WorldWideScience

Sample records for water shell structure

  1. Structure of the first- and second-neighbor shells of simulated water: Quantitative relation to translational and orientational order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhenyu; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Kumar, Pradeep; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2007-11-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of water using the five-site transferable interaction potential (TIP5P) model to quantify structural order in both the first shell (defined by four nearest neighbors) and second shell (defined by twelve next-nearest neighbors) of a central water molecule. We find that the anomalous decrease of orientational order upon compression occurs in both shells, but the anomalous decrease of translational order upon compression occurs mainly in the second shell. The decreases of translational order and orientational order upon compression (called the “structural anomaly”) are thus correlated only in the second shell. Our findings quantitatively confirm the qualitative idea that the thermodynamic, structural, and hence dynamic anomalies of water are related to changes upon compression in the second shell.

  2. Experiment on vibration in water of a cylindrical shell fixed in water; Suichu ni koteisareta ento shell no sessui shindo jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyota, K; Yasuzawa, Y; Kagawa, K; Nanatsuya, Y [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-04-10

    In order to utilize more effectively wide oceanic spaces, a feasibility study is performed on submerged large shell structures from the aspect of structural engineerings. As part of the study, for the purpose of deriving dynamic response characteristics of a structure, development was made on a numerical analysis code, `DASOR`, required to analyze natural frequency of a rotating shell fixed in water. The `DASOR` is a dynamic analysis code to derive added water mass effect, and effects of water depth on the dynamic response characteristics based on the shell theory by Donnell-Mushtari-Vlasov. This paper describes an experiment using a cylindrical shell to elucidate effects of the cylindrical shell on vibration characteristics due to contact with water. Comparisons and discussions were given on the result of numerical calculation using the `DASOR`, solution of a simplified theory analysis, and the result of the experiment to make clear the reasonability of the `DASOR`. The cylindrical shell in water has its natural frequency decreased due to the added water mass effect in association with increase in the water level. The `DASOR` showed good agreement with the experimental values as a result of giving considerations on the boundary conditions, by which its reasonability was verified. 3 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Water Dynamics in the Hydration Shells of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The structure and function of biomolecules are strongly influenced by their hydration shells. Structural fluctuations and molecular excitations of hydrating water molecules cover a broad range in space and time, from individual water molecules to larger pools and from femtosecond to microsecond time scales. Recent progress in theory and molecular dynamics simulations as well as in ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy has led to new and detailed insight into fluctuations of water structure, elementary water motions, electric fields at hydrated biointerfaces, and processes of vibrational relaxation and energy dissipation. Here, we review recent advances in both theory and experiment, focusing on hydrated DNA, proteins, and phospholipids, and compare dynamics in the hydration shells to bulk water. PMID:28248491

  4. Shell-like structures

    CERN Document Server

    Altenbach, Holm

    2011-01-01

    In this volume, scientists and researchers from industry discuss the new trends in simulation and computing shell-like structures. The focus is put on the following problems: new theories (based on two-dimensional field equations but describing non-classical effects), new constitutive equations (for materials like sandwiches, foams, etc. and which can be combined with the two-dimensional shell equations), complex structures (folded, branching and/or self intersecting shell structures, etc.) and shell-like structures on different scales (for example: nano-tubes) or very thin structures (similar

  5. Structural experiments with ice (composite) shells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belis, J.; Martens, K.; Van Lancker, B.; Pronk, A.; Zingoni, Alphose

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Ice can be a very suitable building material for temporary structures in a freezing environment. When water, mixed with small fibre reinforcements, is sprayed onto an inflatable membrane structure in suitable cold outdoor conditions, a thin shell is formed which increases thickness layer

  6. Vibrations of composite circular shell structures due to transient loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader, K.-H.; Krutzik, N.; Winkel, G.

    1975-01-01

    Referring to a container consisting of different shell structures - such as spherical, cylindrical and conical shells - the dynamic behavior of coupled spatial shell structures due to transient loads will be investigated. The spatial structure including the filling of water will be idealized as a three-dimensional model consisting of ring elements. The influence of the water filling on the vibrations will be considered by virtual masses added to the shell structures. In circular direction as well as in meridional direction a consistent mass model has been used. By variation of the virtual masses it will be clarified, how these additional masses influence the vibrational behavior of the composed system. Another aspect which will be investigated is the influence of different stiffnesses of substructures or parts of substructures on the natural frequencies, and on their affiliated eigensystems. Furthermore, the maximum and minimum stresses in the structures caused by transient loads acting on the inner surface of the shells will be explored. Here it seems to be possible to locate an area of maximum strain. Rotational loads as well as nonrotational loads will be considered

  7. Vibration experiment of the semi-spherical shell fixed in water; Suichu ni koteisareta hankyu shell no sessui shindo jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoda, K; Yasuzawa, Y; Kagawa, K; Sugimoto, S [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-10-01

    Vibration characteristics of the semi-spherical shell fixed in water with bidirectional curvatures were studied experimentally. Various marine structures have been devised as relay station for life spaces or submarine resource excavation. As compared with land structures, marine structures are constantly under a severe condition subjected to hydrostatic pressure, and requires advanced technologies. The experimental result, numerical computation result by analytical code DASOR (Dynamic Analysis of Shell of Revolution) and theoretical analysis result were compared with each other. FEM and BEM were used in DASOR computation for the axisymmetric thin semi-spherical shell and circumferential liquid, respectively. Due to an added mass effect, the natural frequency decreased with an increase in water level regardless of mode orders. However, the water level over the top of the semi-spherical shell caused the nearly constant natural frequencies of 30-40% of that in the air. The computation result by DASOR well agreed with the experimental result demonstrating its validity. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Plate shell structures of glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne

    to their curved shape. A plate shell structure maintains a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, while facilitating the use of plane structural elements. The study focuses on using laminated glass panes for the load bearing facets. Various methods of generating a plate shell geometry are suggested. Together with Ghent......, such as facet size, imperfections, and connection characteristics. The critical load is compared to that of a similar, but smoothly curved, shell structure. Based on the investigations throughout the study, a set of guidelines for the structural design of plate shells of glass is proposed....

  9. Temporal structures in shell models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, F.

    2001-01-01

    The intermittent dynamics of the turbulent Gledzer, Ohkitani, and Yamada shell-model is completely characterized by a single type of burstlike structure, which moves through the shells like a front. This temporal structure is described by the dynamics of the instantaneous configuration of the shell...

  10. On-demand oil-water separation via low-voltage wettability switching of core-shell structures on copper substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Chun Haow; Zahiri, Beniamin; Sow, Pradeep Kumar; Mérida, Walter

    2018-06-01

    A copper mesh with dendritic copper-oxide core-shell structure is prepared using an additive-free electrochemical deposition strategy for on-demand oil-water separation. Electrochemical manipulation of the oxidation state of the copper oxide shell phase results in opposite affinities towards water and oil. The copper mesh can be tuned to manifest both superhydrophobic and superoleophilic properties to enable oil-removal. Conversely, switching to superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic allows water-removal. These changes correspond to the application of small reduction voltages (air drying. In the oil-removal mode, heavy oil selectively passes through the mesh while water is retained; in water-removal mode, the mesh allows water to permeate but blocks light oil. The smart membrane achieved separation efficiencies higher than 98% for a series of oil-water mixtures. The separation efficiency remains high with less than 5% variation after 30 cycles of oil-water separation in both modes. The switchable wetting mechanism is demonstrated with the aid of microstructural and electrochemical analysis and based on the well-known Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel theories. The selective removal of water or oil from the oil-water mixtures is driven solely by gravity and yields high efficiency and recyclability. The potential applications for the relevant technologies include oil spills cleanup, fuel purification, and wastewater treatment.

  11. Palladium nanoparticles encapsulated in core-shell silica: A structured hydrogenation catalyst with enhanced activity for reduction of oxyanion water pollutants

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yin; Liu, Jinyong; Wang, Peng; Werth, Charles; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have been applied to mediate catalytic removal of toxic oxyanions and halogenated hydrocarbons in contaminated water using H2 as a clean and sustainable reductant. However, activity loss by nanoparticle aggregation and difficulty of nanoparticle recovery are two major challenges to widespread technology adoption. Herein, we report the synthesis of a core-shell-structured catalyst with encapsulated Pd nanoparticles and its enhanced catalytic activity in reduction of bromate (BrO3-), a regulated carcinogenic oxyanion produced during drinking water disinfection process, using 1 atm H2 at room temperature. The catalyst material consists of a nonporous silica core decorated with preformed octahedral Pd nanoparticles that were further encapsulated within an ordered mesoporous silica shell (i.e., SiO2@Pd@mSiO2). Well-defined mesopores (2.3 nm) provide a physical barrier to prevent Pd nanoparticle (6 nm) movement, aggregation, and detachment from the support into water. Compared to freely suspended Pd nanoparticles and SiO2@Pd, encapsulation in the mesoporous silica shell significantly enhanced Pd catalytic activity (by a factor of 10) under circumneutral pH conditions that are most relevant to water purification applications. Mechanistic investigation of material surface properties combined with Langmuir-Hinshelwood modeling of kinetic data suggest that mesoporous silica shell enhances activity by promoting BrO3- adsorption near the Pd active sites. The dual function of the mesoporous shell, enhancing Pd catalyst activity and preventing aggregation of active nanoparticles, suggests a promising general strategy of using metal nanoparticle catalysts for water purification and related aqueous-phase applications.

  12. Palladium nanoparticles encapsulated in core-shell silica: A structured hydrogenation catalyst with enhanced activity for reduction of oxyanion water pollutants

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yin

    2014-10-03

    Noble metal nanoparticles have been applied to mediate catalytic removal of toxic oxyanions and halogenated hydrocarbons in contaminated water using H2 as a clean and sustainable reductant. However, activity loss by nanoparticle aggregation and difficulty of nanoparticle recovery are two major challenges to widespread technology adoption. Herein, we report the synthesis of a core-shell-structured catalyst with encapsulated Pd nanoparticles and its enhanced catalytic activity in reduction of bromate (BrO3-), a regulated carcinogenic oxyanion produced during drinking water disinfection process, using 1 atm H2 at room temperature. The catalyst material consists of a nonporous silica core decorated with preformed octahedral Pd nanoparticles that were further encapsulated within an ordered mesoporous silica shell (i.e., SiO2@Pd@mSiO2). Well-defined mesopores (2.3 nm) provide a physical barrier to prevent Pd nanoparticle (6 nm) movement, aggregation, and detachment from the support into water. Compared to freely suspended Pd nanoparticles and SiO2@Pd, encapsulation in the mesoporous silica shell significantly enhanced Pd catalytic activity (by a factor of 10) under circumneutral pH conditions that are most relevant to water purification applications. Mechanistic investigation of material surface properties combined with Langmuir-Hinshelwood modeling of kinetic data suggest that mesoporous silica shell enhances activity by promoting BrO3- adsorption near the Pd active sites. The dual function of the mesoporous shell, enhancing Pd catalyst activity and preventing aggregation of active nanoparticles, suggests a promising general strategy of using metal nanoparticle catalysts for water purification and related aqueous-phase applications.

  13. Explosion-Induced Implosions of Cylindrical Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, C. M.; Duncan, J. H.

    2010-11-01

    An experimental study of the explosion-induced implosion of cylindrical shell structures in a high-pressure water environment was performed. The shell structures are filled with air at atmospheric pressure and are placed in a large water-filled pressure vessel. The vessel is then pressurized to various levels P∞=αPc, where Pc is the natural implosion pressure of the model and α is a factor that ranges from 0.1 to 0.9. An explosive is then set off at various standoff distances, d, from the model center line, where d varies from R to 10R and R is the maximum radius of the explosion bubble. High-speed photography (27,000 fps) was used to observe the explosion and resulting shell structure implosion. High-frequency underwater blast sensors recorded dynamic pressure waves at 6 positions. The cylindrical models were made from aluminum (diameter D = 39.1 mm, wall thickness t = 0.89 mm, length L = 240 mm) and brass (D = 16.7 mm, t = 0.36 mm, L=152 mm) tubes. The pressure records are interpreted in light of the high-speed movies. It is found that the implosion is induced by two mechanisms: the shockwave generated by the explosion and the jet formed during the explosion-bubble collapse. Whether an implosion is caused by the shockwave or the jet depends on the maximum bubble diameter and the standoff distance.

  14. Shock wave focusing in water inside convergent structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Experiments on shock focusing in water-filled convergent structures have been performed. A shock wave in water is generated by means of a projectile, launched from a gas gun, which impacts a water-filled convergent structure. Two types of structures have been tested; a bulk material and a thin shell structure. The geometric shape of the convergent structures is given by a logarithmic spiral, and this particular shape is chosen because it maximizes the amount of energy reaching the focal region. High-speed schlieren photography is used to visualize the shock dynamics during the focusing event. Results show that the fluid-structure interaction between the thin shell structure and the shock wave in the water is different from that of a bulk structure; multiple reflections of the shock wave inside the thin shell are reflected back into the water, thus creating a wave train, which is not observed for shock focusing in a bulk material.

  15. Reduction of the radiating sound of a submerged finite cylindrical shell structure by active vibration control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-02-06

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water.

  16. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Bok Choi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water.

  17. Modeling plate shell structures using pyFormex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne; Verhegghe, Benedict; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2009-01-01

    A shell structure made of glass combines a light-weight structural concept with glass’ high permeability to light. If the geometry of the structure is plane-based facetted (plate shell structure), the glass elements will be plane panes, and these glass panes will comprise the primary load...... (plate shells and triangulated lattice shells) may not differ in complexity regarding the topology, but when it comes to the practical generation of the geometry, e.g. in CAD, the plate shell is far more troublesome to handle than the triangulated geometry. The free software tool “pyFormex”, developed...

  18. Water Dynamics in Protein Hydration Shells: The Molecular Origins of the Dynamical Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra. PMID:24479585

  19. Synthesis of novel core-shell structured dual-mesoporous silica nanospheres and their application for enhancing the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chao, E-mail: wuchao27@126.com [Department of Pharmaceutics, Liaoning Medical University, 40 Songpo Road, Linghe District, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province 121001 (China); Sun, Xiaohu [Management Center for Experiments, Bohai University, 19 Keji Road, Songshan District, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province 121000 (China); Zhao, Zongzhe; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Liu, Ying [Department of Pharmaceutics, Liaoning Medical University, 40 Songpo Road, Linghe District, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province 121001 (China); Gao, Yu, E-mail: gaoyu_1116@163.com [Department of Medical Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, 40 Songpo Road, Linghe District, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province 121001 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Novel core-shell dual-mesoporous silica nanospheres (DMSS) with a tunable pore size were synthesized successfully using a styrene monomer as a channel template for the core and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as a channel template for the shell in order to improve the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs. Simvastatin was used as a model drug and loaded into DMSS and the mesoporous core without the shell (MSC) by the solvent evaporation method. The drug loading efficiency of DMSS and MSC were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV). Characterization, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that simvastatin adsorbed in DMSS and MSC was in an amorphous state, and in vitro release test results demonstrated that both DMSS and MSC increased the water solubility and dissolution rate of simvastatin. The shell structure of DMSS was able to regulate the release of simvastatin compared with MSC. It is worth noting that DMSS has significant potential as a carrier for improving the dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs and reducing the rapid release. - Highlights: • A novel core-shell DMSS is prepared for improving the dissolution rate of simvastatin. • The diffusional resistance of the mesoporous shell can delay and regulate drug release. • Simvastatin absorbed in DMSS exists in amorphous form due to spatial confinement.

  20. Synthesis of novel core-shell structured dual-mesoporous silica nanospheres and their application for enhancing the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chao; Sun, Xiaohu; Zhao, Zongzhe; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Liu, Ying; Gao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Novel core-shell dual-mesoporous silica nanospheres (DMSS) with a tunable pore size were synthesized successfully using a styrene monomer as a channel template for the core and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as a channel template for the shell in order to improve the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs. Simvastatin was used as a model drug and loaded into DMSS and the mesoporous core without the shell (MSC) by the solvent evaporation method. The drug loading efficiency of DMSS and MSC were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV). Characterization, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that simvastatin adsorbed in DMSS and MSC was in an amorphous state, and in vitro release test results demonstrated that both DMSS and MSC increased the water solubility and dissolution rate of simvastatin. The shell structure of DMSS was able to regulate the release of simvastatin compared with MSC. It is worth noting that DMSS has significant potential as a carrier for improving the dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs and reducing the rapid release. - Highlights: • A novel core-shell DMSS is prepared for improving the dissolution rate of simvastatin. • The diffusional resistance of the mesoporous shell can delay and regulate drug release. • Simvastatin absorbed in DMSS exists in amorphous form due to spatial confinement

  1. Preparation of porous carbon particle with shell/core structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous carbon particles with a shell/core structure have been prepared successfully by controlled precipitation of the polymer from droplets of oil-in-water emulsion, followed by curing and carbonization. The droplets of the oil phase are composed of phenolic resin (PFR, a good solvent (ethyl acetate and porogen (Poly(methyl methacrylate, PMMA. The microstructure was characterized in detail by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, nitrogen adsorption, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA. The obtained carbon particles have a capsular structure with a microporous carbon shell and a mesoporous carbon core. The BET surface area and porous volume are calculated to be 499 m2g-1 and 0.56 cm3g-1, respectively. The effects of the amount of porogen (PMMA, co-solvent (acetone and surfactant on the resultant structure were studied in detail.

  2. Semiclassical shell structure in rotating Fermi systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magner, A. G.; Sitdikov, A. S.; Khamzin, A. A.; Bartel, J.

    2010-01-01

    The collective moment of inertia is derived analytically within the cranking model for any rotational frequency of the harmonic-oscillator potential well and at a finite temperature. Semiclassical shell-structure components of the collective moment of inertia are obtained for any potential by using the periodic-orbit theory. We found semiclassically their relation to the free-energy shell corrections through the shell-structure components of the rigid-body moment of inertia of the statistically equilibrium rotation in terms of short periodic orbits. The shell effects in the moment of inertia exponentially disappear with increasing temperature. For the case of the harmonic-oscillator potential, one observes a perfect agreement of the semiclassical and quantum shell-structure components of the free energy and the moment of inertia for several critical bifurcation deformations and several temperatures.

  3. Shell model in-water frequencies of the core barrel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, K.; De Santo, D.F.

    1980-01-01

    Natural frequencies of a 1/24th-scale core barrel/vessel model in air and in water are measured by determining frequency responses to applied forces. The measured data are analyzed by the use of the one-dimensional fluid-structure computer code, MULTIFLEX, developed to calculate the hydraulic force. The fluid-structure interaction in the downcomer annulus is computed with a one-dimensional network model formed to be equivalent to two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction. The structural model incorporated in MULTIFLEX is substantially simpler than that necessary for structural analyses. Proposed for computation of structural dynamics is the projector method than can deal with the beam mode by modal analysis and the other shell modes by a direct integration method. Computed in-air and in-water frequencies agree fairly well with the experimental data, verifying the above MULTIFLEX technique

  4. Bifunctional Au@TiO_2 core–shell nanoparticle films for clean water generation by photocatalysis and solar evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jian; He, Yurong; Wang, Li; Huang, Yimin; Jiang, Baocheng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Au@TiO_2 core-shell nanoparticles were prepared in this study. • Bifunctional films for photocatalysis and solar evaporation were designed. • The evaporation and photodegradation with core-shell structures were investigated. - Abstract: With water scarcity becoming an increasingly critical issue for modern society, solar seawater desalination represents a promising approach to mitigating water shortage. In addition, solar seawater desalination shows great potential for mitigating the energy crisis due to its high photo-thermal conversion efficiency. However, the increasing contamination of seawater makes it difficult to generate clean water through simple desalination processes. In this work, clean water is generated by a newly designed bifunctional Au@TiO_2 core-shell nanoparticle film with a high photo-thermal conversion efficiency that is capable of photocatalysis and solar evaporation for seawater desalination. Bifunctional films of Au@TiO_2 core-shell nanoparticles with good stability were prepared. It was found that the formation of the core-shell structures played a key role in promoting the photo-thermal conversion efficiency and the evaporation of seawater, while the photocatalytic function demonstrated herein could contribute to the purification of polluted seawater. Furthermore, the film structure can serve to concentrate the NPs for the photo-reaction, as well as heat for water evaporation, improving both the photo-reaction efficiency and photo-thermal conversion efficiency. This efficient approach to solar seawater desalination, which combines evaporation with the photodegradation of pollutants, could help to address the dual issues of water scarcity and water pollution.

  5. Semiclassical shell structure and nuclear double-humped fission barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Magner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We derived the semiclassical trace formulas for the level density as sums over periodic-orbit families and isolated orbits within the improved stationary phase method. Averaged level-density shell corrections and shell-structure energies are continuous through all symmetry-breaking (bifurcation points with the correct asymptotics of the standard stationary phase approach accounting for continuous symmetries. We found enhancement of the nuclear shell structure near bifurcations in the superdeformed region. Our semiclassical results for the averaged level densities with the gross-shell and more thin-shell structures and the energy shell corrections for critical deformations are in good agreement with the quantum calculations for several single-particle Hamiltonians, in particular for the potentials with a sharp spheroidal shape. Enhancement of the shell structure owing to bifurcations of the shortest 3-dimensional orbits from equatorial orbits is responsible for the second well of fission barrier in a superdeformation region.

  6. Controlling interface characteristics by adjusting core-shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, H.Y.; Cheng, S.Y.; Sheu, C.I.

    2004-01-01

    Most grain boundary layer ceramics comprise semiconductive/conductive grains and insulated grain boundaries. Such a structure can be theoretically regarded as a shell (grain boundary layer) surrounds a core (conductive or semiconductive grain). The core-shell structure of titanium (Ti)-strontium titanate (ST) is composed of three zones - ST, non-stoichiometric strontium-titanium oxide and Ti, in order from shell to core. It was successfully prepared using a hydrothermal method. The Ti-ST core-shell structure was sintered in a reducing atmosphere and then annealed in air to achieve the metal-insulator-metal structure (MIM structure). The resulting MIM structure, annealed in air, changes with the oxygen stoichiometry of the ST shell (insulator layer) at various temperatures, which is thus used to tune its electrical characteristics. The characteristics exhibit nonlinear behavior. Accordingly, the thickness of the insulator layer can be adjusted in various annealing atmospheres and at various temperatures to develop various interfacial devices, such as varistors, capacitors and thermistors, without the use of complex donor/acceptor doping technology

  7. Micromagnetic studies of three-dimensional pyramidal shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knittel, A; Franchin, M; Fischbacher, T; Fangohr, H; Nasirpouri, F; Bending, S J

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic numerical analysis of the magnetic properties of pyramidal-shaped core-shell structures in a size range below 400 nm. These are three-dimensional structures consisting of a ferromagnetic shell which is grown on top of a non-magnetic core. The standard micromagnetic model without the magnetocrystalline anisotropy term is used to describe the properties of the shell. We vary the thickness of the shell between the limiting cases of an ultra-thin shell and a conventional pyramid and delineate different stable magnetic configurations. We find different kinds of single-domain states, which predominantly occur at smaller system sizes. In analogy to equivalent states in thin square films we term these onion, flower, C and S states. At larger system sizes, we also observe two types of vortex states, which we refer to as symmetric and asymmetric vortex states. For a classification of the observed states, we derive a phase diagram that specifies the magnetic ground state as a function of structure size and shell thickness. The transitions between different ground states can be understood qualitatively. We address the issue of metastability by investigating the stability of all occurring configurations for different shell thicknesses. For selected geometries and directions hysteresis measurements are analysed and discussed. We observe that the magnetic behaviour changes distinctively in the limit of ultra-thin shells. The study has been motivated by the recent progress made in the growth of faceted core-shell structures.

  8. Sound-structure interaction analysis of an infinite-long cylindrical shell submerged in a quarter water domain and subject to a line-distributed harmonic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenjie; Li, Tianyun; Zhu, Xiang; Miao, Yuyue

    2018-05-01

    The sound-structure coupling problem of a cylindrical shell submerged in a quarter water domain is studied. A semi-analytical method based on the double wave reflection method and the Graf's addition theorem is proposed to solve the vibration and acoustic radiation of an infinite cylindrical shell excited by an axially uniform harmonic line force, in which the acoustic boundary conditions consist of a free surface and a vertical rigid surface. The influences of the complex acoustic boundary conditions on the vibration and acoustic radiation of the cylindrical shell are discussed. It is found that the complex acoustic boundary has crucial influence on the vibration of the cylindrical shell when the cylindrical shell approaches the boundary, and the influence tends to vanish when the distances between the cylindrical shell and the boundaries exceed certain values. However, the influence of the complex acoustic boundary on the far-field sound pressure of the cylindrical shell cannot be ignored. The far-field acoustic directivity of the cylindrical shell varies with the distances between the cylindrical shell and the boundaries, besides the driving frequency. The work provides more understanding on the vibration and acoustic radiation behaviors of cylindrical shells with complex acoustic boundary conditions.

  9. Creep buckling of shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Hagihara, Seiya

    2015-01-01

    The present article contains a review of the literatures on the creep buckling of shell structures published from late 1950's to recent years. In this article, the creep buckling studies on circular cylindrical shells, spherical shells, partial cylindrical shells and other shells are reviewed in addition to creep buckling criteria. Creep buckling is categorized into two types. One is the creep buckling due to quasi-static instability, in which the critical time for creep buckling is determined by tracing a creep deformation versus time curve. The other is the creep buckling due to kinetic instability, in which the critical time can be determined by examining the shape of total potential energy in the vicinity of a quasi-static equilibrium state. Bifurcation buckling and snap-through buckling during creep deformation belong to this type of creep buckling. A few detailed descriptions are given to the bifurcation and snap-through type of creep buckling based on the present authors' works. (author)

  10. Direct Interferometric Imaging with IOTA Interferometer: Morphology of the Water Shell around U Ori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluzhnik, Eugene; Ragland, S.; Le Coroller, H.; Cotton, W.; Danchi, W.; Traub, W.; Willson, L.

    2007-12-01

    Optical interferometric observations of Mira stars with adequate resolution using the 3-telescope Infrared Optical Telescope Array (IOTA) interferometer have shown detectable asymmetry in several Mira stars. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observed asymmetry. In this paper, we present subsequent IOTA observations of a Mira star, namely, U Ori taken at 1.51, 1.64 and 1.78 μm in 2005. The reconstructed images based on a model independent algorithm are also presented. These images show asymmetric structures of the water shell that is similar to the structure of 22 GHz masers obtained by Vlemmings et al. in 2003. We explore the possibility of the detection of molecular shell rotation with a period of about 30 years by comparing our results with radio observations and discuss a possible geometric structure of the shell.

  11. Process to make core-shell structured nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhrs, Claudia; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N

    2014-01-07

    Disclosed is a process for making a composite material that contains core-shell structured nanoparticles. The process includes providing a precursor in the form of a powder a liquid and/or a vapor of a liquid that contains a core material and a shell material, and suspending the precursor in an aerosol gas to produce an aerosol containing the precursor. In addition, the process includes providing a plasma that has a hot zone and passing the aerosol through the hot zone of the plasma. As the aerosol passes through the hot zone of the plasma, at least part of the core material and at least part of the shell material in the aerosol is vaporized. Vapor that contains the core material and the shell material that has been vaporized is removed from the hot zone of the plasma and allowed to condense into core-shell structured nanoparticles.

  12. Supercooling suppression of microencapsulated phase change materials by optimizing shell composition and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Fangyu; Yang, Bao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new method for supercooling suppression of microPCMs by optimizing the structure of the microcapsule shell. • Large effective latent heat (up to 213 J/g) of the microPCMs, much higher than those using additive as nucleating agents. • Change of shell composition and structure significantly affects the phase transition processes of the encapsulated PCMs. • The latent heat of the shell-induced phase transition is maximized, reaching 83.7% of the latent heat of bulk octadecane. • Hollow spheres with porous rather than solid resin shell are also formed when the SDS concentration is very high. - Abstract: A new method for supercooling suppression of microencapsulated phase change materials (PCMs) has been developed by optimizing the composition and structure of the microcapsule resin shell. The microcapsules comprising paraffin octadecane encapsulated in melamine–formaldehyde resin shell were synthesized with the use the oil-in-water emulsion technique. These PCM microcapsules are 5–15 μm in diameter. The supercooling of these octadecane microcapsules can be as large as 13.6 °C, when the homogeneous nucleation is dominant during the melt crystallization into the thermodynamically stable triclinic phase. It is discovered that the homogeneous nucleation can be mediated by shell-induced nucleation of the triclinic phase and the metastable rotator phase when the shell composition and structure are optimized, without need of any nucleating additives. The effects of synthesis parameters, such as ratio of melamine to formaldehyde, pH of pre-polymer, and pH of emulsion, on the phase transition properties of the octadecane microcapsules have been investigated systemically. The optimum synthesis conditions have been identified in terms of minimizing the supercooling while maintaining heat capacity. Potential applications of this type of phase changeable microcapsules include high heat capacity thermal fluids, thermal management in smart buildings

  13. Amplitude structure of off-shell processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.; Goldstein, G.R.; Moravcsik, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The structure of M matrices, or scattering amplitudes, and of potentials for off-shell processes is discussed with the objective of determining how one can obtain information on off-shell amplitudes of a process in terms of the physical observables of a larger process in which the first process is embedded. The procedure found is inevitably model dependent, but within a particular model for embedding, a determination of the physically measurable amplitudes of the larger process is able to yield a determination of the off-shell amplitudes of the embedded process

  14. Radar attenuation in Europa's ice shell: Obstacles and opportunities for constraining the shell thickness and its thermal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalousová, Klára; Schroeder, Dustin M.; Soderlund, Krista M.

    2017-03-01

    Young surface and possible recent endogenic activity make Europa one of the most exciting solar system bodies and a primary target for spacecraft exploration. Future Europa missions are expected to carry ice-penetrating radar instruments designed to investigate its subsurface thermophysical structure. Several authors have addressed the radar sounders' performance at icy moons, often ignoring the complex structure of a realistic ice shell. Here we explore the variation in two-way radar attenuation for a variety of potential thermal structures of Europa's shell (determined by reference viscosity, activation energy, tidal heating, surface temperature, and shell thickness) as well as for low and high loss temperature-dependent attenuation model. We found that (i) for all investigated ice shell thicknesses (5-30 km), the radar sounder will penetrate between 15% and 100% of the total thickness, (ii) the maximum penetration depth varies laterally, with deepest penetration possible through cold downwellings, (iii) direct ocean detection might be possible for shells of up to 15 km thick if the signal travels through cold downwelling ice or the shell is conductive, (iv) even if the ice/ocean interface is not directly detected, penetration through most of the shell could constrain the deep shell structure through returns from deep non-ocean interfaces or the loss of signal itself, and (v) for all plausible ice shells, the two-way attenuation to the eutectic point is ≲30 dB which shows a robust potential for longitudinal investigation of the ice shell's shallow thermophysical structure.

  15. Efficient tungsten oxide/bismuth oxyiodide core/shell photoanode for photoelectrochemical water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haipeng; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Zhifeng

    2017-11-01

    The novel WO3 nanorods (NRs)/BiOI core/shell structure composite is used as an efficient photoanode applied in photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting for the first time. It is synthesized via facile hydrothermal method and, successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) process. This facile synthesis route can achieve uniform WO3/BiOI core/shell composite nanostructures and obtain varied BiOI morphologies simultaneously. The WO3 NRs/BiOI-20 composite exhibits enhanced PEC activity compared to pristine WO3 with a photocurrent density of 0.79 mA cm-2 measured at 0.8 V vs. RHE under AM 1.5G. This excellent performance benefits from the broader absorption spectrum and suppressed electron-hole recombination. This novel core/shell composite may provide insight in developing more efficient solar driven photoelectrodes.

  16. Structural Acoustic Physics Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-19

    NUWC-NPT Technical Report 12,236 19 September 2017 Structural Acoustic Physics -Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells Rachel E. Hesse...SUBTITLE Structural Acoustic Physics -Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...study was to use physics -based modeling (PBM) to investigate wave propagations through curved shells that are subjected to acoustic excitation. An

  17. Snap-Through Buckling Problem of Spherical Shell Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumirin Sumirin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of a numerical study on the nonlinear behavior of shells undergoing snap-through instability. This research investigates the problem of snap-through buckling of spherical shells applying nonlinear finite element analysis utilizing ANSYS Program. The shell structure was modeled by axisymmetric thin shell of finite elements. Shells undergoing snap-through buckling meet with significant geometric change of their physical configuration, i.e. enduring large deflections during their deformation process. Therefore snap-through buckling of shells basically is a nonlinear problem. Nonlinear numerical operations need to be applied in their analysis. The problem was solved by a scheme of incremental iterative procedures applying Newton-Raphson method in combination with the known line search as well as the arc- length methods. The effects of thickness and depth variation of the shell is taken care of by considering their geometrical parameter l. The results of this study reveal that spherical shell structures subjected to pressure loading experience snap-through instability for values of l≥2.15. A form of ‘turn-back’ of the load-displacement curve took place at load levels prior to the achievement of the critical point. This phenomenon was observed for values of l=5.0 to l=7.0.

  18. Preparation of TiC/W core–shell structured powders by one-step activation and chemical reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Xiao-Yu; Luo, Lai-Ma; Huang, Li-Mei; Luo, Guang-Nan; Zhu, Xiao-Yong; Cheng, Ji-Gui; Wu, Yu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel wet chemical method was used to prepare TiC/W core–shell structure powders. • TiC nanoparticles were well-encapsulated by W shells. • TiC phase was present in the interior of tungsten grains. - Abstract: In the present study, one-step activation and chemical reduction process as a novel wet-chemical route was performed for the preparation of TiC/W core–shell structured ultra-fine powders. The XRD, FE-SEM, TEM and EDS results demonstrated that the as-synthesized powders are of high purity and uniform with a diameter of approximately 500 nm. It is also found that the TiC nanoparticles were well-encapsulated by W shells. Such a unique process suggests a new method for preparing X/W (X refers the water-insoluble nanoparticles) core–shell nanoparticles with different cores

  19. Structural shell analysis understanding and application

    CERN Document Server

    Blaauwendraad, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The mathematical description of the properties of a shell is much more elaborate than those of beam and plate structures. Therefore many engineers and architects are unacquainted with aspects of shell behaviour and design, and are not familiar with sufficiently reliable shell theories for the different shell types as derived in the middle of the 20th century. Rather than contributing to theory development, this university textbook focuses on architectural and civil engineering schools. Of course, practising professionals will profit from it as well. The book deals with thin elastic shells, in particular with cylindrical, conical and spherical types, and with elliptic and hyperbolic paraboloids. The focus is on roofs, chimneys, pressure vessels and storage tanks. Special attention is paid to edge bending disturbance zones, which is indispensable knowledge in FE meshing. A substantial part of the book results from research efforts in the mid 20th century at Delft University of Technology. As such, it is a valua...

  20. Radar attenuation in Europa's ice shell: obstacles and opportunities for constraining shell thickness and thermal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalousova, Klara; Schroeder, Dustin M.; Soderlund, Krista M.; Sotin, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    With its strikingly young surface and possibly recent endogenic activity, Europa is one of the most exciting bodies within our Solar System and a primary target for spacecraft exploration. Future missions to Europa are expected to carry ice penetrating radar instruments which are powerful tools to investigate the subsurface thermophysical structure of its ice shell.Several authors have addressed the 'penetration depth' of radar sounders at icy moons, however, the concept and calculation of a single value penetration depth is a potentially misleading simplification since it ignores the thermal and attenuation structure complexity of a realistic ice shell. Here we move beyond the concept of a single penetration depth by exploring the variation in two-way radar attenuation for a variety of potential thermal structures of Europa's ice shell as well as for a low loss and high loss temperature-dependent attenuation model. The possibility to detect brines is also investigated.Our results indicate that: (i) for all ice shell thicknesses investigated (5-30 km), a nominal satellite-borne radar sounder will penetrate between 15% and 100% of the total thickness, (ii) the maximum penetration depth strongly varies laterally with the deepest penetration possible through the cold downwellings, (iii) the direct detection of the ice/ocean interface might be possible for shells of up to 15 km if the radar signal travels through the cold downwelling, (iv) even if the ice/ocean interface is not detected, the penetration through most of the shell could constrain the deep shell structure through the loss of signal, and (v) for all plausible ice shells the two-way attenuation to the eutectic point is ≤30 dB which shows a robust potential for longitudinal investigation of the ice shell's shallow structure.Part of this work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. K.K. acknowledges support by the Grant Agency of the

  1. Optical and structural investigation of ZnO@ZnS core–shell nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, Efracio Mamani; Raubach, Cristiane W.; Gouvea, Rogério [CCAF, Instituto de Física e Matemática (IFM), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Capão do Leão PO Box 354, CEP: 96010970, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Longo, Elson [INCTMN-UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, P.O. Box 355, Araraquara 14801-907, SP (Brazil); Cava, Sergio [CCAF, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnológico, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Rua Félix da Cunha 809, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Moreira, Mário L., E-mail: mlucio3001@gmail.com [CCAF, Instituto de Física e Matemática (IFM), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Capão do Leão PO Box 354, CEP: 96010970, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2016-04-15

    In the present work, are reported the experimental study of ZnO@ZnS core–shell synthesised by a microwave-assisted solvothermal (MAS) method. Some synthesis parameters such as, time, precursor concentration and temperature were fixed. In order to investigate the effect of growing shell on the structural and optical properties, the samples were grown with two different solvent (water or ethylene glycol). The characterizations were performed by X-ray diffraction, absorption spectroscopy in the UV–vis range, scanning electron microscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The results show that both ZnO and ZnS diffractions are present for all samples, however the crystallinity degree of ZnS shell are too low. The better decorations of ZnS (shell) on the ZnO (core) are obtained for ethylene glycol (EG) solvent, which is verified through FE-SEM images of ZnO@ZnS (EG). On the other hand, non morphological solvent dependence was observed for ZnO multi-wires. Also the luminescent emission for decorated system in water were more intense and leads to form a type-II band alignment for ZnO@ZnS core–shell system. - Highlights: • Obtation of ZnO@ZnS decorated systens using different solvents by MAS methodology. • Growth solvent dependence of hexagonal and cubic phases for ZnS. • Potential application of ZnO@ZnS decorated nanostructures as replacement material for solar cells. • Control over band alignment between ZnO and ZnS.

  2. Preparation and characterization of water-soluble ZnSe:Cu/ZnS core/shell quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei; Cao, Lixin, E-mail: caolixin@ouc.edu.cn; Su, Ge; Liu, Wei; Xia, Chenghui; Zhou, Huajian

    2013-09-01

    The synthesis and luminescent properties of water-soluble ZnSe:Cu/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) with different shell thickness are reported in this paper. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) studies present that the ZnSe:Cu/ZnS core/shell QDs with different shell thickness have a cubic zinc-blende structure. The tests of transmission electron microscope (TEM) pictures exhibit that the QDs obtained are spherical-shaped particles and the average grain size increased from 2.7 to 3.8 nm with the growth of ZnS shell. The emission peak position of QDs has a small redshift from 461 to 475 nm with the growth of ZnS shell within the blue spectral window. The photoluminescence (PL) emission intensity and stability of the ZnSe:Cu core d-dots are both enhanced by coating ZnS shell on the surface of core d-dots. The largest PL intensity of the core/shell QDs is almost 3 times larger than that of Cu doped ZnSe quantum dots (ZnSe:Cu d-dots). The redshift of core/shell QDs compared with the core QDs are observed in both the absorption and the photoluminescence excitation spectra.

  3. Effect of supercritical water shell on cavitation bubble dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Wei-Hang; Chen Wei-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Based on reported experimental data, a new model for single cavitation bubble dynamics is proposed considering a supercritical water (SCW) shell surrounding the bubble. Theoretical investigations show that the SCW shell apparently slows down the oscillation of the bubble and cools the gas temperature inside the collapsing bubble. Furthermore, the model is simplified to a Rayleigh–Plesset-like equation for a thin SCW shell. The dependence of the bubble dynamics on the thickness and density of the SCW shell is studied. The results show the bubble dynamics depends on the thickness but is insensitive to the density of the SCW shell. The thicker the SCW shell is, the smaller are the wall velocity and the gas temperature in the bubble. In the authors’ opinion, the SCW shell works as a buffering agent. In collapsing, it is compressed to absorb a good deal of the work transformed into the bubble internal energy during bubble collapse so that it weakens the bubble oscillations. (paper)

  4. Electromagnetic and structural interaction analysis of curved shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, T.; Niho, T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a finite element formulation of the eddy current and structure coupled problem for curved shell structures. Coupling terms produced by curved geometry as well as flat plate geometry were obtained. Both matrix equations for eddy current and structure were solved simultaneously using coupling sub-matrices. TEAM Workshop bench mark problem 16 was solved to verify the formulation and the computer code. Agreement with experimental results was very good for such plate problem. A coupled problem for cylindrical shell structure was also analyzed. Influence of each coupling term was examined. The next topic is the eigenvalues of the coupled equations. Although the coupled matrix equations are not symmetric, symmetry was obtained by introducing a symmetrizing variable. The eigenvalues of the coupled matrix equations are different from those obtained from the uncoupled equations because of the influence of the coupling sub-matrix components. Some parameters obtained by the eigenvalue analysis have characteristics of parameters which indicate the intensity of electromagnetic structural coupling effect. (author)

  5. Overview of Hanford Single Shell Tank (SST) Structural Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rast, Richard S.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.

    2013-11-14

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project (SSTIP) in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration, Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford Single-Shell Tanks. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS. The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford Single-Shell Tanks has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analysis of the remaining Hanford Single-Shell Tanks is scheduled for FY2014. Hanford Single-Shell Tanks are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of

  6. Overview of Hanford Single Shell Tank (SST) Structural Integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rast, Richard S.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project (SSTIP) in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration, Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford Single-Shell Tanks. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS. The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford Single-Shell Tanks has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analysis of the remaining Hanford Single-Shell Tanks is scheduled for FY2014. Hanford Single-Shell Tanks are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of

  7. UHPFRC in large span shell structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maten, R.N.; Grunewald, S.; Walraven, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-High Performance Fibre-Reinforced Concrete (UHPFRC) is an innovative concrete type with a high compressive strength and a far more durable character compared to conventional concrete. UHPFRC can be applied in structures with aesthetic appearance and high material efficiency. Shell structures

  8. Structural and magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bojesen, A.; Timmermann, L.

    2002-01-01

    We present studies of the structural and magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles. alpha-Fe nanoparticles were fabricated by sputtering and subsequently covered with a protective nanocrystalline oxide shell consisting of either maghaemite (gamma-Fe2O3) or partially oxidized...... magnetite (Fe3O4). We observed that the nanoparticles were stable against further oxidation, and Mossbauer spectroscopy at high applied magnetic fields and low temperatures revealed a stable form of partly oxidized magnetite. The nanocrystalline structure of the oxide shell results in strong canting...... of the spin structure in the oxide shell, which thereby modifies the magnetic properties of the core-shell nanoparticles....

  9. Modified ferrite core-shell nanoparticles magneto-structural characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klekotka, Urszula; Piotrowska, Beata; Satuła, Dariusz; Kalska-Szostko, Beata

    2018-06-01

    In this study, ferrite nanoparticles with core-shell structures and different chemical compositions of both the core and shell were prepared with success. Proposed nanoparticles have in the first and second series magnetite core, and the shell is composed of a mixture of ferrites with Fe3+, Fe2+ and M ions (where M = Co2+, Mn2+ or Ni2+) with a general composition of M0.5Fe2.5O4. In the third series, the composition is inverted, the core is composed of a mixture of ferrites and as a shell magnetite is placed. Morphology and structural characterization of nanoparticles were done using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Infrared spectroscopy (IR). While room temperature magnetic properties were measured using Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS). It is seen from Mössbauer measurements that Co always increases hyperfine magnetic field on Fe atoms at RT, while Ni and Mn have opposite influences in comparison to pure Fe ferrite, regardless of the nanoparticles structure.

  10. Structure of exotic nuclei by large-scale shell model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuno, Yutaka; Otsuka, Takaharu; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Honma, Michio

    2006-01-01

    An extensive large-scale shell-model study is conducted for unstable nuclei around N = 20 and N = 28, aiming to investigate how the shell structure evolves from stable to unstable nuclei and affects the nuclear structure. The structure around N = 20 including the disappearance of the magic number is reproduced systematically, exemplified in the systematics of the electromagnetic moments in the Na isotope chain. As a key ingredient dominating the structure/shell evolution in the exotic nuclei from a general viewpoint, we pay attention to the tensor force. Including a proper strength of the tensor force in the effective interaction, we successfully reproduce the proton shell evolution ranging from N = 20 to 28 without any arbitrary modifications in the interaction and predict the ground state of 42Si to contain a large deformed component

  11. Insolubilization of Chestnut Shell Pigment for Cu(II Adsorption from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-Yu Yao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chestnut shell pigment (CSP is melanin from an agricultural waste. It has potential as an adsorbent for wastewater treatment but cannot be used in its original state because of its solubility in water. We developed a new method to convert CSP to insolubilized chestnut shell pigment (ICSP by heating, and the Cu(II adsorption performance of ICSP was evaluated. The conversion was characterized, and the thermal treatment caused dehydration and loss of carboxyl groups and aliphatic structures in CSP. The kinetic adsorption behavior obeyed the pseudo-second-order rate law, and the equilibrium adsorption data were well described with both the Langmuir and the Freundlich isotherms. ICSP can be used as a renewable, readily-available, easily-producible, environmentally-friendly, inexpensive and effective adsorbent to remove heavy-metal from aquatic environments.

  12. Structural and energetic properties of La3+ in water/DMSO mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Maria; Spezia, Riccardo; Bodo, Enrico

    2017-11-01

    By using molecular dynamics based on a custom polarizable force field, we have studied the solvation of La3+ in an equimolar mixture of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) with water. An extended structural analysis has been performed to provide a complete picture of the physical properties at the basis of the interaction of La3+ with both solvents. Through our simulations we found that, very likely, the first solvation shell in the mixture is not unlike the one found in pure water or pure DMSO and contains 9 solvent molecules. We have also found that the solvation is preferentially due to DMSO molecules with the water initially present in first shell quickly leaving to the bulk. The dehydration process of the first shell has been analyzed by both plain MD simulations and a constrained dynamics approach; the free energy profiles for the extraction of water from first shell have also been computed.

  13. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation from water under visible light using core/shell nano-catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Shih, K; Li, X Y

    2010-01-01

    A microemulsion technique was employed to synthesize nano-sized photocatalysts with a core (CdS)/shell (ZnS) structure. The primary particles of the photocatalysts were around 10 nm, and the mean size of the catalyst clusters in water was about 100 nm. The band gaps of the catalysts ranged from 2.25 to 2.46 eV. The experiments of photocatalytic H(2) generation showed that the catalysts (CdS)(x)/(ZnS)(1-x) with x ranging from 0.1 to 1 were able to produce hydrogen from water photolysis under visible light. The catalyst with x=0.9 had the highest rate of hydrogen production. The catalyst loading density also influenced the photo-hydrogen production rate, and the best catalyst concentration in water was 1 g L(-1). The stability of the nano-catalysts in terms of size, morphology and activity was satisfactory during an extended test period for a specific hydrogen production rate of 2.38 mmol g(-1) L(-1) h(-1) and a quantum yield of 16.1% under visible light (165 W Xe lamp, lambda>420 nm). The results demonstrate that the (CdS)/(ZnS) core/shell nano-particles are a novel photo-catalyst for renewable hydrogen generation from water under visible light. This is attributable to the large band-gap ZnS shell that separates the electron/hole pairs generated by the CdS core and hence reduces their recombinations.

  14. Rotating shell eggs immersed in hot water for the purpose of pasteurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasteurization of shell eggs for inactivation of Salmonella using hot water immersion can be used to improve their safety. The rotation of a shell egg immersed in hot water has previously been simulated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD); however, experimental data to verify the results do not ex...

  15. Structural qualification of the multifunctional instrument tree for installation in double-shell and 100-series single-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohlow, J.P.

    1995-12-01

    This document provides the technical basis and methodology for qualifying the multifunctional instrument tree (MIT) structure for installation in double-shell and 100-series single-shell tanks. Structural qualification for MIT installations in specific tanks are also contained in this document

  16. Role of shell structure in the 2νββ nuclear matrix elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, H.

    1998-01-01

    Significance of the nuclear shell structure in the ββ nuclear matrix elements is pointed out. The 2νββ processes are mainly mediated by the low-lying 1 + states. The shell structure also gives rise to concentration or fragmentation of the 2νββ components over intermediate states, depending on nuclide. These roles of the shell structure are numerically confirmed by realistic shell model calculations. Some shell structure effects are suggested for 0νββ matrix elements; dominance of low-lying intermediate states and nucleus-dependence of their spin-parities. (orig.)

  17. Semiclassical shell structure of moments of inertia in deformed Fermi systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magner, A.G.; Gzhebinsky, A.M.; Sitdikov, A.S.; Khamzin, A.A.; Bartel, J.

    2010-01-01

    The collective moment of inertia is derived analytically within the cranking model in the adiabatic mean-field approximation at finite temperature. Using the nonperturbative periodic-orbit theory the semiclassical shell-structure components of the collective moment of inertia are obtained for any potential well. Their relation to the free-energy shell corrections are found semiclassically as being given through the shell-structure components of the rigid-body moment of inertia of the statistically equilibrium rotation in terms of short periodic orbits. Shell effects in the moment of inertia disappear exponentially with increasing temperature. For the case of the harmonic-oscillator potential one observes a perfect agreement between semiclassical and quantum shell-structure components of the free energy and the moment of inertia for several critical bifurcation deformations and several temperatures. (author)

  18. Pressure Shell Approach to Integrated Environmental Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2011-01-01

    The next generation of exploration mission human systems will require environmental protection such as radiation protection that is effective and efficient. In order to continue human exploration, habitat systems will require special shells to protect astronauts from hostile environments. The Pressure Shell Approach to integrated environmental (radiation) protection is a multi-layer shell that can be used for multifunctional environmental protection. Self-healing, self-repairing nano technologies and sensors are incorporated into the shell. This shell consists of multiple layers that can be tailored for specific environmental protection needs. Mainly, this innovation focuses on protecting crew from exposure to micrometeorites, thermal, solar flares, and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) radiation. The Pressure Shell Approach consists of a micrometeoroid and secondary ejecta protection layer; a thin, composite shell placed in between two layers that is non-structural; an open cavity layer that can be filled with water, regolith, or polyethylene foam; a thicker composite shell that is a structural load bearing that is placed between two layers; and a bladder coating on the interior composite shell. This multi-layer shell creates an effective radiation protection system. Most of its layers can be designed with the materials necessary for specific environments. In situ materials such as water or regolith can be added to the shell design for supplemental radiation protection.

  19. ECO-TECHNIQUE OF SEWER RENOVATION USING COMPOSITE SHELLS: STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Attaf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An eco-technical renovation of the sewage system is developed in this paper; this technique involves incorporating into the existing sewer a series of jointed prefabricated sandwich or composite shells. The purpose of his study is to determine the structural shell deflection, the high displacement areas and to validate the non-failure criterion for each ply constituting the inner and outer laminate facings. The numerical results were obtained at low cost by using the finite element method. Studies have focused on structural analysis of a typical shell unit with an ovoid form (egg-shaped section when it is subjected, during annular space filling operation, to pressure forces generated by wet concrete. To ensure the safety of the composite shell structure, Tsai-Hill criterion function is applied and results are presented for the most stressed plies

  20. Compressive strength, flexural strength and water absorption of concrete containing palm oil kernel shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Nurazuwa Md; Xiang-ONG, Jun; Noh, Hamidun Mohd; Hamid, Noor Azlina Abdul; Kuzaiman, Salsabila; Ali, Adiwijaya

    2017-11-01

    Effect of inclusion of palm oil kernel shell (PKS) and palm oil fibre (POF) in concrete was investigated on the compressive strength and flexural strength. In addition, investigation of palm oil kernel shell on concrete water absorption was also conducted. Total of 48 concrete cubes and 24 concrete prisms with the size of 100mm × 100mm × 100mm and 100mm × 100mm × 500mm were prepared, respectively. Four (4) series of concrete mix consists of coarse aggregate was replaced by 0%, 25%, 50% and 75% palm kernel shell and each series were divided into two (2) main group. The first group is without POF, while the second group was mixed with the 5cm length of 0.25% of the POF volume fraction. All specimen were tested after 7 and 28 days of water curing for a compression test, and flexural test at 28 days of curing period. Water absorption test was conducted on concrete cube age 28 days. The results showed that the replacement of PKS achieves lower compressive and flexural strength in comparison with conventional concrete. However, the 25% replacement of PKS concrete showed acceptable compressive strength which within the range of requirement for structural concrete. Meanwhile, the POF which should act as matrix reinforcement showed no enhancement in flexural strength due to the balling effect in concrete. As expected, water absorption was increasing with the increasing of PKS in the concrete cause by the porous characteristics of PKS

  1. What explains the structure of Enceladus's ice shell and can it be in equilibrium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, D.; Mittal, T.

    2017-12-01

    Over the course of the Cassini mission, a series of geodetic measurements [1-3] have revealed that Enceladus's ongoing south polar eruptions are likely sourced from a global subsurface liquid water ocean [2-6]. The extent of the ocean and the structure of the overlying ice shell are of particular importance as they speak to the nature of the eruptions and the thermal state and evolution of Enceladus. How quickly is Enceladus cooling? Is the ocean a recent, perhaps transient phenomenon, or has it been present for billions of years? Based on shape, gravity, and libration observations, the floating ice shell is inferred to be thickest at the equator, where it is perhaps 35-45 km thick at the sub- and anti-Saturnian points, and thinnest at the poles, especially beneath the broad topographic depression associated with the South Polar Terrain (SPT), where the shell is likely less—perhaps much less—than 10 km thick [6,7]. Although tidal heating is assumed to be the mechanism primarily responsible for the observed shell structure, and whereas several theoretical studies have been carried out [e.g., 8], a clear match between theory and observations has yet to be demonstrated. Likewise, the question of whether or not the current configuration can be in equilibrium, remains open. Here we model the effects of tidal heating on Enceladus's ice shell, showing that the expected equilibrium ice shell structure is largely consistent with the structure inferred from shape, gravity, and libration observations. We consider the nature of the north-south polar asymmetry in shell structure and geologic activity, and we address the question of whether or not the current structure can be maintained in spite of ongoing relaxation. In light of our results, we discuss implications for the heat budget and thermal evolution of Enceladus. [1] P. Thomas et al., Icarus 190 (2), 573-584, Oct. 2007. [2] L. Iess et al., Science 344 (6179), 78-80, 2014. [3] P. C. Thomas et al., Icarus 264, 37

  2. Core@shell@shell structured carbon-based magnetic ternary nanohybrids: Synthesis and their enhanced microwave absorption properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Erqi; Qi, Xiaosi; Xie, Ren; Bai, Zhongchen; Jiang, Yang; Qin, Shuijie; Zhong, Wei; Du, Youwei

    2018-05-01

    High encapsulation efficiency of core@shell@shell structured carbon-based magnetic ternary nanohybrids have been synthesized in high yield by chemical vapor deposition of acetylene directly over octahedral-shaped Fe2O3 nanoparticles. By controlling the pyrolysis temperature, Fe3O4@Fe3C@carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and Fe@Fe3C@CNTs ternary nanohybrids could be selectively produced. The optimal RL values for the as-prepared ternary nanohybrids could reach up to ca. -46.7, -52.7 and -29.5 dB, respectively. The excellent microwave absorption properties of the obtaiend ternary nanohybrids were proved to ascribe to the quarter-wavelength matching model. Moreover, the as-prepared Fe@Fe3C@CNTs ternary nanohybrids displayed remarkably enhanced EM wave absorption capabilities compared to Fe3O4@Fe3C@CNTs due to their excellent dielectric loss abilities, good complementarities between the dielectric loss and the magnetic loss, and high attenuation constant. Generally, this strategy can be extended to explore other categories of core@shell or core@shell@shell structured carbon-based nanohybrids, which is very beneficial to accelerate the advancements of high performance MAMs.

  3. Magnetic monopole interactions: shell structure of meson and baryon states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, D.

    1986-01-01

    It is suggested that a low-mass magnetic monopole of Dirac charge g = (137/2)e may be interacting with a c-quark's magnetic dipole moment to produce Zeeman splitting of meson states. The mass M 0 = 2397 MeV of the monopole is in contrast to the 10 16 -GeV monopoles of grand unification theories (GUT). It is shown that shell structure of energy E/sub n/ = M 0 + 1/4nM 0 ... exists for meson states. The presence of symmetric meson states leads to the identification of the shell structure. The possible existence of the 2397-MeV magnetic monopole is shown to quantize quark masses in agreement with calculations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). From the shell structure of meson states, the existence of two new mesons is predicted: eta(1814 +/- 50 MeV) with I/sup G/(J/sup PC/) = 0 + (0 -+ ) and eta/sub c/ (3907 +/- 100 MeV) with J/sup PC/ = 0 -+ . The presence of shell structure for baryon states is shown

  4. Preparation of core-shell structured CaCO3 microspheres as rapid and recyclable adsorbent for anionic dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mengen; Chen, Zhenhua; Lv, Xinyan; Zhou, Kang; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Xiaohan; Ren, Xiuli; Mei, Xifan

    2017-09-01

    Core-shell structured CaCO3 microspheres (MSs) were prepared by a facile, one-pot method at room temperature. The adsorbent dosage and adsorption time of the obtained CaCO3 MSs were investigated. The results suggest that these CaCO3 MSs can rapidly and efficiently remove 99-100% of anionic dyes within the first 2 min. The obtained CaCO3 MSs have a high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area (211.77 m2 g-1). In addition, the maximum adsorption capacity of the obtained CaCO3 MSs towards Congo red was 99.6 mg g-1. We also found that the core-shell structured CaCO3 MSs have a high recycling capability for removing dyes from water. Our results demonstrate that the prepared core-shell structured CaCO3 MSs can be used as an ideal, rapid, efficient and recyclable adsorbent to remove dyes from aqueous solution.

  5. Nonlinear thermo-optical properties of two-layered spherical system of gold nanoparticle core and water vapor shell during initial stage of shell expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astafyeva Liudmila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nonlinear thermo-optical properties of two-layered spherical system of gold nanoparticle core and water vapor shell, created under laser heating of nanoparticle in water, were theoretically investigated. Vapor shell expansion leads to decreasing up to one to two orders of magnitude in comparison with initial values of scattering and extinction of the radiation with wavelengths 532 and 633 nm by system while shell radius is increased up to value of about two radii of nanoparticle. Subsequent increasing of shell radius more than two radii of nanoparticle leads to rise of scattering and extinction properties of system over initial values. The significant decrease of radiation scattering and extinction by system of nanoparticle-vapor shell can be used for experimental detection of the energy threshold of vapor shell formation and investigation of the first stages of its expansion. PACS: 42.62.BE. 78.67. BF

  6. Broadband absorption and enhanced photothermal conversion property of octopod-like Ag@Ag2S core@shell structures with gradually varying shell thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qian; Zeng, Wenxia; Zhang, Canying; Meng, Zhaoguo; Wu, Jiawei; Zhu, Qunzhi; Wu, Daxiong; Zhu, Haitao

    2017-12-19

    Photothermal conversion materials have promising applications in many fields and therefore they have attracted tremendous attention. However, the multi-functionalization of a single nanostructure to meet the requirements of multiple photothermal applications is still a challenge. The difficulty is that most nanostructures have specific absoprtion band and are not flexible to different demands. In the current work, we reported the synthesis and multi-band photothermal conversion of Ag@Ag 2 S core@shell structures with gradually varying shell thickness. We synthesized the core@shell structures through the sulfidation of Ag nanocubes by taking the advantage of their spatially different reactivity. The resulting core@shell structures show an octopod-like mopgorlogy with a Ag 2 S bulge sitting at each corner of the Ag nanocubes. The thickness of the Ag 2 S shell gradually increases from the central surface towards the corners of the structure. The synthesized core@shell structures show a broad band absorption spectrum from 300 to 1100 nm. Enhanced photothermal conversion effect is observed under the illuminations of 635, 808, and 1064 nm lasers. The results indicate that the octopod-like Ag@Ag 2 S core@shell structures have characteristics of multi-band photothermal conversion. The current work might provide a guidance for the design and synthesis of multifunctional photothermal conversion materials.

  7. Nickel oxide/polypyrrole/silver nanocomposites with core/shell/shell structure: Synthesis, characterization and their electrochemical behaviour with antimicrobial activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Dhaneswar; Nath, Bikash C. [Department of Chemical Sciences, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India); Phukon, Pinkee [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India); Saikia, Bhaskar J.; Kamrupi, Isha R. [Department of Chemical Sciences, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India); Dolui, Swapan K., E-mail: dolui@tezu.ernet.in [Department of Chemical Sciences, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India)

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic and conducting Nickel oxide–polypyrrole (NiO/PPy) nanoparticles with core–shell structure were prepared in the presence of Nickel oxide (NiO) in aqueous solution containing sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS) as a surfactant as well as dopant. A stable dispersion of silver (Ag) nanoparticles was synthesized by chemical (citrate reduction) method. NiO/PPy nanocomposites were added to the Ag colloid under stirring. Ag nanoparticles could be electrostatically attracted on the surface of NiO/PPy nanocomposites, leading to formation of NiO/PPy/Ag nanocomposites with core/shell/shell structure. The morphology, structure, particle size and composition of the products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and current–voltage (I–V) analysis. The resultant nanocomposites have the good conductivity and excellent electrochemical and catalytic properties of PPy and Ag nanoparticles. Furthermore, the nanocomposites showed excellent antibacterial behaviour due to the presence of Ag nanoparticles in the composite. The thermal stability of NiO–PPy as well as NiO/PPy/Ag nanocomposites was higher than that of pristine PPy. Studies of IR spectra suggest that the increased thermal stability may be due to interactions between NiO and Ag nanoparticles with the PPy backbone. - Highlights: • NiO nanoparticles were synthesized by two step soft chemical synthesis route. • Ag nanoparticles were prepared by using citrate reduction method. • NiO/PPy nanocomposites are synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerization process. • NiO/PPy/Ag nanocomposites can be used in the water purification technology.

  8. Nickel oxide/polypyrrole/silver nanocomposites with core/shell/shell structure: Synthesis, characterization and their electrochemical behaviour with antimicrobial activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Dhaneswar; Nath, Bikash C.; Phukon, Pinkee; Saikia, Bhaskar J.; Kamrupi, Isha R.; Dolui, Swapan K.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic and conducting Nickel oxide–polypyrrole (NiO/PPy) nanoparticles with core–shell structure were prepared in the presence of Nickel oxide (NiO) in aqueous solution containing sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS) as a surfactant as well as dopant. A stable dispersion of silver (Ag) nanoparticles was synthesized by chemical (citrate reduction) method. NiO/PPy nanocomposites were added to the Ag colloid under stirring. Ag nanoparticles could be electrostatically attracted on the surface of NiO/PPy nanocomposites, leading to formation of NiO/PPy/Ag nanocomposites with core/shell/shell structure. The morphology, structure, particle size and composition of the products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and current–voltage (I–V) analysis. The resultant nanocomposites have the good conductivity and excellent electrochemical and catalytic properties of PPy and Ag nanoparticles. Furthermore, the nanocomposites showed excellent antibacterial behaviour due to the presence of Ag nanoparticles in the composite. The thermal stability of NiO–PPy as well as NiO/PPy/Ag nanocomposites was higher than that of pristine PPy. Studies of IR spectra suggest that the increased thermal stability may be due to interactions between NiO and Ag nanoparticles with the PPy backbone. - Highlights: • NiO nanoparticles were synthesized by two step soft chemical synthesis route. • Ag nanoparticles were prepared by using citrate reduction method. • NiO/PPy nanocomposites are synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerization process. • NiO/PPy/Ag nanocomposites can be used in the water purification technology

  9. Investigation of stresses in facetted glass shell structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne; Jönsson, Jeppe; Wester, Ture

    2007-01-01

    by in-plane forces in the facets and the transfer of distributed in-plane forces across the joints. It is described how these facets work structurally, specifically how bending moments develop and cause possible stress concentrations in the corners, which are subjected to uplift. Apart from local...... bending moments from distributed load, other types of bending moments are likely to occur, especially if the shell has areas of low stiffness, for example along a free edge. A facetted shell structure has been modelled in a finite element program, and the resulting stresses are presented and discussed....

