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Sample records for water samples irradiated

  1. A quantitative and comparative study of radionuclidic and chemical impurities in water samples irradiated in a niobium target with Havar vs. niobium-sputtered Havar as entrance foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel A. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, Alberta Cancer Board, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada)], E-mail: Miguel.Avila-Rodriguez@utu.fi; Wilson, John S.; McQuarrie, Steve A. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, Alberta Cancer Board, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Enriched and natural abundance water samples were irradiated in a niobium (Nb) chamber target with Havar and Nb-sputtered Havar foils. Irradiations were performed with 17.5 MeV protons at currents from 35 to 100 {mu}A lasting for 1-2.5 h. Radionuclidic and chemical (cationic) impurities were determined via gamma spectroscopy and ICP-MS, respectively. Anionic impurities were evaluated by ion chromatography. Impurities in water samples irradiated with the Havar-Nb foils were much lower than the samples irradiated with an unmodified Havar foil. No significant differences were observed in the impurity levels between samples of H{sub 2}{sup 18}O-enriched and natural abundance water. Radionuclidic impurities were observed to decrease after 3-4 irradiations on a fresh Havar entrance foil, and reached a constant value for subsequent irradiations with the same integrated current. For targets covered with Havar foil, radionuclidic impurities were found to be proportional to the beam-integrated current regardless of the beam power and, unexpectedly, dependant of the beam power when using a Havar-Nb foil.

  2. A quantitative and comparative study of radionuclidic and chemical impurities in water samples irradiated in a niobium target with Havar vs. niobium-sputtered Havar as entrance foils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel A; Wilson, John S; McQuarrie, Steve A

    2008-12-01

    Enriched and natural abundance water samples were irradiated in a niobium (Nb) chamber target with Havar and Nb-sputtered Havar foils. Irradiations were performed with 17.5MeV protons at currents from 35 to 100microA lasting for 1-2.5h. Radionuclidic and chemical (cationic) impurities were determined via gamma spectroscopy and ICP-MS, respectively. Anionic impurities were evaluated by ion chromatography. Impurities in water samples irradiated with the Havar-Nb foils were much lower than the samples irradiated with an unmodified Havar foil. No significant differences were observed in the impurity levels between samples of H(2)(18)O-enriched and natural abundance water. Radionuclidic impurities were observed to decrease after 3-4 irradiations on a fresh Havar entrance foil, and reached a constant value for subsequent irradiations with the same integrated current. For targets covered with Havar foil, radionuclidic impurities were found to be proportional to the beam-integrated current regardless of the beam power and, unexpectedly, dependant of the beam power when using a Havar-Nb foil.

  3. Fungal evaluation on green tea irradiated with different water activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanaro, Gustavo B.; Duarte, Renato C.; Rodrigues, Flavio T.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H., E-mail: gbfanaro@ipen.b, E-mail: villavic@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CTR/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes; Correa, Benedito, E-mail: correabe@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Micologia

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was evaluate the fungal contamination in green tea irradiated with different radiation doses and water activities. Samples were irradiated in {sup 60}Co irradiator at doses of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10.0kGy with three different water activities. In the sample with decreased water activity, the count of fungi was lower than others samples followed by original Aw and the samples with the higher water activity, however there is no difference between the increased and decreased water activities samples after the irradiation on fungi contamination at dose of 2.5 kGy. (author)

  4. Degradation of crosslinked polyethylene in water by gamma-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Tatsuro; Takano, Tadao; Takayama, Shigeru; Ito, Masayuki; Narisawa, Ikuo

    2002-02-01

    The degradation of crosslinked polyethylene by gamma-irradiation in water was studied. Change in the physical properties and the growth of carbonyl group after irradiation showed a good correlation. The degradation observed at 80°C is the least, and that at 60°C is the severest. The distribution of the oxidized layer in the sample was measured and was also calculated from the diffusion model using the observed parameters. Comparison of both results suggest that some products caused by gamma-irradiation of water supress the degradation of XLPE at 80°C.

  5. Glyoxal and methylglyoxal concentrations in irradiated ocean surface microlayer samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Christian; van Pinxteren, Manuela; Schneider, Linda; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    Glyoxal and methylglyoxal are low molecular weight compounds which are volatile enough to be found in significant concentrations in ambient air but at the same time they are water soluble and can be detected in sea water. For the ocean, they are of interest in the cycling of organic carbon and in the atmosphere they potentially play a role for secondary organic aerosol formation. Ocean chemistry can also influence marine particle composition, when processed sea surface microlayer (SML)-material is ejected by bubble-burst or sea-spray mechanisms to form particles. The ocean has been reported to be either a source or a sink of carbonyls depending on the hemispheric location. Interestingly, the measured gas phase concentrations of glyoxal cannot be explained by the currently known source processes. Because the possibility of carbonyl formation under actinic irradiation in the sea surface microlayer was reported earlier, efforts have been made to characterize the influence of light on carbonyls in seawater using a series of SML samples irradiated under controlled laboratory conditions. Samples have been taken during 2011 and 2012 Polarstern cruises employing a glass plate sampling technique. Glyoxal and methylglyoxal were analyzed using O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine hydrochloride derivatization and GC-MS detection. Initial concentrations of glyoxal and methylglyoxal are in the range of 0.1 to 2.5 μg l-1. 100 ml sample aliquots were irradiated in a stirred, thermostated glass reactor using a xenon-lamp with an edge filter resulting in a transmission between 290 and 800 nm wavelength. Irradiation intervals were chosen between 30 and 250 minutes. Unexpectedly, the resulting concentration time profiles do not show similar behavior. There is not always a carbonyl increase with increasing irradiation time. In fact, carbonyl increase as well as decrease is seen in the concentration time profiles. The content of total organic carbon will be discussed as a

  6. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    CERN Document Server

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  7. UCSB ATR-­NSUF Irradiation DMC Sample Inspection Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, Tarik A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Quintana, Matthew Estevan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Romero, Tobias J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-23

    A variety of tensile samples of Ferritic and Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS or nanoferritic) steels were placed the ATR reactor over 2 Years achieving doses of roughly 4-6 dpa at temperatures of roughly 290°C. After irradiation, samples were shipped from the MFC hot cells at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to the Wing 9 hot cells in the CMR facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Samples were cleaned to removed alpha contamination from the MFC hot cells, and then, as needed removed from their irradiation containers, sorted and inspected. This report will summarize the inspection of the Disc Multipurpose Coupon (DMC) inspection from packet 7-1.

  8. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Readiness to Receive Irradiated Graphite Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen A. Moore

    2011-05-01

    The Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Labs C19 and C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. The CCL was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project to support graphite and ceramic composite research and development activities. The research conducted in this laboratory will support the Advanced Graphite Creep experiments—a major series of material irradiation experiments within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite program. The CCL is designed to characterize and test low activated irradiated materials such as high purity graphite, carbon-carbon composites, silicon-carbide composite, and ceramic materials. The laboratory is fully capable of characterizing material properties for both irradiated and nonirradiated materials. Major infrastructural modifications were undertaken to support this new radiological facility at Idaho National Laboratory. Facility modifications are complete, equipment has been installed, radiological controls and operating procedures have been established and work management documents have been created to place the CCL in readiness to receive irradiated graphite samples.

  9. Petrology, chemistry, age and irradiation history of Luna 24 samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserburg, G. J.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Mcculloch, M. T.; Huneke, J. C.; Dymek, R. F.; Depaolo, D. J.; Chodos, A. A.; Albee, A. L.; Radicati Di Brozolo, F.

    1978-01-01

    The results of petrological, chemical, isotopic age determination and irradiation studies of sample 24170 from the 170 cm depth of the regolith core returned from Mare Crisium by Luna 24 are presented. The sample is found to be comprised of fragments from a single igneous rock, with mineralogical evidence indicating it to be a mare basalt. The crystallization age is determined by Sm-Nd and Ar(40)-Ar(39) ages to be 3.30 AE, establishing the presence of relatively young flows. All soil samples show low trace element compositions with minimum contamination by KREEPUTh-rich materials. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd relations reflect the absence of significant fractionation at ages younger than 4.5 AE. One soil sample shows extremely large neutron capture effects, imposing a new lower limit to the neutron production rate in the regolith and requiring the addition of irradiated materials from depth.

  10. WATER COLUMN DATA AND SPECTRAL IRRADIANCE MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water samples collected monthly, for 18 months, from six sites in the Laguna Madre were analyzed to identify and quantify phytopigments using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). In addition, water column pigment and nutrient data were acquired at 12 stations in Upper ...

  11. A facility for studying irradiation accelerated corrosion in high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiman, Stephen S.; Flick, Alexander; Toader, Ovidiu; Wang, Peng; Samad, Nassim A.; Jiao, Zhijie; Was, Gary S.

    2014-08-01

    A facility for the study of irradiation accelerated corrosion in high temperature water using in situ proton irradiation has been developed and validated. A specially designed beamline and flowing-water corrosion cell added to the 1.7 MV tandem accelerator at the Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory provide the capability to study the simultaneous effects of displacement damage and radiolysis on corrosion. A thin sample serves as both a “window” into the corrosion cell through which the proton beam passes completely, and the sample for assessing irradiation accelerated corrosion. The facility was tested by irradiating stainless steel samples at beam current densities between 0.5 and 10 μA/cm2 in 130 °C and 320 °C deaerated water, and 320 °C water with 3 wppm H2. Increases in the conductivity and dissolved oxygen content of the water varied with the proton beam current, suggesting that proton irradiation was accelerating the corrosion of the sample. Conductivity increases were greatest at 320 °C, while DO increases were highest at 130 °C. The addition of 3 wppm H2 suppressed DO below detectable levels. The facility will enable future studies into the effect of irradiation on corrosion in high temperature water with in situ proton irradiation.

  12. Physical Stability of Oil in Water Emulsions in the Presence of Gamma Irradiated Gum Tragacanth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meybodi, Neda Mollakhalili; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Farhoodi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Gum tragacanth (GT) exuded from an Iranian Astragalus species was γ-irradiated at 0, 0.75, 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 10 kGy and used to stabilize a model oil in water emulsion system. Stability and physicochemical properties of emulsion samples were investigated with respect to the effect of irradiation...... repulsion and structure strength for getting maximum emulsion stability. GT significantly reduced the interfacial tension of the oil and water system, but no significant differences were observed among all irradiation treated and non-irradiated samples. This study revealed that, GT acts as a bifunctional...... emulsifier and irradiation treatment has a great positive influence on its ability to reduce droplets collision frequency and stabilize oil in water emulsion....

  13. Accelerated corrosion and oxide dissolution in 316L stainless steel irradiated in situ in high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiman, Stephen S.; Was, Gary S.

