured by differential scanning calorimetry. From Tt and the melting enthalpy, ΔHsol , the equilibrium sol-to-gel ratio was estimated by the van't Hoff equation. The reciprocal form of the Wyman-Tanford equation, which describes the sol-to-gel ratio as a function of water activity, was successfully applied to obtain a good linear relationship. From this analysis, the role of water activity on the sol-gel transition of gelatin was clearly explained and the contributions of hydration and solute binding to gelatin molecules were separately discussed in sol-gel transition. The general solution for the free energy for gel-stabilization in various solutions was obtained as a simple function of solute concentration.

  20. Photoacoustic Signals in Methylene Blue Solutions in Water/Glycerol Mixture Containing Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvekov, A. A.; Nurmukhametov, D. R.; Korzh, M. G.; Kalenskii, A. V.; Aduev, B. P.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the features of photoacoustic phenomena induced by the second harmonic of YAG:Nd3+ laser pulses (532 nm) in a methylene blue solution in a water/glycerol (1:1) mixture containing titanium dioxide nanoparticles as the light-scattering component. Using stationary spectroscopy, it was found that the dimerization degree of methylene blue is substantially lower in this solvent than in water. The dependencies of the signal amplitude normalized to the pulse energy density and of the effective signal rise constant on the methylene blue and titanium dioxide nanoparticle concentrations were obtained. It is shown that the signal rise constant depends linearly on the concentration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, while the amplitude is almost independent. A method is suggested for simultaneous photoacoustic determination of concentrations of both components. For testing samples, the uncertainty of the determination of the components concentration is less than 5% for methylene blue and less than 37% for titanium dioxide.

  1. Probing ion-specific effects on aqueous acetate solutions: Ion pairing versus water structure modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Petit

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of monovalent cations (Li+, K+, NH4+, Na+ on the water structure in aqueous chloride and acetate solutions was characterized by oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS, X-ray emission spectroscopy, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS of a liquid microjet. We show ion- and counterion dependent effects on the emission spectra of the oxygen K-edge, which we attribute to modifications of the hydrogen bond network of water. For acetates, ion pairing with carboxylates was also probed selectively by XAS and RIXS. We correlate our experimental results to speciation data and to the salting-out properties of the cations.

  2. Adhesion between Silica Particle and Mica Surfaces in Water and Electrolyte Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski; Ishimura; Higashitani

    2000-07-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to study the adhesion between a silica sphere and a mica plate in pure water and solutions of monovalent cations (LiCl, NaCl, KCl, and CsCl). It is found that the adhesive force depends not only on the electrolyte concentration but also on the hydration enthalpy of cations and the contact time of the particle on the surface. Possible mechanisms by which the observed phenomena can be explained consistently are discussed extensively. It is suggested that the adhesive force is closely related to the structure of the layer of cations and water molecules adsorbed on the surfaces: the strong adhesive force is obtained when highly hydrated cations (Li(+), Na(+)) are adsorbed to form a thick but weakly adsorbed layer, while the weak adhesive force is observed when poorly hydrated cations (Cs(+), K(+)) are adsorbed to form a thin but strongly adsorbed layer. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. Removal of chromium from aqueous solution by complexation-ultrafiltration using a water-soluble macroligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliane, A; Bounatiro, N; Cherif, A T; Akretche, D E

    2001-06-01

    A process for purifying waste waters containing heavy and toxic metal such as chromium has been studied. A batch complexation-ultrafiltration process was used to concentrate and recover chromium from sulphate solution. As the chromium ions are too small to be retained by the filter, they are first complexed with a water-soluble macroligand (polyethylene-imine). Factors affecting the rejection rate and permeate flux such as pH, concentration ligand, chloride and sulphate concentration, membrane pore size, applied pressure and extraction factor were investigated. Best operating conditions can be obtained in order to achieve high levels of removal (> 95%). Then, decomplexation is obtained so that metal can be separated from macroligand by a second ultrafiltration plant to reuse the macroligand.

  4. Potential of the application of the modified polysaccharides water solutions as binders of moulding sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kaczmarska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The results of preliminary tests of selected properties of the moulding sands with the binder in the form of a 5 % water solution of the sodium salt of carboxymethyl starch (with a degree of substitution (DS of 0,2 and 0,87 arepresented in this study. The moulding sand properties such as permeability, abrasion resistance, tensile and bendingstrength - after curing - are shown in series of tests. The cure process was conducted in a field of electromagnetic radiation within the microwave range. The effect of the microwave treatment on the moulding sand was evaporating of water (solvent in a binder and cross-linking of the polymeric binder. As a result the cured moulding sands with particular properties, essential in the context of its application in the mould technology in the foundry industry, were obtained.

  5. Analysis of the sodium recirculation theory of solute-coupled water transport in small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkaer

    2002-01-01

    permeabilities and pump constants of fluxes of water and electrolytes, volumes and ion concentrations of cell and lateral intercellular space (lis), and membrane potentials and conductances. Simulating physiological bioelectrical features together with cellular and paracellular fluxes of the sodium ion......, computations predict that the concentration differences between lis and bathing solutions are small for all three ions. Nevertheless, the diffusion fluxes of the ions out of lis significantly exceed their mass transports. It is concluded that isotonic transport requires recirculation of all three ions...... flows of water across the epithelium with recirculation of the diffusible ions maintained by a 1Na+-1K+-2Cl- cotransporter in the plasma membrane facing the serosal compartment. With intracellular non-diffusible anions and compliant plasma membranes, the model describes the dependence on membrane...

  6. The potential for solubilizing agents to enhance the remediation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. [Quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, S.; Liu, Z.; Edwards, D.; Luthy, R.G.

    1991-02-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility for use of surfactant solubilizing agents to enhance the solubility and the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. Hydrophobic organic contaminants are strongly sorbed to soil or sediment material, and as a consequence the rate of microbial degradation may depend greatly on the desorption of the sorbed-phase contaminant and the accessibility of the contaminant to soil microorganisms. Chemical solubilizing agents may enhance the rate of hydrophobic organic solute degradation by increasing the rate of solute desorption from soil and the extent of solute partitioning to the aqueous phase. The presentation will review on-going research on: surfactant solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in clean water, and in soil-water suspensions; and experiments to assess if the addition of surfactant to soil-water suspension results in faster rate of mineralization of PAH compounds in soil.

  7. The potential for solubilizing agents to enhance the remediation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, S.; Liu, Z.; Edwards, D.; Luthy, R.G.

    1991-02-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility for use of surfactant solubilizing agents to enhance the solubility and the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. Hydrophobic organic contaminants are strongly sorbed to soil or sediment material, and as a consequence the rate of microbial degradation may depend greatly on the desorption of the sorbed-phase contaminant and the accessibility of the contaminant to soil microorganisms. Chemical solubilizing agents may enhance the rate of hydrophobic organic solute degradation by increasing the rate of solute desorption from soil and the extent of solute partitioning to the aqueous phase. The presentation will review on-going research on: surfactant solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in clean water, and in soil-water suspensions; and experiments to assess if the addition of surfactant to soil-water suspension results in faster rate of mineralization of PAH compounds in soil.

  8. Effect of blanching in water and sugar solutions on texture and microstructure of sliced carrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Lilia; Hernando, Isabel Hernando; Pérez-Munuera, Isabel; Sacchetti, Giampiero; Pittia, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Thermal processing of vegetables has pronounced effects on the cell structure, often negatively affecting the final textural properties of the product. In order to study the effect of thermal processing and the protective effect of sugars on the tissue, sliced carrots were subjected to blanching treatments under different time and temperature combinations both in water and in 4% sugar solutions made of trehalose or maltose. The influence of these process conditions on mass transfer, texture, and microstructure (Cryo-scanning electron microscopy) was thus investigated. The total mass loss of all the samples blanched in water was associated to their cook value (C(100)(18)) except for the overprocessed one (90 °C, 10 min) that showed a total mass change significantly lower due to water uptake. The use of trehalose and maltose in the blanching solution reduced the solute loss while increasing the water loss. Microstructural analysis of the differently blanched carrots showed detachments between adjacent cell walls as well as plasmolysis phenomena as the time and temperature of the thermal treatment were increased. A protective effect of both sugars on cell structures was observed mostly in the sample treated at 90 °C. At macroscopic level, textural changes upon blanching were observed by a penetration test. As blanching time was increased, samples processed at 75 °C showed a hardness increase, while those processed at 90 °C showed a hardness decrease. However, both trehalose and maltose did not exert significant effects on the textural properties of blanched carrots when compared with those blanched in water. Practical Application: The results of this study could offer interesting perspectives in the optimization of the heat treatments in order to preserve the quality of semi-finished processed vegetables. Furthermore, the microstructural analysis is nowadays an important investigation tool that could contribute to a deeper understanding of both the effects of

  9. Enhanced mobility of solution-processed polycrystalline zinc tin oxide thin-film transistors via direct incorporation of water into precursor solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Genmao; Duan, Lian; Zhao, Yunlong; Dong, Guifang; Zhang, Deqiang; Qiu, Yong

    2014-09-01

    Phase transition and the consequent variation in crystalline orientation of metal oxides have profound impact on their transport properties. In this work, we report a simple method to enhance field-effect mobility of solution-processed zinc tin oxide (ZTO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) via direct incorporation of water into precursor solution. It is confirmed H2O molecules could effectively facilitate the conversion and alloying processes during ZTO film formation, characterized by the enhancement of spinel Zn2SnO4 phase and the reduction of cassiterite SnO2 phase. The preferred orientation of metal oxide crystallites varies according to the amount of water added into precursor solutions. Smooth and densely packed polycrystalline ZTO films with only a few organic residuals and moderate oxygen defects are fabricated from water-containing precursor solutions. With the incorporation of 1.67 M H2O, the extracted field-effect mobility of TFT devices could be improved by a factor of 2.3, from 0.92 to 2.11 cm2 V-1 s-1. This work offers a facile and cost-effective route towards high-mobility TFTs based on solution-processed polycrystalline metal oxide thin films.

  10. Use of New Water Soluble Surface Film—Forming Material to Reduce Ammonia Loss from Water Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YINBIN; SHENRENFANG; 等

    1996-01-01

    A new water soluble surface film-forming material was developed and its effect on reducing ammonia volatilization from an alkaline solution was investigated in laboratory,Results showed that the new film formed by the material was not only more effective in reducing ammonia loss than any other films tested but also much cheaper.The optimum amount of addition of the new film-forming material was about 10times the theoretical amount to form a monomolecular film.Under the experimental conditions,the new film could effectively depress the ammonia volatilization for at least 6 days.The cumulative ammonia loss rates for different films were fitted to a simple logistic equation ,and some important parameters such as the cumulative loss,and the maximum and average volatilization rates were calculated.The effect of different films could be,therefore,compared quantitatively,indicating the new film was most effective in depressing ammonia volatilization.

  11. Kinetics of hydrolysis of 4-methoxyphenyl-2,2-dichloroethanoate in binary water-cosolvent mixtures; the role of solvent activity and solute-solute interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rispens, T; Cabaleiro-Lago, C; Engberts, JBFN

    2005-01-01

    Rate constants are reported for the pH-independent hydrolysis of 4-methoxyphenyl-2,2-dichloroethanoate in aqueous solution as a function of the concentration of added cyanomethane ( acetonitrile), polyethylene glycol ( PEG 400) and tetrahydrofuran ( THF). The concentration of water was varied betwee

  12. Water and power for the desert -- Energy solutions for the Near and Middle East

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siersdorfer, D.

    2007-07-01

    2007 will mark a unique milestone in human history: for the first time ever, more people on earth will live and work in cities than in rural areas. Moreover, only four of the twenty biggest megacities with populations over 10 million will be in industrial nations; the others will be in threshold and developing countries. Accelerating urbanization and economic growth will fuel a massive demand for adequate infrastructures - such as power and water supplies. Reliable and economical supply of power and water to populations in regions of harsh environments, e.g. in the Near and Middle East, ensures basic survival rather than merely providing for a pleasant life. Economical supply of power and water for desert regions requires a wide mix of reliable technologies already available today and new technologies under development for future needs. Siemens Power Generation's Energy Solution Division, having proven its responsiveness in the past by playing a vital role in the development of the Near and Middle East, will continue to provide answers in future for meeting power and water demand within the regionally specific environment. (auth)

  13. Finite-bias electronic transport of molecules in a water solution

    KAUST Repository

    Rungger, Ivan

    2010-06-04

    The effects of water wetting conditions on the transport properties of molecular nanojunctions are investigated theoretically by using a combination of empirical-potential molecular-dynamics and first-principles electronic-transport calculations. These are at the level of the nonequilibrium Green’s-function method implemented for self-interaction corrected density-functional theory. We find that water effectively produces electrostatic gating to the molecular junction with a gating potential determined by the time-averaged water dipole field. Such a field is large for the polar benzene-dithiol molecule, resulting in a transmission spectrum shifted by about 0.6 eV with respect to that of the dry junction. The situation is drastically different for carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In fact, because of their hydrophobic nature the gating is almost negligible so that the average transmission spectrum of wet Au/CNT/Au junctions is essentially the same as that in dry conditions. This suggests that CNTs can be used as molecular interconnects also in water-wet situations, for instance, as tips for scanning tunnel microscopy in solution or in biological sensors.

  14. Blood brain barrier is impermeable to solutes and permeable to water after experimental pediatric cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tress, Erika E; Clark, Robert S B; Foley, Lesley M; Alexander, Henry; Hickey, Robert W; Drabek, Tomas; Kochanek, Patrick M; Manole, Mioara D

    2014-08-22

    Pediatric asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) results in unfavorable neurological outcome in most survivors. Development of neuroprotective therapies is contingent upon understanding the permeability of intravenously delivered medications through the blood brain barrier (BBB). In a model of pediatric CA we sought to characterize BBB permeability to small and large molecular weight substances. Additionally, we measured the percent brain water after CA. Asphyxia of 9 min was induced in 16-18 day-old rats. The rats were resuscitated and the BBB permeability to small (sodium fluorescein and gadoteridol) and large (immunoglobulin G, IgG) molecules was assessed at 1, 4, and 24 h after asphyxial CA or sham surgery. Percent brain water was measured post-CA and in shams using wet-to-dry brain weight. Fluorescence, gadoteridol uptake, or IgG staining at 1, 4h and over the entire 24 h post-CA did not differ from shams, suggesting absence of BBB permeability to these solutes. Cerebral water content was increased at 3h post-CA vs. sham. In conclusion, after 9 min of asphyxial CA there is no BBB permeability over 24h to conventional small or large molecule tracers despite the fact that cerebral water content is increased early post-CA indicating the development of brain edema. Evaluation of novel therapies targeting neuronal death after pediatric CA should include their capacity to cross the BBB. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure and dynamics of POPC bilayers in water solutions of room temperature ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetto, Antonio [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Bingham, Richard J. [York Centre for Complex Systems Analysis, University of York, York YO10 5GE (United Kingdom); Ballone, Pietro [Center for Life Nano Science @Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), 00185 Roma (Italy); Department of Physics, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations in the NPT ensemble have been carried out to investigate the effect of two room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), on stacks of phospholipid bilayers in water. We consider RTIL compounds consisting of chloride ([bmim][Cl]) and hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF{sub 6}]) salts of the 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium ([bmim]{sup +}) cation, while the phospholipid bilayer is made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Our investigations focus on structural and dynamical properties of phospholipid and water molecules that could be probed by inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements. The results confirm the fast incorporation of [bmim]{sup +} into the lipid phase already observed in previous simulations, driven by the Coulomb attraction of the cation for the most electronegative oxygens in the POPC head group and by sizeable dispersion forces binding the neutral hydrocarbon tails of [bmim]{sup +} and of POPC. The [bmim]{sup +} absorption into the bilayer favours the penetration of water into POPC, causes a slight but systematic thinning of the bilayer, and further stabilises hydrogen bonds at the lipid/water interface that already in pure samples (no RTIL) display a lifetime much longer than in bulk water. On the other hand, the effect of RTILs on the diffusion constant of POPC (D{sub POPC}) does not reveal a clearly identifiable trend, since D{sub POPC} increases upon addition of [bmim][Cl] and decreases in the [bmim][PF{sub 6}] case. Moreover, because of screening, the electrostatic signature of each bilayer is only moderately affected by the addition of RTIL ions in solution. The analysis of long wavelength fluctuations of the bilayers shows that RTIL sorption causes a general decrease of the lipid/water interfacial tension and bending rigidity, pointing to the destabilizing effect of RTILs on lipid bilayers.

  16. Market-Driven Solutions to Economic, Environmental, and Social Issues Related to Water Management in the Western USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan A. Clayton

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Water management issues continue to plague the western United States, including rapid population growth, degraded aquatic ecosystems, unfulfilled claims to American Indian users, the threat of global warming, an economic recession, and many other issues. This essay outlines some advantages of market-driven reforms to the management of water resources in the western USA. Historical and contemporary western water resource issues are examined from economic, environmental, and social viewpoints. In all such contexts, it is argued that regulated water markets provide flexible and just solutions to western water dilemmas, and reallocations may provide much-needed additional water supply.

  17. Stability of sugar solutions: a novel study of the epimerization kinetics of lactose in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Rim; Drake, Alex F; Elleman, Carole; Martin, Gary P; Warren, Frederick J; Perston, Benjamin B; Ellis, Peter R; Hassoun, Mireille A; Royall, Paul G

    2014-07-07

    This article reports on the stereochemical aspects of the chemical stability of lactose solutions stored between 25 and 60 °C. The lactose used for the preparation of the aqueous solutions was α-lactose monohydrate with an anomer purity of 96% α and 4% β based on the supplied certificate of analysis (using a GC analytical protocol), which was further confirmed here by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Aliquots of lactose solutions were collected at different time points after the solutions were prepared and freeze-dried to remove water and halt epimerization for subsequent analysis by NMR. Epimerization was also monitored by polarimetry and infrared spectroscopy using a specially adapted Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) method. Hydrolysis was analyzed by ion chromatography. The three different analytical approaches unambiguously showed that the epimerization of lactose in aqueous solution follows first order reversible kinetics between 25 to 60 °C. The overall rate constant was 4.4 × 10(-4) s(-1) ± 0.9 (± standard deviation (SD)) at 25 °C. The forward rate constant was 1.6 times greater than the reverse rate constant, leading to an equilibrium constant of 1.6 ± 0.1 (±SD) at 25 °C. The rate of epimerization for lactose increased with temperature and an Arrhenius plot yielded an activation energy of +52.3 kJ/mol supporting the hypothesis that the mechanism of lactose epimerization involves the formation of extremely short-lived intermediate structures. The main mechanism affecting lactose stability is epimerization, as no permanent hydrolysis or chemical degradation was observed. When preparing aqueous solutions of lactose, immediate storage in an ice bath at 0 °C will allow approximately 3 min (180 s) of analysis time before the anomeric ratio alters significantly (greater than 1%) from the solid state composition of the starting material. In contrast a controlled anomeric composition (~38% α and ~62% β) will

  18. The SOLUTIONS project : Challenges and responses for present and future emerging pollutants in land and water resources management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brack, Werner; Altenburger, Rolf; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Krauss, Martin; López Herráez, David; van Gils, Jos; Slobodnik, Jaroslav; Munthe, John; Gawlik, Bernd Manfred; van Wezel, Annemarie; Schriks, Merijn; Hollender, Juliane; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Mekenyan, Ovanes; Dimitrov, Saby; Bunke, Dirk; Cousins, Ian; Posthuma, Leo; van den Brink, Paul J.; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià; Faust, Michael; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Scrimshaw, Mark; Ignatova, Svetlana; Engelen, Guy; Massmann, Gudrun; Lemkine, Gregory; Teodorovic, Ivana; Walz, Karl Heinz; Dulio, Valeria; Jonker, Michiel T O; Jäger, Felix; Chipman, Kevin; Falciani, Francesco; Liska, Igor; Rooke, David; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hollert, Henner; Vrana, Branislav; Hilscherova, Klara; Kramer, Kees; Neumann, Steffen; Hammerbacher, Ruth; Backhaus, Thomas; Mack, Juliane; Segner, Helmut; Escher, Beate; de Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    SOLUTIONS (2013 to 2018) is a European Union Seventh Framework Programme Project (EU-FP7). The project aims to deliver a conceptual framework to support the evidence-based development of environmental policies with regard to water quality. SOLUTIONS will develop the tools for the identification, pri

  19. NMR studies of water dynamics during sol-to-gel transition of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) in concentrated aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    The thermo-sensitive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) undergoes a coil-to-globule transition in an aqueous solution as the temperature is raised through the lower critical solution temperature. Thus far, little is known about the dynamical states of the water molecules that contribute ...

  20. Grammian and Pfaffian solutions as well as Pfaffianization for a (3+1)-dimensional generalized shallow water equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Ya-Ning; Ma Wen-Xiu; Xu Wei

    2012-01-01

    Based on the Grammian and Pfaffian derivative formulae,Grammian and Pfaffian solutions are obtained for a (3+1)-dimensional generalized shallow water equation in the Hirota bilinear form.Moreover,a Pfaffian extension ismade for the equation by means of the Pfaffianization procedure,the Wronski-type and Gramm-type Pfaffian solutions of the resulting coupled system are presented.

  1. Membrane contactor assisted water extraction system for separating hydrogen peroxide from a working solution, and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Seth W.; Lin, Yupo J.; Hestekin' Jamie A.; Henry, Michael P.; Pujado, Peter; Oroskar, Anil; Kulprathipanja, Santi; Randhava, Sarabjit

    2010-09-21

    The present invention relates to a membrane contactor assisted extraction system and method for extracting a single phase species from multi-phase working solutions. More specifically one preferred embodiment of the invention relates to a method and system for membrane contactor assisted water (MCAWE) extraction of hydrogen peroxide (H.sub.2O.sub.2) from a working solution.

  2. Water pulse migration through semi-infinite vertical unsaturated porous column with special relative-permeability functions: Exact solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Mohamed

    2014-09-01

    The paper presents certain exact solutions describing the vertical movement of a water pulse through a semi-infinite unsaturated porous column. The saturation-based form of the Richards' equation is used with special power law relative-permeability functions. Both capillary and gravity effects are taken into account. Three exact solutions are derived corresponding to three relative-permeability functions, linear, quadratic and cubic. The Richards' equation is nonlinear for the three cases. The solutions are obtained by applying a general similarity transformation. They are explicit in space and time variables and do not contain any approximation. They describe the evolution of the water saturation in the vertical column and they can be used to predict the post-infiltration movement of a finite quantity of water. Exact expressions of the masses of water leaving a given depth are also derived for the three cases. We analyze the effect of relative-permeability and capillary pressure. The proposed solutions are also useful for checking numerical schemes. One of the exact solutions is used to validate numerical solution obtained from an arbitrary initial condition. Results show that the numerical solution converges to the exact solution for large times.

  3. Crystallization of a perovskite film for higher performance solar cells by controlling water concentration in methyl ammonium iodide precursor solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Nirmal; Dubey, Ashish; Gaml, Eman A; Vaagensmith, Bjorn; Reza, Khan Mamun; Mabrouk, Sally Adel Abdelsalam; Gu, Shaopeng; Zai, Jiantao; Qian, Xuefeng; Qiao, Qiquan

    2016-02-07

    An optimal small amount of water added into methyl ammonium iodide (MAI) solution in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) helps perovskite crystallization and leads to larger grain size from sequential deposition of perovskite films. The concentration of water was varied from 1% to 7% (vol% of IPA) in MAI solution and optical absorption, crystallization, morphology of perovskite films and their photovoltaic performance were studied in perovskite solar cells. 5% by volume was found to lead to preferential crystallization in the (110) plane with grain size about three times that of perovskite films prepared without adding water into the MAI solution. The optimal water concentration of 5% by volume in the MAI solution led to average perovskite grain size of ∼600 nm and solar cell efficiency of 12.42% at forward scan with a rate of 0.5 V s(-1). Device performance decreases after increasing water concentration beyond 5% in the MAI solution due to formation of the PbI2 phase. Transient photocurrent and photovoltage measurements show the shortest charge transport time at 0.99 μs and the longest charge carrier life time at 13.6 μs for perovskite films prepared from 5% water in MAI solution, which improved perovskite solar cell efficiency from 9.04% to 12.42%.

  4. Separation and preconcentration of aluminum in parenteral solutions and bottled mineral water using different analytical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi, Tasneem G., E-mail: tgkazi@yahoo.com [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Khan, Sumaira, E-mail: skhanzai@gmail.com [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Baig, Jameel A., E-mail: jab_mughal@yahoo.com [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Kolachi, Nida F., E-mail: nidafatima6@gmail.com [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Afridi, Hassan I., E-mail: hassanimranafridi@yahoo.com [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Kandhro, Ghulam A.; Kumar, Sham [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Shah, Abdul Q., E-mail: aqshah07@yahoo.com [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)

    2009-12-30

    A new method is reported for the separation of aluminum ions [Al(III)] from interfering elements in parenteral and pharmaceutical solutions (PS) and bottled mineral water (BMW) samples, through solid-phase extraction with 2-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline (quinaldine) adsorbed onto activated silica gel. While the enrichment step of separated Al(III) was carried out by cloud point extraction (CPE) using 8-hydroxyquinoline as complexing reagent, the resulted complex was entrapped in a non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114). The enriched Al(III) in sample solutions were determined by spectrofluorometry (SPF) at {lambda}{sub excitation} 370 nm and {lambda}{sub emission} 510 nm, and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for comparative purpose. The variables affecting the complexation and extraction steps were studied and optimized. The validity of methodology was checked with certified reference material of water and standard addition method. The enrichment factor and detection limit of Al(III) for the preconcentration of 50 ml of PS and BMW were found to be 100 and 0.25 {mu}g/L, respectively. The proposed method has been applied for the determination of trace amount of Al(III) in PS and BMW samples with satisfactory results. In PS the levels of Al(III) are above than permissible limit (25 {mu}g/L).

  5. Solubility and solution thermodynamics of 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid in (water + ethanol) binary solvent mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Qi; Cao, Cuicui; Cheng, Limin [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Shi, Ying [Taiyuan Qiaoyou Chemical Industrial Co. Ltd., Taiyuan 030025 (China); Yang, Wenge [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Hu, Yonghong, E-mail: yonghonghu11@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-09-20

    Highlights: • The solubility increased with increasing temperature. • The solubility decreased with the rise of the ratio of the water. • The solubility data were fitted using Apelblat equation, CNIBS/R–K and JA model. • The Gibbs energy, enthalpy and entropy were calculated by the van’t Hoff analysis. - Abstract: In this paper, we focused on solubility and solution thermodynamics of 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid. By gravimetric method, the solubility of 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid was measured in (water + ethanol) binary solvent mixtures from 278.15 K to 333.15 K under atmosphere pressure. The solubility data were fitted using modified Apelblat equation, a variant of the combined nearly ideal binary solvent/Redlich–Kister (CNIBS/R–K) model and Jouyban–Acree model. Computational results showed that the modified Apelblat equation has the lowest MD (mean deviation). In addition, the thermodynamic properties of the solution process, including the Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy were calculated by the van’t Hoff analysis.

  6. Field-scale evaluation of water fluxes and manure solution leaching in feedlot pen soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Ana R; Maisonnave, Roberto; Massobrio, Marcelo J; Fabrizio de Iorio, Alicia R

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of beef cattle manure on feedlot pen surfaces generates large amounts of dissolved solutes that can be mobilized by water fluxes, affecting surface and groundwater quality. Our objective was to examine the long-term impacts of a beef cattle feeding operation on water fluxes and manure leaching in feedlot pens located on sandy loam soils of the subhumid Sandy Pampa region in Argentina. Bulk density, gravimetric moisture content, and chloride concentration were quantified. Rain simulation trials were performed to estimate infiltration and runoff rates. Using chloride ion as a tracer, profile analysis techniques were applied to estimate the soil moisture flux and manure conservative chemical components leaching rates. An organic stratum was found over the surface of the pen soil, separated from the underlying soil by a highly compacted thin layer (the manure-soil interface). The soil beneath the organic layer showed greater bulk density in the A horizon than in the control soil and had greater moisture content. Greater concentrations of chloride were found as a consequence of the partial sealing of the manure-soil interface. Surface runoff was the dominant process in the feedlot pen soil, whereas infiltration was the main process in control soil. Soil moisture flux beneath pens decreased substantially after 15 yr of activity. The estimated minimum leaching rate of chloride was 13 times faster than the estimated soil moisture flux. This difference suggests that chloride ions are not exclusively transported by advective flow under our conditions but also by solute diffusion and preferential flow.

  7. A water-cooling solution for PC-racks of the LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Vannerem, P

    2004-01-01

    With ever increasing power consumption and heat dissipation of todays CPUs, cooling of rack-mounted PCs is an issue for the future online farms of the LHC experiments. In order to investigate the viability of a water-cooling solution, a prototype PC-farm rack has been equipped with a commercially available retrofitted heat exchanger. The project has been carried out as a collaboration of the four LHC experiments and the PH-ESS group . This note reports on the results of a series of cooling and power measurements of the prototype rack with configurations of 30 to 48 PCs. The cooling performance of the rack-cooler is found to be adequate; it extracts the heat dissipated by the CPUs efficiently into the cooling water. Hence, the closed PC rack transfers almost no heat into the room. The measurements and the failure tests show that the rack-cooler concept is a viable solution for the future PC farms of the LHC experiments.