  10. Super-paramagnetic core-shell material with tunable magnetic behavior by regulating electron transfer efficiency and structure stability of the shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Zhang

    Full Text Available In this work, a spherical nano core-shell material was constructed by encapsulating Fe3O4 microsphere into conductive polymer-metal composite shell. The Fe3O4 microspheres were fabricated by assembling large amounts of Fe3O4 nano-crystals, which endowed the microspheres with super-paramagnetic property and high saturation magnetization. The polymer-metal composite shell was constructed by inserting Pt nano-particles (NPs into the conductive polymer polypyrrole (PPy. As size and dispersion of the Pt NPs has an important influence on their surface area and surface energy, it was effective to enlarge the interface area between PPy and Pt NPs, enhance the electron transfer efficiency of PPy/Pt composite shell, and reinforced the shell’s structural stability just by tuning the size and dispersion of Pt NPs. Moreover, core-shell structure of the materials made it convenient to investigate the PPy/Pt shell’s shielding effect on the Fe3O4 core’s magnetic response to external magnetic fields. It was found that the saturation magnetization of Fe3O4/PPy/Pt core-shell material could be reduced by 20.5% by regulating the conductivity of the PPy/Pt shell. Keywords: Super-paramagnetic, Conductivity, Magnetic shielding, Structural stability

  11. Enhanced Performance of Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting with ITO@α-Fe2O3 Core-Shell Nanowire Array as Photoanode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Bao, Chunxiong; Yu, Tao; Hu, Yingfei; Luo, Wenjun; Zhu, Weidong; Fu, Gao; Li, Zhaosheng; Gao, Hao; Li, Faming; Zou, Zhigang

    2015-12-09

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) is one of the most promising candidates for photoelectrodes in photoelectrochemical water splitting system. However, the low visible light absorption coefficient and short hole diffusion length of pure α-Fe2O3 limits the performance of α-Fe2O3 photoelectrodes in water splitting. Herein, to overcome these drawbacks, single-crystalline tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanowire core and α-Fe2O3 nanocrystal shell (ITO@α-Fe2O3) electrodes were fabricated by covering the chemical vapor deposited ITO nanowire array with compact thin α-Fe2O3 nanocrystal film using chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The J-V curves and IPCE of ITO@α-Fe2O3 core-shell nanowire array electrode showed nearly twice as high performance as those of the α-Fe2O3 on planar Pt-coated silicon wafers (Pt/Si) and on planar ITO substrates, which was considered to be attributed to more efficient hole collection and more loading of α-Fe2O3 nanocrystals in the core-shell structure than planar structure. Electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) characterization demonstrated a low interface resistance between α-Fe2O3 and ITO nanowire arrays, which benefits from the well contact between the core and shell. The stability test indicated that the prepared ITO@α-Fe2O3 core-shell nanowire array electrode was stable under AM1.5 illumination during the test period of 40,000 s.

  12. Core-Shell Structured Electro- and Magneto-Responsive Materials: Fabrication and Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung Jin Choi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Core-shell structured electrorheological (ER and magnetorheological (MR particles have attracted increasing interest owing to their outstanding field-responsive properties, including morphology, chemical and dispersion stability, and rheological characteristics of shear stress and yield stress. This study covers recent progress in the preparation of core-shell structured materials as well as their critical characteristics and advantages. Broad emphasises from the synthetic strategy of various core-shell particles to their feature behaviours in the magnetic and electric fields have been elaborated.

  13. Topology optimization of 3D shell structures with porous infill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Andreassen, Erik; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D topology optimization approach for designing shell structures with a porous or void interior. It is shown that the resulting structures are significantly more robust towards load perturbations than completely solid structures optimized under the same conditions. The study...... indicates that the potential benefit of using porous structures is higher for lower total volume fractions. Compared to earlier work dealing with 2D topology optimization, we found several new effects in 3D problems. Most notably, the opportunity for designing closed shells significantly improves...

  14. On buckling of double-shell-stiffened cylindrical steel structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.J.; Chiu, K.D.; Odar, E.

    1981-01-01

    Buckling analysis methods and acceptance criteria for single shells of various configurations are well documented and adequately covered by many codes. There are, however, no guidelines or criteria for large Double-Shell-Stiffened (DSS) structures, which have been used recently in nuclear power plant applications. The existing codes for buckling analysis cannot be directly utilized because of the uniqueness of structural configuration and complexity of loading. This paper discusses a method for determining the critical buckling loads for this type of structure under a multitude load and suggests buckling criteria for the design of DSS structures. The method commonly used to determine the critical buckling loads for a single shell with or without stiffeners applies reduction factors to the theoretical results. The capacity reduction factors, which are often obtained from experimental results, include plasticity corrections and account for the difference between actual and theoretical buckling loads resulting from the effects of imperfections and nonlinearities. The interaction formulas derived from experimental results can be used to compute the interaction effects of three stress components. This paper extends these concepts and discusses their applicability to a DSS cylindrical structure. (orig./HP)

  15. Shell model description of band structure in 48Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Velazquez, Victor M.

    2007-01-01

    The band structure for normal and abnormal parity bands in 48Cr are described using the m-scheme shell model. In addition to full fp-shell, two particles in the 1d3/2 orbital are allowed in order to describe intruder states. The interaction includes fp-, sd- and mixed matrix elements

  16. Methanol oxidation reaction on core-shell structured Ruthenium-Palladium nanoparticles: Relationship between structure and electrochemical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübler, Markus; Jurzinsky, Tilman; Ziegenbalg, Dirk; Cremers, Carsten

    2018-01-01

    In this work the relationship between structural composition and electrochemical characteristics of Palladium(Pd)-Ruthenium(Ru) nanoparticles during alkaline methanol oxidation reaction is investigated. The comparative study of a standard alloyed and a precisely Ru-core-Pd-shell structured catalyst allows for a distinct investigation of the electronic effect and the bifunctional mechanism. Core-shell catalysts benefit from a strong electronic effect and an efficient Pd utilization. It is found that core-shell nanoparticles are highly active towards methanol oxidation reaction for potentials ≥0.6 V, whereas alloyed catalysts show higher current outputs in the lower potential range. However, differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) experiments reveal that the methanol oxidation reaction on core-shell structured catalysts proceeds via the incomplete oxidation pathway yielding formaldehyde, formic acid or methyl formate. Contrary, the alloyed catalyst benefits from the Ru atoms at its surface. Those are found to be responsible for high methanol oxidation activity at lower potentials as well as for complete oxidation of CH3OH to CO2 via the bifunctional mechanism. Based on these findings a new Ru-core-Pd-shell-Ru-terrace catalyst was synthesized, which combines the advantages of the core-shell structure and the alloy. This novel catalyst shows high methanol electrooxidation activity as well as excellent selectivity for the complete oxidation pathway.

  17. Determination of Core-Shell Structures in Pd-Hg Nanoparticles by STEM-EDX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deiana, Davide; Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Malacrida, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The structural and elemental configuration of a high-performing Pd-Hg electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction to hydrogen peroxide has been studied by means of high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Pd-Hg nanoparticles are shown to have a crystalline core-shell structure, with a Pd...... core and a Pd-Hg ordered alloy shell. The ordered shell is responsible for the high oxygen reduction selectivity to H2O2....

  18. Elastic stability of cylindrical shells with soft elastic cores: Biomimicking natural tubular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Gebran Nizar

    1994-01-01

    Thin walled cylindrical shell structures are widespread in nature: examples include plant stems, porcupine quills, and hedgehog spines. All have an outer shell of almost fully dense material supported by a low density, cellular core. In nature, all are loaded in combination of axial compression and bending: failure is typically by buckling. Natural structures are often optimized. Here we have analyzed the elastic buckling of a thin cylindrical shell supported by an elastic core to show that this structural configuration achieves significant weight saving over a hollow cylinder. The results of the analysis are compared with data from an extensive experimental program on uniaxial compression and four point bending tests on silicone rubber shells with and without compliant foam cores. The analysis describes the results of the mechanical tests well. Characterization of the microstructures of several natural tubular structures with foamlike cores (plant stems, quills, and spines) revealed them to be close to the optimal configurations predicted by the analytical model. Biomimicking of natural cylindrical shell structures and evolutionary design processes may offer the potential to increase the mechanical efficiency of engineering cylindrical shells.

  19. Kinetic-energy density functional: Atoms and shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, P.; Alvarellos, J.E.; Chacon, E.

    1996-01-01

    We present a nonlocal kinetic-energy functional which includes an anisotropic average of the density through a symmetrization procedure. This functional allows a better description of the nonlocal effects of the electron system. The main consequence of the symmetrization is the appearance of a clear shell structure in the atomic density profiles, obtained after the minimization of the total energy. Although previous results with some of the nonlocal kinetic functionals have given incipient structures for heavy atoms, only our functional shows a clear shell structure for most of the atoms. The atomic total energies have a good agreement with the exact calculations. Discussion of the chemical potential and the first ionization potential in atoms is included. The functional is also extended to spin-polarized systems. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  20. Dynamic Hydrogen Production from Methanol/Water Photo-Splitting Using Core@Shell-Structured CuS@TiO2 Catalyst Wrapped by High Concentrated TiO2 Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghwan Im

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the dynamic hydrogen production ability of a core@shell-structured CuS@TiO2 photocatalyst coated with a high concentration of TiO2 particles. The rectangular-shaped CuS particles, 100 nm in length and 60 nm in width, were surrounded by a high concentration of anatase TiO2 particles (>4~5 mol. The synthesized core@shell-structured CuS@TiO2 particles absorbed a long wavelength (a short band gap above 700 nm compared to that pure TiO2, which at approximately 300 nm, leading to easier electronic transitions, even at low energy. Hydrogen evolution from methanol/water photo-splitting over the core@shell-structured CuS@TiO2 photocatalyst increased approximately 10-fold compared to that over pure CuS. In particular, 1.9 mmol of hydrogen gas was produced after 10 hours when 0.5 g of 1CuS@4TiO2 was used at pH = 7. This level of production was increased to more than 4-fold at higher pH. Cyclic voltammetry and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy confirmed that the CuS in CuS@TiO2 strongly withdraws the excited electrons from the valence band in TiO2 because of the higher reduction potential than TiO2, resulting in a slower recombination rate between the electrons and holes and higher photoactivity.

  1. Core-shell nanofibers of curcumin/cyclodextrin inclusion complex and polylactic acid: Enhanced water solubility and slow release of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytac, Zeynep; Uyar, Tamer

    2017-02-25

    Core-shell nanofibers were designed via electrospinning using inclusion complex (IC) of model hydrophobic drug (curcumin, CUR) with cyclodextrin (CD) in the core and polymer (polylactic acid, PLA) in the shell (cCUR/HPβCD-IC-sPLA-NF). CD-IC of CUR and HPβCD was formed at 1:2 molar ratio. The successful formation of core-shell nanofibers was revealed by TEM and CLSM images. cCUR/HPβCD-IC-sPLA-NF released CUR slowly but much more in total than PLA-CUR-NF at pH 1 and pH 7.4 due to the restriction of CUR in the core of nanofibers and solubility improvement shown in phase solubility diagram, respectively. Improved antioxidant activity of cCUR/HPβCD-IC-sPLA-NF in methanol:water (1:1) is related with the solubility enhancement achieved in water based system. The slow reaction of cCUR/HPβCD-IC-sPLA-NF in methanol is associated with the shell inhibiting the quick release of CUR. On the other hand, cCUR/HPβCD-IC-sPLA-NF exhibited slightly higher rate of antioxidant activity than PLA-CUR-NF in methanol:water (1:1) owing to the enhanced solubility. To conclude, slow release of CUR was achieved by core-shell nanofiber structure and inclusion complexation of CUR with HPβCD provides high solubility. Briefly, electrospinning of core-shell nanofibers with CD-IC core could offer slow release of drugs as well as solubility enhancement for hydrophobic drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of thin composite structures using an efficient hex-shell finite element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiri, Seddik [Universite Bordeaux, Pessac (France); Naceur, Hakim [Universite de valenciennes, Valenciennes (France)

    2013-12-15

    In this paper a general methodology for the modeling of material composite multilayered shell structures is proposed using a Hex-shell finite element modeling. The first part of the paper is devoted to the general FE formulation of the present composite 8-node Hex-shell element called SCH8, based only on displacement degrees of freedom. A particular attention is given to alleviate shear, trapezoidal and thickness locking, without resorting to the classical plane-stress assumption. The anisotropic material behavior of layered shells is modeled using a fully three dimensional elastic orthotropic material law in each layer, including the thickness stress component. Applications to laminate thick shell structures are studied to validate the methodology, and good results have been obtained in comparison with ABAQUS commercial code.

  3. Atomistic tight-binding computations of the structural and optical properties of CdTe/CdX (X=S and Se)/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukkabot, Worasak

    2018-05-01

    A study of CdTe/CdX (X=S and Se)/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals is carried out using atomistic tight-binding theory and the configuration interaction method to provide information for applications in bioimaging, biolabeling, display devices and near-infrared electronic instruments. The calculations yield the dependences of the internal and external passivated shells on the natural behaviours of CdTe/CdX (X=S and Se)/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals. The reduction of the optical band gaps is observed with increasing numbers of monolayers in the external ZnS shell due to quantum confinement. Interestingly, the optical band gaps of CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals are greater than those of CdTe/CdSe/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals. In the presence of an external ZnS-coated shell, electron-hole wave function overlaps, oscillation strengths, ground-state exchange energies and Stokes shift are improved, whereas ground-state coulomb energies and fine-structure splitting are reduced. The oscillation strengths, Stokes shift and fine-structure splitting are reduced with the increase in external ZnS shell thickness. The oscillation strengths, Stokes shift and fine-structure splitting of CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals are larger than those of CdTe/CdSe/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals. Reduction of the atomistic electron-hole interactions is observed with increasing external ZnS shell size. The strong electron-hole interactions are more probed in CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals than in CdTe/CdSe/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals.

  4. Material Distribution Optimization for the Shell Aircraft Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsov, S.; Zhilyaev, I.; Oganesyan, P.; Axenov, V.

    2016-09-01

    One of the main goal in aircraft structures designing isweight decreasing and stiffness increasing. Composite structures recently became popular in aircraft because of their mechanical properties and wide range of optimization possibilities.Weight distribution and lay-up are keys to creating lightweight stiff strictures. In this paperwe discuss optimization of specific structure that undergoes the non-uniform air pressure at the different flight conditions and reduce a level of noise caused by the airflowinduced vibrations at the constrained weight of the part. Initial model was created with CAD tool Siemens NX, finite element analysis and post processing were performed with COMSOL Multiphysicsr and MATLABr. Numerical solutions of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations supplemented by k-w turbulence model provide the spatial distributions of air pressure applied to the shell surface. At the formulation of optimization problem the global strain energy calculated within the optimized shell was assumed as the objective. Wall thickness has been changed using parametric approach by an initiation of auxiliary sphere with varied radius and coordinates of the center, which were the design variables. To avoid a local stress concentration, wall thickness increment was defined as smooth function on the shell surface dependent of auxiliary sphere position and size. Our study consists of multiple steps: CAD/CAE transformation of the model, determining wind pressure for different flow angles, optimizing wall thickness distribution for specific flow angles, designing a lay-up for optimal material distribution. The studied structure was improved in terms of maximum and average strain energy at the constrained expense ofweight growth. Developed methods and tools can be applied to wide range of shell-like structures made of multilayered quasi-isotropic laminates.

  5. Water-resistant, monodispersed and stably luminescent CsPbBr3/CsPb2Br5 core-shell-like structure lead halide perovskite nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Bo; Song, Pengjie; Cao, Jingyue; Zhao, Suling; Shen, Zhaohui; Gao, Di; Liang, Zhiqin; Xu, Zheng; Song, Dandan; Xu, Xurong

    2017-11-01

    Lead halide perovskite materials are thriving in optoelectronic applications due to their excellent properties, while their instability due to the fact that they are easily hydrolyzed is still a bottleneck for their potential application. In this work, water-resistant, monodispersed and stably luminescent cesium lead bromine perovskite nanocrystals coated with CsPb2Br5 were obtained using a modified non-stoichiometric solution-phase method. CsPb2Br5 2D layers were coated on the surface of CsPbBr3 nanocrystals and formed a core-shell-like structure in the synthetic processes. The stability of the luminescence of the CsPbBr3 nanocrystals in water and ethanol atmosphere was greatly enhanced by the photoluminescence-inactive CsPb2Br5 coating with a wide bandgap. The water-stable enhanced nanocrystals are suitable for long-term stable optoelectronic applications in the atmosphere.

  6. Preparation of water-soluble CdTe/CdS core/shell quantum dots with enhanced photostability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Hui; Zhang Lijuan; Soeller, Christian; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka

    2007-01-01

    CdTe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) have been synthesized in an aqueous phase using thioacetamide as a sulfur source. The quantum yield was greatly enhanced by the epitaxial growth of a CdS shell, which was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results. The quantum yield of as-prepared CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs without any post-preparative processing reached 58%. The experimental results illustrate that the QDs with core/shell structure show better photostability than thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe QDs. The cyclic voltammograms reveal higher oxidation potentials for CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs than for TGA-capped CdTe QDs, which explains the superior photostability of QDs with a core/shell structure. This enhanced photostability makes these QDs with core/shell structure more suitable for bio-labeling and imaging

  7. Conceptual Design Tool for Concrete Shell Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Malene Kirstine; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on conceptual tools for concrete shell structures when working within the span of performance-based design and computational morphogenesis. The designer, referred to as the Architect-Engineer, works through several iterations parallel with aesthetic, functional and technical re...

  8. Rapid Synthesis and Formation Mechanism of Core-Shell-Structured La-Doped SrTiO3 with a Nb-Doped Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Hee Park

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To provide a convenient and practical synthesis process for metal ion doping on the surface of nanoparticles in an assembled nanostructure, core-shell-structured La-doped SrTiO3 nanocubes with a Nb-doped surface layer were synthesized via a rapid synthesis combining a rapid sol-precipitation and hydrothermal process. The La-doped SrTiO3 nanocubes were formed at room temperature by a rapid dissolution of NaOH pellets during the rapid sol-precipitation process, and the Nb-doped surface (shell along with Nb-rich edges formed on the core nanocubes via the hydrothermal process. The formation mechanism of the core-shell-structured nanocubes and their shape evolution as a function of the Nb doping level were investigated. The synthesized core-shell-structured nanocubes could be arranged face-to-face on a SiO2/Si substrate by a slow evaporation process, and this nanostructured 10 μm thick thin film showed a smooth surface.

  9. Nano-structured silica coated mesoporous carbon micro-granules for potential application in water filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Avik; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.; Ghosh, A. K.

    2017-05-01

    A novel nano-composite spherical micro-granule has been synthesized using a facile technique of solvent evaporation induced assembly of nanoparticles for potential application in water filtration. The spherical micro-granule is comprised of nano-structured shell of hydrophilic silica encapsulating a hydrophobic mesoporous carbon at the core. Hierarchical structure of such core-shell micro-granules has been rigorously characterized using small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering techniques and complemented with scanning electron microscopy. The hydrophilic silica envelope around the carbon core helps in incorporation of such granules into the hydrophilic polymeric ultra-filtration membrane. The interstitial micro-pores present in the silica shell can serve as water transport channels and the mesoporus carbon core enhances the separation performance due its well adsorption characteristics. It has been found that the incorporation of such granules inside the ultra-filtration membrane indeed enhances the water permeability as well as the separation performance in a significant way.

  10. Coercivity enhancement in Ce-Fe-B based magnets by core-shell grain structuring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ito

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ce-based R2Fe14B (R= rare-earth nano-structured permanent magnets consisting of (Ce,Nd2Fe14B core-shell grains separated by a non-magnetic grain boundary phase, in which the relative amount of Nd to Ce is higher in the shell of the magnetic grain than in its core, were fabricated by Nd-Cu infiltration into (Ce,Nd2Fe14B hot-deformed magnets. The coercivity values of infiltrated core-shell structured magnets are superior to those of as-hot-deformed magnets with the same overall Nd content. This is attributed to the higher value of magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the shell phase in the core-shell structured infiltrated magnets compared to the homogeneous R2Fe14B grains of the as-hot-deformed magnets, and to magnetic isolation of R2Fe14B grains by the infiltrated grain boundary phase. First order reversal curve (FORC diagrams suggest that the higher anisotropy shell suppresses initial magnetization reversal at the edges and corners of the R2Fe14B grains.

  11. Dynamic model of open shell structures buried in poroelastic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordón, J. D. R.; Aznárez, J. J.; Maeso, O.

    2017-08-01

    This paper is concerned with a three-dimensional time harmonic model of open shell structures buried in poroelastic soils. It combines the dual boundary element method (DBEM) for treating the soil and shell finite elements for modelling the structure, leading to a simple and efficient representation of buried open shell structures. A new fully regularised hypersingular boundary integral equation (HBIE) has been developed to this aim, which is then used to build the pair of dual BIEs necessary to formulate the DBEM for Biot poroelasticity. The new regularised HBIE is validated against a problem with analytical solution. The model is used in a wave diffraction problem in order to show its effectiveness. It offers excellent agreement for length to thickness ratios greater than 10, and relatively coarse meshes. The model is also applied to the calculation of impedances of bucket foundations. It is found that all impedances except the torsional one depend considerably on hydraulic conductivity within the typical frequency range of interest of offshore wind turbines.

  12. Design, fabrication and test of a lightweight shell structure, phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported in the construction of lightweight orthogrid shells. Graphite/epoxy panels are being used in the fabrication. The shell structure is diagramed in detail. Panel laminates, and panel stiffener flanges are described while illustrations delineate panel assembly procedures.

  13. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Shell Valley Aquifer, Rolette County, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Shell Valley aquifer is the sole source of water for the city of Belcourt and the primary source of water for most of the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation. The Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians is concerned about the quantity and quality of water in the Shell Valley aquifer, which underlies about 56 square miles in central Rolette County and has an average saturated thickness of about 35 feet. Water levels across most of the Shell Valley aquifer fluctuate with variations in precipitation but generally are stable. Withdrawals from the north well field decreased slightly during 1976-95, but withdrawals from the south well field increased during 1983-95. Water levels in the south well field declined as withdrawals increased. The average decline during the last 8 years was about 1.75 feet per year. The water level has reached the well screen in at least one of the production wells. Most of the water in the aquifer is a bicarbonate type and has dissolved-solids concentrations ranging from 479 to 1,510 milligrams per liter. None of the samples analyzed had detectable concentrations of pesticides, but hydrocarbons were detected in both ground- and surfacewater samples. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were the most frequently detected hydrocarbons. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), and pentachlorophenol (PCP) also were detected.Generally, the Shell Valley aquifer is an adequate source of water for current needs, but evaluation of withdrawals in relation to a knowledge of aquifer hydrology would be important in quantifying sustainable water supplies. Water quality in the aquifer generally is good; the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians filters the water to reduce concentrations of dissolved constituents. Hydrocarbons, although present in the aquifer, have not been quantified and may not pose a general health risk. Further analysis of the quantity and distribution of the hydrocarbons would be useful

  14. Growth of InAs/InP core-shell nanowires with various pure crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorji Ghalamestani, Sepideh; Heurlin, Magnus; Wernersson, Lars-Erik; Lehmann, Sebastian; Dick, Kimberly A

    2012-07-20

    We have studied the epitaxial growth of an InP shell on various pure InAs core nanowire crystal structures by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. The InP shell is grown on wurtzite (WZ), zinc-blende (ZB), and {111}- and {110}-type faceted ZB twin-plane superlattice (TSL) structures by tuning the InP shell growth parameters and controlling the shell thickness. The growth results, particularly on the WZ nanowires, show that homogeneous InP shell growth is promoted at relatively high temperatures (∼500 °C), but that the InAs nanowires decompose under the applied conditions. In order to protect the InAs core nanowires from decomposition, a short protective InP segment is first grown axially at lower temperatures (420-460 °C), before commencing the radial growth at a higher temperature. Further studies revealed that the InP radial growth rate is significantly higher on the ZB and TSL nanowires compared to WZ counterparts, and shows a strong anisotropy in polar directions. As a result, thin shells were obtained during low temperature InP growth on ZB structures, while a higher temperature was used to obtain uniform thick shells. In addition, a schematic growth model is suggested to explain the basic processes occurring during the shell growth on the TSL crystal structures.

  15. Growth of InAs/InP core–shell nanowires with various pure crystal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorji Ghalamestani, Sepideh; Heurlin, Magnus; Lehmann, Sebastian; Dick, Kimberly A; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the epitaxial growth of an InP shell on various pure InAs core nanowire crystal structures by metal–organic vapor phase epitaxy. The InP shell is grown on wurtzite (WZ), zinc-blende (ZB), and {111}- and {110}-type faceted ZB twin-plane superlattice (TSL) structures by tuning the InP shell growth parameters and controlling the shell thickness. The growth results, particularly on the WZ nanowires, show that homogeneous InP shell growth is promoted at relatively high temperatures (∼500 °C), but that the InAs nanowires decompose under the applied conditions. In order to protect the InAs core nanowires from decomposition, a short protective InP segment is first grown axially at lower temperatures (420–460 °C), before commencing the radial growth at a higher temperature. Further studies revealed that the InP radial growth rate is significantly higher on the ZB and TSL nanowires compared to WZ counterparts, and shows a strong anisotropy in polar directions. As a result, thin shells were obtained during low temperature InP growth on ZB structures, while a higher temperature was used to obtain uniform thick shells. In addition, a schematic growth model is suggested to explain the basic processes occurring during the shell growth on the TSL crystal structures. (paper)

  16. Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles study by first principle: The structural, magnetic and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hai-Xia [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Xiao-Xu [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Computing Center, Beijing 100094 (China); Hu, Yao-Wen [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Song, Hong-Quan; Huo, Jin-Rong; Li, Lu [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Qian, Ping, E-mail: ustbqianp@163.com [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Song, Yu-Jun [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles of around 72 atoms have been investigated by the density functional theory, revealing proving for the first time that the core-shell structure exhibits a shrinkage phenomenon from outer shell in agreement with the other studies in literatures. Our calculations predict that the Ag@ZnO core-shell structure is a ferromagnetic spin polarized state, and the magnetism mainly stems from the spin splitting of 2p electrons of O atoms. In addition, the total and partial DOS of Ag@ZnO indicate that the nanostructure is a half-metallic nanoparticle and has the characters of the p-type semiconductor. Furthermore, the optical properties calculations show that the absorption edge of Ag@ZnO have a red shift and good photocatalysis compare to that of the bulk ZnO. These results of the Ag@ZnO core-shell structure obtain a well agreement with the experimental measurement. - Graphical abstract: Geometric structure of (a) Ag@ZnO core-shell nanostructure; (b) the core of Ag; (c) the shell of ZnO The core-shell nanoparticle Ag@ZnO contains Ag inner core of radius of 4 Å and ZnO outer shell with thickness of 2 Å. Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles of around 72 atoms have been proved for the first time that the core-shell structure exhibit a shrinkage phenomenon from outer shell. Our calculations predict that the Ag@ZnO core-shell structure is a half-metallic nanoparticle and has the characters of the p-type semiconductor. The absorption edge of Ag@ZnO have a red shift and get good photo-catalysis compare to that of the bulk ZnO.

  17. Structural responses to plasma disruptions in toroidal shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillack, M.S.; Kazimi, M.S.; Lidsky, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    The induced pressures, stresses and strains in unrestrained axisymmetric toroidal shells are studied to scope the behavior of tokamak first walls during plasma disruptions. The modeling includes a circuit analog representation of the shell to solve for induced currents and pressures, and a separate quasi-static 1-D finite element solution for the mechanical response. This work demonstrates that the stresses in tokamkak first walls due to plasma disruption may be large, but to first order will not cause failure in the bulk structure. However, stress concentrations at structural supports and discontinuities together with resonant effects can result in large enhancements of the stresses, which could contribute to plastic deformation or failure when added to the already large steady state thermal and pressure loading of the first wall

  18. Shell structure and orbit bifurcations in finite fermion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, A. G.; Yatsyshyn, I. S.; Arita, K.; Brack, M.

    2011-10-01

    We first give an overview of the shell-correction method which was developed by V.M. Strutinsky as a practicable and efficient approximation to the general self-consistent theory of finite fermion systems suggested by A.B. Migdal and collaborators. Then we present in more detail a semiclassical theory of shell effects, also developed by Strutinsky following original ideas of M.C. Gutzwiller. We emphasize, in particular, the influence of orbit bifurcations on shell structure. We first give a short overview of semiclassical trace formulae, which connect the shell oscillations of a quantum system with a sum over periodic orbits of the corresponding classical system, in what is usually called the "periodic orbit theory". We then present a case study in which the gross features of a typical double-humped nuclear fission barrier, including the effects of mass asymmetry, can be obtained in terms of the shortest periodic orbits of a cavity model with realistic deformations relevant for nuclear fission. Next we investigate shell structures in a spheroidal cavity model which is integrable and allows for far-going analytical computation. We show, in particular, how period-doubling bifurcations are closely connected to the existence of the so-called "superdeformed" energy minimum which corresponds to the fission isomer of actinide nuclei. Finally, we present a general class of radial power-law potentials which approximate well the shape of a Woods-Saxon potential in the bound region, give analytical trace formulae for it and discuss various limits (including the harmonic oscillator and the spherical box potentials).

  19. Structure of natural draft cooling towers, 1. Study on cooling tower shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishioka, H; Sakamoto, Y; Tsurusaki, M; Koshizawa, K; Chiba, T [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1976-09-01

    Recently in Japan, demands for cooling tower systems have been increasing remarkably with the construction of large power plants and the legislation of environmental regulations. In view of the severe natural conditions in Japan such as strong wind and seismic loadings, etc., the establishment of the optimum design and construction method is essential for the building of safe and economical towers. In order to establish a comprehensive plan of a power plant cooling system of the appropriate structural type, the authors have made researches and experiments on design conditions, static and dynamic analyses, and comparative studies of various structural types such as reinforced concrete thin-shell structures, steel framed structures and composite shell segment structures, based on the investigation results of towers in Europe and America. These results are presented in three reports, the 1st of which concerns cooling tower shells as are herein described.

  20. A novel shell-structure cell microcarrier (SSCM) for cell transplantation and bone regeneration medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kai; Gong, Yihong; Wang, Chunming; Wang, Dong-An

    2011-06-01

    The present study aims to develop a novel open and hollow shell-structure cell microcarrier (SSCM) to improve the anchorage-dependent cell (ADC) loading efficiency, increase the space for cell proliferation and tissue regeneration, and better propel its therapeutic effects. Gelatin particles were prepared with oil/water/oil (o/w/o) technique and modified by an adjustable surface crosslinking technique and subsequent release of uncrosslinked material. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were utilized to observe the morphologies of the microcarriers. Cell loading tests were performed to evaluate the biocompatibilities and effect on osteogenesis of SSCM. SSCMs were successfully fabricated via the surface technique. The shell-structure could allow the cell to attach and grow on both outer and inner surface of sphere and provide adequate space for cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion. The cell loading rate, proliferation rate and osteogenesis-related gene expressions on the SSCMs were higher than those on the spherical gelatin microcarriers. The outstanding performance of injectable SSCMs endowed with favorable micro-structure, desirable cytocompatibility and enhanced cell affinity makes them as a good choice as cell delivery vehicle for transplanting therapeutic cells towards the scope of tissue regeneration.

  1. Effect of sub- and supercritical water treatments on the physicochemical properties of crab shell chitin and its enzymatic degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Mitsumasa; Miura, Chika; Nakagawa, Yuko S; Kaihara, Mikio; Nikaido, Mitsuru; Totani, Kazuhide

    2015-12-10

    This study examined the effects of sub- and supercritical water pretreatments on the physicochemical properties of crab shell α-chitin and its enzymatic degradation to obtain N,N'-diacetylchitobiose (GlcNAc)2. Following sub- and supercritical water pretreatments, the protein in the crab shell was removed and the residue of crab shell contained α-chitin and CaCO3. Prolonged pretreatment led to α-chitin decomposition. The reaction of pure α-chitin in sub- and supercritical water pretreatments was investigated separately; we observed lower mean molecular weight and weaker hydrogen bonds compared with untreated α-chitin. (GlcNAc)2 yields from enzymatic degradation of subcritical (350 °C, 7 min) and supercritical water (400 °C, 2.5 min) pretreated crab shell were 8% and 6%, compared with 0% without any pretreatment. This study shows that sub- and supercritical water pretreatments of crab shell provide to an alternative method to the use of acid and base for decalcification and deproteinization of crab shell required for (GlcNAc)2 production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Coaxial nanofibers containing TiO2 in the shell for water treatment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizildag, N.; Geltmeyer, J.; Ucar, N.; De Buysser, K.; De Clerck, K.

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, the basic electrospinning setup has undergone many modifications carried out to enhance the quality and improve the functionality of the resulting nanofibers. Being one of these modifications, coaxial electrospinning has attracted great attention. It enables to use different materials in nanofiber production and produce multi-layered and functional nanofibers in one step. In this study, TiO2 has been added to the shell layer of coaxial nanofibers to develop functional nanofibers which may be used in water treatment applications. The coaxial nanofibers containing TiO2 in the shell layer are compared to uniaxial nanofibers containing TiO2 in bulk fiber structure, regarding their morphology and photocatalytic activity. Uniform uniaxial and coaxial nanofibers with TiO2 were obtained. The average nanofiber diameter of coaxial nanofibers were higher. Coaxial nanofibers, which contained lower amount of TiO2, displayed similar performance to uniaxial nanofibers with TiO2 in terms of photocatalytic degradation ability against isoproturon.

  3. The influence of MOVPE growth conditions on the shell of core-shell GaN microrod structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpke, Tilman; Avramescu, Adrian; Koller, Andreas; Fernando-Saavedra, Amalia; Hartmann, Jana; Ledig, Johannes; Waag, Andreas; Strassburg, Martin; Lugauer, Hans-Jürgen

    2017-05-01

    A core-shell geometry is employed for most next-generation, three-dimensional opto-electric devices based on III-V semiconductors and grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Controlling the shape of the shell layers is fundamental for device optimization, however no detailed analysis of the influence of growth conditions has been published to date. We study homogeneous arrays of gallium nitride core-shell microrods with height and diameter in the micrometer range and grown in a two-step selective area MOVPE process. Changes in shell shape and homogeneity effected by deliberately altered shell growth conditions were accurately assessed by digital analysis of high-resolution scanning electron microscope images. Most notably, two temperature regimes could be established, which show a significantly different behavior with regard to material distribution. Above 900 °C of wafer carrier temperature, the shell thickness along the growth axis of the rods was very homogeneous, however variations between vicinal rods increase. In contrast, below 830 °C the shell thickness is higher close to the microrod tip than at the base of the rods, while the lateral homogeneity between neighboring microrods is very uniform. This temperature effect could be either amplified or attenuated by changing the remaining growth parameters such as reactor pressure, structure distance, gallium precursor, carrier gas composition and dopant materials. Possible reasons for these findings are discussed with respect to GaN decomposition as well as the surface and gas phase diffusion of growth species, leading to an improved control of the functional layers in next-generation 3D V-III devices.

  4. Adsorption of copper to different biogenic oyster shell structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiong; Chen, Jie [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, New Campus, Minhou, Fujian Province 350108 (China); Clark, Malcolm [Marine Ecology Research Centre, School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, P.O. Box 157, Lismore, NSW 2480 (Australia); Yu, Yan, E-mail: yuyan_1972@126.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, New Campus, Minhou, Fujian Province 350108 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Adsorption of copper to waste oyster shell occurs rapidly at pH 5.5. • Copper adsorbs to the different structures of oyster shell at different rates. • The prismatic layer dominates copper sorption rather than the nacreous layer. • SEM analysis shows a porous open network structure to the prismatic layer. • Surface ζ-potentials establish electrostatic attraction to drive copper sorption. - Abstract: The removal of copper from solution by oyster shell powder was investigated for potential wastewater treatment uses. In particular, adsorption behavior differences between the prismatic (PP) and nacreous (NP) shell layers, and how this affects copper removal, were investigated. Experimental results indicated that copper adsorption was highly pH-dependent with optimal copper removal at pH 5.5, where the powdered whole raw shell (RP) removed up to 99.9% of the copper within 24 h at a 10 mg/L initial copper concentration. Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to analyze the isotherm PP, NP and RP data. These results showed a strong homogeneous Langmuir model for low initial copper concentrations (5–30 mg/L) to both RP and PP layer, while strong agreement with a heterogeneous Freundlich model for high initial copper concentrations (30–200 mg/L); nevertheless, a homogeneous Langmuir model provided the best fit for the more dense NP layer across the initial concentration range (5–200 mg/L). The distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) value of PP layer for each initial concentration investigated was substantially higher than the NP layer and it was also found that the PP layer dominated the adsorption process with an adsorption capacity of 8.9 mg/g, while the adsorption capacity of the NP layer was 2.6 mg/g. These differences are believed to be because of the more porous structure of the PP layer, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and

  5. Adsorption of copper to different biogenic oyster shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qiong; Chen, Jie; Clark, Malcolm; Yu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Adsorption of copper to waste oyster shell occurs rapidly at pH 5.5. • Copper adsorbs to the different structures of oyster shell at different rates. • The prismatic layer dominates copper sorption rather than the nacreous layer. • SEM analysis shows a porous open network structure to the prismatic layer. • Surface ζ-potentials establish electrostatic attraction to drive copper sorption. - Abstract: The removal of copper from solution by oyster shell powder was investigated for potential wastewater treatment uses. In particular, adsorption behavior differences between the prismatic (PP) and nacreous (NP) shell layers, and how this affects copper removal, were investigated. Experimental results indicated that copper adsorption was highly pH-dependent with optimal copper removal at pH 5.5, where the powdered whole raw shell (RP) removed up to 99.9% of the copper within 24 h at a 10 mg/L initial copper concentration. Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to analyze the isotherm PP, NP and RP data. These results showed a strong homogeneous Langmuir model for low initial copper concentrations (5–30 mg/L) to both RP and PP layer, while strong agreement with a heterogeneous Freundlich model for high initial copper concentrations (30–200 mg/L); nevertheless, a homogeneous Langmuir model provided the best fit for the more dense NP layer across the initial concentration range (5–200 mg/L). The distribution coefficient (K d ) value of PP layer for each initial concentration investigated was substantially higher than the NP layer and it was also found that the PP layer dominated the adsorption process with an adsorption capacity of 8.9 mg/g, while the adsorption capacity of the NP layer was 2.6 mg/g. These differences are believed to be because of the more porous structure of the PP layer, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and

  6. Structure function of off-mass-shell pions and the calculation of the Sullivan process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakin, C.M.; Sun, W.

    1994-01-01

    We construct a model for the pion (valence) structure function that fits the experimental data obtained in the study of the Drell-Yan process. The model may also be used to calculate the structure function of off-mass-shell pions. We apply our model in the study of deep-inelastic scattering from off-mass-shell pions found in the nucleon and are thus able to resolve a problem encountered in the standard analysis of such processes. The usual analysis is made using the structure function of on-mass-shell pions and requires the use of a soft πNN form factor that is inconsistent with standard nuclear physics phenomenology. The use of our off-mass-shell structure functions allows for a fit to the data for nonperturbative aspects of the nucleon ''sea'' with a pion-nucleon form factor of the standard form

  7. Developmental plasticity of shell morphology of quagga mussels from shallow and deep-water habitats of the Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyer, Suzanne M; Hermanson, John C; Lee, Carol Eunmi

    2010-08-01

    The invasive zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) has quickly colonized shallow-water habitats in the North American Great Lakes since the 1980s but the quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis) is becoming dominant in both shallow and deep-water habitats. While quagga mussel shell morphology differs between shallow and deep habitats, functional causes and consequences of such difference are unknown. We examined whether quagga mussel shell morphology could be induced by three environmental variables through developmental plasticity. We predicted that shallow-water conditions (high temperature, food quantity, water motion) would yield a morphotype typical of wild quagga mussels from shallow habitats, while deep-water conditions (low temperature, food quantity, water motion) would yield a morphotype present in deep habitats. We tested this prediction by examining shell morphology and growth rate of quagga mussels collected from shallow and deep habitats and reared under common-garden treatments that manipulated the three variables. Shell morphology was quantified using the polar moment of inertia. Of the variables tested, temperature had the greatest effect on shell morphology. Higher temperature (approximately 18-20 degrees C) yielded a morphotype typical of wild shallow mussels regardless of the levels of food quantity or water motion. In contrast, lower temperature (approximately 6-8 degrees C) yielded a morphotype approaching that of wild deep mussels. If shell morphology has functional consequences in particular habitats, a plastic response might confer quagga mussels with a greater ability than zebra mussels to colonize a wider range of habitats within the Great Lakes.

  8. Nonobservable nature of the nuclear shell structure: Meaning, illustrations, and consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, T.; Hergert, H.; Holt, J. D.; Somà, V.

    2015-09-01

    Background: The concept of single-nucleon shells constitutes a basic pillar of our understanding of nuclear structure. Effective single-particle energies (ESPEs) introduced by French [Proceedings of the International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi," Course XXXVI, Varenna 1965, edited by C. Bloch (Academic Press, New York, 1966)] and Baranger [Nucl. Phys. A 149, 225 (1970), 10.1016/0375-9474(70)90692-5] represent the most appropriate tool to relate many-body observables to a single-nucleon shell structure. As briefly discussed in Duguet and Hagen [Phys. Rev. C 85, 034330 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.034330], the dependence of ESPEs on one-nucleon transfer probability matrices makes them purely theoretical quantities that "run" with the nonobservable resolution scale λ employed in the calculation. Purpose: Given that ESPEs provide a way to interpret the many-body problem in terms of simpler theoretical ingredients, the goal is to specify the terms, i.e., the exact sense and conditions, in which this interpretation can be conducted meaningfully. Methods: While the nuclear shell structure is both scale and scheme dependent, the present study focuses on the former. A detailed discussion is provided to illustrate the scale (in)dependence of observables and nonobservables and the reasons why ESPEs, i.e., the shell structure, belong to the latter category. State-of-the-art multireference in-medium similarity renormalization group and self-consistent Gorkov Green's function many-body calculations are employed to corroborate the formal analysis. This is done by comparing the behavior of several observables and of nonobservable ESPEs (and spectroscopic factors) under (quasi) unitary similarity renormalization group transformations of the Hamiltonian parametrized by the resolution scale λ . Results: The formal proofs are confirmed by the results of ab initio many-body calculations in their current stage of implementation. In practice, the unitarity of the similarity

  9. Controllable synthesis and characterization of novel copper-carbon core-shell structured nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Jing; Tao, Xia; Pu, Yuan; Zeng, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Jian-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We reported a facile, green and cheap hydrothermal method to obtain novel copper-carbon core-shell nanoparticles. → The as-formed particles with controllable size and morphology are antioxidant. → The particles with organic-group-loaded surfaces and protective shells are expected to be applied in fields of medicine, electronics, sensors and lubricant. -- Abstract: A facile hydrothermal method was developed for preparing copper-carbon core-shell structured particles through a reaction at 160 o C in which glucose, copper sulfate pentahydrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide were used as starting materials. The original copper-carbon core-shell structured particles obtained were sized of 100-250 nm. The thickness of carbonaceous shells was controlled ranging from 25 to 100 nm by adjusting the hydrothermal duration time and the concentrations of glucose in the process. Products were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Since no toxic materials were involved in the preparation, particles with stable carbonaceous framework and reactive surface also showed promising applications in medicine, electronics, sensors, lubricant, etc.

  10. Controllable synthesis and characterization of novel copper-carbon core-shell structured nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Jing [Sin-China Nano Technology Center, Key Lab for Nanomaterials, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Research Center of the Ministry of Education for High Gravity Engineering and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, No. 15 Beisanhuan Dong Lu, Beijing 100029 (China); Tao, Xia; Pu, Yuan; Zeng, Xiao-Fei [Sin-China Nano Technology Center, Key Lab for Nanomaterials, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Chen, Jian-Feng, E-mail: chenjf@mail.buct.edu.cn [Research Center of the Ministry of Education for High Gravity Engineering and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, No. 15 Beisanhuan Dong Lu, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} We reported a facile, green and cheap hydrothermal method to obtain novel copper-carbon core-shell nanoparticles. {yields} The as-formed particles with controllable size and morphology are antioxidant. {yields} The particles with organic-group-loaded surfaces and protective shells are expected to be applied in fields of medicine, electronics, sensors and lubricant. -- Abstract: A facile hydrothermal method was developed for preparing copper-carbon core-shell structured particles through a reaction at 160 {sup o}C in which glucose, copper sulfate pentahydrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide were used as starting materials. The original copper-carbon core-shell structured particles obtained were sized of 100-250 nm. The thickness of carbonaceous shells was controlled ranging from 25 to 100 nm by adjusting the hydrothermal duration time and the concentrations of glucose in the process. Products were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Since no toxic materials were involved in the preparation, particles with stable carbonaceous framework and reactive surface also showed promising applications in medicine, electronics, sensors, lubricant, etc.

  11. Shell structure of potassium isotopes deduced from their magnetic moments

    CERN Document Server

    Papuga, J.; Kreim, K; Barbieri, C; Blaum, K; De Rydt, M; Duguet, T; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Heylen, H; Kowalska, M; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nortershauser, W; Rajabali, M M; Sanchez, R; Smirnova, N; Soma, V; Yordanov, D T

    2014-09-29

    $\\textbf{Background:}$ Ground-state spins and magnetic moments are sensitive to the nuclear wave function, thus they are powerful probes to study the nuclear structure of isotopes far from stability. \\\\ \\\\ $\\textbf{Purpose:}$ Extend our knowledge about the evolution of the $1/2^+$ and $3/2^+$ states for K isotopes beyond the $N = 28$ shell gap. \\\\ \\\\ $\\textbf{Method:}$ High-resolution collinear laser spectroscopy on bunched atomic beams. \\\\ \\\\ $\\textbf{Results:}$ From measured hyperfine structure spectra of K isotopes, nuclear spins and magnetic moments of the ground states were obtained for isotopes from $N = 19$ up to $N = 32$. In order to draw conclusions about the composition of the wave functions and the occupation of the levels, the experimental data were compared to shell-model calculations using SDPF-NR and SDPF-U effective interactions. In addition, a detailed discussion about the evolution of the gap between proton $1d_{3/2}$ and $2s_{1/2}$ in the shell model and $\\textit{ab initio}$ framework is al...

  12. Morphology and electronic structure of the oxide shell on the surface of iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chongmin; Baer, Donald R; Amonette, James E; Engelhard, Mark H; Antony, Jiji; Qiang, You

    2009-07-01

    An iron (Fe) nanoparticle exposed to air at room temperature will be instantly covered by an oxide shell that is typically approximately 3 nm thick. The nature of this native oxide shell, in combination with the underlying Fe(0) core, determines the physical and chemical behavior of the core-shell nanoparticle. One of the challenges of characterizing core-shell nanoparticles is determining the structure of the oxide shell, that is, whether it is FeO, Fe(3)O(4), gamma-Fe(2)O(3), alpha-Fe(2)O(3), or something else. The results of prior characterization efforts, which have mostly used X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy, electron diffraction, and transmission electron microscopic imaging, have been framed in terms of one of the known Fe-oxide structures, although it is not necessarily true that the thin layer of Fe oxide is a known Fe oxide. In this Article, we probe the structure of the oxide shell on Fe nanoparticles using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) at the oxygen (O) K-edge with a spatial resolution of several nanometers (i.e., less than that of an individual particle). We studied two types of representative particles: small particles that are fully oxidized (no Fe(0) core) and larger core-shell particles that possess an Fe core. We found that O K-edge spectra collected for the oxide shell in nanoparticles show distinct differences from those of known Fe oxides. Typically, the prepeak of the spectra collected on both the core-shell and the fully oxidized particles is weaker than that collected on standard Fe(3)O(4). Given the fact that the origin of this prepeak corresponds to the transition of the O 1s electron to the unoccupied state of O 2p hybridized with Fe 3d, a weak pre-edge peak indicates a combination of the following four factors: a higher degree of occupancy of the Fe 3d orbital; a longer Fe-O bond length; a decreased covalency of the Fe-O bond; and a measure of cation vacancies. These results suggest that the coordination configuration in

  13. [Removal and Recycle of Phosphor from Water Using Magnetic Core/Shell Structured Fe₃O₄ @ SiO₂Nanoparticles Functionalized with Hydrous Aluminum Oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Li; Xie, Qiang; Fang, Wen-kan; Xing, Ming-chao; Wu, De-yi

    2016-04-15

    A novel magnetic core/shell structured nano-particle Fe₃O₄@ SiO₂phosphor-removal ahsorbent functionalized with hydrous aluminum oxides (Fe₃O₄@ SiO₂@ Al₂O₃· nH₂O) was synthesized. Fe₃O₄@ SiO₂@ Al₂O₃· nH₂O was characterized by XRD, TEM, VSM and BET nitrogen adsorption experiment. The XRD and TEM results demonstrated the presence of the core/shell structure, with saturated magnetization and specific surface area of 56.00 emu · g⁻¹ and 47.27 m² · g⁻¹, respectively. In batch phosphor adsorption experiment, the Langmuir adsorption maximum capacity was 12.90 mg · g⁻¹ and nearly 96% phosphor could be rapidly removed within a contact time of 40 mm. Adsorption of phosphor on Fe₃O₄@ SiO₂@ Al₂O₃ · nH₂O was highly dependent on pH condition, and the favored pH range was 5-9 in which the phosphor removal rate was above 90%. In the treatment of sewage water, the recommended dosage was 1.25 kg · t⁻¹. In 5 cycles of adsorption-regeneration-desorption experiment, over 90% of the adsorbed phosphor could be desorbed with 1 mol · L⁻¹ NaOH, and Fe₃O₄@ SiO₂@ Al₂O₃· nH₂O could be reused after regeneration by pH adjustment with slightly decreased phosphor removal rate with increasing recycling number, which proved the recyclability of Fe₃O₄@ SiO₂@ Al₂O₃· nH₂O and thereby its potential in recycling of phosphor resources.

  14. On the intermolecular vibrational coupling, hydrogen bonding, and librational freedom of water in the hydration shell of mono- and bivalent anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Namboodiri, V; Singh, Ajay K; Mondal, Jahur A

    2014-10-28

    The hydration energy of an ion largely resides within the first few layers of water molecules in its hydration shell. Hence, it is important to understand the transformation of water properties, such as hydrogen-bonding, intermolecular vibrational coupling, and librational freedom in the hydration shell of ions. We investigated these properties in the hydration shell of mono- (Cl(-) and I(-)) and bivalent (SO4(2-) and CO3(2-)) anions by using Raman multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) spectroscopy in the OH stretch, HOH bend, and [bend+librational] combination bands of water. Raman-MCR of aqueous Na-salt (NaCl, NaI, Na2SO4, and Na2CO3) solutions provides ion-correlated spectra (IC-spectrum) which predominantly bear the vibrational characteristics of water in the hydration shell of respective anions. Comparison of these IC-spectra with the Raman spectrum of bulk water in different spectral regions reveals that the water is vibrationally decoupled with its neighbors in the hydration shell. Hydrogen-bond strength and librational freedom also vary with the nature of anion: hydrogen-bond strength, for example, decreases as CO3(2-) > SO4(2-) > bulk water ≈ Cl(-) > I(-); and the librational freedom increases as CO3(2-) ≈ SO4(2-) water water in the hydration shell of anions.

  15. On the atomic shell structure calculation (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe Sun Chol

    1986-01-01

    We have considered the problem of atomic shell structure calculation using operator technique. We introduce reduced matrix elements of annihilation operators according to eg. (4). The normalized basis function is denoted as || ...>. The reduced matrix elements of the pair annihilation operators are expressed throw one-electron matrix elements. Some numerical results are represented and the problem of sign assignment is discussed. (author)

  16. Structure and Dynamics of Water on Aqueous Barium Ion and the {001} Barite Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stack, Andrew G.; Rustad, James R.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of water and its dynamics affect a number of fundamental properties of an interface. Yet, these properties are often inaccessible experimentally and computational studies including solvent are comparatively few. Here, we estimate the structure and kinetics of water exchange of aqueous barium ions and barium ions within the {001} barite surface using molecular dynamics and the reactive flux method. For the aqueous ion, the Ba-O distance to water in the first hydration shell was found to be 280 pm with a coordination number of 8.3, and the best estimate of the exchange rate constant is 4.8 x 10 9 s -1 , closely matching experimental estimates. For the barite surface, the first shell water distance was 282 pm, with a coordination number of 0.9 and the best estimate of the rate constant for exchange is 1.7 x 10 10 s -1 , 3.5 times faster than that of the aqueous ion.

  17. Lake Water Quality Improvement by Using Waste Mussel Shell Powder as an Adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukri, N. I.; Khamidun, M. H.; Sapiren, M. S.; Abdullah, S.; Rahman, M. A. A.

    2018-04-01

    Lake water in UTHM was slightly greenish in color indicating the eutrophication process. Eutrophication problem is due to excessive amount of nutrient in the lake water which causes nuisance growth of algae and other aquatic plant. The improvement of lake water quality should be conducted wisely in preventing from eutrophication problem by using a suitable water treatment method. Natural materials, agricultural wastes and industrial wastes are locally available sources can be utilized as low-cost adsorbents. The natural abundant source of waste mussel’s shells is advantages to use as basis material to produce the low cost adsorbent for water treatment. Batch experiments were carried out with the preparation 500 ml volume of lake water sample with the dosage of 2.5g, 7.5g and 12.5g. Then the solution shaking in an incubator with 200 rpm shaking speed. The various dosage of mussel shell greatly affected pollutants removal. Both of NH4+ and PO43- have a higher percentage removal with 31.28% and 21.74% at the 7.5g of sample dosage. Other parameters such as COD and TSS also shown good percentage of removal at 7.5g of dosage sample with 44.45% and 25% respectively. While, dosage at 2.5g was performed as a good adsorption capacity of NH4+, PO43-, COD and TSS as high as 0.142, 0.234, 7.6 and 20 mg/g, respectively. These experimental results suggested that the use of mussel shell powder as good basis material in removing pollutants from lake water.

  18. Shell structure in superdeformed nuclei at high rotational frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploszajczak, M.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of the shell structure in superdeformed nuclei at high rotational frequencies are discussed. Moreover, stability of the high spin compound nucleus with respect to the fission and the emission of light particles is investigated. (author)

  19. Superficial shell insulation in resting and exercising men in cold water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veicsteinas, A; Ferretti, G; Rennie, D W

    1982-06-01

    From measurements of subcutaneous fat temperature (Tsf) at known depths below the surface, skin surface temperature (Tsk), and direct skin heat flux (H), the superficial shell isulation (Iss) of the thigh (fat + skin) was calculated as Iss (degrees C.m2.w-1) = (Tsf - Tsk)/H in nine male subjects immersed head out in a well-stirred water bath. Also, at critical water temperature (CWT = 28-33 degrees C), eight of the subjects rested for 3 h, enabling overall maximal tissue insulation (It,max) to be calculated as It,max (degrees C.m2.W-1) = (Tre - Tw)/(0.92 M +/- delta S), where Tre is rectal temperature, Tw is water temperature, M is metabolic rate, and s is loss or gain of body heat. Five subjects performed up to 2 h of mild leg cycling, preceded and followed by 60 min of rest, and both thigh Iss and overall It were measured during exercise. Iss increased from minimal values in Tw greater than 33 degrees C to maximal values (Iss,max) at CWT or below. Iss,max was linearly related to tissue thickness (d) in millimeters of fat plus skin, Iss,max (degrees C.m2.W-1) = 0.0048d-0.0052; r = 0.95, n = 37, and was not influenced by leg exercise up to a metabolic rate of 150 W.m-2 in CWT despite large increases in Tsf and H and large decreases in overall It. The slope of Iss,max vs. depth, 0.0048 degrees C.m2.W-1.mm-1, is almost identical to thermal resistivity of fat in vitro, suggesting that the superficial shell is unperfused in CWT at rest or during mild exercise. When maximal superficial shell insulation (It,ss,max) for the whole body was calculated with allowance for differing fat thicknesses and surface areas of body regions, it could account for only 10-15% of overall It,max at rest and 35-40% of overall It in mild exercise. We suggest that the poorly perfused muscle shell plays a more important role as a defense against cooling at CWT than does the superficial shell (fat + skin), particularly at rest.

  20. Utilization of wasted cockle shell as a natural coagulant and a neutralizer of polluted water in Bangka Belitung islands, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiandho, Y.; Aldila, H.; Mustari; Megiyo; Afriani, F.

    2018-05-01

    Bangka Belitung Islands is the largest tin producer in Indonesia. The high activity of tin mining caused the environmental damage which had an impact on the emergence of clean water crisis in some areas in this province. In this paper, a simple water quality improvement method based on wasted cockle shell was developed. Based on x-ray diffraction analysis it is known that calcination of cockle shell powder at 700°C will decompose the powder into calcium oxide compound. The addition of calcined cockle shell powder into acidic water from Merawang Sub-district will increase the pH of water through the process of forming hydroxide groups in the water. The calcined cockle shell powder can also coagulate pollutants in some polluted water from Koba Sub-district. The coagulation results were analyzed using SEM/EDS.

  1. Active constrained layer damping treatments for shell structures: a deep-shell theory, some intuitive results, and an energy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, I. Y.

    1997-02-01

    This paper studies vibration control of a shell structure through use of an active constrained layer (ACL) damping treatment. A deep-shell theory that assumes arbitrary Lamé parameters 0964-1726/6/1/011/img1 and 0964-1726/6/1/011/img2 is first developed. Application of Hamilton's principle leads to the governing Love equations, the charge equation of electrostatics, and the associated boundary conditions. The Love equations and boundary conditions imply that the control action of the ACL for shell treatments consists of two components: free-end boundary actuation and membrane actuation. The free-end boundary actuation is identical to that of beam and plate ACL treatments, while the membrane actuation is unique to shell treatments as a result of the curvatures of the shells. In particular, the membrane actuation may reinforce or counteract the boundary actuation, depending on the location of the ACL treatment. Finally, an energy analysis is developed to determine the proper control law that guarantees the stability of ACL shell treatments. Moreover, the energy analysis results in a simple rule predicting whether or not the membrane actuation reinforces the boundary actuation.

  2. High spin structure of 35Cl and the sd-fp shell gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kshetri, Ritesh; Saha Sarkar, M.; Ray, Indrani; Banerjee, P.; Sarkar, S.; Raut, Rajarshi; Goswami, A.; Chatterjee, J.M.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Datta Pramanik, U.; Mukherjee, A.; Dey, C.C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dasmahapatra, B.; Bhowal, Samit; Gangopadhyay, G.; Datta, P.; Jain, H.C.; Bhowmik, R.K.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R.P.; Kumar, R.

    2007-01-01

    The high spin states of 35 Cl have been studied by in-beam γ-spectroscopy following the fusion-evaporation reaction 12 C( 28 Si,αp) 35 Cl at E lab =70 and 88 MeV, using the Indian National Gamma (Clover) Array (INGA). Lifetimes of six new excited states have been estimated for the first time. To understand the underlying structure of the levels and transition mechanisms, experimental results have been compared with those from the large basis cross-shell shell model calculations. Involvement of orbitals from fp shell and squeezing of the sd-fp shell gap seem to be essential for reliable reproduction of high spin states

  3. DNA nanoparticles with core-shell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Preethi L; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Lisziewicz, Julianna; Speransky, Vlad; Horkay, Ferenc

    2014-10-14

    Mannobiose-modified polyethylenimines (PEI) are used in gene therapy to generate nanoparticles of DNA that can be targeted to the antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. We report that the sugar modification alters the DNA organization within the nanoparticles from homogenous to shell-like packing. The depth-dependent packing of DNA within the nanoparticles was probed using AFM nano-indentation. Unmodified PEI-DNA nanoparticles display linear elastic properties and depth-independent mechanics, characteristic of homogenous materials. Mannobiose-modified nanoparticles, however, showed distinct force regimes that were dependent on indentation depth, with 'buckling'-like response that is reproducible and not due to particle failure. By comparison with theoretical studies of spherical shell mechanics, the structure of mannobiosylated particles was deduced to be a thin shell with wall thickness in the order of few nanometers, and a fluid-filled core. The shell-core structure is also consistent with observations of nanoparticle denting in altered solution conditions, with measurements of nanoparticle water content from AFM images, and with images of DNA distribution in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

  4. Fabrication and evaluation of Au-Pd core-shell nanocomposites for dechlorination of diclofenac in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Li, Jian-Rong; Fu, Ming-Lai; Yuan, Baoling; Cui, Hao-Jie; Wang, Ya-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Nanocomposites with core-shell structure usually exhibit excellent catalytic properties due to unique interfaces and synergistic effect among composites. In this study, Au-Pd bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) with core-shell structure (Au-Pd cs) by using Au NPs as core and Pd as shell were successfully fabricated and, for the first time, were used to investigate the dechlorination of diclofenac (DCF) at H2 atmosphere in water at room temperature. The degradation products were studied as well by using HPLC/Q-ToF MS/MS. The operational factors such as pH and composition of the Au-Pd cs were also studied. The results showed that nearly 100% of DCF (30 mg L(-1), 50 mL, pH=7) was dechlorinated in 4.5 h by 10 mL of 56 mg L(-1) of Au-Pd cs. Ninety per cent of DCF was degraded in 6.5 h by the mixture of Au and Pd NPs. However, the individual Au NPs had no obvious effect in degrading DCF and the monometallic Pd NPs with comparable concentration only degraded less than 20% of DCF. Furthermore, the reaction mechanism of this catalytic process was studied in detail. It was found that the degradation was a second-order exponential reaction. The two main degradation products were obtained by cleaving the carbon-halogen bond of DCF and this made the degradation products more environmentally friendly.

  5. Core/shell structured ZnO/SiO2 nanoparticles: Preparation, characterization and photocatalytic property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Jing; Tao Xia; Pu Yuan; Zeng Xiaofei; Chen Jianfeng

    2010-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticles were prepared by a simple chemical synthesis route. Subsequently, SiO 2 layers were successfully coated onto the surface of ZnO nanoparticles to modify the photocatalytic activity in acidic or alkaline solutions. The obtained particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and zeta potential. It was found that ultrafine core/shell structured ZnO/SiO 2 nanoparticles were successfully obtained. The photocatalytic performance of ZnO/SiO 2 core/shell structured nanoparticles in Rhodamine B aqueous solution at varied pH value were also investigated. Compared with uncoated ZnO nanoparticles, core/shell structured ZnO/SiO 2 nanoparticles with thinner SiO 2 shell possess improved stability and relatively better photocatalytic activity in acidic or alkaline solutions, which would broaden its potential application in pollutant treatment.