    2017-09-01

    316L stainless steel samples were irradiated with a proton beam while simultaneously exposed to high temperature water with added hydrogen (320 °C, 3 wppm H2, neutral pH) to study the effect of radiation on stainless steel corrosion. Irradiated samples had thinner and more porous inner oxides with a lower chromium content when compared to unirradiated samples. Observations suggest that depletion of chromium from the inner oxide can be attributed to the dissolution of chromium-rich spinel oxides in irradiated water, leading to an accelerated rate of inner oxide dissolution. Sample areas which were not irradiated, but were exposed to the flow of irradiated water were also found to be porous and deficient in chromium, indicating that these phenomena can be attributed primarily to water radiolysis. A new empirical equation for oxide growth and dissolution is used to describe the observed changes in oxide thickness under irradiation. An experiment in which a stainless steel sample was exposed to high temperature water (320 °C, 3 wppm H2, neutral pH) without irradiation, and then exposed for a second time with irradiation was conducted to observe the effect of irradiation on a pre-formed protective film. After the irradiated exposure, the sample exhibited chromium loss in regions which were directly irradiated, but not on regions exposed only to irradiated water, suggesting that a pre-formed protective oxide may be effective in preventing chromium loss due to irradiated water. Additionally, this observation suggests that enhanced kinetics under irradiation may have accelerated dissolution of chromium from the inner oxide.

  14. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured ...

  15. Irradiation accelerated corrosion of 316L stainless steel in simulated primary water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiman, Stephen S.

    The objective of this work is to understand the effects of irradiation on the corrosion of 316L stainless steel in simulated primary water. 316L stainless steel samples were irradiated with a proton beam while simultaneously exposed to simulated PWR primary water to study the effects of radiation on corrosion. A 3.2 MeV proton beam was transmitted through a 37 microm thick sample that served as a "window" into a corrosion cell containing flowing 320° C water with 3 wppm H2. This design permitted radiolysis and displacement damage to occur on the sample surface in contact with the simulated primary water environment. Samples were irradiated for 4, 12, 24, and 72 hrs at dose rates between 400 and 4000 kGy/s, corresponding to damage rates of 7x10-7 to 7x10-6 dpa/s respectively. The structure and composition of the oxide films were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, STEM, and SEM. Sample areas exposed to direct proton irradiation had inner oxide films that were thinner, more porous, and were deficient in chromium when compared to unirradiated oxides. Outer oxides on irradiated samples exhibited a smaller particle size, and had a significant amount of hematite, which was not found on unirradiated samples. The presence of hematite on irradiated samples indicates an increase in electrochemical potential due to irradiation. Dissolution of chromium-rich spinels due to the elevated potential is identified as a likely mechanism behind the loss of inner oxide chromium. It is suggested that the loss of inner-oxide chromium leads to a less protective inner oxide, and a higher rate of oxide dissolution. Sample areas that were not irradiated, but were exposed to the flow of radiolyzed water, exhibited most of the same phenomena found on irradiated areas including loss of Cr and thinner more porous oxides, indicating that water radiolysis is the primary mechanism. When a sample with a pre-formed oxide was irradiated in the same conditions, the region exposed to radiolyzed

  16. Reduction of Staphylococcus Spp. in jerked beef samples after irradiation with Co-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marcio de Albuquerque, E-mail: marcioalbuquerquesilva@gmail.com [Instituto Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Genomica Funcional e Bioinformatica; Costa, Maria Claudia V.Vicalvi; Junior, Carlos Eduardo de O.C.; Solidonio, Evelyne G.; Sena, Kesia Xisto F.R. de; Colaco, Waldeciro, E-mail: claudiavicalvi@hotmail.com, E-mail: oliveiracosta@msn.com, E-mail: evelyne_solidonio@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: wcolaco@ufpe.com.br, E-mail: k.xisto@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work aimed to isolate and identify Staphylococcus genus microorganisms in jerked beef before and after radiation doses between 2, 4 and 6kGy. Jerked beef samples were obtained on a Recife-PE supermarket network and divided into three lots. Under sterile conditions, the meat was cut and weighed. Sub-samples were assigned to the control group and to the irradiation source of cobalt-60 on doses of 2, 4 and 6kGy. The sub-samples were added to an Erlenmeyer flask with 225 ml of sterile water and stirred for 15 minutes creating wash water, and another part was added to an Erlenmeyer flask with 225 ml of sterile distilled water that was at rest at room temperature for 14 hours there is the formation of a water desalting. 1μL aliquots of this water was removed and sown by depletion in sheep blood agar medium and incubated at 35 °C for 24 hours for analysis of bacterial growth. After Gram staining colonies classified as Gram positive arranged in bunches were subjected to biochemical tests for identification. Were isolated and identified 94 strains of the genus Staphylococcus being 72 (76%) of the control group and 22 (24%) after irradiation. Of the 22 isolates, after irradiation, with 2 kGy 7 species were identified as Staphylococcus succinus, Staphylococcus carnosus sub. carnosus, Staphylococcus fleurettii, Staphylococcus saprophyticus sub. saprophyticus, Staphylococcus simulans, Staphylococcus auricularis all coagulase negative and coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus sub. anaerobius. At a dose of 4kGy were identified six species: Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus intermedius, Staphylococcus warneri, Staphylococcus fleurettii, Staphylococcus aureus sub. anaerobius. Staphylococcus simulans, Staphylococcus saprophyticus sub. saprophyticus, and Staphylococcus lugdunensis were isolated and identified after a dose of 6 kGy. Was observed that irradiation significantly reduced microbial load, and increased dose decreased the number of

  17. Characterization and identification of gamma-irradiated sauces by electron spin resonance spectroscopy using different sample pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Kashif; Ahn, Jae-Jun; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Tomato ketchup, barbeque sauce, sweet chili sauce, and spaghetti sauce were gamma irradiated at 0, 1, 5, and 10 kGy. Electron spin resonance (ESR) technique was used to characterize the irradiated sauces, targeting radiation-induced cellulose radicals and using a modified sample pretreatment method. The samples were first washed with water, and then the residues were extracted with alcohol. The non-irradiated sauces exhibited the single central signal, whose intensity showed a significant increase on irradiation. The ESR spectra from the radiation-induced cellulose radicals, with two side peaks (g=2.02012 and g=1.98516) equally spaced (± 3 mT) from the central signal, were also observed in the irradiated sauces. The improvements in the central (natural) and radiation-induced (two side peaks corresponding to the cellulose radicals) signal intensities were obvious, when compared with routine freeze-drying and alcoholic-extraction techniques.

  18. The morphological changes of Ascaris lumbricoides ova in sewage sludge water treated by gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamma, M.; Al-Adawi, M. A.

    2002-10-01

    Untreated wastewater sampled from Damascus sewage water treatment plant containing nematode Ascaris lumbricoides ova were treated using gamma irradiation (doses between 1.5 and 8 kGy), immediately after irradiation the morphological and developmental status of eggs was examined microscopically. Major morphological changes of the contents of the eggs were detected. These eggs were incubated for 8 weeks, after this period no larvae "inside the eggs" were observed. Thus the morphological changes can be used as a viable parameter.

  19. The role of UV-irradiation pretreatment on the degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchaikovskaya, O; Sokolova, I; Mayer, G V; Karetnikova, E; Lipatnikova, E; Kuzmina, S; Volostnov, D

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in water by the combination process of UV-irradiation, humic acids and activated sludge treatment has been studied. The photoreaction rate of all irradiated samples was lowest for the sample irradiated at 308 nm (the XeCl excilamp) in the absence and in the presence of humic acids, and highest for the sample irradiated at 222 nm (the KrCl excilamp). Photolysis of 2,4-D has been shown to enhance the subsequent microbial degradation. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Recommendations for representative ballast water sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollasch, Stephan; David, Matej

    2017-05-01

    Until now, the purpose of ballast water sampling studies was predominantly limited to general scientific interest to determine the variety of species arriving in ballast water in a recipient port. Knowing the variety of species arriving in ballast water also contributes to the assessment of relative species introduction vector importance. Further, some sampling campaigns addressed awareness raising or the determination of organism numbers per water volume to evaluate the species introduction risk by analysing the propagule pressure of species. A new aspect of ballast water sampling, which this contribution addresses, is compliance monitoring and enforcement of ballast water management standards as set by, e.g., the IMO Ballast Water Management Convention. To achieve this, sampling methods which result in representative ballast water samples are essential. We recommend such methods based on practical tests conducted on two commercial vessels also considering results from our previous studies. The results show that different sampling approaches influence the results regarding viable organism concentrations in ballast water samples. It was observed that the sampling duration (i.e., length of the sampling process), timing (i.e., in which point in time of the discharge the sample is taken), the number of samples and the sampled water quantity are the main factors influencing the concentrations of viable organisms in a ballast water sample. Based on our findings we provide recommendations for representative ballast water sampling.

  1. The freezing and thawing of water in poultry meat and vegetables irradiated by electrons at doses of 0.1-4 kGy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubini, B; Ferrante, L; Leonardi, M; Messina, G; Montecchia, F; Ponzi-Bossi, M G

    1993-06-01

    Poultry meat and some vegetables, irradiated by 5 MeV electrons (0.1-4 kGy), were analysed by differential scanning calorimetry, from 24 h after irradiation. The temperature and enthalpy transitions of the water contained in the irradiated samples were measured and compared with those of unirradiated samples. We analysed 18 meat and 10 vegetable samples for each irradiation dose together with a similar number of unirradiated controls. The mean supercooling temperatures of water in the irradiated poultry meat samples and in some vegetables are significantly lower than those of controls. Moreover, the freezing enthalpies of the irradiated poultry breast are significantly lower than those of controls, while they are unchanged in the other cases. The mean ice melting temperatures and enthalpies are similar for all samples. The amount of the lowering of the water-ice transition depends on the nature of the sample and is highest in poultry breast and lowest in vegetables.

  2. Magnificent Ground Water Connection. [Sample Activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    Water conservation and usage is an important concept in science. This document, geared specifically to New England, provides many activities for protecting and discussing ground water situations. Sample activities for grades K-6 include: (1) All the Water in the World; (2) The Case of the Disappearing Water; (3) Deep Subjects--Wells and Ground…

  3. Water sample-collection and distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Collection and distribution system samples water from six designated stations, filtered if desired, and delivers it to various analytical sensors. System may be controlled by Water Monitoring Data Acquisition System or operated manually.

  4. [Water Sample Results : Rocky Mountain Arsenal : 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A memorandum, from sample collector (organization unknown) Cathy H. to Rocky Mountain Arsenal staff, prefaces tabular water sample results collected from various...

  5. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-05-21

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of {sup 241}Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  6. Photodesradation of N-nitrosodiethylamine in water with UV irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU BingBing; CHEN ZhongLin; QI Fei; YANG Lei

    2008-01-01

    The direct photolysis of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) in water with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was investigated. Results showed that NDEA could be completely degraded under the direct UV irradiation. The effects of the experimental conditions, including the initial concentration of NDEA, humic acid and solution pH, were studied. The degradation products of NDEA were identified and quantified with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). It was confirmed that methylamine (MA), dimethylamine (DMA), ethylamine (EA), diethylamine (DEA), NO-2 and NO3- were the main degradation products. The photolysis degradation mechanism of NDEA was also discussed. As a result of N-N bond fission, NDEA was degraded by direct UV irradiation.