  8. Multidisciplinary approach to study the effect of water status and mobility on the activity of peroxidase in solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, Giampiero; Neri, Lilia; Laghi, Luca; Capozzi, Francesco; Mastrocola, Dino; Pittia, Paola

    2014-02-01

    The effect of water mobility on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) activity in solutions was investigated by measuring water activity (aw), freezable water content, (1)H proton transverse relaxation time and water self-diffusivity determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. The effect of system mobility as described by viscosity and glass transition temperature (T'g) was also studied. The aw and viscosity of aqueous solutions were modulated using ligands (glucose, sorbitol and trehalose) and a thickener (maltodextrin). The effectiveness of a solute in the inhibition of HRP activity was better related to its ability to reduce the mobility of the system than to its water mobility depleting effect. The relationship among viscosity and peroxidase activity was influenced by the type of enzyme but not by the substrate. Bovine lactoperoxidase activity was hindered by viscosity changes more than HRP activity (tested in the same system) due to the higher molecular weight of the former enzyme.

  9. Small angle neutron scattering study of two nonionic surfactants in water micellar solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajewska Aldona

    2008-11-01

    Two classic nonionic surfactants – C14E7 (heptaethylene glycol monotetra-decyl ether) and C10E7 (heptaethylene glycol monodecyl ether) were investigated in heavy water solution for concentration = 0.17% (dilute regime) at different temperatures in the range = 10–35°C by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) method. In the case of C14E7 surfactant – for all temperatures at = 0.17% there are two axial ellipsoidal micelles with longer axis 15 nm at 10°C and 49.5 nm at 35°C in investigated solutions. For C10E7 surfactant at the same concentration of solution and temperature – two axial ellipsoidal micelles were observed, too. The longer axis is equal to 7.5 nm at 10°C, 9 nm at 20°C and at 35°C this axis is equal to 12 nm. Micelles of C10E7 nonionic surfactant are smaller than those of C14E7 surfactant in the same experimental conditions.

  10. Analysis of ice slurry production by direct contact heat transfer of air and water solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-jun ZHANG; Ke-qing ZHENG; Ling-shi WANG; Wei WANG; Min JIANG; Sheng-ying ZHAO

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,a novel system using direct contact heat transfer between air and water solution was proposed to generate ice slurry.The heat transfer process and the system performance were studied;energy efficiency coefficients of 0.038,0.053,and 0.064 were obtained using different solutions.An empirical relationship between the volumetric heat transfer coefficient Uv and the main parameters was obtained by fitting the experimental data.The Uv calculated from the empirical formula agreed with the experimental Uv quite well with a relative error of less than 15%.Based on the empirical formula,a laboratory-scale direct contact ice slurry generator was then constructed,with practical application in mind.If the air flow rate is fixed at 200 m3/h,the ice production rate will be 0.091 kg/min.The experimental results also showed that the cold energy consumption of the air compressor accounted for more than half of the total amount.To improve the system energy efficiency coefficient,it is necessary to increase the air pipes insulation and the solution's thermal capacity,and also it is appropriate to utilize the free cold energy of liquefied natural gas(LNG).

  11. Investigating effects of hypertonic saline solutions on lipid monolayers at the air-water interface

    KAUST Repository

    Nava Ocampo, Maria F.

    2017-05-01

    More than 70,000 people worldwide suffer from cystic fibrosis, a genetic disease characterized by chronic accumulation of mucus in patients’ lungs provoking bacterial infections, and leading to respiratory failure. An employed age-old treatment to prevent the symptoms of the disease is inhalation of hypertonic saline solution, NaCl at concentrations higher than in the human body (~150 mM). This procedure clears the mucus in the lungs, bringing relief to the patient. However, the biophysical mechanisms underlying this process are not entirely clear. We undertook a new experimental approach to understand the effects of sprayed saline solutions on model lung surfactants towards understanding the mechanisms of the treatment. The surface of lungs contains mainly 1,2-Dipalmitol-sn-glycero-3-phosphocoline (DPPC). As previously assumed by others, we considered that monolayer of DPPC at the air-water interface serves as model system for the lungs surface; we employed a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) trough and PM-IRRAS to measure surface-specific infrared spectra of the surfactant monolayers and effects on the interfacial tensions. We investigated spraying hyper-saline solutions onto surfactant monolayers at the airwater interface in two parts: (i) validation of our methodology and techniques with stearic acid and (ii) experiments with DPPC monolayers at the air-water interface. Remarkably, when micro-droplets of NaCl were sprayed to the monolayer of stearic acid, we observed enhanced organization of the surfactant, interpreted from the intensities of the CH2 peaks in the surface-specific IR spectra. However, our results with DPPC monolayers didn’t show an effect with the salt added as aerosol, possibly indicating that the experimental methodology proposed is not adequate for the phenomena studied. In parallel, we mimicked respiratory mucous by preparing salt solutions containing 1% (wt%) agar and measured effects on their viscosities. Interestingly, we found that NaCl was much

  12. PHAST--a program for simulating ground-water flow, solute transport, and multicomponent geochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.; Engesgaard, Peter; Charlton, Scott R.

    2004-01-01

    The computer program PHAST simulates multi-component, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional saturated ground-water flow systems. PHAST is a versatile ground-water flow and solute-transport simulator with capabilities to model a wide range of equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. The flow and transport calculations are based on a modified version of HST3D that is restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The geochemical reactions are simulated with the geochemical model PHREEQC, which is embedded in PHAST. PHAST is applicable to the study of natural and contaminated ground-water systems at a variety of scales ranging from laboratory experiments to local and regional field scales. PHAST can be used in studies of migration of nutrients, inorganic and organic contaminants, and radionuclides; in projects such as aquifer storage and recovery or engineered remediation; and in investigations of the natural rock-water interactions in aquifers. PHAST is not appropriate for unsaturated-zone flow, multiphase flow, density-dependent flow, or waters with high ionic strengths. A variety of boundary conditions are available in PHAST to simulate flow and transport, including specified-head, flux, and leaky conditions, as well as the special cases of rivers and wells. Chemical reactions in PHAST include (1) homogeneous equilibria using an ion-association thermodynamic model; (2) heterogeneous equilibria between the aqueous solution and minerals, gases, surface complexation sites, ion exchange sites, and solid solutions; and (3) kinetic reactions with rates that are a function of solution composition. The aqueous model (elements, chemical reactions, and equilibrium constants), minerals, gases, exchangers, surfaces, and rate expressions may be defined or modified by the user. A number of options are available to save results of simulations to output files. The data may be saved in three formats: a format suitable for viewing with a text editor; a

  13. Stability of artificial ferrite garnets with actinides and lanthanoids in water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livshits, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    Extraction of the actinide-REE fraction and its subsequent incorporation into sparingly soluble crystalline phases (confinement matrices) is assumed in processing of spent nuclear fuel from high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). The chemical stability in the process of interaction with subsurface water governs the capability of a matrix phase to keep radionuclides from getting into the biosphere. In static experiments at 90 and 150°C, the chemical stability of ferrite garnets was investigated for three compositions with Th4+, Ce4+ and Gd3+ + serving as simulator components of the actinide fraction of HLW. Experiments were carried out in distilled water (pH 6.5), 0.01 M HCl solution (pH 2), and 0.01 M NaOH solution (pH 12). The behavior of ferrigarnet matrices depends on the acidity of the solution. In neutral and alkaline media, Th, Ce, and Gd are virtually not transferred into the liquid phase. Acid leaching promotes intense dissolution of garnet matrices. In this case, the leaching rate of Gd and Th from ceramics into the liquid phase is two orders of magnitude lower than the leaching rate of Ce because the Ce-doped phases contain less stable (relative to garnet) Ce-rich perovskite. Amorphization of the ferrigarnet structure due to 244Cm isotope decay leads to an increase in the leaching rate of Cm by no more than five times. In terms of radiation and chemical stability, ferrite garnets are not inferior to zirconolites and titanate pyrochlores. The experimental results suggest that garnet matrices can reliably immobilize actinides in subsurface repositories.

  14. An expanded conceptual framework for solution-focused management of chemical pollution in European waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munthe, John; Brorström-Lundén, Eva; Rahmberg, Magnus; Posthuma, Leo; Altenburger, Rolf; Brack, Werner; Bunke, Dirk; Engelen, Guy; Gawlik, Bernd Manfred; van Gils, Jos; Herráez, David López; Rydberg, Tomas; Slobodnik, Jaroslav; van Wezel, Annemarie

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a conceptual framework for solutions-focused management of chemical contaminants built on novel and systematic approaches for identifying, quantifying and reducing risks of these substances. The conceptual framework was developed in interaction with stakeholders representing relevant authorities and organisations responsible for managing environmental quality of water bodies. Stakeholder needs were compiled via a survey and dialogue. The content of the conceptual framework was thereafter developed with inputs from relevant scientific disciplines. The conceptual framework consists of four access points: Chemicals, Environment, Abatement and Society, representing different aspects and approaches to engaging in the issue of chemical contamination of surface waters. It widens the scope for assessment and management of chemicals in comparison to a traditional (mostly) perchemical risk assessment approaches by including abatement- and societal approaches as optional solutions. The solution-focused approach implies an identification of abatement- and policy options upfront in the risk assessment process. The conceptual framework was designed for use in current and future chemical pollution assessments for the aquatic environment, including the specific challenges encountered in prioritising individual chemicals and mixtures, and is applicable for the development of approaches for safe chemical management in a broader sense. The four access points of the conceptual framework are interlinked by four key topics representing the main scientific challenges that need to be addressed, i.e.: identifying and prioritising hazardous chemicals at different scales; selecting relevant and efficient abatement options; providing regulatory support for chemicals management; predicting and prioritising future chemical risks. The conceptual framework aligns current challenges in the safe production and use of chemicals. The current state of knowledge and implementation

  15. Impact of microbial growth on water flow and solute transport in unsaturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarwood, R. R.; Rockhold, M. L.; Niemet, M. R.; Selker, J. S.; Bottomley, P. J.

    2006-10-01

    A novel analytical method was developed that permitted real-time, noninvasive measurements of microbial growth and associated changes in hydrodynamic properties in porous media under unsaturated flowing conditions. Salicylate-induced, lux gene-based bioluminescence was used to quantify the temporal and spatial development of colonization over a 7-day time course. Water contents were determined daily by measuring light transmission through the system. Hydraulic flow paths were determined daily by pulsing a bromophenol blue dye solution through the colonized region of the sand. Bacterial growth and accumulation had a significant impact on the hydraulic properties of the porous media. Microbial colonization caused localized drying within the colonized zone, with decreases in saturation approaching 50% of antecedent values, and a 25% lowering of the capillary fringe height. Flow was retarded within the colonized zone and diverted around it concurrent with the expansion of the colonized zone between days 3 and 6. The location of horizontal dispersion corresponded with the cell densities of 1-3 × 109 cells g-1 dry sand. The apparent solute velocity through the colonized region was reduced from 0.41 cm min-1 (R2 = 0.99) to 0.25 cm min-1 (R2 = 0.99) by the sixth day of the experiment, associated with population densities that would occupy approximately 7% of the available pore space within the colonized region. Changes in the extent of colonization occurred over the course of the experiment, including upward migration against flow. The distribution of cells was not determined by water flow alone, but rather by a dynamic interaction between water flow and microbial growth. This experimental system provides rich data sets for the testing of conceptualizations expressed through numerical modeling.

  16. Explicit-water theory for the salt-specific effects and Hofmeister series in protein solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyuzhnyi, Yuriy V.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2016-06-01

    Effects of addition of salts on stability of aqueous protein solutions are studied theoretically and the results are compared with experimental data. In our approach, all the interacting species, proteins, ions, and water molecules, are accounted for explicitly. Water molecules are modeled as hard spheres with four off-center attractive square-well sites. These sites serve to bind either another water or to solvate the ions or protein charges. The ions are represented as charged hard spheres, and decorated by attractive sites to allow solvation. Spherical proteins simultaneously possess positive and negative groups, represented by charged hard spheres, attached to the surface of the protein. The attractive square-well sites, mimicking the protein-protein van der Waals interaction, are located on the surface of the protein. To obtain numerical results, we utilized the energy route of Wertheim's associative mean spherical approximation. From measurable properties, we choose to calculate the second virial coefficient B2, which is closely related to the tendency of proteins to aggregate and eventually crystalize. Calculations are in agreement with experimental trends: (i) For low concentration of added salt, the alkali halide salts follow the inverse Hofmeister series. (ii) At higher concentration of added salt, the trend is reversed. (iii) When cations are varied, the salts follow the direct Hofmeister series. (iv) In contrast to the colloidal theories, our approach correctly predicts the non-monotonic behavior of B2 upon addition of salts. (v) With respect to anions, the theory predicts for the B2 values to follow different sequences below and above the iso-ionic point, as also confirmed experimentally. (vi) A semi-quantitative agreement between measured and calculated values for the second virial coefficient, as functions of pH of solution and added salt type and concentration, is obtained.

  17. Identification of Water Scarcity and Providing Solutions for Adapting to Climate Changes in the Heihe River Basin of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangzheng Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In ecologically fragile areas with arid climate, such as the Heihe River Basin in northwestern China, sustainable social and economic development depends largely on the availability and sustainable uses of water resource. However, there is more and more serious water resource shortage and decrease of water productivity in Heihe River Basin under the influence of climate change and human activities. This paper attempts to identify the severe water scarcity under climate change and presents possible solutions for sustainable development in Heihe River Basin. Three problems that intervened land use changes, water resource, the relevant policies and institutions in Heihe River basin were identified, including (1 water scarcity along with serious contradiction between water supply and demand, (2 irrational water consumption structure along with low efficiency, and (3 deficient systems and institutions of water resource management along with unreasonable water allocation scheme. In this sense, we focused on reviewing the state of knowledge, institutions, and successful practices to cope with water scarcity at a regional extent. Possible solutions for dealing with water scarcity are explored and presented from three perspectives: (1 scientific researches needed by scientists, (2 management and institution formulation needed by governments, and (3 water resource optimal allocation by the manager at all administrative levels.

  18. The effect of structural properties on rheological behaviour of starches in binary dimethyl sulfoxide-water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptaszek, Paweł; Dziubiński, Marek; Grzesik, N. Mirosław; Liszka-Skoczylas, Marta

    2017-01-01

    This research study analysed the rheological properties of potato amylose and potato amylopectin in binary solutions of the following water and dimethyl sulfoxide concentrations: 90% DMSO (1), 80% DMSO (2) and 50% DMSO (3), with preparation methodology involving the dissolution at the temperature of 98°C. The studies of dynamic light scattering on the biopolymer coils and the determination of main relaxation times of the solutions were carried out. For the amylose solutions, the fast relaxation phenomena are predominant. The results of the quality tests of the hysteresis loop showed, that the amylose solutions in the solvents (1) and (2) are rheologically stable and shear-thickened. The amylose solutions in solvents (3) reveal oscillatory alterations of viscosity in the time. Amylopectin solutions are characterized by 80% share of slow relaxation phenomena, very low diffusion coefficients and hydrodynamic radii in the range of 2000 nm. The amylopectin solutions are rheologically unstable. PMID:28152071

  19. The effect of structural properties on rheological behaviour of starches in binary dimethyl sulfoxide-water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptaszek, Anna; Ptaszek, Paweł; Dziubiński, Marek; Grzesik, N Mirosław; Liszka-Skoczylas, Marta

    2017-01-01

    This research study analysed the rheological properties of potato amylose and potato amylopectin in binary solutions of the following water and dimethyl sulfoxide concentrations: 90% DMSO (1), 80% DMSO (2) and 50% DMSO (3), with preparation methodology involving the dissolution at the temperature of 98°C. The studies of dynamic light scattering on the biopolymer coils and the determination of main relaxation times of the solutions were carried out. For the amylose solutions, the fast relaxation phenomena are predominant. The results of the quality tests of the hysteresis loop showed, that the amylose solutions in the solvents (1) and (2) are rheologically stable and shear-thickened. The amylose solutions in solvents (3) reveal oscillatory alterations of viscosity in the time. Amylopectin solutions are characterized by 80% share of slow relaxation phenomena, very low diffusion coefficients and hydrodynamic radii in the range of 2000 nm. The amylopectin solutions are rheologically unstable.

  20. Sorption kinetics of ethanol/water solution by dimethacrylate-based dental resins and resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridou, Irini D; Achilias, Dimitris S; Karabela, Maria M

    2007-04-01

    In the present investigation the sorption-desorption kinetics of 75 vol % ethanol/water solution by dimethacrylate-based dental resins and resin composites was studied in detail. The resins examined were made by light-curing of bisphenol A glycol dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), bisphenol A ethoxylated dimethacrylate (Bis-EMA), and mixtures of these monomers. The resin composites were prepared from two commercial light-cured restorative materials (Z100 MP and Filtek Z250), the resin matrix of which is based on copolymers of the above-mentioned monomers. Ethanol/water sorption/desorption was examined in both equilibrium and dynamic conditions in two adjacent sorption-desorption cycles. For all the materials studied, it was found that the amount of ethanol/water sorbed or desorbed was always larger than the corresponding one reported in literature in case of water immersion. It was also observed that the chemical structure of the monomers used for the preparation of the resins directly affects the amount of solvent sorbed or desorbed, as well as sorption kinetics, while desorption rate was nearly unaffected. In the case of composites studied, it seems that the sorption/desorption process is not influenced much by the presence of filler. Furthermore, diffusion coefficients calculated for the resins were larger than those of the composites and were always higher during desorption than during sorption. Finally, an interesting finding concerning the rate of ethanol/water sorption was that all resins and composites followed Fickian diffusion kinetics during almost the whole sorption curve; however, during desorption the experimental data were overestimated by the theoretical model. Instead, it was found that a dual diffusion-relaxation model was able to accurately predict experimental data during the whole desorption curve. Kinetic relaxation parameters, together with diffusion coefficients, are reported

  1. Dynamics of water solutions of natural polysaccharides by fast field cycling nmr relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusova, Alena; Conte, Pellegrino; Kucerik, Jiri; de Pasquale, Claudio; Alonzo, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    second hydration shell contains water molecules, also recognized as partly-bound (PBW), which are not directly interacting with the hyaluronan chains but with BW. Finally, water molecules, which dynamics is resembling that of the pure and undisturbed water, are indicated either as a bulk water or free water (FW). As hyaluronan concentration is increased the third FW hydration shell is lost and all water molecules are affected by the presence of hyaluronan molecules. This work showed the great potential of FFC-NMR relaxometry in revealing water nature in polysaccharide solutions and the possibility for future applications on complex biological systems. Acknowledgements A.P. gratefully acknowledges a bilateral Erasmus project between Brno University of Technology and University of Palermo which provided grant sustainment for working in Italy. Ministry of Education of the Czech Republic, project MSM 0021630501 is also acknwledged. This work was partially funded by Ce.R.T.A. s.c.r.l. (Centri Regionali per le Tecnologie Alimentari; Italy). Authors kindly acknowledge Dr. Vladimír Velebný (CPN company, Dolní Dobrouč, Czech Republic) for providing of hyaluronan sample.

  2. The local order of supercooled water in solution with LiCl studied by NMR proton chemical shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, C.; Mallamace, D.; Vasi, S.; Cicero, N.; Dugo, G.; Mallamace, F.

    2016-05-01

    We study by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the local order of water molecules in solution with lithium chloride at eutectic concentration. In particular, by measuring the proton chemical shift as a function of the temperature in the interval 203{ K}Widom line for water supporting the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis.

  3. How Subsurface Water Technologies (SWT) can Provide Robust, Effective, and Cost-Efficient Solutions for Freshwater Management in Coastal Zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, K.G.; Raat, K.J.; Paalman, M.; Oosterhof, A.T.; Stuyfzand, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater resources in coastal zones are limited while demands are high, resulting in problems like seasonal water shortage, overexploitation of freshwater aquifers, and seawater intrusion. Three subsurface water technologies (SWT) that can provide robust, effective, and cost-efficient solutions to

  4. How Subsurface Water Technologies (SWT) can Provide Robust, Effective, and Cost-Efficient Solutions for Freshwater Management in Coastal Zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, K.G.; Raat, K.J.; Paalman, M.; Oosterhof, A.T.; Stuyfzand, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater resources in coastal zones are limited while demands are high, resulting in problems like seasonal water shortage, overexploitation of freshwater aquifers, and seawater intrusion. Three subsurface water technologies (SWT) that can provide robust, effective, and cost-efficient solutions to

  5. Dalia integrated production bundle (IPB): an innovative riser solution for deep water fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reals, Th Boscals de; Gloaguen, M.; Roche, F. [Total E and P (Angola); Marion, A.; Poincheval, A. [Technip, Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    The Dalia field is located 210 km north west of Luanda (Angola), about 140 km from shore in 1400 meter water-depth. It was the second major discovery out of 15 made in the block 17 operated by Total. The Dalia Umbilical, Flow lines and Risers EPCI Contract was awarded in 2003. The sea-line network to connect and control the 71 wells and 9 manifolds consist of the following: 40 km of insulated pipe in pipe (12 inches into 17 inches) production flow lines; 45 km of 12 inches water and gas injection lines; 6 off 1.7 km flexible water and gas injection risers; 8 off 1.65 km flexible Integrated Production Bundle (IPB) risers; 75 km of control umbilicals. The flow assurance and associated insulation requirement of the production transport system was one of the main challenges of the project. With a crude temperature of 45 deg C at the wellhead and the required minimum temperature of 35 deg C on arrival at the FPSO, this problem was complex. Understanding that, due to the Joule Thompson effect of the riser gas lift, a 'built in' loss of about 5 deg C is induced and together with further losses through the sub sea pipelines, some up to 6 km long, the agreed solution was 'pipe in pipe' for the production flow lines. The innovative flexible IPB riser, incorporating gas lift and heating to keep the fluid temperature above hydrate formation zone, was the selected riser solution. The IPB is new technology for deep water, developed by Technip for Dalia, and consists of a 12 inches nominal central flexible, surrounded by layers of heat tracing cables, small bore gas lift lines, optical fibres and many insulation layers with an Overall Heat Transfer Coefficient of approximately 3,4 W/m{sup 2}K. After an earlier research and development programme, a further extensive qualification programme was conducted during the course of the project, culminating with the deep water testing phase offshore Brazil. The IPB was then approved for fabrication and installation

  6. Dynamic soil water repellency during infiltration of water, ethanol, and aqueous ethanol solutions in post wildfire soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Sarah; Smith, James

    2015-04-01

    Contact angle dynamics, the temporal dependence of repellency, and the persistence of repellency are all terms used to describe dynamic changes in soil water repellency with time. Studied over varied spatial and temporal scales, much remains to be known about dynamic soil water repellency and its role during infiltration. Of those approaches used to characterize dynamic soil water repellency and develop mechanistic insight, tension infiltration has become an important one. Removing positive pore water pressures through tension infiltration facilitates the observation of infiltration initiated by capillary pull and experimentally eliminates one of the competing mechanisms that generates non-uniqueness. This makes tension infiltrometers and the data they generate uniquely sensitive to (primary) changes in contact angles and fractional wettability. Changes, which are subsumed when positive pore water pressures are the primary drivers of infiltration, as is the case during ponded infiltration in water repellent soils. One pressing challenge, however, is that analytical approaches, based on idealized wettable-system principles (e.g. 0° and/or static contact angles), yield suspect results in non-wetting / fractionally wettable / dynamic systems. Consequently, complex infiltration behaviours, and linkages between fundamental process oriented understanding and real-world problems, remain poorly understood. This persistently impedes our ability to accurately describe, model, and predict flow in water repellent systems. To help address this knowledge gap, this work presents suites of in situ field (3D) and laboratory (1D) experimental data collected in naturally repellent post wildfire soils using tension infiltrometers (4.4cm and 8cm, respectively) and different infiltrating fluids. In the field, 49 infiltration tests using water, ethanol (95%), and Molarity of Ethanol Drop (MED)-derived aqueous ethanol solutions indicated that early- and late-time infiltration behaviours

  7. Solute transport in coupled inland-coastal water systems. General conceptualisation and application to Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarsjoe, Jerker; Destouni, Georgia; Persson, Klas; Prieto, Carmen (Dept. of Physical Geography, Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2007-12-15

    We formulate a general theoretical conceptualisation of solute transport from inland sources to downstream recipients, considering main recipient load contributions from all different nutrient and pollutant sources that may exist within any catchment. Since the conceptualisation is model independent, its main hydrological factors and mass delivery factors can be quantified on the basis of inputs to and outputs from any considered analytical or numerical model. Some of the conceptually considered source contribution and transport pathway combinations are however commonly neglected in catchment-scale solute transport and attenuation modelling, in particular those related to subsurface sources, diffuse sources at the land surface and direct groundwater transport into the recipient. The conceptual framework provides a possible tool for clarification of underlying and often implicit model assumptions, which can be useful for e.g. inter-model comparisons. In order to further clarify and explain research questions that may be of particular importance for transport pathways from deep groundwater surrounding a repository, we concretise and interpret some selected transport scenarios for model conditions in the Forsmark area. Possible uncertainties in coastal discharge predictions, related to uncertain spatial variation of evapotranspiration within the catchment, were shown to be small for the relatively large, focused surface water discharges from land to sea, because local differences were averaged out along the length of the main water flow paths. In contrast, local flux values within the diffuse groundwater flow field from land to sea are more uncertain, although estimates of mean values and total sums of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) along some considerable coastline length may be robust. The present results show that 80% to 90% of the total coastal discharge of Forsmark occurred through focused flows in visible streams, whereas the remaining 10% to 20% was

  8. Solute transport in coupled inland-coastal water systems. General conceptualisation and application to Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarsjoe, Jerker; Destouni, Georgia; Persson, Klas; Prieto, Carmen (Dept. of Physical Geography, Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2007-12-15

    We formulate a general theoretical conceptualisation of solute transport from inland sources to downstream recipients, considering main recipient load contributions from all different nutrient and pollutant sources that may exist within any catchment. Since the conceptualisation is model independent, its main hydrological factors and mass delivery factors can be quantified on the basis of inputs to and outputs from any considered analytical or numerical model. Some of the conceptually considered source contribution and transport pathway combinations are however commonly neglected in catchment-scale solute transport and attenuation modelling, in particular those related to subsurface sources, diffuse sources at the land surface and direct groundwater transport into the recipient. The conceptual framework provides a possible tool for clarification of underlying and often implicit model assumptions, which can be useful for e.g. inter-model comparisons. In order to further clarify and explain research questions that may be of particular importance for transport pathways from deep groundwater surrounding a repository, we concretise and interpret some selected transport scenarios for model conditions in the Forsmark area. Possible uncertainties in coastal discharge predictions, related to uncertain spatial variation of evapotranspiration within the catchment, were shown to be small for the relatively large, focused surface water discharges from land to sea, because local differences were averaged out along the length of the main water flow paths. In contrast, local flux values within the diffuse groundwater flow field from land to sea are more uncertain, although estimates of mean values and total sums of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) along some considerable coastline length may be robust. The present results show that 80% to 90% of the total coastal discharge of Forsmark occurred through focused flows in visible streams, whereas the remaining 10% to 20% was

  9. Computer model of two-dimensional solute transport and dispersion in ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikow, Leonard F.; Bredehoeft, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents a model that simulates solute transport in flowing ground water. The model is both general and flexible in that it can be applied to a wide range of problem types. It is applicable to one- or two-dimensional problems involving steady-state or transient flow. The model computes changes in concentration over time caused by the processes of convective transport, hydrodynamic dispersion, and mixing (or dilution) from fluid sources. The model assumes that the solute is non-reactive and that gradients of fluid density, viscosity, and temperature do not affect the velocity distribution. However, the aquifer may be heterogeneous and (or) anisotropic. The model couples the ground-water flow equation with the solute-transport equation. The digital computer program uses an alternating-direction implicit procedure to solve a finite-difference approximation to the ground-water flow equation, and it uses the method of characteristics to solve the solute-transport equation. The latter uses a particle- tracking procedure to represent convective transport and a two-step explicit procedure to solve a finite-difference equation that describes the effects of hydrodynamic dispersion, fluid sources and sinks, and divergence of velocity. This explicit procedure has several stability criteria, but the consequent time-step limitations are automatically determined by the program. The report includes a listing of the computer program, which is written in FORTRAN IV and contains about 2,000 lines. The model is based on a rectangular, block-centered, finite difference grid. It allows the specification of any number of injection or withdrawal wells and of spatially varying diffuse recharge or discharge, saturated thickness, transmissivity, boundary conditions, and initial heads and concentrations. The program also permits the designation of up to five nodes as observation points, for which a summary table of head and concentration versus time is printed at the end of the

  10. Immobilization of zinc from metallurgical waste and water solutions using geopolymerization technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolići I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymeraization technology is recognized as a promising method for immobilization of heavy metals by the stabilization or solidification process. This process involves the chemical reaction of alumino-silicate oxides with highly alkaline activator yielding the new material with amorphous or semi-amorphous structure, called geopolymer. Fly ash and blast furnace slag were mainly used as a raw material for geopolymerization process. In this paper we have investigated the possibility of immobilization of Zn from electric arc furnace dust (EAFD through geopolymerization of fly ash and possibility of Zn2+ adsorption from waste waters using fly ash based geopolymers. Efficacy of Zn immobilization from electric arc furnace dust was evaluated by TCLP test while the immobilization of Zn2+ ions from the water solution was evaluated through the removal efficiency. The results have shown that geopolymerization process may successfully be used for immobilization of Zn by stabilization of EAFD and for production of low cost adsorbent for waste water treatment.

  11. Integrating Water Flow, Solute Transport and Crop Production Models At The Farm-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assinck, F. B. T.; de Vos, J. A.