  6. Core/Shell Structured Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biological Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been widely used for biomedical applications, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia, drug delivery and cell signaling. The surface modification of the nanomaterials is required for biomedical use to give physiogical stability, surface reactivity and targeting properties. Among many approaches for the surface modification with materials, such as polymers, organic ligands and metals, one of the most attractive ways is using metals. The fabrication of metal-based, monolayer-coated magnetic nanoparticles has been intensively studied. However, the synthesis of metal-capped magnetic nanoparticles with monodispersities and controllable sizes is still challenged. Recently, gold-capped magnetic nanoparticles have been reported to increase stability and to provide biocompatibility. Magnetic nanoparticle with gold coating is an attractive system, which can be stabilized in biological conditions and readily functionalized in biological conditions and readily functionalized through well-established surface modification (Au-S) chemistry. The Au coating offers plasmonic properties to magnetic nanoparticles. This makes the magnetic/Au core/shell combinations interesting for magnetic and optical applications. Herein, the synthesis and characterization of gold capped-magnetic core structured nanomaterials with different gold sources, such as gold acetate and chloroauric acid have been reported. The core/shell nanoparticles were transferred from organic to aqueous solutions for biomedical applications. Magnetic core/shell structured nanoparticles have been prepared and transferred from organic phase to aqueous solutions. The resulting Au-coated magnetic core nanoparticles might be an attractive system for biomedical applications, which are needed both magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging

  7. Yolk-shell structured composite for fast and selective lithium ion sieving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Lu, Deli; Zhang, Jinlong; Wang, Lingzhi

    2018-06-15

    Yolk-shell structured C@Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 microspheres composed of carbon core (ca. 500 nm) and sea urchin-like Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 shell (ca. 400-500 nm) are formed by hydrothermally treating the core-shell structured C@TiO 2 in the EtOH/H 2 O solution of LiOH and calcining it in N 2 atmosphere. Yolk-shell structured TiO 2 -type lithium ion sieve is further transformed from C@Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 through the acid treatment, which have a high specific surface area of 201.74 m 2 /g. The composite shows adsorption capacity towards Li + proportional to the pH value in the range of 7-13. The adsorption reaches equilibrium within 2 h with a high equilibrium adsorption capacity of 28.46 mg/g under alkaline conditions, which is ca. 8 times the value of ordinary TiO 2 lithium ion sieve with comparable size and surface area, demonstrating the enhanced adsorption is attributed to the generation of more accessible surficial voids by replacing internal part with light carbon core. The adsorption follows Freundlich and pseudo-second-order kinetic models with a high rate constant of 0.015 g/(mg·min). The selective adsorption to Li + is verified in the presence of K + , Na + , Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Double containment shell for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1977-01-01

    A double containment shell is proposed for nuclear power plants, especially those equipped with pressurized water reactors. The shell offers increased environmental protection from primary circuit accidents. The inner shell is built of steel or concrete while the outer shell is always built of concrete. The space between the two shells is filled with water and is provided with several manholes and with stiffeners designed for compensation for load due to the water hydrostatic pressure. Water serves the airtight separation of the containment shell inside from the environment and the absorption of heat released in a primary circuit accident. In case the inner shell is made of concrete, it is provided with heat-removal tubes in-built in its walls ensuring rapid heat transfer from the inside of the containment to the water in the interwall space. (Z.M.)

  9. Gap state related blue light emitting boron-carbon core shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Paviter; Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Bikramjeet; Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Kulwinder; Kumar, Akshay; Kumar, Manjeet; Bala, Rajni; Thakur, Anup

    2016-01-01

    Boron-carbon core shell structures have been synthesized by solvo-thermal synthesis route. The synthesized material is highly pure. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the reduction of reactants in to boron and carbon. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the shell is uniform with average thickness of 340 nm. Photo luminescence studies showed that the material is blue light emitting with CIE color coordinates: x=0.16085, y=0.07554.

  10. Harnessing the bistable composite shells to design a tunable phononic band gap structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Xu, Yanlong

    2018-02-01

    By proposing a system composed of an array of bistable composite shells immersed in air, we develop a new class of periodic structure to control the propagation of sound. Through numerical investigation, we find that the acoustic band gap of this system can be switched on and off by triggering the snap through deformation of the bistable composite shells. The shape of cross section and filling fraction of unit cell can be altered by different number of bistable composite shells, and they have strong impact on the position and width of the band gap. The proposed concept paves the way of using the bistable structures to design a new class of metamaterials that can be enable to manipulate sound.

  11. Facile synthesis of core–shell structured PANI-Co_3O_4 nanocomposites with superior electrochemical performance in supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai, Zhenyin; Gao, Libo; Zhang, Qiang; Xu, Hongyan; Cui, Danfeng; Zhang, Zengxing; Tsoukalas, Dimitris; Tang, Jun; Yan, Shubin; Xue, Chenyang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PANI-Co_3O_4 is synthesized by carbon-assisted and in situ polymerization methods. • PANI coating improves the properties of Co_3O_4 affecting electrochemical performance. • The nanocomposites exhibit a high specific capacitance of 1184 F g"−"1 at 1.25 A g"−"1. - Abstract: Core–shell structured PANI-Co_3O_4 nanocomposites for supercapacitor applications were synthesized by combination of carbon-assisted method and in situ polymerization method. The crystalline structure, optical band gap, morphology, and hydrophilic property, as the major factors affecting the performances of supercapacitors, were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis spectrophotometry (UV–vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and water contact angle (WCA). The core–shell structured PANI-Co_3O_4 nanocomposites are characterized by amorphous PANI, small bandgaps, large surface area and favorable hydrophilicity, which indicates the superior electrochemical performances of the nanocomposites as electrode material for supercapacitors. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were conducted in 6 M KOH aqueous solution to evaluate the electrochemical performances. The results shows that core–shell structured PANI-Co_3O_4 nanocomposites exhibit a high specific capacitance of 1184 F g"−"1 at 1.25 A g"−"1, excellent cycling stability of a capacitance retention of 84.9% after 1000 galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles, good electrical conductivity and ion diffusion behavior.

  12. Shell structure of natural rubber particles: evidence of chemical stratification by electrokinetics and cryo-TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Christophe N; Crassous, Jérôme J; Drechsler, Markus; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Eloy, Marie; de Gaudemaris, Benoît; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2013-11-26

    The interfacial structure of natural rubber (NR) colloids is investigated by means of cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and electrokinetics over a broad range of KNO3 electrolyte concentrations (4-300 mM) and pH values (1-8). The asymptotic plateau value reached by NR electrophoretic mobility (μ) in the thin double layer limit supports the presence of a soft (ion- and water-permeable) polyelectrolytic type of layer located at the periphery of the NR particles. This property is confirmed by the analysis of the electron density profile obtained from cryo-TEM that evidences a ∼2-4 nm thick corona surrounding the NR polyisoprene core. The dependence of μ on pH and salt concentration is further marked by a dramatic decrease of the point of zero electrophoretic mobility (PZM) from 3.6 to 0.8 with increasing electrolyte concentration in the range 4-300 mM. Using a recent theory for electrohydrodynamics of soft multilayered particles, this "anomalous" dependence of the PZM on electrolyte concentration is shown to be consistent with a radial organization of anionic and cationic groups across the peripheral NR structure. The NR electrokinetic response in the pH range 1-8 is indeed found to be equivalent to that of particles surrounded by a positively charged ∼3.5 nm thick layer (mean dissociation pK ∼ 4.2) supporting a thin and negatively charged outermost layer (0.6 nm in thickness, pK ∼ 0.7). Altogether, the strong dependence of the PZM on electrolyte concentration suggests that the electrostatic properties of the outer peripheral region of the NR shell are mediated by lipidic residues protruding from a shell containing a significant amount of protein-like charges. This proposed NR shell interfacial structure questions previously reported NR representations according to which the shell consists of either a fully mixed lipid-protein layer, or a layer of phospholipids residing exclusively beneath an outer proteic film.

  13. Effects of Soil Water Deficit on Insecticidal Protein Expression in Boll Shells of Transgenic Bt Cotton and the Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effects of soil water deficit on insecticidal protein expression in boll shells of cotton transgenic for a Bt gene. In 2014, Bt cotton cultivars Sikang 1 (a conventional cultivar and Sikang 3 (a hybrid cultivar were planted in pots and five soil water content treatments were imposed at peak boll stage: 15% (G1, 35% (G2, 40% (G3, 60% (G4, and 75% field capacity (CK, respectively. Four treatments (G2, G3, G4, and CK were repeated in 2015 in the field. Results showed that the insecticidal protein content of boll shells decreased with increasing water deficit. Compared with CK, boll shell insecticidal protein content decreased significantly when soil water content was below 60% of maximum water holding capacity for Sikang 1 and Sikang 3. However, increased Bt gene expression was observed when boll shell insecticidal protein content was significantly reduced. Activity assays of key enzymes in nitrogen metabolism showed that boll shell protease and peptidase increased but nitrogen reductase and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT decreased. Insecticidal protein content exhibited significant positive correlation with nitrogen reductase and GPT activities; and significant negative correlation with protease and peptidase activities. These findings suggest that the decrease of insecticidal protein content associated with increasing water deficit was a net result of decreased synthesis and increased decomposition.

  14. Nuclear structure of s-d shell nuclei: what is new?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, G.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the shape evolution of the even-even s-d shell nuclei with temperature and spin is studied using Landau theory of phase transitions. The most important thermal fluctuations are incorporated in this study. The ground state pairing is also included in the calculations. Both the summation and Strutinsky methods are used for extracting the Landau constants. Both yield qualitatively similar results. To conclude, Landau theory of phase transitions can be effectively and economically used to study the structure of excited s-d shell nuclei. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs

  15. Thermodynamic and structural signatures of water-driven methane-methane attraction in coarse-grained mW water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bin; Molinero, Valeria

    2013-08-07

    Hydrophobic interactions are responsible for water-driven processes such as protein folding and self-assembly of biomolecules. Microscopic theories and molecular simulations have been used to study association of a pair of methanes in water, the paradigmatic example of hydrophobic attraction, and determined that entropy is the driving force for the association of the methane pair, while the enthalpy disfavors it. An open question is to which extent coarse-grained water models can still produce correct thermodynamic and structural signatures of hydrophobic interaction. In this work, we investigate the hydrophobic interaction between a methane pair in water at temperatures from 260 to 340 K through molecular dynamics simulations with the coarse-grained monatomic water model mW. We find that the coarse-grained model correctly represents the free energy of association of the methane pair, the temperature dependence of free energy, and the positive change in entropy and enthalpy upon association. We investigate the relationship between thermodynamic signatures and structural order of water through the analysis of the spatial distribution of the density, energy, and tetrahedral order parameter Qt of water. The simulations reveal an enhancement of tetrahedral order in the region between the first and second hydration shells of the methane molecules. The increase in tetrahedral order, however, is far from what would be expected for a clathrate-like or ice-like shell around the solutes. This work shows that the mW water model reproduces the key signatures of hydrophobic interaction without long ranged electrostatics or the need to be re-parameterized for different thermodynamic states. These characteristics, and its hundred-fold increase in efficiency with respect to atomistic models, make mW a promising water model for studying water-driven hydrophobic processes in more complex systems.

  16. Hydrology and water quality of Shell Lake, Washburn County, Wisconsin, with special emphasis on the effects of diversion and changes in water level on the water quality of a shallow terminal lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckem, Paul F.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2013-01-01

    Shell Lake is a relatively shallow terminal lake (tributaries but no outlets) in northwestern Wisconsin that has experienced approximately 10 feet (ft) of water-level fluctuation over more than 70 years of record and extensive flooding of nearshore areas starting in the early 2000s. The City of Shell Lake (City) received a permit from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources in 2002 to divert water from the lake to a nearby river in order to lower water levels and reduce flooding. Previous studies suggested that water-level fluctuations were driven by long-term cycles in precipitation, evaporation, and runoff, although questions about the lake’s connection with the groundwater system remained. The permit required that the City evaluate assumptions about lake/groundwater interactions made in previous studies and evaluate the effects of the water diversion on water levels in Shell Lake and other nearby lakes. Therefore, a cooperative study between the City and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was initiated to improve the understanding of the hydrogeology of the area and evaluate potential effects of the diversion on water levels in Shell Lake, the surrounding groundwater system, and nearby lakes. Concerns over deteriorating water quality in the lake, possibly associated with changes in water level, prompted an additional cooperative project between the City and the USGS to evaluate efeffects of changes in nutrient loading associated with changes in water levels on the water quality of Shell Lake. Numerical models were used to evaluate how the hydrology and water quality responded to diversion of water from the lake and historical changes in the watershed. The groundwater-flow model MODFLOW was used to simulate groundwater movement in the area around Shell Lake, including groundwater/surface-water interactions. Simulated results from the MODFLOW model indicate that groundwater flows generally northward in the area around Shell Lake, with flow locally converging

  17. Shell and membrane theories in mechanics and biology from macro- to nanoscale structures

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhasev, Gennadi

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest results related to shells  characterize and design shells, plates, membranes and other thin-walled structures, a multidisciplinary approach from macro- to nanoscale is required which involves the classical disciplines of mechanical/civil/materials engineering (design, analysis, and properties) and physics/biology/medicine among others. The book contains contributions of a meeting of specialists (mechanical engineers, mathematicians, physicists and others) in such areas as classical and non-classical shell theories. New trends with respect to applications in mechanical, civil and aero-space engineering, as well as in new branches like medicine and biology are presented which demand improvements of the theoretical foundations of these theories and a deeper understanding of the material behavior used in such structures.

  18. Development of Special Tools for the Straightness Measurement of JRTR Core Inner Shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinjlawi, Abdullah; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Chung, Jong-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) is an open pool type nuclear research reactor, 5 MW power, JRTR core made from Zircaloy. The JRTR will be used for nuclear applications such as isotopes production, nuclear researches, neutron transmutation doping (NTD), and training. JRTR core structures will be exposed to a large amount of neutron irradiation during the life time of the reactor. The core inner shell also will be exposed to a pressure that comes from heavy water system. JRTR core inner shell will deform due to the neutron irradiation and the mechanical stress. Therefore, the dimensional change of the core inner shell should be periodically (every 10 years) measured as an in-service inspection to confirm the structural integrity. As a result of neutron irradiation, pressure difference of the heavy water vessel, and the mechanical stress, the reactor core will deform as shown in figure 2 to figure 4. The maximum deformation to the normal direction of inner shell wall is 0.75 mm as shown in figure 3. This study discusses development of special tools that will be used for pre-service and in-service inspection of JRTR inner shell. The performance and procedure for the measurements tools will be verified using by the real inner shell of the heavy water vessel at factory before shipping to Jordan.. There will be very delicate working procedure for the measurement in the limited space in JRTR core. Therefore, we will develop the detail procedures to cover the removal of the core components, installation of the measurement tools, measurement, and re-installation of the core components. The measurement of the inner shell at JAEC site during commissioning stage will be the first remote measurement at the same conditions of pool water and heavy water system

  19. EVOLUTION OF THE WATER MASER EXPANDING SHELL IN W75N VLA 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Sang Joon [School of Space Science, Kyunghee University, Seocheon-dong, Giheung-si, Gyeonggi-do, 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soon-Wook [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Kurayama, Tomoharu [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Honma, Mareki [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sasao, Tesuo [Yaeyama Star Club, Ookawa, Ishigaki, Okinawa 904-0022 (Japan); Surcis, Gabriele [Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Canto, Jorge [Instituto de Astronomia (UNAM), Apartado 70-264, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Torrelles, Jose M., E-mail: evony@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: skim@kasi.re.kr [Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (CSIC)-UB/IEEC, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-04-10

    We present Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers in the high-mass star-forming region of W75N, carried out with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) for three epochs in 2007 with an angular resolution of {approx}1 mas. We detected H{sub 2}O maser emission toward the radio jet in VLA 1 and the expanding shell-like structure in VLA 2. The spatial distribution of the H{sub 2}O masers detected with VERA and measured proper motions around VLA 1 and VLA 2 are similar to those found with previous VLBI observations in epochs 1999 and 2005, with the masers in VLA 1 mainly distributed along a linear structure parallel to the radio jet and, on the other hand, forming a shell-like structure around VLA 2. We have made elliptical fits to the VLA 2 H{sub 2}O maser shell-like structure observed in the different epochs (1999, 2005, and 2007), and found that the shell is still expanding eight years after its discovery. From the difference in the size of the semi-major axes of the fitted ellipses in epochs 1999 ({approx_equal}71 {+-} 1 mas), 2005 ({approx_equal}97 {+-} 3 mas), and 2007 ({approx_equal}111 {+-} 1 mas), we estimate an average expanding velocity of {approx}5 mas yr{sup -1}, similar to the proper motions measured in the individual H{sub 2}O maser features. A kinematic age of {approx}20 yr is derived for this structure. In addition, our VERA observations indicate an increase in the ellipticity of the expanding shell around VLA 2 from epochs 1999 to 2007. In fact, the elliptical fit of the VERA data shows a ratio of the minor and major axes of {approx}0.6, in contrast with an almost circular shape for the shell detected in 1999 and 2005 (b/a {approx} 0.9). This suggests that we are probably observing the formation of a jet-driven H{sub 2}O maser structure in VLA2, evolving from a non-collimated pulsed-outflow event during the first stages of evolution of a massive young stellar object (YSO). This may support predictions made

  20. Water structure around trehalose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagnotta, S.E. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. Amaldi' , Universita di Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); CNISM-CNR, Unita di Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: pagnotta@fis.uniroma3.it; Ricci, M.A.; Bruni, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. Amaldi' , Universita di Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); McLain, S. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratories, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Magazu, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, C. da Papardo 31, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2008-04-18

    A diluted solution of trehalose in water has been investigated by means of neutron diffraction with isotopic H/D substitution of the water hydrogens. Data have been analyzed in terms of site-site radial distribution functions, via the EPSR simulation code. This is the first time that the capabilities of this data refinement method are tested against neutron diffraction data of a complex carbohydrate molecule. A small perturbation of water hydration shell and short hydrogen bonds between trehalose oxygens and water hydrogens has been evidenced.

  1. Natural draft cooling tower with shell disconnected from the substructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diver, Marius

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the analysis of results of a research done by Electricite de France, concerning a new type of cooling tower. The traditional structure (i.e. a hyperbolic shell supported by X shaped or diagonal columns) is replaced by two independent structures: the shell, becoming a self-contained structure, the lower rim being stiffened by an annular beam; the substructure, resting on the soil. This new type of cooling tower has an improved thermal performance due to the increase of the area of air entrance. Bearing pads are provided between the lower ring beam of the shell and the substructure. Any differential settlement can be coped with by jacking. The water distribution structure can be laid out so as to benefit from advantages offered by the presence of the stiff ring and columns of the substructure [fr

  2. Methodology of shell structure reinforcement layout optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafrański, Tomasz; Małachowski, Jerzy; Damaziak, Krzysztof

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an optimization process of a reinforced shell diffuser intended for a small wind turbine (rated power of 3 kW). The diffuser structure consists of multiple reinforcement and metal skin. This kind of structure is suitable for optimization in terms of selection of reinforcement density, stringers cross sections, sheet thickness, etc. The optimisation approach assumes the reduction of the amount of work to be done between the optimization process and the final product design. The proposed optimization methodology is based on application of a genetic algorithm to generate the optimal reinforcement layout. The obtained results are the basis for modifying the existing Small Wind Turbine (SWT) design.

  3. Enhancing photocatalytic activity by using TiO2-MgO core-shell-structured nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Suk; Lee, Jung-Kun; Nastasi, Michael; Kim, Jeong-Ryeol; Lee, Sang-Wook; Kim, Jin Young; Park, Jong-Sung; Hong, Kug Sun; Shin, Hyunho

    2006-01-01

    Hygroscopic Mg(OH) 2 gel was topotactically decomposed on TiO 2 particle surfaces, resulting in highly nanoporous MgO-coated TiO 2 particles. The highly hygroscopic and nanoporous MgO shell absorbed more water molecules and hydroxyl groups from the environment to yield an improved photocatalytic property of the core-shell particles as compared to the uncoated TiO 2 counterpart

  4. The dorsal shell wall structure of Mesozoic ammonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Radtke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of pristine preserved shells of Mesozoic Ammonoidea shows different types of construction and formation of the dorsal shell wall. We observe three major types: (i The vast majority of Ammonoidea, usually planispirally coiled, has a prismatic reduced dorsal shell wall which consists of an outer organic component (e.g., wrinkle layer, which is the first layer to be formed, and the subsequently formed dorsal inner prismatic layer. The dorsal mantle tissue suppresses the formation of the outer prismatic layer and nacreous layer. With the exception of the outer organic component, secretion of a shell wall is omitted at the aperture. A prismatic reduced dorsal shell wall is always secreted immediately after the hatching during early teleoconch formation. Due to its broad distribution in (planispiral Ammonoidea, the prismatic reduced dorsal shell wall is probably the general state. (ii Some planispirally coiled Ammonoidea have a nacreous reduced dorsal shell wall which consists of three mineralized layers: two prismatic layers (primary and secondary dorsal inner prismatic layer and an enclosed nacreous layer (secondary dorsal nacreous layer. The dorsal shell wall is omitted at the aperture and was secreted in the rear living chamber. Its layers are a continuation of an umbilical shell doubling (reinforcement by additional shell layers that extends towards the ventral crest of the preceding whorl. The nacreous reduced dorsal shell wall is formed in the process of ontogeny following a prismatic reduced dorsal shell wall. (iii Heteromorph and some planispirally coiled taxa secrete a complete dorsal shell wall which forms a continuation of the ventral and lateral shell layers. It is formed during ontogeny following a prismatic reduced dorsal shell wall or a priori. The construction is identical with the ventral and lateral shell wall, including a dorsal nacreous layer. The wide distribution of the ability to form dorsal nacre indicates that it is

  5. Electronic shell structure and chemisorption on gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Kleis, Jesper; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    to distort considerably, creating large band gaps at the Fermi level. For up to 200 atoms we consider structures generated with a simple EMT potential and clusters based on cuboctahedra and icosahedra. All types of cluster geometry exhibit jelliumlike electronic shell structure. We calculate adsorption...... energies of several atoms on the cuboctahedral clusters. Adsorption energies are found to vary abruptly at magic numbers. Using a Newns-Anderson model we find that the effect of magic numbers on adsorption energy can be understood from the location of adsorbate-induced states with respect to the cluster...

  6. Enhancement of curcumin water dispersibility and antioxidant activity using core-shell protein-polysaccharide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Xulin; Gong, Yushi; Xiao, Hang; McClements, David Julian; Hu, Kun

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin has strong antioxidant activity, but poor water-solubility and chemical stability, which limits its utilization as a nutraceutical in many applications. Previously, we developed a core-shell (zein-pectin) nanoparticle delivery system with high curcumin loading efficiency, high particle yield, and good water dispersibility. However, this system was unstable to aggregation around neutral pH and moderate ionic strengths due to weakening of electrostatic repulsion between nanoparticles. In the current study, we used a combination of alginate (high charge density) and pectin (low charge density) to form the shell around zein nanoparticles. Replacement of 30% of pectin with alginate greatly improved aggregation stability at pH 5 to 7 and at high ionic strengths (2000mM NaCl). Curcumin encapsulated within these core-shell nanoparticles exhibited higher antioxidant and radical scavenging activities than curcumin solubilized in ethanol solutions as determined by Fe (III) reducing power, 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical (DPPH·), and 2, 2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid radical cation (ABTS· + ) scavenging analysis. These core-shell nanoparticles may be useful for incorporating chemically unstable hydrophobic nutraceuticals such as curcumin into functional foods, dietary supplements, and pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Organic superalkalis with closed-shell structure and aromaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ambrish Kumar

    2018-06-01

    Benzene (C6H6) and polycyclic hydrocarbons such as naphthalene (C10H8), anthracene (C14H10) and coronene (C24H12) are well known aromatic organic compounds. We study the substitution of Li replacing all H-atoms in these hydrocarbons using density functional method. The vertical ionisation energy of such lithiated species, i.e. C6Li6, C10Li8, C14Li10 and C24Li12 ranges 4.24-4.50 eV, which is lower than the ionisation energy (IE) of Li atom. Thus, these species may behave as superalkalis due to their lower IE than alkali metal. However, these lithiated species possess planar and closed-shell structure, unlike typical superalkalis. Furthermore, all Li-substituted species are aromatic although their degree of aromaticity is reduced as compared to corresponding hydrocarbon analogues. We have further explored the structure of C6Li6 as star-like, unlike its inorganic analogue B3N3Li6, which appears as fan-like structure. We have also demonstrated that the interaction of C6Li6 with a superhalogen (such as BF4) is similar to that of a typical superalkali (such as OLi3). This may further suggest that the proposed lithiated species may form a new class of closed-shell organic superalkalis with aromaticity.

  8. High spin structure of {sup 35}Cl and the sd-fp shell gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kshetri, Ritesh [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Saha Sarkar, M. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)]. E-mail: maitrayee.sahasarkar@saha.ac.in; Ray, Indrani [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Banerjee, P. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sarkar, S. [Department of Physics, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Raut, Rajarshi [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Goswami, A. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Chatterjee, J.M. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Chattopadhyay, S. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Datta Pramanik, U. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Mukherjee, A. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Dey, C.C. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Bhattacharya, S. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Dasmahapatra, B. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Bhowal, Samit [Department of Physics, Surendranath Evening College, Kolkata 700009 (India); Gangopadhyay, G. [University of Calcutta, 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Datta, P. [Anandamohan College, 102/1, Raja Rammohan Sarani, Kolkata 700009 (India); Jain, H.C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bhowmik, R.K. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Muralithar, S.; Singh, R.P.; Kumar, R. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2007-01-15

    The high spin states of {sup 35}Cl have been studied by in-beam {gamma}-spectroscopy following the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 12}C({sup 28}Si,{alpha}p){sup 35}Cl at E{sub lab}=70 and 88 MeV, using the Indian National Gamma (Clover) Array (INGA). Lifetimes of six new excited states have been estimated for the first time. To understand the underlying structure of the levels and transition mechanisms, experimental results have been compared with those from the large basis cross-shell shell model calculations. Involvement of orbitals from fp shell and squeezing of the sd-fp shell gap seem to be essential for reliable reproduction of high spin states.

  9. Facile Synthesis of Yolk/Core-Shell Structured TS-1@Mesosilica Composites for Enhanced Hydroxylation of Phenol

    KAUST Repository

    Zou, Houbing

    2015-12-14

    © 2015 by the authors. In the current work, we developed a facile synthesis of yolk/core-shell structured TS-1@mesosilica composites and studied their catalytic performances in the hydroxylation of phenol with H2O2 as the oxidant. The core-shell TS-1@mesosilica composites were prepared via a uniform coating process, while the yolk-shell TS-1@mesosilica composite was prepared using a resorcinol-formaldehyde resin (RF) middle-layer as the sacrificial template. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 sorption, Fourier transform infrared spectoscopy (FT-IR) UV-Visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The characterization results showed that these samples possessed highly uniform yolk/core-shell structures, high surface area (560–700 m2 g−1) and hierarchical pore structures from oriented mesochannels to zeolite micropores. Importantly, owing to their unique structural properties, these composites exhibited enhanced activity, and also selectivity in the phenol hydroxylation reaction.

  10. Embedding of Hollow Polymer Microspheres with Hydrophilic Shell in Nafion Matrix as Proton and Water Micro-Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaolin Liu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Assimilating hydrophilic hollow polymer spheres (HPS into Nafion matrix by a loading of 0.5 wt % led to a restructured hydrophilic channel, composed of the pendant sulfonic acid groups (–SO3H and the imbedded hydrophilic hollow spheres. The tiny hydrophilic hollow chamber was critical to retaining moisture and facilitating proton transfer in the composite membranes. To obtain such a tiny cavity structure, the synthesis included selective generation of a hydrophilic polymer shell on silica microsphere template and the subsequent removal of the template by etching. The hydrophilic HPS (100–200 nm possessed two different spherical shells, the styrenic network with pendant sulfonic acid groups and with methacrylic acid groups, respectively. By behaving as microreservoirs of water, the hydrophilic HPS promoted the Grotthus mechanism and, hence, enhanced proton transport efficiency through the inter-sphere path. In addition, the HPS with the –SO3H borne shell played a more effective role than those with the –CO2H borne shell in augmenting proton transport, in particular under low humidity or at medium temperatures. Single H2-PEMFC test at 70 °C using dry H2/O2 further verified the impactful role of hydrophilic HPS in sustaining higher proton flux as compared to pristine Nafion membrane.

  11. Synthesis and properties MFe2O4 (M = Fe, Co) nanoparticles and core-shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelenich, O. V.; Solopan, S. O.; Greneche, J. M.; Belous, A. G.

    2015-08-01

    Individual Fe3-xO4 and CoFe2O4 nanoparticles, as well as Fe3-xO4/CoFe2O4 core/shell structures were synthesized by the method of co-precipitation from diethylene glycol solutions. Core/shell structure were synthesized with CoFe2O4-shell thickness of 1.0, 2.5 and 3.5 nm. X-ray diffraction patterns of individual nanoparticles and core/shell are similar and indicate that all synthesized samples have a cubic spinel structure. Compares Mössbauer studies of CoFe2O4, Fe3-xO4 nanoparticles indicate superparamagnetic properties at 300 K. It was shown that individual magnetite nanoparticles are transformed into maghemite through oxidation during the synthesis procedure, wherein the smallest nanoparticles are completely oxidized while a magnetite core does occur in the case of the largest nanoparticles. The Mössbauer spectra of core/shell nanoparticles with increasing CoFe2O4-shell thickness show a gradual decrease in the relative intensity of the quadrupole doublet and significant decrease of the mean isomer shift value at both RT and 77 K indicating a decrease of the superparamagnetic relaxation phenomena. Specific loss power for the prepared ferrofluids was experimentally calculated and it was determined that under influence of ac-magnetic field magnetic fluid based on individual CoFe2O4 and Fe3-xO4 particles are characterized by very low heating temperature, when magnetic fluids based on core/shell nanoparticles demonstrate higher heating effect.

  12. Oxidation driven ZnS Core-ZnO shell photocatalysts under controlled oxygen atmosphere for improved photocatalytic solar water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Daegil; Kim, Jung Hyeun

    2018-06-01

    Zinc type photocatalysts attract great attentions in solar hydrogen production due to their easy availability and benign environmental characteristics. Spherical ZnS particles are synthesized with a facile hydrothermal method, and they are further used as core materials to introduce ZnO shell layer surrounding the core part by partial oxidation under controlled oxygen contents. The resulting ZnS core-ZnO shell photocatalysts represent the heterostructural type II band alignment. The existence of oxide layer also influences on proton adsorption power with an aid of strong base cites derived from highly electronegative oxygen atoms in ZnO shell layer. Photocatalytic water splitting reaction is performed to evaluate catalyst efficiency under standard one sun condition, and the highest hydrogen evolution rate (1665 μmolg-1h-1) is achieved from the sample oxidized at 16.2 kPa oxygen pressure. This highest hydrogen production rate is achieved in cooperation with increased light absorption and promoted charge separations. Photoluminescence analysis reveals that the improved visible light response is obtained after thermal oxidation process due to the oxygen vacancy states in the ZnO shell layer. Therefore, overall photocatalytic efficiency in solar hydrogen production is enhanced by improved charge separations, crystallinity, and visible light responses from the ZnS core-ZnO shell structures induced by thermal oxidation.

  13. In Situ Generation of Two-Dimensional Au–Pt Core–Shell Nanoparticle Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Madiha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two-dimensional assemblies of Au–Pt bimetallic nanoparticles are generated in situ on polyethyleneimmine (PEI silane functionalized silicon and indium tin oxide (ITO coated glass surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM, UV–Visible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements reveal the formation of core–shell structure with Au as core and Pt as shell. The core–shell structure is further supported by comparing with the corresponding data of Au nanoparticle assemblies. Static contact angle measurements with water show an increase in hydrophilic character due to bimetallic nanoparticle generation on different surfaces. It is further observed that these Au–Pt core–shell bimetallic nanoparticle assemblies are catalytically active towards methanol electro-oxidation, which is the key reaction for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs.

  14. Energy storage in ferroelectric polymer nanocomposites filled with core-shell structured polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles: understanding the role of polymer shells in the interfacial regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Huang, Xingyi; Yang, Ke; Zhai, Xing; Zhang, Jun; He, Jinliang; Jiang, Pingkai

    2014-11-26

    The interfacial region plays a critical role in determining the electrical properties and energy storage density of dielectric polymer nanocomposites. However, we still know a little about the effects of electrical properties of the interfacial regions on the electrical properties and energy storage of dielectric polymer nanocomposites. In this work, three types of core-shell structured polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles with polymer shells having different electrical properties were used as fillers to prepare ferroelectric polymer nanocomposites. All the polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles were prepared by surface-initiated reversible-addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and the polymer shells were controlled to have the same thickness. The morphology, crystal structure, frequency-dependent dielectric properties, breakdown strength, leakage currents, energy storage capability, and energy storage efficiency of the polymer nanocomposites were investigated. On the other hand, the pure polymers having the same molecular structure as the shells of polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles were also prepared by RAFT polymerization, and their electrical properties were provided. Our results show that, to achieve nanocomposites with high discharged energy density, the core-shell nanoparticle filler should simultaneously have high dielectric constant and low electrical conductivity. On the other hand, the breakdown strength of the polymer@BaTiO3-based nanocomposites is highly affected by the electrical properties of the polymer shells. It is believed that the electrical conductivity of the polymer shells should be as low as possible to achieve nanocomposites with high breakdown strength.

  15. Core-shell structure of Miglyol/poly(D,L-lactide)/Poloxamer nanocapsules studied by small-angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rübe, Andrea; Hause, Gerd; Mäder, Karsten; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2005-10-03

    The contrast variation technique in small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to investigate the inner structure of nanocapsules on the example of poly(D,L-lactide) (PLA) nanocapsules. The determination of the PLA and Poloxamer shell thickness was the focus of this study. Highest sensitivity on the inner structure of the nanocapsules was obtained when the scattering length density of the solvent was varied between the one of the Miglyol core and the PLA shell. According to the fit data the PLA shell thickness was 9.8 nm. The z-averaged radius determined by SANS experiments correlated well with dynamic light scattering (DLS) results, although DLS values were systematically slightly higher than the ones measured by SANS. This could be explained by taking into account the influence of Poloxamer attached to the nanocapsules surface. For a refined fit model with a second shell consisting of Poloxamer, SANS values and DLS values fitted well with each other. The characterization method presented here is significant because detailed insights into the nanocapsule and the Poloxamer shell were gained for the first time. This method could be used to develop strategies for the optimization of the shell properties concerning controlled release and to study changes in the shell structure during degradation processes.

  16. MEL finite element analysis of water-shell interactions in the context of a PWR-LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbiese, S.; Vrije Universiteit Brussels; Goethem, G. van

    1979-01-01

    In the framework of the computational effort engaged towards and understanding of the transient dynamic fluid-structure phenomena taking place in the very first instants of the PWR loss-of-coolant-accident, before the ebullition crisis and the subsequent two-phase flow, two finite element programs have been selected and coupled to describe this class of events in pressure vessels undergoing moderate plastic deformations. Water is modeled by a compressible inviscid Eulerian (bulk of the fluid) - mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian MEL (boundary elements in contact with the moving structure) program. For the shells a convected coordinates elastic-plastic structural code (EURDYN I) is used. A 1-D discussion on the MEL integration scheme is presented, as well as a flow chart of the combined program. Emphases is placed, during the present calculations limited to very simple axisymmetric configurations, upon the computational aspects in dealing with the interaction of both media at the fluid-structure interface, such as weak code coupling, subcycling and pressure relaxation. (orig.)

  17. Point-like structure and off-shell dual strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.B.

    1977-01-01

    It is argued that in a consistent off-shell dual formalism the amplitude for the emission of a scalar off-shell state by a string consists of two components. One of these contains the particle poles in the off-shell leg and the other is intimately related to the insertion of a point-like energy density on the string. As a result, the amplitude for a string to emit a zero momentum scalar state into the vacuum (which may be relevant for spontaneous symmetry breaking) is described by the amplitude for a finite fraction of the energy in the string to collapse to a spatial point at some time (this fraction and its space-time position being integrated over). The off-shell amplitudes have an elegant formulation in terms of a set of 'confined modes' which can be assigned quark flavour quantum numbers to reproduce the Chan-Paton scheme. It is suggested that the dual model be modified by allowing for the coupling of scalar closed strings to the vacuum and the resulting effect on the space-time structure of dual Green functions is described. It is found that even the emission of a single zero-momentum closed string modifies the elastic amplitude in a significant manner, leading to a power-behaved fixed-angle cross section in contrast to the usual exponential decrease of the dual model. This arises from point-like scattering between energy densities accumulating in the colliding strings. The relationship between the fixed angle and Regge limits is discussed. The fixed angle behaviour is found to be the asymptotic limit in momentum transfer of a fixed pole that arises in the Regge limit. (Auth.)

  18. Wrinkling of Pressurized Elastic Shells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, Dominic; Ajdari, Amin; Vaziri, Ashkan; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2011-01-01

    We study the formation of localized structures formed by the point loading of an internally pressurized elastic shell. While unpressurized shells (such as a ping-pong ball) buckle into polygonal structures, we show that pressurized shells

  19. Shell structure at high spin and the influence on nuclear shapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoo, T.L.; Chowdhury, P.; Ahmad, I.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear structure at high spin is influenced by a combination of liquid-drop and shell-structure effects. For N 90. The competition between oblate and prolate driving effects leads to a prolate-to-oblate shape transition in 154 Dy 88 . The role of rotation-aligned configurations in the shape change is discussed

  20. Opal shell structures: direct assembly versus inversion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tian-Song; Sharifi, Parvin; Marlow, Frank

    2013-09-16

    Opal shell structures can be fabricated in two ways: By direct assembly from hollow spheres (hs-opal) or by infiltration of precursors into opal templates and inversion. The resulting lattice disturbances were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy, and transmission spectra. The hs-opal system shows much lower disturbances, for example, a lower number of cracks and lattice deformations. The strong suppression of crack formation in one of these inverse opal structures can be considered as promising candidates for the fabrication of more perfect photonic crystals. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Active vibration control of a cylindrical structure using flexible piezoactuators: experimental work in air and water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Jung Woo; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, the modal characteristics and vibration control performance of a cylindrical structure in air and water are experimentally investigated, and the results are presented in time and frequency domains. In order to achieve this goal, an end-capped cylindrical shell structure is considered as a host structure, and MFC (macro fiber composite) actuators, which are flexible, are bonded on the surface of the structure. After manufacturing a cylindrical shell structure with aluminum, a modal test is carried out, and the natural frequencies of the proposed structure are obtained and analyzed. To verify the modal test results, a finite element analysis is also performed, and the results are compared with the modal test results. By using the experimentally obtained modal characteristics, a state space control model is established. An optimal controller is then designed in order to control the unwanted vibration and is experimentally realized. It has been shown that the structural vibration can be effectively decreased with the optimal control methodology in both air and water environmental conditions. (technical note)

  2. The negative temperature coefficient resistivities of Ag2S-Ag core–shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Mingming; Liu, Dongzhi; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xueqin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the conductivity of silver nanoparticle films protected by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (Ag/MPA) has been investigated. When the nanoparticles were annealed in air at 200 °C, they converted to stable Ag 2 S-Ag core–shell structures. The mechanism for the formation of the Ag 2 S-Ag core–shell structures along with the compositional changes and the microstructural evolution of the Ag/MPA nanoparticles during the annealing process are discussed. It is proposed that the Ag 2 S-Ag core–shell structure was formed through a solid-state reduction reaction, in which the Ag + ions coming from Ag 2 S were reduced by sulfonate species and sulfur ions. The final Ag 2 S-Ag films display an exponentially decreased resistivity with increasing temperature from 25 to 170 °C. The negative temperature coefficient resistivity of Ag 2 S-Ag films can be adjusted by changing the S/Ag molar ratio used for the synthesis of the Ag/MPA nanoparticles, paving the way for the preparation of negative temperature-coefficient thermistors via printing technology for use in the electronics.

  3. Adaptive resolution simulation of a biomolecule and its hydration shell: Structural and dynamical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogarty, Aoife C.; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    A fully atomistic modelling of many biophysical and biochemical processes at biologically relevant length- and time scales is beyond our reach with current computational resources, and one approach to overcome this difficulty is the use of multiscale simulation techniques. In such simulations, when system properties necessitate a boundary between resolutions that falls within the solvent region, one can use an approach such as the Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS), in which solvent particles change their resolution on the fly during the simulation. Here, we apply the existing AdResS methodology to biomolecular systems, simulating a fully atomistic protein with an atomistic hydration shell, solvated in a coarse-grained particle reservoir and heat bath. Using as a test case an aqueous solution of the regulatory protein ubiquitin, we first confirm the validity of the AdResS approach for such systems, via an examination of protein and solvent structural and dynamical properties. We then demonstrate how, in addition to providing a computational speedup, such a multiscale AdResS approach can yield otherwise inaccessible physical insights into biomolecular function. We use our methodology to show that protein structure and dynamics can still be correctly modelled using only a few shells of atomistic water molecules. We also discuss aspects of the AdResS methodology peculiar to biomolecular simulations

  4. Adaptive resolution simulation of a biomolecule and its hydration shell: Structural and dynamical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogarty, Aoife C., E-mail: fogarty@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Potestio, Raffaello, E-mail: potestio@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Kremer, Kurt, E-mail: kremer@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-05-21

    A fully atomistic modelling of many biophysical and biochemical processes at biologically relevant length- and time scales is beyond our reach with current computational resources, and one approach to overcome this difficulty is the use of multiscale simulation techniques. In such simulations, when system properties necessitate a boundary between resolutions that falls within the solvent region, one can use an approach such as the Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS), in which solvent particles change their resolution on the fly during the simulation. Here, we apply the existing AdResS methodology to biomolecular systems, simulating a fully atomistic protein with an atomistic hydration shell, solvated in a coarse-grained particle reservoir and heat bath. Using as a test case an aqueous solution of the regulatory protein ubiquitin, we first confirm the validity of the AdResS approach for such systems, via an examination of protein and solvent structural and dynamical properties. We then demonstrate how, in addition to providing a computational speedup, such a multiscale AdResS approach can yield otherwise inaccessible physical insights into biomolecular function. We use our methodology to show that protein structure and dynamics can still be correctly modelled using only a few shells of atomistic water molecules. We also discuss aspects of the AdResS methodology peculiar to biomolecular simulations.

  5. Controllable dielectric and electrical performance of polymer composites with novel core/shell-structured conductive particles through biomimetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dan; Tian, Ming; Wang, Wencai; Li, Dongdong; Li, Runyuan; Liu, Haoliang; Zhang, Liqun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Conductive core/shell-structured particles were synthesized by biomimetic method. ► These particles with silica/poly(dopamine)/silver core and poly(dopamine) shell. ► Dielectric composites were prepared with resulted particles and silicone elastomer. ► The dielectric properties of the composites can be controlled by shell thickness. ► This biomimetic method is simple, nontoxic, efficient and easy to control. - Abstract: Novel silica/poly(dopamine)/silver (from inner to outer) (denoted as SiO 2 /PDA/Ag) conductive micro-particles were first synthesized by biomimetic poly(dopamine) coating. These micro-particles were then coated with a poly(dopamine) layer to form core/shell-structured particles, with silica/poly(dopamine)/silver core and poly(dopamine) shell (denoted as SiO 2 /PDA/Ag/PDA). This multilayer core/shell micro-particles were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscope. Polymer composites were then prepared by mechanical blending of poly(dimethyl siloxane) and the core/shell-structured particles. It was found that the silver layer and the poly(dopamine) shell had good adhesion with substrate and they kept intact even under violent shearing stress during mechanical mixing. The effect of the thickness of outermost poly(dopamine) shell as well as the loading amount of this filler on the dielectric and electrical properties of the composites was further studied. The results showed that the dielectric constant, dielectric loss, and conductivity of the composites decreased with increasing shell thickness (10–53 nm) at the same loading level. And the maximal dielectric constant of composites was achieved in the composites filled with SiO 2 /PDA/Ag/PDA (with 10–15 nm PDA shell) particles, which was much larger than that of the composite filled with SiO 2 /PDA/Ag particles without insulative PDA shell. At the same time, the composites can change

  6. Benefits of Silica Core-Shell Structures on the Temperature Sensing Properties of Er,Yb:GdVO4 Up-Conversion Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchuk, Oleksandr A; Carvajal, Joan J; Cascales, C; Aguiló, M; Díaz, F

    2016-03-23

    We studied the temperature-dependent luminescence of GdVO4 nanoparticles co-doped with Er(3+) (1 mol %) and Yb(3+) (20 mol %) and determined their thermal sensing properties through the fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) technique. We also analyzed how a silica coating, in a core-shell structure, affects the temperature sensing properties of this material. Spectra were recorded in the range of biological temperatures (298-343 K). The absolute sensitivity for temperature determination calculated for the core-shell nanoparticles is double the one calculated for bare nanoparticles, achieving a thermal resolution of 0.4 K. Moreover, silica-coated nanoparticles show good dispersibility in different solvents, such as water, DMSO, and methanol. Also, they show good luminescence stability without interactions with solvent molecules. Furthermore, we also observed that the silica coating shell prevents progressive heating of the nanoparticles during prolonged excitation periods with the 980 nm laser, preventing effects on their thermometric applications.

  7. Core-Shell Nano structure of a-Fe2O3/Fe3O4: Synthesis and Photo catalysis for Methyl Orange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Y.; Wu, D.; Yu, B.; Jia, X.; Zhan, S.

    2011-01-01

    Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticle was synthesized in the solution involving water and ethanol. Then, a-Fe 2 O 3 shell was produced in situ on the surface of the Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticle by surface oxidation in molten salts, forming α-Fe 2 O 3 /Fe 3 O 4 core-shell nano structure. It was showed that the magnetic properties transformed from ferromagnetism to superparamagnetism after the primary Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were oxidized. Furthermore, the obtained a-Fe 2 O 3 /Fe 3 O 4 core-shell nanoparticles were used to photo catalyse solution of methyl orange, and the results revealed that a-Fe 2 O 3 /Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were more efficient than the self-prepared α-Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles. At the same time, the photo catalyzer was recyclable by applying an appropriate magnetic field.

  8. Gastropod shell size and architecture influence the applicability of methods used to estimate internal volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragagnin, Marilia Nagata; Gorman, Daniel; McCarthy, Ian Donald; Sant'Anna, Bruno Sampaio; de Castro, Cláudio Campi; Turra, Alexander

    2018-01-11

    Obtaining accurate and reproducible estimates of internal shell volume is a vital requirement for studies into the ecology of a range of shell-occupying organisms, including hermit crabs. Shell internal volume is usually estimated by filling the shell cavity with water or sand, however, there has been no systematic assessment of the reliability of these methods and moreover no comparison with modern alternatives, e.g., computed tomography (CT). This study undertakes the first assessment of the measurement reproducibility of three contrasting approaches across a spectrum of shell architectures and sizes. While our results suggested a certain level of variability inherent for all methods, we conclude that a single measure using sand/water is likely to be sufficient for the majority of studies. However, care must be taken as precision may decline with increasing shell size and structural complexity. CT provided less variation between repeat measures but volume estimates were consistently lower compared to sand/water and will need methodological improvements before it can be used as an alternative. CT indicated volume may be also underestimated using sand/water due to the presence of air spaces visible in filled shells scanned by CT. Lastly, we encourage authors to clearly describe how volume estimates were obtained.

  9. A refined element-based Lagrangian shell element for geometrically nonlinear analysis of shell structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Young Jung

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For the solution of geometrically nonlinear analysis of plates and shells, the formulation of a nonlinear nine-node refined first-order shear deformable element-based Lagrangian shell element is presented. Natural co-ordinate-based higher order transverse shear strains are used in present shell element. Using the assumed natural strain method with proper interpolation functions, the present shell element generates neither membrane nor shear locking behavior even when full integration is used in the formulation. Furthermore, a refined first-order shear deformation theory for thin and thick shells, which results in parabolic through-thickness distribution of the transverse shear strains from the formulation based on the third-order shear deformation theory, is proposed. This formulation eliminates the need for shear correction factors in the first-order theory. To avoid difficulties resulting from large increments of the rotations, a scheme of attached reference system is used for the expression of rotations of shell normal. Numerical examples demonstrate that the present element behaves reasonably satisfactorily either for the linear or for geometrically nonlinear analysis of thin and thick plates and shells with large displacement but small strain. Especially, the nonlinear results of slit annular plates with various loads provided the benchmark to test the accuracy of related numerical solutions.

  10. Shell-like structures advanced theories and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Eremeyev, Victor

    2017-01-01

    The book presents mathematical and mechanical aspects of the theory of plates and shells, applications in civil, aero-space and mechanical engineering, as well in other areas. The focus relates to the following problems: • comprehensive review of the most popular theories of plates and shells, • relations between three-dimensional theories and two-dimensional ones, • presentation of recently developed new refined plates and shells theories (for example, the micropolar theory or gradient-type theories), • modeling of coupled effects in shells and plates related to electromagnetic and temperature fields, phase transitions, diffusion, etc., • applications in modeling of non-classical objects like, for example, nanostructures, • presentation of actual numerical tools based on the finite element approach.

  11. Shell structure from N=Z (100Sn) to N>>Z (78Ni)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grawe, H.

    2003-01-01

    The shell structure of 100 Sn shows striking resemblance to 56 Ni one major shell below. Large-scale shell model calculations employing realistic interactions derived from effective NN potentials and allowing for up to 4p4h excitations of the 100 Sn core account very well for the spectroscopy of key neighbours 102,103 Sn, 98 Cd and 94 Ag, as inferred from level energies, isomerism, E2 strengths and Gamow-Teller (GT) decay of high-spin states. Recent β- decay studies of 101-104 Sn using the sulphurisation ISOL technique open the perspective to study the 100 Sn GT resonance. At N>>Z the persistence of the N=50 and the weakness of the N=40 shells are traced back to the monopole interaction in S=0 proton-neutron (πν) pairs of nucleons, a scenario which can be generalised to account for the new N=6,16(14),34(32) magicity in light neutron-rich nuclei. (orig.)

  12. A numerical investigation of γ-Al2O3-water nanofluids heat transfer and pressure drop in a shell and tube heat exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Shahmohammadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of γ-Al2O3 nanoparticles on heat transfer rate, baffle spacing and pressure drop in the shell side of small shell and tube heat exchangers was investigated numerically under turbulent regime. γ-Al2O3-water nanofluids and pure water were used in the shell side and the tube side of heat exchangers, respectively. Since the properties of γ-Al2O3-water nanofluids were variable, they were defined using the user define function. The results revealed that heat transfer and pressure drop were increased with mass flow rate as well as baffle numbers. Adding nanoparticles to the based fluid did not have a significant effect on pressure drop in the shell side. The best heat transfer performance of heat exchangers was for γ-Al2O3-water 1 vol.% and higher nanoparticles concentration was not suitable. The suitable baffle spacing was 43.4% of the shell diameter, showing a good agreement with Bell-Delaware method.

  13. Shell Thickness Dependence of Interparticle Energy Transfer in Core-Shell ZnSe/ZnSe Quantum Dots Doping with Europium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ni; Li, Shuxin; Wang, Caifeng; Li, Jie

    2018-04-01

    Low-toxic core-shell ZnSe:Eu/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) were prepared through two steps in water solution: nucleation doping and epitaxial shell grown. The structural and morphological characteristics of ZnSe/ZnS:Eu QDs with different shell thickness were explored by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results. The characteristic photoluminescence (PL) intensity of Eu ions was enhanced whereas that of band-edge luminescence and defect-related luminescence of ZnSe QDs was decreased with increasing shell thickness. The transformation of PL intensity revealed an efficient energy transfer process between ZnSe and Eu. The PL intensity ratio of Eu ions ( I 613) to ZnSe QDs ( I B ) under different shell thickness was systemically analyzed by PL spectra and time-resolved PL spectra. The obtained results were in agreement with the theory analysis results by the kinetic theory of energy transfer, revealing that energy was transmitted in the form of dipole-electric dipole interaction. This particular method of adjusting luminous via changing the shell thickness can provide valuable insights towards the fundamental understanding and application of QDs in the field of optoelectronics.

  14. Dynamics of Inhomogeneous Shell Systems Under Non-Stationary Loading (Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugovoi, P. Z.; Meish, V. F.

    2017-09-01

    Experimental works on the determination of dynamics of smooth and stiffened cylindrical shells contacting with a soil medium under various non-stationary loading are reviewed. The results of studying three-layer shells of revolution whose motion equations are obtained within the framework of the hypotheses of the Timoshenko geometrically nonlinear theory are stated. The numerical results for shells with a piecewise or discrete filler enable the analysis of estimation of the influence of geometrical and physical-mechanical parameters of structures on their dynamics and reveal new mechanical effects. Basing on the classical theory of shells and rods, the effect of the discrete arrangement of ribs and coefficients of the Winkler or Pasternak elastic foundation on the normal frequencies and modes of rectangular planar cylindrical and spherical shells is studied. The number and shape of dispersion curves for longitudinal harmonic waves in a stiffened cylindrical shell are determined. The equations of vibrations of ribbed shells of revolution on Winkler or Pasternak elastic foundation are obtained using the geometrically nonlinear theory and the Timoshenko hypotheses. On applying the integral-interpolational method, numerical algorithms are developed and the corresponding non-stationary problems are solved. The special attention is paid to the statement and solution of coupled problems on the dynamical interaction of cylindrical or spherical shells with the soil water-saturated medium of different structure.

  15. Immobilization of cholesterol oxidase on magnetic fluorescent core-shell-structured nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jun, E-mail: hjun@whut.edu.cn; Liu, Huichao; Zhang, Peipei; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Mengshi; Ding, Liyun

    2015-12-01

    The magnetic fluorescent core-shell structured nanoparticles, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(F)@meso–SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, were prepared. Cholesterol oxidase (COD) was immobilized on their surface to form Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(F)@meso–SiO{sub 2}@COD nanoparticles. Optimal immobilization was achieved with 2.5% (v/v) APTES, 2.0% (v/v) GA, 10 mg COD (in 15 mg carrier) and solution pH of 7.0. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(F)@meso–SiO{sub 2}@COD nanoparticles showed maximal catalytic activity at pH 7.0 and 50 °C. The thermal, storage and operational stabilities of COD were improved greatly after its immobilization. After the incubation at 50 °C for 5 h, the nanoparticles and free COD retained 80% and 46% of its initial activity, respectively. After kept at 4 °C for 30 days, the nanoparticles and free COD maintained 86% and 65% of initial activity, respectively. The nanoparticles retained 71% of its initial activity after 7 consecutive operations. Since Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(F)@meso–SiO{sub 2}@COD nanoparticles contained tris(2,2-bipyridyl)dichloro-ruthenium(II) hexahydrate (Ru(bpy){sub 3}Cl{sub 2}) and were optical sensitive to oxygen in solution, it might be used as the sensing material and has the application potential in multi parameter fiber optic biosensor based on enzyme catalysis and oxygen consumption. - Highlights: • COD was immobilized on magnetic fluorescent core-shell structured nanoparticles. • The nanoparticles were optical sensitive to oxygen in water solution. • The nanoparticles have remarkable improved stability compared with free COD. • The nanoparticles can probably be used in multi parameter fiber optic Biosensor.

  16. Optimal design of hollow core–shell structural active materials for lithium ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To mitigate mechanical and chemical degradation of active materials, hollow core–shell structures have been applied in lithium ion batteries. Without embedding of lithium ions, the rigid coating shell can constrain the inward volume deformation. In this paper, optimal conditions for the full use of inner hollow space are identified in terms of the critical ratio of shell thickness and inner size and the state of charge. It is shown that the critical ratios are 0.10 and 0.15 for Si particle and tube (0.12 and 0.18 for Sn particle and tube, and above which there is lack of space for further lithiation.

  17. Integrable structure in discrete shell membrane theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schief, W K

    2014-05-08

    We present natural discrete analogues of two integrable classes of shell membranes. By construction, these discrete shell membranes are in equilibrium with respect to suitably chosen internal stresses and external forces. The integrability of the underlying equilibrium equations is proved by relating the geometry of the discrete shell membranes to discrete O surface theory. We establish connections with generalized barycentric coordinates and nine-point centres and identify a discrete version of the classical Gauss equation of surface theory.

  18. Response of a shell structure subject to distributed harmonic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Rui; Bolton, J. Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Previously, a coupled, two-dimensional structural-acoustic ring model was constructed to simulate the dynamic and acoustical behavior of pneumatic tires. Analytical forced solutions were obtained and were experimentally verified through laser velocimeter measurement made using automobile tires. However, the two-dimensional ring model is incapable of representing higher order, in-plane modal motion in either the circumferential or axial directions. Therefore, in this paper, a three-dimensional pressurized circular shell model is proposed to study the in-plane shearing motion and the effect of different forcing conditions. Closed form analytical solutions were obtained for both free and forced vibrations of the shell under simply supported boundary conditions. Dispersion relations were calculated and different wave types were identified by their different speeds. Shell surface mobility results under various input distributions were also studied and compared. Spatial Fourier series decompositions were also performed on the spatial mobility results to give the forced dispersion relations, which illustrate clearly the influence of input force spatial distribution. Such a model has practical application in identifying the sources of noise and vibration problems in automotive tires. (paper)

  19. Biosorption of divalent Pb, Cd and Zn on aragonite and calcite mollusk shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Yang; Lian Fei [Key Laboratory of Pollution Process and Environmental Criteria, Ministry of Education, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Urban Ecology Environmental Remediation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhu Lingyan, E-mail: zhuly@nankai.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Pollution Process and Environmental Criteria, Ministry of Education, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Urban Ecology Environmental Remediation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2011-07-15

    The potential of using mollusk shell powder in aragonite (razor clam shells, RCS) and calcite phase (oyster shells, OS) to remove Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} from contaminated water was investigated. Both biogenic sorbents displayed very high sorption capacities for the three metals except for Cd on OS. XRD, SEM and XPS results demonstrated that surface precipitation leading to crystal growth took place during sorption. Calcite OS displayed a remarkably higher sorption capacity to Pb than aragonite RCS, while the opposite was observed for Cd. However, both sorbents displayed similar sorption capacities to Zn. These could be due to the different extent of matching in crystal lattice between the metal bearing precipitate and the substrates. The initial pH of the solution, sorbent's dosage and grain size affected the removal efficiency of the heavy meals significantly, while the organic matter in mollusk shells affected the removal efficiency to a lesser extent. - Highlights: > Mollusk shells display high removal efficiency to heavy metals in contaminated water. > Surface precipitation leading to crystal growth takes place during the sorption. > Crystal structure similarity between precipitates and substrates affects the sorption. > pH, sorbent dosage and grain size of adsorbent affects the removal efficiency. > Organic matter in mollusk shells affects the removal efficiency to a less extent. - Mollusk shells display high sorption ability to heavy metals and crystal structure similarity between precipitates and substrates affects the sorption.

  20. Electrical Conductivity of Ni-YSZ Anode for SOFCs According to the Ni Powder Size Variations in Core-shell Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Jin; Jung, Sung-Hun; An, Yong-Tae; Choi, Byung-Hyun; Ji, Mi-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Ni-YSZ (Y_2O_3-stabilized ZrO_2) core-shell structures were prepared by a high-speed mixing method, starting from Ni particles of three different average sizes of 0.2, 0.4, and 1.8 μm. The Ni-YSZ core-shell structures prepared using Ni particles of size 0.2, 0.4, and 1.8 μm exhibited dense core, porous core, and random-morphology core, respectively. Subsequently, nano structured cermet anodes were fabricated using the prepared Ni-YSZ core-shell powders. During the formation of cermet, the heat treatment of Ni-YSZ core-shell powder results in the eruption of Ni core out of the YSZ shell layers, thereby facilitating the formation of nano structured Ni-YSZ cermet. Systematic studies indicated that the morphology and electrical conductivity of the prepared Ni-YSZ core-shell powders and the cermet anode varied, depending on the initial particle size of the Ni particles. Of the different samples prepared in this study, the Ni-YSZ cermet prepared using Ni particles of size 0.4 μm showed the highest electrical conductivity at 750 ℃.

  1. Electrical Conductivity of Ni-YSZ Anode for SOFCs According to the Ni Powder Size Variations in Core-shell Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Jin; Jung, Sung-Hun; An, Yong-Tae; Choi, Byung-Hyun; Ji, Mi-Jung [Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology (KICET), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Ni-YSZ (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}) core-shell structures were prepared by a high-speed mixing method, starting from Ni particles of three different average sizes of 0.2, 0.4, and 1.8 μm. The Ni-YSZ core-shell structures prepared using Ni particles of size 0.2, 0.4, and 1.8 μm exhibited dense core, porous core, and random-morphology core, respectively. Subsequently, nano structured cermet anodes were fabricated using the prepared Ni-YSZ core-shell powders. During the formation of cermet, the heat treatment of Ni-YSZ core-shell powder results in the eruption of Ni core out of the YSZ shell layers, thereby facilitating the formation of nano structured Ni-YSZ cermet. Systematic studies indicated that the morphology and electrical conductivity of the prepared Ni-YSZ core-shell powders and the cermet anode varied, depending on the initial particle size of the Ni particles. Of the different samples prepared in this study, the Ni-YSZ cermet prepared using Ni particles of size 0.4 μm showed the highest electrical conductivity at 750 ℃.

  2. Importance-truncated shell model for multi-shell valence spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpf, Christina; Vobig, Klaus; Roth, Robert [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The valence-space shell model is one of the work horses in nuclear structure theory. In traditional applications, shell-model calculations are carried out using effective interactions constructed in a phenomenological framework for rather small valence spaces, typically spanned by one major shell. We improve on this traditional approach addressing two main aspects. First, we use new effective interactions derived in an ab initio approach and, thus, establish a connection to the underlying nuclear interaction providing access to single- and multi-shell valence spaces. Second, we extend the shell model to larger valence spaces by applying an importance-truncation scheme based on a perturbative importance measure. In this way, we reduce the model space to the relevant basis states for the description of a few target eigenstates and solve the eigenvalue problem in this physics-driven truncated model space. In particular multi-shell valence spaces are not tractable otherwise. We combine the importance-truncated shell model with refined extrapolation schemes to approximately recover the exact result. We present first results obtained in the importance-truncated shell model with the newly derived ab initio effective interactions for multi-shell valence spaces, e.g., the sdpf shell.