  7. Design of sample carrier for neutron irradiation facility at TRIGA MARK II nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Y.; Hamid, N. A.; Mansor, M. A.; Ahmad, M. H. A. R. M.; Yusof, M. R.; Yazid, H.; Mohamed, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work is to design a sample carrier for neutron irradiation experiment at beam ports of research nuclear reactor, the Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP). The sample carrier was designed so that irradiation experiment can be performed safely by researchers. This development will resolve the transferring of sample issues faced by the researchers at the facility when performing neutron irradiation studies. The function of sample carrier is to ensure the sample for the irradiation process can be transferred into and out from the beam port of the reactor safely and effectively. The design model used was House of Quality Method (HOQ) which is usually used for developing specifications for product and develop numerical target to work towards and determining how well we can meet up to the needs. The chosen sample carrier (product) consists of cylindrical casing shape with hydraulic cylinders transportation method. The sample placing can be done manually, locomotion was by wheel while shielding used was made of boron materials. The sample carrier design can shield thermal neutron during irradiation of sample so that only low fluencies fast neutron irradiates the sample.

  8. The morphological changes of Ascaris lumbricoides ova in sewage sludge water treated by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamma, M. E-mail: atom@sy.net; Al-Adawi, M.A

    2002-10-01

    Untreated wastewater sampled from Damascus sewage water treatment plant containing nematode Ascaris lumbricoides ova were treated using gamma irradiation (doses between 1.5 and 8 kGy), immediately after irradiation the morphological and developmental status of eggs was examined microscopically. Major morphological changes of the contents of the eggs were detected. These eggs were incubated for 8 weeks, after this period no larvae 'inside the eggs' were observed. Thus the morphological changes can be used as a viable parameter.

  9. Radiolysis driven changes to oxide stability during irradiation-corrosion of 316L stainless steel in high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiman, Stephen S.; Bartels, David M.; Was, Gary S.

    2017-09-01

    316L stainless steel samples were irradiated with a proton beam while simultaneously exposed to high temperature water with hydrogen (320 °C, 3 wppm H2, neutral pH) to study the effect of radiation on corrosion. The inner oxides on irradiated samples were found to be depleted in chromium when compared to the inner oxides on unirradiated samples exposed to the same conditions. Additionally, hematite was found on the oxide surfaces of irradiated samples, but not on unirradiated samples. Sample areas which were not directly irradiated but were exposed to the flow of irradiated water also exhibited chromium-deficient inner oxides and had hematite on their surfaces, so it is concluded that water radiolysis is the primary driver of both effects. Thermodynamic calculations and radiolysis modeling were used to show that radiolytic production of hydrogen peroxide was sufficient to raise corrosion potential high enough to cause the dissolution of chromium-rich spinel oxides which make up the inner oxide layer on stainless steel in high temperature water.

  10. Water Sample Points, Navajo Nation, 2000, USACE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This point shapefile presents the locations and results for water samples collected on the Navajo Nation by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for the US...

  11. CRUMP 2003 Selected Water Sample Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point locations and water sampling results performed in 2003 by the Church Rock Uranium Monitoring Project (CRUMP) a consortium of organizations (Navajo Nation...

  12. Sample Management System for Heavy Ion Irradiation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A robotic sample management device and system for the exposure of biological and material specimens to heavy ion beams of the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL)...

  13. Sample Management System for Heavy Ion Irradiation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A robotic sample management device and system for the exposure of biological and material specimens to heavy ion beams of the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL)...

  14. Disinfection of contaminated water by using solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caslake, Laurie F; Connolly, Daniel J; Menon, Vilas; Duncanson, Catriona M; Rojas, Ricardo; Tavakoli, Javad

    2004-02-01

    Contaminated water causes an estimated 6 to 60 billion cases of gastrointestinal illness annually. The majority of these cases occur in rural areas of developing nations where the water supply remains polluted and adequate sanitation is unavailable. A portable, low-cost, and low-maintenance solar unit to disinfect unpotable water has been designed and tested. The solar disinfection unit was tested with both river water and partially processed water from two wastewater treatment plants. In less than 30 min in midday sunlight, the unit eradicated more than 4 log10 U (99.99%) of bacteria contained in highly contaminated water samples. The solar disinfection unit has been field tested by Centro Panamericano de Ingenieria Sanitaria y Ciencias del Ambiente in Lima, Peru. At moderate light intensity, the solar disinfection unit was capable of reducing the bacterial load in a controlled contaminated water sample by 4 log10 U and disinfected approximately 1 liter of water in 30 min.

  15. Embrittlement of low copper VVER 440 surveillance samples neutron-irradiated to high fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Russell, K. F.; Kocik, J.; Keilova, E.

    2000-11-01

    An atom probe tomography microstructural characterization of low copper (0.06 at.% Cu) surveillance samples from a VVER 440 reactor has revealed manganese and silicon segregation to dislocations and other ultrafine features in neutron-irradiated base and weld materials (fluences 1×10 25 m-2 and 5×10 24 m-2, E>0.5 MeV, respectively). The results indicate that there is an additional mechanism of embrittlement during neutron irradiation that manifests itself at high fluences.

  16. Effects of water and irradiation temperatures on IASCC susceptibility of type 316 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Takashi E-mail: ttsukada@popsvr.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Miwa, Yukio; Jitsukawa, Shiro; Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Ouchi, Asao

    2004-08-01

    Effects of water and irradiation temperatures on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of type 316 stainless steel were investigated. Type 316 stainless steel was irradiated at 333-673 K to a dose level of 16 dpa. Susceptibility to IASCC was evaluated by slow strain rate testing in oxygenated water in the temperature range of 513-573 K. Irradiation at 603 and 673 K caused IASCC in 513 K water, but irradiation below 473 K did not induce IASCC at 513 K. Specimens irradiated at 333 K did not show IASCC susceptibility in 513 K water, but high susceptibility was observed in 573 K water. Effect of irradiation temperature is discussed from the view points of microstructural and microcompositional changes.

  17. Optimization of Eosine Analyses in Water Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kola, Liljana

    2010-01-01

    The fluorescence ability of Eosine enables its using as artificial tracer in the water system studies. The fluorescence intensity of fluorescent dyes in water samples depends on their physical and chemical properties, such as pH, temperature, presence of oxidants, etc. This paper presents the experience of the Center of Applied Nuclear Physics, Tirana, in this field. The problem is dealt with in relation to applying Eosine to trace and determine water movements within the karstic system and underground waters. We have used for this study the standard solutions of Eosine. The method we have elaborated to this purpose made it possible to optimize procedures we use to analyze samples for the presence of Eosine and measure its content, even in trace levels, by the means of a Perkin Elmer LS 55 Luminescence Spectrometer.

  18. Bacterial contamination in cold water samples obtained from water dispensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhata, Katsunori; Ishizaki, Naoto; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a basic study in order to evaluate the bacterial contamination in water dispensers. Water samples were obtained from water dispensers from October 2012 to November 2013, and standard plate counts (at 36˚C, 24 h) of the samples, as well as heterotrophic plate counts (at 25˚C, 7 d), were estimated with the standard methods for the examination of drinking water in Japan. Standard plate counts exceeding the water-quality standard (1.0×10(2) CFU/ml) were observed in 42 of the 140 samples (30.0%), with a maximum detected bacterial count of 2.1×10(5) CFU/ml. The rate of the standard plate counts exceeding the water quality standard tended to be higher when using a one-way type method or water dispensers with natural water. Ralstonia spp. was most commonly isolated, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated in a few cases. Some opportunistic pathogens were also isolated, suggesting that we should be more concerned about bacterial contamination in cold water supplied from water dispensers.

  19. Determination of irradiated reactor uranium in soil samples in Belarus using 236U as irradiated uranium tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Vladislav P; Matusevich, Janna L; Kudrjashov, Vladimir P; Boulyga, Sergei F; Becker, J Sabine

    2002-12-01

    This work presents experimental results on the distribution of irradiated reactor uranium from fallout after the accident at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in comparison to natural uranium distribution in different soil types. Oxidation processes and vertical migration of irradiated uranium in soils typical of the 30 km relocation area around Chernobyl NPP were studied using 236U as the tracer for irradiated reactor uranium and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry as the analytical method for uranium isotope ratio measurements. Measurements of natural uranium yielded significant variations of its concentration in upper soil layers from 2 x 10(-7) g g(-1) to 3.4 x 10(-6) g g(-1). Concentrations of irradiated uranium in the upper 0-10 cm soil layers at the investigated sampling sites varied from 5 x 10(-12) g g(-1) to 2 x 10(-6) g g(-1) depending on the distance from Chernobyl NPP. In the majority of investigated soil profiles 78% to 97% of irradiated "Chernobyl" uranium is still contained in the upper 0-10 cm soil layers. The physical and chemical characteristics of the soil do not have any significant influence on processes of fuel particle destruction. Results obtained using carbonate leaching of 236U confirmed that more than 60% of irradiated "Chernobyl" uranium is still in a tetravalent form, ie. it is included in the fuel matrix (non-oxidized fuel UO2). The average value of the destruction rate of fuel particles determined for the Western radioactive trace (k = 0.030 +/- 0.005 yr(-1)) and for the Northern radioactive trace (k = 0.035 + 0.009 yr(-1)) coincide within experimental errors. Use of leaching of fission products in comparison to leaching of uranium for study of the destruction rate of fuel particles yielded poor coincidence due to the fact that use of fission products does not take into account differences in the chemical properties of fission products and fuel matrix (uranium).

  20. Ion irradiation-induced structure damage to botanic samples using the ion transmission energy spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of irradiation-induced damage ofbotanic samples caused by low energy heavy ions, transmission energy spectrum mea-surement was performed. Kidney bean slice samples 100μm in thickness were irradi-ated by 50 kev N+ ions. The irradiation beam current density was about 30μA/cm2,and the irradiation ion doses were 1×1015, 1×1016, 3×1016 and 1×1017 ions@cm-2,respectively. A target set up that could greatly reduce the incident ion current densitywas designed to achieve the damage-free measurement. The 3.2 MeV H+ transmittedion energy spectrum measurement was carried out before and after the irradiation.From the transmission ion energy spectrum, it was found that the kidney bean sliceitself was structurally inhomogeneous compared with the PET films (C10HsO4). Ourresults indicated that the average mass thickness changed little when the N+ iondose was below 3×1016 ions.cm-2, but changed obviously whcn ion dose was beyond3×1016 ions.cm-2.