    Minimising nitrate pollution of ground and surface water and optimising agricultural yields are problems which have to be addressed at the farm-scale. However, simulation models usually operate at the field-scale. We coupled the subsurface hydrology model SWAP with other existing deterministic (sub)models for solute transport, organic mat- ter dynamics, crop growth, and dairy farm management at the farm-scale, resulting in the model WATERPAS. The (sub)models are coupled in a Framework environment obeying the principles of object oriented modelling. Based on daily weather data, groundwater regimes, soil and farm characteristics WATERPAS is able to simulate the water and nutrient balances, grass production, economical benefits, nitrate leaching and greenhouse gas emissions at a farm. Problems of coupling, such as data-transfer, quality checks, over-parameterisation, complexity and sensitivity of the systems are discussed. Application of deducted simpler models and expert judgement can be use- ful for practical use. However, we believe that integrated models are a powerful tool to understand the complex relationships between the different processes. It also gives opportunities to perform scenario analysis for future boundary conditions, i.e. due to changing farm management, (sea) water levels and climate change.

  12. An Efficient Multiple-Dimensional Finite Element Solution for Water Flow in Variably Saturated Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xue-bin; ZHANG Xiao-xian; PANG Hong-bin

    2008-01-01

    Multiple-dimensional water flow in variably saturated soils plays an important role in ecological systems such as irrigation and water uptake by plant roots;its quantitative description is usually based on the Richards' equation.Because of the nonlinearity of the Richards' equation and the complexity of natural soils,most practical simulations rely on numerical solutions with the nonlinearity solved by iterations.The commonly used iterations for solving the nonlinearity are Picard and Newton methods with the former converging at first-order rate and the later at second-order rate.A recent theoretical analysis by the authors,however,revealed that for solving the diffusive flow,the classical Picard method is actually a chord-Newton method,converging at a rate faster than first order;its linear convergence rate is due to the treatment of the gravity term.To improve computational efficiency,a similar chord-Newton method as for solving the diffusive term was proposed to solve the gravity term.Testing examples for one-dimensional flow showed significant improvement.The core of this method is to produce a diagonally dominant matrix in the linear system so as to improve the iteration-toiteration stability and hence the convergence.In this paper,we develop a similar method for multiple-dimensional flow and compare its performance with the classical Picard and Newton methods for water flow in soils characterised by a wide range of van Genuchten parameters.

  13. Effect of water structure on gelation of agar in glycerol solutions and phase diagram of agar organogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boral, Shilpi; Bohidar, H B

    2012-06-21

    A comprehensive study of hydration of polyanionic agar molecules in its solution and gel phase in glycerol-water binary solvent is reported. Raman spectroscopy results predict differential water structure arrangement for glycerol-water binary solvent, 0.02% (w/v) agar in glycerol solution and 0.3% (w/v) agar organogel. The 3200 cm(-1) Raman band pertaining to ice-like structure of water was found to increase in gel phase alike in glycerol-water solvent while it decreased in agar solutions with increase in glycerol concentration. In contrast, the partially structured water corresponding to the component 3310 cm(-1) of Raman spectra increased in agar solution, and decreased in gel phase similar to glycerol-water solvent case. We have explained these observations based on a simple model where the available oxygen to hydrogen atom ratio in a given solvent-polymer system uniquely defines hydration in solution and gel phases. The gelation concentration was found to increase from 0.18 (for water) to 0.22% (w/v) (50% v/v glycerol solution) as the glycerol concentration was raised. Correspondingly, the gelation temperature, T(g), showed a decline from 40 to 20 °C, and the gel melting temperature, T(m), revealed a reduction from 81 to 65 °C in the same glycerol concentration regime. Two distinctive features are evident here: (i) presence of glycerol as a cosolvent does not favor the gelation of agar as compared to water and (ii) agar organogels are softer than their hydrogels. A unique 3D phase diagram for the agar organogel is proposed. Circular dichroism data confirmed that the agar molecules retained their biological activity in these solvents. Thus, it is shown that thermo-mechanical properties of these organogels could be systematically tuned and adapted as per application requirement.

  14. Glass transition of aqueous solutions involving annealing-induced ice recrystallization resolves liquid-liquid transition puzzle of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Shan; Cao, Ze-Xian; Wang, Qiang

    2015-10-27

    Liquid-liquid transition of water is an important concept in condensed-matter physics. Recently, it was claimed to have been confirmed in aqueous solutions based on annealing-induced upshift of glass-liquid transition temperature, T(g) . Here we report a universal water-content, X(aqu) , dependence of T(g) for aqueous solutions. Solutions with X(aqu)>X(cr)(aqu)vitrify/devitrify at a constant temperature, ~T(g) , referring to freeze-concentrated phase with X(aqu)left behind ice crystallization. Those solutions with X(aqu)recrystallization is stabilized at . Experiments on aqueous glycerol and 1,2,4-butanetriol solutions in literature were repeated, and the same samples subject to other annealing treatments equally reproduce the result. The upshift of T(g) by annealing is attributable to freeze-concentrated phase of solutions instead of 'liquid II phase of water'. Our work also provides a reliable method to determine hydration formula and to scrutinize solute-solvent interaction in solution.

  15. Effect of Solution Properties on Arsenic Adsorption by Drinking Water Treatment Residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, R.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Sharma, S.

    2005-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous element in the environment. Higher levels of As in soils may result from various anthropogenic sources such as use of arsenical pesticides, fertilizers, wood preservatives, smelter wastes, and coal combustion. This is of great environmental and human health concern due to the high toxicity and proven carcinogenicity of several arsenical species. Thus there is a need for developing cost effective technologies capable of lowering bioavailable As concentrations in soils to environmentally acceptable levels. In-situ immobilization of metals using inexpensive amendments such as minerals (apatite, zeolite, or clay minerals) or waste by-products (steel shot, beringite, and iron-rich biosolids) to reduce bioavailability is an inexpensive alternative to the more expensive ex-situ remediation methods. One such emerging in-situ technique is the application of drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs). WTRs can be classified as a byproduct of drinking water treatment plants and are generally composed of amorphous Fe/Al oxides, activated C and cationic polymers. WTRs possess amorphous structure and generally have high positive charge. Because As is chemically similar to phosphorus, the oxyanions As (V) and As (III) may have the potential of being retained by the WTRs. Thus, it is hypothesized that WTRs retain As irreversibly, thereby reducing As biavailability. As mobility of arsenic is controlled by adsorption reactions, knowledge of adsorption of As by WTRs is of primary relevance. Although the overall rate of adsorption is dependent on numerous factors, review of the literature indicates that competing ions in solution play an important role in the overall retention of As; however, little work has been conducted to identify which ions provide the most competition. As arsenic adsorption appears to be influenced by the variable pH-dependent charges developed on the soil particle surfaces, the effect of pH is also of critical importance. Hence, the

  16. Effect of pH Upper Control Limit on Nutrient Solution Component and Water Spinach Growth under Hydroponics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuzhang Xue

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, experiment with four levels of nutrient solution pH control upper limit was conducted to explore the optimal nutrient solution pH management scheme under hydroponics by evaluating the nutrient solution characters i.e., pH, Electric Conductivity (EC, nitrate, soluble phosphorus (soluble-P, water spinach growth and quality. The results showed that the nutrient solution pH was 8.2 and unsuitable for water spinach growth under the treatment with no pH regulation during the experimental period. The pH could be maintained within a reasonable range for water spinach growth by adding nitric acid to nutrient solution. Meanwhile, the availability of cations and soluble-P were improved. The water/nutrition uptake was also promoted. Through nutrient solution pH control, the plant height, leaf number and fresh/dry shoot weight increased by 34.66-55.70%, 12.42-13.66%, 39.18¬-101.72% and 13.78-74.03%, respectively. It indicated that pH regulation could improve water spinach growth, promote allocation of photosynthetic product to shoot and increase the effective yield. The nitrate content of water spinach shoot increased, but which was lower than the critical value of 3000 mg/kg FW. Vitamin C content decreased under the treatment which 6.5 of pH control upper limit was set. There were no significant differences in soluble sugar and crude protein content among the four treatments. Considering the yield and quality of water spinach, the suitable nutrient solution pH control upper limit was 7.0.

  17. Body shaping under water stress: osmosensing and osmoregulation of solute transport in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbach, Susanne; Krämer, Reinhard

    2002-05-03

    Fluctuation of external osmolarity is one of the most common types of environmental stress factors for all kind of cells, both of prokaryotic and of eukaryotic origin. Cells try to keep their volume and/or turgor pressure constant; consequently, both a decrease (hypoosmotic stress) and an increase (hyperosmotic stress) of the solute concentration (correctly: increase or decrease in water activity) in the surrounding area, respectively, are challenges for cellular metabolism and survival. A common example from the prokaryotic world is the fate of a soil bacterium that, after a sunny day has dried out the soil (hyperosmotic stress), is suddenly exposed to a drop of distilled water from a rain cloud (hypoosmotic stress). The immediate and inevitable passive response to the sudden osmotic shift in the surroundings is fast water efflux out of the cell in the former situation and water influx in the latter. In the worst case, these responses may lead to either loss of cell turgor and plasmolysis or to cell burst. In order to overcome such drastic consequences cells have developed effective mechanisms, namely osmoadaptation, to cope with the two different types of osmotic stress. For a graded reaction to osmotic shifts, cells must be able (1) to sense stimuli related to osmotic stress, (2) to transduce corresponding signals to those systems that properly respond (3) by activating transport or enzymatic functions or (4) by changing gene expression profiles. In this review, membrane proteins involved in the cell's active response to osmotic stress are described. Molecular details of structure, function, and regulation of mechanosensitive efflux channels from various organisms, as well as of osmoregulated uptake systems are discussed.

  18. Solute transport characterization in karst aquifers by tracer injection tests for a sustainable water resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, T.; Angulo, B.; Uriarte, J. A.; Olazar, M.; Arandes, J. M.; Antiguedad, I.

    2017-04-01

    Protection of water resources is a major challenge today, given that territory occupation and land use are continuously increasing. In the case of karst aquifers, its dynamic complexity requires the use of specific methodologies that allow establishing local and regional flow and transport patterns. This information is particularly necessary when springs and wells harnessed for water supply are concerned. In view of the present state of the art, this work shows a new approach based on the use of a LiCl based tracer injection test through a borehole for transport characterization from a local to a regional scale. Thus a long term tracer injection test was conducted in a particularly sensitive sector of the Egino karst massif (Basque Country, Spain). The initial displacement of tracer in the vicinity of the injection was monitored in a second borehole at a radial distance of 10.24 m. This first information, assessed by a radial divergent model, allows obtaining transport characteristic parameters in this immediate vicinity during injection. At a larger (regional) scale, the tracer reaches a highly transmissive network with mean traveling velocities to the main springs being from 4.3 to 13.7 m/h. The responses obtained, particularly clear in the main spring used for water supply, and the persistence of part of the tracer in the injection zone, pose reconsidering the need for their protection. Thus, although the test allows establishing the 24-h isochrone, which is the ceiling value in present European vulnerability approaches, the results obtained advise widening the zone to protect in order to guarantee water quality in the springs. Overall, this stimulus-response test allows furthering the knowledge on the dynamics of solute transport in karst aquifers and is a particularly useful tool in studies related to source vulnerability and protection in such a complex medium.

  19. New era / new solutions: The role of alternative tariff structures in water supply projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, F Silva; Marques, R Cunha

    2017-09-13

    Water utilities face different challenges that may force them to seek prioritized objectives. When doing so, particular projects may have to be developed, being important to understand their impact on water tariffs, and thus, on customers. Such consequences may bear an increased relevance in cases stressed with, e.g., resource scarcity, poverty, and the need for infrastructure investments. The resulting cost and revenue variability demand a comprehensive study. If the first may require a stochastic modeling (in major cost components) in order to consider its inherent uncertainty, the second needs to be modeled following context-specific objectives set by the relevant stakeholders. The solutions achieved will likely promote distinct revenue sources, as well as diversified water tariff structures. A multi-objective optimization model (i.e., a Framework for Suitable Prices) is built to deal with those diversified requirements (e.g., stochastic energy costs, affordability, cost recovery, or administrative simplicity). The model is solved through achievement scalarizing functions with several weighting coefficients for a reference point, so as to provide a significant perception of possible revenue options (and their impact) to the decision makers. The proposed method is applied to a case study, Boa Vista Island in Cabo Verde, in which the background characteristics, namely water sources availability (e.g., the adoption of desalination technologies), economic development and other contextual factors were considered. The key role of tariff structure selection is displayed, instead of assuming it a priori, giving important insights regarding project feasibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Initial-Boundary Value Problem Solution of the Nonlinear Shallow-water Wave Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoglu, U.; Aydin, B.

    2014-12-01

    The hodograph transformation solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear shallow-water wave (NSW) equations are usually obtained through integral transform techniques such as Fourier-Bessel transforms. However, the original formulation of Carrier and Greenspan (1958 J Fluid Mech) and its variant Carrier et al. (2003 J Fluid Mech) involve evaluation integrals. Since elliptic integrals are highly singular as discussed in Carrier et al. (2003), this solution methodology requires either approximation of the associated integrands by smooth functions or selection of regular initial/boundary data. It should be noted that Kanoglu (2004 J Fluid Mech) partly resolves this issue by simplifying the resulting integrals in closed form. Here, the hodograph transform approach is coupled with the classical eigenfunction expansion method rather than integral transform techniques and a new analytical model for nonlinear long wave propagation over a plane beach is derived. This approach is based on the solution methodology used in Aydın & Kanoglu (2007 CMES-Comp Model Eng) for wind set-down relaxation problem. In contrast to classical initial- or boundary-value problem solutions, here, the NSW equations are formulated to yield an initial-boundary value problem (IBVP) solution. In general, initial wave profile with nonzero initial velocity distribution is assumed and the flow variables are given in the form of Fourier-Bessel series. The results reveal that the developed method allows accurate estimation of the spatial and temporal variation of the flow quantities, i.e., free-surface height and depth-averaged velocity, with much less computational effort compared to the integral transform techniques such as Carrier et al. (2003), Kanoglu (2004), Tinti & Tonini (2005 J Fluid Mech), and Kanoglu & Synolakis (2006 Phys Rev Lett). Acknowledgments: This work is funded by project ASTARTE- Assessment, STrategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe. Grant 603839, 7th FP (ENV.2013.6.4-3 ENV

  1. Corrosion of AISI 4130 Steel Alloy under Hydrodynamic Condition in Ethylene Glycol + Water + NO2-Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I. Danaee; M. Niknejad Khomami; A.A. Attar

    2013-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of steel alloy in ethylene glycol-water mixture at different solution rotating speeds was investigated by polarization curves and AC impedance measurements (EIS).The results obtained showed that corrosion rate was not changed significantly at different rotating speeds and was decreased with increasing ethylene glycol concentration.The effect of nitrite as an inhibitor was studied and high inhibition efficiency was obtained.It was found that surface passivation occurred in the presence of inhibitor.The inhibiting effect of the nitrite was explained on the basis of the competitive adsorption between the inorganic anions and the aggressive Cl-ions and the adsorption isotherm basically obeys the Flory-Huggins adsorption isotherm.Thermodynamic parameters for steel corrosion and inhibitor adsorption were determined,which revealed that the adsorption process is spontaneous.

  2. Effect of Initial Concentrations on Solidification of Ammonium Chloride water Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    The effect of initial concentrations on solidification of ammonium chloride water solution is numerically investigated in detail.The solidifying process.with the cold wall temperature lower than the eutectic temperature,is assumed to be one-dimensional,and controlled by heat conduction only.The simulation reveals that:(1) The solid-mush interface grows in a linear manner,while the growth rate of the mush-liquid interface decreases in a parabolic manner,with increasing initial concentrations.(2) The temperature field in the whole region has parabolic characteristics,but is shows a linear feature in the solid zone and mushy zone.(3) The concentration always has linear characteristics in the much.(4)The solid fraction distribution is strongly affected by the initial concertration.The solidification process shows quite different features,especially at small and high initial concentrations.

  3. Determination of Iron in Water Solution by Time-Resolved Femtosecond Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergey, S. Golik; Alexey, A. Ilyin; Michael, Yu. Babiy; Yulia, S. Biryukova; Vladimir, V. Lisitsa; Oleg, A. Bukin

    2015-11-01

    The influence of the energy of femtosecond laser pulses on the intensity of Fe I (371.99 nm) emission line and the continuous spectrum of the plasma generated on the surface of Fe3+ water solution by a Ti: sapphire laser radiation with pulse duration laser pulse energy. It is found that an increase of laser pulse energy insignificantly affects on LOD in the time-resolved LIBS and leads to a slight improvement of the limit of detection. supported by the Russian Science Foundation (agreement #14-50-00034) (measurements of limit of detection), Russian Foundation for Basic Research (NK 15-32-20878/15) obtained in the frame of “Organization of Scientific Research” in the Far Eastern Federal University supported by Ministry of Education and Science of Russian Federation

  4. Trends in Modelling, Simulation and Design of Water Hydraulic Systems – Motion Control and Open-Ended Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents and discusses a R&D-view on trends in development and best practise in modelling, simulation and design of both low-pressure and high-pressure tap water hydraulic components and systems for motion control as well as open-ended solutions various industrial applications. The focus...... is on the advantages using ordinary tap water and the range of application areas are illustrated with examples, in particular within the food processing industry, humidification operations, water mist systems for fire fighting, high water pressure cleaners, water moisturising systems for wood processing, lumber drying...... is that the components operate with pure water from the tap without additives of any kind. Hence water hydraulics takes the benefit of pure water as fluid being environmentally friendly, easy to clean sanitary design, non-toxic, non-flammable, inexpensive, readily available and easily disposable. The low-pressure tap...

  5. A Direct Solution Approach to the Inverse Shallow-Water Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alelign Gessese

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of open channel flow modelling often requires an accurate representation of the channel bed topography to accurately predict the flow hydrodynamics. Experimental techniques are the most widely used approaches to measure the bed topographic elevation of open channels. However, they are usually cost and time consuming. Free surface measurement is, on the other hand, relatively easy to obtain using airborne photographic techniques. We present in this work an easy to implement and fast to solve numerical technique to identify the underlying bedrock topography from given free surface elevation data in shallow open channel flows. The main underlying idea is to derive explicit partial differential equations which govern this inverse reconstruction problem. The technique described here is a “one-shot technique” in the sense that the solution of the partial differential equation provides the solution to the inverse problem directly. The idea is tested on a set of artificial data obtained by first solving the forward problem governed by the shallow-water equations. Numerical results show that the channel bed topographic elevation can be reconstructed with a level of accuracy less than 3%. The method is also shown to be robust when noise is present in the input data.

  6. Behavior of gellan in aqueous-salt solutions and oilfield saline water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanar Nurakhmetova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of storage time and temperature on the behavior of low acyl gellan (LAG was studied by viscometry and 1H NMR spectroscopy without salt addition. The viscometric results revealed that the effectiveness of salts to enhance gelation of gellan changes in the following order: BaСl2>CaCl2»MgCl2>KCl>NaCl. The sol-gel and liquid-solid phase transitions of gellan solutions were observed upon addition of oilfield water containing 73 g L-1 of alkaline and alkaline earth metal ions. The effectiveness of salts to induce the separation of liquid and solid phases changes in the sequence: NaCl>KCl>MgCl2»CaCl2»BaСl2. The hydrodynamic behavior of 0.5 wt.% gellan solution injected into the sand pack model with high (20 Darcy and lower (2 Darcy permeability is useful to model the oil reservoirs in the process of enhanced oil recovery.

  7. Development of long-life-cycle tablet ceramic adsorbent for geosmin removal from water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rongzhi; Xue, Qiang; Zhang, Zhenya; Sugiura, Norio; Yang, Yingnan; Li, Miao; Chen, Nan; Ying, Zhao; Lei, Zhongfang

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the tablet ceramic adsorbent (TCA), a silica/iron(III) oxide composite material, has been developed for geosmin (GSM) removal from the water solution. The physicochemical characteristics of TCA were examined with XRD, SEM, EDX and BET analyses. The sorption characteristics of GSM on TCA were investigated in a batch system. Attempts have been made to understand the adsorption kinetics, the effect of initial GSM concentration, solution pH, and reaction time. The batch experiments equilibrium data were well fitted to the Lagergren kinetic equation, which indicate the first-order nature adsorption. Over 82% of the GSM was removed by the TCA within 600 min at an initial concentration of 200 ng/L with 20 g/L of TCA dose. The batch and regeneration study indicated that the TCA is a cost-effective GSM adsorbent with sufficient mechanical strength to retain its physical integrity after long-time adsorption, and high regeneration performance for long-life-cycle application. Almost no second contamination (toxic sludge or leached iron) was observed after adsorption, and the gas resultant of thermal regeneration is harmless to atmospheric environment.

  8. Fertilizer drawn forward osmosis process for sustainable water reuse to grow hydroponic lettuce using commercial nutrient solution

    KAUST Repository

    Chekli, Laura

    2017-03-10

    This study investigated the sustainable reuse of wastewater using fertilizer drawn forward osmosis (FDFO) process through osmotic dilution of commercial nutrient solution for hydroponics, a widely used technique for growing plants without soil. Results from the bench-scale experiments showed that the commercial hydroponic nutrient solution (i.e. solution containing water and essential nutrients) exhibited similar performance (i.e., water flux and reverse salt flux) to other inorganic draw solutions when treating synthetic wastewater. The use of hydroponic solution is highly advantageous since it provides all the required macro- (i.e., N, P and K) and micronutrients (i.e., Ca, Mg, S, Mn, B, Zn and Mo) in a single balanced solution and can therefore be used directly after dilution without the need to add any elements. After long-term operation (i.e. up to 75% water recovery), different physical cleaning methods were tested and results showed that hydraulic flushing can effectively restore up to 75% of the initial water flux while osmotic backwashing was able to restore the initial water flux by more than 95%; illustrating the low-fouling potential of the FDFO process. Pilot-scale studies demonstrated that the FDFO process is able to produce the required nutrient concentration and final water quality (i.e., pH and conductivity) suitable for hydroponic applications. Coupling FDFO with pressure assisted osmosis (PAO) in the later stages could help in saving operational costs (i.e., energy and membrane replacement costs). Finally, the test application of nutrient solution produced by the pilot FDFO process to hydroponic lettuce showed similar growth pattern as the control without any signs of nutrient deficiency.

  9. Homogenous Balance Method and Exact Analytical Solutions for Whitham-Broer-Kaup Equations in Shallow Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAZhi

    2004-01-01

    Based on the homogenous balance method and with the help of mathematica, the Backlund transformation and the transfer heat equation are derived. Analyzing the heat-transfer equation, the multiple soliton solutions and other exact analytical solution for Whitham-Broer-Kaup equations(WBK) are derived. These solutions contain Fan's, Xie's and Yan's results and other new types of analytical solutions, such as rational function solutions and periodic solutions. The method can also be applied to solve more nonlinear differential equations.

  10. New design solutions for low-power energy production in water pipe systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena M. RAMOS

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is the result of ongoing research for a European Union 7th Framework Program Project regarding energy converters for very low heads, and aims to analyze optimization of new cost-effective hydraulic turbine designs for possible implementation in water supply systems (WSSs or in other pressurized water pipe infrastructures, such as irrigation, wastewater, or drainage systems. A new methodology is presented based on a theoretical, technical and economic analysis. Viability studies focused on small power values for different pipe systems were investigated. Detailed analyses of alternative typical volumetric energy converters were conducted on the basis of mathematical and physical fundamentals as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD associated with the interaction between the flow conditions and the system operation. Important constraints (e.g., size, stability, efficiency, and continuous steady flow conditions can be identified and a search for alternative rotary volumetric converters is being conducted. As promising cost-effective solutions for the coming years, adapted rotor-dynamic turbomachines and non-conventional axial propeller devices were analyzed based on the basic principles of pumps operating as turbines, as well as through an extensive comparison between simulations and experimental tests.

  11. Different behaviours in the solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water induced by mixed surfactant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Pablo S; de Rossi, Rita H; Fernández, Mariana A

    2011-09-01

    Water solubility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), viz, naphthalene and phenanthrene, in micellar solutions at 25°C was investigated, using two series of different binary mixtures of anionic and nonionic surfactants. Tween 80 and Brij-35 were used as nonionic surfactants whereas fatty acids or amphiphilic cyclodextrins (Mod-β-CD) synthesized in our laboratory were used as anionic ones. Solubilization capacity has been quantified in terms of the molar solubilization ratio and the micelle-water partition coefficient, using UV-visible spectrophotometry. Anionic surfactants exhibited less solubilization capacity than nonionics. The mixtures between Tween 80 and Mod-β-CD did not show synergism to increase the solubilization of PAHs. On the other hand, the mixtures formed by Tween 80 and fatty acids at all mole fractions studied produced higher enhancements of the solubility of naphthalene than the individual surfactants. The critical micellar concentration of the mixtures of Tween 80/sodium laurate was determined by surface tension measurements and spectrofluorimetry using pyrene as probe. The system is characterized by a negative interaction parameter (β) indicating attractive interactions between both surfactants in the range of the compositions studied. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Solution of shallow-water equations using least-squares finite-element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shin-Jye Liang; Jyh-Haw Tang; Ming-Shun Wu

    2008-01-01

    A least-squares finite-element method (LSFEM) for the non-conservative shallow-water equations is pre-sented. The model is capable of handling complex topogra-phy, steady and unsteady flows, subcritical and supercritical flows, and flows with smooth and sharp gradient changes. Advantages of the model include: (1) sources terms, such as the bottom slope, surface stresses and bed frictions, can be treated easily without any special treatment; (2) upwind scheme is no needed; (3) a single approximating space can be used for all variables, and its choice of approximating space is not subject to the Ladyzhenskaya-Babuska-Brezzi (LBB) condition; and (4) the resulting system of equations is sym-metric and positive-definite (SPD) which can be solved effi-ciently with the preconditioned conjugate gradient method. The model is verified with flow over a bump, tide induced flow, and dam-break. Computed results are compared with analytic solutions or other numerical results, and show the model is conservative and accurate. The model is then used to simulate flow past a circular cylinder. Important flow charac-teristics, such as variation of water surface around the cylin-der and vortex shedding behind the cylinder are investigated. Computed results compare well with experiment data and other numerical results.

  13. Competitive Adsorption of Cadmium (II from Aqueous Solutions onto Nanoparticles of Water Treatment Residual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed Elkhatib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in using water treatment residuals (WTRs for heavy metals removal from wastewater due to their low cost, availability, and high efficiency in removing various pollutants. In this study, novel water treatment residuals nanoparticles (nWTRs were prepared using high energy ball milling and used for efficient removal of Cd(II in single- and multi-ion systems. The WTR nanoparticles demonstrated high removal efficiency for Cd from aqueous solution as the adsorption capacities of nWTR were 17 and 10 times higher than those of bulk WTR in single- and multielement systems, respectively. Noticeably, Cd(II adsorption was clearly suppressed in the multi-ion system as Cu and Pb form the most stable monohydroxo complexes. Fourier transmission infrared (FTIR analyses suggested the participation of OH−, O-Al-O, FeOH, and FeOOH entities in the adsorption process. The stability of Cd-nWTR surface complexes is evident as less than 0. 2% of adsorbed Cd(ll was released at the highest Cd(II concentration load after 4 consecutive desorption cycles. Moreover, the real efficiency of nWTR for Cd(II removal from wastewater samples studied was calculated to be 98.35%. These results highlight the potential of nWTR for heavy metals removal from wastewater.

  14. Removal of fluoride in aqueous solution by adsorption on acid activated water treatment sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinitnantharat, Soydoa; Kositchaiyong, Sriwilai; Chiarakorn, Siriluk

    2010-06-01

    This paper reports the use of a pellet of adsorbent made from water treatment sludge (S) and acid activated water treatment sludge (SH) for removal of fluoride in the batch equilibration technique. The influence of pH, adsorbent dosage, temperature and effect of other ions were employed to find out the feasibility of acid activated adsorbent to remove fluoride to the permissible concentration of 0.7 mg/L. The results from the adsorption isotherm followed both Langmuir and Freundlich models and the highest fluoride removal was found for adsorbent activated with acetic acid at 2.0 mol/L. The optimum adsorbent dosage was found at 40 g/L, 0.01 mol/L acid activated adsorbent which was able to adsorb fluoride from 10 down to 0.11 mg/L. The adsorption capacity was decreased when the temperature increased. This revealed that the adsorption of fluoride on SH was exothermic. In the presence of nitrate and carbonate ions in the aqueous solution, fluoride removal efficiency of SH decreased from 94.4% to 86.6% and 90.8%, respectively. However, there is no significant effect in the presence of sulfate and chloride ions.

  15. BIOSORPTION AND RECOVERY OF HEAVY METALS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY EICHHORNIA CRASSIPES (WATER HYACINTH ASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Mahmood

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal’s release without treatment poses a significant threat to the environment. Heavy metals are non-biodegradable and persistent. In the present study the ash of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes, was used to remove six metals from aqueous solutions through biosorption. Results of batch and column experiments showed excellent adsorption capacity. Removal of lead, chromium, zinc, cadmium, copper, and nickel was 29.83, 1.263, 1.575, 3.323, 2.984 and 1.978 µgg-1, respectively. The biosorptive capacity was maximum with pH >8.00. Desorption in µgg-1 of ash for lead, chromium, zinc, cadmium, copper, and nickel was 18.10, 9.99, 11.99, 27.54, 21.09, and 3.71 respectively. Adsorption/desorption of these metals from ash showed the potential of this technology for recovery of metals for further usages. Hydrogen adsorption was also studied with a Sievert-type apparatus. Hydrogen adsorption experiments showed significant storage capacity of water hyacinth ash.