  3. Structural Color Palettes of Core-Shell Photonic Ink Capsules Containing Cholesteric Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Seok; Seo, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Yun Ho; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Photonic microcapsules with onion-like topology are microfluidically designed to have cholesteric liquid crystals with opposite handedness in their core and shell. The microcapsules exhibit structural colors caused by dual photonic bandgaps, resulting in a rich variety of color on the optical palette. Moreover, the microcapsules can switch the colors from either core or shell depending on the selection of light-handedness. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Facile synthesis of core–shell structured PANI-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposites with superior electrochemical performance in supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hai, Zhenyin [Key Laboratory of Instrumentation and Dynamic Measurement of Ministry of Education, North University of China, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030051 (China); Gao, Libo [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, Kowloon 999077 (Hong Kong); Zhang, Qiang [Key Laboratory of Instrumentation and Dynamic Measurement of Ministry of Education, North University of China, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030051 (China); Xu, Hongyan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030051 (China); Cui, Danfeng; Zhang, Zengxing [Key Laboratory of Instrumentation and Dynamic Measurement of Ministry of Education, North University of China, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030051 (China); Tsoukalas, Dimitris [Department of Applied Physics, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou GR-15780 (Greece); Tang, Jun; Yan, Shubin [Key Laboratory of Instrumentation and Dynamic Measurement of Ministry of Education, North University of China, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030051 (China); Xue, Chenyang, E-mail: xuechenyang@nuc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Instrumentation and Dynamic Measurement of Ministry of Education, North University of China, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030051 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PANI-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} is synthesized by carbon-assisted and in situ polymerization methods. • PANI coating improves the properties of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} affecting electrochemical performance. • The nanocomposites exhibit a high specific capacitance of 1184 F g{sup −1} at 1.25 A g{sup −1}. - Abstract: Core–shell structured PANI-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposites for supercapacitor applications were synthesized by combination of carbon-assisted method and in situ polymerization method. The crystalline structure, optical band gap, morphology, and hydrophilic property, as the major factors affecting the performances of supercapacitors, were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis spectrophotometry (UV–vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and water contact angle (WCA). The core–shell structured PANI-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposites are characterized by amorphous PANI, small bandgaps, large surface area and favorable hydrophilicity, which indicates the superior electrochemical performances of the nanocomposites as electrode material for supercapacitors. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were conducted in 6 M KOH aqueous solution to evaluate the electrochemical performances. The results shows that core–shell structured PANI-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposites exhibit a high specific capacitance of 1184 F g{sup −1} at 1.25 A g{sup −1}, excellent cycling stability of a capacitance retention of 84.9% after 1000 galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles, good electrical conductivity and ion diffusion behavior.

  5. Chemical Structure, Ensemble and Single-Particle Spectroscopy of Thick-Shell InP-ZnSe Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kemar R; McBride, James R; Freymeyer, Nathaniel J; Thal, Lucas B; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2018-02-14

    Thick-shell (>5 nm) InP-ZnSe colloidal quantum dots (QDs) grown by a continuous-injection shell growth process are reported. The growth of a thick crystalline shell is attributed to the high temperature of the growth process and the relatively low lattice mismatch between the InP core and ZnSe shell. In addition to a narrow ensemble photoluminescence (PL) line-width (∼40 nm), ensemble and single-particle emission dynamics measurements indicate that blinking and Auger recombination are reduced in these heterostructures. More specifically, high single-dot ON-times (>95%) were obtained for the core-shell QDs, and measured ensemble biexciton lifetimes, τ 2x ∼ 540 ps, represent a 7-fold increase compared to InP-ZnS QDs. Further, high-resolution energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) chemical maps directly show for the first time significant incorporation of indium into the shell of the InP-ZnSe QDs. Examination of the atomic structure of the thick-shell QDs by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) reveals structural defects in subpopulations of particles that may mitigate PL efficiencies (∼40% in ensemble), providing insight toward further synthetic refinement. These InP-ZnSe heterostructures represent progress toward fully cadmium-free QDs with superior photophysical properties important in biological labeling and other emission-based technologies.

  6. Facile one-step synthesis and photoluminescence properties of Ag–ZnO core–shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, HongJu; Wang, LiJing; Han, DongLai; Wang, Huan; Wang, Jian; Liu, XiaoYan; Lin, Xue; Li, XiuYan; Gao, Ming; Yang, JingHai

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The PL of the Ag–ZnO core-shell nanostructure showed obvious increase of UV emission and slight decrease of visible light emission compared to that of the pure ZnO. With the calcination temperature increasing from 300 to 600 °C, the primary peak located at 380 nm became stronger and sharper, indicating that the increasing calcination temperature made the samples crystallize better. - Highlights: • Ag-ZnO core-shell structure was obtained via a simple one-step solvothermal process. • The approach was simple, mild, low cost, reproducible and easy-to-handle. • The obvious enhancement of UV luminescent has been observed. • Effects of the calcining temperature to luminescence were investigated in detail. - Abstract: Ag–ZnO core–shell structures were gained via one-step solvothermal process. The products were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) and UV–vis spectroscopy, respectively. It was shown that the properties were greatly changed compared to pure ZnO from the PL and Raman spectra, which indicated the strong interfacial interaction between ZnO and Ag. The work provides a feasible method to synthesize Ag–ZnO core–shell structure photocatalyst, which is promising in the further practical application of ZnO-based photocatalytic materials

  7. Optimised photocatalytic hydrogen production using core–shell AuPd promoters with controlled shell thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Wilm; Su, Ren; Wells, Peter

    2014-01-01

    of these materials towards the reforming of alcohols for hydrogen production. The core–shell structured Au–Pd bimetallic nanoparticle supported on TiO2 has being of interest as it exhibited extremely high quantum efficiencies for hydrogen production. However, the effect of shell composition and thickness...... of the nanoparticles by a combination of X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photocatalytic ethanol reforming showed that the core–shell structured Au–Pd promoters supported on TiO2 exhibit enhanced activity compared to that of monometallic Au and Pd as promoters, whilst the core......–shell Au–Pd promoters containing one ML equivalent Pd provide the optimum reactivity....

  8. Controlled growth of Ni/NiO core–shell nanoparticles: Structure, morphology and tuning of magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Addato, S., E-mail: sergio.daddato@unimore.it [CNR-NANO, S3, via G. Campi 213/a, Modena (Italy); Dipartimento FIM, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G. Campi 213/a, Modena (Italy); Spadaro, M.C. [CNR-NANO, S3, via G. Campi 213/a, Modena (Italy); Dipartimento FIM, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G. Campi 213/a, Modena (Italy); Luches, P. [CNR-NANO, S3, via G. Campi 213/a, Modena (Italy); Grillo, V. [CNR-NANO, S3, via G. Campi 213/a, Modena (Italy); CNR-IMEM, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43100 Parma (Italy); Frabboni, S.; Valeri, S. [CNR-NANO, S3, via G. Campi 213/a, Modena (Italy); Dipartimento FIM, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G. Campi 213/a, Modena (Italy); Ferretti, A.M.; Capetti, E.; Ponti, A. [CNR-ISTM, Laboratorio di Nanotecnologie, via G. Fantoli 16/15, 20138 Milano (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    We performed a detailed study of Ni/NiO core–shell nanoparticles (NP) obtained with a gas aggregation source. The NP oxide shells were produced by oxidizing the NP with different procedures: deposition in oxygen atmosphere, post-annealing in air, sequential deposition of (a) first NiO layer, (b) Ni NP and (c) third NiO Layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy from Ni 2p core-level gave information about the chemical state of Ni in the core and in the oxide shell, while scanning electron microscopy was used for investigation of the NP morphology. High quality scanning transmission electron microscopy in high angle annular dark field mode data demonstrated core–shell structure also for NiO/Ni NP/NiO samples. Field-cooled/zero-field-cooled magnetization curves and field-cooled isothermal hysteresis cycles at T = 5 K were recorded by a SQUID magnetometer. In this way, the relation between magnetic properties and oxide shell structure was assessed, showing the role played by the control of the formation of oxide on the exchange bias and interparticle magnetic interaction.

  9. Controlled growth of Ni/NiO core–shell nanoparticles: Structure, morphology and tuning of magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Addato, S.; Spadaro, M.C.; Luches, P.; Grillo, V.; Frabboni, S.; Valeri, S.; Ferretti, A.M.; Capetti, E.; Ponti, A.

    2014-01-01

    We performed a detailed study of Ni/NiO core–shell nanoparticles (NP) obtained with a gas aggregation source. The NP oxide shells were produced by oxidizing the NP with different procedures: deposition in oxygen atmosphere, post-annealing in air, sequential deposition of (a) first NiO layer, (b) Ni NP and (c) third NiO Layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy from Ni 2p core-level gave information about the chemical state of Ni in the core and in the oxide shell, while scanning electron microscopy was used for investigation of the NP morphology. High quality scanning transmission electron microscopy in high angle annular dark field mode data demonstrated core–shell structure also for NiO/Ni NP/NiO samples. Field-cooled/zero-field-cooled magnetization curves and field-cooled isothermal hysteresis cycles at T = 5 K were recorded by a SQUID magnetometer. In this way, the relation between magnetic properties and oxide shell structure was assessed, showing the role played by the control of the formation of oxide on the exchange bias and interparticle magnetic interaction.

  10. The impact of core-shell nanotube structures on fracture in ceramic nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xin; Yang, Yingchao; Lou, Jun; Sheldon, Brian W.

    2017-01-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be used to create ceramic nanocomposites with improved fracture toughness. In the present work, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was employed to deposit thin oxide layers on MWCNTs. These core-shell structures were then used to create nanocomposites by using a polymer derived ceramic (PDC) to produce the matrix. Variations in both the initial MWCNT structure and the oxide layers led to substantial differences in fiber-pullout behavior. Single tube pullout tests also showed that the oxide coatings led to stronger bonding with the ceramic matrix. With high defect density MWCNTs, this led to shorter pull-out lengths which is consistent with the conventional understanding of fracture in ceramic matrix composites. However, with low defect density MWCNTs longer pullout lengths were observed with the oxide layers. To interpret the different trends that were observed, we believe that the ALD coatings should not be viewed simply as a means of altering the interfacial properties. Instead, the coated MWCNTs should be viewed as more complex core-shell fibers where both interface and internal properties can be controlled with the ALD layers. - Graphical abstract: Fracture properties of core-shell nanotubes reinforced ceramic nanocomposites.

  11. Gross shell structure of moments of inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleplanque, M.A.; Frauendorf, S.; Pashkevich, V.V.; Chu, S.Y.; Unzhakova, A.

    2002-01-01

    Average yrast moments of inertia at high spins, where the pairing correlations are expected to be largely absent, were found to deviate from the rigid-body values. This indicates that shell effects contribute to the moment of inertia. We discuss the gross dependence of moments of inertia and shell energies on the neutron number in terms of the semiclassical periodic orbit theory. We show that the ground-state shell energies, nuclear deformations and deviations from rigid-body moments of inertia are all due to the same periodic orbits

  12. Thermodynamic properties of water molecules in the presence of cosolute depend on DNA structure: a study using grid inhomogeneous solvation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Miki; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Tanaka, Shigenori; Tama, Florence; Miyashita, Osamu; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    In conditions that mimic those of the living cell, where various biomolecules and other components are present, DNA strands can adopt many structures in addition to the canonical B-form duplex. Previous studies in the presence of cosolutes that induce molecular crowding showed that thermal stabilities of DNA structures are associated with the properties of the water molecules around the DNAs. To understand how cosolutes, such as ethylene glycol, affect the thermal stability of DNA structures, we investigated the thermodynamic properties of water molecules around a hairpin duplex and a G-quadruplex using grid inhomogeneous solvation theory (GIST) with or without cosolutes. Our analysis indicated that (i) cosolutes increased the free energy of water molecules around DNA by disrupting water–water interactions, (ii) ethylene glycol more effectively disrupted water–water interactions around Watson–Crick base pairs than those around G-quartets or non-paired bases, (iii) due to the negative electrostatic potential there was a thicker hydration shell around G-quartets than around Watson–Crick-paired bases. Our findings suggest that the thermal stability of the hydration shell around DNAs is one factor that affects the thermal stabilities of DNA structures under the crowding conditions. PMID:26538600

  13. Light-stimulated cargo release from a core–shell structured nanocomposite for site-specific delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Yun; Ling, Li; Li, Xiaofang; Chen, Meng; Su, Likai

    2015-01-01

    This paper reported a core–shell structured site-specific delivery system with a light switch triggered by low energy light (λ=510 nm). Its core was composed of supermagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles for magnetic guiding and targeting. Its outer shell consisted of mesoporous silica molecular sieve MCM-41 which offered highly ordered hexagonal tunnels for cargo capacity. A light switch N1-(4aH-cyclopenta[1,2-b:5,4-b′]dipyridin-5(5aH)-ylidene)benzene-1, 4-diamine (CBD) was covalently grafted into these hexagonal tunnels, serving as light stimuli acceptor with loading content of 1.1 μM/g. This composite was fully characterized and confirmed by SEM, TEM, XRD patterns, N 2 adsorption/desorption, thermogravimetric analysis, IR, UV–vis absorption and emission spectra. Experimental data suggested that this composite had a core as wide as 150 nm and could be magnetically guided to specific sites. Its hexagonal tunnels were as long as 180 nm. Upon light stimuli of “on” and “off” states, controllable release was observed with short release time of ~900 s (90% capacity). - Graphical abstract: A core–shell structured site-specific delivery system with a light switch triggered by yellow light was constructed. Controllable release was observed with short release time of ~900 s (90% capacity). - Highlights: • A core–shell structured site-specific delivery system was constructed. • It consisted of Fe 3 O 4 core and MCM-41 shell grafted with light switch. • This delivery system was triggered by low energy light. • Controllable release was observed with short release time of ~900 s

  14. Light-stimulated cargo release from a core–shell structured nanocomposite for site-specific delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yun; Ling, Li; Li, Xiaofang [Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University, Baoding 071000 (China); Chen, Meng [Department of Rheumatology, Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University, Baoding 071000 (China); Su, Likai, E-mail: zhangdong19992003@163.com [Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University, Baoding 071000 (China)

    2015-03-15

    This paper reported a core–shell structured site-specific delivery system with a light switch triggered by low energy light (λ=510 nm). Its core was composed of supermagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles for magnetic guiding and targeting. Its outer shell consisted of mesoporous silica molecular sieve MCM-41 which offered highly ordered hexagonal tunnels for cargo capacity. A light switch N1-(4aH-cyclopenta[1,2-b:5,4-b′]dipyridin-5(5aH)-ylidene)benzene-1, 4-diamine (CBD) was covalently grafted into these hexagonal tunnels, serving as light stimuli acceptor with loading content of 1.1 μM/g. This composite was fully characterized and confirmed by SEM, TEM, XRD patterns, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, thermogravimetric analysis, IR, UV–vis absorption and emission spectra. Experimental data suggested that this composite had a core as wide as 150 nm and could be magnetically guided to specific sites. Its hexagonal tunnels were as long as 180 nm. Upon light stimuli of “on” and “off” states, controllable release was observed with short release time of ~900 s (90% capacity). - Graphical abstract: A core–shell structured site-specific delivery system with a light switch triggered by yellow light was constructed. Controllable release was observed with short release time of ~900 s (90% capacity). - Highlights: • A core–shell structured site-specific delivery system was constructed. • It consisted of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} core and MCM-41 shell grafted with light switch. • This delivery system was triggered by low energy light. • Controllable release was observed with short release time of ~900 s.

  15. Soil structure interaction analysis for the Hanford Site 241-SY-101 double-shell waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giller, R.A.; Weiner, E.O.

    1991-09-01

    The 241-SY-101 tank is a double-shell waste storage tank buried in the 241-SY tank farm in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This analysis addresses the effects of seismic soil-structure interaction on the tank structure and includes a parametric soil-structure interaction study addressing three configurations: two-dimensional soil structure, a two-dimensional structure-soil-structure, and a three-dimensional soil-structure interaction. This study was designed to determine an optimal method for addressing seismic-soil effects on underground storage tanks. The computer programs calculate seismic-soil pressures on the double-shell tank walls and and seismic acceleration response spectra in the tank. The results of this soil-structure interaction parametric study as produced by the computer programs are given in terms of seismic soil pressures and response spectra. The conclusions of this soil-structure interaction evaluation are that dynamically calculated soil pressures in the 241-SY-101 tank are significantly reduce from those using standard hand calculation methods and that seismic evaluation of underground double-shell waste storage tanks must consider soil-structure interaction effects in order to predict conservative structural response. Appendixes supporting this study are available in Volume 2 of this report

  16. Facile synthesis of flower like FePt@ZnO core–shell structure and its bifunctional properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majeed, Jerina [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Jayakumar, O.D., E-mail: ddjaya@barc.gov.in [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mandal, B.P. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Salunke, H.G. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Naik, R. [Department of Physics, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Tyagi, A.K., E-mail: aktyagi@barc.gov.in [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-06-01

    Graphical abstract: Flower shaped FePt and ZnO coated FePt with core–shell nanostructures are synthesized by a facile solvothermal procedure. Shell thickness of ZnO over FePt core was tuned by varying FePt concentration with respect to ZnO. Hybrid structure with lower FePt concentration exhibited bifunctionality such as near room temperature ferromagnetism and photoluminescence. Pristine FePt crystallize in the fct (L1{sub 0}) phase whereas it converts into fcc phase in presence of ZnO. - Highlights: • FePt@ZnO hybrid core–shell particles, with unique flower shape morphology have been prepared by solvothermal method. • Phase transition of fct-FePt to fcc-FePt has been found in presence of ZnO nanoparticles. • Plausible mechanism for growth of flowershaped nanoparticle is in accordance with energy minimization principle. • The core shell structure (FePt@ZnO) exhibits bi-functional properties. - Abstract: Flower shaped FePt and ZnO coated FePt (FePt@ZnO) core–shell nanostructures are synthesized by a facile solvothermal procedure. Two different compositions (molar ratio) of FePt and ZnO (FePt:ZnO = 1:3 and FePt:ZnO = 1:6) core–shells with different thicknesses of ZnO shells were synthesized. Hybrid FePt@ZnO core–shell flower structure with lower FePt concentration (FePt:ZnO = 1:6) exhibited bifunctionality including near room temperature ferromagnetism and photoluminescence at ambient conditions. X-ray diffraction patterns of pristine FePt showed partially ordered face centred tetragonal (fct) L1{sub 0} phase whereas ZnO coated FePt (FePt@ZnO) nanostructures showed hexagonal ZnO and disordered phase of FePt with fcc structure. The phase transition of fct FePt to fcc phase occurring in presence of ZnO is further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and magnetic measurement studies. The formation of the nanoflowers was possibly due to growth along the [0 1 1] or [0 0 1] direction, keeping the core nearly spherical in accordance with the

  17. Single and multi-layered core-shell structures based on ZnO nanorods obtained by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáenz-Trevizo, A.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Pizá-Ruiz, P.; Antúnez-Flores, W.; Ornelas-Gutiérrez, C.; Miki-Yoshida, M., E-mail: mario.miki@cimav.edu.mx

    2015-07-15

    Core–shell nanorod structures were prepared by a sequential synthesis using an aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. Several samples consisting of ZnO nanorods were initially grown over TiO{sub 2} film-coated borosilicate glass substrates, following the synthesis conditions reported elsewhere. Later on, a uniform layer consisting of individual Al, Ni, Ti or Fe oxides was grown onto ZnO nanorod samples forming the so-called single MO{sub x}/ZnO nanorod core–shell structures, where MO{sub x} was the metal oxide shell. Additionally, a three-layer core–shell sample was developed by growing Fe, Ti and Fe oxides alternately, onto the ZnO nanorods. The microstructure of the core–shell materials was characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was employed to corroborate the formation of different metal oxides. X-ray diffraction outcomes for single core–shell structures showed solely the presence of ZnO as wurtzite and TiO{sub 2} as anatase. For the multi-layered shell sample, the existence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} as hematite was also detected. Morphological observations suggested the existence of an outer material grown onto the nanorods and further microstructural analysis by HR-STEM confirmed the development of core–shell structures in all cases. These studies also showed that the individual Al, Fe, Ni and Ti oxide layers are amorphous; an observation that matched with X-ray diffraction analysis where no apparent extra oxides were detected. For the multi-layered sample, the development of a shell consisting of three different oxide layers onto the nanorods was found. Overall results showed that no alteration in the primary ZnO core was produced during the growth of the shells, indicating that the deposition technique used herein was and it is suitable for the synthesis of homogeneous and complex nanomaterials high in quality and purity. In addition

  18. Shell structures and chaos in nuclei and large metallic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiss, W.D.; University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Nazmitdinov, R.G.; Radu, S.; University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

    1995-01-01

    A reflection-asymmetric deformed oscillator potential is analyzed from the classical and quantum mechanical point of view. The connection between occurrence of shell structures and classical periodic orbits is studied using the ''removal of resonances method'' in a classical analysis. In this approximation, the effective single particle potential becomes separable and the frequencies of the classical trajectories are easily determined. It turns out that the winding numbers calculated in this way are in good agreement with the ones found from the corresponding quantum mechanical spectrum using the particle number dependence of the fluctuating part of the total energy. When the octupole term is switched on it is found that prolate shapes are stable against chaos and can exhibit shells where spherical and oblate cases become chaotic. An attempt is made to explain this difference in the quantum mechanical context by looking at the distribution of exceptional points which results from the matrix structure of the respective Hamiltonians. In a similar way we analyze the modified Nilsson model and discuss its consequences for metallic clusters. (orig.)

  19. A study on the nonlinear finite element analysis of reinforced concrete structures: shell finite element formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Seo, Jeong Moon

    2000-08-01

    The main goal of this research is to establish a methodology of finite element analysis of containment building predicting not only global behaviour but also local failure mode. In this report, we summerize some existing numerical analysis techniques to be improved for containment building. In other words, a complete description of the standard degenerated shell finite element formulation is provided for nonlinear stress analysis of nuclear containment structure. A shell finite element is derived using the degenerated solid concept which does not rely on a specific shell theory. Reissner-Mindlin assumptions are adopted to consider the transverse shear deformation effect. In order to minimize the sensitivity of the constitutive equation to structural types, microscopic material model is adopted. The four solution algorithms based on the standard Newton-Raphson method are discussed. Finally, two numerical examples are carried out to test the performance of the adopted shell medel.

  20. A study on the nonlinear finite element analysis of reinforced concrete structures: shell finite element formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Seo, Jeong Moon

    2000-08-01

    The main goal of this research is to establish a methodology of finite element analysis of containment building predicting not only global behaviour but also local failure mode. In this report, we summerize some existing numerical analysis techniques to be improved for containment building. In other words, a complete description of the standard degenerated shell finite element formulation is provided for nonlinear stress analysis of nuclear containment structure. A shell finite element is derived using the degenerated solid concept which does not rely on a specific shell theory. Reissner-Mindlin assumptions are adopted to consider the transverse shear deformation effect. In order to minimize the sensitivity of the constitutive equation to structural types, microscopic material model is adopted. The four solution algorithms based on the standard Newton-Raphson method are discussed. Finally, two numerical examples are carried out to test the performance of the adopted shell medel

  1. Heat exchanger, head and shell acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, P.S.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1992-09-01

    Instability of postulated flaws in the head component of the heat exchanger could not produce a large break, equivalent to a DEGB in the PWS piping, due to the configuration of the head and restraint provided by the staybolts. Rather, leakage from throughwall flaws in the head would increase with flaw length with finite leakage areas that are bounded by a post-instability flaw configuration. Postulated flaws at instability in the shell of the heat exchanger or in the cooling water nozzles could produce a large break in the Cooling Water System (CWS) pressure boundary. An initial analysis of flaw stability for postulated flaws in the heat exchanger head was performed in January 1992. This present report updates that analysis and, additionally, provides acceptable flaw configurations to maintain defined structural or safety margins against flaw instability of the external pressure boundary components of the heat exchanger, namely the head, shell, and cooling water nozzles. Structural and flaw stability analyses of the heat exchanger tubes, the internal pressure boundary of the heat exchangers or interface boundary between the PWS and CWS, were previously completed in February 1992 as part of the heat exchanger restart evaluation and are not covered in this report

  2. Hi shells, supershells, shell-like objects, and ''worms''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiles, C.

    1984-01-01

    We present photographic representations of the combination of two Hi surveys, so as to eliminate the survey boundaries at Vertical BarbVertical Bar = 10 0 . We also present high-contrast photographs for particular velocities to exhibit weak Hi features. All of these photographs were used to prepare a new list of Hi shells, supershells, and shell-like objects. We discuss the structure of three shell-like objects that are associated with high-velocity gas, and with gas at all velocities that is associated with radio continuum loops I, II, and III. We use spatial filtering to find wiggly gas filaments: ''worms'': crawling away from the galactic plane in the inner Galaxy. The ''worms'' are probably parts of shells that are open at the top; such shells should be good sources of hot gas for the galactic halo

  3. Engineered inorganic core/shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mélinon, Patrice, E-mail: patrice.melinon@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière matière Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 et CNRS et OMNT, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Bâtiment Léon Brillouin, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Begin-Colin, Sylvie [IPCMS et OMNT, 23 rue du Loess BP 43, 67034 STRASBOURG Cedex 2 (France); Duvail, Jean Luc [IMN UMR 6502 et OMNT Campus Sciences : 2 rue de la Houssinire, BP32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex3 (France); Gauffre, Fabienne [SPM et OMNT : Institut des sciences chimiques de Rennes - UMR 6226, 263 Avenue du General Leclerc, CS 74205, 35042 RENNES Cedex (France); Boime, Nathalie Herlin [IRAMIS-NIMBE, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CEA CNRS URA 2453) et OMNT, Bat 522, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Ledoux, Gilles [Institut Lumière Matière Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 et CNRS et OMNT, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Bâtiment Alfred Kastler 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918 F 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Plain, Jérôme [Universit de technologie de Troyes LNIO-ICD, CNRS et OMNT 12 rue Marie Curie - CS 42060 - 10004 Troyes cedex (France); Reiss, Peter [CEA Grenoble, INAC-SPrAM, UMR 5819 CEA-CNRS-UJF et OMNT, Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Silly, Fabien [CEA, IRAMIS, SPEC, TITANS, CNRS 2464 et OMNT, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Warot-Fonrose, Bénédicte [CEMES-CNRS, Université de Toulouse et OMNT, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig F 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2014-10-20

    It has been for a long time recognized that nanoparticles are of great scientific interest as they are effectively a bridge between bulk materials and atomic structures. At first, size effects occurring in single elements have been studied. More recently, progress in chemical and physical synthesis routes permitted the preparation of more complex structures. Such structures take advantages of new adjustable parameters including stoichiometry, chemical ordering, shape and segregation opening new fields with tailored materials for biology, mechanics, optics magnetism, chemistry catalysis, solar cells and microelectronics. Among them, core/shell structures are a particular class of nanoparticles made with an inorganic core and one or several inorganic shell layer(s). In earlier work, the shell was merely used as a protective coating for the core. More recently, it has been shown that it is possible to tune the physical properties in a larger range than that of each material taken separately. The goal of the present review is to discuss the basic properties of the different types of core/shell nanoparticles including a large variety of heterostructures. We restrict ourselves on all inorganic (on inorganic/inorganic) core/shell structures. In the light of recent developments, the applications of inorganic core/shell particles are found in many fields including biology, chemistry, physics and engineering. In addition to a representative overview of the properties, general concepts based on solid state physics are considered for material selection and for identifying criteria linking the core/shell structure and its resulting properties. Chemical and physical routes for the synthesis and specific methods for the study of core/shell nanoparticle are briefly discussed.

  4. Effects of solvation shells and cluster size on the reaction of aluminum clusters with water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Mou

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Reaction of aluminum clusters, Aln (n = 16, 17 and 18, with liquid water is investigated using quantum molecular dynamics simulations, which show rapid production of hydrogen molecules assisted by proton transfer along a chain of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds between water molecules, i.e. Grotthuss mechanism. The simulation results provide answers to two unsolved questions: (1 What is the role of a solvation shell formed by non-reacting H-bonds surrounding the H-bond chain; and (2 whether the high size-selectivity observed in gas-phase Aln-water reaction persists in liquid phase? First, the solvation shell is found to play a crucial role in facilitating proton transfer and hence H2 production. Namely, it greatly modifies the energy barrier, generally to much lower values (< 0.1 eV. Second, we find that H2 production by Aln in liquid water does not depend strongly on the cluster size, in contrast to the existence of magic numbers in gas-phase reaction. This paper elucidates atomistic mechanisms underlying these observations.

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of core–shell TiO_2 to enhance the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Jinghui; Zhou, Han; Zhang, Fan; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Core–shell TiO_2 with interior cavity was synthesized by a hydrothermal approach to enhance the photocatalytic performance. - Highlights: • Core–shell TiO_2 with interior cavity can be synthesized by hydrothermal approach. • Multiple reflection of incident light in cavity can increase the absorption. • Rutile can optimize the bandgap and delay the charge recombination. - Abstract: A hydrothermal approach was designed to synthesize core–shell TiO_2 with interior cavity by making sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) as the surfactant and the mixture of water and ethanol as the solvent. The control experiment of solvent reveals ethanol and water are responsible for the formation of sphere and interior cavity, respectively. Besides, SDS can assist the growth of core–shell structure, and the sizes of sphere and interior cavity can be tuned by regulating the reaction time or temperature. UV–vis absorption proves core–shell structure with interior cavity can increase the absorption of incident light to enhance the optical activity of final product. The calculated bandgap and photoluminescence (PL) analyses reveal the coexistence of rutile in final product can optimize the bandgap to 3.03 eV and delay the charge recombination. As a result, an effective photocatalytic hydrogen evolution under full spectrum irradiation can be harvested by the as-synthesized core–shell spheres to reach a quantum yield, approximately 9.57% at 340 nm wavelength.

  6. Surface energy effect on free vibration of nano-sized piezoelectric double-shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xue-Qian; Zhu, Chang-Song; Liu, Jin-Xi; Liu, Xiang-Lin

    2018-01-01

    Combining Goldenveizer-Novozhilov shell theory, thin plate theory and electro-elastic surface theory, the size-dependent vibration of nano-sized piezoelectric double-shell structures under simply supported boundary condition is presented, and the surface energy effect on the natural frequencies is discussed. The displacement components of the cylindrical nano-shells and annular nano-plates are expanded as the superposition of standard Fourier series based on Hamilton's principle. The total stresses with consideration of surface energy effect are derived, and the total energy function is obtained by using Rayleigh-Ritz energy method. The free vibration equation is solved, and the natural frequency is analyzed. In numerical examples, it is found that the surface elastic constant, piezoelectric constant and surface residual stress show different effects on the natural frequencies. The effect of surface piezoelectric constant is the maximum. The effect of dimensions of the double-shell under different surface material properties is also examined.

  7. Ultimate load capacity assessment of reinforced concrete shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Amita; Singh, R.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop capability for prediction of ultimate load capacity of reinforced concrete shell structures. The present finite element code ULCA (Ultimate Load Capacity Assessment) adopts a degenerate concept of formulating general isoparametric shell element with a layered approach in the thickness direction. Different failure modes such as crushing, tensile cracking and reinforcement yielding are recognised for various problems. The structure fails by crushing of concrete when the concrete strain/stress reaches the ultimate stress or strain of concrete. Material nonlinearities as a result of tension cracking, tension stiffening between reinforcement and concrete in cracked region and yielding of reinforcement are considered along with geometric nonlinearity. Thus with this code it is possible to predict the pressure at which the first cracking, first through thickness cracking, first yielding of reinforcement occurs. After validating the code with few bench mark problems for different failure modes a reinforced concrete nuclear containment is analysed for its ultimate capacity and the results are matched with the published results. Further the ultimate load capacity of outer containment wall of Narora Atomic Power Station is predicted. It is observed that containment fails in membrane region and has a sufficient margin against design pressure. (author). 9 refs., 56 figs., 3 tabs., 1 appendix with 4 tabs

  8. Fe Core–Carbon Shell Nanoparticles as Advanced MRI Contrast Enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh P. Chaudhary

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to fabricate a hybrid composite of iron (Fe core–carbon (C shell nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. These new classes of magnetic core–shell nanoparticles are synthesized using a one-step top–down approach through the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field in organic solvents by an ultrasonic horn. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM observations revealed the core–shell nanoparticles with 10–85 nm in diameter with excellent dispersibility in water without any agglomeration. TEM showed the structural confirmation of Fe nanoparticles with body centered cubic (bcc crystal structure. Magnetic multi-functional hybrid composites of Fe core–C shell nanoparticles were then evaluated as negative MRI contrast agents, displaying remarkably high transverse relaxivity (r2 of 70 mM−1·S−1 at 7 T. This simple one-step synthesis procedure is highly versatile and produces desired nanoparticles with high efficacy as MRI contrast agents and potential utility in other biomedical applications.

  9. TiN/VN composites with core/shell structure for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Shanmu; Chen, Xiao [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Gu, Lin [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 9808577 (Japan); Zhou, Xinhong [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266101 (China); Wang, Haibo; Liu, Zhihong; Han, Pengxian; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Li [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Cui, Guanglei, E-mail: cuigl@qibebt.ac.cn [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Chen, Liquan [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Vanadium and titanium nitride nanocomposite with core-shell structure was prepared. {yields} TiN/VN composites with different V:Ti molar ratios were obtained. {yields} TiN/VN composites can provide promising electronic conductivity and favorable capacity storage. -- Abstract: TiN/VN core-shell composites are prepared by a two-step strategy involving coating of commercial TiN nanoparticles with V{sub 2}O{sub 5}.nH{sub 2}O sols followed by ammonia reduction. The highest specific capacitance of 170 F g{sup -1} is obtained when scanned at 2 mV s{sup -1} and a promising rate capacity performance is maintained at higher voltage sweep rates. These results indicate that these composites with good electronic conductivity can deliver a favorable capacity performance.

  10. Ionic core–shell dendrimers with a polycationic core: structural aspects and host–guest binding properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Coevering, R.; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; van Koten, G.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The structural aspects and host–guest binding properties of ionic core–shell dendrimers [1]Br8 and [2]Br4, which bear a polycationic core and a neutral shell of Fréchet-type poly(benzyl aryl ether) dendrons, have been investigated by means of dendritic wedges [3]Br2 and [4]Br, that resemble one of

  11. Laser ablation of Au-CuO core-shell nanocomposite in water for optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Raid A.; Abdul-Hamed, Ryam S.

    2017-12-01

    Core-shell gold-copper oxide Au-CuO nanocomposites were synthesized using laser ablation of CuO target in colloidal solution of Au nanoparticles (NPs). The effect of laser fluence on the structural, morphological, electrical, and optical properties of Au-CuO nanocomposites was investigated using x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Hall measurement, and UV-vis spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction results confirm the formation of polycrystalline Au-CuO NPs with monoclinic structure. The optical energy gap for CuO was 4 eV and for the Au-CuO core-shell nanocomposites was found to be in the range of 3.4-3.7 eV. SEM and TEM investigations revealed that the structure and morphology of Au-CuO core-shell nanocomposites were strongly depending on the laser fluence. A formation of Au-CuO nanospheres and platelets structures was observed. The photoluminescence data showed an emission of broad visible peaks between 407 and 420 nm. The effect of laser fluence on the dark and illuminated I-V characteristics of Au-CuO/n-Si heterojunction photodetectors was investigated and analyzed. The experimental data demonstrated that the photodetector prepared at optimum laser fluence exhibited photosensitivity of 0.6 AW-1 at 800 nm.

  12. Shell structure of the A = 6 ground states from three-body dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehman, D.R.; Parke, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    Three-body (αNN) models of the 6 He and 6 Li ground states are used to investigate their shell structure. Three models for each nucleus are considered: simple, full (nn), and full (np) for 6 He, and simple, full (0%), and full (4%) for 6 Li. The full models in both cases are obtained by including the S/sub 1/2/, P/sub 1/2/, and P/sub 3/2/ partial waves of the αN interaction, whereas the simple model truncates to only the strongly resonant P/sub 3/2/ wave. The 6 He full models distinguish between use of the nn or np parameters for the 1 S 0 NN interaction, while the 6 Li full models have either a pure 3 S 1 NN interaction (0%) or a 3 S 1 - 3 D 1 interaction that leads to a 4% d-wave component in the deuteron (4%). These models are used to calculate the probabilities of the orbital components of the wave functions, the configuration-space single-particle orbital densities, and the configuration-space two-particle wave function amplitudes in j-j coupling with the nucleon coordinates referred to the alpha particle as the ''core'' or ''center of force.'' The results are then compared with those from phenomenological and realistic-interaction shell models. Major findings of the comparison are the following: None of the shell models considered have a distribution of orbital probabilities across shells like that predicted by three-body models; the orbital rms radii from three-body models indicate an ordering of the orbits within shells, i.e., p/sub 1/2/ outside p/sub 3/2/, unlike oscillator shell models with a single oscillator parameter where the p-shell orbitals have the same shape; and, as expected, three-body orbital densities decay at large radial distances as exponentials rather than the too compact Gaussian falling off of oscillator shell models

  13. Improvement in the reliability of shells for light water reactors by manufacture from hollow ingots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocquet, P.; Blondeau, R.; Poitrault, I.; Badeau, J.P.; Dumont, R.

    1991-01-01

    The problems associated to the segregation located at the inner surface and subsurface of heavy shell forgings used in nuclear light water reactors are presented. The effect of A segregation on cold or reheat cracking HAZ has conducted fabricators to use severe welding procedures with high preheat temperature and refining HAZ grain size sequences. For shells and rings, the hollow ingot as developed by CLI, with a good control of the location of the center line of segregation, is an excellent answer to these problems. The use of core shell forgings issued from this type of hollow ingots, free of segregation at the inner surface and subsurface area, contributes, by reducing the irradiation embrittlement effect, to increase the safety factor relatively to the risk of failure of the reactor. (orig.)

  14. Preparation and characterisation of core-shell CNTs@MIPs nanocomposites and selective removal of estrone from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruixia; Su, Xiaoqian; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2011-01-15

    This paper reports the preparation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for advanced removal of estrone. CNTs@Est-MIPs nanocomposites with a well-defined core-shell structure were obtained using a semi-covalent imprinting strategy, which employed a thermally reversible covalent bond at the surface of silica-coated CNTs for a large-scale production. The morphology and structure of the products were characterised by transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The adsorption properties were demonstrated by equilibrium rebinding experiments and Scatchard analysis. The results demonstrate that the imprinted nanocomposites possess favourable selectivity, high capacity and fast kinetics for template molecule uptake, yielding an adsorption capacity of 113.5 μmol/g. The synthetic process is quite simple, and the different batches of synthesized CNTs@Est-MIPs nanocomposites showed good reproducibility in template binding. The feasibility of removing estrogenic compounds from environmental water using the CNTs@Est-MIPs nanocomposites was demonstrated using water samples spiked with estrone. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure of liposome encapsulating proteins characterized by X-ray scattering and shell-modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Mitsuhiro; Kimura, Ryota; Takeuchi, Kazuki; Hagiwara, Yoshihiko; Kawai-Hirai, Rika; Ohta, Noboru; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Shimuzu, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Wide-angle X-ray scattering data using a third-generation synchrotron radiation source are presented. Lipid liposomes are promising drug delivery systems because they have superior curative effects owing to their high adaptability to a living body. Lipid liposomes encapsulating proteins were constructed and the structures examined using synchrotron radiation small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SR-SWAXS). The liposomes were prepared by a sequential combination of natural swelling, ultrasonic dispersion, freeze-throw, extrusion and spin-filtration. The liposomes were composed of acidic glycosphingolipid (ganglioside), cholesterol and phospholipids. By using shell-modeling methods, the asymmetric bilayer structure of the liposome and the encapsulation efficiency of proteins were determined. As well as other analytical techniques, SR-SWAXS and shell-modeling methods are shown to be a powerful tool for characterizing in situ structures of lipid liposomes as an important candidate of drug delivery systems

  16. Development of lipid-shell and polymer core nanoparticles with water-soluble salidroside for anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Dai-Long; Chen, Yan; Xu, Bei; Ren, Ke; He, Zhi-Yao; He, Li-Li; Lei, Yi; Fan, Chun-Mei; Song, Xiang-Rong

    2014-02-25

    Salidroside (Sal) is a potent antitumor drug with high water-solubility. The clinic application of Sal in cancer therapy has been significantly restricted by poor oral absorption and low tumor cell uptake. To solve this problem, lipid-shell and polymer-core nanoparticles (Sal-LPNPs) loaded with Sal were developed by a double emulsification method. The processing parameters including the polymer types, organic phase, PVA types and amount were systemically investigated. The obtained optimal Sal-LPNPs, composed of PLGA-PEG-PLGA triblock copolymers and lipids, had high entrapment efficiency (65%), submicron size (150 nm) and negatively charged surface (-23 mV). DSC analysis demonstrated the successful encapsulation of Sal into LPNPs. The core-shell structure of Sal-LPNPs was verified by TEM. Sal released slowly from the LPNPs without apparent burst release. MTT assay revealed that 4T1 and PANC-1 cancer cell lines were sensitive to Sal treatment. Sal-LPNPs had significantly higher antitumor activities than free Sal in 4T1 and PANC-1 cells. The data indicate that LPNPs are a promising Sal vehicle for anti-cancer therapy and worthy of further investigation.

  17. Development of Lipid-Shell and Polymer Core Nanoparticles with Water-Soluble Salidroside for Anti-Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai-Long Fang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Salidroside (Sal is a potent antitumor drug with high water-solubility. The clinic application of Sal in cancer therapy has been significantly restricted by poor oral absorption and low tumor cell uptake. To solve this problem, lipid-shell and polymer-core nanoparticles (Sal-LPNPs loaded with Sal were developed by a double emulsification method. The processing parameters including the polymer types, organic phase, PVA types and amount were systemically investigated. The obtained optimal Sal-LPNPs, composed of PLGA-PEG-PLGA triblock copolymers and lipids, had high entrapment efficiency (65%, submicron size (150 nm and negatively charged surface (−23 mV. DSC analysis demonstrated the successful encapsulation of Sal into LPNPs. The core-shell structure of Sal-LPNPs was verified by TEM. Sal released slowly from the LPNPs without apparent burst release. MTT assay revealed that 4T1 and PANC-1 cancer cell lines were sensitive to Sal treatment. Sal-LPNPs had significantly higher antitumor activities than free Sal in 4T1 and PANC-1 cells. The data indicate that LPNPs are a promising Sal vehicle for anti-cancer therapy and worthy of further investigation.

  18. Ocean-driven heating of Europa's icy shell at low latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, K. M.; Schmidt, B. E.; Wicht, J.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2014-01-01

    The ice shell of Jupiter's moon Europa is marked by regions of disrupted ice known as chaos terrains that cover up to 40% of the satellite's surface, most commonly occurring within 40° of the equator. Concurrence with salt deposits implies a coupling between the geologically active ice shell and the underlying liquid water ocean at lower latitudes. Europa's ocean dynamics have been assumed to adopt a two-dimensional pattern, which channels the moon's internal heat to higher latitudes. Here we present a numerical model of thermal convection in a thin, rotating spherical shell where small-scale convection instead adopts a three-dimensional structure and is more vigorous at lower latitudes. Global-scale currents are organized into three zonal jets and two equatorial Hadley-like circulation cells. We find that these convective motions transmit Europa's internal heat towards the surface most effectively in equatorial regions, where they can directly influence the thermo-compositional state and structure of the ice shell. We suggest that such heterogeneous heating promotes the formation of chaos features through increased melting of the ice shell and subsequent deposition of marine ice at low latitudes. We conclude that Europa's ocean dynamics can modulate the exchange of heat and materials between the surface and interior and explain the observed distribution of chaos terrains.

  19. Bending stresses in Facetted Glass Shells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne; Jönsson, Jeppe; Almegaard, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    A shell structure of glass combines a highly effective structural principle with a material of optimal permeability to light. A facetted shell structure has a piecewise plane geometry, and together the facets form an approximation to a curved surface. A distributed load on a plane-based facetted...... structure will locally cause bending moments in the loaded facets. The bending stresses are dependent on the stiffness of the joints. Approximate solutions are developed to estimate the magnitude of the bending stresses. A FE-model of a facetted glass shell structure is used to validate the expressions...

  20. The shell structure effects in neutron cross section calculation by a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of the shell structure properties of the nucleus in the calculation of neutron-induced reaction cross-section data based on nuclear reaction theory has been investigated. In this investigation, measured, evaluated and calculated (n.p) reaction cross-section data on la spherical nucleus (i.e. 112Sn) and a deformed ...

  1. Solvation of positive ions in water: the dominant role of water-water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krekeler, Christian; Site, Luigi Delle

    2007-01-01

    Local polarization effects, induced by monovalent and divalent positive ions in water, influence (and in turn are influenced by) the large-scale structural properties of the solvent. Experiments can only distinguish this process of interplay in a generic qualitative way. Instead, first-principles calculations can address the question at both the electronic and atomistic scale, accounting for electronic polarization as well as geometrical conformations. For this reason we study the extension of the scales' interconnection by means of first-principle Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics applied to systems of different size. In this way we identify the general aspects dominating the physics of the first solvation shell and their connection to the effects related to the formation of the outer shells and eventually the bulk. We show that while the influence of the ions is extended to the first shell only, the water-water interaction is instead playing a dominant role even within the first shell independently of the size or the charge of the ion. (fast track communication)

  2. Wrinkling of Pressurized Elastic Shells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, Dominic

    2011-10-01

    We study the formation of localized structures formed by the point loading of an internally pressurized elastic shell. While unpressurized shells (such as a ping-pong ball) buckle into polygonal structures, we show that pressurized shells are subject to a wrinkling instability. We study wrinkling in depth, presenting scaling laws for the critical indentation at which wrinkling occurs and the number of wrinkles formed in terms of the internal pressurization and material properties of the shell. These results are validated by numerical simulations. We show that the evolution of the wrinkle length with increasing indentation can be understood for highly pressurized shells from membrane theory. These results suggest that the position and number of wrinkles may be used in combination to give simple methods for the estimation of the mechanical properties of highly pressurized shells. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  3. Water-Soluble CdTe/CdS Core/Shell Semiconductor Nanocrystals: How Their Optical Properties Depend on the Synthesis Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brener R. C. Vale

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a comparative synthesis of water-soluble CdTe/CdS colloidal nanocrystalline semiconductors of the core/shell type. We prepared the CdS shell using two different methods: a one-pot approach and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR; in both cases, we used 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA as the surface ligand. In the one-pot approach, thiourea was added over the freshly formed CdTe dispersion, and served as the sulfur source. We achieved thicker CdS layers by altering the Cd:S stoichiometric ratio (1:1, 1:2, 1:4, and 1:8. The Cd:S ratios 1:1 and 1:2 furnished the best optical properties; these ratios also made the formation of surface defects less likely. For CdTe/CdS obtained using SILAR, we coated the surface of three differently sized CdTe cores (2.17, 3.10, and 3.45 nm with one to five CdS layers using successive injections of the Cd2+ and S2– ions. The results showed that the core size influenced the optical properties of the materials. The deposition of three to five layers over the surface of smaller CdTe colloidal nanocrystals generated strain effects on the core/shell structure.

  4. Cluster shell model: I. Structure of 9Be, 9B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rocca, V.; Iachello, F.

    2018-05-01

    We calculate energy spectra, electromagnetic transition rates, longitudinal and transverse electron scattering form factors and log ft values for beta decay in 9Be, 9B, within the framework of a cluster shell model. By comparing with experimental data, we find strong evidence for the structure of these nuclei to be two α-particles in a dumbbell configuration with Z2 symmetry, plus an additional nucleon.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of noble metal–titania core–shell nanostructures with tunable shell thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Bartosewicz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Core–shell nanostructures have found applications in many fields, including surface enhanced spectroscopy, catalysis and solar cells. Titania-coated noble metal nanoparticles, which combine the surface plasmon resonance properties of the core and the photoactivity of the shell, have great potential for these applications. However, the controllable synthesis of such nanostructures remains a challenge due to the high reactivity of titania precursors. Hence, a simple titania coating method that would allow better control over the shell formation is desired. A sol–gel based titania coating method, which allows control over the shell thickness, was developed and applied to the synthesis of Ag@TiO2 and Au@TiO2 with various shell thicknesses. The morphology of the synthesized structures was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Their sizes and shell thicknesses were determined using tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS technique. The optical properties of the synthesized structures were characterized using UV–vis spectroscopy. Ag@TiO2 and Au@TiO2 structures with shell thickness in the range of ≈40–70 nm and 90 nm, for the Ag and Au nanostructures respectively, were prepared using a method we developed and adapted, consisting of a change in the titania precursor concentration. The synthesized nanostructures exhibited significant absorption in the UV–vis range. The TRPS technique was shown to be a very useful tool for the characterization of metal–metal oxide core–shell nanostructures.

  6. Structural performance of a multipurpose canister shell for HLNW under normal handling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Rajagopalan, R.

    1994-01-01

    A Multipurpose Canister (MPC) is analyzed for critical stresses that occur during normal handling conditions and accidental scenarios. Linear and Non-linear Finite Element Analysis is performed and the stresses at various critical locations in the MPC and its weldments are studied extensively. Progressive failure analysis of the MPC's groove and fillet welds, is presented. The structural response of the MPC to dynamic lifting loads, to loads resulting from an accidental slippage of a crane cable carrying the MPC, and from the impact between two canisters, is evaluated. Nonlinear structural analysis is used in the evaluation of the local buckling and the ultimate failure phenomena in the shell when the steel is in the strain hardening state during impact. Results make a case for increasing the thickness of the shell and all the welds

  7. An ultrasonic methodology for in-service inspection of shell weld of core support structure in a sodium cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Anish, E-mail: anish@igcar.gov.in; Rajkumar, K.V.; Sharma, Govind K.; Dhayalan, R.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We demonstrate a novel ultrasonic methodology for in-service inspection of shell weld of core support structure in a sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. • The methodology comprises of the inspection of shell weld immersed in sodium from the outside surface of the main vessel using ultrasonic guided wave. • The formation and propagation of guided wave modes are validated by finite element simulation of the inspection methodology. • A defect down to 20% of 30 mm thick wall (∼6 mm) in the shell weld can be detected reliably using the developed methodology. - Abstract: The paper presents a novel ultrasonic methodology developed for in-service inspection (ISI) of shell weld of core support structure of main vessel of 500 MWe prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR). The methodology comprises of the inspection of shell weld immersed in sodium from the outsider surface of the main vessel using a normal beam longitudinal wave ultrasonic transducer. Because of the presence of curvature in the knuckle region of the main vessel, the normal beam longitudinal wave enters the support shell plate at an angle and forms the guided waves by mode conversion and multiple reflections from the boundaries of the shell plate. Hence, this methodology can be used to detect defects in the shell weld of the core support structure. The successful demonstration of the methodology on a mock-up sector made of stainless steel indicated that an artificial defect down to 20% of 30 mm thick wall (∼6 mm) in the shell weld can be detected reliably.

  8. Flexible 3D Fe@VO2 core-shell mesh: A highly efficient and easy-recycling catalyst for the removal of organic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wang, Ruoqi; Su, Zhen; Zhang, Dandan; Li, Heping; Yan, Youwei

    2018-10-01

    Nowadays, it is extremely urgent to search for efficient and effective catalysts for water purification due to the severe worldwide water-contamination crises. Here, 3D Fe@VO 2 core-shell mesh, a highly efficient catalyst toward removal of organic dyes with excellent recycling ability in the dark is designed and developed for the first time. This novel core-shell structure is actually 304 stainless steel mesh coated by VO 2 , fabricated by an electrophoretic deposition method. In such a core-shell structure, Fe as the core allows much easier separation from the water, endowing the catalyst with a flexible property for easy recycling, while VO 2 as the shell is highly efficient in degradation of organic dyes with the addition of H 2 O 2 . More intriguingly, the 3D Fe@VO 2 core-shell mesh exhibits favorable performance across a wide pH range. The 3D Fe@VO 2 core-shell mesh can decompose organic dyes both in a light-free condition and under visible irradiation. The possible catalytic oxidation mechanism of Fe@VO 2 /H 2 O 2 system is also proposed in this work. Considering its facile fabrication, remarkable catalytic efficiency across a wide pH range, and easy recycling characteristic, the 3D Fe@VO 2 core-shell mesh is a newly developed high-performance catalyst for addressing the universal water crises. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nano-sized LiFePO4/C composite with core-shell structure as cathode material for lithium ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Min; Li, Ying; Hu, Yemin; Zhu, Mingyuan; Jin, Hongming; Li, Wenxian

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Nano-sized LiFePO4/C composite with core-shell structure was fabricated via a well-designed approach as cathode material forlithium ion battery. The nano-sized LiFePO4/C composite with whole carbon shell coating layer showed an excellent electrical performance. - Abstract: Nano-sized composite with LiFePO 4 -core and carbon-shell was synthesized via a facile route followed by heat treatment at 650 °C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the core is well crystallized LiFePO 4 . The electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) observations show that the core-shell structured LiFePO 4 /C composite coating with whole carbon shell layer of ∼2.8 nm, possesses a specific surface area of 51 m 2 g −1 . As cathode material for lithium ion battery, the core-shell LiFePO 4 /C composite exhibits high initial capacity of 161 mAh g −1 at 0.1 C, excellent high-rate discharge capacity of 135 mAh g −1 at 5 C and perfect cycling retention of 99.6% at 100 th cycle. All these promising results should be contributed to the core-shell nanostructure which prevents collapse of the particle structure in the long-term charge and discharge cycles, as well as the large surface area of the nano-sized LiFePO 4 /C composite which enhances the electronic conductivity and shortens the distance of lithium ion diffusion

  10. Theory of elastic thin shells solid and structural mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Gol'Denveizer, A L; Dryden, H L

    1961-01-01

    Theory of Elastic Thin Shells discusses the mathematical foundations of shell theory and the approximate methods of solution. The present volume was originally published in Russian in 1953, and remains the only text which formulates as completely as possible the different sets of basic equations and various approximate methods of shell analysis emphasizing asymptotic integration. The book is organized into five parts. Part I presents the general formulation and equations of the theory of shells, which are based on the well-known hypothesis of the preservation of the normal element. Part II is

  11. Ge/Si core/shell quantum dots in alumina: tuning the optical absorption by the core and shell size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekić Nikolina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ge/Si core/shell quantum dots (QDs recently received extensive attention due to their specific properties induced by the confinement effects of the core and shell structure. They have a type II confinement resulting in spatially separated charge carriers, the electronic structure strongly dependent on the core and shell size. Herein, the experimental realization of Ge/Si core/shell QDs with strongly tunable optical properties is demonstrated. QDs embedded in an amorphous alumina glass matrix are produced by simple magnetron sputtering deposition. In addition, they are regularly arranged within the matrix due to their self-assembled growth regime. QDs with different Ge core and Si shell sizes are made. These core/shell structures have a significantly stronger absorption compared to pure Ge QDs and a highly tunable absorption peak dependent on the size of the core and shell. The optical properties are in agreement with recent theoretical predictions showing the dramatic influence of the shell size on optical gap, resulting in 0.7 eV blue shift for only 0.4 nm decrease at the shell thickness. Therefore, these materials are very promising for light-harvesting applications.

  12. Intrinsic hierarchical structural imperfections in a natural ceramic of bivalve shell with distinctly graded properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Da; Liu, Zengqian; Zhang, Zhenjun; Zhang, Zhefeng

    2015-07-22

    Despite the extensive investigation on the structure of natural biological materials, insufficient attention has been paid to the structural imperfections by which the mechanical properties of synthetic materials are dominated. In this study, the structure of bivalve Saxidomus purpuratus shell has been systematically characterized quantitatively on multiple length scales from millimeter to sub-nanometer. It is revealed that hierarchical imperfections are intrinsically involved in the crossed-lamellar structure of the shell despite its periodically packed platelets. In particular, various favorable characters which are always pursued in synthetic materials, e.g. nanotwins and low-angle misorientations, have been incorporated herein. The possible contributions of these imperfections to mechanical properties are further discussed. It is suggested that the imperfections may serve as structural adaptations, rather than detrimental defects in the real sense, to help improve the mechanical properties of natural biological materials. This study may aid in understanding the optimizing strategies of structure and properties designed by nature, and accordingly, provide inspiration for the design of synthetic materials.

  13. Faceted shell structure in grain boundary diffusion-processed sintered Nd–Fe–B magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seelam, U.M.R.; Ohkubo, T.; Abe, T.; Hirosawa, S.; Hono, K.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The grain boundary diffusion process (GBDP) using a heavy rare earth elements (HRE) such as Dy and Tb is known as an effective method to enhance the coercivity of Nd–Fe–B sintered magnets without reducing remanence. This process has been industrially implemented to manufacture Nd–Fe–B based sintered magnets with high coercivity and high remanence. In this process, Dy is considered to diffuse through grain boundaries (GBs) to form (Nd 1−x Dy x ) 2 Fe 14 B shells surrounding the Nd 2 Fe 14 B grains and the higher anisotropy field of the Dy-rich shell is considered to suppress the nucleation of reverse domains at low magnetic field. Although there are several investigations on the microstructure of HRE GBDP Nd–Fe–B magnets, no paper addressed the origin of the asymmetric formation of HRE rich shells. Based on detailed analysis of facet planes of core/shell interfaces, we propose a mechanism of the faceted core/shell microstructure formation in the GBDP sintered magnets. We believe that this gives new insights on understanding the coercivity enhancement by the GBDP. - Highlights: • Faceting was observed at the interfaces of cores and shells. • The core/shell interfaces are sharp with an abrupt change in Dy concentration. • Meting occurs at the interfaces of metalic Nd-rich/Nd 2 Fe 14 B phases above 685 °C due to eutectic reaction. • Solidification of Dy-enriched liquid phase from 900 °C can result in the shell formation. - Abstract: Dysprosium enriched shell structure formed by the grain boundary diffusion process (GBDP) of a sintered Nd–Fe–B magnet was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Faceted core–shell interfaces with an abrupt change in Dy concentration suggest the Dy-rich shells are formed by the solidification of the liquid phase during cooling from the GBDP temperature. The Nd-rich phases are almost free from Dy, and

  14. The creep analysis of shell structures using generalised models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, J.T.; Spence, J.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper a new, more complete estimate of the accuracy of the stationary creep model is given for the general case through the evaluation of exact and approximate energy surfaces. In addition, the stationary model is extended to include more general non-stationary (combined elastic-creep) behaviour and to include the possibility of material deterioration through damage. The resulting models are then compared to existing exact solutions for several shell structures - e.g. a thin pressurised cylinder, a curved pipe in bending and an S-bellows under axial extension with large deflections. In each case very good agreement is obtained. Although requiring similar computing effort, so that the same solution techniques can be utilised, the calculation times are shown to be significantly reduced using the generalised approach. In conclusion, it has been demonstrated that a new simple mechanical model of a thin shell in creep, with or without material deterioration can be constructed; the model is assessed in detail and successfully compared to existing solutions. (orig./HP)

  15. Design of cryogenic tanks for space vehicles shell structures analytical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copper, Charles; Mccarthy, K.; Pilkey, W. D.; Haviland, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    The initial objective was to study the use of superplastically formed corrugated hat section stringers and frames in place of integrally machined stringers over separate frames for the tanks of large launch vehicles subjected to high buckling loads. The ALS was used as an example. The objective of the follow-on project was to study methods of designing shell structures subjected to severe combinations of structural loads and thermal gradients, with emphasis on new combinations of structural arrangements and materials. Typical applications would be to fuselage sections of high speed civil transports and to cryogenic tanks on the National Aerospace Plane.

  16. Aplication of the statistical experimental design to optimize mine-impacted water (MIW) remediation using shrimp-shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Gómez, Dámaris; Alves, Alcione Aparecida de Almeida; Lapolli, Flavio Rubens; Lobo-Recio, María A

    2017-01-01

    Mine-impacted water (MIW) is one of the most serious mining problems and has a high negative impact on water resources and aquatic life. The main characteristics of MIW are a low pH (between 2 and 4) and high concentrations of SO 4 2- and metal ions (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, Fe, Al, Cr, Mn, Mg, etc.), many of which are toxic to ecosystems and human life. Shrimp shell was selected as a MIW treatment agent because it is a low-cost metal-sorbent biopolymer with a high chitin content and contains calcium carbonate, an acid-neutralizing agent. To determine the best metal-removal conditions, a statistical study using statistical planning was carried out. Thus, the objective of this work was to identify the degree of influence and dependence of the shrimp-shell content for the removal of Fe, Al, Mn, Co, and Ni from MIW. In this study, a central composite rotational experimental design (CCRD) with a quadruplicate at the midpoint (2 2 ) was used to evaluate the joint influence of two formulation variables-agitation and the shrimp-shell content. The statistical results showed the significant influence (p < 0.05) of the agitation variable for Fe and Ni removal (linear and quadratic form, respectively) and of the shrimp-shell content variable for Mn (linear form), Al and Co (linear and quadratic form) removal. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for Al, Co, and Ni removal showed that the model is valid at the 95% confidence interval and that no adjustment needed within the ranges evaluated of agitation (0-251.5 rpm) and shrimp-shell content (1.2-12.8 g L -1 ). The model required adjustments to the 90% and 75% confidence interval for Fe and Mn removal, respectively. In terms of efficiency in removing pollutants, it was possible to determine the best experimental values of the variables considered as 188 rpm and 9.36 g L -1 of shrimp-shells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Isogeometric shell formulation based on a classical shell model

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti

    2012-09-04

    This paper constitutes the first steps in our work concerning isogeometric shell analysis. An isogeometric shell model of the Reissner-Mindlin type is introduced and a study of its accuracy in the classical pinched cylinder benchmark problem presented. In contrast to earlier works [1,2,3,4], the formulation is based on a shell model where the displacement, strain and stress fields are defined in terms of a curvilinear coordinate system arising from the NURBS description of the shell middle surface. The isogeometric shell formulation is implemented using the PetIGA and igakit software packages developed by the authors. The igakit package is a Python package used to generate NURBS representations of geometries that can be utilised by the PetIGA finite element framework. The latter utilises data structures and routines of the portable, extensible toolkit for scientific computation (PETSc), [5,6]. The current shell implementation is valid for static, linear problems only, but the software package is well suited for future extensions to geometrically and materially nonlinear regime as well as to dynamic problems. The accuracy of the approach in the pinched cylinder benchmark problem and present comparisons against the h-version of the finite element method with bilinear elements. Quadratic, cubic and quartic NURBS discretizations are compared against the isoparametric bilinear discretization introduced in [7]. The results show that the quadratic and cubic NURBS approximations exhibit notably slower convergence under uniform mesh refinement as the thickness decreases but the quartic approximation converges relatively quickly within the standard variational framework. The authors future work is concerned with building an isogeometric finite element method for modelling nonlinear structural response of thin-walled shells undergoing large rigid-body motions. The aim is to use the model in a aeroelastic framework for the simulation of flapping wings.

  18. Ni3Si(Al)/a-SiOx core shell nanoparticles: characterization, shell formation, and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigozzi, G.; Mukherji, D.; Gilles, R.; Barbier, B.; Kostorz, G.

    2006-08-01

    We have used an electrochemical selective phase dissolution method to extract nanoprecipitates of the Ni3Si-type intermetallic phase from two-phase Ni-Si and Ni-Si-Al alloys by dissolving the matrix phase. The extracted nanoparticles are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, x-ray powder diffraction, and electron powder diffraction. It is found that the Ni3Si-type nanoparticles have a core-shell structure. The core maintains the size, the shape, and the crystal structure of the precipitates that existed in the bulk alloys, while the shell is an amorphous phase, containing only Si and O (SiOx). The shell forms around the precipitates during the extraction process. After annealing the nanoparticles in nitrogen at 700 °C, the tridymite phase recrystallizes within the shell, which remains partially amorphous. In contrast, on annealing in air at 1000 °C, no changes in the composition or the structure of the nanoparticles occur. It is suggested that the shell forms after dealloying of the matrix phase, where Si atoms, the main constituents of the shell, migrate to the surface of the precipitates.