  1. Characteristics of the KUR Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility as a neutron irradiation field with variable energy spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2000-10-01

    The Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility (HWNIF) of the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) was updated in March 1996, mainly for the improvement in neutron capture therapy (NCT). A striking feature of the updated facility is that the energy spectrum of the neutron beam can be controlled from almost pure thermal to epi-thermal, within 5 min by remote control under a continuous reactor operation. This feature is advantageous not only to medical science such as NCT, but also to the other research fields such as physics, engineering, biology, etc. The performance of the updated facility as a neutron irradiation field with variable energy spectra, was characterized. Thermal neutron flux, cadmium ratio, gamma-ray dose rate, etc., at the normal irradiation position for various irradiation modes were determined, mainly on the basis of the measurement using gold activation foils and thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The emphasis was on the performance of the new neutron energy spectrum shifter and cadmium thermal neutron filter, that control the mixing ratio of thermal and epi-thermal neutrons, through the change in the heavy water thickness of the spectrum shifter and the aperture size of the cadmium filter. The evaluation of neutron energy spectra at the normal irradiation position was also performed for three representative irradiation modes, in which the neutron intensities are largest of all the irradiation modes. In addition, the irradiation characteristics of two irradiation devices, namely the Irradiation Rail Device and the Remote Patient Carrier, which were updated concurrently with the facility update, were evaluated.

  2. Tank Access for Ballast Water Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation. ~~r R~ obert C. chards "Director of Technical Development United States Coast Guard Research...Water Sampling Protocols (Technical Report No. 18). Hobart, Tasmania: Centre for Research on Introduced Marine Pests. U.S. Department of

  3. Reliability of chemical analyses of water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beardon, R.

    1989-11-01

    Ground-water quality investigations require reliable chemical analyses of water samples. Unfortunately, laboratory analytical results are often unreliable. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s solution to this problem was to establish a two phase quality assurance program for the analysis of water samples. In the first phase, eight laboratories analyzed three solutions of known composition. The analytical accuracy of each laboratory was ranked and three laboratories were awarded contracts. The second phase consists of on-going monitoring of the reliability of the selected laboratories. The following conclusions are based on two years experience with the UMTRA Project`s Quality Assurance Program. The reliability of laboratory analyses should not be taken for granted. Analytical reliability may be independent of the prices charged by laboratories. Quality assurance programs benefit both the customer and the laboratory.

  4. Reliability of chemical analyses of water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beardon, R.

    1989-11-01

    Ground-water quality investigations require reliable chemical analyses of water samples. Unfortunately, laboratory analytical results are often unreliable. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s solution to this problem was to establish a two phase quality assurance program for the analysis of water samples. In the first phase, eight laboratories analyzed three solutions of known composition. The analytical accuracy of each laboratory was ranked and three laboratories were awarded contracts. The second phase consists of on-going monitoring of the reliability of the selected laboratories. The following conclusions are based on two years experience with the UMTRA Project`s Quality Assurance Program. The reliability of laboratory analyses should not be taken for granted. Analytical reliability may be independent of the prices charged by laboratories. Quality assurance programs benefit both the customer and the laboratory.

  5. The effect of e-beam irradiation on water splitting protochloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sam S. [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Photocatalysis of water splitting promises a low-cost and environmentally friendly hydrogen production via free solar energy. We used the well-controlled aerosol deposition (AD) technique to fabricate TiO2 thin film as photo-electrodes. The AD TiO2 films were irradiated with lower energy electron beam from a 0.2 MeV (1mA) electrostatic accelerator under ambient conditions. The dose absorbed to the sample is 12kGy. The current-potential curve results showed the enhancement of photocurrent density after e-beam irradiation from 39.2 to 204.3 {mu}A/cm2 at +0.20V vs. Ag/AgCl.

  6. Irradiation test of mirror samples for the LHCb SciFi tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Joram, Christian; Gavardi, Laura; Ravotti, Federico; Schneider, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The optical mirrors at the inner ends of the SciFi fibre modules in the upgraded LHCb detector will be exposed to an ionising dose reaching 35 kGy for an integrated luminosity of 50 /fb. This note describes a campaign at the cyclotron at KIT where 7 different samples were irradiated with 23 MeV protons. The samples consisted of plastic scintillator tiles, on which two different mirror foils – aluminised mylar and 3M ESR - were attached with two different glues – Epotek H301-2FL and Dow Corning RTV 3145. The transmission and/or reflectivity of the samples were measured before and after irradiation. The measurements reveal the combination of 3M ESR foil and Epotek H301-2FL to give the highest reflectivity, before and also after irradiation. In all cases, the irradiation leads only to a small, i.e. less than 10%, degradation of the transmission or reflectivity. From a radiation hardness point of view, all investigated mirror samples qualify for use in the SciFi detector.

  7. Modelling of Disinfection by-products formation via UV irradiation of the water from Tajan River (source water for Sari drinking water, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahbakhsh Javid

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study Irradiation with ultraviolet light (UV is used for the disinfection of bacterial contaminants in the production of potable water. The main objective of the study was to investigate and model Disinfection By-Products (DBPs formation due to the UV Irradiation of the Tajan River water under different Irradiation conditions. Materials & Methods:  Water samples were collected throughout September 2011 to August 2013. Transportation of the sample to the laboratory was done on ice in a cooler, and physiochemical analysis was conducted immediately within one day. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC was determined by a TOC analyzer. Irradiation experiments were conducted in a series of 25 mL glass serum bottles with Teflon septa. The present study adopts an orthogonal design. The design involved irradiation with UV at a UV/DOC ratio of 0.5–3.0 and incubating (headspace-free storage for 5–25 sec. A 1 mM phosphate buffer maintained the pH at 6, 7, or 8 respectively, and an incubator maintained the temperature (Temp at 15, 20, or 25 °C respectively. The development of empirical models for DBPs formation used a multivariate regression procedure (stepwise which applied the SPSS System for Windows (Version 16.0. Results:  The results showed that the total DBPs formation ranged between 12.3 and 67.4 mg/l and that control of the levels was primarily due to the reaction time and the dissolved organic carbon level (DOC in the water. Conclusions:  Reaction time and level of DOC concentrations in water exerted a dominant influence on the formation of DBPs during the UV irradiation of water from the Tajan River. The relationships between the measured and predicted values were satisfactory with R 2 values ranging from 0.89 (for Octanal–0.92 (for Formaldehydes. The DOC level in water is the key factor in controlling DBPs formation.

  8. Characteristics of charge and discharge of PMMA samples due to electron irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    封国宝; 王芳; 胡天存; 曹猛

    2015-01-01

    In this study, using a comprehensive numerical simulation of charge and discharge processes, we investigate the formation and evolution of negative charge and discharge characteristics of a grounded PMMA film irradiated by a non-focused electron beam. Electron scattering and transport processes in the sample are simulated with the Monte Carlo and the finite-different time-domain (FDTD) methods, respectively. The properties of charge and discharge processes are presented by the evolution of internal currents, charge quantity, surface potential, and discharge time. Internal charge accumulation in the sample may reach saturation by primary electron (PE) irradiation providing the charge duration is enough. Internal free electrons will run off to the ground in the form of leakage current due to charge diffusion and drift during the discharge process after irradiation, while trapped electrons remain. The negative surface potential determined by the charging quantity decreases to its saturation in the charge process, and then increases in the discharge process. A larger thickness of the PMMA film will result in greater charge amount and surface potential in charge saturation and in final discharge state, while the electron mobility of the material has little effects on the final discharge state. Moreover, discharge time is less for smaller thickness or larger electron mobility. The presented results can be helpful for estimating and weakening the charging of insulating samples especially under the intermittent electron beam irradiation in related surface analysis or measurement.

  9. Characteristics of recycled and electron beam irradiated high density polyethylene samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Jessica R.; Gabriel, Leandro; Geraldo, Aurea B.C.; Moura, Eduardo, E-mail: jrcardoso@ipen.br, E-mail: lgabriell@gmail.com, E-mail: ageraldo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Polymers modification by irradiation is a well-known process that allows degradation and cross-linking in concurrent events; this last is expected when an increase of mechanical properties is required. Actually, the interest of recycling and reuse of polymeric material is linked to the increase of plastics ending up in waste streams. Therefore, these both irradiation and recycling process may be conducted to allow a new use to this material that would be discarded by an improvement of its mechanical properties. In this work, the High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) matrix has been recycled five times from original substrate. The electron beam irradiation process was applied from 50 kGy to 200 kGy in both original and recycled samples; in this way, mechanical properties and thermal characteristics were evaluated. The results of applied process and material characterization are discussed. (author)

  10. Design of water feeding system for IASCC irradiation tests at JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Masaru; Nabeya, Hideaki; Mori, Yuichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-12-01

    In relation to the aging of light water reactors (LWRs), the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) has been regarded as a significant and urgent issue for the reliability of in-core components and materials of LWRs, and the irradiation research is now under schedule. It is essential for IASCC studies to irradiated materials under well-controlled conditions simulating LWR in-core environment. Therefore, a new water feeding system to supply high temperature water into irradiation capsules in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) has been designed and will be installed in near future. This report describes the specification and performance of the water feeding system that is designed to supply high temperature water to simulate BWR conditions in irradiation capsules. This design work was performed in the fiscal year 1999. (author)

  11. Formation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Electron Irradiated Crystalline Water Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, W; Kaiser, R I; Zheng, Weijun; Jewitt, David; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2006-01-01

    Water ice is abundant both astrophysically, for example in molecular clouds, and in planetary systems. The Kuiper belt objects, many satellites of the outer solar system, the nuclei of comets and some planetary rings are all known to be water-rich. Processing of water ice by energetic particles and ultraviolet photons plays an important role in astrochemistry. To explore the detailed nature of this processing, we have conducted a systematic laboratory study of the irradiation of crystalline water ice in an ultrahigh vacuum setup by energetic electrons holding a linear energy transfer of 4.3 +/- 0.1 keV mm-1. The irradiated samples were monitored during the experiment both on line and in situ via mass spectrometry (gas phase) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (solid state). We observed the production of hydrogen and oxygen, both molecular and atomic, and of hydrogen peroxide. The likely reaction mechanisms responsible for these species are discussed. Additional formation routes were derived from the ...

  12. Photodegradation of Trace Trichloronitromethane in Water under UV Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study’s objective was to study the photodegradation of TCNM (trichloronitromethane in water under UV light. The effects of light intensity, nitrate ions, chloride ions, humic acid, and pH on the photochemical degradation of TCNM were investigated under the irradiation of low pressure mercury lamp (λ = 254 nm, 12 W. The photodegradation rate of TCNM was found to increase with increasing the concentration of nitrate ions, chloride ions, humic acid, pH, and light intensity. The photodegradation of TCNM was examined at pH 6.0 with initial concentrations (C0 of TCNM at 10.0–200.0 µg/L. The overall rate of degradation of TCNM was modeled using a pseudofirst-order rate law. Finally, the proposed mechanism involved in the photodegradation of TCNM was also discussed by analysis. Results of this study can contribute to the development of new source control strategies for minimization of TCNM risk at drinking water and wastewater utilities.