  16. Carbon dioxide as refrigerant for tap water heat pumps: A comparison with the traditional solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchinato, Luca; Corradi, Marco; Fornasieri, Ezio; Zamboni, Lorenzo [Dipartimento di Fisica Tecnica, Universita degli Studi di Padova, Via Venezia, 1 I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2005-12-01

    Increased concern about the environmental impact of the refrigeration technology is leading toward design solutions aimed at improving the energy efficiency of the related applications, using eco-friendly refrigerants, i.e. ozone-friendly and with the least possible global warming potential (GWP). In this respect, carbon dioxide (ASHRAE R744) is seen today as one of the most promising refrigerants and is raising great interest in industrial and scientific fields. In the present work, the plant options are investigated, which are related to the design of air/water heat pumps for tap water using CO{sub 2}. A comparison is made, in terms of energy efficiency, between a system working with CO{sub 2} and a similar one working with HFC R134a; such a comparison is carried out by means of a simulation model of a refrigerating machine/heat pump, characterized by a detailed representation of the heat exchangers, based on their subdivision into elementary volumes. Results show that carbon dioxide is an interesting substitute for synthetic fluids, if the design of the system is focused to take advantage of its properties. (author)

  17. Existence of strong solutions in a larger space for the shallow-water system

    CERN Document Server

    Charve, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the study of both viscous compressible barotropic fluids and Navier-Stokes equation with dependent density, when the viscosity coefficients are variable, in dimension $d\\geq2$. We aim at proving the local and global well-posedness for respectively {\\it large} and \\textit{small} initial data having critical Besov regularity and more precisely we are interested in extending the class of initial data velocity when we consider the shallow water system, improving the results in \\cite{CMZ1,H2} and \\cite{arma}. Our result relies on the fact that the velocity $u$ can be written as the sum of the solution $u_{L}$ of the associated linear system and a remainder velocity term $\\bar{u}$; then in the specific case of the shallow-water system the remainder term $\\bar{u}$ is more regular than $u_{L}$ by taking into account the regularizing effects induced on the bilinear convection term. In particular we are able to deal with initial velocity in $\\dot{H}^{\\N-1}$ as Fujita and Kato for the incompre...

  18. Alternating irrigation water quality as a method to control solute concentrations and mass fluxes below irrigated fields: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, David

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present numerical study was to extend the data-driven protocol for the control of soil salinity, to control chloride and nitrate concentrations and mass fluxes below agricultural fields irrigated with treated waste water (TWW). The protocol is based on alternating irrigation water quality between TWW and desalinized water (DSW), guided by solute concentrations at soil depth, zs. Two different schemes, the first requires measurements of soil solution concentrations of chloride and nitrate at zs, while, the second scheme requires only measurements of soil solution EC at zs, were investigated. For this purpose, 3-D numerical simulations of flow and transport were performed for variably saturated, spatially heterogeneous, flow domains located at two different field sites. The sites differ in crop type, irrigation method, and in their lithology; these differences, in turn, considerably affect the performance of the proposed schemes, expressed in terms of their ability to reduce solute concentrations that drained below the root zone. Results of the analyses suggest that the proposed data-driven schemes allow the use of low-quality water for irrigation, while minimizing the consumption of high-quality water to a level, which, for given climate, soil, crop, irrigation method, and water quality, may be determined by the allowable nitrate and chloride concentrations in the groundwater. The results of the present study indicate that with respect to the diminution of groundwater contamination by chloride and nitrate, the more data demanding, first scheme is superior the second scheme.

  19. Rates of water exchange for two cobalt(II) heteropoly-oxotungstate compounds in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlin, C. Andre [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Harley, Stephen J. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); McAlpin, J. Gregory [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Hocking, Rosalie K. [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Mercado, Brandon Q. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Johnson, Rene L. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Villa, Eric M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Fidler, Mary Kate [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Olmstead, Marilyn M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Spiccia, Leone [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Britt, R. David [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Casey, William H. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2011-03-17

    Polyoxometalate ions are used as ligands in water-oxidation processes related to solar energy production. An important step in these reactions is the association and dissociation of water from the catalytic sites, the rates of which are unknown. Here we report the exchange rates of water ligated to CoII atoms in two polyoxotungstate sandwich molecules using the 17O-NMR-based Swift–Connick method. The compounds were the [Co4(H2O)2(B-α-W9O34)2]-10 and the larger αββα-[Co4(H2O)2(P2W15O56)2]-16 ions, each with two water molecules bound trans to one another in a CoII sandwich between the tungstate ligands. The clusters, in both solid and solution state, were characterized by a range of methods, including NMR, EPR, FT-IR, UV-Vis, and EXAFS spectroscopy, ESI-MS, single-crystal X-ray crystallography, and potentiometry. For [Co4(H2O)2(B-α-PW9O34)2]-10 at pH 5.4, we estimate: k 298=1.5(5)±0.3×106 s-1, ΔH=39.8±0.4 kJ mol-1, ΔS=+7.1±1.2 J mol-1 K-1 and ΔV=5.6 ±1.6 cm3 mol-1. For the Wells–Dawson sandwich cluster (αββα-[Co4(H2O)2(P2W15O56)2]-16) at pH 5.54, we find: k298=1.6(2)±0.3×106 s-1, ΔH=27.6±0.4 kJ mol-1 ΔS=-33±1.3 J mol-1 K-1 and ΔV=2.2±1.4 cm3mol-1 at pH 5.2. The molecules are clearly stable and monospecific in slightly acidic solutions, but dissociate in strongly acidic solutions. This dissociation is detectable by EPR

  20. Global existence of strong solution for shallow water system with large initial data on the irrotational part

    CERN Document Server

    Haspot, Boris

    2012-01-01

    We show existence of global strong solutions with large initial data on the irrotational part for the shallow-water system in dimension $N\\geq 2$. We introduce a new notion of \\textit{quasi-solutions} when the initial velocity is assumed to be irrotational, these last one exhibit regularizing effects both on the velocity and in a very surprising way also on the density (indeed the density is a priori governed by an hyperbolic equation). We would like to point out that this smoothing effect is purely non linear and is absolutely crucial in order to deal with the pressure term as it provides new damping effects in high frequencies. In particular our result gives a first kind of answer to the problem of the existence of global weak solution for the shallow-water system. We conclude by giving new point wise decay estimates on the solution which improves the previous works \\cite{HZ1,HZ2}.

  1. Formation of three-dimensional surface waves on deep-water using elliptic solutions of nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation

    CERN Document Server

    Sajjadi, Shahrdad G; Drullion, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    A review of three-dimensional waves on deep-water is presented. Three forms of three dimensionality, namely oblique, forced and spontaneous type, are identified. An alternative formulation for these three-dimensional waves is given through cubic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. The periodic solutions of the cubic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation are found using Weierstrass elliptic $\\wp$ functions. It is shown that the classification of solutions depends on the boundary conditions, wavenumber and frequency. For certain parameters, Weierstrass $\\wp$ functions are reduced to periodic, hyperbolic or Jacobi elliptic functions. It is demonstrated that some of these solutions do not have any physical significance. An analytical solution of cubic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation with wind forcing is also obtained which results in how groups of waves are generated on the surface of deep water in the ocean. In this case the dependency on the energy-transfer parameter, from wind to waves, make either the groups of wav...

  2. 2012 WATER & AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE (GRC) AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR (GRS), AUG 10-17, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dor Ben-Amotz, PI

    2012-08-17

    Understanding the fundamental principles governing the structure and dynamics of water - and particularly how water mediates chemical interactions and processes - continues to pose formidable challenges and yield abundant surprises. The focus of this Gordon Research Conference is on identifying key questions, describing emerging understandings, and unveiling surprising discoveries related to water and aqueous solutions. The talks and posters at this meeting will describe studies of water and its interactions with objects such as interfaces, channels, electrons, oils, ions, and proteins; probed using optical, electrical, and particle experiments, and described using classical, quantum, and multi-scale theories.

  3. Darboux Transformation and Soliton Solutions for the (2+1)-Dimensional Generalization of Shallow Water Wave Equation with Symbolic Computation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Xiao-Yong; MENG Xiang-Hua

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,the (2+1)-dimensional generalization of shallow water wave equation,which may be used to describe the propagation of ocean waves,is analytically investigated.With the aid of symbolic computation,we prove that the (2+1)-dimensional generalization of shallow water wave equation possesses the Painlevé property under a certain condition,and its Lax pair is constructed by applying the singular manifold method.Based on the obtained Lax representation,the Darboux transformation (DT) is constructed.The first iterated solution,second iterated solution and a special N-soliton solution with an arbitrary function are derived with the resulting DT.Relevant properties are graphically illustrated,which might be helpful to understanding the propagation processes for ocean waves in shallow water.

  4. Solute Spreading in Variably Saturated, Spatially Heterogeneous Formations: The Role of Water Saturation and Soil Texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, David

    2017-04-01

    -order analysis suggests that features of solute transport associated with the two different formations exhibit a crossover behavior and that the mean pressure head associated with the crossover may be estimated from the asymptotic D associated with the two formations. The applicability of the results of the first-order analysis to more realistic conditions was tested by a series of numerical simulations of flow and transport in 3-D, heterogeneous, bimodal, variably saturated formations, considering relatively simple, steady-state flow, and more complicated, transient, non-monotone flow originating from periodic influx and water uptake by plant roots. For the steady-state flows, results of the simulations were in qualitative agreement with the results of the first-order analysis. For the more realistic flow regime, the results of the simulations suggested that the difference between the responses of the two different bimodal formations might decrease substantially, similar to the situation in steady-state flow associated with mean pressure head at which a crossover occurs.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF THE TECHNIQUE OF QUANTITATIVE DEFINITION OF TRIAZAVIRIN IN WATER SOLUTIONS WITH USE OF THE SPECTROPHOTOMETRY METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    M. Yu. Kinev; O. A. Melnikova; A. Yu. Petro; D. V. Zaboyarkina

    2014-01-01

    Authors of article developed techniques of quantitative definition Triazavirin in water solutions with use of a method of a spectrophotometry. Three options of a method of a s spectrophotometry are used: direct spectrophotometry, spectrophotometry according to A.M. Firordt, a spectrophotometry with use of standard solution. For all techniques calculation of metrological characteristics is carried out. The developed techniques of quantitative definition were applicable for practical use in the...

  6. Determination of oil/water and octanol/water distribution coefficients from aqueous solutions from four fossil fuels. [MS thesis; in oil-water and octanol-water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.L.

    1984-07-01

    Liquid fossil fuels, both petroleum and synthetically derived oils, are exceedingly complex mixtures of thousands of components. The effect of many of these energy-related components on the environment is largely unknown. Octanol/water distribution coefficients relate both to toxicity and to the bioaccumulation potential of chemical components. Use of these partition data in conjunction with component concentrations in the oils in environmental models provides important information on the fate of fossil fuel components when released to the environment. Octanol/water distribution data are not available for many energy-related organic compounds, and those data that are available have been determined for individual components in simple, one-component octanol/water equilibrium mixtures. In this study, methods for determining many octanol/water distribution coefficients from aqueous extracts of oil products were developed. Sample aqueous mixtures were made by equilibrating liquid fossil fuels with distilled water. This approach has the advantage of detecting interactions between components of interest and other sample components. Compound types studied included phenols, nitrogen bases, hydrocarbons, sulfur heterocyclic compounds, and carboxylic acids. Octanol/water distribution coefficients that were determined in this study ranged from 9.12 for aniline to 67,600 for 1,2-dimethylnaphthalene. Within a compound type, distribution coefficients increased logarithmically with increasing alkyl substitution and molecular weight. Additionally, oil/water distribution data were determined for oil components. These data are useful in predicting maximum environmental concentrations in water columns. 96 references, 26 figures, and 40 tables.

  7. Measurements of activity coefficients at infinite dilution of organic solutes and water on polar imidazolium-based ionic liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Mónia A. R.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Pinho, Simão; Domańska, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    The activity coefficients at infinite dilution, gamma(infinity)(13), of 55 organic solutes and water in three ionic liquids with the common cation 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium and the polar anions Cl--,Cl- [CH3SO3](-) and [(CH3)(2)PO4](-), were determined by (gas + liquid) chromatography at four temperatures in the range (358.15 to 388.15) K for alcohols and water, and T = (398.15 to 428.15) K for the other organic solutes including alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, cycloalkenes, alkynes, ketone...

  8. SELF-SIMILAR SOLUTIONS AND BLOW-UP PHENOMENA FOR A TWO-COMPONENT SHALLOW WATER SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shouming ZHOU; Chunlai MU; Liangchen WANG

    2013-01-01

    In this article,we consider a two-component nonlinear shallow water system,which includes the famous 2-component Camassa-Holm and Degasperis-Procesi equations as special cases.The local well-posedess for this equations is established.Some sufficient conditions for blow-up of the solutions in finite time are given.Moreover,by separation method,the self-similar solutions for the nonlinear shallow water equations are obtained,and which local or global behavior can be determined by the corresponding Emden equation.

  9. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. V. Graph entropy analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved ions in water tend to form polydisperse ion aggregates such as ion pairs, relatively compact ion clusters, and even spatially extended ion networks with increasing salt concentration. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and graph theoretical analysis methods, we recently studied morphological structures of ion aggregates with distinctively different characteristics. They can be distinguished from each other by calculating various spectral graph theoretical properties such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors of adjacency matrices of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks, minimum path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree distributions. Here, we focus on percolation and graph entropic properties of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks in high salt solutions. Ion network-forming K+ and SCN- ions at high concentrations show a percolating behavior in their aqueous solutions, but ion cluster-forming ions in NaCl solutions do not show such a transition from isolated ion aggregates to percolating ion-water mixture morphology. Despite that the ion aggregate structures are strikingly different for either cluster- or network-forming ions in high salt solutions, it is interesting that the water structures remain insensitive to the electrostatic properties, such as charge densities and polydentate properties, of dissolved ions, and morphological structures of water H-bonding networks appear to be highly robust regardless of the nature and concentration of salt. We anticipate that the present graph entropy analysis results would be of use in understanding a variety of anomalous behaviors of interfacial water around biomolecules as well as electric conductivities of high electrolyte solutions.

  10. Low-Density Water Structure Observed in a Nanosegregated Cryoprotectant Solution at Low Temperatures from 285 to 238 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towey, J J; Soper, A K; Dougan, L

    2016-05-19

    The structure of liquid water is defined by its molecular association through hydrogen bonding. Two different structures have been proposed for liquid water at low temperatures: low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL) water. Here, we demonstrate a platform that can be exploited to experimentally probe the structure of liquid water in equilibrium at temperatures down to 238 K. We make use of a cryoprotectant molecule, glycerol, that, when mixed with water, lowers the freezing temperature of the solution nonmonotonically with glycerol concentration. We use a combination of neutron diffraction measurements and computational modeling to examine the structure of water in glycerol-water liquid mixtures at low temperatures from 285 to 238 K. We confirm that the mixtures are nanosegregated into regions of glycerol-rich and water-rich clusters. We examine the water structure and reveal that, at the temperatures studied here, water forms a low-density water structure that is more tetrahedral than the structure at room temperature. We postulate that nanosegregation allows water to form a low-density structure that is protected by an extensive and encapsulating glycerol interface.

  11. Extraction of water and solutes from argillaceous rocks for geochemical characterisation: Methods, processes and current understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Elisa; Michelot, Jean-Luc; Pitsch, Helmut; Lalieux, Philippe; Aranyossy, Jean-François

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarises the results of a comprehensive critical review, initiated by the OECD/NEA "Clay Club," of the extraction techniques available to obtain water and solutes from argillaceous rocks. The paper focuses on the mechanisms involved in the extraction processes, the consequences on the isotopic and chemical composition of the extracted pore water and the attempts made to reconstruct its original composition. Finally, it provides some examples of reliable techniques and information, as a function of the purpose of the geochemical study. Résumé. Cet article résume les résultats d'une synthèse critique d'ensemble, lancée par le OECD/NEA "Clay Club", sur les techniques d'extraction disponibles pour obtenir l'eau et les solutés de roches argileuses. L'article est consacré aux mécanismes impliqués dans les processus d'extraction, aux conséquences sur la composition isotopique et chimique de l'eau porale extraite et aux tentatives faites pour reconstituer sa composition originelle. Finalement, il donne quelques exemples de techniques fiables et d'informations, en fonction du but de l'étude géochimique. Resúmen. Este artículo resume los resultados de una revisión crítica exhaustiva (iniciada por el "Clay Club" OECD/NEA) de las técnicas de extracción disponibles para obtener agua y solutos en rocas arcillosas. El artículo se centra en los mecanismos involucrados en los procesos extractivos, las consecuencias en la composición isotópica y química del agua intersticial extraída, y en los intentos realizados para reconstruir su composición original. Finalmente, se presentan algunos ejemplos de técnicas fiables e información, en función del propósito del estudio geoquímico.

  12. Analysis of water sorption isotherms of amorphous food materials by solution thermodynamics with relevance to glass transition: evaluation of plasticizing effect of water by the thermodynamic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Eriko; Tashiro, Akiko; Kumagai, Hitomi; Kumagai, Hitoshi

    2017-04-01

    Relation between the thermodynamic parameters obtained from water sorption isotherms and the degree of reduction in the glass transition temperature (Tg), accompanied by water sorption, was quantitatively studied. Two well-known glassy food materials namely, wheat gluten and maltodextrin were used as samples. The difference between the chemical potential of water in a solution and that of pure water ([Formula: see text]), the difference between the chemical potential of solid in a solution and that of a pure solid ([Formula: see text]), and the change in the integral Gibbs free energy ([Formula: see text]) were obtained by analyzing the water sorption isotherms using solution thermodynamics. The parameter [Formula: see text] correlated well with ΔTg (≡Tg - Tg0; where Tg0 is the glass transition temperature of dry material), which had been taken to be an index of plasticizing effect. This indicates that plasticizing effect of water on foods can be evaluated through the parameter [Formula: see text].

  13. Effects of water concentration in the coating solution on the wall relaxation rate of octadecyltrichlorosilane coated rubidium vapor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guiying; Wei, Lihua; Wang, Meiling; Zhao, Kaifeng, E-mail: zhaokf@fudan.edu.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China and Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2015-01-28

    High quality anti-relaxation surface coatings for atomic vapor cells are essential for the preservation of atomic spin coherence and the enhancement of measurement sensitivity. In this paper, we studied the effects of water concentration in octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) coating solution on the relaxation rate and its reproducibility of OTS coated Rubidium vapor cells. We found that appropriate water concentration can improve the anti-relaxation performance of OTS coated cells.

  14. Modeling global water use for the 21st century: the Water Futures and Solutions (WFaS) initiative and its approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y.; Flörke, M.; Hanasaki, N.; Eisner, S.; Fischer, G.; Tramberend, S.; Satoh, Y.; van Vliet, M. T. H.; Yillia, P.; Ringler, C.; Burek, P.; Wiberg, D.

    2016-01-01

    To sustain growing food demand and increasing standard of living, global water use increased by nearly 6 times during the last 100 years, and continues to grow. As water demands get closer and closer to the water availability in many regions, each drop of water becomes increasingly valuable and water must be managed more efficiently and intensively. However, soaring water use worsens water scarcity conditions already prevalent in semi-arid and arid regions, increasing uncertainty for sustainable food production and economic development. Planning for future development and investments requires that we prepare water projections for the future. However, estimations are complicated because the future of the world's waters will be influenced by a combination of environmental, social, economic, and political factors, and there is only limited knowledge and data available about freshwater resources and how they are being used. The Water Futures and Solutions (WFaS) initiative coordinates its work with other ongoing scenario efforts for the sake of establishing a consistent set of new global water scenarios based on the shared socio-economic pathways (SSPs) and the representative concentration pathways (RCPs). The WFaS "fast-track" assessment uses three global water models, namely H08, PCR-GLOBWB, and WaterGAP. This study assesses the state of the art for estimating and projecting water use regionally and globally in a consistent manner. It provides an overview of different approaches, the uncertainty, strengths and weaknesses of the various estimation methods, types of management and policy decisions for which the current estimation methods are useful. We also discuss additional information most needed to be able to improve water use estimates and be able to assess a greater range of management options across the water-energy-climate nexus.

  15. Probing chiral solute-water hydrogen bonding networks by chirality transfer effects: A vibrational circular dichroism study of glycidol in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guochun; Xu, Yunjie

    2009-04-01

    Vibrational absorption (VA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of (S)-(-)-glycidol were measured in water with a concentration of 6.0M in the 1000-1750 cm-1 region. Prominent and complex VCD spectral features were detected at the water bending vibrational region. Our experimental results show that water molecules can become optically active through hydrogen bonding interactions with glycidol molecules. To model the glycidol-water hydrogen bonding network in the solution, molecular dynamics simulations using the AMBER9 suite of programs were carried out. Altogether, 34 conformers of the small glycidol-(water)N clusters with N =1, 2, 3, and 4 were considered. Geometry optimizations, harmonic frequency calculations, and the VA and VCD intensity predictions of these small glycidol-water clusters were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory using the GAUSSIAN 03 program package. Strong cooperative hydrogen bonding effects were detected in the larger glycidol-(water)N clusters. The population weighted VA and VCD spectra of each N group of glycidol (water)N=1,2,3,4 were used to produce the simulated VA and VCD spectra, which are in good agreement with the experimental VA and VCD spectra. The study shows that all these clusters make important contributions to the observed spectra and are the most important species in the aqueous solution with complicated equilibriums among them.

  16. Highly water soluble nanoparticles as a draw solute in forward osmosis for the treatment of radioactive liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Heeman; Choi, Hye Min; Jang, Sungchan; Seo, Bumkyoung; Lee, Kune Woo; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    . In this study, we introduced highly water-soluble hyperbranched caroboxylated polyglycerol-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CPG-MNPs). It is known that the highly branched, globular architecture of PG significantly increase solubility compared to linear polymer and they are eco-friendly. The CPG-MNPs showed no aggregate of particles in water even after placing external magnet, and exhibited a high water flux in FO process. The CPG-MNPs are, therefore, potentially useful as a draw solute in FO processes. The operation of nuclear pressurized water reactors (PWRs) results in numerous radioactive waste streams which vary in radioactivity content. Most PWR stations have experienced leakages of boric acid into liquid radioactive waste systems. These wastes contain about 0.3∼0.8 wt% of boric acid. It is known that reverse osmosis (RO) membrane can eliminate boron at high pH and boron of 40∼90% can be removed by RO membrane in pH condition. RO uses hydraulic pressure to oppose, and exceed, the osmotic pressure of an aqueous feed solution containing boric acid. Forward osmosis (FO), a low energy technique based on membrane technologies, has recently garnered attention for its utility in wastewater treatment and desalination applications. In the FO process, water flows across a semi-permeable membrane from a solution with a low osmotic pressure (the feed solution) to a solution with a high osmotic pressure (the draw solution). The driving force in FO processes is provided by the osmotic gradient between the two solutions. Low energy costs and low degrees of membrane fouling are two of the advantages conveyed by FO processes over other processes, such as reverse osmosis processes that rely on a hydraulic pressure driving force. However, the challenges of FO still lie in the fabrication of eligible FO membranes and the readily separable draw solutes of high osmotic pressures. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles can be separated from water by an external magnet field

  17. Implementation of the national desalination and water purification technology roadmap : structuring and directing the development of water supply solutions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Kevin M.; Dorsey, Zachary; Miller, G. Wade; Brady, Patrick Vane; Mulligan, Conrad; Rayburn, Chris

    2006-06-01

    In the United States, economic growth increasingly requires that greater volumes of freshwater be made available for new users, yet supplies of freshwater are already allocated to existing users. Currently, water for new users is made available through re-allocation of xisting water supplies-for example, by cities purchasing agricultural water rights. Water may also be made available through conservation efforts and, in some locales, through the development of ''new'' water from non-traditional sources such as the oceans, deep aquifer rackish groundwater, and water reuse.

  18. The Pumping Up Phenomenon of Double-Stage Bubble Pump with Water and Aqueous LiBr Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Gao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The double-stage bubble pump, using thermal energy as driving force to transport the solution, can replace the mechanical solution pump in the double-effect lithium bromide absorption chiller. By building a bench, a lot of experimental research and analysis were conducted with water and different concentrations of lithium bromide solution as the working fluid of the bubble pump. The first-stage bubble pump in the experiment pumps up by the external heat source. The heat for driving the second-stage bubble pump is provided by refrigerant steam produced from the first-stage bubble pump. The experiment data shows that the heating of refrigerant vapor is only one of the elements of pump-up phenomenon. Another is that the intermediate solution flashes to vapor to become bubbles. The pump-up phenomenon of double-stage bubble pump has much to do with the pressure difference of intermediate solution and first-stage refrigerant vapor. With water as the working fluid, when the pressure difference between refrigerant vapor and the intermediate liquefied refrigerant is 3.5-3.9 kPa, the bubble pump can pump up and run for some time and the start-up time decreases with the driving head. When the working fluid is lithium bromide solution, the pressure difference of the double-stage bubble pump increases with the solution concentration and is bigger than that of water. The start-up time increases with the concentrations of lithium bromide solution within the range of 45.5 to 54% and decreases within the range of 54-59.5%. The start-up time is largest at 54% under this experimental condition. The experimental result is also compared with the single-stage bubble pump. The start-up time of double-stage bubble pump decreases with the driving height, which is contrary to the single-stage bubble pump.

  19. Molecular mechanism of gelation upon the addition of water to a solution of poly(acrylonitrile) in dimethylsulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettegren, V. I.; Kulik, V. B.; Savitskii, A. V.; Fetisov, O. I.; Usov, V. V.

    2010-05-01

    The solidification of a solution of poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) upon introduction of water into the solution is studied by Raman spectroscopy. In the absence of water, DMSO molecules are found to produce dipole-dipole bonds with PAN molecules. Upon the introduction of water, DMSO molecules produce hydrogen bonds with it and bands at 1005 and 1015 cm-1 appear in the Raman spectrum, which are assigned to the valence vibrations of S=O bonds involved in the hydrogen bonds. Simultaneously, water molecules produce hydrogen bonds with PAN molecules: R-C≡N...H-O-H...N≡C-R, where R is the carbon skeleton of a PAN molecule. Accordingly, a band at 2250 cm-1 arises in the Raman spectrum, which is assigned to the valence vibrations of C≡N bonds producing hydrogen bonds with a water molecule. When the water content is low and the DMSO concentration is high, the length of the hydrogen bonds varies in wide limits and the band at 2250 cm-1 is wide. As the water content rises, DMSO molecules come out of PAN, the variation of the hydrogen bond length in it decreases (the band at 2250 cm-1 narrows), and a high-viscosity system (gel) arises that consists of PAN molecules bonded to water molecules via “equally strong” hydrogen bonds.

  20. Dissecting ion-specific dielectric spectra of sodium-halide solutions into solvation water and ionic contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinne, Klaus F.; Netz, Roland R. [Fachbereich Physik, Freie Universität Berlin, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Gekle, Stephan [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-12-07

    Using extensive equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we determine the dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of NaF, NaCl, NaBr, and NaI. The ion-specific and concentration-dependent shifts of the static dielectric constants and the dielectric relaxation times match experimental results very well, which serves as a validation of the classical and non-polarizable ionic force fields used. The purely ionic contribution to the dielectric response is negligible, but determines the conductivity of the salt solutions. The ion-water cross correlation contribution is negative and reduces the total dielectric response by about 5%-10% for 1 M solutions. The dominating water dielectric response is decomposed into different water solvation shells and ion-pair configurations, by this the spectral blue shift and the dielectric decrement of salt solutions with increasing salt concentration is demonstrated to be primarily caused by first-solvation shell water. With rising salt concentration the simulated spectra show more pronounced deviations from a single-Debye form and can be well described by a Cole-Cole fit, in quantitative agreement with experiments. Our spectral decomposition into ionic and different water solvation shell contributions does not render the individual contributions more Debye-like, this suggests the non-Debye-like character of the dielectric spectra of salt solutions not to be due to the superposition of different elementary relaxation processes with different relaxation times. Rather, the non-Debye-like character is likely to be an inherent spectral signature of solvation water around ions.

  1. Dissecting ion-specific dielectric spectra of sodium-halide solutions into solvation water and ionic contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, Klaus F.; Gekle, Stephan; Netz, Roland R.

    2014-12-01

    Using extensive equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we determine the dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of NaF, NaCl, NaBr, and NaI. The ion-specific and concentration-dependent shifts of the static dielectric constants and the dielectric relaxation times match experimental results very well, which serves as a validation of the classical and non-polarizable ionic force fields used. The purely ionic contribution to the dielectric response is negligible, but determines the conductivity of the salt solutions. The ion-water cross correlation contribution is negative and reduces the total dielectric response by about 5%-10% for 1 M solutions. The dominating water dielectric response is decomposed into different water solvation shells and ion-pair configurations, by this the spectral blue shift and the dielectric decrement of salt solutions with increasing salt concentration is demonstrated to be primarily caused by first-solvation shell water. With rising salt concentration the simulated spectra show more pronounced deviations from a single-Debye form and can be well described by a Cole-Cole fit, in quantitative agreement with experiments. Our spectral decomposition into ionic and different water solvation shell contributions does not render the individual contributions more Debye-like, this suggests the non-Debye-like character of the dielectric spectra of salt solutions not to be due to the superposition of different elementary relaxation processes with different relaxation times. Rather, the non-Debye-like character is likely to be an inherent spectral signature of solvation water around ions.