  19. Zero-valent iron treatment of dark brown colored coffee effluent: Contributions of a core-shell structure to pollutant removals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Mayuka; Kurosu, Shunji; Kobayashi, Maki; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2016-12-01

    The decolorization and total organic carbon (TOC) removal of dark brown colored coffee effluent by zero-valent iron (ZVI) have been systematically examined with solution pH of 3.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0 under oxic and anoxic conditions. The optimal decolorization and TOC removal were obtained at pH 8.0 with oxic condition. The maximum efficiencies of decolorization and TOC removal were 92.6 and 60.2%, respectively. ZVI presented potential properties for pollutant removal at nearly neutral pH because of its core-shell structure in which shell or iron oxide/hydroxide layer on ZVI surface dominated the decolorization and TOC removal of coffee effluent. To elucidate the contribution of the core-shell structure to removals of color and TOC at the optimal condition, the characterization of ZVI surface by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was conducted. It was confirmed that the core-shell structure was formed and the shell on ZVI particulate surface and the precipitates formed during the course of ZVI treatment consisted of iron oxides and hydroxides. They were significantly responsible for decolorization and TOC removal of coffee effluent via adsorption to shell on ZVI surface and inclusion into the precipitates rather than the oxidative degradation by OH radicals and the reduction by emitted electrons. The presence of dissolved oxygen (DO) enhanced the formation of the core-shell structure and as a result improved the efficiency of ZVI treatment for the removal of colored components in coffee effluents. ZVI was found to be an efficient material toward the treatment of coffee effluents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Argonne effect - evidence for the shell structure of proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levintov, I.I.

    1983-01-01

    A strong spin effect in P,P scattering at parallel spin orientation of a target and a projectile and psub(t)sup(2) > or approximately 4(GeV/c) 2 (psub(t) is a transverse momentum of scattered proton) - Argonne effect - is explained by the presence of Fock configuration (qqc anti cq) ip proton which has the structure of p-shell. An analogous effect in the region psub(perpendicular)sup(2) > or approximately 25(GeV/c) 2 associated with the configuration (qqb anti bq) is predicted

  1. Economic Development through Globalisation in Nigeria : An analysis of Shell & the IMF Structural Adjustment Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Bokhari, Sven; Del Duca, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Date: 2008/06/03 Level: Master thesis in International Business and Entrepreneurship, 10p (15ECTS) Authors: Sven Bokhari Fabrizio Del Duca Title: Economic Development through globalisation in Nigeria. An analysis of Shell & the IMF Structural Adjustment Programs Tutor: Leif Linnskog, Ph.D. Research Question: Can globalisation be seen as positive or negative for the Economic Development of Nigeria? A focus on Shell and the International Monetary Fund Research Issue: Globalisation in its cu...

  2. Composted oyster shell as lime fertilizer is more effective than fresh oyster shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Han; Islam, Shah Md Asraful; Hong, Sun Joo; Cho, Kye Man; Math, Renukaradhya K; Heo, Jae Young; Kim, Hoon; Yun, Han Dae

    2010-01-01

    Physio-chemical changes in oyster shell were examined, and fresh and composted oyster shell meals were compared as lime fertilizers in soybean cultivation. Structural changes in oyster shell were observed by AFM and FE-SEM. We found that grains of the oyster shell surface became smoother and smaller over time. FT-IR analysis indicated the degradation of a chitin-like compound of oyster shell. In chemical analysis, pH (12.3+/-0.24), electrical conductivity (4.1+/-0.24 dS m(-1)), and alkaline powder (53.3+/-1.12%) were highest in commercial lime. Besides, pH was higher in composted oyster shell meal (9.9+/-0.53) than in fresh oyster shell meal (8.4+/-0.32). The highest organic matter (1.1+/-0.08%), NaCl (0.54+/-0.03%), and moisture (15.1+/-1.95%) contents were found in fresh oyster shell meal. A significant higher yield of soybean (1.33 t ha(-1)) was obtained by applying composted oyster shell meal (a 21% higher yield than with fresh oyster shell meal). Thus composting of oyster shell increases the utility of oyster shell as a liming material for crop cultivation.

  3. Subscale and Full-Scale Testing of Buckling-Critical Launch Vehicle Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Haynie, Waddy T.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Roberts, Michael G.; Norris, Jeffery P.; Waters, W. Allen; Herring, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    New analysis-based shell buckling design factors (aka knockdown factors), along with associated design and analysis technologies, are being developed by NASA for the design of launch vehicle structures. Preliminary design studies indicate that implementation of these new knockdown factors can enable significant reductions in mass and mass-growth in these vehicles and can help mitigate some of NASA s launch vehicle development and performance risks by reducing the reliance on testing, providing high-fidelity estimates of structural performance, reliability, robustness, and enable increased payload capability. However, in order to validate any new analysis-based design data or methods, a series of carefully designed and executed structural tests are required at both the subscale and full-scale level. This paper describes recent buckling test efforts at NASA on two different orthogrid-stiffened metallic cylindrical shell test articles. One of the test articles was an 8-ft-diameter orthogrid-stiffened cylinder and was subjected to an axial compression load. The second test article was a 27.5-ft-diameter Space Shuttle External Tank-derived cylinder and was subjected to combined internal pressure and axial compression.

  4. Core-Shell-Corona Micelles with a Responsive Shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohy, Jean-François; Willet, Nicolas; Varshney, Sunil; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Jérôme, Robert

    2001-09-03

    A reactor for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles is one of the uses of a poly(styrene)-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) triblock copolymer (PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO) which forms core-shell-corona micelles in water. Very low polydispersity spherical micelles are observed that consist of a PS core surrounded by a pH-sensitive P2VP shell and a corona of PEO chains end-capped by a hydroxyl group. The corona can act as a site for attaching responsive or sensing molecules. © 2001 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Fed. Rep. of Germany.

  5. Multi-shelled ZnCo2O4 yolk-shell spheres for high-performance acetone gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ya; Zhu, Zongye; Ding, Degong; Lu, Wenbo; Xue, Qingzhong

    2018-06-01

    In the present study, multi-shelled ZnCo2O4 yolk-shell spheres have been successfully prepared by using carbonaceous microspheres as templates. It is found that the multi-shelled ZnCo2O4 yolk-shell spheres based sensor shows optimal sensing performances (response value of 38.2, response/recovery time of 19 s/71 s) toward 500 ppm acetone at 200 °C. In addition, this sensor exhibits a low detection limit of 0.5 ppm acetone (response value of 1.36) and a good selectivity toward hydrogen, methane, ethanol, ammonia and carbon dioxide. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that acetone gas response of multi-shelled ZnCo2O4 yolk-shell spheres is significantly better than that of ZnCo2O4 nanotubes and ZnCo2O4 nanosheets. High acetone response of the multi-shelled ZnCo2O4 yolk-shell spheres is attributed to the enhanced gas accessibility of the multi-shell morphology caused by the small crystalline size and high specific surface area while the short response/recovery time is mainly related to the rapid gas diffusion determined by the highly porous structure. Our work puts forward an exciting opportunity in designing various yolk-shelled structures for multipurpose applications.

  6. Synthesis, structural, and optical properties of type-II ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sookhakian, M., E-mail: m.sokhakian@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Amin, Y.M. [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Basirun, W.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Nanotechnology and Catalysis Research Centre (NanoCat), Institute of Postgraduate Studies, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Tajabadi, M.T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Kamarulzaman, N. [Centre for Nanomaterials Research Institute of Science, Level 3 Block C (Old Engineering Building), Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-01-15

    We demonstrate a facile one-step method for the preparation of ZnO–ZnS core–shell type-II nanostructures, pure ZnS quantum dots and pure ZnO nanoparticles with different experimental conditions. Treatment with sodium hydroxide as a capping agent is investigated systematically during the synthesis of ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The thickness of the ZnS shell is controlled by the concentration of the sodium sulphide during the synthesis of ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructures. The morphology and structure of samples are verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The UV–vis absorption spectra of the pure ZnS QDs exhibit a blue shift in the absorption edge due to the quantum confinement effect. The PL emission spectra of the ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructure are compared with the ZnO nanoparticles. The ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructures show decrease in the UV and green emissions with the appearance of a blue emission, which are not found in the ZnO nanoparticles. -- Highlights: • It has synthesised ZnO–ZnS core–shell type II in one-step for the first time. • The as-synthesised samples were characterised by using XRD, UV–vis. • The photoluminescence properties of ZnO–ZnS core–shell was compared with ZnO. • The UV and green emission in the PL spectrum of ZnO–ZnS core–shell decreased. • The blue emission in the PL spectrum of ZnO–ZnS core–shell appeared.

  7. Synthesis, structural, and optical properties of type-II ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sookhakian, M.; Amin, Y.M.; Basirun, W.J.; Tajabadi, M.T.; Kamarulzaman, N.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a facile one-step method for the preparation of ZnO–ZnS core–shell type-II nanostructures, pure ZnS quantum dots and pure ZnO nanoparticles with different experimental conditions. Treatment with sodium hydroxide as a capping agent is investigated systematically during the synthesis of ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The thickness of the ZnS shell is controlled by the concentration of the sodium sulphide during the synthesis of ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructures. The morphology and structure of samples are verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The UV–vis absorption spectra of the pure ZnS QDs exhibit a blue shift in the absorption edge due to the quantum confinement effect. The PL emission spectra of the ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructure are compared with the ZnO nanoparticles. The ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructures show decrease in the UV and green emissions with the appearance of a blue emission, which are not found in the ZnO nanoparticles. -- Highlights: • It has synthesised ZnO–ZnS core–shell type II in one-step for the first time. • The as-synthesised samples were characterised by using XRD, UV–vis. • The photoluminescence properties of ZnO–ZnS core–shell was compared with ZnO. • The UV and green emission in the PL spectrum of ZnO–ZnS core–shell decreased. • The blue emission in the PL spectrum of ZnO–ZnS core–shell appeared

  8. Controlled synthesis of multi-shelled transition metal oxide hollow structures through one-pot solution route

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Wang; Yi-Jun Yang; Ying Ma; Jian-Nian Yao

    2013-01-01

    As one type of promising candidates fot environmental and energy-related systems,multi-shelled transition metal oxide hollow structures (MS-TMOHSs) have drawn great scientific and technical interest in the past few years.This article highlights recent advances in one-pot solution synthesis of MS-TMOHSs.We begin it with an overview of synthetic strategies that have been exploited to achieve these peculiar structures.We then focus on one-pot solution approaches in the following four sections:i) soft templates directed growth; ii) Ostwald ripening; iii) controlled etching; and iv) gas bubble assisted growth.After giving a brief discussion on the unique properties and applications of these multi-shelled hollow structures,we conclude this review with the general challenges and the potential future directions of this exciting area of research.

  9. Preparation of yolk-shell MoS2 nanospheres covered with carbon shell for excellent lithium-ion battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bangjun; Feng, Yu; Chen, Xiaofan; Li, Bo; Yu, Ke

    2018-03-01

    Molybdenum disulfide is regarded as one of the most promising electrode materials for high performance lithium-ion batteries. Designing firm basal structure is a key point to fully utilize the high capacity of layered MoS2 nanomaterials. Here, yolk-shell structured MoS2 nanospheres is firstly designed and fabricated to meet this needs. This unique yolk-shell nanospheres are transformed from solid nanospheres by a simply weak alkaline etching method. Then, the yolk-shell MoS2/C is synthesized by a facile process to protect the outside MoS2 shell and promote the conductivity. Taking advantages of high capacity and well-defined cavity space, allowing the core MoS2 to expand freely without breaking the outer shells, yolk-shell MoS2/C nanospheres delivers long cycle life (94% of capacity retained after 200 cycles) and high rate behaviour (830 mA h g-1 at 5 A g-1). This design of yolk-shell structure may set up a new strategy for preparing next generation anode materials for LIBs.

  10. In-situ synthetize multi-walled carbon nanotubes@MnO2 nanoflake core-shell structured materials for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huajun; Wang, Jiaoxia; Jia, Yi; Ma, Chun'an

    2012-10-01

    A new type of core-shell structured material consisting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and manganese dioxide (MnO2) nanoflake is synthesized using an in-situ co-precipitation method. By scanning electron microscopy and transition electron microscope, it is confirmed that the core-shell nanostructure is formed by the uniform incorporation of birnessite-type MnO2 nanoflake growth round the surface of the activated-MWCNTs. That core-shell structured material electrode presents excellent electrochemical capacitance properties with the specific capacitance reaching 380 F g-1 at the current density of 5 A g-1 in 0.5 M Na2SO4 electrolyte. In addition, the electrode also exhibits good performance (the power density: 11.28 kW kg-1 at 5 A g-1) and long-term cycling stability (retaining 82.7% of its initial capacitance after 3500 cycles at 5 A g-1). It mainly attributes to MWCNTs not only providing considerable specific surface area for high mass loading of MnO2 nanoflakes to ensure effective utilization of MnO2 nanoflake, but also offering an electron pathway to improve electrical conductivity of the electrode materials. It is clearly indicated that such core-shell structured materials including MWCNTs and MnO2 nanoflake may find important applications for supercapacitors.

  11. Hierarchical core-shell structure of ZnO nanorod@NiO/MoO₂ composite nanosheet arrays for high-performance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Sucheng; Zhang, Guanhua; Zeng, Wei; Zhu, Jian; Gong, Feilong; Li, Feng; Duan, Huigao

    2014-08-27

    A hierarchical core-shell structure of ZnO nanorod@NiO/MoO2 composite nanosheet arrays on nickel foam substrate for high-performance supercapacitors was constructed by a two-step solution-based method involving two hydrothermal processes followed by a calcination treatment. Compared to one composed of pure NiO/MoO2 composite nanosheets, the hierarchical core-shell structure electrode displays better pseudocapacitive behaviors in 2 M KOH, including high areal specific capacitance values of 1.18 F cm(-2) at 5 mA cm(-2) and 0.6 F cm(-2) at 30 mA cm(-2) as well as relatively good rate capability at high current densities. Furthermore, it also shows remarkable cycle stability, remaining at 91.7% of the initial value even after 4000 cycles at a current density of 10 mA cm(-2). The enhanced pseudocapacitive behaviors are mainly due to the unique hierarchical core-shell structure and the synergistic effect of combining ZnO nanorod arrays and NiO/MoO2 composite nanosheets. This novel hierarchical core-shell structure shows promise for use in next-generation supercapacitors.

  12. Reactive turbulent flow CFD study in supercritical water oxidation process: application to a stirred double shell reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussiere, S.

    2006-12-01

    Supercritical water oxidation is an innovative process to treat organic liquid waste which uses supercritical water properties to mix efficiency the oxidant and the organic compounds. The reactor is a stirred double shell reactor. In the step of adaptation to nuclear constraints, the computational fluid dynamic modeling is a good tool to know required temperature field in the reactor for safety analysis. Firstly, the CFD modeling of tubular reactor confirms the hypothesis of an incompressible fluid and the use of k-w turbulence model to represent the hydrodynamic. Moreover, the EDC model is as efficiency as the kinetic to compute the reaction rate in this reactor. Secondly, the study of turbulent flow in the double shell reactor confirms the use of 2D axisymmetric geometry instead of 3D geometry to compute heat transfer. Moreover, this study reports that water-air mixing is not in single phase. The reactive turbulent flow is well represented by EDC model after adaptation of initial conditions. The reaction rate in supercritical water oxidation reactor is mainly controlled by the mixing. (author)

  13. Core–shell interaction and its impact on the optical absorption of pure and doped core-shell CdSe/ZnSe nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xinqin; Cui, Yingqi; Zeng, Qun; Yang, Mingli, E-mail: myang@scu.edu.cn [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Yu, Shengping [College of Chemistry and Environment Protection Engineering, Southwest University for Nationalities, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2016-04-07

    The structural, electronic, and optical properties of core-shell nanoclusters, (CdSe){sub x}@(CdSe){sub y} and their Zn-substituted complexes of x = 2–4 and y = 16–28, were studied with density functional theory calculations. The substitution was applied in the cores, the shells, and/or the whole clusters. All these clusters are characterized by their core-shell structures in which the core-shell interaction was found different from those in core or in shell, as reflected by their bondlengths, volumes, and binding energies. Moreover, the core and shell combine together to compose a new cluster with electronic and optical properties different from those of separated individuals, as reflected by their HOMO-LUMO gaps and optical absorptions. With the substitution of Cd by Zn, the structural, electronic, and optical properties of clusters change regularly. The binding energy increases with Zn content, attributed to the strong Zn–Se bonding. For the same core/shell, the structure with a CdSe shell/core has a narrower gap than that with a ZnSe shell/core. The optical absorption spectra also change accordingly with Zn substitution. The peaks blueshift with increasing Zn concentration, accompanying with shape variations in case large number of Cd atoms are substituted. Our calculations reveal the core-shell interaction and its influence on the electronic and optical properties of the core-shell clusters, suggesting a composition–structure–property relationship for the design of core-shell CdSe and ZnSe nanoclusters.

  14. One-pot synthesis of stable water soluble Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hao; Gao Xue; Liu Siyu; Su Xingguang, E-mail: suxg@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Department of Analytical Chemistry (China)

    2013-06-15

    In this paper, Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell-doped quantum dots (d-dots) with 3-mercaptopropionic acid as the stabilizer are successfully synthesized through a simple one-pot synthesis procedure in aqueous solution. The average diameter of Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell d-dots is about 2.9 nm, which is lager than that of Mn:ZnSe cores (about 1.9 nm). The optical features and structure of the obtained Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots have been characterized by UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photostability against UV irradiation and chemical stability against H{sub 2}O{sub 2} etching have been studied, and the results showed that the prepared Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell d-dots are more stable than CdTe quantum dots prepared in aqueous solution. Finally, the resulting core/shell quantum dots are used as fluorescent label in human osteoblast-like HepG2 cell imaging.

  15. Faceted shell structure in grain boundary diffusion-processed sintered Nd–Fe–B magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seelam, U.M.R.; Ohkubo, T.; Abe, T.; Hirosawa, S.; Hono, K., E-mail: kazuhiro.hono@nims.go.jp

    2014-12-25

    Graphical abstract: The grain boundary diffusion process (GBDP) using a heavy rare earth elements (HRE) such as Dy and Tb is known as an effective method to enhance the coercivity of Nd–Fe–B sintered magnets without reducing remanence. This process has been industrially implemented to manufacture Nd–Fe–B based sintered magnets with high coercivity and high remanence. In this process, Dy is considered to diffuse through grain boundaries (GBs) to form (Nd{sub 1−x}Dy{sub x}){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B shells surrounding the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains and the higher anisotropy field of the Dy-rich shell is considered to suppress the nucleation of reverse domains at low magnetic field. Although there are several investigations on the microstructure of HRE GBDP Nd–Fe–B magnets, no paper addressed the origin of the asymmetric formation of HRE rich shells. Based on detailed analysis of facet planes of core/shell interfaces, we propose a mechanism of the faceted core/shell microstructure formation in the GBDP sintered magnets. We believe that this gives new insights on understanding the coercivity enhancement by the GBDP. - Highlights: • Faceting was observed at the interfaces of cores and shells. • The core/shell interfaces are sharp with an abrupt change in Dy concentration. • Meting occurs at the interfaces of metalic Nd-rich/Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phases above 685 °C due to eutectic reaction. • Solidification of Dy-enriched liquid phase from 900 °C can result in the shell formation. - Abstract: Dysprosium enriched shell structure formed by the grain boundary diffusion process (GBDP) of a sintered Nd–Fe–B magnet was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Faceted core–shell interfaces with an abrupt change in Dy concentration suggest the Dy-rich shells are formed by the solidification of the liquid phase during cooling from the GBDP temperature. The Nd-rich phases

  16. Effect of the STereoLithography file structure on the ear shell production for hearing aids according to DICOM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIm, Hyeong Gyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    A technique for producing the ear shell for a hearing aid using DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) image and a 3D printing was studied. It is a new application method, and is an application technique that can improve the safety and infection of hearing aid users and can reduce the production time and process stages. In this study, the effects on the shape surface were examined before and after the printing of the ear shell using a 3D printer based on the values obtained from the raw data of the DICOM images at the volumes of 0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 2.0 mm, respectively. Before the printing, relative relationship was compared with respect to the STL (STereoLithography) file structure; and after the printing, the intervals of the layered structure of the ear shell shape surface were compared by magnifying them using a microscope. For the STL file structure, the numbers of triangular vertices, more than five intersecting points, and maximum intersecting points were large in the order of 0.5 mm, 1.0 m, and 2.0 mm, respectively; and the triangular structure was densely distributed in the order of the bending, angle, and crest regions depending on the sinuosity of the external auditory meatus shape. As for the ear shell shape surface examined by the digital microscope, the interval of the layered structure was thick in the order of 2.0 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm. For the STL surface structure mentioned above, the intersecting STL triangular structure was denser as the sinuosity of the 3D ear shell shape became more irregular and the volume of the raw data decreased.

  17. Effect of the STereoLithography file structure on the ear shell production for hearing aids according to DICOM images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KIm, Hyeong Gyun

    2017-01-01

    A technique for producing the ear shell for a hearing aid using DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) image and a 3D printing was studied. It is a new application method, and is an application technique that can improve the safety and infection of hearing aid users and can reduce the production time and process stages. In this study, the effects on the shape surface were examined before and after the printing of the ear shell using a 3D printer based on the values obtained from the raw data of the DICOM images at the volumes of 0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 2.0 mm, respectively. Before the printing, relative relationship was compared with respect to the STL (STereoLithography) file structure; and after the printing, the intervals of the layered structure of the ear shell shape surface were compared by magnifying them using a microscope. For the STL file structure, the numbers of triangular vertices, more than five intersecting points, and maximum intersecting points were large in the order of 0.5 mm, 1.0 m, and 2.0 mm, respectively; and the triangular structure was densely distributed in the order of the bending, angle, and crest regions depending on the sinuosity of the external auditory meatus shape. As for the ear shell shape surface examined by the digital microscope, the interval of the layered structure was thick in the order of 2.0 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm. For the STL surface structure mentioned above, the intersecting STL triangular structure was denser as the sinuosity of the 3D ear shell shape became more irregular and the volume of the raw data decreased

  18. Ni(3)Si(Al)/a-SiO(x) core-shell nanoparticles: characterization, shell formation, and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigozzi, G; Mukherji, D; Gilles, R; Barbier, B; Kostorz, G

    2006-08-28

    We have used an electrochemical selective phase dissolution method to extract nanoprecipitates of the Ni(3)Si-type intermetallic phase from two-phase Ni-Si and Ni-Si-Al alloys by dissolving the matrix phase. The extracted nanoparticles are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, x-ray powder diffraction, and electron powder diffraction. It is found that the Ni(3)Si-type nanoparticles have a core-shell structure. The core maintains the size, the shape, and the crystal structure of the precipitates that existed in the bulk alloys, while the shell is an amorphous phase, containing only Si and O (SiO(x)). The shell forms around the precipitates during the extraction process. After annealing the nanoparticles in nitrogen at 700 °C, the tridymite phase recrystallizes within the shell, which remains partially amorphous. In contrast, on annealing in air at 1000 °C, no changes in the composition or the structure of the nanoparticles occur. It is suggested that the shell forms after dealloying of the matrix phase, where Si atoms, the main constituents of the shell, migrate to the surface of the precipitates.

  19. Cleaning oil refining drainage waters out of emulsified oil products with thermic treated cedar nut shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatanova, P. A.; Adeeva, L. N.

    2017-08-01

    It was elaborated the ability of the sorbent produced by thermic treatment of cedar nut shell to destruct model and real first kind (direct) emulsions in static and dynamic conditions. In static conditions optimal ratio sorbent-emulsion with the original concentration of oil products 800 mg/l was in the range of 2.0 g per 100 ml of emulsion which corresponds to the level of treatment 94.9%. The time of emulsion destruction was 40 minutes. This sorbent is highly active in dynamic processes of oil-contaminated water treatment, the level of treatment 96.0% is being achieved. Full dynamic sorptive capacity of the sorbent is 0.85 g/g. Sorbent based on the thermic treated cedar nut shell can be elaborated as sorptive filter element of local treatment facilities of oil refining and petrochemical processes. After the treatment with this sorbent of drainage waters of oil refinery in dynamic conditions the concentration of oil products became less than mpc on oil products for waste waters coming to biological treatment.

  20. Shell supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almegaard, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    A new statical and conceptual model for membrane shell structures - the stringer system - has been found. The principle was first published at the IASS conference in Copenhagen (OHL91), and later the theory has been further developed (ALMO3)(ALMO4). From the analysis of the stringer model it can...... be concluded that all membrane shells can be described by a limited number of basic configurations of which quite a few have free edges....

  1. Constructing Repairable Meta-Structures of Ultra-Broad-Band Electromagnetic Absorption from Three-Dimensional Printed Patterned Shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei-Li; Zhou, Zhili; Wang, Li-Chen; Cheng, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Mingji; He, Rujie; Chen, Haosen; Yang, Yazheng; Fang, Daining

    2017-12-13

    Ultra-broad-band electromagnetic absorption materials and structures are increasingly attractive for their critical role in competing with the advanced broad-band electromagnetic detection systems. Mechanically soft and weak wax-based materials composites are known to be insufficient to serve in practical electromagnetic absorption applications. To break through such barriers, here we developed an innovative strategy to enable the wax-based composites to be robust and repairable meta-structures by employing a three-dimensional (3D) printed polymeric patterned shell. Because of the integrated merits from both the dielectric loss wax-based composites and mechanically robust 3D printed shells, the as-fabricated meta-structures enable bear mechanical collision and compression, coupled with ultra-broad-band absorption (7-40 and 75-110 GHz, reflection loss  smaller than -10 dB) approaching state-of-the-art electromagnetic absorption materials. With the assistance of experiment and simulation methods, the design advantages and mechanism of employing such 3D printed shells for substantially promoting the electromagnetic absorption performance have been demonstrated. Therefore, such universal strategy that could be widely extended to other categories of wax-based composites highlights a smart stage on which high-performance practical multifunction meta-structures with ultra-broad-band electromagnetic absorption could be envisaged.

  2. Isotopic characteristics of shells Mytilus galloprovincialis from eastern coastal area of Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjaša Kanduč

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Samples of Mytilus galloprovincialis were collected from entire Eastern Adriatic coast to determine δ18O and δ13C performed on calcite and aragonite shell layers. The aim of this work was to check whether shells of M. galloprovincialis are good environmental indicators (water temperature, salinity. Based on measured isotopic composition of oxygen in shell layers and assumed isotopic composition in water temperatures of calcite and aragonite of shell layers were calculated. The calculated temperatures for M. galloprovincialis shell growth of calcite and aragonite shell layer are in good agreement with measured temperatures of sea water. According to our results of δ18O and δ13C in shell layers we canseparate the locations of the investigated area into three groups: those with more influence of fresh water, those with less influence of fresh water and those of marine environments.

  3. Cu–Ni core–shell nanoparticles: structure, stability, electronic, and magnetic properties: a spin-polarized density functional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wangqiang@njtech.edu.cn; Wang, Xinyan; Liu, Jianlan; Yang, Yanhui [Nanjing Tech University, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Institute of Advanced Synthesis (IAS) (China)

    2017-02-15

    Bimetallic core–shell nanoparticles (CSNPs) have attracted great interest not only because of their superior stability, selectivity, and catalytic activity but also due to their tunable properties achieved by changing the morphology, sequence, and sizes of both core and shell. In this study, the structure, stability, charge transfer, electronic, and magnetic properties of 13-atom and 55-atom Cu and Cu–Ni CSNPs were investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results show that Ni@Cu CSNPs with a Cu surface shell are more energetically favorable than Cu@Ni CSNPs with a Ni surface shell. Interestingly, three-shell Ni@Cu{sub 12}@Ni{sub 42} is more stable than two-shell Cu{sub 13}@Ni{sub 42}, while two-shell Ni{sub 13}@Cu{sub 42} is more stable than three-shell Cu@Ni{sub 12}@Cu{sub 42}. Analysis of Bader charge illustrates that the charge transfer increases from Cu core to Ni shell in Cu@Ni NPs, while it decreases from Ni core to Cu shell in Ni@Cu NPs. Furthermore, the charge transfer results that d-band states have larger shift toward the Fermi level for the Ni@Cu CSNPs with Cu surface shell, while the Cu@Ni CSNPs with Ni surface shell have similar d-band state curves and d-band centers with the monometallic Ni NPs. In addition, the Cu–Ni CSNPs possess higher magnetic moment when the Ni atoms aggregated at core region of CSNPs, while having lower magnetic moment when the Ni atoms segregate on surface region. The change of the Cu atom location in CSNPs has a weak effect on the total magnetic moment. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic core–shell catalysts.

  4. Driven self-assembly of hard nanoplates on soft elastic shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yao-Yang; Hua Yun-Feng; Deng Zhen-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The driven self-assembly behaviors of hard nanoplates on soft elastic shells are investigated by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method, and the driven self-assembly structures of adsorbed hard nanoplates depend on the shape of hard nanoplates and the bending energy of soft elastic shells. Three main structures for adsorbed hard nanoplates, including the ordered aggregation structures of hard nanoplates for elastic shells with a moderate bending energy, the collapsed structures for elastic shells with a low bending energy, and the disordered aggregation structures for hard shells, are observed. The self-assembly process of adsorbed hard nanoplates is driven by the surface tension of the elastic shell, and the shape of driven self-assembly structures is determined on the basis of the minimization of the second moment of mass distribution. Meanwhile, the deformations of elastic shells can be controlled by the number of adsorbed rods as well as the length of adsorbed rods. This investigation can help us understand the complexity of the driven self-assembly of hard nanoplates on elastic shells. (paper)

  5. Core-Shell Structuring of Pure Metallic Aerogels towards Highly Efficient Platinum Utilization for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bin; Hübner, René; Sasaki, Kotaro; Zhang, Yuanzhe; Su, Dong; Ziegler, Christoph; Vukmirovic, Miomir B; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Adzic, Radoslav R; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2018-03-05

    The development of core-shell structures remains a fundamental challenge for pure metallic aerogels. Here we report the synthesis of Pd x Au-Pt core-shell aerogels composed of an ultrathin Pt shell and a composition-tunable Pd x Au alloy core. The universality of this strategy ensures the extension of core compositions to Pd transition-metal alloys. The core-shell aerogels exhibited largely improved Pt utilization efficiencies for the oxygen reduction reaction and their activities show a volcano-type relationship as a function of the lattice parameter of the core substrate. The maximum mass and specific activities are 5.25 A mg Pt -1 and 2.53 mA cm -2 , which are 18.7 and 4.1 times higher than those of Pt/C, respectively, demonstrating the superiority of the core-shell metallic aerogels. The proposed core-based activity descriptor provides a new possible strategy for the design of future core-shell electrocatalysts. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Core/Shell Microstructure Induced Synergistic Effect for Efficient Water-Droplet Formation and Cloud-Seeding Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yanlong; Liang, Haoran; Zaki, Abdelali; El Hadri, Nabil; Abshaev, Ali M; Huchunaev, Buzgigit M; Griffiths, Steve; Jouiad, Mustapha; Zou, Linda

    2017-12-26

    Cloud-seeding materials as a promising water-augmentation technology have drawn more attention recently. We designed and synthesized a type of core/shell NaCl/TiO 2 (CSNT) particle with controlled particle size, which successfully adsorbed more water vapor (∼295 times at low relative humidity, 20% RH) than that of pure NaCl, deliquesced at a lower environmental RH of 62-66% than the hygroscopic point (h g.p ., 75% RH) of NaCl, and formed larger water droplets ∼6-10 times its original measured size area, whereas the pure NaCl still remained as a crystal at the same conditions. The enhanced performance was attributed to the synergistic effect of the hydrophilic TiO 2 shell and hygroscopic NaCl core microstructure, which attracted a large amount of water vapor and turned it into a liquid faster. Moreover, the critical particle size of the CSNT particles (0.4-10 μm) as cloud-seeding materials was predicted via the classical Kelvin equation based on their surface hydrophilicity. Finally, the benefits of CSNT particles for cloud-seeding applications were determined visually through in situ observation under an environmental scanning electron microscope on the microscale and cloud chamber experiments on the macroscale, respectively. These excellent and consistent performances positively confirmed that CSNT particles could be promising cloud-seeding materials.

  7. Stability of Ag@SiO2 core–shell particles in conditions of photocatalytic overall water-splitting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Sun Young; Han, Kai; O'Neill, Devin B.; Mul, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Core–shell nanoparticles containing plasmonic metals (Ag or Au) have been frequently reported to enhance performance of photo-electrochemical (PEC) devices. However, the stability of these particles in water-splitting conditions is usually not addressed. In this study we demonstrate that Ag@SiO2

  8. Optical absorption of carbon-gold core-shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaolong; Quan, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhuomin; Cheng, Ping

    2018-01-01

    In order to enhance the solar thermal energy conversion efficiency, we propose to use carbon-gold core-shell nanoparticles dispersed in liquid water. This work demonstrates theoretically that an absorbing carbon (C) core enclosed in a plasmonic gold (Au) nanoshell can enhance the absorption peak while broadening the absorption band; giving rise to a much higher solar absorption than most previously studied core-shell combinations. The exact Mie solution is used to evaluate the absorption efficiency factor of spherical nanoparticles in the wavelength region from 300 nm to 1100 nm as well as the electric field and power dissipation profiles inside the nanoparticles at specified wavelengths (mostly at the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength). The field enhancement by the localized plasmons at the gold surfaces boosts the absorption of the carbon particle, resulting in a redshift of the absorption peak with increased peak height and bandwidth. In addition to spherical nanoparticles, we use the finite-difference time-domain method to calculate the absorption of cubic core-shell nanoparticles. Even stronger enhancement can be achieved with cubic C-Au core-shell structures due to the localized plasmonic resonances at the sharp edges of the Au shell. The solar absorption efficiency factor can exceed 1.5 in the spherical case and reach 2.3 in the cubic case with a shell thickness of 10 nm. Such broadband absorption enhancement is in great demand for solar thermal applications including steam generation.

  9. Shell structure effects at high excitations and many-quasiparticle configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, V.G.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical data available on few- and many-quasiparticle components of the wave functions of complex nuclei at low, intermediate and high energies are shortly analyzed. The components are treated in the nuclear quasiparticle-phonon model. Specific features of the lowest and high-spin states, giant resonances, neutron resonances and the effects of the energy-level structure in the few-and many-particle transfer reactions are discussed. It is concluded that the most reliable nuclear properties are determined by the components, their behaviour reflecting the shell structure effects. Wich increasing excitation energy the density of levels increases exponentially and the contribution of few-quasiparticle components to the normalization of the wave functions decreases exponentially

  10. Hysteresis and compensation behaviors of mixed spin-2 and spin-1 hexagonal Ising nanowire core–shell structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masrour, R., E-mail: rachidmasrour@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Materials, Processes, Environment and Quality, Cady Ayyed University, National School of Applied Sciences, 63 46000 Safi (Morocco); Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); Jabar, A. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); Benyoussef, A. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat (Morocco); Hamedoun, M. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Bahmad, L. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco)

    2015-09-01

    The magnetic behaviors of a mixed spins (2-1) hexagonal Ising nanowire with core–shell structure are investigated by using the Monte Carlo simulations. The thermal magnetizations, the magnetic susceptibilities and the transition temperatures of core–shell are studied for different values of crystal field and exchange interactions. The thermal and magnetic hysteresis cycles are given for different values of the crystal field. - Highlights: • Critical temperature increase when exchange interaction increasing in core-shell. • Hysteresis loop areas decrease at above transition temperature. • Magnetic coercive field decrease when crystal field increasing. • Magnetic coercive field increase when exchange interaction increasing.

  11. Core-shell SrTiO3/graphene structure by chemical vapor deposition for enhanced photocatalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chenye; Bu, Xiuming; Yang, Siwei; He, Peng; Ding, Guqiao; Xie, Xiaoming

    2018-04-01

    Direct growth of high quality graphene on the surface of SrTiO3 (STO) was realized through chemical vapor deposition (CVD), to construct few-layer 'graphene shell' on every STO nanoparticle. The STO/graphene composite shows significantly enhanced UV light photocatalytic activity compared with the STO/rGO reference. Mechanism analysis confirms the role of special core-shell structure and chemical bond (Tisbnd C) for rapid interfacial electron transfer and effective electron-hole separation.

  12. Holographic shell model: Stack data structure inside black holes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Aharon

    2014-03-01

    Rather than tiling the black hole horizon by Planck area patches, we suggest that bits of information inhabit, universally and holographically, the entire black core interior, a bit per a light sheet unit interval of order Planck area difference. The number of distinguishable (tagged by a binary code) configurations, counted within the context of a discrete holographic shell model, is given by the Catalan series. The area entropy formula is recovered, including Cardy's universal logarithmic correction, and the equipartition of mass per degree of freedom is proven. The black hole information storage resembles, in the count procedure, the so-called stack data structure.

  13. Analysis of thin-walled cylindrical composite shell structures subject to axial and bending loads: Concept development, analytical modeling and experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadev, Sthanu

    Continued research and development efforts devoted in recent years have generated novel avenues towards the advancement of efficient and effective, slender laminated fiber-reinforced composite members. Numerous studies have focused on the modeling and response characterization of composite structures with particular relevance to thin-walled cylindrical composite shells. This class of shell configurations is being actively explored to fully determine their mechanical efficacy as primary aerospace structural members. The proposed research is targeted towards formulating a composite shell theory based prognosis methodology that entails an elaborate analysis and investigation of thin-walled cylindrical shell type laminated composite configurations that are highly desirable in increasing number of mechanical and aerospace applications. The prime motivation to adopt this theory arises from its superior ability to generate simple yet viable closed-form analytical solution procedure to numerous geometrically intense, inherent curvature possessing composite structures. This analytical evaluative routine offers to acquire a first-hand insight on the primary mechanical characteristics that essentially govern the behavior of slender composite shells under typical static loading conditions. Current work exposes the robustness of this mathematical framework via demonstrating its potential towards the prediction of structural properties such as axial stiffness and bending stiffness respectively. Longitudinal ply-stress computations are investigated upon deriving the global stiffness matrix model for composite cylindrical tubes with circular cross-sections. Additionally, this work employs a finite element based numerical technique to substantiate the analytical results reported for cylindrically shaped circular composite tubes. Furthermore, this concept development is extended to the study of thin-walled, open cross-sectioned, curved laminated shells that are geometrically

  14. Synthesis of Aqueous CdTe/CdS/ZnS Core/shell/shell Quantum Dots by a Chemical Aerosol Flow Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Dong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This work described a continuous method to synthesize CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell quantum dots. In an integrated system by flawlessly combining the chemical aerosol flow system working at high temperature (200–300°C to generate CdTe/CdS intermediate products and an additional heat-up setup at relatively low temperature to overcoat the ZnS shells, the CdTe/CdS/ZnS multishell structures were realized. The as-synthesized CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell quantum dots are characterized by photoluminescence spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. Fluorescence and XRD results confirm that the obtained quantum dots have a core/shell/shell structure. It shows the highest quantum yield above 45% when compared to the rhodamine 6G. The core/shell/shell QDs were more stable via the oxidation experiment by H2O2.

  15. Nanostructued core–shell Sn nanowires @ CNTs with controllable thickness of CNT shells for lithium ion battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xifei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Cai, Mei [General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, MI 48090-9055 (United States); Sun, Xueliang, E-mail: xsun@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sn nanowires encapsulated in CNTs directly grew on current collectors. • The thickness of CNTs were controlled via growth time, gas flow rate and synthesis temperature. • Thick CNTs contributed to a better capacity retention while thin CNTs led to a higher capacity. • The core–shell structures formed in one-step CVD process. - Abstract: Core–shell structure of Sn nanowires encapsulated in amorphous carbon nanotubes (Sn@CNTs) with controlled thickness of CNT shells was in situ prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The thickness of CNT shells was accurately controlled from 4 to 99 nm by using different growth time, flow rate of hydrocarbon gas (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and synthesis temperature. The microstructure and composition of the coaxial Sn@CNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. Moreover, the Sn@CNTs were studied as anode materials for Li-ion batteries and showed excellent cycle performance. The capacity was affected by the thickness of outer CNT shells: thick CNT shells contributed to a better retention while thin CNT shells led to a higher capacity. The thin CNT shell of 6 nm presented the highest capacity around 630 mAh g{sup −1}.

  16. Nanostructued core–shell Sn nanowires @ CNTs with controllable thickness of CNT shells for lithium ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xifei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying; Cai, Mei; Sun, Xueliang

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sn nanowires encapsulated in CNTs directly grew on current collectors. • The thickness of CNTs were controlled via growth time, gas flow rate and synthesis temperature. • Thick CNTs contributed to a better capacity retention while thin CNTs led to a higher capacity. • The core–shell structures formed in one-step CVD process. - Abstract: Core–shell structure of Sn nanowires encapsulated in amorphous carbon nanotubes (Sn@CNTs) with controlled thickness of CNT shells was in situ prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The thickness of CNT shells was accurately controlled from 4 to 99 nm by using different growth time, flow rate of hydrocarbon gas (C 2 H 4 ) and synthesis temperature. The microstructure and composition of the coaxial Sn@CNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. Moreover, the Sn@CNTs were studied as anode materials for Li-ion batteries and showed excellent cycle performance. The capacity was affected by the thickness of outer CNT shells: thick CNT shells contributed to a better retention while thin CNT shells led to a higher capacity. The thin CNT shell of 6 nm presented the highest capacity around 630 mAh g −1

  17. Gross shell structure at high spin in heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleplanque, Marie-Agnes; Frauendorf, Stefan; Pashkevich, Vitaly V.; Chu, S.Y.; Unzhakova, Anja

    2003-01-01

    Experimental nuclear moments of inertia at high spins along the yrast line have been determined systematically and found to differ from the rigid-body values. The difference is attributed to shell effect and these have been calculated microscopically. The data and quantal calculations are interpreted by means of the semiclassical Periodic Orbit Theory. From this new perspective, features in the moments of inertia as a function of neutron number and spin, as well as their relation to the shell energies can be understood. Gross shell effects persist up to the highest angular momenta observed

  18. Study Added of Waste Chicken Egg Shell in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keng Wong Irwan Lie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil is the foundation of structure or construction that will receive the load transfer through to foundation. If the soil has a carrying capacity of small and cannot withstand the load transfer can result in the failure of construction. If the soil has a carrying capacity of small ground it is necessary to stabilize or improve the soil so that an increase in the carrying capacity of the land so that it can be used for construction. One material is commonly used for soil stabilization with the addition of lime. Waste chicken egg shell is waste that is still rarely used, the results of research [1], states that composition egg shell broadly consists of water (1,6% and dry material (98,4%. The total dry ingredients are there, in shell eggs contained mineral elements (95,1% and protein (3,3%. Based on the existing mineral composition, then the egg shells are composed of crystalline CaCO3 (98,43%, MgCO3 (0,84% and Ca3(PO42 (0,75%. This research was done by adding powdered chicken egg shell waste in clay with a composition of 5%, 7,5%, 10% and 14% with physical properties test and soil compaction test.

  19. Characterization of Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wever, Diego-Armando Z.; Heeres, H.J.; Broekhuis, Antonius A.

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of Physic nut shells was done using the wet chemical analysis of wood components. The obtained fractions were analyzed using IR, NMR, GPC, ICP and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. TGA was used to determine the fixed carbon (+ash) and water content of the shells. The results of wet chemical analysis of wood components offered a clear procedure to isolate the main components in Physic nut shells (a). The fractions obtained were: polar extract (b), non-polar extract (c), Acid Insoluble Lignin (d), Holocellulose (e), α-Cellulose (f). The total Lignin content present in the shells equaled 48.84%. IR and NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the non-polar extract is Lignin, which corresponds to the extractable Lignin (1.24%) in the Physic nut shells and the Acid Insoluble Lignin was 47.60%. Elemental analysis showed no Sulfur present in the investigated materials. Furthermore both 1 H and 13 C NMR of the non-polar extract showed the presence of aliphatic hydrocarbon chains. The α-Cellulose content (22.29%) and the Hemicelluloses content (23.84%) were in line with that of agricultural residues. The water content and the fixed carbon content (+ash [2.8%]) equal 5–6% and 35.6%, respectively. GPC showed that the polydispersity of the non-polar extract (3.6) lies between Alcell Lignin and Kraft Lignin. The polar extract contains a variety of metals, with especially a high amount of the alkali metals K and Na. The extraction with water is proposed to generate a fertilizer fraction and may be applied to reduce potential sintering issues during eventual combustion or gasification of the shells. -- Highlights: ► Physic nut shell is a potential source of value added chemicals due to its high lignin content (48.8 wt%). ► Lignin extracted from Jatropha curcas L. shells is rich in aliphatic linkages. ► Water extraction of the shells yields a potential fertilizer fraction rich in alkali metals and phosphorous. ► Pre-extraction is recommended to eliminate

  20. Structural aspects of the solvation shell of lysine and acetylated lysine: A Car-Parrinello and classical molecular dynamics investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnevale, V.; Raugei, S.

    2009-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification, which modulates the affinity of protein-protein and/or protein-DNA complexes. Its crucial role as a switch in signaling pathways highlights the relevance of charged chemical groups in determining the interactions between water and biomolecules. A great effort has been recently devoted to assess the reliability of classical molecular dynamics simulations in describing the solvation properties of charged moieties. In the spirit of these investigations, we performed classical and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations on lysine and acetylated-lysine in aqueous solution. A comparative analysis between the two computational schemes is presented with a focus on the first solvation shell of the charged groups. An accurate structural analysis unveils subtle, yet statistically significant, differences which are discussed in connection to the significant electronic density charge transfer occurring between the solute and the surrounding water molecules.

  1. Removal of Arsenic with Oyster Shell: Experimental Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Atiqur Rahman, , and

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Oyster shell has tremendous potential as a remediation material for the removal of arsenic from groundwater. A single arsenic removal system was developed with oyster shell for tube well water containing arsenic. The system removes arsenic from water by adsorption through fine oyster shell. Various conditions that affect the adsorption/desorption of arsenic were investigated. Adsorption column methods showed the removal of As(III under the following conditions: initial As concentration, 100 µg /L; oyster shell amount, 6 g; particle size, <355µm ; treatment flow rate, 1.7 mL/min; and pH 6.5. Arsenic concentration of the treated water were below the Bangladesh drinking water standard of 50 µg/L for As. The desorption efficiencies with 2M of KOH after the treatment of groundwater were in the range of 80-83%. A combination of techniques was used to measure the pH, conductivity, cations and anions. The average concentrations of other inorganic constituents of health concern (Na, K, Ca, Mg and Fe in treated water were below their respective WHO guideline for drinking. The present study might provide new avenues to achieve the arsenic concentrations required for drinking water recommended by Bangladesh and the World Health Organization (WHO.

  2. Structural acceptance criteria for the evaulation of existing double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julyk, L.J.; Day, A.D.; Dyrness, A.D.; Moore, C.J.; Peterson, W.S.; Scott, M.A.; Shrivastava, H.P.; Sholman, J.S.; Watts, T.N.

    1995-09-01

    The structural acceptance criteria contained herein for the evaluation of existing underground double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site is part of the Life Management/Aging Management Program of the Tank Waste Remediation System. The purpose of the overall life management program is to ensure that confinement of the waste is maintained over the required service life of the tanks. Characterization of the present condition of the tanks, understanding and characterization of potential degradation mechanisms, and development of tank structural acceptance criteria based on previous service and projected use are prerequisites to assessing tank integrity, to projecting the length of tank service, and to developing and applying prudent fixes or repairs. The criteria provided herein summarize the requirements for the analysis and structural qualification of the existing double-shell tanks for continued operation. Code reconciliation issues and material degradation under aging conditions are addressed. Although the criteria were developed for double-shell tanks, many of the provisions are equally applicable to single-shell tanks. However, the criteria do not apply to the evaluation of tank appurtenances and buried piping

  3. Variation in Orthologous Shell-Forming Proteins Contribute to Molluscan Shell Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Daniel J; Reim, Laurin; Randow, Clemens; Cerveau, Nicolas; Degnan, Bernard M; Fleck, Claudia

    2017-11-01

    Despite the evolutionary success and ancient heritage of the molluscan shell, little is known about the molecular details of its formation, evolutionary origins, or the interactions between the material properties of the shell and its organic constituents. In contrast to this dearth of information, a growing collection of molluscan shell-forming proteomes and transcriptomes suggest they are comprised of both deeply conserved, and lineage specific elements. Analyses of these sequence data sets have suggested that mechanisms such as exon shuffling, gene co-option, and gene family expansion facilitated the rapid evolution of shell-forming proteomes and supported the diversification of this phylum specific structure. In order to further investigate and test these ideas we have examined the molecular features and spatial expression patterns of two shell-forming genes (Lustrin and ML1A2) and coupled these observations with materials properties measurements of shells from a group of closely related gastropods (abalone). We find that the prominent "GS" domain of Lustrin, a domain believed to confer elastomeric properties to the shell, varies significantly in length between the species we investigated. Furthermore, the spatial expression patterns of Lustrin and ML1A2 also vary significantly between species, suggesting that both protein architecture, and the regulation of spatial gene expression patterns, are important drivers of molluscan shell evolution. Variation in these molecular features might relate to certain materials properties of the shells of these species. These insights reveal an important and underappreciated source of variation within shell-forming proteomes that must contribute to the diversity of molluscan shell phenotypes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  4. Triple layered core–shell structure with surface fluorinated ZnO-carbon nanotube composites and its electron emission properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.Y.; Chua, Daniel H.C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The effects of CF 4 plasma on ZnO-CNT core–shell structures were studied. ► ZnO was effective in protecting the aligned CNTs core for as long as 30 min of plasma etching. ► SEM showed the surface morphology was nearly similar between pristine, 2 min and 30 min plasma etched specimens. ► F was observed to displace O in ZnO. ► This is the first report of an ultra long plasma etch of fluorine onto ZnO surface. - Abstract: Core-shelled structures such as zinc oxide (ZnO) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) give rise to interesting material properties. In this work, a triple-layered core–shell–shell structure is presented where the effects of fluorine (F) incorporation on the outmost shell of the ZnO-CNT structure are studied. The samples prepared ranged from a short 2 min to a 30 min immersion in carbon tetraflouride (CF 4 ) plasma. In addition, its effects on the electron emission properties also studied and it is shown that the plasma immersions create thinner field emitters with sharp tiny wrinkles giving rise to more electron emission sites and higher enhancement factor. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements showed that F ions replace O in ZnO coatings during immersion process, thus increasing the electrical conductivity and shifts the Fermi level of ZnO upwards. Both physical and electronic effects further contribute to a lower threshold field.

  5. Synthesis of Fe5C2@SiO2 core@shell nanoparticles as a potential candidate for biomedical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadpoor, Fatemeh; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Delavari H, Hamid; Christiansen, Gunna; Saber, Reza

    2018-05-01

    A new strategy for water-dispersibility of hydrophobic carbide nanostructures was proposed. In this regard, hydrophobic Fe5C2 nanoparticles (NPs) with size ranging 25–40 nm were synthesized and coated with 12–15 nm silica shell for biomedical applications. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results revealed that Fe5C2 NPs with monoclinic structure were successfully prepared. The crystalline structure of Fe5C2 NPs was remained unchanged and saturation magnetization of core remained nearly constant after coating with silica shell. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy identified D-band of amorphous carbon shells which was also confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Finally, Fe5C2@SiO2 core@shell NPs demonstrated no significant cytotoxicity and appropriate heat generating which makes them a promising candidate for magnetic fluid hyperthermia applications.

  6. Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on TiO_2 Nanotube and Shelled Arrayed Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jie; Kusumawati, Yuly; Pauporté, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Anatase TiO_2 nanostructure arrays were synthetized starting from a template made of self-standing ZnO NWs prepared by an electrodeposition technique. By controlling the liquid phase deposition step, the obtained structures could be varied from free-standing nanotube (NT) arrays with controlled morphology to hierarchical spiky radiating core-shell rods. The nanotubes were made of assembled nanocrystals with an average size of 7–8 nm. The structures were investigated as n-type layers in DSSCs. The efficiency was enhanced for the core-shell layer and by starting with longer initial ZnO NW templates. The limitation of the cell efficiency was shown related to the specific surface area and dye loading. The cell functioning was in-depth investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy over a large applied voltage range and compared to a cell based on a nanoparticle TO_2 mesoporous layer. A slow recombination rate was found. The enhancement of electron transport with nanocrystallite size explained the conductivity results. We also found that the prepared structures presented a high charge collection efficiency.

  7. Soft template synthesis of yolk/silica shell particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue-Jun; Xu, Dongsheng

    2010-04-06

    Yolk/shell particles possess a unique structure that is composed of hollow shells that encapsulate other particles but with an interstitial space between them. These structures are different from core/shell particles in that the core particles are freely movable in the shell. Yolk/shell particles combine the properties of each component, and can find potential applications in catalysis, lithium ion batteries, and biosensors. In this Research News article, a soft-template-assisted method for the preparation of yolk/silica shell particles is presented. The demonstrated method is simple and general, and can produce hollow silica spheres incorporated with different particles independent of their diameters, geometry, and composition. Furthermore, yolk/mesoporous silica shell particles and multishelled particles are also prepared through optimization of the experimental conditions. Finally, potential applications of these particles are discussed.

  8. Ab initio results for intermediate-mass, open-shell nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert B.; Dytrych, Tomas; Launey, Kristina D.; Draayer, Jerry P.

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical understanding of nuclei in the intermediate-mass region is vital to astrophysical models, especially for nucleosynthesis. Here, we employ the ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM) in an effort to push first-principle calculations across the sd-shell region. The ab initio SA-NCSM's advantages come from its ability to control the growth of model spaces by including only physically relevant subspaces, which allows us to explore ultra-large model spaces beyond the reach of other methods. We report on calculations for 19Ne and 20Ne up through 13 harmonic oscillator shells using realistic interactions and discuss the underlying structure as well as implications for various astrophysical reactions. This work was supported by the U.S. NSF (OCI-0904874 and ACI -1516338) and the U.S. DOE (DE-SC0005248), and also benefitted from the Blue Waters sustained-petascale computing project and high performance computing resources provided by LSU.

  9. Synthesis and optical properties of core-multi-shell CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots: Surface modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnesh, R. K.; Mehata, Mohan Singh

    2017-02-01

    We report two port synthesis of CdSe/CdS/ZnS core-multi-shell quantum dots (Q-dots) and their structural properties. The multi-shell structures of Q-dots were developed by using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique. The obtained Q-dots show high crystallinity with the step-wise adjustment of lattice parameters in the radial direction. The size of the core and core-shell Q-dots estimated by transmission electron microscopy images and absorption spectra is about 3.4 and 5.3 nm, respectively. The water soluble Q-dots (scheme-1) were prepared by using ligand exchange method, and the effect of pH was discussed regarding the variation of quantum yield (QY). The decrease of a lifetime of core-multi-shell Q-dots with respect to core CdSe indicates that the shell growth may be tuned by the lifetimes. Thus, the study clearly demonstrates that the core-shell approach can be used to substantially improve the optical properties of Q-dots desired for various applications.

  10. Overview Of Hanford Single Shell Tank (SST) Structural Integrity - 12123

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rast, R.S.; Rinker, M.W.; Washenfelder, D.J.; Johnson, J.B.

    2012-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration. Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford SSTs. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford SSTs is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS(reg s ign) The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford SSTs has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analyses of the remaining Hanford SSTs are scheduled for FY2013. Hanford SSTs are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of the concrete tank domes, looking for cracks and

  11. OVERVIEW OF HANFORD SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY - 12123

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAST RS; RINKER MW; WASHENFELDER DJ; JOHNSON JB

    2012-01-25

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration. Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford SSTs. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford SSTs is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS{reg_sign} The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford SSTs has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analyses of the remaining Hanford SSTs are scheduled for FY2013. Hanford SSTs are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of the concrete tank domes, looking for cracks and

  12. Mesoporous coaxial titanium nitride-vanadium nitride fibers of core-shell structures for high-performance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinhong; Shang, Chaoqun; Gu, Lin; Dong, Shanmu; Chen, Xiao; Han, Pengxian; Li, Lanfeng; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Zhihong; Xu, Hongxia; Zhu, Yuwei; Cui, Guanglei

    2011-08-01

    In this study, titanium nitride-vanadium nitride fibers of core-shell structures were prepared by the coaxial electrospinning, and subsequently annealed in the ammonia for supercapacitor applications. These core-shell (TiN-VN) fibers incorporated mesoporous structure into high electronic conducting transition nitride hybrids, which combined higher specific capacitance of VN and better rate capability of TiN. These hybrids exhibited higher specific capacitance (2 mV s(-1), 247.5 F g(-1)) and better rate capability (50 mV s(-1), 160.8 F g(-1)), which promise a good candidate for high-performance supercapacitors. It was also revealed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization that the minor capacitance fade originated from the surface oxidation of VN and TiN.

  13. Catalyst-free fabrication of novel ZnO/CuO core-Shell nanowires heterojunction: Controlled growth, structural and optoelectronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Arif; Wahab, Yussof; Muhammad, Rosnita; Tahir, Muhammad; Sakrani, Samsudi

    2018-03-01

    Development of controlled growth and vertically aligned ZnO/CuO core-shell heterojunction nanowires (NWs) with large area by a catalyst free vapor deposition and oxidation approach has been investigated. Structural characterization reveals successful fabrication of a core ZnO nanowire having single crystalline hexagonal wurtzite structure along [002] direction and CuO nanostructure shell with thickness (8-10 nm) having polycrystalline monoclinic structure. The optical property analysis suggests that the reflectance spectrum of ZnO/CuO heterostructure nanowires is decreased by 18% in the visible range, which correspondingly shows high absorption in this region as compared to pristine ZnO nanowires. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of core-shell heterojunction nanowires measured by conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) shows excellent rectifying behavior, which indicates the characteristics of a good p-n junction. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has confirmed the sharp junction interface between the core-shell heterojunction nanowire arrays. The valence band offset and conduction band offset at ZnO/CuO heterointerfaces are measured to be 2.4 ± 0.05 and 0.23 ± 0.005 eV respectively, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and a type-II band alignment structure is found. The results of this study contribute to the development of new advanced device heterostructures for solar energy conversion and optoelectronics applications.

  14. Study on collision resistance characteristics of the side tanks with water inside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxi; Hu, Jinwen; Liu, Ting; Wu, Can

    2018-05-01

    When we evaluate the safety performance of ships against external events, one of the most important indicator is the collision resistance to which water inside the side tanks also make some contributions because of the water effect. To further analyze the interaction mechanism, different collision velocities and side tank waterlines are set for the analysis model. Results indicate the outside shell and the inner shell of the side structure significantly enhanced the collision resistance performance to a certain extension. The water effect on the failure of the outside shell is unobvious, while, it performs a great influence on the destructive reaction force of the inner shell. When the velocity of the coming bulbous bow gradually increases, the destructive reaction forces of the outside shell and the inner shell increase with a decreasing rate. Besides, water influence the collision characteristics of the inner shell a lot when the waterlines are below the upper rib of the strong frame.

  15. Mg/Ca of Continental Ostracode Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, E.; Forester, R. M.; Marco-Barba, J.; Mezquita, F.

    2007-12-01

    Marine ionic chemistry is thought to remain constant. This, together with the belief that marine calcifiers partition Mg/Ca in a systematic manner as functions of temperature (and Mg/Ca) of water forms the basis of the Mg/Ca thermometer. In continental settings both of these assumptions are usually not true. Continental waters contain a wide variety of solutes in absolute and relative ion concentrations. Hence, waters with identical Mg/Ca may have very different concentrations of Mg and Ca and very different anions. Here we use two examples to focus on the effects of ion chemistry on Mg/Ca partitioning in continental ostracode shells and we ignore the complexities of solute evolution, which can change Mg/Ca over timescales of minutes to millennia. Palacios-Fest and Dettman (2001) conducted a monthly study of ,Cypridopsis vidua at El Yeso Lake in Sonora, Mexico. They established a relation between temperature and average shell Mg/Ca using regression analyses on averaged data. When their Mg/Ca-temperature relation is applied to monthly ,C. vidua data from Page Pond near Cleveland, Ohio, water temperatures of -8 to -1°C are obtained. The observed Mg/Ca ranges for El Yeso Lake (0.31 to 0.46) and Page Pond (0.33 to 0.46) are similar, as are their specific conductivities (700 to 850μS for El Yeso Lake; 400 to 600μS for Page Pond). However, [Ca] is 140-260 mg/L for El Yeso, but only 70-90 mg/L for Page Pond. Page Pond data, in fact, shows a good temperature shell Mg/Ca relation for .C. vidua, but the relation is different from that at El Yeso. Hence, shell Mg/Ca is a multi-valued, family of curves function of temperature and Mg/Ca of water that depends on the [Mg] and [Ca] values in water and perhaps other factors. Our second example comes from sites near Valencia, Spain and involves shell data for ,Cyprideis torosa, an estuarine ostracode that is tolerant of a wide range of salinity and can live in continental waters as long as the carbonate alkalinity to Ca ratio is

  16. Construction of carbon nanoflakes shell on CuO nanowires core as enhanced core/shell arrays anode of lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, F.; Xia, X.H.; Pan, G.X.; Chen, J.; Zhang, Y.J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CuO/C core/shell nanowire arrays are prepared by electro-deposition + ALD method. • Carbon shell is favorable for structural stability. • CuO/C core/shell arrays show enhanced cycle stability and high capacity. - Abstract: Tailored metal oxide/carbon composite structures have attracted great attention due to potential synergistic effects and enhanced properties. In this work, novel CuO/C core/shell nanowire arrays are prepared by the combination of electro-deposition of CuO and atomic-layer-deposition-assisted formation of carbon nanoflakes shell. The CuO nanowires with diameters of ∼200 nm are homogenously coated by carbon nanoflakes shell. When evaluated as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), compared to the unmodified CuO nanowire arrays, the CuO/C core/shell nanowire arrays exhibit improved electrochemical performances with higher capacity, better electrochemical reactivity and high-rate capability as well as superior cycling life (610 mAh g"−"1 at 0.5C after 290 cycles). The enhanced electrochemical performance is mainly attributed to the introduction of carbon flake shell in the core/shell nanowire arrays structure, which provides higher active material-electrolyte contact area, improved electrical conductivity, and better accommodation of volume change. The proposed method provides a new way for fabrication of high-performance metal oxides anodes of LIBs.

  17. Bio-inspired passive actuator simulating an abalone shell mechanism for structural control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Henry T Y; Lin, Chun-Hung; Bridges, Daniel; Randall, Connor J; Hansma, Paul K

    2010-01-01

    An energy dispersion mechanism called 'sacrificial bonds and hidden length', which is found in some biological systems, such as abalone shells and bones, is the inspiration for new strategies for structural control. Sacrificial bonds and hidden length can substantially increase the stiffness and enhance energy dissipation in the constituent molecules of abalone shells and bone. Having been inspired by the usefulness and effectiveness of such a mechanism, which has evolved over millions of years and countless cycles of evolutions, the authors employ the conceptual underpinnings of this mechanism to develop a bio-inspired passive actuator. This paper presents a fundamental method for optimally designing such bio-inspired passive actuators for structural control. To optimize the bio-inspired passive actuator, a simple method utilizing the force–displacement–velocity (FDV) plots based on LQR control is proposed. A linear regression approach is adopted in this research to find the initial values of the desired parameters for the bio-inspired passive actuator. The illustrative examples, conducted by numerical simulation with experimental validation, suggest that the bio-inspired passive actuator based on sacrificial bonds and hidden length may be comparable in performance to state-of-the-art semi-active actuators

  18. Bio-inspired passive actuator simulating an abalone shell mechanism for structural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Henry T. Y.; Lin, Chun-Hung; Bridges, Daniel; Randall, Connor J.; Hansma, Paul K.