  13. Design study of water chemistry control system for IASCC irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Yuichiro; Ide, Hiroshi; Nabeya, Hideaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tsukada, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-02-01

    In relation to the aging of Light Water Reactor (LWR), the Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) has been regarded as a significant and urgent issue for the reliability of in-core components of LWR, and the irradiation research on the IASCC is now under schedule. With the progress of the irradiation research on reactor materials, well-controlled environment conditions during irradiation testing are required. Especially for irradiation testing of IASCC studies, water chemistry control is essential in addition to the control of neutron fluence and irradiation temperature. According to these requirements, at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), an irradiation testing facility that simulates in-core environment of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) has been designed to be installed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). This facility is composed of the Saturated Temperature Capsules (SATCAP) that are installed into the JMTR's core to irradiate material specimens, the Water Control Unit that is able to supply high-temperature and high-pressure chemical controlled water to SATCAP, and other components. This report describes the design study of water chemistry control system of the Water Control Unit. The design work has been performed in the fiscal year 1999. (author)

  14. Spectral irradiance measurement and actinic radiometer calibration for UV water disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperfeld, Peter; Barton, Bettina; Pape, Sven; Towara, Anna-Lena; Eggers, Jutta; Hopfenmüller, Gabriel

    2014-12-01

    In a joint project, sglux and PTB investigated and developed methods and equipment to measure the spectral and weighted irradiance of high-efficiency UV-C emitters used in water disinfection plants. A calibration facility was set up to calibrate the microbicidal irradiance responsivity of actinic radiometers with respect to the weighted spectral irradiance of specially selected low-pressure mercury and medium-pressure mercury UV lamps. To verify the calibration method and to perform on-site tests, spectral measurements were carried out directly at water disinfection plants in operation. The weighted microbicidal irradiance of the plants was calculated and compared to the measurements of various actinic radiometers.

  15. USE OF NATURAL WATERS AS U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY REFERENCE SAMPLES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzer, Victor J.

    1985-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey conducts research and collects hydrologic data relating to the Nation's water resources. Seven types of natural matrix reference water samples are prepared for use in the Survey's quality assurance program. These include samples containing major constituents, trace metals, nutrients, herbicides, insecticides, trace metals in a water and suspended-sediment mixture, and precipitation (snowmelt). To prepare these reference samples, natural water is collected in plastic drums and the sediment is allowed to settle. The water is then filtered, selected constituents are added, and if necessary the water is acidified and sterilized by ultraviolet irradiation before bottling in plastic or glass. These reference samples are distributed twice yearly to more than 100 laboratories for chemical analysis. The most probable values for each constituent are determined by evaluating the data submitted by the laboratories using statistical techniques recommended by ASTM.

  16. ESR detection procedure of irradiated papaya containing high water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2011-05-01

    ESR signals were recorded from irradiated papaya at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), and freeze-dried irradiated papaya at room temperature (295 K). Two side peaks from the flesh at the liquid nitrogen temperature indicated a linear dose response for 3-14 days after the γ-irradiation. The line shapes recorded from the freeze-dried specimens were sharper than those at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  17. ESR detection procedure of irradiated papaya containing high water content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro, E-mail: kikuchi.masahiro@jaea.go.j [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Shimoyama, Yuhei [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Ukai, Mitsuko [Hokkaido University of Education, 1-2 Hachiman-cho, Hakodate, Hokkaido 040-8567 (Japan); Kobayashi, Yasuhiko [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    ESR signals were recorded from irradiated papaya at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), and freeze-dried irradiated papaya at room temperature (295 K). Two side peaks from the flesh at the liquid nitrogen temperature indicated a linear dose response for 3-14 days after the {gamma}-irradiation. The line shapes recorded from the freeze-dried specimens were sharper than those at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  18. Effects of γ-radiation on microbial load and antioxidant proprieties in black tea irradiated with different water activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanaro, G. B.; Hassimotto, N. M. A.; Bastos, D. H. M.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the effect of gamma radiation on black tea irradiated with different water activities. The black tea samples had their Aw adjusted to three values (0.92, 0.65, and 0.18) and were irradiated in 60Co source at doses of 0, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 kGy. The methods used were: microbiology, total phenolic compounds quantification, antioxidant activity by ORAC, and quantification of the main antioxidants. It was observed that the greater the amount of free water present in the samples, lower was the dose to achieve microbiological control. Regardless the water activity used, there was no difference in content of the phenolic compounds and at the mainly theaflavins, as well in the antioxidant activity at doses up to 5.0 kGy.

  19. Luminescence imaging of water during carbon-ion irradiation for range estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Akagi, Takashi; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Koyama, Shuji; Morishita, Yuki; Sekihara, Eri; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    The authors previously reported successful luminescence imaging of water during proton irradiation and its application to range estimation. However, since the feasibility of this approach for carbon-ion irradiation remained unclear, the authors conducted luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation and estimated the ranges. The authors placed a pure-water phantom on the patient couch of a carbon-ion therapy system and measured the luminescence images with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device camera during carbon-ion irradiation. The authors also carried out imaging of three types of phantoms (tap-water, an acrylic block, and a plastic scintillator) and compared their intensities and distributions with those of a phantom containing pure-water. The luminescence images of pure-water phantoms during carbon-ion irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured carbon-ion ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained by simulation. The image of the tap-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as that of the pure-water phantom. The acrylic block phantom's luminescence image produced seven times higher luminescence and had a 13% shorter range than that of the water phantoms; the range with the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The plastic scintillator showed ∼15 000 times higher light than that of water. Luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation of water is not only possible but also a promising method for range estimation in carbon-ion therapy.

  20. Effects of UV irradiation and UV/chlorine co-exposure on natural organic matter in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zaili; Yang, Xin; Xu, Yiyue; Liang, Yongmei, E-mail: liangym@mail.sysu.edu.cn

    2012-01-01

    The effects of co-exposure to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (with either low- or medium-pressure UV lamps) and free chlorine (chloramine) at practical relevant conditions on changes in natural organic matter (NOM) properties were investigated using four waters. The changes were characterized using the specific disinfection by-product formation potential (SDBPFP), specific total organic halogen formation potential (STOXFP), differential UV absorbance ( Increment UVA), and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). The results for exposure to UV irradiation alone and for samples with no exposure were also obtained. The SDBPFPs in all UV-irradiated NOM waters observed were higher than those of non-irradiated samples. UV irradiation led to increases in STOXFPs as a result of chlorination, but no changes, or only small decreases, from chloramination. UV irradiation alone led to positive Increment UVA spectra of the four NOM waters; co-exposure to UV and chlorine gave larger negative Increment UVA spectra than those obtained by chlorine exposure alone. No obvious changes in SEC results were observed for samples only irradiated with UV light; co-exposure gave no detectable changes in the abundances of small fractions for exposure to chlorine only. Both UV photooxidation and photocatalytic oxidation appear to affect the reactivity of the NOM toward subsequent chlorination, and the magnitude of the changes is generally greater for medium-pressure lamps than for low-pressure lamps. These results suggest that applying UV disinfection technology to a particular source may not always be disinfection by-product-problem-free, and the interactions between UV light, chlorine, and NOM may need to be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discussed the effects of co-exposure to UV light and chlorine on properties of natural organic matters in waters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UV irradiation led to increases in SDBPFP and STOXFP of NOM waters from chlorination. Black

  1. Heating and temperature gradients of lipid bilayer samples induced by RF irradiation in MAS solid-state NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Zhengfeng; Zhao, Weijing; Wang, Liying; Yang, Jun

    2016-05-09

    The MAS solid-state NMR has been a powerful technique for studying membrane proteins within the native-like lipid bilayer environment. In general, RF irradiation in MAS NMR experiments can heat and potentially destroy expensive membrane protein samples. However, under practical MAS NMR experimental conditions, detailed characterization of RF heating effect of lipid bilayer samples is still lacking. Herein, using (1) H chemical shift of water for temperature calibration, we systematically study the dependence of RF heating on hydration levels and salt concentrations of three lipids in MAS NMR experiments. Under practical (1) H decoupling conditions used in biological MAS NMR experiments, three lipids show different dependence of RF heating on hydration levels as well as salt concentrations, which are closely associated with the properties of lipids. The maximum temperature elevation of about 10 °C is similar for the three lipids containing 200% hydration, which is much lower than that in static solid-state NMR experiments. The RF heating due to salt is observed to be less than that due to hydration, with a maximum temperature elevation of less than 4 °C in the hydrated samples containing 120 mmol l(-1) of salt. Upon RF irradiation, the temperature gradient across the sample is observed to be greatly increased up to 20 °C, as demonstrated by the remarkable broadening of (1) H signal of water. Based on detailed characterization of RF heating effect, we demonstrate that RF heating and temperature gradient can be significantly reduced by decreasing the hydration levels of lipid bilayer samples from 200% to 30%. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Fabrication of SERS Active Surface on Polyimide Sample by Excimer Laser Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Csizmadia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A possible application of excimer laser irradiation for the preparation of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS substrate is demonstrated. A polyimide foil of 125 μm thickness was irradiated by 240 pulses of focused ArF excimer laser beam (λ = 193 nm, FWHM = 20 ns. The applied fluence was varied between 40 and 80 mJ/cm2. After laser processing, the sample was coated with 40 nm silver by PLD in order to create a conducting layer required for the SERS application. The SERS activity of the samples was tested by Raman microscopy. The Raman spectra of Rhodamine 6G aqueous solution (c=10−3 mol/dm3 were collected from the patterned and metalized areas. For areas prepared at 40–60 mJ/cm2 laser fluences, the measured Raman intensities have shown a linear dependence on the applied laser fluence, while above 60 mJ/cm2 saturation was observed. The morphology of the SERS active surface areas was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Finite element modeling was performed in order to simulate the laser-absorption induced heating of the polyimide foil. The simulation resulted in the temporal and spatial distribution of the estimated temperature in the irradiated polyimide sample, which are important for understanding the structure formation process.

  3. Inactivation of Aspergillus flavus in drinking water after treatment with UV irradiation followed by chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Gabr, Hamid Mohammad [Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Sciences, and Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Coast and Wetland Ecosystems, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zheng, Tianling [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Sciences, and Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Coast and Wetland Ecosystems, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Yu, Xin, E-mail: xyu@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China)

    2013-10-01

    The disinfection process for inactivating microorganisms at drinking water treatment plants is aimed for safety of drinking water for humans from a microorganism, such as bacteria, viruses, algae, fungi by using chlorination, ozonation, UV irradiation, etc. In the present study, a combination of two disinfectants, UV irradiation followed by chlorination, was evaluated for inactivating Aspergillus flavus under low contact time and low dosage of UV irradiation. The results indicated an inverse correlation between the inactivation of A. flavus by using UV irradiation only or chlorination alone. By using UV radiation, the 2 log{sub 10} control of A. flavus was achieved after 30 s of irradiation, while chlorination was observed to be more effective than UV, where the 2 log was achieved at chlorine concentration of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mg/l, in contact time of 60, 5, 1 and 1 min, respectively. However, combined use (UV irradiation followed by chlorination) was more effective than using either UV or chlorination alone; 5 s UV irradiation followed by chlorination produced 4 log{sub 10} reduction of A. flavus at chlorine concentrations of 2 and 3 mg/l under a contact time of 15 min. The results indicated that efficiency of UV irradiation improves when followed by chlorination at low concentrations. - Highlights: • As a disinfectant, chlorine is more effective than UV in inactivating Aspergillus flavus. • As a combined method, UV irradiation followed by chlorination shows high efficiency. • UV irradiation can improve effectiveness of chlorination in reducing Aspergillus flavus.