  2. Effect of pore water velocities and solute input methods on chloride transport in the undisturbed soil columns of Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, BeiBei; Wang, QuanJiu

    2016-04-01

    Studies on solute transport under different pore water velocity and solute input methods in undisturbed soil could play instructive roles for crop production. Based on the experiments in the laboratory, the effect of solute input methods with small pulse input and large pulse input, as well as four pore water velocities, on chloride transport in the undisturbed soil columns obtained from the Loess Plateau under controlled condition was studied. Chloride breakthrough curves (BTCs) were generated using the miscible displacement method under water-saturated, steady flow conditions. Using the 0.15 mol L-1 CaCl2 solution as a tracer, a small pulse (0.1 pore volumes) was first induced, and then, after all the solution was wash off, a large pulse (0.5 pore volumes) was conducted. The convection-dispersion equation (CDE) and the two-region model (T-R) were used to describe the BTCs, and their prediction accuracies and fitted parameters were compared as well. All the BTCs obtained for the different input methods and the four pore water velocities were all smooth. However, the shapes of the BTCs varied greatly; small pulse inputs resulted in more rapid attainment of peak values that appeared earlier with increases in pore water velocity, whereas large pulse inputs resulted in an opposite trend. Both models could fit the experimental data well, but the prediction accuracy of the T-R was better. The values of the dispersivity, λ, calculated from the dispersion coefficient obtained from the CDE were about one order of magnitude larger than those calculated from the dispersion coefficient given by the T-R, but the calculated Peclet number, Pe, was lower. The mobile-immobile partition coefficient, β, decreased, while the mass exchange coefficient increased with increases in pore water velocity.

  3. Photochemical transformation of zearalenone in aqueous solutions under simulated solar irradiation: Kinetics and influence of water constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emídio, Elissandro S; Calisto, Vânia; de Marchi, Mary Rosa R; Esteves, Valdemar I

    2017-02-01

    The presence of estrogenic mycotoxins, such as zearalenone (ZEN), in surface waters is an emerging environmental issue. Little is known about its phototransformation behavior, which may influence its environmental fate. In this context, the phototransformation of ZEN was investigated in pure water, river water and estuarine water using simulated sunlight irradiation. Kinetic studies revealed that two concomitant processes contribute to the fate of ZEN under solar irradiation: photoisomerization and photodegradation. This phototransformation followed a pseudo-first order kinetics. ZEN degrades quickly in natural waters and slowly in deionized water, with half-lives (t1/2) of 28 ± 4 min (estuarine water), 136 ± 21 min (river water) and 1777 ± 412 min (deionized water). The effects of different water constituents on the phototransformation of ZEN in aqueous solution have been assessed (NaCl, Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(3+), NO3(-) and oxalate ions, synthetic seawater, Fe(III)-oxalate and Mg(II)-oxalate complexes, humic acids, fulvic acids and XAD-4 fraction). In the presence of synthetic seawater salt (t1/2 = 18 ± 5 min) and Fe(III)-oxalate complexes (t1/2 = 61 ± 9 min), the transformation rate increased considerably in relation to other water constituents tested. The solution pH also had a considerable effect in the kinetics with maximum transformation rates occurring around pH 8.5. These results allow us to conclude that phototransformation by solar radiation can be an important degradation pathway of ZEN in natural waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of temperature on corrosion behavior of 3003 aluminum alloy in ethylene glycol-water solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xin; Tian Wenming; Li Songmei; Yu Mei; Liu Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of 3003 aluminum alloy in ethylene glycol–water solution was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impe-dance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The surface characterization was observed and determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and energy dispersive spec-trometer (EDS). The results demonstrate that the anodic aluminum dissolution and the cathodic oxygen reduction were accelerated by the increased temperature. However, as temperature was over 60 °C, the solubility and concentration of oxygen decreased, resulting in the inhibition of cathodic reaction. The cathodic reaction rate of 3003 aluminum alloy rose to the maximum at 60 °C. The Warburg impedance in Nyquist diagram diminished and then was replaced by a negative capaci-tance caused by the absorption of intermediate corrosion product on electrode. On the other hand, after potentiodynamic measurements, 3003 aluminum alloy suffered pitting corrosion. The dissolu-tion of aluminum alloy around secondary phase particles expanded both horizontally and vertically. © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd. on behalf of Chinese Society of Aeronautics and Astronautics. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.

  5. Trends in Modelling, Simulation and Design of Water Hydraulic Systems – Motion Control and Open-Ended Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents and discusses a R&D-view on trends in development and best practise in modelling, simulation and design of both low-pressure and high-pressure tap water hydraulic components and systems for motion control as well as open-ended solutions various industrial applications. The focus...

  6. On the existence of local strong solutions to chemotaxis-shallow water system with large data and vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Jiahang; Chen, Li; Duan, Ben; Luo, Zhen

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, motivated by the chemotaxis-Navier-Stokes system arising from mathematical biology [43], a modified shallow water type chemotactic model is derived. For large initial data allowing vacuum, the local existence of strong solutions together with the blow-up criterion is established.

  7. Glass solution formation in water - In situ amorphization of naproxen and ibuprofen with Eudragit® E PO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doreth, Maria; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger;

    2016-01-01

    a glass solution with Eudragit® E when immersed into water. In XRPD, reflections of the respective drugs decreased or disappeared completely. All samples showed a single glass transition temperature in the DSC, suggesting the formation of single phase amorphous systems. Ionic interactions between drug...

  8. Analytical Solution for Transient Water Table Heights and Outflows from Inclined Ditch-Drained Terrains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoest, N.E.C.; Pauwels, V.R.N.; Troch, P.A.; Troch, De F.P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents two analytical solutions of the linearized Boussinesq equation for an inclined aquifer, drained by ditches, subjected to a constant recharge rate. These solutions are based on different initial conditions. First, the transient solution is obtained for an initially fully saturated

  9. Prediction of Solid-Liquid Equilibrium for KCl in Mixed Water-Ethanol Solutions Using the LIQUAC Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Yangzheng; LI Jiding; ZENG Chuyi; CHEN Cuixian

    2005-01-01

    The LIQUAC model is often used to predict vapor-liquid equilibria, osmotic coefficients, and mean ion activity coefficients for electrolyte systems. This paper describes a thermodynamic method to analyze solid-liquid equilibrium for electrolytes in mixed solvents solutions using the LIQUAC model. The KCl solubilities in mixed water-ethanol solutions are predicted with the LIQUAC model and its original interaction parameters. This method is also used to obtain new K+-ethanol interaction parameters in the LIQUAC model from the solubility data. The new interaction parameters accurately predict the vapor-liquid equilibrium data of K+ salts (including KCl, KBr, and KCOOCH3) in mixed water-ethanol solutions. The results illustrate the flexibility of the LIQUAC model which can predict not only vapor-liquid equilibrium but also solid-liquid equilibrium in mixed solvent systems.

  10. Calcium and ascorbic acid affect cellular structure and water mobility in apple tissue during osmotic dehydration in sucrose solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Maria A; Dellarosa, Nicolò; Tylewicz, Urszula; Tappi, Silvia; Laghi, Luca; Rocculi, Pietro; Rosa, Marco Dalla

    2016-03-15

    The effects of the addition of calcium lactate and ascorbic acid to sucrose osmotic solutions on cell viability and microstructure of apple tissue were studied. In addition, water distribution and mobility modification of the different cellular compartments were observed. Fluorescence microscopy, light microscopy and time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) were respectively used to evaluate cell viability and microstructural changes during osmotic dehydration. Tissues treated in a sucrose-calcium lactate-ascorbic acid solution did not show viability. Calcium lactate had some effects on cell walls and membranes. Sucrose solution visibly preserved the protoplast viability and slightly influenced the water distribution within the apple tissue, as highlighted by TD-NMR, which showed higher proton intensity in the vacuoles and lower intensity in cytoplasm-free spaces compared to other treatments. The presence of ascorbic acid enhanced calcium impregnation, which was associated with permeability changes of the cellular wall and membranes.

  11. Hydration of portland cement, natural zeolite mortar in water and sulphate solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janotka, I.

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to characterise sulphate resistance of mortars made from ordinary Portland cement ( PC and Portland-pozzolan cement with 35 wt.% of zeolite addition (zeolite-blended cement-ZBC . Mortars with two different cement types were tested in water and 5% sodium sulphate solution for 720 days. A favourable effect of zeolite on increased sulphate resistance of the cement is caused by decrease in free Ca(OH2 content of the mortar There is not sufficient of Ca(OH2 available for reacting with the sulphate solution to form voluminous reaction products. A decreased C3A, content due to 35 wt.% replacement of PC by zeolite is the next pronounced factor improving resistance of the mortar with such blended cement.

    El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido estudiar la resistencia a los sulfatos de morteros preparados con cemento portland ordinario (PC y cemento portland puzolánico, con un 35% en peso de zeolita (zeolite-blended cement (ZBC. Ambos tipos de morteros fueron conservados en agua y en una disolución de sulfato sódico al 5% durante 720 días. Se observó una mayor resistencia a los sulfatos en el mortero preparado con el cemento que contenía zeolita debido a su menor contenido en Ca(OH2. No hay cantidad suficiente de Ca(OH2 para que se produzca la reacción de los constituyentes de la pasta con la disolución de sulfato sódico y formar así productos de naturaleza expansiva. La disminución en el contenido de C,3A, debida a la sustitución de un 35% en peso de PC por zeolita, es el factor más determinante en el aumento de la resistencia del mortero en los cementos con adición.

  12. Heat capacity and density of potassium iodide solutions in mixed N-methylpyrrolidone-water solvent at 298.15 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, A. N.

    2014-10-01

    The heat capacity and density of potassium iodide solutions in a mixed N-methylpyrrolidone (MP)-water solvent with a low content of the organic component are measured via calorimetry and densimetry at 298.15 K. Standard partial molal heat capacities and volumes of potassium iodide in MP-water mixtures are calculated. Standard heat capacities and volumes of potassium and iodide ions are determined. The character of the changes in heat capacity and volume are discussed on the basis of calculating additivity coefficients δ c and δ v upon the mixing of isomolal binary solutions KI-MP and KI-water, depending on the composition of the MP-H2O mixture and the concentration of the electrolyte.

  13. Molecular mechanics and microcalorimetric investigations of the effects of molecular water on the aggregation of asphaltenes in solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murgich, J.; Lira-Galeana, C.; Garcia, Daniel Merino;

    2002-01-01

    by titration calorimetry. A simple dimer dissociation model was used to derive the information about the heat and the constant of dissociation from asphaltenes of Mexico and Alaska obtained from the calorimetric data. The association enthalpies calculated were found to be in excellent agreement with those......The interaction of two model asphaltene molecules from the Athabasca sand oil with a water molecule in a toluene solution was studied by means of molecular mechanics calculations. It was found that water forms bridging H bonds between the heteroatoms of asphaltenes with a considerable span...... in energies. The stronger H bond found has energies higher than those corresponding to the stacking of the aromatic areas of the same asphaltene molecules. This shows that the water molecule may generate additional mechanisms of aggregation of asphaltenes in toluene solution, as found experimentally. The H...

  14. Molecular mechanics and microcalorimetric investigations of the effects of molecular water on the aggregation of asphaltenes in solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murgich, J.; Lira-Galeana, C.; Garcia, Daniel Merino

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of two model asphaltene molecules from the Athabasca sand oil with a water molecule in a toluene solution was studied by means of molecular mechanics calculations. It was found that water forms bridging H bonds between the heteroatoms of asphaltenes with a considerable span...... in energies. The stronger H bond found has energies higher than those corresponding to the stacking of the aromatic areas of the same asphaltene molecules. This shows that the water molecule may generate additional mechanisms of aggregation of asphaltenes in toluene solution, as found experimentally. The H...... bond mechanism depends on the heteroatoms involved, the extension of the aromatic regions, and the steric interference present in the asphaltene molecules. The simulation results have been compared with experimental values of enthalpy of association of two different petroleum asphaltenes obtained...

  15. Life Cycle Network Modeling Framework and Solution Algorithms for Systems Analysis and Optimization of the Water-Energy Nexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Garcia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The water footprint of energy systems must be considered, as future water scarcity has been identified as a major concern. This work presents a general life cycle network modeling and optimization framework for energy-based products and processes using a functional unit of liters of water consumed in the processing pathway. We analyze and optimize the water-energy nexus over the objectives of water footprint minimization, maximization of economic output per liter of water consumed (economic efficiency of water, and maximization of energy output per liter of water consumed (energy efficiency of water. A mixed integer, multiobjective nonlinear fractional programming (MINLFP model is formulated. A mixed integer linear programing (MILP-based branch and refine algorithm that incorporates both the parametric algorithm and nonlinear programming (NLP subproblems is developed to boost solving efficiency. A case study in bioenergy is presented, and the water footprint is considered from biomass cultivation to biofuel production, providing a novel perspective into the consumption of water throughout the value chain. The case study, optimized successively over the three aforementioned objectives, utilizes a variety of candidate biomass feedstocks to meet primary fuel products demand (ethanol, diesel, and gasoline. A minimum water footprint of 55.1 ML/year was found, economic efficiencies of water range from −$1.31/L to $0.76/L, and energy efficiencies of water ranged from 15.32 MJ/L to 27.98 MJ/L. These results show optimization provides avenues for process improvement, as reported values for the energy efficiency of bioethanol range from 0.62 MJ/L to 3.18 MJ/L. Furthermore, the proposed solution approach was shown to be an order of magnitude more efficient than directly solving the original MINLFP problem with general purpose solvers.

  16. Influence of substitution on the rheological properties and gelation of hydroxyethyl cellulose solution in NaOH-water solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wencong; Li, Faxue; Yu, Jianyong; Navard, Patrick; Budtova, Tatiana

    2015-06-25

    The rheological properties of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) with a low molar substitution (MS) dissolved in 8wt% NaOH-water were studied as a function of solution temperature, polymer concentration and molar substitution. Special attention was paid to gelation kinetics. Similar to cellulose dissolved in alkali or ionic liquids, the intrinsic viscosity of HEC decreased with temperature increase, indicating a decrease of solvent thermodynamic quality. The gelation time of HEC solutions decreased exponentially with temperature but the kinetics is much slower than the gelation of microcrystalline cellulose solutions in the same solvent. Higher molar substitution leads to slower gelation. The small amount of introduced hydroxyethyl groups prevented cellulose aggregation thus increasing solution stability.

  17. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamic Analysis of Transport Properties in the Nanofiltration of Ionic Liquid-Water Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua P. Wang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Thenanofiltration of aqueous solutions of the ionic liquids (ILs 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Bmim]BF4, and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([Bmim]Br with a polyamide nanofiltration membrane was investigated. The practical transport coefficients, including hydrodynamic permeability (Lp, reflection (σ and solute permeability (ω were calculated in terms of a non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach. It was found that Lp and σ diminished as the concentration of the IL solutions increased. These characteristics are similar to those observed in inorganic electrolyte-water systems. In addition, it was shown that the rejection and volume flux for both ionic liquid solutions rose with feed pressure, while it decreased with feed concentration. The maximum rejection efficiencies for [Bmim]Br and [Bmim]BF4 are 67 % and 60 %, respectively, on our experimental scale. All the data suggests that a highly efficient process for IL separation could be developed when the operating conditions are optimized further.

  18. Relative Permittivities for Glucose+Glycine+Water Solution at 278.15 to 313.15 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUO Ke-lei; LIU Qian-ge; LIU Hong-xun; LI Na-na; CHEN Yu-juan

    2011-01-01

    The relative permittivities(ε) for the glucose+glycine+water mixtures were measured at temperatures of 278.15 to 313.15 K.The experimental values for a complete data set were critically analyzed.The experimental values were fitted to some empirical equations as the functions of temperature and/or compositions of the solution.At given temperatures and compositions of glycine,the dependences of the relative permittivities on the molar fraction of glucose(Glc) and glycine(Gly) can be described by a linear or quadratic equation,respectively.A comparison of the εGlc values of glucose solution with the εGla values of galactose solution indicates that the relative permittivities of the ternary solutions containing glucose are smaller than those containing galactose under the same conditions.This difference arises from the slight difference in the stereo-structures of the saccharide molecules.

  19. Quantitative evaluation of XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins used in tandem for removing organic solutes from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, R.L.; MacCarthy, P.

    1992-01-01

    The combined XAD-8 and XAD-4 resin procedure for the isolation of dissolved organic solutes from water was found to isolate 85% or more of the organic solutes from Lake Skjervatjern in Norway. Approximately 65% of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was first removed on XAD-8 resin, and then an additional 20% of the DOC was removed on XAD-4 resin. Approximately 15% of the DOC solutes (primarily hydrophilic neutrals) were not sorbed or concentrated by the procedure. Of the 65% of the solutes removed on XAD-8 resin, 40% were fulvic acids, 16% were humic acids, and 9% were hydrophobic neutrals. Approximately 20% of the hydrophilic solutes that pass through the XAD-8 resin were sorbed solutes on the second resin, XAD-4 (i.e., they were hydrophobic relative to the XAD-4 resin). The fraction sorbed on XAD-4 resin was called XAD-4 acids because it represented approximately 85-90% of the hydrophilic XAD-8 acid fraction according to the original XAD-8 fractionation procedure. The recovery of hydrophobic acids (fulvic acids and humic acids) and the hydrophobic neutral fraction from XAD-8 resin was essentially quantitative at 96%, 98%, and 86%, respectively. The recovery of XAD-4 acids from the XAD-4 resin was only about 50%. The exact reason for this moderately low recovery is unknown, but could result from ??-?? bonding between these organic solutes and the aromatic matrix of XAD-4. The hydrophobic/hydrophilic solute separation on XAD-8 resin for water from background Side A and Side B of the lake was almost identical at 65 and 67%, respectively. This result suggested that both sides of the lake are similar in organic chemical composition even though the DOC variation from side to side is 20%.

  20. A Novel Biosorbent, Water-Hyacinth, Uptaking Methylene Blue from Aqueous Solution: Kinetics and Equilibrium Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Nasir Uddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of MB dye from aqueous solution onto HCl acid treated water-hyacinth (H-WH was investigated by carried out batch sorption experiments. The effect of process parameters such as pH, adsorbent dosage, concentrations and contact time, and ionic strength were studied. Adsorption of MB onto H-WH was found highly pH dependent and ionic strength shows negative impact on MB removal. To predict the biosorption isotherms and to determine the characteristic parameters for process design, Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Halsey isotherms models were utilized to equilibrium data. The adsorption kinetics was tested for pseudo-first-order (PFO, pseudo-second-order (PSO, intraparticle diffusion (IPD, and Bangham’s kinetic models. The Langmuir isotherm model showed the goodness-of-fit among the tested models for equilibrium adsorption of MB over H-WH and indicated the maximum adsorption capacity as 63.30 mg/g. Higher coefficient of determination (R2>0.99 and better agreement between the qe (experimental and qe (calculated values predicted that PSO kinetic model showed the goodness-of-fit for kinetic data along with rate constant 1.66×10-3, 4.42×10-3, and 3.57×10-3 mg·g-1min⁡-1/2⁡, respectively, for the studied concentration range. At the initial stage of adsorption, the overall rate of dye uptake was found to be dominated by external mass transfer, and afterwards, it is controlled by IPD mechanism.

  1. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: one-dimensional soil thaw with conduction and advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have emerged in recent years. Dissimilarities often exist in their mathematical formulations and/or numerical solution techniques, but few analytical solutions exist for benchmarking flow and energy transport models that include pore water phase change. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Lunardini solution, an approximate analytical solution for predicting soil thawing subject to conduction, advection, and phase change. Fifteen thawing scenarios are examined by considering differences in porosity, surface temperature, Darcy velocity, and initial temperature. The accuracy of the Lunardini solution is shown to be proportional to the Stefan number. The analytical solution results obtained for soil thawing scenarios with water flow and advection are compared to those obtained from the finite element model SUTRA. Three problems, two involving the Lunardini solution and one involving the classic Neumann solution, are recommended as standard benchmarks for future model development and testing.

  2. On the feasibility of near infrared spectroscopy to detect contaminants in water using single salt solutions as model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowen, A A; Marini, F; Tsuchisaka, Y; De Luca, S; Bevilacqua, M; O'Donnell, C; Downey, G; Tsenkova, R

    2015-01-01

    This research work evaluates the feasibility of NIRS to detect contaminants in water using single salt solutions as model systems. Previous research has indicated the potential of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for detecting solutes in water; however, a comprehensive investigation of the limit of detection of this technique has not been carried out. Near infrared transmittance spectra of aqueous salt solutions in the concentration range 0.002-0.1 mol L(-1) (equivalent to 117-13,334 ppm or 0.0001-0.01% mass/mass) were investigated. The first overtone region of the near infrared spectrum (1300-1600 nm) was found to be the most effective wavelength range for prediction of salt concentration in aqueous solutions. Calibration models built using this wavelength range and employing the extended multiplicative scatter spectral pre-treatment resulted in root mean squared error of prediction values ranging from 0.004 to 0.01 mol L(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be of the order of 0.1% (mass/mass) or 1000 ppm. Within the framework of Aquaphotomics, it was possible to examine the effect of different salts on the NIR spectra of water in the first overtone range. Our results were confirmed through test experiments at various geographical locations employing dispersive and Fourier transform type NIRS instruments.

  3. Water uptake by growing cells: an assessment of the controlling roles of wall relaxation, solute uptake, and hydraulic conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Growing plant cells increase in volume principally by water uptake into the vacuole. There are only three general mechanisms by which a cell can modulate the process of water uptake: (a) by relaxing wall stress to reduce cell turgor pressure (thereby reducing cell water potential), (b) by modifying the solute content of the cell or its surroundings (likewise affecting water potential), and (c) by changing the hydraulic conductance of the water uptake pathway (this works only for cells remote from water potential equilibrium). Recent studies supporting each of these potential mechanisms are reviewed and critically assessed. The importance of solute uptake and hydraulic conductance is advocated by some recent studies, but the evidence is indirect and conclusions remain controversial. For most growing plant cells with substantial turgor pressure, it appears that reduction in cell turgor pressure, as a consequence of wall relaxation, serves as the major initiator and control point for plant cell enlargement. Two views of wall relaxation as a viscoelastic or a chemorheological process are compared and distinguished.

  4. Electrophoretic painting on AZ31 Mg alloy pretreated in cerium conversion coating solutions prepared in ethanol-water mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Phuong, Nguyen; Fazal, Basit Raza; Moon, Sungmo

    2017-01-01

    Electrophoretic painting (E-paint) was prepared on AZ31 Mg alloy samples pretreated in cerium conversion coating (CeCC) solutions with various ratios of ethanol and water mixture and its characteristics, adhesion and corrosion resistance were investigated. It was found that CeCC formed on AZ31 Mg alloy in a CeCC solution without ethanol was partly cracked structure and mainly consisted of Mg(OH)2/MgO, which exhibited weak adhesion with E-painting layer after water immersion test, and low corrosion resistance, as indicated by rapid formation of blisters and paint delamination during salt spray test. The addition of ethanol promoted the growth of a fine nano-crystalline CeO2 layer over the entire substrate surface. The E-paint on AZ31 pretreated in the CeCC solutions with addition of ethanol showed also improved corrosion resistance, as represented by the delayed time for paint delamination and blister formation. The E-paint layers on the CeCC layers formed in solutions containing 50-80 vol% ethanol showed stronger adhesion and better corrosion resistance than those formed on the samples treated in a non-ethanol containing CeCC solution.

  5. The effect of solution nonideality on modeling transmembrane water transport and diffusion-limited intracellular ice formation during cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; He, Xiaoming

    2014-04-14

    A new model was developed to predict transmembrane water transport and diffusion-limited ice formation in cells during freezing without the ideal-solution assumption that has been used in previous models. The model was applied to predict cell dehydration and intracellular ice formation (IIF) during cryopreservation of mouse oocytes and bovine carotid artery endothelial cells in aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution with glycerol as the cryoprotectant or cryoprotective agent. A comparison of the predictions between the present model and the previously reported models indicated that the ideal-solution assumption results in under-prediction of the amount of intracellular ice at slow cooling rates (<50 K/min). In addition, the lower critical cooling rates for IIF that is lethal to cells predicted by the present model were much lower than those estimated with the ideal-solution assumption. This study represents the first investigation on how accounting for solution nonideality in modeling water transport across the cell membrane could affect the prediction of diffusion-limited ice formation in biological cells during freezing. Future studies are warranted to look at other assumptions alongside nonideality to further develop the model as a useful tool for optimizing the protocol of cell cryopreservation for practical applications.

  6. Temperature-dependent solubility transition of Na₂SO₄ in water and the effect of NaCl therein: solution structures and salt water dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharmoria, Pankaj; Gehlot, Praveen Singh; Gupta, Hariom; Kumar, Arvind

    2014-11-06

    Dual, aqueous solubility behavior of Na2SO4 as a function of temperatures is still a natural enigma lying unresolved in the literature. The solubility of Na2SO4 increases up to 32.38 °C and decreases slightly thereafter at higher temperatures. We have thrown light on this phenomenon by analyzing the Na2SO4-water clusters (growth and stability) detected from temperature-dependent dynamic light scattering experiments, solution compressibility changes derived from the density and speed of sound measurements, and water structural changes/Na2SO4 (ion pair)-water interactions observed from the FT-IR and 2D DOSY (1)H NMR spectroscopic investigations. It has been observed that Na2SO4-water clusters grow with an increase in Na2SO4 concentration (until the solubility transition temperature) and then start decreasing afterward. An unusual decrease in cluster size and solution compressibility has been observed with the rise in temperature for the Na2SO4 saturated solutions below the solubility transition temperature, whereas an inverse pattern is followed thereafter. DOSY experiments have indicated different types of water cluster species in saturated solutions at different temperatures with varying self-diffusion coefficients. The effect of NaCl (5-15 wt %) on the solubility behavior of Na2SO4 at different temperatures has also been examined. The studies are important from both fundamental and industrial application points of view, for example, toward the clean separation of NaCl and Na2SO4 from the effluent streams of textile and tannery industries.

  7. Farmers, Trust, and the Market Solution to Water Pollution: The Role of Social Embeddedness in Water Quality Trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariola, Matt J.

    2012-01-01

    Water quality trading (WQT) is a market arrangement in which a point-source water polluter pays farmers to implement conservation practices and claims the resulting benefits as credits toward meeting a pollution permit. Success rates of WQT programs nationwide are highly variable. Most of the literature on WQT is from an economic perspective…

  8. Farmers, Trust, and the Market Solution to Water Pollution: The Role of Social Embeddedness in Water Quality Trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariola, Matt J.

    2012-01-01

    Water quality trading (WQT) is a market arrangement in which a point-source water polluter pays farmers to implement conservation practices and claims the resulting benefits as credits toward meeting a pollution permit. Success rates of WQT programs nationwide are highly variable. Most of the literature on WQT is from an economic perspective…

  9. HydroCrowd: a citizen science snapshot to assess the spatial control of nitrogen solutes in surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Lutz; Hiery, Noreen; Kraft, Philipp; Bach, Martin; Aubert, Alice H.; Frede, Hans-Georg

    2015-01-01

    We organized a crowdsourcing experiment in the form of a snapshot sampling campaign to assess the spatial distribution of nitrogen solutes, namely, nitrate, ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), in German surface waters. In particular, we investigated (i) whether crowdsourcing is a reasonable sampling method in hydrology and (ii) what the effects of population density, soil humus content and arable land were on actual nitrogen solute concentrations and surface water quality. The statistical analyses revealed a significant correlation between nitrate and arable land (0.46), as well as soil humus content (0.37) but a weak correlation with population density (0.12). DON correlations were weak but significant with humus content (0.14) and arable land (0.13). The mean contribution of DON to total dissolved nitrogen was 22%. Samples were classified as water quality class II or above, following the European Water Framework Directive for nitrate and ammonium (53% and 82%, respectively). Crowdsourcing turned out to be a useful method to assess the spatial distribution of stream solutes, as considerable amounts of samples were collected with comparatively little effort. PMID:26561200

  10. HEIST: An event-scale model of cascading water and solute fronts through the vadose zone (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, C. J.; Basu, N. B.; Rao, P. C.; Sivapalan, M.

    2009-12-01

    The transport of a sorbing, degrading solute (such as Atrazine) through the soil is largely driven by infiltrating water from storms or irrigation, and so depends on the interactions between the timing and characteristics of the rainfall or irrigation events, the properties of the solute, soil characteristics (e.g, porosity, macropore density etc.), and the antecedent soil moisture conditions. This interaction causes the time series inputs of the solute to be “filtered” prior to reaching the watertable, so that the timing, frequency and magnitude of output events is altered. While many previous studies have examined the movement of solutes through soils for a particular site, few have examined the nature of this filtering in more general terms. In this work we present an elegant 1-D model of solute transport through the soil, driven by infiltration events, that is designed to examine this filtering effect. A unique feature of this model is the event-scale time-stepping. By assuming that infiltration and redistribution processes occur instantaneously during an event, while degradation, mobilization, and evapotranspiration are the only important processes occurring between storms, analytical expressions can be derived for the event-to-event transformations of the input signal within the system. Solutes can be surface applied in recalcitrant and labile forms, with first-order mass transfer between the pools, and linear reversible sorption. Infiltrating water mobilizes the labile dissolved solute, generating a point load that moves through the soil with wetting fronts generated by storm events. The retardation and first-order decay of the point-loads eventually decouples them from the wetting fronts they first entered with, allowing solutes to concentrate in the profile. Because only one timestep is required per storm, the model runs very fast, allowing us to examine the effect of different parameter combinations on the filtering. The results show that

  11. Classification of the Group Invariant Solutions for Contaminant Transport in Saturated Soils under Radial Uniform Water Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Potsane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport of chemicals through soils to the groundwater or precipitation at the soils surfaces leads to degradation of these resources. Serious consequences may be suffered in the long run. In this paper, we consider macroscopic deterministic models describing contaminant transport in saturated soils under uniform radial water flow backgrounds. The arising convection-dispersion equation given in terms of the stream functions is analyzed using classical Lie point symmetries. A number of exotic Lie point symmetries are admitted. Group invariant solutions are classified according to the elements of the one-dimensional optimal systems. We analyzed the group invariant solutions which satisfy the physical boundary conditions.