    2010-10-01

    An energy dispersion mechanism called 'sacrificial bonds and hidden length', which is found in some biological systems, such as abalone shells and bones, is the inspiration for new strategies for structural control. Sacrificial bonds and hidden length can substantially increase the stiffness and enhance energy dissipation in the constituent molecules of abalone shells and bone. Having been inspired by the usefulness and effectiveness of such a mechanism, which has evolved over millions of years and countless cycles of evolutions, the authors employ the conceptual underpinnings of this mechanism to develop a bio-inspired passive actuator. This paper presents a fundamental method for optimally designing such bio-inspired passive actuators for structural control. To optimize the bio-inspired passive actuator, a simple method utilizing the force-displacement-velocity (FDV) plots based on LQR control is proposed. A linear regression approach is adopted in this research to find the initial values of the desired parameters for the bio-inspired passive actuator. The illustrative examples, conducted by numerical simulation with experimental validation, suggest that the bio-inspired passive actuator based on sacrificial bonds and hidden length may be comparable in performance to state-of-the-art semi-active actuators.

  19. Damage detection strategies for aircraft shell-like structures based on propagation guided elastic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zak, A; Ostachowicz, W; Krawczuk, M

    2011-01-01

    Damage of aircraft structural elements in any form always present high risks. Failures of these elements can be caused by various reasons including material fatigue or impact leading to damage initiation and growth. Detection of these failures at their earliest stage of development, estimation of their size and location, are one of the most crucial factors for each damage detection method. Structural health monitoring strategies based on propagation of guided elastic waves in structures and wave interaction with damage related discontinuities are very promising tools that offer not only damage detection capabilities, but are also meant to provide precise information about the state of the structures and their remaining lifetime. Because of that various techniques are employed to simulate and mimic the wave-discontinuity interactions. The use of various types of sensors, their networks together with sophisticated contactless measuring techniques are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Certain results of numerical simulations obtained by the use of the spectral finite element method are presented by the authors and related with propagation of guided elastic waves in shell-type aircraft structures. Two types of structures are considered: flat 2D panels with or without stiffeners and 3D shell structures. The applicability of two different damage detection approaches is evaluated in order to detect and localise damage in these structures. Selected results related with the use of laser scanning vibrometry are also presented and discussed by the authors.

  20. Yolk-shell structured Sb@C anodes for high energy Na-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Junhua; Yan, Pengfei; Luo, Langli; Qi, Xingguo; Rong, Xiaohui; Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Biwei; Feng, Shuo; Wang, Chongmin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Lin, Yuehe; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Li, Xiaolin

    2017-10-01

    Despite great advances in sodium-ion battery developments, the search for high energy and stable anode materials remains a challenge. Alloy or conversion-typed anode materials are attractive candidates of high specific capacity and low voltage potential, yet their applications are hampered by the large volume expansion and hence poor electrochemical reversibility and fast capacity fade. Here, we use antimony (Sb) as an example to demonstrate the use of yolk-shell structured anodes for high energy Na-ion batteries. The Sb@C yolk-shell structure prepared by controlled reduction and selective removal of Sb2O3 from carbon coated Sb2O3 nanoparticles can accommodate the Sb swelling upon sodiation and improve the structural/electrical integrity against pulverization. It delivers a high specific capacity of ~554 mAh•g-1, good rate capability (315 mhA•g-1 at 10C rate) and long cyclability (92% capacity retention over 200 cycles). Full-cells of O3-Na0.9[Cu0.22Fe0.30Mn0.48]O2 cathodes and Sb@C-hard carbon composite anodes demonstrate a high specific energy of ~130 Wh•kg-1 (based on the total mass of cathode and anode) in the voltage range of 2.0-4.0 V, ~1.5 times energy of full-cells with similar design using hard carbon anodes.

  1. Studies on II-VI and III-V semiconductor nanostructures. Introduction of the core/shell/shell structure and development of CdSe nanocrystals in an automatized procedure; Untersuchungen an II-VI und III-V Halbleiternanostrukturen. Einfuehrung der Core/shell/shell-Struktur und Darstellung von CdSe-Nanokristallen in einem automatisierten Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekis, I.

    2005-11-15

    The work in this dissertation is focused on the development and characterization of fluorescent II-VI and III-V-Nanomaterials. Highly luminescent and photostable Nanocrystals with narrow size distributions were prepared. It was shown that nearly monodisperse CdSe-Nanocrystals could be prepared from Cd(Ac){sub 2} and TOPSe in a mixture of TOPO/TOP/HDA/TDPA. Nearly monodisperse CdSe/CdS-Core/shell-Nanocrystals have been prepared in a one-pot-synthesis by injection of H{sub 2}S-Gas into a freshly prepared crude solution of CdSe. The passivation of the CdSe-core with an inorganic shell of CdS resulted in the drastic improvement of the photoluminescence-efficiency of the colloidal solution. Reproducible room-temperature quantum yields reached up to a value of 85%. Photostability investigations have proved the enhanced stability of CdSe/CdS-Nanocrystals compared to CdSe-Nanocrystals under illumination with UV-Light. A novel type of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal structure has been developed, consisting of a CdSe core and two anorganic shells. Highly fluorescent and nearly monodisperse CdSe/CdS/ZnS- and CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS-Core/shell/shell-nanocrystals have been prepared via organometallic- and acetate-precursors. The Core/she ll/shell particles reached reproducible room-temperature quantum yields up to 85%. Photostability investigations among CdSe-core, CdSe/CdS-Core/shell- and CdSe/CdS/ZnS- Core/shell/-shell-nanocrystals under illumination with UV-light have proved the highest photostability of the Core/shell/shell-particles. The photostabilities of CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS-and CdSe/ZnS-nanocrystals were compared under illumination with intense laser-beam in air. Another part of this work focused on the development of an automated synthesis procedure of CdSe-nanocrystals by constructing and implementing a flow-reactor system. The size and structure of prepared nanocrystals depended considerably on the Cd:Se-precursorratio and the flow-rate. The preparation of CdSe using Cd(Ac)2

  2. Synthesis of parallel and antiparallel core-shell triangular nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Gourab; Satpati, Biswarup

    2018-04-01

    Core-shell triangular nanoparticles were synthesized by seed mediated growth. Using triangular gold (Au) nanoparticle as template, we have grown silver (Ag) shellto get core-shell nanoparticle. Here by changing the chemistry we have grown two types of core-shell structures where core and shell is having same symmetry and also having opposite symmetry. Both core and core-shell nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to know the crystal structure and composition of these synthesized core-shell nanoparticles. From diffraction pattern analysis and energy filtered TEM (EFTEM) we have confirmed the crystal facet in core is responsible for such two dimensional growth of core-shell nanostructures.

  3. A new method to make poly acrylate foam shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yongheng; Luo Xuan; Fang Yu; Ren Hongbo; Zhang Lin; Cui Yi

    2009-01-01

    A triple-orifice droplet generator was designed and developed for the size-controllable continuous fabrication of hollow foam micro-shells. Solutions of an internal water phase, an oil phase (trimethylpropane triacrylate monomer, dibutyl phthalate solvent, and benzoin ethyl ether initiator), and an external water phase were used to prepare micro-shells whose diameters are between 1.5 mm and 4.0 mm successfully. Characterization of the foam shells was carried out using a scanning electron microscope and X-ray radiography. The results show that cell diameters of the shells are not above 1 um. The refractive index of the polymer framework is around 1.50. Furthermore, the shells fabricated through the triple-orifice droplet generator have a high survival probability of 93% and exhibit narrow size distribution. (authors)

  4. Fast synthesis, formation mechanism, and control of shell thickness of CuS–polystyrene core–shell microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Li-min; Shao, Xin; Yin, Yi-bin; Li, Wen-zhi

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Core–shell structure PSt/CuS were prepared using polystyrene which were modified by 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane as template. The coating thickness of CuS can be controlled by the amount of 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane and the UV–vis absorption intensity of PSt/CuS composite also changed with the coating thickness of CuS. Highlights: ► Core–shell structure PSt/CuS were prepared using silanol-modified polystyrene microspheres as template. ► The coating thickness of core–shell structure PSt/CuS can be controlled by a simple method. ► The UV–vis absorption intensity of PSt/CuS composite also changed with the coating thickness of CuS. -- Abstract: The silanol-modified polystyrene microspheres were prepared through dispersion polymerization. Then copper sulfide particles were grown on silanol-modified polystyrene through sonochemical deposition in an aqueous bath containing copper acetate and sulfide, released through the hydrolysis of thioacetamide. The resulting particles were continuous and uniform as characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fourier transform infrared, thermogravimetric analysis and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy were used to characterize the structure and properties of core–shell particles. The results showed the coating thickness of CuS shell can be controlled by the amount of silanol and the UV–vis absorption intensity of PSt/CuS composite also changed with the coating thickness of CuS.

  5. Crossover from disordered to core-shell structures of nano-oxide Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersed particles in Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, M. P.; Wang, L. M.; Gao, F., E-mail: gaofeium@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Lu, C. Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110819 (China); Lu, Z. [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110819 (China); Shao, L. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2016-07-18

    Molecular dynamic simulations of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in bcc Fe and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations were used to understand the structure of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-clusters in an oxide dispersion strengthened steel matrix. The study showed that Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-clusters below 2 nm were completely disordered. Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-clusters above 2 nm, however, form a core-shell structure, with a shell thickness of 0.5–0.7 nm that is independent of nano-cluster size. Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-clusters were surrounded by off-lattice Fe atoms, further increasing the stability of these nano-clusters. TEM was used to corroborate our simulation results and showed a crossover from a disordered nano-cluster to a core-shell structure.

  6. Layered structure in core–shell silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tuan, Pham [Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST) and International Training Institute for Materials Science Hanoi University of Science and Technology, 01 Dai Co Viet Street,Hanoi 10000,Vietnam (Viet Nam); Anh Tuan, Chu; Thanh Thuy, Tran; Binh Nam, Vu [Institute of Materials Science (IMS), Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Hanoi 10000 (Viet Nam); Toan Thang, Pham [Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST) and International Training Institute for Materials Science Hanoi University of Science and Technology, 01 Dai Co Viet Street,Hanoi 10000,Vietnam (Viet Nam); Hong Duong, Pham, E-mail: duongphamhong@yahoo.com [Institute of Materials Science (IMS), Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Hanoi 10000 (Viet Nam); Thanh Huy, Pham, E-mail: huy.phamthanh@hust.edu.vn [Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST) and International Training Institute for Materials Science Hanoi University of Science and Technology, 01 Dai Co Viet Street,Hanoi 10000,Vietnam (Viet Nam)

    2014-10-15

    Silicon nanowires (NWs) with core–shell structures were prepared using the Vapor–Liquid–Solid (VLS) method. The wires have lengths of several hundreds of nanometers and diameters in the range of 30–50 nm. Generally, these wires are too large to exhibit the quantum confinement effect of excitons in Si nanocrystals. However, the photoluminescence (PL) and Raman spectra are similar to those of nanocrystalline silicon embedded in a SiO{sub 2} matrix, in which the recombination of quantum-confined excitons plays an important role. This effect occurs only when the average size of the silicon nanocrystals is smaller than 5 nm. To understand this discrepancy, TEM images of nanowires were obtained and analyzed. The results revealed that the cores of wires have a layered Si/SiO{sub 2} structure, in which the thickness of each layer is much smaller than its diameter. The temperature dependence of the PL intensity was recorded from 11 to 300 K; the result is in good agreement with a model that takes into account the energy splitting between the excitonic singlet and triplet levels. - Highlights: • The cores of the Si NWs have a layered Si/SiO{sub 2} structure. • The Si NWs were formed due to the phase separation of Si and SiO{sub 2} and the partial oxidization by residual oxygen. • Two processes, the reaction of Si and oxygen atoms and the combination between Si atoms, occur simultaneously. • The formation of the layered structures is associated with the self-limiting oxidation phenomenon in Si nanostructures.

  7. Sexual selection on land snail shell ornamentation: a hypothesis that may explain shell diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schilthuizen Menno

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many groups of land snails show great interspecific diversity in shell ornamentation, which may include spines on the shell and flanges on the aperture. Such structures have been explained as camouflage or defence, but the possibility that they might be under sexual selection has not previously been explored. Presentation of the hypothesis The hypothesis that is presented consists of two parts. First, that shell ornamentation is the result of sexual selection. Second, that such sexual selection has caused the divergence in shell shape in different species. Testing the hypothesis The first part of the hypothesis may be tested by searching for sexual dimorphism in shell ornamentation in gonochoristic snails, by searching for increased variance in shell ornamentation relative to other shell traits, and by mate choice experiments using individuals with experimentally enhanced ornamentation. The second part of the hypothesis may be tested by comparing sister groups and correlating shell diversity with degree of polygamy. Implications of the hypothesis If the hypothesis were true, it would provide an explanation for the many cases of allopatric evolutionary radiation in snails, where shell diversity cannot be related to any niche differentiation or environmental differences.

  8. Sexual selection on land snail shell ornamentation: a hypothesis that may explain shell diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilthuizen, M.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Many groups of land snails show great interspecific diversity in shell ornamentation, which may include spines on the shell and flanges on the aperture. Such structures have been explained as camouflage or defence, but the possibility that they might be under sexual selection has not

  9. Structure of neutron-rich nuclei around the N = 50 shell-gap closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faul, T.; Duchêne, G.; Thomas, J.-C.; Nowacki, F.; Huyse, M.; Van Duppen, P.

    2010-04-01

    The structure of neutron-rich nuclei in the vicinity of 78Ni have been investigated via the β-decay of 71,73,75Cu isotopes (ISOLDE, CERN). Experimental results have been compared with shell-model calculations performed with the ANTOINE code using a large (2p3/21f5/22p1/21g9/2) valence space and a 56/28Ni28 core.

  10. Morphology and oxide shell structure of iron nanoparticles grown by sputter-gas-aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C M; Baer, D R; Amonette, J E; Engelhard, M H; Qiang, Y; Antony, J

    2007-01-01

    The crystal faceting planes and oxide coating structures of core-shell structured iron/iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesized by a sputter-gas-aggregation process were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction and Wulff shape construction. The particles grown by this process and deposited on a support in a room temperature process have been compared with particles grown and deposited at high temperature as reported in the literature. It has been found that the Fe nanoparticles formed at RT are invariantly faceted on the {100} lattice planes and truncated by the {110} planes at different degrees. A substantial fraction of particles are confined only by the 6{100} planes (not truncated by the {110} planes); this contrasts with the Fe particles formed at high temperature (HT) for which a predominance of {110} planes has been reported. Furthermore, at RT no particle was identified to be only confined by the 12{110} planes, which is relatively common for the particles formed at HT. The Fe cubes defined by the 6{100} planes show a characteristic inward relaxation along the and directions and the reason for this behaviour is not fully understood. The oxide shell on the Fe{100} plane maintains an orientation relationship: Fe(001) parallel Fe 3 O 4 (001) and Fe[100] parallel Fe 3 O 4 [110], which is the same as the oxide formed on a bulk Fe(001) through thermal oxidation. Orientation of the oxide that forms on the Fe{110} facets differs from that on Fe{001}: therefore, properties of core-shell structured Fe nanoparticle faceted primarily with one type of lattice plane may be fully different from that faceted with another type of lattice plane

  11. Method of fabricating nested shells and resulting product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Kool, Lawrence B.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple shell structure and a method of manufacturing such structure wherein a hollow glass microsphere is surface treated in an organosilane solution so as to render the shell outer surface hydrophobic. The surface treated glass shell is then suspended in the oil phase of an oil-aqueous phase dispersion. The oil phase includes an organic film-forming monomer, a polymerization initiator and a blowing agent. A polymeric film forms at each phase boundary of the dispersion and is then expanded in a blowing operation so as to form an outer homogeneously integral monocellular substantially spherical thermoplastic shell encapsulating an inner glass shell of lesser diameter.

  12. Zero-point energy effects in anion solvation shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott

    2014-05-21

    By comparing classical and quantum-mechanical (path-integral-based) molecular simulations of solvated halide anions X(-) [X = F, Cl, Br and I], we identify an ion-specific quantum contribution to anion-water hydrogen-bond dynamics; this effect has not been identified in previous simulation studies. For anions such as fluoride, which strongly bind water molecules in the first solvation shell, quantum simulations exhibit hydrogen-bond dynamics nearly 40% faster than the corresponding classical results, whereas those anions which form a weakly bound solvation shell, such as iodide, exhibit a quantum effect of around 10%. This observation can be rationalized by considering the different zero-point energy (ZPE) of the water vibrational modes in the first solvation shell; for strongly binding anions, the ZPE of bound water molecules is larger, giving rise to faster dynamics in quantum simulations. These results are consistent with experimental investigations of anion-bound water vibrational and reorientational motion.

  13. Stereo and scanning electron microscopy of in-shell Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K.): part two-surface sound nut fungi spoilage susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scussel, Vildes M; Manfio, Daniel; Savi, Geovana D; Moecke, Elisa H S

    2014-11-01

    This work reports the in-shell Brazil nut spoilage susceptible morpho-histological characteristics and fungi infection (shell, edible part, and brown skin) through stereo and scanning electron microscopies (SEM). The following characteristics related to shell (a) morphology-that allow fungi and insects' entrance to inner nut, and (b) histology-that allow humidity absorption, improving environment conditions for living organisms development, were identified. (a.1) locule in testae-the nut navel, which is a cavity formed during nut detaching from pods (located at 1.0 to 2.0/4th of the shell B&C nut faces linkage). It allows the nut brown skin (between shell and edible part) first contact to the external environment, through the (a.2) nut channel-the locule prolongation path, which has the water/nutrients cambium function for their transport and distribution to the inner seed (while still on the tree/pod). Both, locule followed by the channel, are the main natural entrance of living organisms (fungi and insects), including moisture to the inner seed structures. In addition, the (a.3) nut shell surface-which has a crinkled and uneven surface morphology-allows water absorption, thus adding to the deterioration processes too. The main shell histological characteristic, which also allows water absorption (thus improving environment conditions for fungi proliferation), is the (b.1) cell wall porosity-the multilayered wall and porous rich cells that compose the shell faces double tissue layers and the (b.2) soft tissue-the mix of tissues 2 faces corner/linkage. This work also shows in details the SEM nut spoilage susceptible features highly fungi infected with hyphae and reproductive structures distribution. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. The Inferred Distribution of Liquid Water in Europa's Ice Shell: Implications for the Europa Lander Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noviello, J. L.; Torrano, Z. A.; Rhoden, A.; Manga, M.

    2017-12-01

    A key objective of the Europa lander mission is to identify liquid water within 30 km of the lander (Europa Lander SDT report, 2017), to provide essential context with which to evaluate samples and enable assessment of Europa's overall habitability. To inform lander mission development, we utilize a model of surface feature formation that invokes liquid water within Europa's ice shell to map out the implied 3D distribution of liquid water and assess the likelihood of a lander to be within 30 km of liquid water given regional variability. Europa's surface displays a variety of microfeatures, also called lenticulae, including pits, domes, spots, and microchaos. A recent model by Manga and Michaut (2017) attributes these features to various stages in the thermal-mechanical evolution of liquid water intrusions (i.e. sills) within the ice shell, from sill emplacement to surface breaching (in the case of microchaos) to freezing of the sill. Pits are of particular interest because they appear only when liquid water is still present. Another key feature of the model is that the size of a microfeature at the surface is controlled by the depth of the sill. Hence, we can apply this model to regions of Europa that contain microfeatures to infer the size, depth, and spatial distribution of liquid water within the ice shell. We are creating a database of microfeatures that includes digitized, collated data from previous mapping efforts along with our own mapping study. We focus on images with 220 m/pixel resolution, which includes the regional mapping data sets. Analysis of a preliminary study area suggests that sills are typically located at depths of 2km or less from the surface. We will present analysis of the full database of microfeatures and the corresponding 3D distribution of sills implied by the model. Our preliminary analysis also shows that pits are clustered in some regions, consistent with previous results, although individual pits are also observed. We apply a

  15. Statistical mechanics of microscopically thin thermalized shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmrlj, Andrej

    Recent explosion in fabrication of microscopically thin free standing structures made from graphene and other two-dimensional materials has led to a renewed interest in the mechanics of such structures in presence of thermal fluctuations. Since late 1980s it has been known that for flat solid sheets thermal fluctuations effectively increase the bending rigidity and reduce the bulk and shear moduli in a scale-dependent fashion. However, much is still unknown about the mechanics of thermalized flat sheets of complex geometries and about the mechanics of thermalized shells with non-zero background curvature. In this talk I will present recent development in the mechanics of thermalized ribbons, spherical shells and cylindrical tubes. Long ribbons are found to behave like hybrids between flat sheets with renormalized elastic constants and semi-flexible polymers, and these results can be used to predict the mechanics of graphene kirigami structures. Contrary to the anticipated behavior for ribbons, the non-zero background curvature of shells leads to remarkable novel phenomena. In shells, thermal fluctuations effectively generate negative surface tension, which can significantly reduce the critical buckling pressure for spherical shells and the critical axial load for cylindrical tubes. For large shells this thermally generated load becomes big enough to spontaneously crush spherical shells and cylindrical tubes even in the absence of external loads. I will comment on the relevance for crushing of microscopic shells (viral capsids, bacteria, microcapsules) due to osmotic shocks and for crushing of nanotubes.

  16. Characterization of core/shell structures based on CdTe and GaAs nanocrystalline layers deposited on SnO2 microwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimpu, L.; Ursaki, V. V.; Pantazi, A.; Mesterca, R.; Brâncoveanu, O.; Shree, Sindu; Adelung, R.; Tiginyanu, I. M.; Enachescu, M.

    2018-04-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of SnO2/CdTe and SnO2/GaAs core/shell microstructures. CdTe or GaAs shell layers were deposited by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering on core SnO2 microwires synthesized by a flame-based thermal oxidation method. The produced structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (HR-STEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman scattering and FTIR spectroscopy. It was found that the SnO2 core is of the rutile type, while the shells are composed of CdTe or GaAs nanocrystallites of zincblende structure with the dimensions of crystallites in the range of 10-20 nm. The Raman scattering investigations demonstrated that the quality of the porous nanostructured shell is improved by annealing at temperatures of 420-450 °C. The prospects of implementing these microstructures in intrinsic type fiber optic sensors are discussed.

  17. Study of band structure in 78,80Sr using Triaxial Projected Shell Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behera, N.; Naik, Z.; Bhat, G.H.; Sheikh, J.A.; Palit, R.; Sun, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of present work is to carry out a systematic study of the yrast-band and gamma-band structure for the even-even 78-80 Sr nuclei using Triaxial Projected Shell Model (TPSM) approach. These nuclei were chosen because 78 Sr has well developed side band(unassigned configuration) and 80 Sr has well developed band observed experimentally

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Core-Shell Acrylate Based Latex and Study of Its Reactive Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Nie

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Techniques in resin blending are simple and efficient method for improving the properties of polymers, and have been used widely in polymer modification field. However, polymer latex blends such as the combination of latexes, especially the latexes with water-soluble polymers, were rarely reported. Here, we report a core-shell composite latex synthesized using methyl methacrylate (MMA, butyl acrylate (BA, 2-ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA as monomers and ammonium persulfate and sodium bisulfite redox system as the initiator. Two stages seeded semi-continuous emulsion polymerization were employed for constructing a core-shell structure with P(MMA-co-BA component as the core and P(EHA-co-GMA component as the shell. Results of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and Dynamics Light Scattering (DLS tests confirmed that the particles obtained are indeed possessing a desired core-shell structural character. Stable reactive latex blends were prepared by adding the latex with waterborne melamine-formaldehyde resin (MF or urea-formaldehyde resin (UF. It was found that the glass transition temperature, the mechanical strength and the hygroscopic property of films cast from the latex blends present marked enhancements under higher thermal treatment temperature. It was revealed that the physical properties of chemically reactive latexes with core-shell structure could be altered via the change of crosslinking density both from the addition of crosslinkers and the thermal treatment.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of homo-oligomeric ion channels: Structures of the surrounding lipids and dynamics of water movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuy Hien Nguyen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the structural perturbations of lipids surrounding transmembrane ion channel forming helices/helical bundles and the movement of water within the pores of the ion-channels/bundles. Specifically, helical monomers to hexameric helical bundles embedded in palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (POPC lipid bilayer were studied. Two amphipathic α-helices with the sequence Ac-(LSLLLSL3-NH2 (LS2, and Ac-(LSSLLSL3-NH2 (LS3, which are known to form ion channels, were used. To investigate the surrounding lipid environment, we examined the hydrophobic mismatch, acyl chain order parameter profiles, lipid head-to-tail vector projection on the membrane surface, and the lipid headgroup vector projection. We find that the lipid structure is perturbed within approximately two lipid solvation shells from the protein bundle for each system (~15.0 Å. Beyond two lipid “solvation” shells bulk lipid bilayer properties were observed in all systems. To understand water flow, we enumerated each time a water molecule enters or exited the channel, which allowed us to calculate the number of water crossing events and their rates, and the residence time of water in the channel. We correlate the rate of water crossing with the structural properties of these ion channels and find that the movements of water are predominantly governed by the packing and pore diameter, rather than the topology of each peptide or the pore (hydrophobic or hydrophilic. We show that the crossing events of water fit quantitatively to a stochastic process and that water molecules are traveling diffusively through the pores. These lipid and water findings can be used for understanding the environment within and around ion channels. Furthermore, these findings can benefit various research areas such as rational design of novel therapeutics, in which the drug interacts with membranes and transmembrane proteins to enhance the efficacy or reduce off

  20. The structure of liquid water up to 360 MPa from x-ray diffraction measurements using a high Q-range and from molecular simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, L. B. [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, New York 11794-2100 (United States); Galib, M.; Fulton, J. L., E-mail: John.Fulton@pnnl.gov, E-mail: benmore@anl.gov; Mundy, C. J.; Schenter, G. K. [Physical and Computational Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Parise, J. B. [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, New York 11794-2100 (United States); Department of Geosciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, New York 11794-2100 (United States); Photon Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Pham, V.-T. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Center for Quantum Electronics, Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 429, Boho, Hanoi 10000 (Viet Nam); Benmore, C. J., E-mail: John.Fulton@pnnl.gov, E-mail: benmore@anl.gov [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2016-04-07

    X-ray diffraction measurements of liquid water are reported at pressures up to 360 MPa corresponding to a density of 0.0373 molecules per Å{sup 3}. The measurements were conducted at a spatial resolution corresponding to Q{sub max} = 16 Å{sup −1}. The method of data analysis and measurement in this study follows the earlier benchmark results reported for water under ambient conditions having a density of 0.0333 molecules per Å{sup 3} and Q{sub max} = 20 Å{sup −1} [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 074506 (2013)] and at 70 °C having a density of 0.0327 molecules per Å{sup 3} and Q{sub max} = 20 Å{sup −1} [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214507 (2014)]. The structure of water is very different at these three different T and P state points and thus they provide the basis for evaluating the fidelity of molecular simulation. Measurements show that at 360 MPa, the 4 waters residing in the region between 2.3 and 3 Å are nearly unchanged: the peak position, shape, and coordination number are nearly identical to their values under ambient conditions. However, in the region above 3 Å, large structural changes occur with the collapse of the well-defined 2nd shell and shifting of higher shells to shorter distances. The measured structure is compared to simulated structure using intermolecular potentials described by both first-principles methods (revPBE-D3) and classical potentials (TIP4P/2005, MB-pol, and mW). The DFT-based, revPBE-D3, method and the many-body empirical potential model, MB-pol, provide the best overall representation of the ambient, high-temperature, and high-pressure data. The revPBE-D3, MB-pol, and the TIP4P/2005 models capture the densification mechanism, whereby the non-bonded 5th nearest neighbor molecule, which partially encroaches the 1st shell at ambient pressure, is pushed further into the local tetrahedral arrangement at higher pressures by the more distant molecules filling the void space in the network between the 1st and 2nd shells.

  1. Gastropod shells: a dynamic resource that helps shape benthic community structure. [Calliactis tricolor; Pagurus pollicaris; Calappa flammea; Octopus joubini; Panulirus argus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, R

    1983-01-01

    Empty gastropod shells are an important resource for many animals in shallow benthic marine communities. Shells provide shelter for hermit crabs, octopuses, and fishes, provide attachment substratum for hermit crab symbionts, and directly or indirectly modify hermit crab predation. Creation of an empty shell due to predation of one gastropod on another and acquisition of that shell by a hermit crab are two key events in the subsequent use of that shell. Shells of different gastropod species and the species of hermit crab acquiring them affect the symbiont complement that attaches to the shell, which in turn may affect future shell use by other symbionts. Certain shell types worn by the hermit crab, Pagurus pollicaris Say, are positively associated with the symbiotic sea anemone, Calliactis tricolor (Lesueur), which protects the hermit crab from predation by the crab, Calappa flammea (Herbst), and possibly from the octopus, Octopus joubini Robson. Shells of other species of gastropods are resistant to being crushed by the spiny lobster, Panulirus argus (Latreille). The inter- and intraspecific interactions centered on the gastropod shell are termed a ''habitat web.'' The potential of the shell to limit the size and distribution of animal populations demonstrates how this resource helps shape community structure.

  2. Shell report 2001; Les personnes, la planete, les profits. Shell rapport 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    In 2001, Shell saw mixed results across the social, environmental and economic spectrum. In order to contribute to the sustainable development, the Group is on track towards meeting its target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 10 % below 1990 levels by the end of 2002, although there was a significant increase in spill volumes and greenhouse gas emissions rose. Shell has articulated the business case and defined seven principles of sustainable development for use across the Group in business plans and daily operations: generating robust profitability; delivering value to customers; protecting the environment; managing resources; respecting and safeguarding people; benefiting communities; and working with stakeholders. Key points from the Shell Report include: in the framework of Managing, an independent review of the Shell Nigeria Community Development programme and testing of a human rights assessment tool in Shell South Africa and the implementing of a new Diversity and Inclusiveness Standard; in the framework of the economy the cost improvements of 5,1 billion dollars, ahead of target, the second highest earnings ever in difficult market conditions and the election of Shell top brand for fifth year running by motorists; in the framework of the Social, the safety performance, the avoidance of 100 contracts for incompatibility with Shell Business Principles; in the framework of the Environment, the publication of the Fresh water usage report for the first time, the Greenhouse gas emissions, the increase of spills as a result of a small number of incidents including a pipeline rupture in Nigeria and a well blow out in Oman. The economic, environmental and social data of the Shell Report are externally verified. (A.L.B.)

  3. Modeling of microencapsulated polymer shell solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, T.; Cheung, L.; Nelson, D.; Soane, D.; Wilemski, G.; Cook, R.

    1995-01-01

    A finite element transport model has been developed and implemented to complement experimental efforts to improve the quality of ICF target shells produced via controlled-mass microencapsulation. The model provides an efficient means to explore the effect of processing variables on the dynamics of shell dimensions, concentricity, and phase behavior. Comparisons with experiments showed that the model successfully predicts the evolution of wall thinning and core/wall density differences. The model was used to efficiently explore and identify initial wall compositions and processing temperatures which resulted in concentricity improvements from 65 to 99%. The evolution of trace amounts of water entering into the shell wall was also tracked in the simulations. Comparisons with phase envelope estimations from modified UNIFAP calculations suggest that the water content trajectory approaches the two-phase region where vacuole formation via microphase separation may occur

  4. Numerical simulation of deformation and fracture of space protective shell structures from concrete and fiber concrete under pulse loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radchenko, P A; Batuev, S P; Radchenko, A V; Plevkov, V S

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between aircraft Boeing 747-400 and protective shell of nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as complex multilayered cellular structure comprising layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was held three-dimensionally using the author's algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. The dynamics of stress-strain state and fracture of structure were studied. Destruction is described using two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of shell cellular structure—cells start to destruct in unloading wave, originating after output of compression wave to the free surfaces of cells. (paper)

  5. Removal of mercury from water by carbonaceous sorbents derived from walnut shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabihi, M.; Ahmadpour, A.; Asl, A. Haghighi

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption ability of a powdered activated carbon (PAC) derived from walnut shell was investigated in an attempt to produce more economic and effective sorbent for the control of Hg(II) ion from industrial liquid streams. Carbonaceous sorbents derived from Iranian walnut shell (WS) were prepared by chemical activation method using ZnCl 2 as an activating reagent. To the best of our knowledge, this adsorbent was not used before for removing mercury from water. Adsorption of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions was carried out under different experimental conditions by varying treatment time, metal ion concentration, adsorbent amount, pH and solution temperature. It was determined that Hg(II) adsorption follows both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms as well as pseudo-second-order kinetics. It was also shown that Hg(II) uptake decreases with increasing pH of the solution. The proper choice of preparation conditions resulted in a microporous activated carbon with 0.45 g/cm 3 density, 737 mg/g iodine number and 780 m 2 /g BET surface area. The monolayer sorption capacity of this optimum adsorbent was obtained as 151.5 mg/g.

  6. Activated carbons prepared from hazelnut shells, walnut shells and peanut shells for high CO2 adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewicka Katarzyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Research treats about producing activated carbons for CO2 capture from hazelnut shells (HN, walnut shells (WN and peanut shells (PN. Saturated solution of KOH was used as an activating agent in ratio 1:1. Samples were carbonized in the furnace in the range of temperatures 600°C–900°C. Properties of carbons were tested by N2 adsorption method, using BET equation, DFT method and volumetric CO2 adsorption method. With the increase of carbonization temperature specific surface area of studied samples increased. The largest surface area was calculated for samples carbonized at 900°C and the highest values of CO2 adsorption had samples: PN900 at 0°C (5.5 mmol/g and WN900 at 25°C (4.34 mmol/g. All of the samples had a well-developed microporous structure.

  7. Eco-friendly synthesis of core-shell structured (TiO2/Li2CO3) nanomaterials for low cost dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppuchamy, S; Brundha, C

    2016-12-01

    Core-shell structured TiO 2 /Li 2 CO 3 electrode was successfully synthesized by eco-friendly solution growth technique. TiO 2 /Li 2 CO 3 electrodes were characterized using X-ray Diffractometer (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and photocurrent-voltage measurements. The synthesized core-shell electrode material was sensitized with tetrabutylammonium cis-di(thiocyanato)-N,N'-bis(4-carboxylato-4'-carboxylic acid-2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenate(II) (N-719). The performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) based on N719 dye modified TiO 2 /Li 2 CO 3 electrodes was investigated. The effect of various shell thickness on the photovoltaic performance of the core-shell structured electrode is also investigated. We found that Li 2 CO 3 shells of all thicknesses perform as inert barriers which improve open-circuit voltage (V oc ) of the DSCs. The energy conversion efficiency was greatly dependent on the thickness of Li 2 CO 3 on TiO 2 film, and the highest efficiency of 3.7% was achieved at the optimum Li 2 CO 3 shell layer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel approach to preparing magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Wei, E-mail: climentjw@126.co [National Special Superfine Powder Engineering Research Center, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Sun Zhendong; Li Fengsheng [National Special Superfine Powder Engineering Research Center, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Chen Kai; Liu Tianyu; Liu Jialing [Department of Physics, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Zhou Tianle [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Guo Rui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2011-03-15

    Magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure were prepared through a novel approach based on the sonochemical method and the emulsion solvent evaporation method. The microspheres are composed of the oleic acid and undecylenic acid modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} cores and coated with globular bovine serum albumin (BSA). Under an optimized condition, up to 57.8 wt% of approximately 10 nm superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles could be uniformly encapsulated into the BSA microspheres with the diameter of approximately 160 nm and the high saturation magnetization of 38.5 emu/g, besides of the abundant functional groups. The possible formation mechanism of magnetic microspheres was discussed in detail. - Research Highlights: Magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure were prepared through a novel approach based on the sonochemical method and the emulsion solvent evaporation method. The microspheres are composed of the oleic acid and undecylenic acid modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} cores and coated with globular bovine serum albumin (BSA). 57.8 wt% of approximately 10 nm superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles could be uniformly encapsulated into the BSA microspheres with the diameter of approximately 160 nm and the high saturation magnetization of 38.5 emu/g, besides the abundant functional groups.

  9. A novel approach to preparing magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Wei; Sun Zhendong; Li Fengsheng; Chen Kai; Liu Tianyu; Liu Jialing; Zhou Tianle; Guo Rui

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure were prepared through a novel approach based on the sonochemical method and the emulsion solvent evaporation method. The microspheres are composed of the oleic acid and undecylenic acid modified Fe 3 O 4 cores and coated with globular bovine serum albumin (BSA). Under an optimized condition, up to 57.8 wt% of approximately 10 nm superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles could be uniformly encapsulated into the BSA microspheres with the diameter of approximately 160 nm and the high saturation magnetization of 38.5 emu/g, besides of the abundant functional groups. The possible formation mechanism of magnetic microspheres was discussed in detail. - Research Highlights: → Magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure were prepared through a novel approach based on the sonochemical method and the emulsion solvent evaporation method.→ The microspheres are composed of the oleic acid and undecylenic acid modified Fe 3 O 4 cores and coated with globular bovine serum albumin (BSA).→ 57.8 wt% of approximately 10 nm superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles could be uniformly encapsulated into the BSA microspheres with the diameter of approximately 160 nm and the high saturation magnetization of 38.5 emu/g, besides the abundant functional groups.

  10. Assembly of core–shell structured porous carbon–graphene composites as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Rong; Zhao, Li; Yue, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    As potential anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, mesoporous carbons such as CMK-3 and CMK-8 usually show stable cycling performances but only slightly higher reversible capacities than commercial graphite. Graphene has much higher theoretical capacity than that of graphite in theory. However, its electrochemical behavior is not as good as expected due to the aggregation of graphene nanosheets. Herein we describe a novel strategy for the preparation of core–shell structured porous carbon–graphene composites. Compared to pure porous carbons or pure graphene nanosheets, these novel composites exhibit superior electrochemical performances including higher reversible capacities and better cycle/rate performances. This core–shell structure can avoid the aggregation of graphene nanosheets as well as may stabilize the mesostructure of porous carbon, which is beneficial to improving the electrochemical performances of the composites

  11. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-21

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization.

  12. Magnetic properties of mixed spin (1, 3/2) Ising nanoparticles with core–shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Şener, Yunus

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic properties of mixed spin-1 and spin-3/2 Ising nanoparticles with core/shell structure are studied by using the effective-field theory with correlations. We investigate the thermal variations of the core, shell and total magnetizations and the Q-, R-, P-, S-, N- and L-types of compensation behavior in Néel classification nomenclature exists in the system. The effects of the crystal-field, core and shell interactions and interface coupling, on the phase diagrams are investigated in detail and the obtained phase diagrams are presented in three different planes. The system exhibits both second- and first-order phase transitions besides tricritical point, double critical end point, triple point and critical end point depending on the appropriate values of the interaction parameters. The system strongly affected by the surface situations and some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the ratio of the physical parameters in the surface shell and the core. - Highlights: • Magnetic properties of mixed spin (1, 3/2) Ising nanoparticles are investigated. • The system exhibits tricritical, double critical end, triple, critical end points. • Q-, R-, P-, S-, N- and L-types of compensation behavior are found. • Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the interaction parameters. • Effects of crystal-field and bilinear interactions on the system are examined

  13. Magnetic properties of mixed spin (1, 3/2) Ising nanoparticles with core–shell structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deviren, Bayram, E-mail: bayram.deviren@nevsehir.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Nevsehir Hacı Bektaş Veli University, 50300 Nevşehir (Turkey); Şener, Yunus [Institute of Science, Department of Physics, Nevsehir Hacı Bektaş Veli University, 50300 Nevşehir (Turkey)

    2015-07-15

    The magnetic properties of mixed spin-1 and spin-3/2 Ising nanoparticles with core/shell structure are studied by using the effective-field theory with correlations. We investigate the thermal variations of the core, shell and total magnetizations and the Q-, R-, P-, S-, N- and L-types of compensation behavior in Néel classification nomenclature exists in the system. The effects of the crystal-field, core and shell interactions and interface coupling, on the phase diagrams are investigated in detail and the obtained phase diagrams are presented in three different planes. The system exhibits both second- and first-order phase transitions besides tricritical point, double critical end point, triple point and critical end point depending on the appropriate values of the interaction parameters. The system strongly affected by the surface situations and some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the ratio of the physical parameters in the surface shell and the core. - Highlights: • Magnetic properties of mixed spin (1, 3/2) Ising nanoparticles are investigated. • The system exhibits tricritical, double critical end, triple, critical end points. • Q-, R-, P-, S-, N- and L-types of compensation behavior are found. • Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the interaction parameters. • Effects of crystal-field and bilinear interactions on the system are examined.

  14. Degenerated shell element for geometrically nonlinear analysis of thin-walled piezoelectric active structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinković, D; Köppe, H; Gabbert, U

    2008-01-01

    Active piezoelectric thin-walled structures, especially those with a notably higher membrane than bending stiffness, are susceptible to large rotations and transverse deflections. Recent investigations conducted by a number of researchers have shown that the predicted behavior of piezoelectric structures can be significantly influenced by the assumption of large displacements and rotations of the structure, thus demanding a geometrically nonlinear formulation in order to investigate it. This paper offers a degenerated shell element and a simplified formulation that relies on small incremental steps for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of piezoelectric composite structures. A set of purely mechanical static cases is followed by a set of piezoelectric coupled static cases, both demonstrating the applicability of the proposed formulation

  15. Spectral element modelling of wave propagation in isotropic and anisotropic shell-structures including different types of damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, R T; Fritzen, C-P; Moll, J

    2010-01-01

    During the last decades, guided waves have shown great potential for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. These waves can be excited and sensed by piezoelectric elements that can be permanently attached onto a structure offering online monitoring capability. However, the setup of wave based SHM systems for complex structures may be very difficult and time consuming. For that reason there is a growing demand for efficient simulation tools providing the opportunity to design wave based SHM systems in a virtual environment. As usually high frequency waves are used, the associated short wavelength leads to the necessity of a very dense mesh, which makes conventional finite elements not well suited for this purpose. Therefore in this contribution a flat shell spectral element approach is presented. By including electromechanical coupling a SHM system can be simulated entirely from actuator voltage to sensor voltage. Besides a comparison to measured data for anisotropic materials including delamination, a numerical example of a more complex, stiffened shell structure with debonding is presented.

  16. Structural-performance testing of titanium-shell lead-matrix container MM2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosaluk, L. J.; Barrie, J. N.

    1992-05-15

    This report describes the hydrostatic structural-performance testing of a half-scale, titanium-shell, lead-matrix container (MM2) with a large, simulated volumetric casting defect. Mechancial behaviour of the container is assessed from extensive surface-strain measurements and post-test non-destructive and destructive examinations. Measured strain data are compared briefly with analytical results from a finite-element model of a previous test prototype, MM1, and with data generated by a finite-difference computer code. Finally, procedures are recommended for more detailed analytical modelling. (auth)

  17. Core/shell structure NiCo2O4@MnCo2O4 nanofibers fabricated by different temperatures for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Qin, Xuefeng; Jiang, Pengcheng; Dai, Jianfeng; Li, Weixue; Gao, Haoran

    2018-03-01

    Core/shell structure NiCo2O4@MnCo2O4 nanofibers (NiCo2O4@MnCo2O4 NFs) were prepared by a facile co-electrospinning method and heat treatment. The composites annealed at 500 °C have a complete, continuously obvious core/shell structure, and clear interface of composites with good morphology, while annealed at 600 °C were stacked on each other and were unable to sustain three-dimensional network structures and 700 °C calcination have completely lost one-dimensional structure. The core NiCo2O4 is about 70 nm in diameter and the MnCo2O4 shell behaves a thickness about 60 nm. When investigated as an electrode material for supercapacitors, the NiCo2O4@MnCo2O4 NFs annealed at 500 °C exihibited the specific capacitance of 463 F g-1 (0.926 F cm-2) at 1 A g-1, higher than that annealed at 600 °C 362 F g-1, 1 A g-1 (0.724 F cm-2, 1 A g-1) and 700 °C 283 F g-1, 1 A g-1 (0.566 F cm-2, 1 A g-1). These results suggest that core/shell NiCo2O4@MnCo2O4 NFs annealed at 500 °C have formed a good morphology with continuously complete core/shell structure which lead to good properties would be potential electrodes for supercapacitors.

  18. TiO2@C Core-Shell Nanoparticles Formed by Polymeric Nano-Encapsulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra eVasei

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 semiconducting nanoparticles are known to be photocatalysts of moderate activity due to their high band-gap and high rate of electron-hole recombination. The formation of a shell of carbon around the core of TiO2, i.e. the formation of TiO2@C nanoparticles, is believed to partly alleviate these problems. It is usually achieved by a hydrothermal treatment in a presence of a sugar derivative. We present here a novel method for the formation of highly uniform C shell around TiO2 nanoparticles. For this purpose, TiO2 nanoparticles were dispersed in water using an oligomeric dispersant prepared by Reversible Addition-Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT polymerization. Then the nanoparticles were engaged into an emulsion polymerization of acrylonitrile, resulting in the formation of a shell of polyacrylonitrile (PAN around each TiO2 nanoparticles. Upon pyrolisis, the PAN was transformed into carbon, resulting in the formation of TiO2@C nanoparticles. The structure of the resulting particles was elucidated by X-Ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-VIS and Raman spectroscopy as well as TEM microscopy. Preliminary results about the use of the TiO2@C particles as photocatalysts for the splitting of water are presented. They indicate that the presence of the C shell is responsible for a significant enhancement of the photocurrent.

  19. Synthesis of TiO2/Bi2S3 heterojunction with a nuclear-shell structure and its high photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Juan; Han, Qiaofeng; Wang, Zuoshan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Bi 2 S 3 was doped into TiO 2 and it was clearly proved by the expander of the crystalline lattice in XRD result. ► As-prepared TiO 2 /Bi 2 S 3 heterojunctions have a nuclear-shell structure which has not been reported. ► As-prepared TiO 2 /Bi 2 S 3 heterojunctions have the excellent photocatalytic activity. -- Abstract: TiO 2 /Bi 2 S 3 heterojunctions with a nuclear-shell structure were prepared by the coprecipitation method. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman spectra, transmission electron microscope images and energy dispersion X-ray spectra. Results showed that as-prepared Bi 2 S 3 was urchin-like, made from many nanorods, and TiO 2 /Bi 2 S 3 heterojunctions have a similar nuclear-shell structure, with Bi 2 S 3 as the shell and TiO 2 as the nuclear. The photocatalytic experiments performed under UV irradiation using methyl orange as the pollutant revealed that the photocatalytic activity of TiO 2 could be improved by introduction of an appropriate amount of Bi 2 S 3 . However, excessive amount of Bi 2 S 3 would result in the decrease of photocatalytic activity of TiO 2 . The relative mechanism was proposed.

  20. Stress analysis of partial sphere used for bottom shell of off-shore structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimaki, Ko; Matsumoto, Kohei; Hori, Tohru; Takeshita, Haruyuki; Iwata, Setsuo

    1976-01-01

    In the near future, various huge off-shore structures will be constructed. Concrete shall become a leading material in the structures, owing to its versatile properties. One of the limitations of concrete is its low tensile strength. The problem of low tensile strength of concrete is dealt with in main by two different methods: by applying prestressing and by designing the structural configuration so that no tensile stresses appear. In the paper, the authors discuss the application of partially spherical shell to huge off-shore structures. Structural analysis by using the finite element method were done in order to investigate the feasibility of the structure. The results were arranged as to certain parameters to derive design charts by which the stresses of check points can be presumed. Optimum shape is also discussed. (auth.)

  1. Nuclear structure of the N = Z odd - odd nuclei around N=28 closed shell interpreted with IBFFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragulescu, E.; Serbanut, G. C.; Serbanut, I.

    2001-01-01

    In the very recent years the knowledge of the level structure at lower and higher energies in the fpg shell N=Z nuclei has renewed a growing interest due to major improvements in the theoretical techniques. Going away from closed shell, the shell model calculations rapidly exhaust computer capabilities and we must resort to the model observed on collective phenomena. The fpg odd-odd N = Z nuclei close to the doubly magic 56 Ni nucleus are good candidates to investigate the competition between collective and single-particle excitations. Here part of the results obtained from an exhaustive systematic study of the self conjugate doubly-odd nuclei with A > 62: 62 Ga and 66 As nuclei using the interacting - boson - fermion - fermion - model (IBFFM) is presented. The odd-odd nuclei are described in the framework of the IBFFM by coupling valence shell proton and neutron quasiparticles to even-even core described in the interacting - boson model. In the first step of the calculations the core parameters for 60 Zn and 64 Ge cores were fitted to the energies of their excited states. In the second step of calculations, we have adjusted the IBFM proton Hamiltonian to the low - lying levels of 63 Ga and 67 As nuclei and IBFM neutron Hamiltonian of low - lying levels of 61 Zn and 65 Ge nuclei involved in the cases of the structure of odd-odd 62 Ga and 66 As nuclei. We have finally calculated the level spectra and electromagnetic properties of above mentioned nuclei. The IBFFM positive - parity energy spectra are compared with experimental ones. The calculations show a reasonable agreement with experimental data and existing shell - model calculations. (authors)

  2. Strontium clusters: electronic and geometry shell effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    charged strontium clusters consisting of up to 14 atoms, average bonding distances, electronic shell closures, binding energies per atom, and spectra of the density of electronic states (DOS). It is demonstrated that the size-evolution of structural and electronic properties of strontium clusters...... is governed by an interplay of the electronic and geometry shell closures. Influence of the electronic shell effects on structural rearrangements can lead to violation of the icosahedral growth motif of strontium clusters. It is shown that the excessive charge essentially affects the optimized geometry...

  3. Synthesis, structural characterization and dielectric properties of Nb doped BaTiO3/SiO2 core–shell heterostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernea, M.; Vasile, B.S.; Boni, A.; Iuga, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Optimal parameters for preparation by sol–gel of core–shell (BT-Nb 0.005 )/SiO 2 are presented in this paper. • Single crystalline BT-Nb 0.005 /SiO 2 core–shell composite with ∼34 nm shell thick was prepared. • The core–shell ceramic exhibits good dielectric properties and ferroelectric characteristics. -- Abstract: Perovskite complex ceramic oxides, BaTiO 3 doped with 0.5 mol%Nb 2 O 5 and then nanocoated with SiO 2 (abbreviated as BT-Nb 0.005 /SiO 2 ) was successful prepared using conventional sol–gel processing. Phase composition, particle morphology, structure, and electric properties of BT-Nb 0.005 core and BT-Nb 0.005 /SiO 2 core–shell were examined and compared, using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and, dielectric and ferroelectric measurements. Core–shell composite with well-defined perovskite tetragonal phase of BaTiO 3 was achieved. Furthermore, single crystalline BT-Nb 0.005 /SiO 2 core–nanoshell heterostructure with ∼34 nm shell thick was prepared, which is a novelty in ferroelectrics field. The ferroelectric quality of BT-Nb 0.005 has suffered an alteration when the (BT-Nb 0.005 )/SiO 2 core–shell heterostructure was realized. One-dimensional BT-Nb 0.005 /SiO 2 core–shell heterostructure exhibits an improvement of dielectric losses and a decrease of dielectric constant, compared to uncoated BT-Nb 0.005 . The (BT-Nb 0.005 )/SiO 2 core–shell material could be interesting for application in the composite capacitors

  4. Design aids for stiffened composite shells with cutouts

    CERN Document Server

    Sahoo, Sarmila

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the free vibrations of graphite-epoxy laminated composite stiffened shells with cutout both in terms of the natural frequencies and mode shapes. The dynamic analysis of shell structures, which may have complex geometry and arbitrary loading and boundary conditions, is solved efficiently by the finite element method, even including cutouts in shells. The results may be readily used by practicing engineers dealing with stiffened composite shells with cutouts. Several shell forms viz. cylindrical shell, hypar shell, conoidal shell, spherical shell, saddle shell, hyperbolic paraboloidal shell and elliptic paraboloidal shell are considered in the book. The dynamic characteristics of stiffened composite shells with cutout are described in terms of the natural frequency and mode shapes. The size of the cutouts and their positions with respect to the shell centre are varied for different edge constraints of cross-ply and angle-ply laminated composite shells. The effects of these parametric variat...

  5. Controllable synthesis of mesoporous multi-shelled ZnO microspheres as efficient photocatalysts for NO oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaolang; Zhang, Huiqiang; Zhang, Dieqing; Miao, Yingchun; Li, Guisheng

    2018-03-01

    The successful application of hierarchically porous structure in environmental treatment has provided new insights for solving environmental problems. Hierarchically structured semiconductor materials were considered as promising photocatalysts for NO oxidation in gas phase. Multi-shelled ZnO microspheres (MMSZ) were controllably shaped with hierarchically porous structures via a facile hydrothermal route using amino acid (N-Acetyl-D-Proline) as template and post-calcination treatment. Symmetric Ostwald ripening was used to explain the morphological evolution of hierarchical nanostructure. MMSZ was proved highly efficient for oxidizing NO (400 ppb) in gas phase under UV light irradiation with a much higher photocatalytic removal rate (77.3%) than that of the as-obtained ZnO crystals with other hierachically porous structures, owing to its higher photocurrent intensity. Such greatly enhanced photocatalytic activity can be assigned to the enhanced crystallinity of ZnO, mesopores and unique multi-shelled structure. Enhanced crystallinity promotes photogenerated charges under light irradiation. Mesoporous porosity can ensure enough light scattering between the shells. Multi-shelled structure endows ZnO with higher specific surface area and high frequency of multiple light reflection, resulting in more exposed active sites, higher light utilization efficiency, and fast separation efficiency of photogenerated charge carriers. The experimental results demonstrated that the photogenerated holes (h+) are the main active species. Hierarchically structured ZnO is not only contributed to directly use solar energy to solving various problems caused by atmospheric pollution, but also has potential applications in energy converse and storage including solar cells, lithium batteries, water-splitting, etc.

  6. Experimental and numerical modelling of ductile crack propagation in large-scale shell structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Törnquist, R.

    2004-01-01

    plastic and controlled conditions. The test specimen can be deformed either in combined in-plane bending and extension or in pure extension. Experimental results are described for 5 and 10 mm thick aluminium and steel plates. By performing an inverse finite-element analysis of the experimental results......This paper presents a combined experimental-numerical procedure for development and calibration of macroscopic crack propagation criteria in large-scale shell structures. A novel experimental set-up is described in which a mode-I crack can be driven 400 mm through a 20(+) mm thick plate under fully...... for steel and aluminium plates, mainly as curves showing the critical element deformation versus the shell element size. These derived crack propagation criteria are then validated against a separate set of experiments considering centre crack specimens (CCS) which have a different crack-tip constraint...

  7. Investigation of the structure change of atomic shells due to uranium ionization by the Dirac-Fock-Slater method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchornak, G.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of outer vacancies in the atomic shells of uranium on the atomic shell structure is claculated by the Dirac-Fock-Slater method. It is found out that the energy of the X-ray transitions increases due to the detachment of the electrons with the lowest binding energies. The electron detachment from the subshells of the 4f level gives rise to negative energy shifts of the X-ray transitions.(author)

  8. Inactivation of Salmonella in Shell Eggs by Hot Water Immersion and Its Effect on Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geveke, David J; Gurtler, Joshua B; Jones, Deana R; Bigley, Andrew B W

    2016-03-01

    Thermal inactivation kinetics of heat resistant strains of Salmonella Enteritidis in shell eggs processed by hot water immersion were determined and the effects of the processing on egg quality were evaluated. Shell eggs were inoculated with a composite of heat resistant Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) strains PT8 C405, 2 (FSIS #OB030832), and 6 (FSIS #OB040159). Eggs were immersed in a circulating hot water bath for various times and temperatures. Come-up time of the coldest location within the egg was 21 min. SE was reduced by 4.5 log at both hot water immersion treatments of 56.7 C for 60 min and 55.6 °C for 100 min. Decimal reduction times (D-values) at 54.4, 55.6, and 56.7 °C were 51.8, 14.6, and 9.33 min, respectively. The z-value was 3.07 °C. Following treatments that resulted in a 4.5 log reduction (56.7 °C/60 min and 55.6 °C/100 min), the surviving population of SE remained static during 4 wk of refrigerated storage. After processing under conditions resulting in 4.5 log reductions, the Haugh unit and albumen height significantly increased (P eggs by 4.5 log, but also significantly affected several egg quality characteristics. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Highly selective and sensitive methanol gas sensor based on molecular imprinted silver-doped LaFeO3 core-shell and cage structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Qian; Zhang, Yumin; Lv, Tianping; Shen, Kaiyuan; Zi, Baoye; Zhu, Zhongqi; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Qingju

    2018-04-01

    Silver-doped LaFeO3 molecularly imprinted polymers (SLMIPs) were synthesized by a sol-gel method combined with molecularly imprinted technology as precursors. The precursors were then used to prepare SLMIPs cage (SLM-cage) and SLMIPs core-shell (SLM-core-shell) structures by using a carbon sphere as the template and hydrothermal synthesis, respectively. The structures, morphologies, and surface areas of these materials were determined, as well as their gas-sensing properties and related mechanisms. The SLM-cage and SLM-core-shell samples exhibited good responses to methanol gas, with excellent selectivity. The response and optimum working temperature were 16.98 °C and 215 °C, 33.7 °C and 195 °C, respectively, with corresponding response and recovery times of 45 and 50 s (SLM-cage) and 42 and 57 s (SLM-core-shell) for 5 ppm methanol gas. Notably, the SLM-cage and SLM-core-shell samples exhibited lower responses (≤5 and ≤7, respectively) to other gases, including ethanol, ammonia, benzene, acetone, and toluene. Thus, these materials show potential as practical methanol detectors.

  10. Nitrite sensing composite systems based on a core-shell emissive-superamagnetic structure: Construction, characterization and sensing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Liu, Liang; Zha, Jianhua; Yuan, Ningyi

    2017-04-01

    Two recyclable nitrite sensing composite samples were designed and constructed through a core-shell structure, with Fe3O4 nanoparticles as core, silica molecular sieve MCM-41 as shell and two rhodamine derivatives as chemosensors, respectively. These samples and their structure were identified with their electron microscopy images, N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, magnetic response, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis. Their nitrite sensing behavior was discussed based on emission intensity quenching, their limit of detection was found as low as 1.2 μM. Further analysis suggested a static sensing mechanism between nitrite and chemosensors through an additive reaction between NO+ and chemosensors. After finishing their nitrite sensing, these composite samples and their emission could be recycled and recovered by sulphamic acid.

  11. Amphiphilic hollow porous shell encapsulated Au@Pd bimetal nanoparticles for aerobic oxidation of alcohols in water

    KAUST Repository

    Zou, Houbing

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. This work describes the design, synthesis and analysis of an amphiphilic hollow mesoporous shell encapsulating catalytically active Au@Pd bimetal nanoparticles. The particles exhibited excellent catalytic activity and stability in the aerobic oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes or ketones in water when using air as an oxidizing agent under atmospheric pressure.

  12. Synthesis of soft shell poly(styrene) colloids for filtration experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinge, Mogens

    Separating a solid from a liquid is an important unit operation in many different industries e.g. mining, chemical, pharmaceutical and food industries. Solid liquid separation can roughly be divided into three groups. 1) Separation by gravity forces e.g. sedimentation, centrifugation, 2) Separation...... consisting of a solid poly(styrene) (PS) core with a water swollen shell have been employed in investigating the effect from varying amounts and type of water swollen material on filtration dewatering properties. Three series of model material have been used in this investigation 1) poly......(styrene-co-acrylic acid) core-shell colloids with varying thickness of the poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) shell. 2) poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) core-shell colloids with varying diameter of the PS core and 3) poly(styrene-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) core-shell colloids with varying thickness of the poly...

  13. Analysis of intelligent hinged shell structures: deployable deformation and shape memory effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guang-Hui; Yang, Qing-Sheng; He, X. Q.

    2013-12-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a class of intelligent materials with the ability to recover their initial shape from a temporarily fixable state when subjected to external stimuli. In this work, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a deployable SMP-based hinged structure is modeled by the finite element method using a 3D constitutive model with shape memory effect. The influences of hinge structure parameters on the nonlinear loading process are investigated. The total shape memory of the processes the hinged structure goes through, including loading at high temperature, decreasing temperature with load carrying, unloading at low temperature and recovering the initial shape with increasing temperature, are illustrated. Numerical results show that the present constitutive theory and the finite element method can effectively predict the complicated thermo-mechanical deformation behavior and shape memory effect of SMP-based hinged shell structures.

  14. Analysis of intelligent hinged shell structures: deployable deformation and shape memory effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Guang-Hui; Yang, Qing-Sheng; He, X Q

    2013-01-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a class of intelligent materials with the ability to recover their initial shape from a temporarily fixable state when subjected to external stimuli. In this work, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a deployable SMP-based hinged structure is modeled by the finite element method using a 3D constitutive model with shape memory effect. The influences of hinge structure parameters on the nonlinear loading process are investigated. The total shape memory of the processes the hinged structure goes through, including loading at high temperature, decreasing temperature with load carrying, unloading at low temperature and recovering the initial shape with increasing temperature, are illustrated. Numerical results show that the present constitutive theory and the finite element method can effectively predict the complicated thermo-mechanical deformation behavior and shape memory effect of SMP-based hinged shell structures. (paper)

  15. Nanostructured core-shell electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Long-bo; Yuan, Xing-zhong; Liang, Jie; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Hou; Zeng, Guang-ming

    2016-11-01

    Core-shell nanostructure represents a unique system for applications in electrochemical energy storage devices. Owing to the unique characteristics featuring high power delivery and long-term cycling stability, electrochemical capacitors (ECs) have emerged as one of the most attractive electrochemical storage systems since they can complement or even replace batteries in the energy storage field, especially when high power delivery or uptake is needed. This review aims to summarize recent progress on core-shell nanostructures for advanced supercapacitor applications in view of their hierarchical architecture which not only create the desired hierarchical porous channels, but also possess higher electrical conductivity and better structural mechanical stability. The core-shell nanostructures include carbon/carbon, carbon/metal oxide, carbon/conducting polymer, metal oxide/metal oxide, metal oxide/conducting polymer, conducting polymer/conducting polymer, and even more complex ternary core-shell nanoparticles. The preparation strategies, electrochemical performances, and structural stabilities of core-shell materials for ECs are summarized. The relationship between core-shell nanostructure and electrochemical performance is discussed in detail. In addition, the challenges and new trends in core-shell nanomaterials development have also been proposed.

  16. Development of SiO2@TiO2 core-shell nanospheres for catalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsou, I.; Panagopoulos, P.; Maggos, Th.; Arkas, M.; Tsetsekou, A.