  4. DNA damage focus analysis in blood samples of minipigs reveals acute partial body irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lamkowski

    Full Text Available Radiation accidents frequently involve acute high dose partial body irradiation leading to victims with radiation sickness and cutaneous radiation syndrome that implements radiation-induced cell death. Cells that are not lethally hit seek to repair ionizing radiation (IR induced damage, albeit at the expense of an increased risk of mutation and tumor formation due to misrepair of IR-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs. The response to DNA damage includes phosphorylation of histone H2AX in the vicinity of DSBs, creating foci in the nucleus whose enumeration can serve as a radiation biodosimeter. Here, we investigated γH2AX and DNA repair foci in peripheral blood lymphocytes of Göttingen minipigs that experienced acute partial body irradiation (PBI with 49 Gy (± 6% Co-60 γ-rays of the upper lumbar region. Blood samples taken 4, 24 and 168 hours post PBI were subjected to γ-H2AX, 53BP1 and MRE11 focus enumeration. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL of 49 Gy partial body irradiated minipigs were found to display 1-8 DNA damage foci/cell. These PBL values significantly deceed the high foci numbers observed in keratinocyte nuclei of the directly γ-irradiated minipig skin regions, indicating a limited resident time of PBL in the exposed tissue volume. Nonetheless, PBL samples obtained 4 h post IR in average contained 2.2% of cells displaying a pan-γH2AX signal, suggesting that these received a higher IR dose. Moreover, dispersion analysis indicated partial body irradiation for all 13 minipigs at 4 h post IR. While dose reconstruction using γH2AX DNA repair foci in lymphocytes after in vivo PBI represents a challenge, the DNA damage focus assay may serve as a rapid, first line indicator of radiation exposure. The occurrence of PBLs with pan-γH2AX staining and of cells with relatively high foci numbers that skew a Poisson distribution may be taken as indicator of acute high dose partial body irradiation, particularly when samples are available

  5. Numerical analysis of irradiated Am samples in experimental fast reactor Joyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuro; Shiba, Tomo-oki; Saito, Masaki [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo, 1528550 (Japan); Koyama, Shin-ichi; Maeda, Shigetaka, E-mail: sagara@nr.titech.ac.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Nanta-cho, O-arai machi, Ibaraki, 3111393 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    Americium is a key element to design the FBR based nuclear fuel cycle, because of its long-term high radiological toxicity as well as a resource of even-mass-number plutonium by its transmutation in reactors, which contributes the enhancement of proliferation resistance. The present paper deals with the numerical analysis of the Am sample irradiation in Joyo to examine the transmutation performance of pure isotope in fast neutron environment during the irradiation, and deals with the comparison with the experimental result to evaluate the accuracy of current available numerical tool. In {sup 241}Am pure isotope sample, the burn-up calculation of Am transmutation ratio and principal nuclides accumulation are agreed with the measured data within 1-{sigma} uncertainty caused of cross-section covariance. Isomeric ratio of {sup 242}Am in total {sup 241}Am capture reaction were calculated as 0.852{+-}0.016 in the core and 0.85{+-}0.025 in the axial and radial reactors. The current data and recently reported data by Koyama et. al 2008 support the latest version of nuclear data sets in ENDFB-VII and JENDL/AC-2008. From the view point of proliferation resistance, it was confirmed {sup 241}Amp reduces un-attractive Pu to abuse from the beginning to the end of irradiation, and it would have important role to denature Pu in future FBR based nuclear fuel cycle.

  6. Effect of alpha self irradiation on helium migration in (U,Pu)O{sub 2} samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipon, Yves; Roudil, Daniele; Jegou, Christophe [CEA Marcoule DEN/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, BP 171 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Khodja, Hicham; Raepsaet, Caroline [CEA Saclay DSM/IRAMIS/LPS, Point courrier 127, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    The helium behavior and its migration mechanisms in nuclear spent fuel (UOX and MOX) significantly impact the possible evolution of the spent fuel matrix in a closed system during interim storage or during a disposal repository. An experimental study has been conducted on (U,Pu)O{sub 2} samples in order to investigate the impact of defects created by alpha decay on helium diffusion. One large part is devoted to thermal atomic diffusion and applied on {sup 3}He implanted samples, annealed at 850 and 1000 deg. C. The He profiles, as implanted and after annealing, were investigated with the {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. Another part deals with the thermal release of {sup 4}He amassed in the samples. The measured thermal diffusion coefficients are compared with previously published values, thereby highlighting the effect of the alpha self-irradiation on helium behavior. (authors)

  7. Effect of annealing on Raman scattering spectra of monolayer graphene samples gradually disordered by ion irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Zion, E.; BUTENKO A.; Kaganovskii, Yu.; Richter, V.; Wolfson, L; Sharoni, A.; Kogan, E.; Kaveh, M.; Shlimak, I.

    2016-01-01

    The Raman scattering spectra (RS) of two series of monolayer graphene samples irradiated with various doses of C$^{+}$ and Xe$^{+}$ ions were measured after annealing in high vacuum, and in forming gas (95\\%Ar+5\\%H$_{2}$). It was found that these methods of annealing have dramatically different influence on the RS lines. Annealing in vacuum below 500$^{\\circ}$C leads to significant decrease of both D-line, associated with defects, and 2D-line, associated with the intact lattice structure, whi...

  8. BACTERIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF WATER SAMPLES IN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Man's assessment of the value surface drainage, catchments protection to ... turbidity and pH at the point at which the consumption, water must be aesthetically .... on the skin and nostril of humans (9). ... and Measurements Standards (Water).

  9. Inactivation of Aspergillus flavus in drinking water after treatment with UV irradiation followed by chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gabr, Hamid Mohammad; Zheng, Tianling; Yu, Xin

    2013-10-01

    The disinfection process for inactivating microorganisms at drinking water treatment plants is aimed for safety of drinking water for humans from a microorganism, such as bacteria, viruses, algae, fungi by using chlorination, ozonation, UV irradiation, etc. In the present study, a combination of two disinfectants, UV irradiation followed by chlorination, was evaluated for inactivating Aspergillus flavus under low contact time and low dosage of UV irradiation. The results indicated an inverse correlation between the inactivation of A. flavus by using UV irradiation only or chlorination alone. By using UV radiation, the 2 log10 control of A. flavus was achieved after 30 s of irradiation, while chlorination was observed to be more effective than UV, where the 2 log was achieved at chlorine concentration of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mg/l, in contact time of 60, 5, 1 and 1 min, respectively. However, combined use (UV irradiation followed by chlorination) was more effective than using either UV or chlorination alone; 5 s UV irradiation followed by chlorination produced 4 log10 reduction of A. flavus at chlorine concentrations of 2 and 3 mg/l under a contact time of 15 min. The results indicated that efficiency of UV irradiation improves when followed by chlorination at low concentrations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Caffeine degradation in water by gamma irradiation, ozonation and ozonation/gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torun Murat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous solutions of caffeine were treated with ozone and gamma irradiation. The amounts of remaining caffeine were determined after solid phase extraction as a function of absorbed dose and ozonation time. In addition to this, some important parameters such as inorganic ions, chemical oxygen demand (COD dissolved oxygen and total acidity changes were followed. Caffeine (50 ppm is found to be completely decomposed at 3.0 kGy and 1.2 kGy doses in the absence of H2O2 and in 1.20 mM H2O2 solutions, respectively. In the case of gamma irradiation after ozonation, 50 ppm caffeine was removed at 0.2 kGy when the solution was ozonized for 100 s at a rate of 10 g O3 h-1 in 400 mL 50 ppm paracetamol solution.

  11. Water swelling properties of the electron beam irradiated PVA-g-AAc hydrogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qingguo, E-mail: qwang@qust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Rubber-Plastics of Ministry of Education, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Rubber-Plastics, Qingdao 266042 (China); Zhou, Xue; Zeng, Jinxia; Wang, Jizeng [Key Laboratory of Rubber-Plastics of Ministry of Education, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China)

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the electron beam irradiation technology being more suitable for the industry application is explored to fabricate the acrylic acid (AAc) monomer-grafted polyvinyl alcohol (PVA-g-AAc) hydrogels. ATR-IR spectra of the PVA-g-AAc hydrogels shows an obvious absorption peak of the −C=O group at 1701 cm{sup −1}, indicating that the AAc monomers were grafted onto the PVA macromolecules. This paper also studied some effects of the mass ratio of PVA/AAc, pH of buffer solution and irradiation dosage on the water swelling properties of the electron beam irradiated PVA-g-AAc hydrogels. The water swelling ratio of PVA-g-AAc hydrogels decreases with increased irradiation dosage and mass ratio of PVA/AAc, whereas swelling ratio increases with increased pH of buffer solution and soaking time. The water-swelling behavior of PVA-g-AAc hydrogels occurred easily in an alkaline environment, particularly in a buffer solution with pH 9.2. Both PVA-g-AAc hydrogels (PVA/AAc = 1/5, w/w) irradiated with 5 kilogray (kGy) and PVA-g-AAc hydrogels (PVA/AAc = 1/1, w/w) irradiated with 15 kGy could easily absorb water and lead to high water swelling ratios (up to about 600%), which are potential candidates to meet the requirements for some biomedical applications.

  12. UMTRA water sampling and analysis plan, Green River, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papusch, R.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is to provide a basis for groundwater and surface water sampling at the Green River Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the monitoring locations.