  12. Northern Regions of Russia as Alternative Sources of Pure Water for Sustainable Development: Challenges and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukerman, V. A.; Gudkov, A. V.; Ivanov, S. V.

    The paper discusses problems associated with the existing crisis of water scarcity in the modern conditions of the global water use. Available alternative sources of fresh water may be underground and surface waters of the North and the Arctic. Investigated the current situation and condition of fresh water resources in the technological and industrial development of the North and Arctic. The necessity of developing and using green technologies and measures to prevent pollution of surface and ground water from industrial sectors of the Northern regions is shown. Studied modern technologies and techniques for monitoring groundwater and determination of their age in order to avoid and prevent the effects of environmental contaminants. The ways of use of innovative production technologies of fresh and clean water of north Russia for sustainable development, and delivery of water in the needy regions of the world are investigated.

  13. Formation of quasi-free and bubble positronium states in water and aqueous solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, Serge V; Byakov, Vsevolod M; Zvezhinskiy, D S; Subrahmanyam, V S

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that in aqueous solutions a positronium atom is first formed in the quasi-free state, and, after 50-100 ps, becomes localized in a nanobubble. Analysis of the annihilation spectra of NaNO3 aqueous solutions shows that the hydrated electron is not involved in the positronium (Ps) formation.

  14. Global dissipative solutions for the two-component Camassa-Holm shallow water system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujuan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a continuous semigroup of globally defined weak dissipative solutions for the two-component Camassa-Holm system. Such solutions are established by using a new approach based on characteristics a set of new variables overcoming the difficulties inherent in multi-component systems.

  15. The Energy and Water Emergency Module; A containerized solution for meeting the energy and water needs in protracted displacement situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nerini, Francesco Fuso; Valentini, Francesco; Modi, Anish

    2015-01-01

    The world has faced many natural and man-made disasters in the past few years, resulting in millions of people living in temporary camps across the globe. The energy and clean water needs of the relief operators in such emergency situations are primarily satisfied by diesel engine based generators...... hybrid generation from solar, wind and biomass, with the possibility of using fossil sources too thanks to a dual fuel gas engine. The module can work both in grid connected and stand-alone mode. In addition the module includes a water purification unit to meet the water needs of displaced population...

  16. Adsorption at air-water and oil-water interfaces and self-assembly in aqueous solution of ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun X; Petkov, Jordan T; Tucker, Ian; Webster, John R P; Terry, Ann E

    2015-03-17

    The Tween nonionic surfactants are ethoxylated sorbitan esters, which have 20 ethylene oxide groups attached to the sorbitan headgroup and a single alkyl chain, lauryl, palmityl, stearyl, or oleyl. They are an important class of surfactants that are extensively used in emulsion and foam stabilization and in applications associated with foods, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. A range of ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants, with differing degrees of ethoxylation from 3 to 50 ethylene oxide groups, have been synthesized and characterized by neutron reflection, small-angle neutron scattering, and surface tension. In conjunction with different alkyl chain groups, this provides the opportunity to modify their surface properties, their self-assembly in solution, and their interaction with macromolecules, such as proteins. Adsorption at the air-water and oil-water interfaces and solution self-assembly of the range of ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants synthesized are presented and discussed.

  17. Degradation of industrial waste waters on Fe/C-fabrics. Optimization of the solution parameters during reactor operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzi, A; Yuranova, T; Lais, P; Kiwi, J

    2005-04-01

    This study addresses the pre-treatment of toxic and recalcitrant compounds found in the waste waters arriving at a treating station for industrial effluents containing chlorinated aromatics and non-aromatic compounds, anilines, phenols, methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE). By reducing the total organic carbon (TOC) of these waste waters the hydraulic load for the further bacterial processing in the secondary biological treatment is decreased. The TOC decrease and discoloration of the waste waters was observed only under light irradiation in the reactor by immobilized Fenton processes on Fe/C-fabrics but not in the dark. The energy of activation for the degradation of the waste waters was of 4.2 kcal/mol. The degradation of the waste waters was studied in the reactor as a function of (a) the amount of oxidant used (H2O2), (b) the recirculation rate, (c) the solution pH and (d) the applied temperature. With these parameters taken as input factors, statistical modeling allows one to estimate the most economic use of the oxidant and electrical energy to degrade these waste waters. The concentration of the most abundant organic pollutants during waste waters degradation was followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The ratio of the biological oxygen demand to the total organic carbon BOD5/TOC increased significantly due to the Fe/C-fabric catalyzed treatment from an initial value of 2.03 to 2.71 (2 h). The reactor results show that the recirculation rate has no influence on the TOC decrease of the treated waters but affects the BOD increase of these solutions.

  18. Developing a cost effective environmental solution for produced water and creating a ''new'' water resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doran, Glenn; Leong, Lawrence Y.C.

    2000-05-01

    The project goal is to convert a currently usable by-product of oil production, produced water, into a valuable drinking water resource. The project was located at the Placate Oil Field in Santa Clarita, California, approximately 25 miles north of Los Angeles. The project included a literature review of treatment technologies; preliminary bench-scale studies to refine a planning level cost estimate; and a 10-100 gpm pilot study to develop the conceptual design and cost estimate for a 44,000 bpd treatment facility. A reverse osmosis system was constructed, pilot tested, and the data used to develop a conceptual design and operation of four operational scenarios, two industrial waters levels and two irrigation/potable water.

  19. Analytical solutions for determining extreme water levels in surge tank of hydropower station under combined operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbao; Guo, Wencheng; Yang, Jiandong

    2017-06-01

    Combined operating condition usually refers to the control operating condition under which the highest and lowest water levels occur in a surge tank of hydropower station. In this paper, with the basic equations of surge analysis and nonlinear vibrational asymptotic method, analytical expressions of the worst superimposition time of surge waves in an upstream surge tank under four typical combined operating conditions (i.e. load-acceptance-then-rejection, successive load rejection, successive load acceptance and load-rejection-then-acceptance) are derived firstly. Then using these expressions, the analytical extreme water levels are determined. The analytical solutions are verified with numerical simulation results. Finally, the effect of the hydraulic resistance coefficient of surge tank on the control operating condition is investigated. The results indicate that: The analytical solutions for determining extreme water levels in surge tank under various combined operating conditions are accurate due to the good agreements between the analytical results and the numerical results. With the increase of the hydraulic resistance coefficient of surge tank, the control operating condition for the highest water level shifts from load-acceptance-then-rejection condition to successive load rejection condition, and the control operating condition for the lowest water level shifts from load-rejection-then-acceptance condition to successive load acceptance condition.

  20. Simulation study on structure of water in aqueous solutions confined between graphene electrodes under very high applied electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuty, Gary; Tsige, Mesfin; Talapatra, Saikat

    2011-03-01

    Arising from questions regarding electric double-layer capacitors utilizing graphene electrodes and aqueous electrolyte (KOH solution), atomistic MD simulations of electrolyte confined between graphene electrodes were performed to understand the behavior of electrolyte as a function of electric field strength and solution concentration, from pure water to 6M KOH. It was noted that the strength of the electric field had a demonstrable effect on the structure of pure water between the electrodes (as has previously been seen in highly confined multilayer water systems), creating regularly spaced channels and densely packed sheets of highly ordered molecules. We also saw a clear effect due to the presence of electrolyte ions and their separation from the water due to the action of the field; different field strengths appear to greatly alter the distribution of ions, which in turn affects the structure and ordering of the water. Time dependence in the strength of the electric field was also studied to determine what effect, if any, it has on induced structure. Authors gratefully acknowledge support from the ACS Petroleum Research Fund and the National Science Foundation.

  1. Simulation of ground-water flow and solute transport in the Glen Canyon aquifer, East-Central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freethey, Geoffrey W.; Stolp, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    The extraction of methane from coal beds in the Ferron coal trend in central Utah started in the mid-1980s. Beginning in 1994, water from the extraction process was pressure injected into the Glen Canyon aquifer. The lateral extent of the aquifer that could be affected by injection is about 7,600 square miles. To address regional-scale effects of injection over a decadal time frame, a conceptual model of ground-water movement and transport of dissolved solids was formulated. A numerical model that incorporates aquifer concepts was then constructed and used to simulate injection. The Glen Canyon aquifer within the study area is conceptualized in two parts-an active area of ground-water flow and solute transport that exists between recharge areas in the San Rafael Swell and Desert, Waterpocket Fold, and Henry Mountains and discharge locations along the Muddy, Dirty Devil, San Rafael, and Green Rivers. An area of little or negligible ground-water flow exists north of Price, Utah, and beneath the Wasatch Plateau. Pressurized injection of coal-bed methane production water occurs in this area where dissolved-solids concentrations can be more than 100,000 milligrams per liter. Injection has the potential to increase hydrologic interaction with the active flow area, where dissolved-solids concentrations are generally less than 3,000 milligrams per liter. Pressurized injection of coal-bed methane production water in 1994 initiated a net addition of flow and mass of solutes into the Glen Canyon aquifer. To better understand the regional scale hydrologic interaction between the two areas of the Glen Canyon aquifer, pressurized injection was numerically simulated. Data constraints precluded development of a fully calibrated simulation; instead, an uncalibrated model was constructed that is a plausible representation of the conceptual flow and solute-transport processes. The amount of injected water over the 36-year simulation period is about 25,000 acre-feet. As a result

  2. X-ray CT-Derived Soil Characteristics Explain Varying Air, Water, and Solute Transport Properties across a Loamy Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Katuwal, Sheela; Møldrup, Per;

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of soil pore space geometry is important for explaining fluxes of air, water, and solutes through soil and understanding soil hydrogeochemical functions. X-ray computed tomography (CT) can be applied for this characterization, and in this study CT-derived parameters were used...... be factors that increased the uncertainty of the relationships. Nevertheless, the results confirmed the potential of X-ray CT visualization techniques for estimating fluxes through soil at the field scale....... to explain water, air, and solute transport through soil. Forty-five soil columns (20 by 20 cm) were collected from an agricultural field in Estrup, Denmark, and subsequently scanned using a medical CT scanner. Nonreactive tracer leaching experiments were performed in the laboratory along with measurements...

  3. Enhancements and limits in drug membrane transport using supersaturated solutions of poorly water soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Shweta A; Zhang, Geoff G Z; Alonzo, David E; Wu, Jianwei; Zhu, Donghua; Catron, Nathaniel D; Gao, Yi; Taylor, Lynne S

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) give rise to supersaturated solutions (solution concentration greater than equilibrium crystalline solubility). We have recently found that supersaturating dosage forms can exhibit the phenomenon of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Thus, the high supersaturation generated by dissolving ASDs can lead to a two-phase system wherein one phase is an initially nanodimensioned and drug-rich phase and the other is a drug-lean continuous aqueous phase. Herein, the membrane transport of supersaturated solutions, at concentrations above and below the LLPS concentration has been evaluated using a side-by-side diffusion cell. Measurements of solution concentration with time in the receiver cell yield the flux, which reflects the solute thermodynamic activity in the donor cell. As the nominal concentration of solute in the donor cell increases, a linear increase in flux was observed up to the concentration where LLPS occurred. Thereafter, the flux remained essentially constant. Both nifedipine and felodipine solutions exhibit such behavior as long as crystallization is absent. This suggests that there is an upper limit in passive membrane transport that is dictated by the LLPS concentration. These results have several important implications for drug delivery, especially for poorly soluble compounds requiring enabling formulation technologies.

  4. GIAO-DFT isotropic magnetic shielding constants and spin-spin coupling of tartaric acid in water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fideles, Bruna; Oliveira, Leonardo B. A.; Colherinhas, Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the nuclear isotropic shielding constants and spin-spin coupling for oxygen and carbons atoms of isomers of tartaric acid in gas phase and in water solutions by Monte Carlo simulation and quantum mechanics calculations using the GIAO-B3LYP approach. Solute polarization effects are included iteratively and play an important role in the quantitative determination of shielding constants. Our MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ results show substantial increases of the dipole moment in solution as compared with the gas phase results (61-221%). The solvent effects on the σ(13O) values are in general small. More appreciable solvent effects can be seen on the σ(17O) and J(Csbnd O).

  5. GIAO-DFT Isotropic magnetic shielding constants and spin-spin coupling of tartaric acid in water solution

    CERN Document Server

    Fideles, Bruna; Colherinhas, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the nuclear isotropic shielding constants and spin-spin coupling for oxygen and carbons atoms of isomers of tartaric acid in gas phase and water solutions by Monte Carlo simulation and quantum mechanics calculations using the GIAO-B3LYP approach. Solute polarization effects are included iteratively and play an important role in the quantitative determination of shielding constants. Our MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ results show substantial increases of the dipole moment in solution as compared with the gas phase results (61-221%). The solvent effects on the {\\sigma}(13C) [J(C-C)] values are in general small. More appreciable solvent effects can be seen on the {\\sigma}(17O) and J(C-O).

  6. Multi-model and multi-scenario assessments of Asian water futures: The Water Futures and Solutions (WFaS) initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Yusuke; Kahil, Taher; Byers, Edward; Burek, Peter; Fischer, Günther; Tramberend, Sylvia; Greve, Peter; Flörke, Martina; Eisner, Stephanie; Hanasaki, Naota; Magnuszewski, Piotr; Nava, Luzma Fabiola; Cosgrove, William; Langan, Simon; Wada, Yoshihide

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents one of the first quantitative scenario assessments for future water supply and demand in Asia to 2050. The assessment, developed by the Water Futures and Solutions (WFaS) initiative, uses the latest set of global climate change and socioeconomic scenarios and state-of-the-art global hydrological models. In Asia, water demand for irrigation, industry, and households is projected to increase substantially in the coming decades (30-40% by 2050 compared to 2010). These changes are expected to exacerbate water stress, especially in the current hotspots such as north India and Pakistan, and north China. By 2050, 20% of the land area in the Asia-Pacific region, with a population of 1.6-2 billion, is projected to experience severe water stress. We find that socioeconomic changes are the main drivers of worsening water scarcity in Asia, with climate change impacts further increasing the challenge into the 21st century. Moreover, a detailed basin-level analysis of the hydro-economic conditions of 40 Asian basins shows that although the coping capacity of all basins is expected to improve due to gross domestic product (GDP) growth, some basins continuously face severe water challenges. These basins will potentially be home to up to 1.6 billion people by mid-21st century.

  7. Influence of adding salt on ultrasonic atomization in an ethanol-water solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamai, Koumei; Takenaka, Norimichi; Nanzai, Ben; Okitsu, Kenji; Bandow, Hiroshi; Maeda, Yasuaki

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol was enriched by ultrasonic atomization. Enrichment ratios were increased by adding salt to the ethanol solution. Different enrichment ratios were observed for different types of salts in a range of low ethanol concentrations. The enrichment ratio was significantly improved by adding K(2)CO(3) or (NH(4))(2)SO(4). It is concluded that this is due to enhanced interfacial adsorption of the ethanol. Addition of Na(2)CO(3) to the ethanol solution also enhanced the interfacial adsorption of the ethanol, but the effect was relatively small. Addition of NaCl to the ethanol solution did not enhance the interfacial adsorption of the ethanol.

  8. Solvent Dynamics in Solutions of PNIPAM in Water/Methanol Mixtures-A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakos, Konstantinos; Philipp, Martine; Silvi, Luca; Lohstroh, Wiebke; Petry, Winfried; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Papadakis, Christine M

    2016-05-26

    The solvent dynamics of concentrated solutions of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM, 25 wt %) in water/methanol mixtures (85:15 v/v) are measured with the aim of shedding light onto the cononsolvency effect. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) with contrast variation has been carried out at temperatures below and above the cloud point by using in the first set of experiments the mixture H2O:d-MeOD (d-MeOD denotes fully deuterated methanol) as a solvent and in the second set of experiments the mixture D2O:MeOH (MeOH denotes methanol). As a reference, bulk H2O, bulk MeOH and the mixtures H2O:d-MeOD and D2O:MeOH (both 85:15 v/v) have been investigated as well. In the PNIPAM solution in H2O:d-MeOD, two water populations are identified, namely strongly and less strongly arrested water. At the cloud point, the former is partially released from PNIPAM. The diffusion coefficient of the latter one is similar to the one in the water/methanol mixture, and its residence time decreases at the cloud point. The PNIPAM solution in D2O:MeOH reveals similar dynamics to the one in H2O:d-MeOD which may reflect that the dynamics of MeOH near the PNIPAM chain is similar to the one of H2O. The similarity may, however, partially be due to H/D exchange between D2O and MeOH. In both PNIPAM solutions, the mean-square displacement of the PNIPAM chain decreases gradually above the cloud point.

  9. The Development and Full-Scale Experimental Validation of an Optimal Water Treatment Solution in Improving Chiller Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yu Chiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An optimal solution, in combining physical and chemical water treatment methods, has been developed. This method uses a high voltage capacitance based (HVCB electrodes, coupled with biocides to form a sustainable solution in improving chiller plant performances. In this study, the industrial full-scale tests, instead of laboratory tests, have been conducted on chiller plants at the size of 5000 RT to 10,000 RT cooling capacities under commercial operation for more than two years. The experimental results indicated that the condenser approach temperatures can be maintained at below 1 °C for over two years. It has been validated that the coefficient of performance (COP of a chiller can be improved by over 5% by implementing this solution. Every 1 °C reduction in condenser approach temperature can yield approximately 3% increase on chiller COP, which warrants its future application potential in the HVAC industry, where Ta can degrade by 1 °C every three to six months. The solution developed in this study could also reduce chemical dosages and conserve makeup water substantially and is more environment friendly.

  10. Comparison of the effects of hydration with water or isotonic solution on the recovery of cardiac autonomic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Moreno, Isadora Lessa; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Ferreira, Celso

    2015-04-01

    Despite the importance of hydration during exercise, the impact of ingesting water or isotonic solution during and after exercise on the regulation of autonomic modulation is unclear. The study aimed to compare the effect of ingesting water or isotonic solution (Gatorade®, Brazil) on cardiac autonomic modulation in young people after submaximal aerobic exercise. Thirty-one young men were subjected to a protocol consisting of 4 steps: 1) incremental test, 2) control protocol without hydration, 3) protocol with ingestion of water, and 4) protocol with ingestion of isotonic solution. The protocol consisted of 10 min of rest, 90 min of treadmill exercise at 60% VO2peak, and 60 min of recovery at rest. In the hydration protocols, hydration occurred during and after exercise, every 15 min beginning after the 15th minute of exercise, with the amount ingested proportional to body mass lost in the control protocol. Autonomic modulation was evaluated by heart rate variability. The hydration protocols promoted a more efficient recovery of autonomic modulation, and for the exercise performed, regardless of the hydration administered, the effect on autonomic modulation was similar.

  11. Photoelectron spectroscopy of aqueous solutions: streaming potentials of NaX (X = Cl, Br, and I) solutions and electron binding energies of liquid water and X-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurahashi, Naoya; Karashima, Shutaro; Tang, Ying; Horio, Takuya; Abulimiti, Bumaliya; Suzuki, Yoshi-Ichi; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Oura, Masaki; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2014-05-07

    The streaming potentials of liquid beams of aqueous NaCl, NaBr, and NaI solutions are measured using soft X-ray, He(I), and laser multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. Gaseous molecules are ionized in the vicinity of liquid beams and the photoelectron energy shifts are measured as a function of the distance between the ionization point and the liquid beam. The streaming potentials change their polarity with concentration of electrolytes, from which the singular points of concentration eliminating the streaming potentials are determined. The streaming currents measured in air also vanish at these concentrations. The electron binding energies of liquid water and I(-), Br(-), and Cl(-) anions are revisited and determined more accurately than in previous studies.

  12. City-scale analysis of water-related energy identifies more cost-effective solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ka Leung; Kenway, Steven J; Lant, Paul A

    2017-02-01

    Energy and greenhouse gas management in urban water systems typically focus on optimising within the direct system boundary of water utilities that covers the centralised water supply and wastewater treatment systems, despite a greater energy influence by the water end use. This work develops a cost curve of water-related energy management options from a city perspective for a hypothetical Australian city. It is compared with that from the water utility perspective. The curves are based on 18 water-related energy management options that have been implemented or evaluated in Australia. In the studied scenario, the cost-effective energy saving potential from a city perspective (292 GWh/year) is far more significant than that from a utility perspective (65 GWh/year). In some cases, for similar capital cost, if regional water planners invested in end use options instead of utility options, a greater energy saving potential at a greater cost-effectiveness could be achieved in urban water systems. For example, upgrading a wastewater treatment plant for biogas recovery at a capital cost of $27.2 million would save 31 GWh/year with a marginal cost saving of $63/MWh, while solar hot water system rebates at a cost of $28.6 million would save 67 GWh/year with a marginal cost saving of $111/MWh. Options related to hot water use such as water-efficient shower heads, water-efficient clothes washers and solar hot water system rebates are among the most cost-effective city-scale opportunities. This study demonstrates the use of cost curves to compare both utility and end use options in a consistent framework. It also illustrates that focusing solely on managing the energy use within the utility would miss substantial non-utility water-related energy saving opportunities. There is a need to broaden the conventional scope of cost curve analysis to include water-related energy and greenhouse gas at the water end use, and to value their management from a city perspective. This

  13. Soliton solutions to a few fractional nonlinear evolution equations in shallow water wave dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzazadeh, Mohammad; Ekici, Mehmet; Sonmezoglu, Abdullah; Ortakaya, Sami; Eslami, Mostafa; Biswas, Anjan

    2016-05-01

    This paper studies a few nonlinear evolution equations that appear with fractional temporal evolution and fractional spatial derivatives. These are Benjamin-Bona-Mahoney equation, dispersive long wave equation and Nizhnik-Novikov-Veselov equation. The extended Jacobi's elliptic function expansion method is implemented to obtain soliton and other periodic singular solutions to these equations. In the limiting case, when the modulus of ellipticity approaches zero or unity, these doubly periodic functions approach solitary waves or shock waves or periodic singular solutions emerge.

  14. Design solutions for water treatment plants constructed on the basis of membrane technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteleev, A. A.; Ryabchikov, B. E.; Zhadan, A. V.; Khoruzhii, O. V.

    2012-07-01

    Two process circuits for demineralizing makeup water for power units at thermal power stations are considered. One of them is constructed on the basis of a combined plant comprising reverse-osmosis and ion-exchange apparatuses and the other comprises reverse-osmosis and electric deionization apparatuses. The considered circuits are analyzed by way of comparing them with the traditional chemical water demineralization system. Advantages and drawbacks of the new technologies for treating natural water are pointed out.

  15. How to react to shallow water hydrodynamics: The larger benthic foraminifera solution

    OpenAIRE

    Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann

    2011-01-01

    Symbiont-bearing larger benthic foraminifera inhabit the photic zone to provide their endosymbiotic algae with light. Because of the hydrodynamic conditions of shallow water environments, tests of larger foraminifera can be entrained and transported by water motion. To resist water motion, these foraminifera have to build a test able to avoid transport or have to develop special mechanisms to attach themselves to substrate or to hide their test below sediment grains. For those species which r...

  16. Oxygen and air nanobubble water solution promote the growth of plants, fishes, and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Ebina

    Full Text Available Nanobubbles (<200 nm in diameter have several unique properties such as long lifetime in liquid owing to its negatively charged surface, and its high gas solubility into the liquid owing to its high internal pressure. They are used in variety of fields including diagnostic aids and drug delivery, while there are no reports assessing their effects on the growth of lives. Nanobubbles of air or oxygen gas were generated using a nanobubble aerator (BUVITAS; Ligaric Company Limited, Osaka, Japan. Brassica campestris were cultured hydroponically for 4 weeks within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Sweetfish (for 3 weeks and rainbow trout (for 6 weeks were kept either within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Finally, 5 week-old male DBA1/J mice were bred with normal free-chaw and free-drinking either of oxygen-nanobubble water or of normal water for 12 weeks. Oxygen-nanobubble significantly increased the dissolved oxygen concentration of water as well as concentration/size of nanobubbles which were relatively stable for 70 days. Air-nanobubble water significantly promoted the height (19.1 vs. 16.7 cm; P<0.05, length of leaves (24.4 vs. 22.4 cm; P<0.01, and aerial fresh weight (27.3 vs. 20.3 g; P<0.01 of Brassica campestris compared to normal water. Total weight of sweetfish increased from 3.0 to 6.4 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 3.0 to 10.2 kg in air-nanobubble water. In addition, total weight of rainbow trout increased from 50.0 to 129.5 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 50.0 to 148.0 kg in air-nanobubble water. Free oral intake of oxygen-nanobubble water significantly promoted the weight (23.5 vs. 21.8 g; P<0.01 and the length (17.0 vs. 16.1 cm; P<0.001 of mice compared to that of normal water. We have demonstrated for the first time that oxygen and air-nanobubble water may be potentially effective tools for the growth of lives.

  17. Irrigation Water Quality for Leafy Crops: A Perspective of Risks and Potential Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Allende

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of the contribution of irrigation water in the contamination of produce leading to subsequent outbreaks of foodborne illness. This is a particular risk in the production of leafy vegetables that will be eaten raw without cooking. Retailers selling leafy vegetables are increasingly targeting zero-risk production systems and the associated requirements for irrigation water quality have become more stringent in regulations and quality assurance schemes (QAS followed by growers. Growers can identify water sources that are contaminated with potential pathogens through a monitoring regime and only use water free of pathogens, but the low prevalence of pathogens makes the use of faecal indicators, particularly E. coli, a more practical approach. Where growers have to utilise water sources of moderate quality, they can reduce the risk of contamination of the edible portion of the crop (i.e., the leaves by treating irrigation water before use through physical or chemical disinfection systems, or avoid contact between the leaves and irrigation water through the use of drip or furrow irrigation, or the use of hydroponic growing systems. This study gives an overview of the main problems in the production of leafy vegetables associated with irrigation water, including microbial risk and difficulties in water monitoring, compliance with evolving regulations and quality standards, and summarises the current alternatives available for growers to reduce microbial risks.

  18. Irrigation Water Quality for Leafy Crops: A Perspective of Risks and Potential Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende, Ana; Monaghan, James

    2015-07-03

    There is increasing evidence of the contribution of irrigation water in the contamination of produce leading to subsequent outbreaks of foodborne illness. This is a particular risk in the production of leafy vegetables that will be eaten raw without cooking. Retailers selling leafy vegetables are increasingly targeting zero-risk production systems and the associated requirements for irrigation water quality have become more stringent in regulations and quality assurance schemes (QAS) followed by growers. Growers can identify water sources that are contaminated with potential pathogens through a monitoring regime and only use water free of pathogens, but the low prevalence of pathogens makes the use of faecal indicators, particularly E. coli, a more practical approach. Where growers have to utilise water sources of moderate quality, they can reduce the risk of contamination of the edible portion of the crop (i.e., the leaves) by treating irrigation water before use through physical or chemical disinfection systems, or avoid contact between the leaves and irrigation water through the use of drip or furrow irrigation, or the use of hydroponic growing systems. This study gives an overview of the main problems in the production of leafy vegetables associated with irrigation water, including microbial risk and difficulties in water monitoring, compliance with evolving regulations and quality standards, and summarises the current alternatives available for growers to reduce microbial risks.

  19. Numerical model of water flow and solute accumulation in vertisols using HYDRUS 2D/3D code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Tomáš; Dahan, Ofer; Turkeltub, Tuvia

    2015-04-01

    Keywords: dessication-crack-induced-salinization, preferential flow, conceptual model, numerical model, vadose zone, vertisols, soil water retention function, HYDRUS 2D/3D Vertisols cover a hydrologically very significant area of semi-arid regions often through which water infiltrates to groundwater aquifers. Understanding of water flow and solute accumulation is thus very relevant to agricultural activity and water resources management. Previous works suggest a conceptual model of dessication-crack-induced-salinization where salinization of sediment in the deep section of the vadose zone (up to 4 m) is induced by subsurface evaporation due to convective air flow in the dessication cracks. It suggests that the salinization is induced by the hydraulic gradient between the dry sediment in the vicinity of cracks (low potential) and the relatively wet sediment further from the main cracks (high potential). This paper presents a modified previously suggested conceptual model and a numerical model. The model uses a simple uniform flow approach but unconventionally prescribes the boundary conditions and the hydraulic parameters of soil. The numerical model is bound to one location close to a dairy farm waste lagoon, but the application of the suggested conceptual model could be possibly extended to all semi-arid regions with vertisols. Simulations were conducted using several modeling approaches with an ultimate goal of fitting the simulation results to the controlling variables measured in the field: temporal variation in water content across thick layer of unsaturated clay sediment (>10 m), sediment salinity and salinity the water draining down the vadose zone to the water table. The development of the model was engineered in several steps; all computed as forward solutions by try-and-error approach. The model suggests very deep instant infiltration of fresh water up to 12 m, which is also supported by the field data. The paper suggests prescribing a special atmospheric

  20. A comparison of particle-tracking and solute transport methods for simulation of tritium concentrations and groundwater transit times in river water

    OpenAIRE

    Gusyev, M. A.; D. Abrams; Toews, M. W.; U. Morgenstern; M. K. Stewart

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to simulate tritium concentrations and groundwater transit times in river water with particle-tracking (MODPATH) and compare them to solute transport (MT3DMS) simulations. Tritium measurements in river water are valuable for the calibration of particle-tracking and solute transport models as well as for understanding of watershed storage dynamics. In a previous study, we simulated tritium concentrations in river water of the western Lake Taupo...