    2018-05-01

    Silica-titania core-shell nanospheres, CSNp, were prepared via a simple and environmentally friendly two step route. First, silica cores were prepared through the hydrolysis-condensation reaction of silicic acid in the presence of hyperbranched poly(ethylene)imine (HBPEI) followed by repeating washing, centrifugation and, finally, calcination steps. To create the core-shell structure, various amounts of titanium isopropoxide were added to the cores and after that a HBPEI-water solution was added to hydrolyze the titanium precursor. Washing with ethanol and heat treatment followed. The optimization of processing parameters led to well-developed core-shell structures bearing a homogeneous nanocrystalline anatase coating over each silica core. The photocatalytic activity for NO was examined in a continuous flux photocatalytic reactor under real environmental conditions. The results revealed a very potent photocatalyst as the degradation percentage reached 84.27% for the core-shell material compared to the 82% of pure titania with the photodecomposition rates measured at 0.62 and 0.55 μg·m-2·s-1, respectively. In addition, catalytic activities of the CSNp and pure titania were investigated by monitoring the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by an excess of NaBH4. Both materials exhibited excellent catalytic activity (100%), making the core-shell material a promising alternative catalyst to pure titania for various applications.

  17. Tube in shell heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, O.; Willby, C.R.; Sheward, G.E.; Ormrod, D.T.; Firth, G.F.

    1980-01-01

    An improved tube-in-shell heat exchanger to be used between liquid metal and water is described for use in the liquid metal coolant system of fast breeder reactors. It is stated that this design is less prone to failures which could result in sodium water reactions than previous exchangers. (UK)

  18. Optimization of wall thickness and lay-up for the shell-like composite structure loaded by non-uniform pressure field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsov, S.; Zhilyaev, I.; Oganesyan, P.; Axenov, V.

    2017-01-01

    The glass/carbon fiber composites are widely used in the design of various aircraft and rotorcraft components such as fairings and cowlings, which have predominantly a shell-like geometry and are made of quasi-isotropic laminates. The main requirements to such the composite parts are the specified mechanical stiffness to withstand the non-uniform air pressure at the different flight conditions and reduce a level of noise caused by the airflow-induced vibrations at the constrained weight of the part. The main objective of present study is the optimization of wall thickness and lay-up of composite shell-like cowling. The present approach assumes conversion of the CAD model of the cowling surface to finite element (FE) representation, then its wind tunnel testing simulation at the different orientation of airflow to find the most stressed mode of flight. Numerical solutions of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations supplemented by k-w turbulence model provide the spatial distributions of air pressure applied to the shell surface. At the formulation of optimization problem the global strain energy calculated within the optimized shell was assumed as the objective. A wall thickness of the shell had to change over its surface to minimize the objective at the constrained weight. We used a parameterization of the problem that assumes an initiation of auxiliary sphere with varied radius and coordinates of the center, which were the design variables. Curve that formed by the intersection of the shell with sphere defined boundary of area, which should be reinforced by local thickening the shell wall. To eliminate a local stress concentration this increment was defined as the smooth function defined on the shell surface. As a result of structural optimization we obtained the thickness of shell's wall distribution, which then was used to design the draping and lay-up of composite prepreg layers. The global strain energy in the optimized cowling was reduced in2

  19. Semiclassical moment of inertia shell-structure within the phase-space approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorpinchenko, D V; Magner, A G; Bartel, J; Blocki, J P

    2015-01-01

    The moment of inertia for nuclear collective rotations is derived within a semiclassical approach based on the cranking model and the Strutinsky shell-correction method by using the non-perturbative periodic-orbit theory in the phase-space variables. This moment of inertia for adiabatic (statistical-equilibrium) rotations can be approximated by the generalized rigid-body moment of inertia accounting for the shell corrections of the particle density. A semiclassical phase-space trace formula allows us to express the shell components of the moment of inertia quite accurately in terms of the free-energy shell corrections for integrable and partially chaotic Fermi systems, which is in good agreement with the corresponding quantum calculations. (paper)

  20. Electronic structure of single- and multiple-shell carbon fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.; Nori, F.

    1994-01-01

    We study the electronic states of giant single-shell and the recently discovered nested multiple-shell carbon fullerenes within the tight-binding approximation. We use two different approaches, one based on iterations and the other on symmetry, to obtain the π-state energy spectra of large fullerene cages: C 240 , C 540 , C 960 , C 1500 , C 2160 , and C 2940 . Our iteration technique reduces the size of the problem by more than one order of magnitude (factors of ∼12 and 20), while the symmetry-based approach reduces it by a factor of 10. We also find formulas for the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energies of C 60n 2 fullerenes as a function of n, demonstrating a tendency towards a metallic regime for increasing n. For multiple-shell fullerenes, we analytically obtain the eigenvalues of the intershell interaction

  1. Multi-scale hierarchy of Chelydra serpentina: microstructure and mechanical properties of turtle shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balani, Kantesh; Patel, Riken R; Keshri, Anup K; Lahiri, Debrupa; Agarwal, Arvind

    2011-10-01

    Carapace, the protective shell of a freshwater snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina, shields them from ferocious attacks of their predators while maintaining light-weight and agility for a swim. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the turtle shell are very appealing to materials scientists and engineers for bio-mimicking, to obtain a multi-functional surface. In this study, we have elucidated the complex microstructure of a dry Chelydra serpentina's shell which is very similar to a multi-layered composite structure. The microstructure of a turtle shell's carapace elicits a sandwich structure of waxy top surface with a harder sub-surface layer serving as a shielding structure, followed by a lamellar carbonaceous layer serving as shock absorber, and the inner porous matrix serves as a load-bearing scaffold while acting as reservoir of retaining water and nutrients. The mechanical properties (elastic modulus and hardness) of various layers obtained via nanoindentation corroborate well with the functionality of each layer. Elastic modulus ranged between 0.47 and 22.15 GPa whereas hardness varied between 53.7 and 522.2 MPa depending on the microstructure of the carapace layer. Consequently, the modulus of each layer was represented into object oriented finite element (OOF2) modeling towards extracting the overall effective modulus of elasticity (~4.75 GPa) of a turtle's carapace. Stress distribution of complex layered structure was elicited with an applied strain of 1% in order to understand the load sharing of various composite layers in the turtle's carapace. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Core–shell TiO2 microsphere with enhanced photocatalytic activity and improved lithium storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hong; Tian, Dongxue; Liu, Lixiang; Wang, Yapeng; Guo, Yuan; Yang, Xiangjun

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic hollow core–shell spheres have attracted considerable interest due to their singular properties and wide range of potential applications. Herein a novel facile generic strategy of combining template assisted and solvothermal alcoholysis is employed to prepare core–void–shell anatase TiO 2 nanoparticle aggregates with an excellent photocatalytic activity, and enhanced lithium storage in large quantities. Amorphous carbon can be loaded on the TiO 2 nanoparticles uniformly under a suitably formulated ethanol/water system in the solvothermal alcoholysis process, and the subsequent calcination results of the formation of core–shell–shell anatase TiO 2 nanoparticle aggregates. The intrinsic core–void–shell nature as well as high porosity of the unique nanostructures contributes greatly to the superior photocatalytic activity and improved performance as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. - Graphical abstract: A novel strategy of combining template assisted and solvothermal alcoholysis is employed to prepare unique core–void–shell anatase TiO 2 nanoparticle aggregates with the superior photocatalytic activity and improved lithium storage. Highlights: ► TiO 2 mesospheres are synthesized by solvothermal alcoholysis. ► It is core–void–shell structure and the thickness of shell is estimated to 80 nm. ► It exhibits a remarkable photocatalytic activity and improved lithium storage

  3. Removal of toxic dichlorophenol from water by sorption with chemically activated carbon of almond shells - a green approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamil, N.; Ahsan, N.; Munwar, M.A.; Anwar, J.; Shafiq, U.

    2011-01-01

    Chloro phenols (CP) represents a group of organic compounds having substituted chlorines attached to phenol ring. These trace organic pollutants represent a major environmental concern, because of toxicity, non-biodegradability, carcinogenic and stubborn properties. The adsorption of 2, 4-dichlorophenol (DCP) by chemically activated carbon of almond shells (CAC-AS) has been studied in the batch setup. Operational parameters like adsorbent dose, pH, and shaking speed were investigated. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were employed to calculate adsorption capacity and other sorption features of CAC-AS. The maximum amount of DCP adsorbed was 24.3 mg per gram of activated carbon derived from almond shells. Optimum conditions for DCP uptake were 2.5 g adsorbent dose, pH 5 and agitation speed of 200 rpm whereas the concentration of DCP solution was 25 mg/L (50 mL). Results corroborated that almond shells pretreated chemically, can be an excellent low cost adsorbents for removal of DCP from contaminated water. (author)

  4. Formation of an Anti-Core–Shell Structure in Layered Oxide Cathodes for Li-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hanlei [Materials; amp, Department; NorthEast; Omenya, Fredrick [NorthEast; Whittingham, M. Stanley [NorthEast; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental; Zhou, Guangwen [Materials; amp, Department; NorthEast

    2017-10-20

    The layered → rock-salt phase transformation in the layered dioxide cathodes for Li-ion batteries is believed to result in a “core-shell” structure of the primary particles, in which the core region maintains as the layered phase while the surface region undergoes the phase transformation to the rock-salt phase. Using transmission electron microscopy, here we demonstrate the formation of an “anti-core-shell” structure in cycled primary particles with a formula of LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05O2, in which the surface and subsurface regions remain as the layered structure while the rock-salt phase forms as domains in the bulk with a thin layer of the spinel phase between the rock-salt core and the skin of the layered phase. Formation of this anti-core-shell structure is attributed to the oxygen loss at the surface that drives the migration of oxygen from the bulk to the surface, thereby resulting in localized areas of significantly reduced oxygen levels in the bulk of the particle, which subsequently undergoes the phase transformation to the rock-salt domains. The formation of the anti-core-shell rock-salt domains is responsible for the reduced capacity, discharge voltage and ionic conductivity in cycled cathode.

  5. Synthesis of Superparamagnetic Core-Shell Structure Supported Pd Nanocatalysts for Catalytic Nitrite Reduction with Enhanced Activity, No Detection of Undesirable Product of Ammonium, and Easy Magnetic Separation Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wuzhu; Yang, Weiyi; Xu, Zhengchao; Li, Qi; Shang, Jian Ku

    2016-01-27

    Superparamagnetic nanocatalysts could minimize both the external and internal mass transport limitations and neutralize OH(-) produced in the reaction more effectively to enhance the catalytic nitrite reduction efficiency with the depressed product selectivity to undesirable ammonium, while possess an easy magnetic separation capability. However, commonly used qusi-monodispersed superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanosphere is not suitable as catalyst support for nitrite reduction because it could reduce the catalytic reaction efficiency and the product selectivity to N2, and the iron leakage could bring secondary contamination to the treated water. In this study, protective shells of SiO2, polymethylacrylic acid, and carbon were introduced to synthesize Fe3O4@SiO2/Pd, Fe3O4@PMAA/Pd, and Fe3O4@C/Pd catalysts for catalytic nitrite reduction. It was found that SiO2 shell could provide the complete protection to Fe3O4 nanosphere core among these shells. Because of its good dispersion, dense structure, and complete protection to Fe3O4, the Fe3O4@SiO2/Pd catalyst demonstrated the highest catalytic nitrite reduction activity without the detection of NH4(+) produced. Due to this unique structure, the activity of Fe3O4@SiO2/Pd catalysts for nitrite reduction was found to be independent of the Pd nanoparticle size or shape, and their product selectivity was independent of the Pd nanoparticle size, shape, and content. Furthermore, their superparamagnetic nature and high saturation magnetization allowed their easy magnetic separation from treated water, and they also demonstrated a good stability during the subsequent recycling experiment.

  6. Evolution of Structure in Nuclei: Meditation by Sub-Shell Modifications and Relation to Binding Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casten, R. F.; Cakirli, R. B.

    2009-03-01

    Understanding the development of configuration mixing, coherence, collectivity, and deformation in nuclei is one of the crucial challenges in nuclear structure physics, and one which has become all the more important with the advent of next generation facilities for the study of exotic nuclei. We will discuss recent work on phase/shape transitional behavior in nuclei, and the role of changes in sub-shell structure in mediating such transitional regions. We will also discuss a newly found, much deeper, link between nuclear structure and nuclear binding energies.

  7. Charge radii of magnesium isotopes by laser spectroscopy a structural study over the $sd$ shell

    CERN Multimedia

    Schug, M; Krieger, A R

    We propose to study the evolution of nuclear sizes and shapes over the magnesium chain by measuring the root-mean-square charge radii of $^{21 - 32}$Mg, essentially covering the entire $\\textit{sd}$ shell. Our goal is to detect the structural changes, which in the neutron-deficient isotopes may originate from clustering, in a way similar to neon, and on the neutron-rich side would characterize the transition to the "island of inversion". We will combine, for the first time, the sensitive $\\beta$-detection technique with traditional fluorescence spectroscopy for isotope-shift measurements and in such a way gain access to the exotic species near the ${N}$ = 8 and ${N}$ = 20 shell closures.

  8. High performance and durability of order-structured cathode catalyst layer based on TiO_2@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Meng; Yang, Zhaoyi; Wang, Xindong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • TiO_2@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays were prepared and applied as catalyst support. • As-prepared Pt-TiO_2@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays were applied as order-structured cathode catalyst layer. • The novel cathode catalyst structure without Nafion"® ionomer enhance the performance and durability of PEMFC. - Abstract: In this paper, an order-structured cathode catalyst layer consisting of Pt-TiO_2@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays that in situ grown on commercial gas diffusion layer (GDL) are prepared and applied to membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In order to prepare the TiO_2@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays with suitable porosity and prominent conductivity, the morphologies of the TiO_2 nanoarray and electrochemical polymerization process of aniline are schematically investigated. The MEA with order-structured cathode catalyst layer is assembled in the single cell to evaluate the electrochemical performance and durability of PEMFC. As a result, the PEMFC with order-structured cathode catalyst layer shows higher peak power density (773.54 mW cm"−"2) than conventional PEMFC (699.30 mW cm"−"2). Electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) and charge transfer impedance (R_c_t) are measured before and after accelerated degradation test (ADT), and the corresponding experimental results indicate the novel cathode structure exhibits a better stability with respect to conventional cathode. The enhanced electrochemical performance and durability toward PEMFC can be ascribed to the order-structured cathode nanoarray structure with high specific surface area increases the utilization of catalyst and reduces the tortuosity of transport pathways, and the synergistic effect between TiO_2@PANI support and Pt nanoparticles promotes the high efficiency of electrochemical reaction and improves the stability of catalyst. This research provides a facile and controllable method to prepare order-structured

  9. Core-shell architectures as nano-size transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeli, M.; Zarnegar, Z.; Kabiri, R.; Salimi, F.; Dadkah, A.

    2006-01-01

    Core-shell architectures containing poly (ethylene imine) (PEI) as a core and poly (lactide) (PLA) as arms were prepared. PEI was used as macro initiator for ring opening polymerization of lactide. PEI-PLA core-shell architectures were able to encapsulate guest molecules. Size of the core-shell architectures was between 10- 100 nm, hence they can be considered as nano carriers to transport the guest molecules. Transport capacity of nano carriers depends on their nano-environments and type of self-assembly in solvent. In solid state nano carriers self-assemble as long structures with nano-size diameter or they form network structures. Aggregations type depends on the concentration of nano carriers in solution. Effect of the shell thickness and aggregation type on the release rate are also investigated

  10. Expansion connection of socket in flow distributed cabin of heavy water research reactor inner shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zhiliang; Li Yanshui

    1995-01-01

    Expansion connection of aluminium alloy LT21 socket in flow distributed cabin of Heavy Water Research Reactor (HWRR) inner shell is described systematically. The expansion connection technology parameters of products are determined through tests. They are as following: bounce value of inner diameter after expansion, expansion degree, space between socket and plate hole, device for expanding pipes, selection of tools for enlarging or reaming holes, manufacture for socket inner hole and cleaning after expansion

  11. A Study on the Plasmonic Properties of Silver Core Gold Shell Nanoparticles: Optical Assessment of the Particle Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Derrick; Lee, JaeDong; Thi Bich Thuy, Nguyen; Aoki, Yoshiya; Singh, Prerna; Maenosono, Shinya

    2011-06-01

    This paper reports a qualitative comparison between the optical properties of a set of silver core, gold shell nanoparticles with varying composition and structure to those calculated using the Mie solution. To achieve this, silver nanoparticles were synthesized in aqueous phase from a silver hydroxide precursor with sodium acrylate as dual reducing-capping agent. The particles were then coated with a layer of gold with controllable thickness through a reduction-deposition process. The resulting nanoparticles reveal well defined optical properties that make them suitable for comparison to ideal calculated results using the Mie solution. The discussion focuses on the correlation between the synthesized core shell nanoparticles with varying Au shell thickness and the Mie solution results in terms of the optical properties. The results give insight in how to design and synthesize silver core, gold shell nanoparticles with controllable optical properties (e.g., SPR band in terms of intensity and position), and has implications in creating nanoparticle materials to be used as biological probes and sensing elements.

  12. Development of an integrated pretreatment fractionation process for fermentable sugars and lignin: Application to almond (Prunus dulcis) shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Dachun; Holtman, Kevin M.; Franqui-Espiet, Diana; Orts, William J.; Zhao, Ruming

    2011-01-01

    An environmentally friendly pretreatment process was developed to fractionate cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin from almond (Prunus dulcis) shells, consisting of hot water pretreatment (HWP) coupled with organic solvent (organosolv) pretreatment of water/ethanol (OWEP). This integrated pretreatment process proved more effective on the basis of yield of fermentable sugar and lignin separation compared with HWP alone, dilute acid pretreatment (DAP), ammonia pretreatment (AP), lime pretreatment LP, organosolv water/ethanol pretreatment (OWEP), and organosolv water/acetone pretreatment (OWAP). In the coupled hot water-organosolv process, hemicellulose sugars were recovered in the first residual liquid while varying amounts of cellulose was retained in the residual solid. The lignin fraction was obtained by simply adjusting the pH from the second liquid. The optimal two-stage process consisted of first HWP stage at 195 o C for 30 min, resulting in w glucose = 95.4% glucose recovery yield and w xylose = 92.2% xylose removal. The second organosolv OWEP stage was operated at 195 o C for 20 min, in ethanol in water mixtures of ethanol = 50% and resulted in nearly w glucose = 100% glucose recovery yield, w xylose = 90% xylose and w lignin = 61% lignin removal. After enzymatic hydrolysis, glucose yield was up to w glucose = 95%, compared to 61% yield from untreated almond. Images obtained via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) highlighted the differences in almond structure from the varying pretreatment methods during biomass fractionation. -- Highlights: → Almond shells are an under-utilized agriculture byproduct available in the world. → Almond shells are particularly attractive as bioenergy feedstock. → We have developed a new fractionation process for the almond shell. → The new process combined the HWP with OWEP. → The fractionation process has potential in the utilization of almond shell.

  13. Factors affecting the yield of bio-oil from the pyrolysis of coconut shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yun; Yang, Yi; Qin, Zhanbin; Sun, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Coconut is a high-quality agricultural product of the Asia-Pacific region. In this paper, coconut shell which mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin was used as a raw material for coconut shell oil from coconut shell pyrolysis. The influence of the pyrolysis temperature, heating rate and particle size on coconut oil yield was investigated, and the effect of heating rate on coconut oil components was discussed. Experimental results show that the maximum oil yield of 75.74 wt% (including water) were obtained under the conditions that the final pyrolysis temperature 575 °C, heating rate 20 °C/min, coconut shell diameter about 5 mm. Thermal gravimetric analysis was used and it can be seen that coconut shell pyrolysis process can be divided into three stages: water loss, pyrolysis and pyrocondensation. The main components of coconut-shell oil are water (about 50 wt%), aromatic, phenolic, acid, ketone and ether containing compounds.

  14. Structures of high and low density amorphous ice by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finney, J.L.; Hallbrucker, A.; Kohl, I.; Soper, A.K.; Bowron, D.T.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron diffraction with isotope substitution is used to determine the structures of high (HDA) and low (LDA) density amorphous ice. Both 'phases' are fully hydrogen bonded, tetrahedral networks, with local order similarities between LDA and ice Ih, and HDA and liquid water. Moving from HDA, through liquid water and LDA to ice Ih, the second shell radial order increases at the expense of spatial order. This is linked to a fifth first neighbor 'interstitial' that restricts the orientations of first shell waters. This 'lynch pin' molecule which keeps the HDA structure intact has implications for the nature of the HDA-LDA transition that bear on the current metastable water debate

  15. Dynamic characteristics of a perforated cylindrical shell for flow distribution in SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seungho; Choi, Youngin; Ha, Kyungrok [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyoung-Su, E-mail: pks6348@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, No-Cheol; Park, Young-Pil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Park, Jin-Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-303 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > A 1/12 scaled-down flow skirt is manufactured and a modal test is performed. > A finite element model predicts the added mass effect of the perforated cylindrical shell. > Modal characteristics are extracted by considering the fluid-structure interaction. - Abstract: The System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor (SMART) is a small nuclear reactor under development in Korea. It is equipped with a perforated cylindrical shell, which is called a flow skirt, in the lower plenum of the reactor for uniform flow distribution and to prevent inflow of debris into the core. This perforated cylindrical shell can be excited by external forces such as seismic or pump pulsation loads. The dynamic characteristics of the perforated cylindrical shell must be identified for further dynamic analysis. This research explores the modal analysis of the scaled-down flow skirt model submerged in coolant water. For the numerical simulation, finite element analysis is carried out to extract modal characteristics of the structure considering the fluid-structure interaction and we introduce the NAVMI factor for similarity analysis. In the finite element model, the whole shape of the perforated cylindrical shell is simulated instead of using the effective material properties. In addition, a 1/12 scaled-down flow skirt is manufactured, and an experiment is designed using an exciter and waterproof accelerometers for the modal test. Due to excellent agreement between the modal test results and the finite element analysis results such as natural frequencies and mode shapes, the finite element model is validated and can be used to predict the dynamic characteristics of the real flow skirt. Moreover, the natural frequency of the real flow skirt can be calculated from the NAVMI factor and is in good agreement with the FEM result.

  16. 40 Years of Shell Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    Shell has been using scenario planning for four decades. During that time these scenarios have helped the company and governments across the world to make better strategic choices. Scenarios provide lenses that help see future prospects more clearly, make richer judgments and be more sensitive to uncertainties. Discover how the Shell Scenarios team has helped guide decision makers at major moments in history and get a peek at the team future focus, including the intricate relationship between energy, water and food.

  17. Electronic Structure of Single- and Multiple-shell Carbon Fullerenes

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yeong-Lieh; Nori, Franco

    1993-01-01

    We study the electronic states of giant single-shell and the recently discovered nested multi-shell carbon fullerenes within the tight-binding approximation. We use two different approaches, one based on iterations and the other on symmetry, to obtain the $\\pi$-state energy spectra of large fullerene cages: $C_{240}$, $C_{540}$, $C_{960}$, $C_{1500}$, $C_{2160}$ and $C_{2940}$. Our iteration technique reduces the dimensionality of the problem by more than one order of magnitude (factors of $\\...

  18. Unified description of pf-shell nuclei by the Monte Carlo shell model calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Honma, Michio

    1998-03-01

    The attempts to solve shell model by new methods are briefed. The shell model calculation by quantum Monte Carlo diagonalization which was proposed by the authors is a more practical method, and it became to be known that it can solve the problem with sufficiently good accuracy. As to the treatment of angular momentum, in the method of the authors, deformed Slater determinant is used as the basis, therefore, for making angular momentum into the peculiar state, projected operator is used. The space determined dynamically is treated mainly stochastically, and the energy of the multibody by the basis formed as the result is evaluated and selectively adopted. The symmetry is discussed, and the method of decomposing shell model space into dynamically determined space and the product of spin and isospin spaces was devised. The calculation processes are shown with the example of {sup 50}Mn nuclei. The calculation of the level structure of {sup 48}Cr with known exact energy can be done with the accuracy of peculiar absolute energy value within 200 keV. {sup 56}Ni nuclei are the self-conjugate nuclei of Z=N=28. The results of the shell model calculation of {sup 56}Ni nucleus structure by using the interactions of nuclear models are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Fluid structure interaction studies on acoustic load response of light water nuclear reactor core internals under blowdown condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses Lemuel Raj, G.; Singh, R.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    1998-12-01

    Acoustic load evaluation within two phase medium and the related fluid-structure interaction analysis in case of Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) for light water reactor systems is an important inter-disciplinary area. The present work highlights the development of a three-dimensional finite element code FLUSHEL to analyse LOCA induced depressurization problems for Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) core barrel and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shroud. With good comparison obtained between prediction made by the present code and the experimental results of HDR-PWR test problem, coupled fluid-structure interaction analysis of core shroud of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) is presented for recirculation line break. It is shown that the acoustic load induced stresses in the core shroud are small and downcomer acoustic cavity modes are decoupled with the shell multi-lobe modes. Thus the structural integrity of TAPS core shroud for recirculation line break induced acoustic load is demonstrated. (author)

  20. Isogeometric shell formulation based on a classical shell model

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti; Collier, Nathan; Dalcí n, Lisandro D.; Ghommem, Mehdi; Calo, Victor M.

    2012-01-01

    The authors future work is concerned with building an isogeometric finite element method for modelling nonlinear structural response of thin-walled shells undergoing large rigid-body motions. The aim is to use the model in a aeroelastic framework for the simulation of flapping wings.

  1. Rheological properties of magnetorheological suspensions based on core–shell structured polyaniline-coated carbonyl iron particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlačík, M.; Pavlínek, V.; Sáha, P.; Švrčinová, Petra; Filip, Petr; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 11 (2010), s. 115008 ISSN 0964-1726 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : magnetorheology * core - shell structure * polyaniline Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.094, year: 2010

  2. Stability of bubble nuclei through Shell-Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Dietrich, Klaus; Pomorski, Krzysztof

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the shell structure of bubble nuclei in simple phenomenological shell models and study their binding energy as a function of the radii and of the number of neutron and protons using Strutinsky's method. Shell effects come about, on the one hand, by the high degeneracy of levels with large angular momentum and, on the other, by the big energy gaps between states with a different number of radial nodes. Shell energies down to -40 MeV are shown to occur for certain magic nuclei. E...

  3. Structures in the K-shell delta electron spectrum near threshold for ionization by fast charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amundsen, P.A.; Aashamar, K.

    Results of calculations of the delta electron spectrum for K-shell ionization of atoms by fast charged particles for target charges in the range 6 2 <=40 are presented. Appreciable structure is found in the spectrum near the ionization threshold, in particular for fast projectiles and heavy target elements. The structure can be quite sensitive to the details of the effective atomic potentials. (Auth.)

  4. Structural Control of InP/ZnS Core/Shell Quantum Dots Enables High-quality White LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh Kumar, Baskaran; Sadeghi, Sadra; Melikov, Rustamzhon; Mohammadi Aria, Mohammed; Bahmani Jalali, Houman; Ow-Yang, Cleva; Nizamoglu, Sedat

    2018-05-30

    Herein, we demonstrate that the structural and optical control of InP-based quantum dots can lead to high-performance LEDs. Zinc sulphide (ZnS) shells passivate the InP quantum dot core and increase the quantum yield in green-emitting quantum dots by 13-fold and red-emitting quantum dots by 8-fold. The optimised quantum dots are integrated in the liquid-state to eliminate aggregation induced emission quenching and we fabricated white LEDs with warm, neutral, and cool white appearance by the down-conversion mechanism. The quantum dot-functionalized white LEDs achieve luminous efficiency up to 14.7 lm/W and colour-rendering index up to 80. The structural and optical control of InP/ZnS core/shell quantum dots enable 23-fold enhancement in luminous efficiency of white LEDs compared to ones containing only QDs of InP core. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  5. Electrospun pH-sensitive core-shell polymer nanocomposites fabricated using a tri-axial process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Yu, Deng-Guang; Pan, Deng; Liu, Xin-Kuan; Wang, Xia; Bligh, S W Annie; Williams, Gareth R

    2016-04-15

    A modified tri-axial electrospinning process was developed for the generation of a new type of pH-sensitive polymer/lipid nanocomposite. The systems produced are able to promote both dissolution and permeation of a model poorly water-soluble drug. First, we show that it is possible to run a tri-axial process with only one of the three fluids being electrospinnable. Using an electrospinnable middle fluid of Eudragit S100 (ES100) with pure ethanol as the outer solvent and an unspinnable lecithin-diclofenac sodium (PL-DS) core solution, nanofibers with linear morphology and clear core/shell structures can be fabricated continuously and smoothly. X-ray diffraction proved that these nanofibers are structural nanocomposites with the drug present in an amorphous state. In vitro dissolution tests demonstrated that the formulations could preclude release in acidic conditions, and that the drug was released from the fibers in two successive steps at neutral pH. The first step is the dissolution of the shell ES100 and the conversion of the core PL-DS into sub-micron sized particles. This frees some DS into solution, and later the remaining DS is gradually released from the PL-DS particles through diffusion. Ex vivo permeation results showed that the composite nanofibers give a more than twofold uplift in the amount of DS passing through the colonic membrane as compared to pure DS; 74% of the transmitted drug was in the form of PL-DS particles. The new tri-axial electrospinning process developed in this work provides a platform to fabricate structural nanomaterials, and the core-shell polymer-PL nanocomposites we have produced have significant potential applications for oral colon-targeted drug delivery. A modified tri-axial electrospinning is demonstrated to create a new type of core-shell pH-sensitive polymer/lipid nanocomposites, in which an electrospinnable middle fluid is exploited to support the un-spinnable outer and inner fluids. The structural nanocomposites are able

  6. Coupled fluid-structure method for pressure suppression analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMaster, W.H.; Norris, D.M. Jr.; Goudreau, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    We have coupled an incompressible Eulerian hydrodynamic algorithm to a Lagrangian finite-element shell algorithm for the analysis of pressure suppression in boiling water reactors. The computer program calculates loads and structural response from air and steam blowdown and the oscillating condensation of steam bubbles in a water pool. The fluid, structure, and coupling algorithms have been verified by the calculation of solved problems from the literature and from air and steam blowdown experiments. The foundation of the program is the semi-implicit, two-dimensional SOLA algorithm. The shell structure algorithm uses conventional thin-shell theory with transverse shear. The finite-element spatial discretization employs piecewise-linear interpolation functions and one-point quadrature applied to conical frustra. We use the Newmark implicit time-integration method implemented as a one-step module. The algorithms are strongly coupled in the iteration loop using the iterated pressure in the fluid to drive the structure. The coupling algorithm requires normal velocity compatibility at the fluid-structure interface and incompressibility of the computational Eulerian zone overlaid by the structure. This is accomplished by iterating on the pressure field which is applied to the structure during each iteration until both conditions are satisfied

  7. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  8. On the absence of an α-nucleus structure in a two-centre shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Sharma, M.K.; Antonenko, N.V.; Scheid, W.

    1999-01-01

    The two-centre shell model, used within the Strutinsky macro-microscopic method, is a valid prescription for calculating adiabatic or diabatic potential energy surfaces. It is shown, however, that this model does not contain the appropriate α-nucleus structure effects, very much required for collisions between light nuclei. A possible way to incorporate such effects is suggested. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  9. Experimental approach towards shell structure at 100Sn and 78Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grawe, H.; Gorska, M.; Fahlander, C.

    2000-07-01

    The status of experimental approach to 100 Sn and 78 Ni is reviewed. Revised single particle energies for neutrons are deduced for the N=Z=50 shell closure and evidence for low lying I π =2 + and 3 - states is presented. Moderate E2 polarisation charges of 0.1 e and 0.6 e are found to reproduce the experimental data when core excitation of 100 Sn is properly accounted for in the shell model. For the neutron rich Ni region no conclusive evidence for a N=40 subshell is found, whereas firm evidence for the persistence of the N=50 shell at 78 Ni is inferred from the existence of seniority isomers. The disappearance of this isomerism in the mid νg 9/2 shell is discussed. (orig.)

  10. Characterization of Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) shells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, Diego; Heeres, H. J.; Broekhuis, Antonius A.

    The characterization of Physic nut shells was done using the wet chemical analysis of wood components. The obtained fractions were analyzed using IR, NMR, GPC, ICP and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. TGA was used to determine the fixed carbon (+ash) and water content of the shells. The results of wet

  11. Evaluation of sanitizers for inactivating Salmonella on in-shell pecans and pecan nutmeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchat, Larry R; Mann, David A; Alali, Walid Q

    2012-11-01

    Chlorine, organic acids, and water extracts of inedible pecan components were tested for effectiveness in killing Salmonella on pecans. In-shell pecans and nutmeats (U.S. Department of Agriculture medium pieces) were immersion inoculated with a mixture of five Salmonella serotypes, dried to 3.7% moisture, and stored at 4°C for 3 to 6 weeks. In-shell nuts were immersed in chlorinated water (200, 400, and 1,000 μg/ml), lactic acid (0.5, 1, and 2%), and levulinic acid (0.5, 1, and 2%) with and without 0.05% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and a mixed peroxyacid sanitizer (Tsunami 200, 40 μg/ml) for up to 20 min at 21°C. The rate of reduction of free chlorine in conditioning water decreased as the ratio of in-shell nuts/water was increased. The rate of reduction was more rapid when nuts were not precleaned before treatment. The initial population of Salmonella on in-shell nuts (5.9 to 6.3 log CFU/g) was reduced by 2.8 log CFU/g after treating with chlorinated water (1,000 μg/ml). Treatment with 2% lactic acid plus SDS or 2% levulinic acid plus SDS reduced the pathogen by 3.7 and 3.4 log CFU/g, respectively. Lactic and levulinic acids (2%) without SDS were less effective (3.3- and 2.1-log CFU/g reductions, respectively) than acids with SDS. Treatment with Tsunami 200 resulted in a 2.4-log CFU/g reduction. In-shell nuts and nutmeats were immersed in water extracts of ground pecan shucks (hulls), shells, a mixture of shells and pith, and pith. The general order of lethality of extracts to Salmonella was shuck pecans before conditioning in chlorinated water and the need for sanitizers with increased effectiveness in killing Salmonella on pecans.

  12. Seniority structure of the cranked shell model wave function and the pairing phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.S.; Zeng, J.Y.; Center of Theoretical Physics, China Center of Advanced Science and Technology

    1989-01-01

    The accurate solutions to the low-lying eigenstates of the cranked shell model Hamiltonian are obtained by the particle-number-conserving treatment, in which a many-particle configuration truncation is adopted instead of the conventional single-particle level truncation. The variation of the seniority structures of low-lying eigenstates with rotational frequency ω is analyzed. The gap parameter of the yrast band decreases with ω very slowly, though the seniority structure has undergone a great change. It is suggested to use the seniority structure to indicate the possible pairing phase transition from a superconducting state to a normal state. The important blocking effects on the low-lying eigenstates are discussed

  13. Large-scale micromagnetic simulation of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets with Dy-rich shell structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Oikawa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale micromagnetic simulations have been performed using the energy minimization method on a model with structural features similar to those of Dy grain boundary diffusion (GBD-processed sintered magnets. Coercivity increases as a linear function of the anisotropy field of the Dy-rich shell, which is independent of Dy composition in the core as long as the shell thickness is greater than about 15 nm. This result shows that the Dy contained in the initial sintered magnets prior to the GBD process is not essential for enhancing coercivity. Magnetization reversal patterns indicate that coercivity is strongly influenced by domain wall pinning at the grain boundary. This observation is found to be consistent with the one-dimensional pinning theory.

  14. Extended fine structure in the K-shell photoionization spectrum of Br2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dill, D.; Dehmer, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    The multiple-scattering approach to molecular wavefunctions in the electronic continuum has been used recently to elucidate the structure of the shape resonance just above threshold in the K-shell photoionization spectrum of N 2 . A similar calculation for Br 2 has yielded significantly different results, i.e., there is no shape resonance; appearing instead is a single resonance in the discrete spectrum, and the photoionization spectrum is found to oscillate with appreciable amplitude throughout the spectral range investigated, from threshold to 60 Ry

  15. Nuclear structure in the vicinity of shell closures far from stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grawe, H.; Gorska, M.; Doering, J.

    2000-09-01

    The status of experimental approach to 100 Sn and 78 Ni is reviewed. Revised single particle energies for neutrons are deduced for the N=Z=50 shell closure and evidence for low lying I π =2 + and 3 - states is presented. Moderate E2 polarization charges of 0.1 e and 0.6 e are found to reproduce the experimental data when core excitation of 100 Sn is properly accounted for in the shell model. For the neutron rich Ni region no conclusive evidence for an N=40 subshell is found, whereas firm evidence for the persistence of the N=50 shell at 78 Ni is inferred from the existence of seniority isomers. The disappearance of this isomerism in the mid νg 9/2 shell is discussed. The spectroscopy of 216 Th disproves the existence of a Z=92 shell gap as predicted by some recent mean field calculations. Inversion of the πh 9/2 and f 7/2 orbitals at Z=90 is ascribed to the coupling of the f 7/2 (and i 13/2 ) protons to the low-lying 3 - state (ℎω 3 =1.69 MeV). (orig.)

  16. Biomineral repair of abalone shell apertures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Maggie; Guo, Dujiao; Chung, Peter; Kamenos, Nicholas A

    2013-08-01

    The shell of the gastropod mollusc, abalone, is comprised of nacre with an outer prismatic layer that is composed of either calcite or aragonite or both, depending on the species. A striking characteristic of the abalone shell is the row of apertures along the dorsal margin. As the organism and shell grow, new apertures are formed and the preceding ones are filled in. Detailed investigations, using electron backscatter diffraction, of the infill in three species of abalone: Haliotis asinina, Haliotis gigantea and Haliotis rufescens reveals that, like the shell, the infill is composed mainly of nacre with an outer prismatic layer. The infill prismatic layer has identical mineralogy as the original shell prismatic layer. In H. asinina and H. gigantea, the prismatic layer of the shell and infill are made of aragonite while in H. rufescens both are composed of calcite. Abalone builds the infill material with the same high level of biological control, replicating the structure, mineralogy and crystallographic orientation as for the shell. The infill of abalone apertures presents us with insight into what is, effectively, shell repair. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adsorption process of fluoride from drinking water with magnetic core-shell Ce-Ti@Fe3O4 and Ce-Ti oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo Markeb, Ahmad; Alonso, Amanda; Sánchez, Antoni; Font, Xavier

    2017-11-15

    Synthesized magnetic core-shell Ce-Ti@Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were tested, as an adsorbent, for fluoride removal and the adsorption studies were optimized. Adsorption capacity was compared with the synthesized Ce-Ti oxide nanoparticles. The adsorption equilibrium for the Ce-Ti@Fe 3 O 4 adsorbent was found to occur in cycles of adsorption-desorption. Although the nanoparticles suffer slight structure modifications after their reusability, they keep their adsorption capacity. Likewise, the efficiency of the Ce-Ti@Fe 3 O 4 was demonstrated when applied to real water to obtain a residual concentration of F - below the maximum contaminated level, 1.5mg/L (WHO, 2006). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pasteurization of shell eggs using radio frequency heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA-FSIS estimates that pasteurization of all shell eggs in the U.S. would reduce the annual number of illnesses by more than 110,000, yet less than 1% of shell eggs are commercially pasteurized. One of the main reasons for this is that the current process, hot water immersion, requires approxi...

  19. Synthesis, characterization and nitrite ion sensing performance of reclaimable composite samples through a core-shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiao; Yuqing, Zhao; Cui, Jiantao; Zheng, Qian; Bo, Wang

    2018-02-01

    The following paper reported and discussed a nitrite ion optical sensing platform based on a core-shell structure, using superamagnetic nanoparticles as the core, a silica molecular sieve MCM-41 as the shell and two rhodamine derivatives as probe, respectively. This superamagnetic core made this sensing platform reclaimable after finishing nitrite ion sensing procedure. This sensing platform was carefully characterized by means of electron microscopy images, porous structure analysis, magnetic response, IR spectra and thermal stability analysis. Detailed analysis suggested that the emission of these composite samples was quenchable by nitrite ion, showing emission turn off effect. A static sensing mechanism based on an additive reaction between chemosensors and nitrite ion was proposed. These composite samples followed Demas quenching equation against different nitrite ion concentrations. Limit of detection value was obtained as low as 0.4 μM. It was found that, after being quenched by nitrite ion, these composite samples could be reclaimed and recovered by sulphamic acid, confirming their recyclability.

  20. High performance and durability of order-structured cathode catalyst layer based on TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Meng; Yang, Zhaoyi [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 College Road, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 College Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Xindong, E-mail: echem@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 College Road, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 College Road, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays were prepared and applied as catalyst support. • As-prepared Pt-TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays were applied as order-structured cathode catalyst layer. • The novel cathode catalyst structure without Nafion{sup ®} ionomer enhance the performance and durability of PEMFC. - Abstract: In this paper, an order-structured cathode catalyst layer consisting of Pt-TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays that in situ grown on commercial gas diffusion layer (GDL) are prepared and applied to membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In order to prepare the TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays with suitable porosity and prominent conductivity, the morphologies of the TiO{sub 2} nanoarray and electrochemical polymerization process of aniline are schematically investigated. The MEA with order-structured cathode catalyst layer is assembled in the single cell to evaluate the electrochemical performance and durability of PEMFC. As a result, the PEMFC with order-structured cathode catalyst layer shows higher peak power density (773.54 mW cm{sup −2}) than conventional PEMFC (699.30 mW cm{sup −2}). Electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) and charge transfer impedance (R{sub ct}) are measured before and after accelerated degradation test (ADT), and the corresponding experimental results indicate the novel cathode structure exhibits a better stability with respect to conventional cathode. The enhanced electrochemical performance and durability toward PEMFC can be ascribed to the order-structured cathode nanoarray structure with high specific surface area increases the utilization of catalyst and reduces the tortuosity of transport pathways, and the synergistic effect between TiO{sub 2}@PANI support and Pt nanoparticles promotes the high efficiency of electrochemical reaction and improves the stability of catalyst. This research provides a facile and

  1. Fast and low-cost synthesis of 1D ZnO–TiO{sub 2} core–shell nanoarrays: Characterization and enhanced photo-electrochemical performance for water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, Simelys, E-mail: simelys.hernandez@iit.it [Center for Space Human Robotics (IIT-POLITO), Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129 Torino (Italy); Cauda, Valentina; Hidalgo, Diana; Farías Rivera, Vivian; Manfredi, Diego; Chiodoni, Angelica [Center for Space Human Robotics (IIT-POLITO), Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129 Torino (Italy); Pirri, Fabrizio C. [Center for Space Human Robotics (IIT-POLITO), Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129 Torino (Italy); Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Simple, fast and low-cost synthesis of 1-D ZnO–TiO{sub 2} core–shell heterostructures. • ZnO NWs completely covered with a shell of anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals in only 3 min. • The TiO{sub 2} shell thickness depends on the impregnation time in the titania synthesis bath. • 2-fold enhancement of photo-electrochemical activity and better stability of ZnONWs. • Forty- times higher photocurrent densities than TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles film. - Abstract: We report on a simple, fast and low-cost synthesis procedure for the complete covering of zinc oxide (ZnO) 1D nanostructures with a protective shell of titania (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles. ZnO nanowires (NWs) were grown on transparent F-doped Tin Oxide (FTO) conductive layer on glass by seed layer-assisted hydrothermal route in aqueous media, while the titania shell was deposited on the ZnO NWs through an in situ non-acid sol–gel synthesis. The nanowires impregnation time in the titania sol was varied from 3 to 10 min. The resulting core–shell ZnO–TiO{sub 2} structures were characterized by different techniques, including Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction and UV–Vis spectroscopy, confirming the uniform coverage of the wurzite ZnO NWs with anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs), with a shell thickness dependent on the impregnation time in the titania synthesis bath. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) tests of the ZnO–TiO{sub 2} material, used as anode for the water splitting reaction, confirmed the formation of the heterojunction by the enhanced photocurrent densities, reaching values of about 0.7 mA/cm{sup 2} under simulated solar light (AM1.5G, 100mW/cm{sup 2}). The core–shell photo-anodes performance was about twice and forty- times better than the ones with a film of equivalent thickness of bare ZnO NWs and TiO{sub 2} NPs, respectively. Steady-state measures of the photocurrent over the time and FESEM analysis confirmed that this procedure could be

  2. Interface Fracture in Adhesively Bonded Shell Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2008-01-01

    Two methods for the prediction of crack propagation through the interface of adhesively bonded shells are discussed. One is based on a fracture mechanics approach; the other is based on a cohesive zone approach. Attention is focussed on predicting the shape of the crack front and the critical...

  3. Determination of iodate in iodized salt and water samples by shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Kaige; Liang, Lizhen; Huang, Meiying; Hu, Yuling; Li, Gongke

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a simple, rapid, and sensitive method for the determination of iodate in iodized salt and water samples. The method is making use of shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) and is based on the oxidation of hydroxylammonium chloride by iodate to produce nitrite which then is used to diazotize with p-nitroaniline. The resulting diazonium ion is then coupled to N-(1-naphthyl) ethylenediamine dihydrochloride to form an azo dye whose concentration is determined by SHINERS. The active substrate used in SHINERS is composed of gold nanoparticles coated with an ultrathin silica shell possessing pinholes on their surface. Various factors that influence the chemical reaction and the intensity of SHINERS were investigated. Under the optimal conditions, the Raman intensity is linearly related to the concentration of iodate in the 7.5–130.0 μg L−1 range, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9920. The limit of detection is 2.0 μg L−1, and the relative standard deviation is 7.5 % (for n = 5) at 1,138 cm−1 without additional sample pre-concentration. The method was successfully applied to the determination of iodate in iodized salt and water samples. The accuracy was assessed through recovery tests and independent analysis by a conventional titrimetric method. (author)

  4. Synthesis of double-shelled sea urchin-like yolk-shell Fe3O4/TiO2/Au microspheres and their catalytic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jie; Tan, Li; Wang, Ge; Yang, Mu

    2015-01-01

    Double-shelled sea urchin-like yolk-shell Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 /Au microspheres were successfully synthesized through loading Au nanoparticles on the Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 support by a in situ reduction of HAuCl 4 with NaBH 4 aqueous solution. These microspheres possess tunable cavity size, adjustable shell layers, high structural stability and large specific surface area. The Au nanoparticles of approximately 5 nm in diameter were loaded both on the TiO 2 nanofibers and inside the cavities of sea urchin-like yolk-shell Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 microspheres. The sea urchin-like structure composed of TiO 2 nanofibers ensure the good distribution of the Au nanoparticles, while the novel double-shelled yolk-shell structure guarantees the high stability of the Au nanoparticles. Furthermore, the Fe 3 O 4 magnetic core facilitates the convenient recovery of the catalyst by applying an external magnetic field. The Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 /Au microspheres display excellent activities and recycling properties in the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP): the rate constant is 1.84 min −1 and turnover frequency is 5457 h −1 . (paper)

  5. Composites Based on Core-Shell Structured HBCuPc@CNTs-Fe3O4 and Polyarylene Ether Nitriles with Excellent Dielectric and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Zejun; Zhong, Jiachun; Liu, Xiaobo

    2017-10-01

    Core-shell structured magnetic carbon nanotubes (CNTs-Fe3O4) coated with hyperbranched copper phthalocyanine (HBCuPc) (HBCuPc@CNTs-Fe3O4) hybrids were prepared by the solvent-thermal method. The results indicated that the HBCuPc molecules were decorated on the surface of CNTs-Fe3O4 through coordination behavior of phthalocyanines, and the CNTs-Fe3O4 core was completely coaxial wrapped by a functional intermediate HBCuPc shell. Then, polymer-based composites with a relatively high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss were fabricated by using core-shell structured HBCuPc@CNTs-Fe3O4 hybrids as fillers and polyarylene ether nitriles (PEN) as the polymer matrix. The cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of composites showed that there is almost no agglomeration and internal delamination. In addition, the rheological analysis reveals that the core-shell structured HBCuPc@CNTs-Fe3O4 hybrids present better dispersion and stronger interface adhesion with the PEN matrix than CNTs-Fe3O4, thus resulting in significant improvement of the mechanical, thermal and dielectric properties of polymer-based composites.

  6. NIF Double Shell outer/inner shell collision experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, E. C.; Loomis, E. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Cardenas, T.; Montgomery, D. S.; Daughton, W. S.; Dodd, E. S.; Desjardins, T.; Renner, D. B.; Palaniyappan, S.; Batha, S. H.; Khan, S. F.; Smalyuk, V.; Ping, Y.; Amendt, P.; Schoff, M.; Hoppe, M.

    2017-10-01

    Double shell capsules are a potential low convergence path to substantial alpha-heating and ignition on NIF, since they are predicted to ignite and burn at relatively low temperatures via volume ignition. Current LANL NIF double shell designs consist of a low-Z ablator, low-density foam cushion, and high-Z inner shell with liquid DT fill. Central to the Double Shell concept is kinetic energy transfer from the outer to inner shell via collision. The collision determines maximum energy available for compression and implosion shape of the fuel. We present results of a NIF shape-transfer study: two experiments comparing shape and trajectory of the outer and inner shells at post-collision times. An outer-shell-only target shot measured the no-impact shell conditions, while an `imaging' double shell shot measured shell conditions with impact. The `imaging' target uses a low-Z inner shell and is designed to perform in similar collision physics space to a high-Z double shell but can be radiographed at 16keV, near the viable 2DConA BL energy limit. Work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  7. Chemical Composition of Apricot Pit Shells and Effect of Hot-Water Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek B. Corbett

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural residues, such as corn stover, wheat straw, and nut shells show promise as feedstocks for lignocellulosic biorefinery due to their relatively high polysaccharide content and low or no nutritional value for human consumption. Apricot pit shells (APS were studied in this work to assess their potential for use in a biorefinery. Hot water extraction (HWE; 160 °C, 2 h, proposed to remove easily accessible hemicelluloses, was performed to evaluate the susceptibility of APS to this mild pretreatment process. The chemical composition of APS before and after HWE (EAPS was analyzed by standard methods and 1H-NMR. A low yield of the remaining HW-extracted APS (~59% indicated that APS are highly susceptible to this pretreatment method. 1H-NMR analysis of EAPS revealed that ~77% of xylan present in raw APS was removed along with ~24% of lignin. The energy of combustion of APS was measured before and after HWE showing a slight increase due to HWE (1.61% increase. Near infrared radiation spectroscopy (NIRS, proposed as a quick non-invasive method of biomass analysis, was performed. NIRS corroborated results of traditional analysis and 1H-NMR. Determination of antioxidizing activity (AOA of APS extracts was also undertaken. AOA of organic APS extracts were shown to be more than 20 times higher than that of a synthetic antioxidizing agent.

  8. Modelling the structure and kinematics of the Firework nebula: The nature of the GK Persei nova shell and its jet-like feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, E.; Redman, M. P.; Boumis, P.; Akras, S.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: The shaping mechanisms of old nova remnants are probes for several important and unexplained processes, such as dust formation and the structure of evolved star nebulae. To gain a more complete understanding of the dynamics of the GK Per (1901) remnant, an examination of symmetry of the nova shell is explored, followed by a kinematical analysis of the previously detected jet-like feature in the context of the surrounding fossil planetary nebula. Methods: Faint-object high-resolution echelle spectroscopic observations and imaging were undertaken covering the knots which comprise the nova shell and the surrounding nebulosity. New imaging from the Aristarchos telescope in Greece and long-slit spectra from the Manchester Echelle Spectrometer instrument at the San Pedro Mártir observatory in Mexico were obtained, supplemented with archival observations from several other optical telescopes. Position-velocity arrays are produced of the shell, and also individual knots, and are then used for morpho-kinematic modelling with the shape code. The overall structure of the old knotty nova shell of GK Per and the planetary nebula in which it is embedded is then analysed. Results: Evidence is found for the interaction of knots with each other and with a wind component, most likely the periodic fast wind emanating from the central binary system. We find that a cylindrical shell with a lower velocity polar structure gives the best model fit to the spectroscopy and imaging. We show in this work that the previously seen jet-like feature is of low velocity. Conclusions: The individual knots have irregular tail shapes; we propose here that they emanate from episodic winds from ongoing dwarf nova outbursts by the central system. The nova shell is cylindrical, not spherical, and the symmetry axis relates to the inclination of the central binary system. Furthermore, the cylinder axis is aligned with the long axis of the bipolar planetary nebula in which it is embedded. Thus, the

  9. Synthesis of low density foam shells for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattaud, Cecile

    2011-01-01

    This work deals with the fabrication process of low density foam shells and the sharp control of their shape (diameter, thickness, density, sphericity, non-concentricity). During this PhD we focused on the non-concentricity criterion which has to be lower than 1%. The shells are synthesized using a microencapsulation process leading to a double emulsion and followed by a thermal polymerization at 60 C. According to the literature, three major parameters, the density of the three phases, the deformations of the shells along the process and the kinetics of the polymerization have a direct influence on the shells non-concentricity. The results obtained showed that when the density gap between the internal water phase and the organic phase increases, the TMPTMA shells non-concentricity improves. A density gap of 0.078 g.cm -3 at 60 C, leads to an average non-concentricity of 2.4% with a yield of shells of 58%. It was also shown that the synthesis process can be considered as reproducible. While using the same internal water phase, equivalent non-concentricity results are obtained using either a straight tube, a tube with areas of constriction or a short wound tube. The time required to fix the shell's shape is at least 20 minutes with thermal polymerization. So, it seems that the time spent by the shells inside the rotating flask allows the centering of the internal water phase inside the organic phase, whatever the circulation process used. In order to get higher polymerization rates and to avoid destabilization phenomena, we then focused our study on photo polymerization. When the synthesis is performed using a UV lamp with an efficient light intensity, the shells have a slightly higher thickness than the shells synthesized by thermal polymerization. Moreover, a really higher yield, around 80%, is achieved with UV polymerization. However, the average non-concentricity of the shells synthesized lays around 20%, which is really high compared to the 2.4% average

  10. Vibration test of spherical shell structure and replacing method into mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayanagi, M.; Suzuki, S.; Okamura, T.; Haas, E.E.; Krutzik, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    To verify the beam-type and oval-type vibratory characteristics of a spherical shell structure, two test specimens were made and vibration tests were carried out. Results of these tests are compared with results of detailed analyses using 3-D FEM and 2-D axisymmetric FEM models. The analytical results of overall vibratory characteristics are in good agreement with the test results, has been found that the effect of the attached mass should be considered in evaluating local vibration. The replacing method into equivalent beam model is proposed

  11. Compressibility of the protein-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2018-06-01

    The compressibility of a protein relates to its stability, flexibility, and hydrophobic interactions, but the measurement, interpretation, and computation of this important thermodynamic parameter present technical and conceptual challenges. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of protein compressibility and apply it to molecular dynamics simulations of four globular proteins. Using additively weighted Voronoi tessellation, we decompose the solution compressibility into contributions from the protein and its hydration shells. We find that positively cross-correlated protein-water volume fluctuations account for more than half of the protein compressibility that governs the protein's pressure response, while the self correlations correspond to small (˜0.7%) fluctuations of the protein volume. The self compressibility is nearly the same as for ice, whereas the total protein compressibility, including cross correlations, is ˜45% of the bulk-water value. Taking the inhomogeneous solvent density into account, we decompose the experimentally accessible protein partial compressibility into intrinsic, hydration, and molecular exchange contributions and show how they can be computed with good statistical accuracy despite the dominant bulk-water contribution. The exchange contribution describes how the protein solution responds to an applied pressure by redistributing water molecules from lower to higher density; it is negligibly small for native proteins, but potentially important for non-native states. Because the hydration shell is an open system, the conventional closed-system compressibility definitions yield a pseudo-compressibility. We define an intrinsic shell compressibility, unaffected by occupation number fluctuations, and show that it approaches the bulk-water value exponentially with a decay "length" of one shell, less than the bulk-water compressibility correlation length. In the first hydration shell, the intrinsic compressibility is 25%-30% lower than in

  12. Compressibility of the protein-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2018-06-07

    The compressibility of a protein relates to its stability, flexibility, and hydrophobic interactions, but the measurement, interpretation, and computation of this important thermodynamic parameter present technical and conceptual challenges. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of protein compressibility and apply it to molecular dynamics simulations of four globular proteins. Using additively weighted Voronoi tessellation, we decompose the solution compressibility into contributions from the protein and its hydration shells. We find that positively cross-correlated protein-water volume fluctuations account for more than half of the protein compressibility that governs the protein's pressure response, while the self correlations correspond to small (∼0.7%) fluctuations of the protein volume. The self compressibility is nearly the same as for ice, whereas the total protein compressibility, including cross correlations, is ∼45% of the bulk-water value. Taking the inhomogeneous solvent density into account, we decompose the experimentally accessible protein partial compressibility into intrinsic, hydration, and molecular exchange contributions and show how they can be computed with good statistical accuracy despite the dominant bulk-water contribution. The exchange contribution describes how the protein solution responds to an applied pressure by redistributing water molecules from lower to higher density; it is negligibly small for native proteins, but potentially important for non-native states. Because the hydration shell is an open system, the conventional closed-system compressibility definitions yield a pseudo-compressibility. We define an intrinsic shell compressibility, unaffected by occupation number fluctuations, and show that it approaches the bulk-water value exponentially with a decay "length" of one shell, less than the bulk-water compressibility correlation length. In the first hydration shell, the intrinsic compressibility is 25%-30% lower than

  13. Investigation of CuInSe2 nanowire arrays with core–shell structure electrodeposited at various duty cycles into anodic alumina templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Yu-Song; Wang, Na-Fu; Tsai, Yu-Zen; Lin, Jia-Jun; Houng, Mau-Phon

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The present paper reports that CuInSe2 NW arrays were fabricated through pulsed electrode position onto an AAO template with various duty cycles, and a pore-filling ratio of approximately 92% was achieved. • GIXRD patterns showed that all CuInSe2 NW arrays were chalcopyrite and SAED images confirmed that the CuInSe2 NWs were polycrystalline. • PEDOT/CuInSe2 NW core–shell arrays were fabricated using surfactant-modified CuInSe2 NW surfaces showing the lotus effect. • Current–voltage plots revealed that the CuInSe2 NW arrays were p-type semiconductors; moreover, the core–shell structure improved the diode ideality factor from 3.91 to 2.63. - Abstract: Copper indium selenide (CuInSe 2 ) nanowire (NW) arrays were prepared at various electrolyte duty cycles by filling anodic alumina templates through the pulsed electrodeposition technique. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the nucleation mechanism of CuInSe 2 NW arrays was affected by the electrodeposition duty cycle. Moreover, SEM images showed that the diameter and length of the NWs were 80 nm and 2 μm, respectively. Furthermore, PEDOT/CuInSe 2 NW core–shell arrays were fabricated using surfactant-modified CuInSe 2 NW surfaces showing the lotus effect. Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that a core–shell structure was achieved. Current–voltage plots revealed that the CuInSe 2 NW arrays were p-type semiconductors; moreover, the core–shell structure improved the diode ideality factor from 3.91 to 2.63.

  14. Mechanical properties of crossed-lamellar structures in biological shells: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X W; Ji, H M; Yang, W; Zhang, G P; Chen, D L

    2017-10-01

    The self-fabrication of materials in nature offers an alternate and powerful solution towards the grand challenge of designing advanced structural materials, where strength and toughness are always mutually exclusive. Crossed-lamellar structures are the most common microstructures in mollusks that are composed of aragonites and a small amount of organic materials. Such a distinctive composite structure has a fracture toughness being much higher than that of pure carbonate mineral. These structures exhibiting complex hierarchical microarchitectures that span several sub-level lamellae from microscale down to nanoscale, can be grouped into two types, i.e., platelet-like and fiber-like crossed-lamellar structures based on the shapes of basic building blocks. It has been demonstrated that these structures have a great potential to strengthen themselves during deformation. The observed underlying toughening mechanisms include microcracking, channel cracking, interlocking, uncracked-ligament bridging, aragonite fiber bridging, crack deflection and zig-zag, etc., which play vital roles in enhancing the fracture resistance of shells with the crossed-lamellar structures. The exploration and utilization of these important toughening mechanisms have attracted keen interests of materials scientists since they pave the way for the development of bio-inspired advanced composite materials for load-bearing structural applications. This article is aimed to review the characteristics of hierarchical structures and the mechanical properties of two kinds of crossed-lamellar structures, and further summarize the latest advances and biomimetic applications based on the unique crossed-lamellar structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a toroidal shell-type shock absorber for an irradiated fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Y.; Mochizuki, S.

    1983-01-01

    This study described the design method of a toroidal shell-type shock absorber and the dynamic responses of the cask body, the internal structure and water when this shock absorber was used. Conclusions are: the calculated results on the basis of the master curves of non-dimensionalized force-deflection relations by static compression tests show a close agreement with the experimental results; the internal structure moves together with the cask body in every position; and the maximum water pressure is larger by a factor of 1.2 than the static pressure multiplied by the maximum deceleration in every direction due to the low-frequency wave propagation

  16. Investigation of CuInSe2 nanowire arrays with core-shell structure electrodeposited at various duty cycles into anodic alumina templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Song; Wang, Na-Fu; Tsai, Yu-Zen; Lin, Jia-Jun; Houng, Mau-Phon

    2017-02-01

    Copper indium selenide (CuInSe2) nanowire (NW) arrays were prepared at various electrolyte duty cycles by filling anodic alumina templates through the pulsed electrodeposition technique. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the nucleation mechanism of CuInSe2 NW arrays was affected by the electrodeposition duty cycle. Moreover, SEM images showed that the diameter and length of the NWs were 80 nm and 2 μm, respectively. Furthermore, PEDOT/CuInSe2 NW core-shell arrays were fabricated using surfactant-modified CuInSe2 NW surfaces showing the lotus effect. Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that a core-shell structure was achieved. Current-voltage plots revealed that the CuInSe2 NW arrays were p-type semiconductors; moreover, the core-shell structure improved the diode ideality factor from 3.91 to 2.63.

  17. Hydrogen bond dynamics and water structure in glucose-water solutions by depolarized Rayleigh scattering and low-frequency Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolantoni, Marco; Sassi, Paola; Morresi, Assunta; Santini, Sergio

    2007-07-01

    The effect of glucose on the relaxation process of water at picosecond time scales has been investigated by depolarized Rayleigh scattering (DRS) experiments. The process is assigned to the fast hydrogen bonding dynamics of the water network. In DRS spectra this contribution can be safely separated from the slower relaxation process due to the sugar. The detected relaxation time is studied at different glucose concentrations and modeled considering bulk and hydrating water contributions. As a result, it is found that in diluted conditions the hydrogen bond lifetime of proximal water molecules becomes about three times slower than that of the bulk. The effect of the sugar on the hydrogen bond water structure is investigated by analyzing the low-frequency Raman (LFR) spectrum sensitive to intermolecular modes. The addition of glucose strongly reduces the intensity of the band at 170cm-1 assigned to a collective stretching mode of water molecules arranged in cooperative tetrahedral domains. These findings indicate that proximal water molecules partially lose the tetrahedral ordering typical of the bulk leading to the formation of high density environments around the sugar. Thus the glucose imposes a new local order among water molecules localized in its hydration shell in which the hydrogen bond breaking dynamics is sensitively retarded. This work provides new experimental evidences that support recent molecular dynamics simulation and thermodynamics results.