  13. Elimination of disinfection byproduct formation potential in reclaimed water during solar light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian-Yuan, Wu; Chao, Li; Ye, Du; Wen-Long, Wang; Huang, Huang; Hong-Ying, Hu

    2016-05-15

    Ecological storage of reclaimed water in ponds and lakes is widely applied in water reuse. During reclaimed water storage, solar light can degrade pollutants and improve water quality. This study investigated the effects of solar light irradiation on the disinfection byproduct formation potential in reclaimed water, including haloacetonitriles (HANs), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), trihalomethanes (THMs), haloketones (HKs) and chloral hydrate (CH). Natural solar light significantly decreased the formation potential of HANs, TCNM, and HKs in reclaimed water, but had a limited effect on the formation potential of THMs and CH. Ultraviolet (UV) light in solar radiation played a dominant role in the decrease of the formation potential of HANs, TCNM and HKs. Among the disinfection byproducts, the removal kinetic constant of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) with irradiation dose was much larger than those for dichloropropanone (1,1-DCP), trichloropropanone (1,1,1-TCP) and TCNM. During solar irradiation, fluorescence spectra intensities of reclaimed water also decreased significantly. The removal of tyrosine (Tyr)-like and tryptophan (Trp)-like protein fluorescence spectra intensity volumes was correlated to the decrease in DCAN formation potential. Solar irradiation was demonstrated to degrade Trp, Tyr and their DCAN formation potential. The photolysis products of Trp after solar irradiation were detected as kynurenine and tryptamine, which had chloroform, CH and DCAN formation potential lower than those of Trp.

  14. Investigation of thermally stimulated properties of SHI beam irradiated polycarbonate/polystyrene double layered samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Bhupendra Singh; Gaur, Mulayam Singh; Singh, Kripa Shanker

    2011-12-01

    The double layered samples of polycarbonate/polystyrene (PC/PS) have been prepared by solvent casting method and irradiated with 55 MeV C 5+ beam at different ion fluences range from 1 × 10 11 to 1 × 10 13 ion/cm 2. The effect of swift heavy ion (SHI) beam in interfacial phenomena, phase change, dielectric relaxation, degradation temperature, stability, charge storage and transport mechanism of PC/PS pristine and irradiated double layered samples have been investigated by thermally stimulated discharge current (TSDC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TSDC show α, β-relaxation peaks shifted to the lower temperatures side with increase of fluence. The activation energy and relaxation time decrease, while the depolarization current and charge released increase with increase in the ion fluences. DSC curve show the glass transition temperature ( T g) and heat capacity decreases with increase in the ion fluences. The TGA characteristics represent the thermal stability, which is found to be decreased with increase in the ion fluences.

  15. Effects of γ-radiation on microbial load and antioxidant proprieties in green tea irradiated with different water activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanaro, G. B.; Hassimotto, N. M. A.; Bastos, D. H. M.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the effect of gamma radiation on green tea irradiated with different water activities. The green tea samples had their Aw adjusted to three values (0.93, 0.65, and 0.17) and were irradiated in 60Co source at doses of 0, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 kGy. The methods used were: microbiology, total phenolic compounds quantification, antioxidant activity by ORAC, and quantification of the main antioxidants. It was observed that the greater the amount of free water present in the samples, lower was the dose to achieve microbiological control. Despite the irradiation with 5.0 kGy with high water activity has a small decrease in phenolic compounds and in some catechins content, this condition is recommended once was the dose to ensure microbiological safety without interfering in the main catechins and the antioxidant activity.

  16. Characterization and formation mechanism of water-insoluble DNA-matrix induced by UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M; Satoh, S; Nomizu, M; Ohkawa, K; Yamamoto, H; Nishi, N

    2001-01-01

    We have prepared water-insoluble and nuclease resistant DNA-matrixes by UV irradiation. The UV-irradiated DNA-matrix could effectively accumulate and condense harmful DNA-intercalating compounds, such as acridine orange (AO) and ethidium bromide (EB), from diluted aqueous solutions. The binding constant of AO and EB for UV-irradiated DNA were determined to be 1.0 (+/- 0.2) x 10(5) M-1 and 6.8 (+/- 0.3) x 10(4) M-1, respectively; values consisted with reported results for non-irradiated DNA. In addition, the agarose gel electrophoresis and AFM measurements indicate that DNA matrix forms an intermolecular cross-linking structure with the radical reaction. The UV-irradiated DNA-matrixes have potential uses as a biomaterial filter for the removal of harmful DNA intercalating compounds.

  17. PIXE analysis of heavy metals in water samples from a mining area in Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolormaa, Oyuntsetseg; Baasansuren, Jamsranjav; Kawasaki, Katsunori; Watanabe, Makiko; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2006-01-01

    The affect of mining activity on the environment has been long of public concern. The present paper deals with chemical analysis of the Boroo River water samples collected in mining area of Mongolia focusing the determination of heavy metal contents by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. The samples were prepared by preconcentration method (water samples treated to form metal-dibenzyldithiocarbamate (DBDTC) complexes and collected on a nuclepore track-etch membrane filter) and irradiated by 2.5 MeV proton beam from the single-end type Van de Graaff accelerator. The accuracy of the results was proved by using certified river water samples. The total dispersions of experimental procedure were evaluated by variance analysis.

  18. PIXE analysis of heavy metals in water samples from a mining area in Mongolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolormaa, Oyuntsetseg [Department of Environment Science and Technology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: bolormaa@n.cc.titech.ac.jp; Baasansuren, Jamsranjav [Department of Environment Science and Technology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Kawasaki, Katsunori [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Watanabe, Makiko [Department of Environment Science and Technology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Hattori, Toshiyuki [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    The affect of mining activity on the environment has been long of public concern. The present paper deals with chemical analysis of the Boroo River water samples collected in mining area of Mongolia focusing the determination of heavy metal contents by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. The samples were prepared by preconcentration method (water samples treated to form metal-dibenzyldithiocarbamate (DBDTC) complexes and collected on a nuclepore track-etch membrane filter) and irradiated by 2.5 MeV proton beam from the single-end type Van de Graaff accelerator. The accuracy of the results was proved by using certified river water samples. The total dispersions of experimental procedure were evaluated by variance analysis.

  19. Progress on using deuteron-deuteron fusion generated neutrons for 40Ar/39Ar sample irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutte, Daniel; Renne, Paul R.; Becker, Tim; Waltz, Cory; Ayllon Unzueta, Mauricio; Zimmerman, Susan; Hidy, Alan; Finkel, Robert; Bauer, Joseph D.; Bernstein, Lee; van Bibber, Karl

    2017-04-01

    We present progress on the development and proof of concept of a deuteron-deuteron fusion based neutron generator for 40Ar/39Ar sample irradiation. Irradiation with deuteron-deuteron fusion neutrons is anticipated to reduce Ar recoil and Ar production from interfering reactions. This will allow dating of smaller grains and increase accuracy and precision of the method. The instrument currently achieves neutron fluxes of ˜9×107 cm-2s-1 as determined by irradiation of indium foils and use of the activation reaction 115In(n,n')115mIn. Multiple foils and simulations were used to determine flux gradients in the sample chamber. A first experiment quantifying the loss of 39Ar is underway and will likely be available at the time of the presentation of this abstract. In ancillary experiments via irradiation of K salts and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis we determined the cross-sections of the 39K(n,p)39Ar reaction at ˜2.8 MeV to be 160 ± 35 mb (1σ). This result is in good agreement with bracketing cross-section data of ˜96 mb at ˜2.45 MeV and ˜270 mb at ˜4 MeV [Johnson et al., 1967; Dixon and Aitken, 1961 and Bass et al. 1964]. Our data disfavor a much lower value of ˜45 mb at 2.59 MeV [Lindström & Neuer, 1958]. In another ancillary experiment the cross section for 39K(n,α)36Cl at ˜2.8 MeV was determined as 11.7 ± 0.5 mb (1σ), which is significant for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology due to subsequent decay to 36Ar as well as for the determination of production rates of cosmogenic 36Cl. Additional experiments resolving the cross section functions on 39K between 1.5 and 3.6 MeV are on their way using the LICORNE neutron source of the IPN Orsay tandem accelerator. Results will likely be available at the time of the presentation of this abstract. While the neutron generator is designed for fluxes of ˜109 cm-2s-1, arcing in the sample chamber currently limits the power—straightforwardly correlated to the neutron flux—the generator can safely be run at. Further

  20. Measurement of water column primary production using photosynthesis-irradiance relations for surface phytoplankton, the vertical chlorophyll profile, and underwater light intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, A. B.; Gagarin, V. I.; Mosharov, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    A method has been developed to measure water column integrated primary production (PPint) in the water column using photosynthesis-irradiance relations for surface phytoplankton, the vertical profile of chlorophyll a concentration, and the underwater light intensity. Good correlation has been found for the results calculated with this method and light dependences in situ. The advantages of this method are the independence of PPint calculation from CTD profiling and water sampling, and thus optimization (reduction) of the station working time.

  1. Microstructural characterization and model of hardening for the irradiated austenitic stainless steels of the internals of pressurized water reactors; Caracterisation microstructurale et modelisation du durcissement des aciers austenitiques irradies des structures internes des reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokor, C

    2003-07-01

    The core internals of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) are composed of SA 304 stainless steel plates and CW 316 stainless steel bolts. These internals undergo a neutron flux at a temperature between 280 deg C and 380 deg C which modifies their mechanical properties. These modifications are due to the changes in the microstructure of these materials under irradiation which depend on flux, dose and irradiation temperature. We have studied, by Transmission Electron Microscopy, the microstructure of stainless steels SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti irradiated in a mixed flux reactor (OSIRIS at 330 deg C between 0,8 dpa et 3,4 dpa) and in a fast breeder reactor at 330 deg C (BOR-60) up to doses of 40 dpa. Moreover, samples have been irradiated at 375 deg C in a fast breeder reactor (EBR-II) up to doses of 10 dpa. The microstructure of the irradiated stainless steels consists in faulted Frank dislocation loops in the [111] planes of austenitic, with a Burgers vector of [111]. It is possible to find some voids in the solution annealed samples irradiated at 375 deg C. The evolution of the dislocations loops and voids has been simulated with a 'cluster dynamic' model. The fit of the model parameters has allowed us to have a quantitative description of our experimental results. This description of the microstructure after irradiation was coupled together with a hardening model by Frank loops that has permitted us to make a quantitative description of the hardening of SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti stainless steels after irradiation at a certain dose, flux and temperature. The irradiation doses studied grow up to 90 dpa, dose of the end of life of PWR internals. (author)

  2. Design and Demonstration of a Material-Plasma Exposure Target Station for Neutron Irradiated Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Juergen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Aaron, A. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bell, Gary L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burgess, Thomas W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ellis, Ronald James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giuliano, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kiggans, James O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lessard, Timothy L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ohriner, Evan Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perkins, Dale E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Varma, Venugopal Koikal [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-20

    -state heat fluxes of 5–20 MW/m2 and ion fluxes up to 1024 m-2s-1. Since PFCs will have to withstand neutron irradiation displacement damage up to 50 dpa, the target station design must accommodate radioactive specimens (materials to be irradiated in HFIR or at SNS) to enable investigations of the impact of neutron damage on materials. Therefore, the system will have to be able to install and extract irradiated specimens using equipment and methods to avoid sample modification, control contamination, and minimize worker dose. Included in the design considerations will be an assessment of all the steps between neutron irradiation and post-exposure materials examination/characterization, as well as an evaluation of the facility hazard categorization. In particular, the factors associated with the acquisition of radioactive specimens and their preparation, transportation, experimental configuration at the plasma-specimen interface, post-plasma-exposure sample handling, and specimen preparation will be evaluated. Neutronics calculations to determine the dose rates of the samples were carried out for a large number of potential plasma-facing materials.