  1. THERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF ADSORPTION OF PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY A WATER-COMPATIBLE HYPERCROSSLINKED POLYMERIC ADSORBENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-min Li; Hai-suo Wu; Quan-xing Zhang; Gen-cheng Zhang; Chao Long; Zheng-hao Fei; Fu-qiang Liu; Jin-long Chen

    2004-01-01

    Equilibrium data for the adsorption of phenolic compounds, i.e., phenol, p-cresol, p-chlorophenol and pnitrophenol from aqueous solutions by a water-compatible hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbent (NJ-8) within temperature range of 283-323 K were obtained and correlated with a Freundlich-type of isotherm equation, so that equilibrium constants KF and n were obtained. The capacities of equilibrium adsorption for all the four phenolic compounds on the NJ-8 from aqueous solutions are around 2 times as high as those of Amberlite XAD-4, which may be attributed to the unusual micropore structure and the partial polarity on the network. The values of the enthalpy (always negative) are indicative of an exothermic process, which manifests the adsorption of all the four phenolic compounds on the two polymeric adsorbents to be a process of physical adsorption. The negative values of free energy change show that the solute is more concentrated on the adsorbent than in the bulk solution. The absolute free energy values of adsorption for NJ-8 are always higher than those for Amberlite XAD-4, which indicates that phenolic compounds are preferentially adsorbed on NJ-8. The negative values of the adsorption entropy are consistent with the restricted mobilities of adsorbed molecules of phenolic compounds as compared with the molecules in solution. The adsorption entropy values of phenolic compounds for NJ-8 are lower than those for Amberlite XAD-4, which means the micropores of NJ-8 require more orderly arranged adsorbate.

  2. Thermodynamics of Highly Supersaturated Aqueous Solutions of Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs-Impact of a Second Drug on the Solution Phase Behavior and Implications for Combination Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasi, Niraj S; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-08-01

    There is increasing interest in formulating combination products that contain two or more drugs. Furthermore, it is also common for different drug products to be taken simultaneously. This raises the possibility of interactions between different drugs that may impact formulation performance. For poorly water-soluble compounds, the supersaturation behavior may be a critical factor in determining the extent of oral absorption. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the maximum achievable supersaturation for several poorly water-soluble compounds alone, and in combination. Model compounds included ritonavir, lopinavir, paclitaxel, felodipine, and diclofenac. The "amorphous solubility" for the pure drugs was determined using different techniques and the change in this solubility was then measured in the presence of differing amounts of a second drug. The results showed that "amorphous solubility" of each component in aqueous solution is substantially decreased by the second component, as long as the two drugs are miscible in the amorphous state. A simple thermodynamic model could be used to predict the changes in solubility as a function of composition. This information is of great value when developing co-amorphous or other supersaturating formulations and should contribute to a broader understanding of drug-drug physicochemical interactions in in vitro assays as well as in the gastrointestinal tract.

  3. Should we reconsider the Use of Deionized Water as Control Vase Solution ?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeteren, van U.; Gelder, van H.; Ieperen, van W.; Slootweg, G.

    2001-01-01

    In Bouvardia ‘Van Zijverden’ flowers held in deionized water leaf wilting started from day 6 of vase life, while flowers placed in tap water did not show any leaf wilting for the 14 days of the experiment. Fresh weight of chrysanthemum ‘Cassa’ flowers started to decrease after three days in deionize

  4. Refinements of water parameters for molecular dynamics: Simulations of adsorption at the clay mineral/aqueous solution interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, L.; Yu, C.; Teppen, B.J.;

    1999-01-01

    In the context of a long-term program involving molecular dynamics simulations of adsorption phenomena at the clay mineral/aqueous solution interface, we are testing the viability of combining a force field that we developed specificially for clays with other, independently derived potential...... parameters for molecular species which are important in clay adsorption. For the current study the importance of variations in the potential parameters of water were investigated and polarization effects on oxygen studied as a function of intermolecular interactions. For this purpose ab initio MP2/6-311GG...... atomic charges were determined for several oligomers of water and for the water dimer at different intermolecular separations. Charge variations of up to ~0.1 electron charge unit on oxygen are found and, together with changes in van der Waals constants, their significance for dynamics simulations...

  5. Acid and base recovery from brine solution using PVP intermediate-based bipolar membrane through water splitting technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Krishnaveni; Murugappan, Minnoli; Dharmalingam, Sangeetha

    2017-07-01

    Potable water has become a scarce resource in many countries. In fact, the world is not running out of water, but rather, the relatively fixed quantity is becoming too contaminated for many applications. Hence, the present work was designed to evaluate the desalination efficiency of resin and glass fiber-reinforced Polysulfone polymer-based monopolar and bipolar (BPM) ion exchange membranes (with polyvinyl pyrrolidone as the intermediate layer) on a real sample brine solution for 8 h duration. The prepared ion exchange membranes (IEMs) were characterized using FTIR, SEM, TGA, water absorption, and contact angle measurements. The BPM efficiency, electrical conductivity, salinity, sodium, and chloride ion concentration were evaluated for both prepared and commercial-based IEM systems. The current efficiency and energy consumption values obtained during BPMED process were found to be 45 % and 0.41 Wh for RPSu-PVP-based IEM system and 38 % and 1.60 Wh for PSDVB-based IEM system, respectively.

  6. Effect of Water Content in N-Methylmorpholine N-Oxide/Cellulose Solutions on Thermodynamics, Structure, and Hydrogen Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabideau, Brooks D; Ismail, Ahmed E

    2015-12-03

    Native crystalline cellulose is notoriously difficult to dissolve due to its dense hydrogen bond network between chains and weaker hydrophobic forces between cellulose sheets. N-Methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO), the solvent behind the Lyocell process, is one of the most successful commercial solvents for the nonderivatized dissolution of cellulose. In this process, water plays a very important role. Its presence at low concentrations allows NMMO to dissolve substantial amounts of cellulose, while at much higher concentrations it precipitates the crystalline fibers. Using all-atom molecular dynamics, we study the thermodynamic and structural properties of ternary solutions of cellulose, NMMO, and water. Using the two-phase thermodynamic method to calculate solvent entropy, we estimate the free energy of dissolution of cellulose as a function of the water concentration and find a transition of spontaneity that is in excellent agreement with experiment. In pure water, we find that cellulose dissolution is nonspontaneous, a result that is due entirely to strong decreases in water entropy. Although the combined effect of enthalpy on dissolution in water is negligible, we observe a net loss of hydrogen bonds, resulting in a change in hydrogen bond energy that opposes dissolution. At lower water concentrations, cellulose dissolution is spontaneous and largely driven by decreases in enthalpy, with solvent entropy playing only a very minor role. When searching for the root causes of this enthalpy decrease, a complex picture emerges in which not one but many different factors contribute to NMMO's good solvent behavior. The reduction in enthalpy is led by the formation of strong hydrogen bonds between cellulose and NMMO's N-oxide, intensified through van der Waals interactions between NMMO's nonpolar body and the nonpolar surfaces of cellulose and unhindered by water at low concentrations due to the formation of efficient hydrogen bonds between water and cellulose.

  7. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on leaf solutes and root absorption areas of trifoliate orange seedlings under water stress conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qiangsheng; XIA Renxue

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM)fungus Glomus mosseae on plant growth,leaf solutes and root absorption area of trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.) seedlings were studied in potted culture under water stress conditions.Inoculation with G.mosseae increased plant height,stem diameter,leaf area,shoot dry weight,root dry weight and plant dry weight,when the soil water content was 20%,16% and 12%.AM inoculation also promoted the active and total absorption area of root system and absorption of phosphorus from the rhizosphere,enhanced the content of soluble sugar in leaves and roots,and reduced proline content in leaves.AM seedlings had higher plant water use efficiency and higher drought tolerance than non-AM seedlings.Effects of G.mosseae inoculation on trifoliate orange seedlings under 20% and 16% soil water content were more significant than under 12% soil water content.AM infection was severely restrained by 12% soil water content.Thus,effects of AM fungi on plants were probably positively related to the extent of root colonization by AM fungi.The mechanism of AM fungi in enhancing drought resistance of host plants ascribed to greater osmotic adjustment and greater absorption area of root system by AM colonization.

  8. Assessment of trace ground-water contaminants release from south Texas in-situ uranium solution-mining sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidwell, J.R.; Humenick, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    The future of uranium solution mining in south Texas depends heavily on the industry's ability to restore production zone ground water to acceptable standards. This study investigated the extent of trace contaminant solubilization during mining and subsequent restoration attempts, first through a literature search centered on uranium control mechanisms, and then by laboratory experiments simulating the mining process. The literature search indicated the complexity of the situation. The number of possible interactions between indigenous elements and materials pointed on the site specificity of the problem. The column studies evaluated three different production area ores. Uranium, molybdenum, arsenic, vanadium, and selenium were analyzed in column effluents. After simulated mining operations were completed, uranium was found to be the most persistent trace element. However, subsequent ground water flushing of the columns could restore in-situ water to EPA recommended drinking water concentrations. Limited data indicated that ground water flowing through mined areas may solubilize molybdenum present in down gradient areas adjacent to the production zone due to increased oxidation potential of ground water if adequate restoration procedures are not followed.

  9. Uranyl-glycine-water complexes in solution: comprehensive computational modeling of coordination geometries, stabilization energies, and luminescence properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing; Zhang, Kai; Schwarz, W H Eugen; Li, Jun

    2011-03-21

    Comprehensive computational modeling of coordination structures, thermodynamic stabilities, and luminescence spectra of uranyl-glycine-water complexes [UO(2)(Gly)(n)aq(m)](2+) (Gly = glycine, aq = H(2)O, n = 0-2, m = 0-5) in aqueous solution has been carried out using relativistic density functional approaches. The solvent is approximated by a dielectric continuum model and additional explicit water molecules. Detailed pictures are obtained by synergic combination of experimental and theoretical data. The optimal equatorial coordination numbers of uranyl are determined to be five. The energies of several complex conformations are competitively close to each other. In non-basic solution the most probable complex forms are those with two water ligands replaced by the bidentate carboxyl groups of zwitterionic glycine. The N,O-chelation in non-basic solution is neither entropically nor enthalpically favored. The symmetric and antisymmetric stretch vibrations of the nearly linear O-U-O unit determine the luminescence features. The shapes of the vibrationally resolved experimental solution spectra are reproduced theoretically with an empirically fitted overall line-width parameter. The calculated luminescence origins correspond to thermally populated, near-degenerate groups of the lowest electronically excited states of (3)Δ(g) and (3)Φ(g) character, originating from (U-O)σ(u) → (U-5f)δ(u),ϕ(u) configurations of the linear [OUO](2+) unit. The intensity distributions of the vibrational progressions are consistent with U-O bond-length changes around 5 1/2 pm. The unusually high intensity of the short wavelength foot is explained by near-degeneracy of vibrationally and electronically excited states, and by intensity enhancement through the asymmetric O-U-O stretch mode. The combination of contemporary computational chemistry and experimental techniques leads to a detailed understanding of structures, thermodynamics, and luminescence of actinide compounds, including

  10. Variable Step Integration Coupled with the Method of Characteristics Solution for Water-Hammer Analysis, A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Jason B.

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional water-hammer modeling involves the solution of two coupled non-linear hyperbolic partial differential equations (PDEs). These equations result from applying the principles of conservation of mass and momentum to flow through a pipe, and usually the assumption that the speed at which pressure waves propagate through the pipe is constant. In order to solve these equations for the interested quantities (i.e. pressures and flow rates), they must first be converted to a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) by either approximating the spatial derivative terms with numerical techniques or using the Method of Characteristics (MOC). The MOC approach is ideal in that no numerical approximation errors are introduced in converting the original system of PDEs into an equivalent system of ODEs. Unfortunately this resulting system of ODEs is bound by a time step constraint so that when integrating the equations the solution can only be obtained at fixed time intervals. If the fluid system to be modeled also contains dynamic components (i.e. components that are best modeled by a system of ODEs), it may be necessary to take extremely small time steps during certain points of the model simulation in order to achieve stability and/or accuracy in the solution. Coupled together, the fixed time step constraint invoked by the MOC, and the occasional need for extremely small time steps in order to obtain stability and/or accuracy, can greatly increase simulation run times. As one solution to this problem, a method for combining variable step integration (VSI) algorithms with the MOC was developed for modeling water-hammer in systems with highly dynamic components. A case study is presented in which reverse flow through a dual-flapper check valve introduces a water-hammer event. The predicted pressure responses upstream of the check-valve are compared with test data.

  11. Equilibrium and dynamic interfacial properties of protein/ionic-liquid-type surfactant solutions at the decane/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chong; Lei, Jinmei; Zhang, Lu; Du, Feng-Pei

    2014-11-25

    The interfacial behavior of β-casein and lysozyme solutions has been investigated in the presence of an ionic liquid-type imidazolium surfactant ([C16mim]Br) at the decane/water interface. The dynamic dilational properties of the protein/surfactant solutions are investigated by the oscillating drop method and interfacial tension relaxation method. The interfacial tension isotherms for the mixed adsorption layers indicate that the increased addition of [C16mim]Br to a pure protein changes the properties of the complex formed at the decane/water interface. Whereas the interfacial tension data of the protein/surfactant mixed layers do not clearly show differences with changing bulk composition, the dilational rheology provides undoubted evidence that the structure and, in particular, the dynamics of the adsorbed layers depend on the bulk surfactant concentration. The experiment data for β-casein/[C16mim]Br solutions indicate that at higher bulk [C16mim]Br concentrations, β-casein in the interfacial layer is subject to conformational changes, where it gives space to [C16mim]Br molecules in the form of coadsorb rather than replacement; in contrast, in lysozyme/[C16mim]Br solutions some lysozyme molecules desorb from the interface due to the competitive adsorption of free [C16mim]Br molecules. Experimental results related to the interfacial dilational properties of the protein/surfactant solutions show that the dilational modulus turns out to be more sensitive to the conformation of protein/surfactant mixture at the liquid interface than the interfacial tension.

  12. Thermodynamics of micelle formation in a water-alcohol solution of sodium tetradecyl sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilova, S. V.; Tret'yakova, A. Ya.; Barabanov, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of addition of ethanol and propan-1-ol on sodium tetradecyl sulfate micelle formation in an aqueous solution are studied via microprobe fluorescence microscopy and conductometry. The critical micelle concentration, quantitative characteristics of micelles, and thermodynamic parameters of micelle formation are determined. Addition of 5-15 vol % of ethanol or 5-10 vol % of propan-1-ol is shown to result in a lower critical micelle concentration than in the aqueous solution, and in the formation of mixed spherical micelles whose sizes and aggregation numbers are less than those for the systems without alcohol. The contribution from the enthalpy factor to the free energy of sodium tetradecyl sulfate micelle formation is found to dominate in mixed solvents, in contrast to aqueous solutions.

  13. Experiment study on water-rock interaction about gold activation and migration in different solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The interactions on gold active and migratory quantities and rates between tuffaceous slate and solu-tions with different compositions were experimentally studied at 200 ℃, 20 MPa, in a high-pressure apparatus. After reaction, tuffaceous slate became light colored and soft, and its mass density reduced. The amount of gold extracted from tuffaceous slate ranges widely, from 0.027 to 0.234 μg/g. Chlorine solution may activate appreciable amount of gold, and the gold migratory rate is high enough, from 50.70% to 92.30%, which reveals that sulphur and chlorine work together in solutions to accelerate gold activation and migration, and to realize gold mineralization in favorable places.

  14. High-order Finite Difference Solution of Euler Equations for Nonlinear Water Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Torben Robert Bilgrav; Bingham, Harry B.; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2012-01-01

    The incompressible Euler equations are solved with a free surface, the position of which is captured by applying an Eulerian kinematic boundary condition. The solution strategy follows that of [1, 2], applying a coordinate-transformation to obtain a time-constant spatial computational domain which...... with a two-dimensional implementation of the model are compared with highly accurate stream function solutions to the nonlinear wave problem, which show the approximately expected convergence rates and a clear advantage of using high-order finite difference schemes in combination with the Euler equations....

  15. How to react to shallow water hydrodynamics: The larger benthic foraminifera solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann

    2011-11-01

    Symbiont-bearing larger benthic foraminifera inhabit the photic zone to provide their endosymbiotic algae with light. Because of the hydrodynamic conditions of shallow water environments, tests of larger foraminifera can be entrained and transported by water motion. To resist water motion, these foraminifera have to build a test able to avoid transport or have to develop special mechanisms to attach themselves to substrate or to hide their test below sediment grains. For those species which resist transport by the construction of hydrodynamic convenient shapes, the calculation of hydrodynamic parameters of their test defines the energetic input they can resist and therefore the scenario where they can live in. Measuring the density, size and shape of every test, combined with experimental data, helps to define the best mathematical approach for the settling velocity and Reynolds number of every shell. The comparison between water motion at the sediment-water interface and the specimen-specific settling velocity helps to calculate the water depths at which, for a certain test type, transport, deposition and accumulation may occur. The results obtained for the investigated taxa show that the mathematical approach gives reliable results and can discriminate the hydrodynamic behaviour of different shapes. Furthermore, the study of the settling velocities, calculated for all the investigated taxa, shows that several species are capable to resist water motion and therefore they appear to be functionally adapted to the hydrodynamic condition of its specific environment. The same study is not recommended on species which resist water motion by adopting hiding or anchoring strategies to avoid the effect of water motion.

  16. Modeling Large Water Infiltration Events in Small Plots Using the 1-D Finite Water-content Method and Numerical Solutions to the Richards' Equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A.; Dahlke, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    The ability of soil to infiltrate large volumes of water is fundamental to managed aquifer recharge (MAR) when using infiltration basins or agricultural fields. In order to investigate the feasibility of using agricultural fields for MAR we conducted a field experiment designed to not only assess the resilience of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) to large (300 mm), short duration (1.5 hour), repeated irrigation events during the winter but also how crop resilience was influenced by soil water movement. We hypothesized that large irrigation amounts designed for groundwater recharge could cause prolonged saturated conditions in the root-zone and yield loss. Tensiometers were installed at two depths (60 and 150 cm) in a loam soil to monitor the changes in soil matric potential within and below the root-zone following irrigation events in each of five experimental plots (8 x 16 m2). To simulate the individual infiltration events we employed the HYDRUS-1D computational module (Simunek et al., 2005) and compared the finite-water content vadose zone flow method (Ogden et al. 2015) with numerical solutions to the Richards' equation. For both models we assumed a homogenous and isotropic root zone that is initially unsaturated with no water flow. Here we assess the ability of these two models to account for the control volume applied to the plots and to capture sharp changes in matric potential that were observed in the early time after an irrigation pulse. The goodness-of-fit of the models was evaluated using the root mean square error (RMSE) for observed and predicted values of cumulative infiltration over time, wetting front depth over time and water content at observation nodes. For the finite-water content method, the RMSE values and output for observation nodes were similar to that from the HYDRUS-1D solution. This indicates that the finite-water content method may be useful for predicting the fate of large volumes of water applied for MAR. Moreover, both models suggest a

  17. Functional test of pedotransfer functions to predict water flow and solute transport with the dual-permeability model MACRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeys, J.; Larsbo, M.; Bergström, L.; Brown, C. D.; Coquet, Y.; Jarvis, N. J.

    2012-07-01

    Estimating pesticide leaching risks at the regional scale requires the ability to completely parameterise a pesticide fate model using only survey data, such as soil and land-use maps. Such parameterisations usually rely on a set of lookup tables and (pedo)transfer functions, relating elementary soil and site properties to model parameters. The aim of this paper is to describe and test a complete set of parameter estimation algorithms developed for the pesticide fate model MACRO, which accounts for preferential flow in soil macropores. We used tracer monitoring data from 16 lysimeter studies, carried out in three European countries, to evaluate the ability of MACRO and this "blind parameterisation" scheme to reproduce measured solute leaching at the base of each lysimeter. We focused on the prediction of early tracer breakthrough due to preferential flow, because this is critical for pesticide leaching. We then calibrated a selected number of parameters in order to assess to what extent the prediction of water and solute leaching could be improved. Our results show that water flow was generally reasonably well predicted (median model efficiency, ME, of 0.42). Although the general pattern of solute leaching was reproduced well by the model, the overall model efficiency was low (median ME = -0.26) due to errors in the timing and magnitude of some peaks. Preferential solute leaching at early pore volumes was also systematically underestimated. Nonetheless, the ranking of soils according to solute loads at early pore volumes was reasonably well estimated (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC, between 0.54 and 0.72). Moreover, we also found that ignoring macropore flow leads to a significant deterioration in the ability of the model to reproduce the observed leaching pattern, and especially the early breakthrough in some soils. Finally, the calibration procedure showed that improving the estimation of solute transport parameters is probably more important than the

  18. Functional test of pedotransfer functions to predict water flow and solute transport with the dual-permeability model MACRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moeys

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Estimating pesticide leaching risks at the regional scale requires the ability to completely parameterise a pesticide fate model using only survey data, such as soil and land-use maps. Such parameterisations usually rely on a set of lookup tables and (pedotransfer functions, relating elementary soil and site properties to model parameters. The aim of this paper is to describe and test a complete set of parameter estimation algorithms developed for the pesticide fate model MACRO, which accounts for preferential flow in soil macropores. We used tracer monitoring data from 16 lysimeter studies, carried out in three European countries, to evaluate the ability of MACRO and this "blind parameterisation" scheme to reproduce measured solute leaching at the base of each lysimeter. We focused on the prediction of early tracer breakthrough due to preferential flow, because this is critical for pesticide leaching. We then calibrated a selected number of parameters in order to assess to what extent the prediction of water and solute leaching could be improved.

    Our results show that water flow was generally reasonably well predicted (median model efficiency, ME, of 0.42. Although the general pattern of solute leaching was reproduced well by the model, the overall model efficiency was low (median ME = −0.26 due to errors in the timing and magnitude of some peaks. Preferential solute leaching at early pore volumes was also systematically underestimated. Nonetheless, the ranking of soils according to solute loads at early pore volumes was reasonably well estimated (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC, between 0.54 and 0.72. Moreover, we also found that ignoring macropore flow leads to a significant deterioration in the ability of the model to reproduce the observed leaching pattern, and especially the early breakthrough in some soils. Finally, the calibration procedure showed that improving the estimation of solute transport parameters is

  19. Functional test of pedotransfer functions to predict water flow and solute transport with the dual-permeability model MACRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moeys

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Estimating pesticide leaching risks at the regional scale requires the ability to completely parameterise a pesticide fate model using only survey data, such as soil and land-use maps. Such parameterisation usually rely on a set of lookup tables and (pedotransfer functions, relating elementary soil and site properties to model parameters. The aim of this paper is to describe and test a complete set of parameter estimation algorithms developed for the pesticide fate model MACRO, which accounts for preferential flow in soil macropores. We used tracer monitoring data from 16 lysimeter studies, carried out in three European countries, to evaluate the ability of MACRO and this "blind parameterisation" scheme to reproduce measured solute leaching at the base of each lysimeter. We focused on the prediction of early tracer breakthrough due to preferential flow, because this is critical for pesticide leaching. We then calibrated a selected number of parameters in order to assess to what extent the prediction of water and solute leaching could be improved.

    Our results show that water flow was generally reasonably well predicted (median model efficiency, ME, of 0.42. Although the general pattern of solute leaching was reproduced well by the model, the overall model efficiency was low (median ME = −0.26 due to errors in the timing and magnitude of some peaks. Preferential solute leaching at early pore volumes was also systematically underestimated. Nonetheless, the ranking of soils according to solute loads at early pore volumes was reasonably well estimated (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC, between 0.54 and 0.72. Moreover, we also found that ignoring macropore flow leads to a significant deterioration in the ability of the model to reproduce the observed leaching pattern, and especially the early breakthrough in some soils. Finally, the calibration procedure showed that improving the estimation of solute transport parameters is probably

  20. Caution on the storage of waters and aqueous solutions in plastic containers for hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Jorge E

    2012-11-30

    The choice of containers for storage of aqueous samples between their collection, transport and water hydrogen ((2)H) and oxygen ((18)O) stable isotope analysis is a topic of concern for a wide range of fields in environmental, geological, biomedical, food, and forensic sciences. The transport and separation of water molecules during water vapor or liquid uptake by sorption or solution and the diffusive transport of water molecules through organic polymer material by permeation or pervaporation may entail an isotopic fractionation. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the extent of such fractionation. Sixteen bottle-like containers of eleven different organic polymers, including low and high density polyethylene (LDPE and HDPE), polypropylene (PP), polycarbonate (PC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and perfluoroalkoxy-Teflon (PFA), of different wall thickness and size were completely filled with the same mineral water and stored for 659 days under the same conditions of temperature and humidity. Particular care was exercised to keep the bottles tightly closed and prevent loss of water vapor through the seals. Changes of up to +5‰ for δ(2)H values and +2.0‰ for δ(18)O values were measured for water after more than 1 year of storage within a plastic container, with the magnitude of change depending mainly on the type of organic polymer, wall thickness, and container size. The most important variations were measured for the PET and PC bottles. Waters stored in glass bottles with Polyseal™ cone-lined PP screw caps and thick-walled HDPE or PFA containers with linerless screw caps having an integrally molded inner sealing ring preserved their original δ(2)H and δ(18)O values. The carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen stable isotope compositions of the organic polymeric materials were also determined. The results of this study clearly show that for precise and accurate measurements of the water stable isotope composition in aqueous solutions, rigorous sampling and

  1. [Adsorption of calcium ion from aqueous solution using Na(+)-conditioned clinoptilolite for hot-water softening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Dong; Chen, Yuan-Chao; Zhang, Xing-Wen; Chen, Gui-Jun

    2015-02-01

    This work investigated adsorptive removal of calcium ion (Ca2+) by virtue of Na(+) -conditioned clinoptilolite simulating the process of softening for industrial hot-water system. Influential factors such as the activation/regeneration of sorbent and solution pH were tested. The kinetics/thermodynamics for adsorption of Ca2+ were analyzed and discussed. Results showed that: (1) The adsorption rate was in good agreement with the pseudo-second order kinetic models, and the process of adsorption better followed the Langmuir model; (2) Higher solution temperature allowed an enhanced efficiency on Ca2+ removal, albeit the maximum adsorption capacity of Na(+)-conditioned clinoptilolite was hardly affected; (3) The process of adsorption was dominated by chemisorption, and also characterized by entropy increase with spontaneous/endothermic nature; (4) Solution temperature was suggested to be controlled within the range of 6 to 10, and more than 9 times of sorbent regeneration could be ensured for an effective adsorption towards Ca2+ with initial concentration less than 20 mg x L(-1). It was demonstrated that the activated clinoptilolite should be a promising alternative adsorbent for industrial hot-water softening.

  2. Beta-adrenergic activation of solute coupled water uptake by toad skin epithelium results in near-isosmotic transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Robert; Larsen, Erik Hviid

    2007-01-01

    (V) decreased to 0.50+/-0.15 nL cm(-2) x s(-1), which is significantly different from zero. Isoproterenol decreased the osmotic concentration of the transported fluid, C(osm) approximately 2 x I(SC)(Eqv)/J(V), from 351+/-72 to 227+/-28 mOsm (Ringer's solution: 252.8 mOsm). J(V) depicted a saturating function......(V) with a [Na+] of the transported fluid of 130+/-24 mM ([Na+]Ringer's solution = 117.4 mM). Addition of bumetanide to the inside solution reduced J(V). Water was transported uphill and J(V) reversed at an excess outside osmotic concentration, deltaC(S,rev) = 28.9+/-3.9 mOsm, amiloride decreased delta......Transepithelial potential (V(T)), conductance (G(T)), and water flow (J(V)) were measured simultaneously with good time resolution (min) in isolated toad (Bufo bufo) skin epithelium with Ringer on both sides. Inside application of 5 microM isoproterenol resulted in the fast increase in G(T) from 1...

  3. Density functional theory study of 1:1 glycine–water complexes in the gas phase and in solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic study of 1:1 glycine-water complexes involving all possible glycine conformers. The complex geometries are fully optimized for the first time both in the gas phase and in solution using three DFT methods (B3LYP, PBE1PBE, X3LYP) and the MP2 method. We calculate the G3 energies and use them as the reference data to gauge hydrogen bond strength in the gas phase. The solvent effects are treated via the integral equation formalism-polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM). Altogether, we locate fifty-two unique nonionized (N) structures and six zwitterionic (Z) structures in the gas phase, and fifty-five N structures and thirteen Z structures in solution. Both correlation and solvation are shown to be important in geometry determination. We found that in the gas phase, a water molecule binds more strongly to the carboxylic acid group of glycine than to its amine group, whereas in solution phase the reverse is true. The most stable Z structure is isoenergetic with the most stable N structure.

  4. Solution Properties of Water-Soluble “Smart” Poly(N-acryloyl-N′-ethyl piperazine-co-methyl methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Roshan Deen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble copolymers of N-acryloyl-N′-ethylpiperazine (AcrNEP with methyl methacrylate (MMA were synthesized to high conversion by free-radical solution polymerization. The composition of the copolymers was determined using Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR. Copolymers containing AcrNEP content above 44 mol% were readily soluble in water and exhibited the critical solution temperature behavior. The copolymers were strongly responsive to changes in pH of the external medium due to the presence of tertiary amine functions that could be protonated at low pH. The influence of various factors such as copolymer composition, pH, temperature, salt and surfactant concentration on the LCST of the copolymers were systematically studied. The intrinsic viscosity of the copolymers in dimethyl formamide decreased with increase in temperature due to a decrease in thermodynamic affinity between polymer chains and solvent molecules. The viscosity behavior of the copolymers in sodium chloride solution was similar to that of classical polyelectrolytes and hydrophobically modified polyacrylate systems.