  18. Effects of Alloying Elements on the Formation of Core-Shell-Structured Reinforcing Particles during Heating of Al–Ti Powder Compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tijun; Gao, Min; Tong, Yunqi

    2018-01-01

    To prepare core-shell-structured Ti@compound particle (Ti@compoundp) reinforced Al matrix composite via powder thixoforming, the effects of alloying elements, such as Si, Cu, Mg, and Zn, on the reaction between Ti powders and Al melt, and the microstructure of the resulting reinforcements were investigated during heating of powder compacts at 993 K (720 °C). Simultaneously, the situations of the reinforcing particles in the corresponding semisolid compacts were also studied. Both thermodynamic analysis and experiment results all indicate that Si participated in the reaction and promoted the formation of Al–Ti–Si ternary compounds, while Cu, Mg, and Zn did not take part in the reaction and facilitated Al3Ti phase to form to different degrees. The first-formed Al–Ti–Si ternary compound was τ1 phase, and then it gradually transformed into (Al,Si)3Ti phase. The proportion and existing time of τ1 phase all increased as the Si content increased. In contrast, Mg had the largest, Cu had the least, and Si and Zn had an equivalent middle effect on accelerating the reaction. The thicker the reaction shell was, the larger the stress generated in the shell was, and thus the looser the shell microstructure was. The stress generated in (Al,Si)3Ti phase was larger than that in τ1 phase, but smaller than that in Al3Ti phase. So, the shells in the Al–Ti–Si system were more compact than those in the other systems, and Si element was beneficial to obtain thick and compact compound shells. Most of the above results were consistent to those in the semisolid state ones except the product phase constituents in the Al–Ti–Mg system and the reaction rate in the Al–Ti–Zn system. More importantly, the desirable core-shell structured Ti@compoundp was only achieved in the semisolid Al–Ti–Si system. PMID:29342946

  19. Effects of Alloying Elements on the Formation of Core-Shell-Structured Reinforcing Particles during Heating of Al-Ti Powder Compacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tijun; Gao, Min; Tong, Yunqi

    2018-01-15

    To prepare core-shell-structured Ti@compound particle (Ti@compound p ) reinforced Al matrix composite via powder thixoforming, the effects of alloying elements, such as Si, Cu, Mg, and Zn, on the reaction between Ti powders and Al melt, and the microstructure of the resulting reinforcements were investigated during heating of powder compacts at 993 K (720 °C). Simultaneously, the situations of the reinforcing particles in the corresponding semisolid compacts were also studied. Both thermodynamic analysis and experiment results all indicate that Si participated in the reaction and promoted the formation of Al-Ti-Si ternary compounds, while Cu, Mg, and Zn did not take part in the reaction and facilitated Al₃Ti phase to form to different degrees. The first-formed Al-Ti-Si ternary compound was τ1 phase, and then it gradually transformed into (Al,Si)₃Ti phase. The proportion and existing time of τ1 phase all increased as the Si content increased. In contrast, Mg had the largest, Cu had the least, and Si and Zn had an equivalent middle effect on accelerating the reaction. The thicker the reaction shell was, the larger the stress generated in the shell was, and thus the looser the shell microstructure was. The stress generated in (Al,Si)₃Ti phase was larger than that in τ1 phase, but smaller than that in Al₃Ti phase. So, the shells in the Al-Ti-Si system were more compact than those in the other systems, and Si element was beneficial to obtain thick and compact compound shells. Most of the above results were consistent to those in the semisolid state ones except the product phase constituents in the Al-Ti-Mg system and the reaction rate in the Al-Ti-Zn system. More importantly, the desirable core-shell structured Ti@compound p was only achieved in the semisolid Al-Ti-Si system.

  20. Electronic structure and intersubband magnetoabsorption spectra of CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wen

    2016-10-01

    The electronic structures of CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires are calculated based on the effective-mass theory, and it is found that the hole states in CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires are strongly mixed, which are very different from the hole states in CdSe or CdS nanowires. In addition, we find the three highest hole states at the Γ point are almost localized in the CdSe core and the energies of the hole states in CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires can be enhanced greatly when the core radius Rc increases and the total radius R is fixed. The degenerate hole states are split by the magnetic field, and the split energies will increase when |Jh | increases from 1/2 to 7/2, while they are almost not influenced by the change of the core radius Rc. The absorption spectra of CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires at the Γ point are also studied in the magnetic field when the temperature T is considered, and we find there are only two peaks will arise if the core radius Rc and the temperature T increase. The intensity of each optical absorption can be considerably enhanced by increasing the core radius Rc when the temperature T is fixed, it is due to the increase of their optical transition matrix element. Meanwhile, the intensity of each optical absorption can be decreased when the temperature T increases and the core radius Rc is fixed, and this is because the Fermi-Dirac distribution function of the corresponding hole states will increase as the increase of the temperature T.

  1. Pentachlorophenol removal from aqueous matrices by sorption with almond shell residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevinho, B.N.; Ratola, N.; Alves, A.; Santos, L.

    2006-01-01

    Sorption with activated carbon has been the technique preferred for pentachlorophenol (PCP) removal from contaminated waters, but regeneration needs and high operation costs are supporting a renewed interest in the search for alternative sorbents. Among them, almond shell, an agricultural by-product, provides interesting economical advantages, once shells account for 50% (in mass) of the whole almond. In this work, the capacity of almond shells to remove PCP from waters without previous activation was studied in batch conditions. While PCP analysis was performed solid-phase microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-ECD), mercury porosimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) provided a preliminary physical and chemical characterization of the sorbent. Almond shells were essentially a macroporous material, with an average surface area of 12.9 ± 2.8 m 2 /g. The efficiency of PCP removal was 93 ± 14%, in 24 h, with an initial concentration of 100 μg/l PCP and 5 μg PCP/g shell. Isotherm data adjusted better to Freundlich equation, where K F and 1/n were 0.075 ± 0.081 mg 1-1/n l 1/n and 1.882 ± 0.289, respectively. Average desorption efficiency was 7%, indicating strong adsorption capacity. Results proved that almond shells may be an excellent low-cost alternative for PCP removal from contaminated waters

  2. Sub-nanoscale surface ruggedness provides a water-tight seal for exposed regions in soluble protein structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Schulz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Soluble proteins must maintain backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs water-tight to ensure structural integrity. This protection is often achieved by burying the BHBs or wrapping them through intermolecular associations. On the other hand, water has low coordination resilience, with loss of hydrogen-bonding partnerships carrying significant thermodynamic cost. Thus, a core problem in structural biology is whether natural design actually exploits the water coordination stiffness to seal the backbone in regions that are exposed to the solvent. This work explores the molecular design features that make this type of seal operative, focusing on the side-chain arrangements that shield the protein backbone. We show that an efficient sealing is achieved by adapting the sub-nanoscale surface topography to the stringency of water coordination: an exposed BHB may be kept dry if the local concave curvature is small enough to impede formation of the coordination shell of a penetrating water molecule. Examination of an exhaustive database of uncomplexed proteins reveals that exposed BHBs invariably occur within such sub-nanoscale cavities in native folds, while this level of local ruggedness is absent in other regions. By contrast, BHB exposure in misfolded proteins occurs with larger local curvature promoting backbone hydration and consequently, structure disruption. These findings unravel physical constraints fitting a spatially dependent least-action for water coordination, introduce a molecular design concept, and herald the advent of water-tight peptide-based materials with sufficient backbone exposure to remain flexible.

  3. Vibrio cholerae Colonization of Soft-Shelled Turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiazheng; Yan, Meiying; Gao, He; Lu, Xin; Kan, Biao

    2017-07-15

    Vibrio cholerae is an important human pathogen and environmental microflora species that can both propagate in the human intestine and proliferate in zooplankton and aquatic organisms. Cholera is transmitted through food and water. In recent years, outbreaks caused by V. cholerae -contaminated soft-shelled turtles, contaminated mainly with toxigenic serogroup O139, have been frequently reported, posing a new foodborne disease public health problem. In this study, the colonization by toxigenic V. cholerae on the body surfaces and intestines of soft-shelled turtles was explored. Preferred colonization sites on the turtle body surfaces, mainly the carapace and calipash of the dorsal side, were observed for the O139 and O1 strains. Intestinal colonization was also found. The colonization factors of V. cholerae played different roles in the colonization of the soft-shelled turtle's body surface and intestine. Mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) of V. cholerae was necessary for body surface colonization, but no roles were found for toxin-coregulated pili (TCP) or N -acetylglucosamine-binding protein A (GBPA). Both TCP and GBPA play important roles for colonization in the intestine, whereas the deletion of MSHA revealed only a minor colonization-promoting role for this factor. Our study demonstrated that V. cholerae can colonize the surfaces and the intestines of soft-shelled turtles and indicated that the soft-shelled turtles played a role in the transmission of cholera. In addition, this study showed that the soft-shelled turtle has potential value as an animal model in studies of the colonization and environmental adaption mechanisms of V. cholerae in aquatic organisms. IMPORTANCE Cholera is transmitted through water and food. Soft-shelled turtles contaminated with Vibrio cholerae (commonly the serogroup O139 strains) have caused many foodborne infections and outbreaks in recent years, and they have become a foodborne disease problem. Except for epidemiological

  4. Computational mechanics of nonlinear response of shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraetzig, W.B. (Bochum Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Statik und Dynamik); Onate, E. (Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain). Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros de Caminos) (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    Shell structures and their components are utilized in a wide spectrum of engineering fields reaching from space and aircraft structures, pipes and pressure vessels over liquid storage tanks, off-shore installations, cooling towers and domes, to bodyworks of motor vehicles. Of continuously increasing importance is their nonlinear behavior, in which large deformations and large rotations are involved as well as nonlinear material properties. The book starts with a survey about nonlinear shell theories from the rigorous point of view of continuum mechanics, this starting point being unavoidable for modern computational concepts. There follows a series of papers on nonlinear, especially unstable shell responses, which draw computational connections to well established tools in the field of static and dynamic stability of systems. Several papers are then concerned with new finite element derivations for nonlinear shell problems, and finally a series of authors contribute to specific applications opening a small window of the above mentioned wide spectrum. (orig./HP) With 159 figs.

  5. Computational mechanics of nonlinear response of shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraetzig, W.B.; Onate, E.

    1990-01-01

    Shell structures and their components are utilized in a wide spectrum of engineering fields reaching from space and aircraft structures, pipes and pressure vessels over liquid storage tanks, off-shore installations, cooling towers and domes, to bodyworks of motor vehicles. Of continuously increasing importance is their nonlinear behavior, in which large deformations and large rotations are involved as well as nonlinear material properties. The book starts with a survey about nonlinear shell theories from the rigorous point of view of continuum mechanics, this starting point being unavoidable for modern computational concepts. There follows a series of papers on nonlinear, especially unstable shell responses, which draw computational connections to well established tools in the field of static and dynamic stability of systems. Several papers are then concerned with new finite element derivations for nonlinear shell problems, and finally a series of authors contribute to specific applications opening a small window of the above mentioned wide spectrum. (orig./HP) With 159 figs

  6. Fabrication of Ni@Ti core-shell nanoparticles by modified gas aggregation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanuš, J.; Vaidulych, M.; Kylián, O.; Choukourov, A.; Kousal, J.; Khalakhan, I.; Cieslar, M.; Solař, P.; Biederman, H.

    2017-11-01

    Ni@Ti core-shell nanoparticles were prepared by a vacuum based method using the gas aggregation source (GAS) of nanoparticles. Ni nanoparticles fabricated in the GAS were afterwards coated by a Ti shell. The Ti shell was deposited by means of magnetron sputtering. The Ni nanoparticles were decelerated in the vicinity of the magnetron to the Ar drift velocity in the second deposition chamber. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis of the nanoparticles showed the core-shell structure. It was shown that the thickness of the shell can be easily tuned by the process parameters with a maximum achieved thickness of the Ti shell ~2.5 nm. The core-shell structure was confirmed by the STEM analysis of the particles.

  7. Inferring Enceladus' ice shell strength and structure from Tiger Stripe formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoden, A.; Hurford, T., Jr.; Spitale, J.; Henning, W. G.

    2017-12-01

    The tiger stripe fractures (TSFs) of Enceladus are four, roughly parallel, linear fractures that correlate with plume sources and high heat flows measured by Cassini. Diurnal variations of plume eruptions along the TSFs strongly suggest that tides modulate the eruptions. Several attempts have been made to infer Enceladus' ice shell structure, and the mechanical process of plume formation, by matching variations in the plumes' eruptive output with tidal stresses for different interior models. Unfortunately, the many, often degenerate, unknowns make these analyses non-unique. Tidal-interior models that best match the observed plume variability imply very low tidal stresses (<14 kPa), much lower than the 1 MPa tensile strength of ice implied by lab experiments or the 100 kPa threshold inferred for Europa's ice. In addition, the interior models that give the best matches are inconsistent with the constraints from observed librations. To gain more insight into the interior structure and rheology of Enceladus and the role of tidal stress in the development of the south polar terrain, we utilize the orientations of the TSFs themselves as observational constraints on tidal-interior models. While the initial formation of the TSFs has previously been attributed to tidal stress, detailed modeling of their formation has not been performed until now. We compute tidal stresses for a suite of rheologically-layered interior models, consistent with Enceladus' observed librations, and apply a variety of failure conditions. We then compare the measured orientations at 6391 points along the TSFs with the predicted orientations from the tidal models. Ultimately, we compute the likelihood of forming the TSFs with tidal stresses for each model and failure condition. We find that tidal stresses are a good match to the observed orientations of the TSFs and likely led to their formation. We also find that the model with the highest likelihood changes depending on the failure criterion

  8. Theory and design of heat exchanger : shell and tube condenser and reboiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Ui Dong

    1996-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of shell and tube heat exchanger including from, sorts, structure like shell and shell side, channel, and sliding bar, basic design of heat exchanger, flow-induced vibration, shell side condenser, tube side condenser and design of basic structure of condenser by types, selection of reboiler type, kettle type reboiler, internal reboiler, pump through reboiler, design of reboiler like kettle and internal reboiler, and horizontal and vertical thermosyphon reboiler.

  9. Ancient shell industry at Bet Dwarka island

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Patankar, V.

    for the manufacture of beads, bangles, etc. 12 . Shell species found at the sites include T. pyrum (cha nk), Chicoreus ramosus , Fasciolaria trapezium , Cypraea (cowries), Arabica arabica (cowries), Babylonia spirata , dentalium, mussel and Arca... muscles are attached. Average length of a shell can be up to 15 to 20 cm and width 10 ? 15 cm 8 . It provides a unique structure for the manufacture of several bangles from a single shell. The organ ism living inside is also edible...

  10. Magnetic core-shell silica particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claesson, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with magnetic silica core-shell colloids and related functionalized silica structures. Synthesis routes have been developed and optimized. The physical properties of these colloids have been investigated, such as the magnetic dipole moment, dipolar structure formation and

  11. Shell model in large spaces and statistical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kota, V.K.B.

    1996-01-01

    For many nuclear structure problems of current interest it is essential to deal with shell model in large spaces. For this, three different approaches are now in use and two of them are: (i) the conventional shell model diagonalization approach but taking into account new advances in computer technology; (ii) the shell model Monte Carlo method. A brief overview of these two methods is given. Large space shell model studies raise fundamental questions regarding the information content of the shell model spectrum of complex nuclei. This led to the third approach- the statistical spectroscopy methods. The principles of statistical spectroscopy have their basis in nuclear quantum chaos and they are described (which are substantiated by large scale shell model calculations) in some detail. (author)

  12. Improvement of operational properties of shell limestone building materials by polysulfide solution impregnation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MASSALIMOV Ismail Alexandrovich

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The data of studies on the effectiveness of impregnation with polysulfide solutions of shell limestone used as facing and wall material, as well as for the manufacture of road products are presented. Modification of the limestone with the impregnating composition «Akvastat» created by the authors which is sulfur-containing water-based solution of calcium polysulfide containing alcohols and surfactants, can significantly reduce water absorption and increase durability of limestone. Impregnating composition on the basis of calcium polysulfide possesses density of 1.22–1.24 g/cm3, the infiltrant penetrates into the pore structure of limestone to a depth of 4 cm or more, depending on the density and structure of the sample. While the material is drying, sulfur nanoparticles are crystallized from the polysulfide solution in its pores. They partially fill pore space and form protective durable insoluble hydrophobic coating that impedes the penetration of water into the pores of the limestone, but preserves its vapor permeability, which is important for wall and decoration materials. The evaluation of protective coatings was performed with laser particle size analyzer, scanning probe microscope and a diffractometer. It showed that the average size of the particles forming the protective coating is in the range of 20–25 nm, the particles shape is spherical, the particles are elemental sulfur with orthorhombic structure of the crystal lattice. The processing of shell limestone with calcium polysulphide solution provides formation of coating based on nanosized sulfur on the surface of stone pores. The coating partially fills the pore space and, as it is hydrophobic, reduces the water absorption of the samples by a factor of 5–8, increases their average density by 22–27%, strength in 1,2–1,3 times, the softening factor by 6–19%, that makes possible to predict the increase of the durability of building materials based on shell limestone to 1

  13. In situ distribution and characterization of the organic content of the oyster shell Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca, Bivalvia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauphin, Yannicke; Ball, Alexander D; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Chevallard, Corinne; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Farre, Bastien; Pouvreau, Stéphane; Salomé, Murielle

    2013-01-01

    Cultivation of commercial oysters is now facing the possible influence of global change in sea water composition, commonly referred to as "ocean acidification". In order to test the potential consequence of the predicted environmental changes, a cultivation experiment was carried out. The left and right valves of the oyster shell Crassostrea gigas differ in their structure; moreover, lenses of non compact layers are irregular. The shell layers of juvenile C. gigas are studied using a variety of highly spatially resolved techniques to establish their composition and structure. Our results confirm the presence of three different calcitic structural types. The role of the lenses of chalky layers is not yet deciplered. Despite a common mineralogy, the elemental composition of the layers differs. The sulphur aminoacids and sulphated polysaccharide contents of the intracrystalline and intercrystalline matrices differ, as well as those of the structural types. The possible different sensitivity of these structures to environmental changes is still unknown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Curvature-driven morphing of non-Euclidean shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzulla, Matteo; Stoop, Norbert; Jiang, Xin; Holmes, D. P.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate how thin structures change their shape in response to non-mechanical stimuli that can be interpreted as variations in the structure's natural curvature. Starting from the theory of non-Euclidean plates and shells, we derive an effective model that reduces a three-dimensional stimulus to the natural fundamental forms of the mid-surface of the structure, incorporating expansion, or growth, in the thickness. Then, we apply the model to a variety of thin bodies, from flat plates to spherical shells, obtaining excellent agreement between theory and numerics. We show how cylinders and cones can either bend more or unroll, and eventually snap and rotate. We also study the nearly isometric deformations of a spherical shell and describe how this shape change is ruled by the geometry of a spindle. As the derived results stem from a purely geometrical model, they are general and scalable.

  15. Stability analysis of whirling composite shells partially filled with two liquid phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahebnasagh, Mohammad [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikkhah-Bahrami, Mansour; Firouz-Abadi, Roohollah [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Sharif University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    In this paper, the stability of whirling composite cylindrical shells partially filled with two liquid phases is studied. Using the first-order shear shell theory, the structural dynamics of the shell is modeled and based on the Navier-Stokes equations for ideal liquid, a 2D model is developed for liquid motion at each section of the cylinder. In steady state condition, liquids are supposed to locate according to mass density. In this study, the thick shells are investigated. Using boundary conditions between liquids, the model of coupled fluid-structure system is obtained. This coupled fluid-structure model is employed to determine the critical speed of the system. The effects of the main variables on the stability of the shell are studied and the results are investigated.

  16. Hierarchical structure observation and nanoindentation size effect characterization for a limnetic shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jingru; Fan, Cuncai; Ma, Hansong; Wei, Yueguang

    2015-06-01

    In the present research, hierarchical structure observation and mechanical property characterization for a type of biomaterial are carried out. The investigated biomaterial is Hyriopsis cumingii, a typical limnetic shell, which consists of two different structural layers, a prismatic "pillar" structure and a nacreous "brick and mortar" structure. The prismatic layer looks like a "pillar forest" with variation-section pillars sized on the order of several tens of microns. The nacreous material looks like a "brick wall" with bricks sized on the order of several microns. Both pillars and bricks are composed of nanoparticles. The mechanical properties of the hierarchical biomaterial are measured by using the nanoindentation test. Hardness and modulus are measured for both the nacre layer and the prismatic layer, respectively. The nanoindentation size effects for the hierarchical structural materials are investigated experimentally. The results show that the prismatic nanostructured material has a higher stiffness and hardness than the nacre nanostructured material. In addition, the nanoindentation size effects for the hierarchical structural materials are described theoretically, by using the trans-scale mechanics theory considering both strain gradient effect and the surface/interface effect. The modeling results are consistent with experimental ones.

  17. BOWOOSS: bionic optimized wood shells with sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Göran

    2011-04-01

    In architecture, shell construction is used for the most efficient, large spatial structures. Until now the use of wood rather played a marginal role, implementing those examples of architecture, although this material offers manifold advantages, especially against the background of accelerating shortage of resources and increasing requirements concerning the energy balance. Regarding the implementation of shells, nature offers a wide range of suggestions. The focus of the examinations is on the shells of marine plankton, especially of diatoms, whose richness in species promises the discovery of entirely new construction principles. The project is targeting at transferring advantageous features of these organisms on industrial produced, modular wood shell structures. Currently a transfer of these structures in CAD - models is taking place, helping to perform stress analysis by computational methods. Micro as well as macro structures are the subject of diverse consideration, allowing to draw the necessary conclusions for an architectural design. The insights of these tests are the basis for the development of physical models on different scales, which are used to verify the different approaches. Another important aim which is promoted in the project is to enhance the competitiveness of timber construction. Downsizing of the prefabricated structural elements leads to considerable lower transportation costs as abnormal loads can be avoided as far as possible and means of transportation can be loaded with higher efficiency so that an important contribution to the sustainability in the field of architecture can also be made.

  18. The CEASEMT system (Calculation and Analysis of Structures in Mechanics and Thermics). Program TRICO. Analysis of tridimensionnal structures made of shells and beams. Statics - Dynamics - Elasticity - Plasticity - Collapse - Large displacements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Alain; Jeanpierre, Francoise.

    1976-01-01

    The TRICO subroutine of the CEASEMT system is especially intended for elastic or plastic computation of structures made of thin shells and beams. TRICO involves the finite element method for shells and beams, and is also suitable for a dynamic structural analysis: eigenmode and eigenfrequency analysis, and analysis of the response to various sinusoidal excitations, or time dependent elastic and plastic loading. Structures may have various shapes composed of a number of materials. Data are distributed between different optional commands having a precise physical sense, corresponding to a sequential program. A dynamic memory control provides the adaptation of the size of the program to that of the problem to be solved [fr

  19. PREFACE: 11th International Spring Seminar on Nuclear Physics: Shell Model and Nuclear Structure - achievements of the past two decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The 11th International Seminar on Nuclear Physics was held in Ischia from May 12 to May 16, 2014. This Seminar was dedicated to Aldo Covello, who has been the promoter of this series of meetings, which started in Sorrento in 1986 and continued with meetings held every two or three years in the Naples area. Aldo's idea was to offer to a group of researchers, actively working in selected fields of Nuclear Physics, the opportunity to confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. The choice for the period of the year, Spring, as well as the sites chosen reflected this intent. The first meeting was of a purely theoretical nature, but it was immediately clear that the scope of these conferences needed to be enlarged calling into play the experimental community. Then, starting from the second meeting, all the following ones have been characterized by fruitful discussion between theoretical and experimental researchers on current achievements and future developments of nuclear structure. This may be read, in fact, as one of the motivating factors for Aldo's election as Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2008 "... for his outstanding contributions to the international nuclear physics community by providing, for over two decades, a venue for theorists and experimentalists to share their latest ideas." The present meeting, organized by Aldo's former students and with the benefit of his suggestions, has maintained this tradition. The title "Shell model and nuclear structure: achievements of the past two decades" recalls that of the 2nd International Spring Seminar "Shell Model and Nuclear Structure: where do we stand?". The main aim of this 11th Seminar was, in fact, to discuss the changes of the past two decades on our view of nuclei in terms of shell structure as well as the perspectives of the shell model, which has been one of the key points in Aldo's research. This point is well accounted by the Opening Speech of Igal Talmi, one of the fathers of the

  20. Triggered Snap-Through of Bistable Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yijie; Huang, Shicheng; Trase, Ian; Hu, Nan; Chen, Zi

    Elastic bistable shells are common structures in nature and engineering, such as the lobes of the Venus flytrap or the surface of a toy jumping poppers. Despite their ubiquity, the parameters that control the bistability of such structures are not well understood. In this study, we explore how the geometrical features of radially symmetric elastic shells affect the shape and potential energy of a shell's stable states, and how to tune certain parameters in order to generate a snap-through transition from a convex semi-stable state to concave stable state. We fabricated a series of elastic shells with varying geometric parameters out of silicone rubber and measured the resulting potential energy in the semi-stable state. Finite element simulations were also conducted in order to determine the deformation and stress in the shells during snap-through. It was found that the energy of the semi-stable state is controlled by only two geometric parameters and a dimensionless ratio. We also noted two distinct transitions during snap-through, one between monostability and semi-bistability (the state a popper toy is in before it snaps-through and jumps), and a second transition between semi-bistability and true bistability. This work shows that it is possible to use a set of simple parameters to tailor the energy landscape of an elastic shell in order to generate complex trigger motions for their potential use in smart applications. Z.C. acknowledge support from Society in Science-Branco Weiss Fellowship, administered by ETH Zurich.

  1. Double-Shell Tank (DST) Utilities Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SUSIENE, W.T.

    2000-01-01

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides the references to the requisite codes and standards to he applied during the design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Utilities Subsystems that support the first phase of waste feed delivery (WFD). The DST Utilities Subsystems provide electrical power, raw/potable water, and service/instrument air to the equipment and structures used to transfer low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to designated DST staging tanks. The DST Utilities Subsystems also support the equipment and structures used to deliver blended LAW and HLW feed from these staging tanks to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor facility where the waste will be immobilized. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations. This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program

  2. Chemical and thermal stability of core-shelled magnetite nanoparticles and solid silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Sikora, Pawel; Zielinska, Beata; Horszczaruk, Elzbieta; Mijowska, Ewa

    2017-06-01

    Pristine nanoparticles of magnetite were coated by solid silica shell forming core/shell structure. 20 nm thick silica coating significantly enhanced the chemical and thermal stability of the iron oxide. Chemical and thermal stability of this structure has been compared to the magnetite coated by mesoporous shell and pristine magnetite nanoparticles. It is assumed that six-membered silica rings in a solid silica shell limit the rate of oxygen diffusion during thermal treatment in air and prevent the access of HCl molecules to the core during chemical etching. Therefore, the core/shell structure with a solid shell requires a longer time to induce the oxidation of iron oxide to a higher oxidation state and, basically, even strong concentrated acid such as HCl is not able to dissolve it totally in one month. This leads to the desired performance of the material in potential applications such as catalysis and environmental protection.

  3. Core-shell particles as model compound for studying fouling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Troels Bach; Andersen, Morten Boel Overgaard

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic colloidal particles with hard cores and soft, water-swollen shells were used to study cake formation during ultrafiltration. The total cake resistance was lowest for particles with thick shells, which indicates that interparticular forces between particles (steric hindrance...... and electrostatic repulsion) influenced cake formation. At low pressure the specific cake resistance could be predicted from the Kozeny-Carman equation. At higher pressures, the resistance increased due to cake compression. Both cake formation and compression were reversible. For particles with thick shells...

  4. Electrochemical performance and structure evolution of core-shell nano-ring α-Fe_2O_3@Carbon anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yan-Hui; Liu, Shan; Zhou, Feng-Chen; Nan, Jun-Min

    2016-01-01

    Core-shell nano-ring α-Fe_2O_3@Carbon (CSNR) composites with different carbon content (CSNR-5%C and CSNR-13%C) are synthesized using a hydrothermal method by controlling different amounts of glucose and α-Fe_2O_3 nano-rings with further annealing. The CSNR electrodes exhibit much improved specific capacity, cycling stability and rate capability compared with that of bare nano-ring α-Fe_2O_3 (BNR), which is attributed to the core-shell nano-ring structure of CSNR. The carbon shell in the inner and outer surface of CSNR composite can increase electron conductivity of the electrode and inhibit the volume change of α-Fe_2O_3 during discharge/charge processes, and the nano-ring structure of CSNR can buffer the volume change too. The CSNR-5%C electrode shows super high initial discharge/charge capacities of 1570/1220 mAh g"−"1 and retains 920/897 mAh g"−"1 after 200 cycles at 500 mA g"−"1 (0.5C). Even at 2000 mA g"−"1 (2C), the electrode delivers the initial capacities of 1400/900 mAh g"−"1, and still maintains 630/610 mAh g"−"1 after 200 cycles. The core-shell nano-rings opened during cycling and rebuilt a new flower-like structure consisting of α-Fe_2O_3@Carbon nano-sheets. The space among the nano-sheet networks can further buffer the volume expansion of α-Fe_2O_3 and facilitate the transportation of electrons and Li"+ ions during the charge/discharge processes, which increases the capacity and rate capability of the electrode. It is the first time that the evolution of core-shell α-Fe_2O_3@Carbon changing to flower-like networks during lithiation/de-lithiation has been reported.

  5. Electrochemical performance and structure evolution of core-shell nano-ring α-Fe2O3@Carbon anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-Hui; Liu, Shan; Zhou, Feng-Chen; Nan, Jun-Min

    2016-12-01

    Core-shell nano-ring α-Fe2O3@Carbon (CSNR) composites with different carbon content (CSNR-5%C and CSNR-13%C) are synthesized using a hydrothermal method by controlling different amounts of glucose and α-Fe2O3 nano-rings with further annealing. The CSNR electrodes exhibit much improved specific capacity, cycling stability and rate capability compared with that of bare nano-ring α-Fe2O3 (BNR), which is attributed to the core-shell nano-ring structure of CSNR. The carbon shell in the inner and outer surface of CSNR composite can increase electron conductivity of the electrode and inhibit the volume change of α-Fe2O3 during discharge/charge processes, and the nano-ring structure of CSNR can buffer the volume change too. The CSNR-5%C electrode shows super high initial discharge/charge capacities of 1570/1220 mAh g-1 and retains 920/897 mAh g-1 after 200 cycles at 500 mA g-1 (0.5C). Even at 2000 mA g-1 (2C), the electrode delivers the initial capacities of 1400/900 mAh g-1, and still maintains 630/610 mAh g-1 after 200 cycles. The core-shell nano-rings opened during cycling and rebuilt a new flower-like structure consisting of α-Fe2O3@Carbon nano-sheets. The space among the nano-sheet networks can further buffer the volume expansion of α-Fe2O3 and facilitate the transportation of electrons and Li+ ions during the charge/discharge processes, which increases the capacity and rate capability of the electrode. It is the first time that the evolution of core-shell α-Fe2O3@Carbon changing to flower-like networks during lithiation/de-lithiation has been reported.

  6. Structure and stability of nickel/nickel oxide core-shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Addato, S; Grillo, V; Valeri, S; Frabboni, S; Altieri, S; Tondi, R

    2011-01-01

    The results of a combined x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) study of Ni nanoparticles (NP), before and after oxidation, are presented. An experimental set-up was realized for the preparation and study of pre-formed NP films, concentrating the attention on Ni NP in the diameter range between 4 and 8 nm. The XPS data were taken in situ from NPs after different stages of oxidation, including controlled dosing of O 2 gas in the experimental system and exposure to the atmosphere. The Ni 2p structure is a combination of spectra from metallic Ni in the NP core and from the oxide shell. The signal from the NP core was observed even for samples after exposure to air. From the comparison of HR-TEM experimental images with theoretical simulations, it was found that the Ni NP core has a regular multitwinned icosahedral structure, composed of single-crystal tetrahedra with (111) faces. The NiO phase is clearly observed forming islands on the NP surface.

  7. Structure and stability of nickel/nickel oxide core-shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Addato, S; Grillo, V; Valeri, S; Frabboni, S [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Altieri, S; Tondi, R, E-mail: sergio.daddato@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy)

    2011-05-04

    The results of a combined x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) study of Ni nanoparticles (NP), before and after oxidation, are presented. An experimental set-up was realized for the preparation and study of pre-formed NP films, concentrating the attention on Ni NP in the diameter range between 4 and 8 nm. The XPS data were taken in situ from NPs after different stages of oxidation, including controlled dosing of O{sub 2} gas in the experimental system and exposure to the atmosphere. The Ni 2p structure is a combination of spectra from metallic Ni in the NP core and from the oxide shell. The signal from the NP core was observed even for samples after exposure to air. From the comparison of HR-TEM experimental images with theoretical simulations, it was found that the Ni NP core has a regular multitwinned icosahedral structure, composed of single-crystal tetrahedra with (111) faces. The NiO phase is clearly observed forming islands on the NP surface.

  8. The effect of oxide shell thickness on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of Si-SiO{sub 2} core-shell nano-crystals: A (time dependent)density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazemi, Sanaz, E-mail: s.nazemi@ut.ac.ir, E-mail: pourfath@ut.ac.ir; Soleimani, Ebrahim Asl [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran 14395-515 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pourfath, Mahdi, E-mail: s.nazemi@ut.ac.ir, E-mail: pourfath@ut.ac.ir [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran 14395-515 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Microelectronics, Technische Universität Wien, Wien A-1040 (Austria); Kosina, Hans [Institute for Microelectronics, Technische Universität Wien, Wien A-1040 (Austria)

    2016-04-14

    Due to their tunable properties, silicon nano-crystals (NC) are currently being investigated. Quantum confinement can generally be employed for size-dependent band-gap tuning at dimensions smaller than the Bohr radius (∼5 nm for silicon). At the nano-meter scale, however, increased surface-to-volume ratio makes the surface effects dominant. Specifically, in Si-SiO{sub 2} core-shell semiconductor NCs the interfacial transition layer causes peculiar electronic and optical properties, because of the co-existence of intermediate oxidation states of silicon (Si{sup n+}, n = 0–4). Due to the presence of the many factors involved, a comprehensive understanding of the optical properties of these NCs has not yet been achieved. In this work, Si-SiO{sub 2} NCs with a diameter of 1.1 nm and covered by amorphous oxide shells with thicknesses between 2.5 and 4.75 Å are comprehensively studied, employing density functional theory calculations. It is shown that with increased oxide shell thickness, the low-energy part of the optical transition spectrum of the NC is red shifted and attenuated. Moreover, the absorption coefficient is increased in the high-energy part of the spectrum which corresponds to SiO{sub 2} transitions. Structural examinations indicate a larger compressive stress on the central silicon cluster with a thicker oxide shell. Examination of the local density of states reveals the migration of frontier molecular orbitals from the oxide shell into the silicon core with the increase of silica shell thickness. The optical and electrical properties are explained through the analysis of the density of states and the spatial distribution of silicon sub-oxide species.

  9. Novel fluorescent core-shell nanocontainers for cell membrane transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Meizhen; Kuhlmann, Christoph R W; Sorokina, Ksenia; Li, Chen; Mihov, George; Pietrowski, Eweline; Koynov, Kaloian; Klapper, Markus; Luhmann, Heiko J; Müllen, Klaus; Weil, Tanja

    2008-05-01

    The synthesis and characterization of novel core-shell macromolecules consisting of a fluorescent perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxdiimide chromophore in the center surrounded by a hydrophobic polyphenylene shell as a first and a flexible hydrophilic polymer shell as a second layer was presented. Following this strategy, several macromolecules bearing varying polymer chain lengths, different polymer shell densities, and increasing numbers of positive and negative charges were achieved. Because all of these macromolecules reveal a good water solubility, their ability to cross cellular membranes was investigated. In this way, a qualitative relationship between the molecular architecture of these macromolecules and the biological response was established.

  10. A shell-resolved analysis of preferential solvation of coffee ingredients in aqueous mixtures of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeindlhofer, Veronika; Berger, Magdalena; Steinhauser, Othmar; Schröder, Christian

    2018-05-01

    Ionic liquids increase the solubility of various coffee ingredients in aqueous solution but little is known about the underlying mechanism. Kirkwood-Buff integrals as well as the potential of mean force indicate that the imidazolium cations are accumulated at the surface of the solutes, removing water molecules from the solute surface. Although hydrogen bonding of the anions to hydroxy groups of the solutes can be detected, their concentration at the surface is less enhanced compared to the cations. The decomposition into solvation shells by Voronoi tessellation reveals that structural features are only observed in the first solvation shell. Nevertheless, the depletion of water and the excess concentration of the ions and, in particular, of the cations are visible in the next solvation shells as well. Therefore, classical arguments of hydrotropic theory fail to explain this behavior.

  11. Preliminary structural investigations of the Eut-L shell protein of the ethanolamine ammonia-lyase metabolosome of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolakakis, Kiel; Ohtaki, Akashi; Newton, Keith; Chworos, Arkadiusz; Sagermann, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary X-ray analysis of crystals of the bacterial microcompartment shell protein Eut-L from Escherichia coli is reported. The ethanolamine ammonia-lyase microcompartment is composed of five different shell proteins that have been proposed to assemble into symmetrically shaped polyhedral particles of varying sizes. Here, preliminary X-ray analysis of crystals of the bacterial microcompartment shell protein Eut-L from Escherichia coli is reported. Cloning, overexpression and purification resulted in highly pure protein that crystallized readily under many different conditions. In all cases the protein forms thin hexagonal plate-shaped crystals belonging to space group P3 that are of unusually high stability against different solvent conditions. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.0 Å using synchrotron radiation but proved to be radiation-sensitive. Preparations of heavy-atom-derivatized crystals for use in determining the three-dimensional structure are under way

  12. Load requirements for maintaining structural integrity of Hanford single-shell tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JULYK, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides structural load requirements and their basis for maintaining the structural integrity of the Hanford Single-Shell Tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities. The requirements are based on a review of previous requirements and their basis documents as well as load histories with particular emphasis on the proposed lead transfer feed tanks for the privatized vitrification plant

  13. Explicit Dynamic Finite Element Method for Predicting Implosion/Explosion Induced Failure of Shell Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hoon Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simplified implementation of the conventional extended finite element method (XFEM for dynamic fracture in thin shells is presented. Though this implementation uses the same linear combination of the conventional XFEM, it allows for considerable simplifications of the discontinuous displacement and velocity fields in shell finite elements. The proposed method is implemented for the discrete Kirchhoff triangular (DKT shell element, which is one of the most popular shell elements in engineering analysis. Numerical examples for dynamic failure of shells under impulsive loads including implosion and explosion are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the method.

  14. Eosin-Y sensitized core-shell TiO2-ZnO nano-structured photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, V S; Palai, Akshaya K; Mohanty, Smita; Nayak, Sanjay K

    2018-06-01

    In the current investigation, TiO 2 and TiO 2 -ZnO (core-shell) spherical nanoparticles were synthesized by simple combined hydrolysis and refluxing method. A TiO 2 core nanomaterial on the shell material of ZnO was synthesized by utilizing variable ratios of ZnO. The structural characterization of TiO 2 -ZnO core/shell nanoparticles were done by XRD analysis. The spherical structured morphology of the TiO 2 -ZnO has been confirmed through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. The UV-visible spectra of TiO 2 -ZnO nanostructures were also compared with the pristine TiO 2 to investigate the shift of wavelength. The TiO 2 -ZnO core/shell nanoparticles at the interface efficiently collect the photogenarated electrons from ZnO and also ZnO act a barrier for reduced charge recombination of electrolyte and dye-nanoparticles interface. This combination improved the light absorption which induced the charge transfer ability and dye loading capacity of core-shell nanoparticles. An enhancement in the short circuit current (J sc ) from 1.67 mA/cm 2 to 2.1 mA/cm 2 has been observed for TiO 2 -ZnObased photoanode (with platinum free counter electrode), promises an improvement in the energy conversion efficiency by 57% in comparison with that of the DSSCs based on the pristine TiO 2 . Henceforth, TiO 2 -ZnO photoelectrode in ZnO will effectively act as barrier at the interface of TiO 2 -ZnO and TiO 2 , ensuring the potential for DSSC application. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Scalable Synthesis of Triple-Core-Shell Nanostructures of TiO2 @MnO2 @C for High Performance Supercapacitors Using Structure-Guided Combustion Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongjoon; Shin, Jungho; Yeo, Taehan; Hwang, Hayoung; Park, Seonghyun; Choi, Wonjoon

    2018-03-01

    Core-shell nanostructures of metal oxides and carbon-based materials have emerged as outstanding electrode materials for supercapacitors and batteries. However, their synthesis requires complex procedures that incur high costs and long processing times. Herein, a new route is proposed for synthesizing triple-core-shell nanoparticles of TiO 2 @MnO 2 @C using structure-guided combustion waves (SGCWs), which originate from incomplete combustion inside chemical-fuel-wrapped nanostructures, and their application in supercapacitor electrodes. SGCWs transform TiO 2 to TiO 2 @C and TiO 2 @MnO 2 to TiO 2 @MnO 2 @C via the incompletely combusted carbonaceous fuels under an open-air atmosphere, in seconds. The synthesized carbon layers act as templates for MnO 2 shells in TiO 2 @C and organic shells of TiO 2 @MnO 2 @C. The TiO 2 @MnO 2 @C-based electrodes exhibit a greater specific capacitance (488 F g -1 at 5 mV s -1 ) and capacitance retention (97.4% after 10 000 cycles at 1.0 V s -1 ), while the absence of MnO 2 and carbon shells reveals a severe degradation in the specific capacitance and capacitance retention. Because the core-TiO 2 nanoparticles and carbon shell prevent the deformation of the inner and outer sides of the MnO 2 shell, the nanostructures of the TiO 2 @MnO 2 @C are preserved despite the long-term cycling, giving the superior performance. This SGCW-driven fabrication enables the scalable synthesis of multiple-core-shell structures applicable to diverse electrochemical applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Investigation of CuInSe{sub 2} nanowire arrays with core–shell structure electrodeposited at various duty cycles into anodic alumina templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yu-Song [Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Wang, Na-Fu; Tsai, Yu-Zen [Department of Electronic Engineering, Cheng Shiu University, 840 Chengcing Rd., Niaosong District, Kaohsiung City 833, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jia-Jun [Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Houng, Mau-Phon, E-mail: mphoung@eembox.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The present paper reports that CuInSe2 NW arrays were fabricated through pulsed electrode position onto an AAO template with various duty cycles, and a pore-filling ratio of approximately 92% was achieved. • GIXRD patterns showed that all CuInSe2 NW arrays were chalcopyrite and SAED images confirmed that the CuInSe2 NWs were polycrystalline. • PEDOT/CuInSe2 NW core–shell arrays were fabricated using surfactant-modified CuInSe2 NW surfaces showing the lotus effect. • Current–voltage plots revealed that the CuInSe2 NW arrays were p-type semiconductors; moreover, the core–shell structure improved the diode ideality factor from 3.91 to 2.63. - Abstract: Copper indium selenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) nanowire (NW) arrays were prepared at various electrolyte duty cycles by filling anodic alumina templates through the pulsed electrodeposition technique. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the nucleation mechanism of CuInSe{sub 2} NW arrays was affected by the electrodeposition duty cycle. Moreover, SEM images showed that the diameter and length of the NWs were 80 nm and 2 μm, respectively. Furthermore, PEDOT/CuInSe{sub 2} NW core–shell arrays were fabricated using surfactant-modified CuInSe{sub 2} NW surfaces showing the lotus effect. Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that a core–shell structure was achieved. Current–voltage plots revealed that the CuInSe{sub 2} NW arrays were p-type semiconductors; moreover, the core–shell structure improved the diode ideality factor from 3.91 to 2.63.

  17. Cement hydration from hours to centuries controlled by diffusion through barrier shells of C-S-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi-Aghdam, Saeed; Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Abdolhosseini Qomi, M. J.

    2017-02-01

    Although a few good models for cement hydration exist, they have some limitations. Some do not take into account the complete range of variation of pore relative humidity and temperature, and apply over durations limited from up a few months to up to about a year. The ones that are applicable for long durations are either computationally too intensive for use in finite element programs or predict the hydration to terminate after few months. However, recent tests of autogenous shrinkage and swelling in water imply that the hydration may continue, at decaying rate, for decades, provided that a not too low relative pore humidity (above 0.7) persists for a long time, as expected for the cores of thick concrete structural members. Therefore, and because design lifetimes of over hundred years are required for large concrete structures, a new hydration model for a hundred year lifespan and beyond is developed. The new model considers that, after the first day of hydration, the remnants of anhydrous cement grains, gradually consumed by hydration, are enveloped by contiguous, gradually thickening, spherical barrier shells of calcium-silicate hydrate (C-S-H). The hydration progress is controlled by transport of water from capillary pores through the barrier shells toward the interface with anhydrous cement. The transport is driven by a difference of humidity, defined by equivalence with the difference in chemical potential of water. Although, during the period of 4-24 h, the C-S-H forms discontinuous nano-globules around the cement grain, an equivalent barrier shell control was formulated for this period, too, for ease and effectiveness of calculation. The entire model is calibrated and validated by published test data on the evolution of hydration degree for various cement types, particle size distributions, water-cement ratios and temperatures. Computationally, this model is sufficiently effective for calculating the evolution of hydration degree (or aging) at every

  18. Organic-Inorganic Hydrophobic Nanocomposite Film with a Core-Shell Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A method to prepare novel organic-inorganic hydrophobic nanocomposite films was proposed by a site-specific polymerization process. The inorganic part, the core of the nanocomposite, is a ternary SiO2–Al2O3–TiO2 nanoparticles, which is grafted with methacryloxy propyl trimethoxyl silane (KH570, and wrapped by fluoride and siloxane polymers. The synthesized samples are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, contact angle meter (CA, and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results indicate that the novel organic-inorganic hydrophobic nanocomposite with a core-shell structure was synthesized successfully. XRD analysis reveals the nanocomposite film has an amorphous structure, and FTIR analysis indicates the nanoparticles react with a silane coupling agent (methacryloxy propyl trimethoxyl silane KH570. Interestingly, the morphology of the nanoparticle film is influenced by the composition of the core. Further, comparing with the film synthesized by silica nanoparticles, the film formed from SiO2–Al2O3–TiO2 nanoparticles has higher hydrophobic performance, i.e., the contact angle is greater than 101.7°. In addition, the TEM analysis reveals that the crystal structure of the particles can be changed at high temperatures.

  19. Recent shell-model results for exotic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utsuno Yusuke

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on our recent advancement in the shell model and its applications to exotic nuclei, focusing on the shell evolution and large-scale calculations with the Monte Carlo shell model (MCSM. First, we test the validity of the monopole-based universal interaction (VMU as a shell-model interaction by performing large-scale shell-model calculations in two different mass regions using effective interactions which partly comprise VMU. Those calculations are successful and provide a deeper insight into the shell evolution beyond the single-particle model, in particular showing that the evolution of the spin-orbit splitting due to the tensor force plays a decisive role in the structure of the neutron-rich N ∼ 28 region and antimony isotopes. Next, we give a brief overview of recent developments in MCSM, and show that it is applicable to exotic nuclei that involve many valence orbits. As an example of its applications to exotic nuclei, shape coexistence in 32Mg is examined.

  20. Mussel shell evaluation as bioindicator for heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrello, Avacir Casanova; Lopes, Fabio; Galvao, Tiago D. [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica. Lab. de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Recently, in Brazil, it has been appearing a new and unusual 'plague' in leisure and commercial fishing, caused by the parasitic larval phase of certain native bivalve mollusks of fresh water known as 'Naiades'. Such situation involves the presence of big bivalve of fresh water, mainly Anodontites trapesialis, in the tanks and dams of the fish creation, such bivalve mollusks belonging to the Ordem Unionoida and the Familia Mycetopodidae. The present work objectified to analyze the shells of such mollusks to verify the possibility of such mollusks as bioindicators of heavy metals in fresh water. The mollusks shells were collected in a commercial fishing at Londrina-PR, and analyzed qualitatively to determine the chemical composition and possible correlation with existent heavy metals in the aquatic environment. Studies of the literature have been showing that those mollusks are susceptible the existent chemical alterations in the aquatic environment due to anthropogenic action. Three different shells were analyzed, with the measures done on the external and internal side, using a portable Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence system (PXRF-LFNA-02). The measures were realized in the applied nuclear physics laboratory of State University of Londrina, and the PXRF-LFNA-02 is composed by a X-Ray tube (with Ag target and filter) with potency of 4W, and a detector Si-PIN model XR-100CR of Ampetc Inc. with resolution of 221eV for the line of 5.9 keV of the {sup 55}Fe (with a 25{mu}m Be window thickness and Ag collimator), Current 10 mA and High Voltage 28 kV. In the internal part of shells were identified the elements Ca, P, Fe, Mn and Sr and in the external part were identified Ca, P, Fe, Mn, Sr and Cu. The Ca ratio among the external and internal sides of the analyzed shells is around of 1, and it was expected because Ca is the main composed of mollusks shells. The ratio of P, Fe, Mn, and Sr for Ca stayed constant in all analyzed shells

  1. Rare earth elements in the aragonitic shell of freshwater mussel Corbicula fluminea and the bioavailability of anthropogenic lanthanum, samarium and gadolinium in river water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merschel, Gila; Bau, Michael

    2015-01-01

    High-technology metals — such as the rare earth elements (REE) — have become emerging contaminants in the hydrosphere, yet little is known about their bioavailability. The Rhine River and the Weser River in Germany are two prime examples of rivers that are subjected to anthropogenic REE input. While both rivers carry significant loads of anthropogenic Gd, originating from contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging, the Rhine River also carries large amounts of anthropogenic La and lately Sm which are discharged into the river from an industrial point source. Here, we assess the bioavailability of these anthropogenic microcontaminants in these rivers by analyzing the aragonitic shells of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea. Concentrations of purely geogenic REE in shells of comparable size cover a wide range of about one order of magnitude between different sampling sites. At a given sampling site, geogenic REE concentrations depend on shell size, i.e. mussel age. Although both rivers show large positive Gd anomalies in their dissolved loads, no anomalous enrichment of Gd relative to the geogenic REE can be observed in any of the analyzed shells. This indicates that the speciations of geogenic and anthropogenic Gd in the river water differ from each other and that the geogenic, but not the anthropogenic Gd is incorporated into the shells. In contrast, all shells sampled at sites downstream of the industrial point source of anthropogenic La and Sm in the Rhine River show positive La and Sm anomalies, revealing that these anthropogenic REE are bioavailable. Only little is known about the effects of long-term exposure to dissolved REE and their general ecotoxicity, but considering that anthropogenic Gd and even La have already been identified in German tap water and that anthropogenic La and Sm are bioavailable, this should be monitored and investigated further. - Highlights: • Corbicula fluminea shells are bioarchives of dissolved geogenic REE in

  2. Rare earth elements in the aragonitic shell of freshwater mussel Corbicula fluminea and the bioavailability of anthropogenic lanthanum, samarium and gadolinium in river water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merschel, Gila, E-mail: g.merschel@jacobs-university.de; Bau, Michael

    2015-11-15

    High-technology metals — such as the rare earth elements (REE) — have become emerging contaminants in the hydrosphere, yet little is known about their bioavailability. The Rhine River and the Weser River in Germany are two prime examples of rivers that are subjected to anthropogenic REE input. While both rivers carry significant loads of anthropogenic Gd, originating from contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging, the Rhine River also carries large amounts of anthropogenic La and lately Sm which are discharged into the river from an industrial point source. Here, we assess the bioavailability of these anthropogenic microcontaminants in these rivers by analyzing the aragonitic shells of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea. Concentrations of purely geogenic REE in shells of comparable size cover a wide range of about one order of magnitude between different sampling sites. At a given sampling site, geogenic REE concentrations depend on shell size, i.e. mussel age. Although both rivers show large positive Gd anomalies in their dissolved loads, no anomalous enrichment of Gd relative to the geogenic REE can be observed in any of the analyzed shells. This indicates that the speciations of geogenic and anthropogenic Gd in the river water differ from each other and that the geogenic, but not the anthropogenic Gd is incorporated into the shells. In contrast, all shells sampled at sites downstream of the industrial point source of anthropogenic La and Sm in the Rhine River show positive La and Sm anomalies, revealing that these anthropogenic REE are bioavailable. Only little is known about the effects of long-term exposure to dissolved REE and their general ecotoxicity, but considering that anthropogenic Gd and even La have already been identified in German tap water and that anthropogenic La and Sm are bioavailable, this should be monitored and investigated further. - Highlights: • Corbicula fluminea shells are bioarchives of dissolved geogenic REE in

  3. Larvicidal Activity of A Mixture of Cashew Nut Shell Liquid and Water-Soluble Extract of Soap Nut Fruit (Sapindus rarak DC. Against 3rd Instar Larvae of Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glory Resia Raraswati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNSL which has been known as a waste of processing cashew fruits which is contain phenolic compounds have activity as larvicides. Cashew nut shell liquid is not soluble in the water where the larvae grow. Cashew nut shell liquid mixed with water-soluble extract of soapnut fruit which serves as a natural surfactant that can emulsify oil in water. The test subjects were larvae of Aedes aegypti third instar. Test subjects were divided into treatment group and control group. In the treatment group, test subjects were  the mixture of CNSL and Ethylacetat Soluble Extract (ESE in tap water. The Larvae mortality observations were done 24 hours after the treatment. LC50 and LC90 as final test data were analyzed using probit analysis. Extract constituents   of CNSL and Water Soluble Extract of SoapNut fruit (WSEoSN were  investigated using Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC method. The effect of CNSL as larvicides against third instar larvae of Ae. aegypti with were LC50 of 14,12 ppm, while the LC90 of 24,85 ppm.

  4. Local conditions for the Pauli potential in order to yield self-consistent electron densities exhibiting proper atomic shell structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finzel, Kati, E-mail: kati.finzel@liu.se [Linköpings University, IFM Department of Physics, 58183 Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-01-21

    The local conditions for the Pauli potential that are necessary in order to yield self-consistent electron densities from orbital-free calculations are investigated for approximations that are expressed with the help of a local position variable. It is shown that those local conditions also apply when the Pauli potential is given in terms of the electron density. An explicit formula for the Ne atom is given, preserving the local conditions during the iterative procedure. The resulting orbital-free electron density exhibits proper shell structure behavior and is in close agreement with the Kohn-Sham electron density. This study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain self-consistent orbital-free electron densities with proper atomic shell structure from simple one-point approximations for the Pauli potential at local density level.

  5. Facile synthesis of core-shell Cu2O@ ZnO structure with enhanced photocatalytic H2 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Hui; Jiu, Bei-Bei; Gong, Fei-Long; Lu, Kuan; Jiang, Nan; Zhang, Hao-Li; Chen, Jun-Li

    2018-05-01

    Core-shell Cu2O@ZnO composites were synthesized successfully based on a one-pot hydrothermal method in the presence of dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) surfactant. The Cu2O can be converted to rough core-shell Cu2O@ZnO structure by adjusting the amount of zinc powder added. The as-synthesized Cu2O@ZnO composites exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity and the amount of H2 generated using these composites was 4.5-fold more than that produced with Cu2O cubes. A possible photocatalytic mechanism for the Cu2O@ZnO composites with enhanced photocatalytic activity could be the separation by ZnO of the effective charge carriers.

  6. Structural and magnetic properties of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} core/shell nanocomposite prepared by the hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattar, A.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, 11566 Abbasia, Cairo (Egypt); EL-Sayed, H.M., E-mail: h_m_elsaid@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, 11566 Abbasia, Cairo (Egypt); ALsuqia, Ibrahim [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education and Applied Science, Hajjah University, Alshahli, Hajjah (Yemen)

    2015-12-01

    CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} core/shell magnetic nanocomposite was synthesized by using hydrothermal method.The analysis of XRD indicated the coexistence of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}as core/shell composite. The core/shell structure of the composite sample has been confirmed by HR-TEM images, EDX and FT-IR measurements. The size of obtained core/shell nanoparticles was 17 nm in core diameter and about 3 nm in shell thickness. The magnetization measurements showed that both the coercive field and the saturation magnetization of the resulting core/shell nanocomposite were slightly decreased compared to those of the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} core but the thermal stability is of the magnetization parameter was enhanced. Furthermore, superparamagnetic phase is established at temperatures higher than the room temperature. The results were discussed in terms of the surface pinning and the magnetic interaction at the interface between the core and shell. - Highlights: • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} core/shell could be prepared by hydrothermal method. • The structural analysis proved the formation of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} shell with thickness 3 nm. • The thermal stability of M{sub s} and H{sub c} is enhanced due to the presence of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} as a shell. • Super paramagnetic transition is confirmed and the effective magnetic anisotropy was calculated.

  7. Understanding to Hierarchical Microstructures of Crab (Chinese hairy) Shell as a Natural Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuanqiang, Zhou [Testing Center, Yangzhou University, No. 48 Wenhui East Road, Yangzhou (China); Xiangxiang, Gong [Testing Center, Yangzhou University, No. 48 Wenhui East Road, Yangzhou (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Jie, Han [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China)

    2016-03-07

    This work was done to better understand the microstructures, composition and mechanical properties of Chinese hairy crab shell. For fully revealing its hierarchical microstructure, the crab shell was observed with electron microscope under different magnifications from different facets. XRD, EDS, FTIR and TGA techniques have been used to characterize the untreated and chemically-treated crab shells, which provided enough information to determine the species and relative content of components in this biomaterial. Combined the microstructures with constituents analysis, the structural principles of crab shell was detailedly realized from different structural levels beyond former reports. To explore the relationship between structure and function, the mechanical properties of shell have been measured through performing tensile tests. The contributions of organics and minerals in shell to the mechanical properties were also discussed by measuring the tensile strength of de-calcification samples treated with HCl solution.

  8. Understanding to Hierarchical Microstructures of Crab (Chinese hairy) Shell as a Natural Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuanqiang, Zhou; Xiangxiang, Gong; Jie, Han

    2016-01-01

    This work was done to better understand the microstructures, composition and mechanical properties of Chinese hairy crab shell. For fully revealing its hierarchical microstructure, the crab shell was observed with electron microscope under different magnifications from different facets. XRD, EDS, FTIR and TGA techniques have been used to characterize the untreated and chemically-treated crab shells, which provided enough information to determine the species and relative content of components in this biomaterial. Combined the microstructures with constituents analysis, the structural principles of crab shell was detailedly realized from different structural levels beyond former reports. To explore the relationship between structure and function, the mechanical properties of shell have been measured through performing tensile tests. The contributions of organics and minerals in shell to the mechanical properties were also discussed by measuring the tensile strength of de-calcification samples treated with HCl solution

  9. Peptide Microencapsulation by Core-Shell Printing Technology for Edible Film Application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco-Pascual, N.; Koldeweij, R.B.J.; Stevens, R.S.A.; Montero, M.P.; Gómez-Guillén, M.C.; Cate, A.T.T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new microencapsulation methodology for incorporation of functional ingredients in edible films. Core-shell microcapsules filled with demineralized water (C) or 1 % (w/v) peptide solution (Cp) were prepared using the microencapsulation printer technology. Shell material,

  10. Beneficial effects of water in the colloidal synthesis of InP/ZnS core-shell quantum dots for optoelectronic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Parthiban; Kim, Bumjin; Lee, Min-Sang; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-10-21

    We demonstrate that the presence of a small amount of water as an impurity during the hot-injection synthesis can significantly decrease the emission lines full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and improve the quantum yield (QY) of InP/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). By utilizing the water present in the indium precursor and solvent, we obtained InP/ZnS QDs emitting around 530 nm with a FWHM as narrow as 46 nm and a QY up to 45%. Without water, the synthesized QDs have emission around 625 nm with a FWHM of 66 nm and a QY of about 33%. Absorption spectra, XRD and XPS analyses revealed that when water is present, an amorphous phosphate layer is formed over the InP QDs and inhibits the QD growth. This amorphous layer favors the formation of a very thick ZnS shell by decreasing the lattice mismatch between the InP core and the ZnS shell. We further show the possibility to tune the emission wavelengths of InP/ZnS QDs by simply adjusting the amount of water present in the system while keeping all the other reaction parameters (i.e., precursor concentration, reaction temperature and time) constant. As an example of their application in light-emitting diodes (LEDs), the green and red InP/ZnS QDs are combined with a blue LED chip to produce white light.

  11. Shell closures, loosely bound structures, and halos in exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, G.; Singh, D.

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by the recent experiments indicating doubly magic nuclei that lie near the drip-line and encouraged by the success of our relativistic mean-field (RMF) plus state-dependent BCS approach to the description of the ground-state properties of drip-line nuclei, we develop this approach further, across the entire periodic table, to explore magic nuclei, loosely bound structures, and halo formation in exotic nuclei. In our RMF+BCS approach, the single-particle continuum corresponding to the RMF is replaced by a set of discrete positive-energy states for the calculations of pairing energy. Detailed analysis of the single-particle spectrum, pairing energies, and densities of the nuclei predict the unusual proton shell closures at proton numbers Z = 6, 14, 16, 34, and unusual neutron shell closures at neutron numbers N = 6, 14, 16, 34, 40, 70, 112. Further, in several nuclei like the neutron-rich isotopes of Ca, Zr, Mo, etc., the gradual filling of lowlying single-particle resonant state together with weakly bound single-particle states lying close to the continuum threshold helps accommodate more neutrons but with an extremely small increase in the binding energy. This gives rise to the occurrence of loosely bound systems of neutron-rich nuclei with a large neutron-to-proton ratio. In general, the halo-like formation, irrespective of the existence of any resonant state, is seen to be due to the large spatial extension of the wave functions for the weakly bound single-particle states with low orbital angular momentum having very small or no centrifugal barriers.

  12. Shell closures, loosely bound structures, and halos in exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, G., E-mail: gauravphy@gmail.com [Govt. Women Engineering College, Department of Physics (India); Singh, D. [University of Rajasthan, Department of Physics (India)

    2013-04-15

    Inspired by the recent experiments indicating doubly magic nuclei that lie near the drip-line and encouraged by the success of our relativistic mean-field (RMF) plus state-dependent BCS approach to the description of the ground-state properties of drip-line nuclei, we develop this approach further, across the entire periodic table, to explore magic nuclei, loosely bound structures, and halo formation in exotic nuclei. In our RMF+BCS approach, the single-particle continuum corresponding to the RMF is replaced by a set of discrete positive-energy states for the calculations of pairing energy. Detailed analysis of the single-particle spectrum, pairing energies, and densities of the nuclei predict the unusual proton shell closures at proton numbers Z = 6, 14, 16, 34, and unusual neutron shell closures at neutron numbers N = 6, 14, 16, 34, 40, 70, 112. Further, in several nuclei like the neutron-rich isotopes of Ca, Zr, Mo, etc., the gradual filling of lowlying single-particle resonant state together with weakly bound single-particle states lying close to the continuum threshold helps accommodate more neutrons but with an extremely small increase in the binding energy. This gives rise to the occurrence of loosely bound systems of neutron-rich nuclei with a large neutron-to-proton ratio. In general, the halo-like formation, irrespective of the existence of any resonant state, is seen to be due to the large spatial extension of the wave functions for the weakly bound single-particle states with low orbital angular momentum having very small or no centrifugal barriers.

  13. Enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity in SnO{sub 2}@g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} core-shell structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Hao; Zhao, Xiaoru, E-mail: xrzhao@nwpu.edu.cn; Duan, Libing; Liu, Ruidi; Li, Hui

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Novel SnO{sub 2}@g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} core-shell structures were successfully synthesized. • The core-shell structures exhibited enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity. • The enhanced photocatalytic activity was due to synergic action of SnO{sub 2} and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. - Abstract: SnO{sub 2}@g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} core-shell structures were successfully synthesized by simple calcination of SnO{sub 2} microspheres and urea in a muffle furnac