  5. An Analytic Solution to Well-water Level Changes under Barometric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chunping; Deng Liang; Liao Xin; Wan Fei; Shi Yun

    2011-01-01

    Under barometric pressure, groundwater flow in well-aquifer systems is a kind of hydromechanical coupling problem. Applying the flux boundary conditions on borehole wall and water pressure equilibrium conditions inside and outside the borehole wall under

  6. Analysis of the sodium recirculation theory of solute-coupled water transport in small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkaer

    2002-01-01

    permeabilities and pump constants of fluxes of water and electrolytes, volumes and ion concentrations of cell and lateral intercellular space (lis), and membrane potentials and conductances. Simulating physiological bioelectrical features together with cellular and paracellular fluxes of the sodium ion...

  7. New Class of Solutions for Water Infiltration Problems in Unsaturated Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barari, Amin; Omidvar, M; Momeni, M

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of approximate analytical solutions to Richards’ equation, which governs the problem of unsaturated flow in porous media. The existing methods generally fall within the category of numerical and analytical methods, often having many restrictions for practical situa...

  8. Quasielastic small-angle neutron scattering from heavy water solutions of cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmin, André; Lechner, Ruep E; Saenger, Wolfram

    2011-01-14

    We present a model for quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) by an aqueous solution of compact and inflexible molecules. This model accounts for time-dependent spatial pair correlations between the atoms of the same as well as of distinct molecules and includes all coherent and incoherent neutron scattering contributions. The extension of the static theory of the excluded volume effect [A. K. Soper, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 9, 2399 (1997)] to the time-dependent (dynamic) case allows us to obtain simplified model expressions for QENS spectra in the low Q region in the uniform fluid approximation. The resulting expressions describe the quasielastic small-angle neutron scattering (QESANS) spectra of D(2)O solutions of native and methylated cyclodextrins well, yielding in particular translational and rotational diffusion coefficients of these compounds in aqueous solution. Finally, we discuss the full potential of the QESANS analysis (that is, beyond the uniform fluid approximation), in particular, the information on solute-solvent interactions (e.g., hydration shell properties) that such an analysis can provide, in principle.

  9. Inhibition of localized attack on the aluminium alloy AA 6351 in glycol/water solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monticelli, C.; Brunoro, G.; Zucchi, F.; Fagioli, F.

    1989-06-01

    The objective of this work was to examine the feasibility of enhancing pitting resistance of AA 6351 (nominal composition: 1% Si, 0.6% Mg, 0.3% Mn, balance Al) by adding suitable inhibitors to the solutions. The compounds used were two inorganic salts: sodium molybdate and sodium tungstate and two derivatives of pyrimidine: 2-aminopyrimidine (2AP) and 2-hydroxypyrimidine (2HP). The inhibiting efficiencies of these substances were tested by both short-time electrochemical tests (galvanic coupling tests and polarization curves) and long-time immersions under experimental conditions causing the localized attack. Molybdate, tungstate and, to some extent, also 2AP efficiently inhibit AA 6351 localized corrosion in degraded solutions at 80/sup 0/C and in pure boiling solutions, for long exposure periods. The short-time electrochemical tests suggest that molybdate and tungstate are able to retard the electrochemical processes occurring on both the aluminium alloy and the small copper cathodic area produced by copper deposition. On the other hand, the 2AP efficiency is attributed to some complexing capability of this pyrimidine derivative towards dissolved copper ions, that are stabilized in solution. 2HP does not prevent AA 6351 localized attack. (orig./MM).

  10. Stratigraphic controls on fluid and solute fluxes across the sediment-water interface of an estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Audrey H.; Lazareva, Olesya; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Crespo, Kyle; Chan, Clara S.; Stieglitz, Thomas; Michael, Holly A.

    2014-01-01

    Shallow stratigraphic features, such as infilled paleovalleys, modify fresh groundwater discharge to coastal waters and fluxes of saltwater and nutrients across the sediment–water interface. We quantify the spatial distribution of shallow surface water–groundwater exchange and nitrogen fluxes near a paleovalley in Indian River Bay, Delaware, using a hand resistivity probe, conventional seepage meters, and pore-water samples. In the interfluve (region outside the paleovalley) most nitrate-rich fresh groundwater discharges rapidly near the coast with little mixing of saline pore water, and nitrogen transport is largely conservative. In the peat-filled paleovalley, fresh groundwater discharge is negligible, and saltwater exchange is deep (∼1 m). Long pore-water residence times and abundant sulfate and organic matter promote sulfate reduction and ammonium production in shallow sediment. Reducing, iron-rich fresh groundwater beneath paleovalley peat discharges diffusely around paleovalley margins offshore. In this zone of diffuse fresh groundwater discharge, saltwater exchange and dispersion are enhanced, ammonium is produced in shallow sediments, and fluxes of ammonium to surface water are large. By modifying patterns of groundwater discharge and the nature of saltwater exchange in shallow sediments, paleovalleys and other stratigraphic features influence the geochemistry of discharging groundwater. Redox reactions near the sediment–water interface affect rates and patterns of geochemical fluxes to coastal surface waters. For example, at this site, more than 99% of the groundwater-borne nitrate flux to the Delaware Inland Bays occurs within the interfluve portion of the coastline, and more than 50% of the ammonium flux occurs at the paleovalley margin.

  11. Universal tight binding model for chemical reactions in solution and at surfaces. II. Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovoi, A Y; Sheppard, T J; Pashov, D L; Kohanoff, J J; Paxton, A T

    2014-07-28

    A revised water model intended for use in condensed phase simulations in the framework of the self consistent polarizable ion tight binding theory is constructed. The model is applied to water monomer, dimer, hexamers, ice, and liquid, where it demonstrates good agreement with theoretical results obtained by more accurate methods, such as DFT and CCSD(T), and with experiment. In particular, the temperature dependence of the self diffusion coefficient in liquid water predicted by the model, closely reproduces experimental curves in the temperature interval between 230 K and 350 K. In addition, and in contrast to standard DFT, the model properly orders the relative densities of liquid water and ice. A notable, but inevitable, shortcoming of the model is underestimation of the static dielectric constant by a factor of two. We demonstrate that the description of inter and intramolecular forces embodied in the tight binding approximation in quantum mechanics leads to a number of valuable insights which can be missing from ab initio quantum chemistry and classical force fields. These include a discussion of the origin of the enhanced molecular electric dipole moment in the condensed phases, and a detailed explanation for the increase of coordination number in liquid water as a function of temperature and compared with ice--leading to insights into the anomalous expansion on freezing. The theory holds out the prospect of an understanding of the currently unexplained density maximum of water near the freezing point.

  12. [Distribution of drinking water in French Guyana: issues and solutions for improving access].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansotte, François; Margueron, Thomas; Maison, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    French Guyana is located in South America, and it is confronted with an endemic situation where waterborne diseases are widespread, especially among those 30,000 people without access to drinking water. In 2007, two notices of the French High Council for Public Health were issued, one concerning vaccination against typhoid and the other on conditions for improving water supply in Guyana. The latter served as a basis for proposing and implementing actions to "improve water quality for those who did not have access to it". Some foundation for further action was provided due to actions developed during the 1991 cholera outbreak there, when hand pumps and fountains were installed, and rainwater collection was promoted at the household level. Top priority is given to water supply provided by public facilities, especially through hand pumps. Rainwater harvest and storage is promoted for remote and very isolated households, including tools for purification through the use of a Brazilian-made ceramic filter. Important challenges are identified for the further, such as: conducting an evaluation of those technical choices made, developing a social and cultural understanding of drinking water and sanitation among the users, distribution and training for the use of water quality test kits, data sharing and exchange of good practice with neighbouring countries and an accurate mapping of enteric disease cases recorded in local health facilities.

  13. Cosmogenic 22Na as a steady-state tracer of solute transport and water age in first-order catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaste, James M.; Lauer, Nancy E.; Spaetzel, Alana B.; Goydan, Claire

    2016-12-01

    Naturally-occurring cosmogenic 22Na (T1/2 = 2.6 yr) is a potentially powerful tracer of solute and water movement in catchments. However, due to its low abundance in precipitation (∼10-20 molL-1), there are only a handful of datasets documenting cosmogenic 22Na atmospheric fluxes and concentrations in surface waters. Here we present the first record of cosmogenic 22Na fallout to North America and test its use as a radiometric tracer of water age in three small catchments in the Eastern United States. We show that 22Na deposition to southeastern Virginia, USA during 2012-2014 was 187 ± 10 mBqm-2yr-1 and that flux is largely additive with precipitation amounts. Our measurements of fallout combined with previous 22Na deposition data from other regions indicate that approximately 77% of the variability in the annual global 22Na atmospheric flux is controlled by precipitation. Export of 22Na in drainage waters from three first-order forested catchments ranged from 12.5 to 174 mBq m-2 yr-1 and can be explained by a flux-based radioactive decay model, indicating that the watersheds are in steady-state with respect to cosmogenic 22Na on annual timescales. We conclude that in temperate climates with no systematic changes in rainfall amounts at the annual timescale, 22Na may be useful for quantifying the recharge age of relatively young (<20 yr) surface waters and groundwaters and for tracing solute transport at the watershed scale.

  14. Oxidizing dissolution of spent MOX47 fuel subjected to water radiolysis: Solution chemistry and surface characterization by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégou, C.; Caraballo, R.; De Bonfils, J.; Broudic, V.; Peuget, S.; Vercouter, T.; Roudil, D.

    2010-04-01

    The mechanisms of oxidizing dissolution of spent MOX fuel (MIMAS TU2®) subjected to water radiolysis were investigated experimentally by leaching spent MOX47 fuel samples in pure water at 25 °C under different oxidizing conditions (with and without external gamma irradiation); the leached surfaces were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The highly oxidizing conditions resulting from external gamma irradiation significantly increased the concentration of plutonium (Pu(V)) and uranium (U(VI)) compared with a benchmark experiment (without external irradiation). The oxidation behavior of the plutonium-enriched aggregates differed significantly from that of the UO 2 matrix after several months of leaching in water under gamma irradiation. The plutonium in the aggregates appears to limit fuel oxidation. The only secondary phases formed and identified to date by Raman spectroscopy are uranium peroxides that generally precipitate on the surface of the UO 2 grains. Concerning the behavior of plutonium, solution analysis results appear to be compatible with a conventional explanation based on an equilibrium with a Pu(OH) 4(am) phase. The fission product release - considered as a general indicator of matrix alteration - from MOX47 fuel also increases under external gamma irradiation and a change in the leaching mode is observed. Diffusive leaching was clearly identified, coinciding with the rapid onset of steady-state actinide concentrations in the bulk solution.

  15. Spatially variable water table recharge and the hillslope hydrologic response: Analytical solutions to the linearized hillslope Boussinesq equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dralle, David N.; Boisramé, Gabrielle F. S.; Thompson, Sally E.

    2014-11-01

    The linearized hillslope Boussinesq equation, introduced by Brutsaert (1994), describes the dynamics of saturated, subsurface flow from hillslopes with shallow, unconfined aquifers. In this paper, we use a new analytical technique to solve the linearized hillslope Boussinesq equation to predict water table dynamics and hillslope discharge to channels. The new solutions extend previous analytical treatments of the linearized hillslope Boussinesq equation to account for the impact of spatiotemporal heterogeneity in water table recharge. The results indicate that the spatial character of recharge may significantly alter both steady state subsurface storage characteristics and the transient hillslope hydrologic response, depending strongly on similarity measures of controls on the subsurface flow dynamics. Additionally, we derive new analytical solutions for the linearized hillslope-storage Boussinesq equation and explore the interaction effects of recharge structure and hillslope morphology on water storage and base flow recession characteristics. A theoretical recession analysis, for example, demonstrates that decreasing the relative amount of downslope recharge has a similar effect as increasing hillslope convergence. In general, the theory suggests that recharge heterogeneity can serve to diminish or enhance the hydrologic impacts of hillslope morphology.

  16. Evaluation Of Method Of Line (MOL For Solution Of Soil Water Flow Equations And Comparison With Finite Element Method (FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISAM M. Mahammed

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to evaluate Method of Line (MOL used for solution of  water flow equations through porous media using MATLAB package functions for solution of ordinary differential equations ODE,s  , instead of writing long programs codes.  sink & source term to MOL model were included. Then Comparing MOL model with another model that uses finite element method in solving water flow equations (FEM in one dimensional flow using computer program code in FORTRAN.  Two cases were examined for evaluation and comparison of these two models. Firstly, infiltration phenomena using sandy soil was studied with the same parameter for both models.  Results show that there is a divergence between the two models along time of 60 minutes of infiltration. Changes of moisture content with soil depth were sharp with FEM model. Second case, data of  the volume  of water content for wheat field where used taking irrigation and evaporation into account, along the growth period of wheat crop and different depths up to  100 cm. Results show that output of  FEM model has  high degree of agreement with  the measured data for all depths and along all period of growth. Data given by MOL model were less in values than measured data for all depths and along all period of wheat growth time.

  17. Synthesis, photophysical and antimicrobial activity of new water soluble ammonium quaternary benzanthrone in solution and in polylactide film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Desislava; Vasileva-Tonkova, Evgenia; Makki, Mohamad Saleh I; Sobahi, Tariq Rashad; Abdеl-Rahman, Reda Mohamed; Asiri, Abdullah M; Grabchev, Ivo

    2015-02-01

    The synthesis of a new cationic water soluble fluorescent 1-[(7-oxo-7H-benzo[de]anthracen-3-ylcarbamoyl)-methyl]-triethylammonium chloride (B) has been described. Due to the presence of the quaternary amino group, the compound is soluble in water. Its photophysical characteristics in aqueous solution and organic solvents with different polarity have been determined using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The photostability of compound B has been investigated in aqueous media. The newly synthesized compound has been tested in vitro for its antimicrobial activity against eight bacterial and two yeasts cultures. The results obtained suggest that the newly synthesized compound is effective in treating the relevant pathogens and is suitable in designing new effective antimicrobial preparations. The incorporation of the compound into thin polylactic acid film and its release into water solution has been also investigated. It was demonstrated that the compound released from the polymer polylactic acid matrix exhibited a prolonged good antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Surface Film Adsorption and Lubricity of Soybean Oil In-Water Emulsion and Triblock Copolymer Aqueous Solution: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Taheri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the surface film adsorption and lubricity of two different types of potential environmentally friendly cold metal forming lubricants: soybean vegetable oil in water VO/W emulsions and triblock copolymer aqueous solutions. The lubricants have different visual appearance, surface film adsorption characteristic, lubricity and surface cleaning behaviour. The effects of concentration, temperature and emulsification ultrasonic energy (for VO/W emulsion are studied. The result shows that the soybean VO/W emulsions have stronger adsorption, superior lubricity and anti-wear property compared to the copolymer solutions. The effect of temperature is investigated at 30 °C and 65 °C which are below and above cloud point of the aqueous copolymer solutions. Both lubricants show improved friction and anti-wear property at 65 °C. However, tenacious residual film remained on the discs surface after surface cleaning indicates lower cleanability of the soybean VO/W emulsions compared to the copolymer solutions, postulating the need for extra post-processing cleaning operations after cold forming process with VO/W emulsion lubricant.

  19. On the light intensity transmitted through water and aqueous supersaturated ammonium dihydrogen phosphate solutions containing different antisolvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwal, Keshra

    2017-02-01

    Experimental data of the dependence of transmitted laser light intensity I of aqueous ADP solutions saturated at 303.15 K on feeding time t of three antisolvents (i.e. acetone, methanol and ethanol) are analyzed using mathematical equations based on two approaches. The first approach is based on exponential decrease in I with increasing t whereas the second one is based on the concept of adsorption of antisolvent molecules onto solvent and solute molecules. It was found that: (1) the latter approach is superior to the former one for explaining the observed dependence of transmitted laser-beam intensities of pure solvent and aqueous saturated ADP solutions, (2) the parameter A of the second approach provides better insight into the processes of adsorption of antisolvents in terms of the differential heat Qdiff of adsorption, and (3) the trends of changes in the values Qdiff for different antisolvents in water and aqueous solutions are associated with the dielectric constants of different antisolvents and are directly connected with the chemical constitution of the methanol, ethanol and acetone molecules.

  20. Groundwater level deterioration issues and suggested solution for the water curtain cultivation area in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongcheol; Lee, Bongju; Ha, Kucheol; Yoon, Yunyeol; Moon, Sangho; Cho, Suyoung; Kim, Seongyun

    2013-04-01

    Protected water curtain cultivation system is an energy saving technique for winter season by splashing groundwater on the inner roof of the green house. But the issue is that the method results in groundwater level deterioration because it disposes the used groundwater to nearby stream. Reuse of the groundwater for water curtain cultivation is important Groundwater level, steam level, and groundwater usage rate are investigated at the five green house concentrated areas such as Cheongwon, Namyangju, Choongju, Namwon, Jinju. Groundwater usage rate is estimated using a ultrasonic flowmeter for a specific well and using the combination of pressure sensor and propeller type velocity counting equipment at a water disposal channel from November to April which is water curtain cultivating season. Groundwater usage rate ranges from 46.9m3/d to 108.0m3/d for a 10a greenhouse. Groundwater level change is strongly influenced by seasonal variation of rainfall and concentrated pumping activities in winter but the level is lower than stream level all year long resulting in all year around losing stream at Cheongwon, Namyangju, Jinju. At Nanwon, the stream is converted from losing one in winter to gaining one in summer. Groundwater level deterioration at concentrated water curtain cultivation area is found to be severe for some area where circulating water curtain cultivation system is need to be applied for groundwater restoration and sustainable cultivation in winter. Circulating water curtain cultivation system can restore the groundwater level by recharging the used groundwater through injection well and then pumping out from pumping well.

  1. The solvation study of carbon, silicon and their mixed nanotubes in water solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Haeri, Haleh; Ketabi, Sepideh; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid

    2012-07-01

    Nanotubes are believed to open the road toward different modern fields, either technological or biological. However, the applications of nanotubes have been badly impeded for the poor solubility in water which is especially essential for studies in the presence of living cells. Therefore, water soluble samples are in demand. Herein, the outcomes of Monte Carlo simulations of different sets of multiwall nanotubes immersed in water are reported. A number of multi wall nanotube samples, comprised of pure carbon, pure silicon and several mixtures of carbon and silicon are the subjects of study. The simulations are carried out in an (N,V,T) ensemble. The purpose of this report is to look at the effects of nanotube size (diameter) and nanotube type (pure carbon, pure silicon or a mixture of carbon and silicon) variation on solubility of multiwall nanotubes in terms of number of water molecules in shell volume. It is found that the solubility of the multi wall carbon nanotube samples is size independent, whereas multi wall silicon nanotube samples solubility varies with diameter of the inner tube. The higher solubility of samples containing silicon can be attributed to the larger atomic size of silicon atom which provides more direct contact with the water molecules. The other affecting factor is the bigger inter space (the space between inner and outer tube) in the case of silicon samples. Carbon type multi wall nanotubes appeared as better candidates for transporting water molecules through a multi wall nanotube structure, while in the case of water adsorption problems it is better to use multi wall silicon nanotubes or a mixture of multi wall carbon/ silicon nanotubes.

  2. Facile synthesis of a water-soluble fluorescence sensor for Al3 + in aqueous solution and on paper substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianqi; Wan, Xuejuan; Dong, Yunsheng; Li, Weibin; Wu, Lisi; Pei, Hang; Yao, Youwei

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a facile water-soluble fluorescence sensor 2-((2-hydroxybenzylidene)-amino)-2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol (ST) was synthesized via one-step reaction, and its fluorescence sensing performance for Al3 + both in aqueous solution and on paper substrate was evaluated. The results showed that ST exhibited an specific fluorescence "turn-on" response to Al3 + over other cations in aqueous solution as well as on the test paper. The limit of detection was found to be 3.2 × 10- 7 M, which revealed that the obtained Schiff-base based fluorescence chemosensor ST possessed a great potential for the rapid, quantitative and qualitative detection of Al3 +.

  3. Cooperative hydration effect causes thermal unfolding of proteins and water activity plays a key role in protein stability in solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Osato; Dozen, Michiko; Hirota, Kaede

    2016-08-01

    The protein unfolding process observed in a narrow temperature range was clearly explained by evaluating the small difference in the enthalpy of hydrogen-bonding between amino acid residues and the hydration of amino acid residue separately. In aqueous solutions, the effect of cosolute on the protein stability is primarily dependent on water activity, aw, the role of which has been long neglected in the literature. The effect of aw on protein stability works as a power law so that a small change in aw is amplified substantially through the cooperative hydration effect. In the present approach, the role of hydrophobic interaction stands behind. This affects protein stability indirectly through the change in solution structure caused by the existence of cosolute.

  4. Application of an easily water-compatible hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbent for efficient removal of catechol and resorcinol in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Jianhan, E-mail: xiaomeijiangou@yahoo.com.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Huang Kelong; Yan Cheng [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2009-08-15

    An easily water-compatible hypercrosslinked resin HJ-1 was developed for adsorbing catechol and resorcinol in aqueous solution in this study. Its adsorption performances for catechol and resorcinol were investigated in aqueous solution by using the commercial Amberlite XAD-4 as a reference. The adsorption dynamic curves were measured and the adsorption obeyed the pseudo-second-order rate equation of Boyer and Hsu. The adsorption isotherms were scaled and Freundlich isotherm model characterized the adsorption better. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters were calculated and the adsorption was an exothermic, favorable, and more ordered process. The fact that the adsorption capacity of catechol was larger than resorcinol and the adsorption enthalpy of catechol was more negative than resorcinol can be explained in terms of the solubility and the polarity of two adsorbates.

  5. Possibility of Modification of Zeolites by Iron Oxides and its Utilization for Removal of Pb(II from Water Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lovás

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Ion-exchange properties of cations from lattice and ions from solutions are characteristic for zeolites. Zeolites as sorbents are used in many branches of industry. Ion-exchange reactions of cations on zeolites have been a theme of many works. With the exception of using natural zeolites as the sorbent, a modification of surface of zeolites and preparation of synthetic zeolites has received interest lately. One of the common modification of zeolites is modification by iron oxides, which increases capacity of adsorption. In this work, we prepared a modified zeolite by the precipitation of magnetite on the surface of zeolite. This new adsorbent was used to remove of Pb(II from waste water. The maximum adsorption capacity was 73,25 mg/g from the solution of Pb with the concentration of 400 mg/l.

  6. Estimates of water and solute release from a coal waste rock dump in the Elk Valley, British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, S A; Barbour, S L; Hendry, M J; Carey, S K

    2017-12-01

    Long term (1999 to 2014) flow and water quality data from a rock drain located at the base of a coal waste rock dump constructed in the Elk Valley, British Columbia was used to characterize the release of three solutes (NO3(-), Cl(-) and SO4(2-)) from the dump and obtain whole dump estimates of net percolation (NP). The concentrations of dump derived solutes in the rock drain water were diluted by snowmelt waters from the adjacent natural watershed during the spring freshet and reached a maximum concentration during the winter baseflow period. Historical peak baseflow concentrations of conservative ions (NO3(-) and Cl(-)) increased until 2006/07 after which they decreased. This decrease was attributed to completion of the flushing of the first pore volume of water stored within the dump. The baseflow SO4(2-) concentrations increased proportionally with NO3(-) and Cl(-) to 2007, but then continued to slowly increase as NO3(-) and Cl(-) concentrations decreased. This was attributed to ongoing production of SO4(2-) due to oxidation of sulfide minerals within the dump. Based on partitioning of the annual volume of water discharged from the rock drain to waste rock effluent (NP) and water entering the rock drain laterally from the natural watershed, the mean NP values were estimated to be 446±50mm/a (area normalized net percolation/year) for the dump and 172±71mm/a for the natural watershed. The difference was attributed to greater rates of recharge in the dump from summer precipitation compared to the natural watershed where rainfall interception and enhanced evapotranspiration will increase water losses. These estimates included water moving through subsurface pathways. However, given the limitations in quantifying these flows the estimated NP rates for both the natural watershed and the waste rock dump are considered to be low, and could be much higher (e.g. ~450mm/a and ~800mm/a). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fracture mechanics solution of confined water progressive intrusion height of mining fracture floor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Haifeng; Yao Duoxi; Shen Dan; Cao Jiyang

    2015-01-01

    In order to obtain the value of confined water progressive intrusion height of mining fracture floor, the analysis equation was deduced based on the fracture extension theory of the fracture mechanics. Further-more, the influence of some parameters (e.g., advancing distance of working face, water pressure, initial fracture length and its angle) on confined water progressive intrusion height were analyzed. The results indicate that tension-shearing fracture of floor is extended more easily than compression-shearing frac-ture under the same conditions. When floor fracture dip angle is less than 90?, tension-shearing extension occurs more easily on the left edge of the goaf. If fracture dip angle is larger than 90?, it occurs more easily on the right edge of the goaf. The longer the advancing distance of working face is, the greater initial frac-ture length goes; or the larger water pressure is, the greater possibility of tension-shearing extension occurs. The confined water progressive intrusion height reaches the maximum on the edge of the goaf. Field in situ test is consistent with the theoretical analysis result.

  8. A Good Solution for Household Based on Fast Waste Water Blockage Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Omardin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The waste pipes from the wash basin are always flow in with several waste form kitchen preparation. Due to time consideration the pipe may comes through blockage and need blockage maintenance. Approach: This study presented an invention for early warning blockage detection for a kitchen waste water drain pipe. The waste water pipe some be connected through vertical pipe runs which are usually embedded in the wall. The Fast Waste Water Blockage Detection (FWABET is to create early detection of a blocked waste water level at kitchen appliances means for quick action knowing fluid flow passing through detector and indicates sign and alarm. Results: User society and country will be benefited from FWABET such as restaurants, slaughters house, hotels, hospitals, building developers and plumbing contractors. It is the first invention in Malaysia and can be adapt as a part of building services requirements. Conclusion: It is concluded that by apply the FWABETs, it may reduce the costs and time of blockage waste water blockage drainage maintenance operations.

  9. Water-isopropanol solutions for the offset printing and photooxidation of alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherstyuk, V.; Zorenko, O.; Velychko, O. [The National Technical Univ. of Ukraine, Kyiv Polytechnic Inst., Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2003-07-01

    The photochemical procedures of alcohols oxidation are discussed from the viewpoint of understanding mechanisms of processes in which alcohol is one-electron agent that result radical transformations. Oxidation of alcohols by the strong photo acceptors chromium (VI) salts leads to formation of several chromium (V) compounds and radical pairs. The nature of alcohol is essential as for detailed features of red ox processes, which occur differently in the presence and in absence of oxygen. Isopropanol as a component of wetting solutions in printing influences on the state of offset rubber blankets which have shown to be destructurized. The rubber structure of the blanket has been shown by mass-spectrometric procedure to be changed during printing and contacting with wetting solution. The destruction occurs and oxygen and isopropanol as well as products of its oxidation take part in it. (orig.)

  10. Water flow and solute transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum: Upscaling from rhizosphere to root zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarovitch, Naftali; Perelman, Adi; Guerra, Helena; Vanderborght, Jan; Pohlmeier, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Root water and nutrient uptake are among the most important processes considered in numerical models simulating water content and fluxes in the subsurface, as they control plant growth and production as well as water flow and nutrient transport out of the root zone. Root water uptake may lead to salt accumulation at the root-soil interface, resulting in rhizophere salt concentrations much higher than in the bulk soil. This salt accumulation is caused by soluble salt transport towards the roots by mass flow through the soil, followed by preferential adsorption of specific nutrients by active uptake, thereby excluding most other salts at the root-soil interface or in the root apoplast. The salinity buildup can lead to large osmotic pressure gradients across the roots thereby effectively reducing root water uptake. The initial results from rhizoslides (capillary paper growth system) show that sodium concentration is decreasing with distance from the root, compared with the bulk that remained more stable. When transpiration rate was decreased under high salinity levels, sodium concentration was more homogenous compared with low salinity levels. Additionally, sodium and gadolinium distributions were measured nondestructively around tomato roots using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This technique could also observe the root structure and water content around single roots. Results from the MRI confirm the solutes concentration pattern around roots and its relation to their initial concentration. We conclude that local water potentials at the soil-root interface differ from bulk potentials. These relative differences increase with decreasing root density, decreasing initial salt concentration and increasing transpiration rate. Furthermore, since climate may significantly influence plant response to salinity a dynamic climate-coupled salinity reduction functions are critical in while using macroscopic numerical models.

  11. Effects of nitrate and water on the oxygen isotopic analysis of barium sulfate precipitated from solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Janet E.; Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Mroczkowski, Stanley J.

    2008-01-01

    BaSO4 precipitated from mixed salt solutions by common techniques for SO isotopic analysis may contain quantities of H2O and NOthat introduce errors in O isotope measurements. Experiments with synthetic solutions indicate that δ18O values of CO produced by decomposition of precipitated BaSO4 in a carbon reactor may be either too low or too high, depending on the relative concentrations of SO and NO and the δ18O values of the H2O, NO, and SO. Typical δ18O errors are of the order of 0.5 to 1‰ in many sample types, and can be larger in samples containing atmospheric NO, which can cause similar errors in δ17O and Δ17O. These errors can be reduced by (1) ion chromatographic separation of SO from NO, (2) increasing the salinity of the solutions before precipitating BaSO4 to minimize incorporation of H2O, (3) heating BaSO4 under vacuum to remove H2O, (4) preparing isotopic reference materials as aqueous samples to mimic the conditions of the samples, and (5) adjus