  3. Erosion behavior of lithium coated tungsten fuzz samples under D and He ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Anton; Lang, Eric; Allain, Jean Paul

    2016-10-01

    As the primary candidate for the ITER divertor, tungsten (W) should be tailored to produce a more radiation tolerant plasma facing component (PFC). This alteration must overcome the surface microstructure changes such as bubbles, pores, fuzz, etc. that form under D and He ion irradiation in order to reduce tungsten erosion from the ITER divertor. Studies have shown that adding low Z impurities (C and Be) to a mixed D-He plasma can inhibit the growth of fuzz. In contrast, previous studies have shown that low Z lithium (Li) does not inhibit fuzz production but does appear to persist on the surface among the fuzz. To further investigate this, we exposed 1000 nm Li coatings on a fuzz coated W to D and He ion bombardment. The erosion yield was measured with a quartz crystal microbalance and surface chemical changes were measured in operando with our HP-XPS system IGNIS (Ion-Gas-Neutral Interactions with Surfaces) at UIUC. Helium and D ion fluxes were 1018 m-2s-1 at room temperature. After irradiation, the surfaces of the samples were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These results will be presented along with SIMS results investigating the concentration depth profiles. Work supported by DOE contract DE-SC0010719.

  4. Stabilization of the spark-discharge point on a sample surface by laser irradiation for steel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuta, Hideyuki; Kitagawa, Kuniyuki; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2006-10-01

    A combined technique with laser irradiation is suggested to control spark discharge for analytical use, having a unique feature that firing points of the spark discharge can be fixed by laser irradiation. Because the spark discharge easily initiates at particular surface sites, such as non-metallic inclusions, called selective discharge, the concentration of some elements sometimes deviates from their average one in spark discharge optical emission spectrometry. Therefore, stabilization of firing points on a sample surface could improve the analytical precision.

  5. Design and Demonstration of a Material-Plasma Exposure Target Station for Neutron Irradiated Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Juergen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Aaron, A. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bell, Gary L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burgess, Thomas W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ellis, Ronald James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giuliano, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kiggans, James O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lessard, Timothy L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ohriner, Evan Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perkins, Dale E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Varma, Venugopal Koikal [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-20

    -state heat fluxes of 5–20 MW/m2 and ion fluxes up to 1024 m-2s-1. Since PFCs will have to withstand neutron irradiation displacement damage up to 50 dpa, the target station design must accommodate radioactive specimens (materials to be irradiated in HFIR or at SNS) to enable investigations of the impact of neutron damage on materials. Therefore, the system will have to be able to install and extract irradiated specimens using equipment and methods to avoid sample modification, control contamination, and minimize worker dose. Included in the design considerations will be an assessment of all the steps between neutron irradiation and post-exposure materials examination/characterization, as well as an evaluation of the facility hazard categorization. In particular, the factors associated with the acquisition of radioactive specimens and their preparation, transportation, experimental configuration at the plasma-specimen interface, post-plasma-exposure sample handling, and specimen preparation will be evaluated.

  6. Measurement of Fission Gas Release from Irradiated U-Mo Monolithic Fuel Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Luscher, Walter G.; Rice, Francine; Pool, Karl N.

    2015-06-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An apparatus capable of annealing post-irradiated small-scale samples cut from larger fuel segments according to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere has been installed into a hot cell. Results show that optimized experimental parameters to investigate fission product release from small samples have been established. Initial measurements conducted on aluminum alloy clad uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel samples reveal three clear fission gas release events over the temperature range of 30-1050 C. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in literature.

  7. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated U–Mo monolithic fuel samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Andrew M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Luscher, Walter G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rice, Francine J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pool, Karl N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The uranium–molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An apparatus capable of heating post-irradiated small-scale samples cut from larger fuel segments according to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere has been installed into a hot cell. Results show that optimized experimental parameters to investigate fission product release from small samples have been established. Initial measurements conducted on aluminum alloy clad uranium–molybdenum monolithic fuel samples reveal three clear fission gas release events over the temperature range of 30-1000 °C. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature.

  8. EFFECT OF THE CRITICAL IRRADIANCE ON PHOTOVOLTAIC WATER PUMP DISCHARGE UNDER EGYPTIAN CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamdouh Abbas HELMY

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation aimed to study the effect of critical irradiance due to changing tilt angle of PV panel and tracking sun on submersible pump discharge. The authors used solar tracker and suitable tilt angle for the panel to increase the time interval during which the water pump operates. For the same irradiance collected by the PV, all systems pump the same amount of water, although they occur at different periods of the day. The pump itself 'does not know whether the electric power comes from any processes, as long as it has the same intensity.

  9. Sampling procedure for lake or stream surface water chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Musselman

    2012-01-01

    Surface waters collected in the field for chemical analyses are easily contaminated. This research note presents a step-by-step detailed description of how to avoid sample contamination when field collecting, processing, and transporting surface water samples for laboratory analysis.

  10. Comparison between different types of glass and aluminum as containers for irradiation samples by neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroor, A; El-Dine, N W; El-Shershaby, A; Abdel-Haleem, A S

    2000-01-01

    Three different types of glass and four different kinds of aluminum sheet have been analyzed using neutron activation analysis. The irradiation facilities of the first Egyptian research reactor (ET-RR-1) and a hyper-pure germanium (HPGe) detection system were used for the analysis. Among the 34 identified elements, the isotopes 60Co, 65Zn, 110mAg, 123mTe, 134Cs, 152Eu and 182Ta are of special significance because of their long half-lives, providing a background interference for analyzed samples. A comparison between the different types of containers was made to select the preferred one for sample irradiation.

  11. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated UMo dispersion fuel samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-09-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an Al-Si matrix has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. In this paper, two irradiated samples containing 53.6 vol% U-7wt% Mo fuel particles dispersed in an Al-2wt% Si matrix were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Measurements revealed three distinct fission gas release events for the samples from 400 to 700 oC, as well as a number of minor fission gas releases below and above this temperature range. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature with exceptional agreement.

  12. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated Usbnd Mo dispersion fuel samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-09-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (Usbnd Mo) alloy dispersed in an Alsbnd Si matrix has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world's highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. In this paper, two irradiated samples containing 53.9 vol% U-7wt% Mo fuel particles dispersed in an Al-2wt% Si matrix were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Measurements revealed three distinct fission gas release events for the samples from 400 to 700 °C, as well as a number of minor fission gas releases below and above this temperature range. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature with exceptional agreement.

  13. Observation of bubble formation in water during microwave irradiation by dynamic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakuma, Yusuke; Munenaga, Takuya; Nakata, Ryosuke

    2016-09-01

    A microwave reactor was designed for in situ observation of nano- and micro-bubbles, and size profiles during and after irradiation were measured with respect to irradiation power and time. Bubble formation in water during irradiation was observed even at temperatures below the boiling point of water. The maximum size strongly depended on radiation power and time, even at a given temperature. Nano-particles in the dispersion medium were found to play an important role in achieving more stable nucleation of bubbles around particles, and stable size distributions were obtained from clear autocorrelation by a dynamic light scattering system. Moreover, a combination of microwave induction heating and the addition of nano-particles to the dispersion medium can prevent heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles on the cell wall. Quantitative nano-bubble size profiles obtained by in situ observation provide useful information regarding microwave-based industrial processes for nano-particle production.

  14. Microbial Condition of Water Samples from Foreign Fuel Storage Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, C.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Fliermans, C.B.; Santo Domingo, J.

    1997-10-30

    In order to assess the microbial condition of foreign nuclear fuel storage facilities, fourteen different water samples were received from facilities outside the United States that have sent spent nuclear fuel to SRS for wet storage. Each water sample was analyzed for microbial content and activity as determined by total bacteria, viable aerobic bacteria, viable anaerobic bacteria, viable sulfate- reducing bacteria, viable acid-producing bacteria and enzyme diversity. The results for each water sample were then compared to other foreign samples and to data from the receiving basin for off- site fuel (RBOF) at SRS.

  15. Development of sampling for quantification of glyphosate in natural waters

    OpenAIRE

    Tzaskos,Danilla Fernanda; Marcovicz,Crislaine; Dias,Nivea Maria Piccolomini; Rosso,Neiva Deliberali

    2012-01-01

    Glyphosate is a systemic, post-emergent, non-selective herbicide widely used in agriculture. The objective of this study was to develop a method for sample preparation, to partially purified natural water samples contaminated with residues of glyphosate, and to quantify them by derivation and spectroscopically. To assess the accuracy of the method, samples of water from an artesian well and from a stream were fortified with known amounts of glyphosate. The concentration of glyphosate was dete...

  16. Optical teledetection of the vertical attenuation coefficient for downward quantum irradiance of photosynthetically available radiation in turbid inland waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gons, H.J.; Ebert, J.; Kromkamp, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Depth profiles of downward quantum irradiance of photosynthetically available radiation in situ and spectral subsurface irradiance reflectance, obtained from water-leaving radiance, were determined in different inland water types. These included the large, shallow and eutrophic IJssel lagoon in the

  17. Optical teledetection of the vertical attenuation coefficient for downward quantum irradiance of photosynthetically available radiation in turbid inland waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gons, H.J.; Ebert, J.; Kromkamp, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Depth profiles of downward quantum irradiance of photosynthetically available radiation in situ and spectral subsurface irradiance reflectance, obtained from water-leaving radiance, were determined in different inland water types. These included the large, shallow and eutrophic IJssel lagoon in the

  18. An experimental study on the motion of water droplets in oil under ultrasonic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoming; He, Limin; Wang, Hongping; Yan, Haipeng; Qin, Yahua

    2016-01-01

    The motion of a single water droplet in oil under ultrasonic irradiation is investigated with high-speed photography in this paper. First, we described the trajectory of water droplet in oil under ultrasonic irradiation. Results indicate that in acoustic field the motion of water droplet subjected to intermittent positive and negative ultrasonic pressure shows obvious quasi-sinusoidal oscillation. Afterwards, the influence of major parameters on the motion characteristics of water droplet was studied, such as acoustic intensity, ultrasonic frequency, continuous phase viscosity, interfacial tension, and droplet diameter, etc. It is found that when the acoustic intensity and frequency are 4.89 W cm(-2) and 20 kHz respectively, which are the critical conditions, the droplet varying from 250 to 300 μm in lower viscous oil has the largest oscillation amplitude and highest oscillation frequency.

  19. Efficacy of uv irradiation in the microbial disinfection of marine mammal water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spotte, S.; Buck, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    A study was made on the efficacy of a commercial ultraviolet (UV) sterilizer in reducing the number of bacteria and yeasts in a saline, closed-system marine mammal complex. UV irradiation was effective in lowering bacterial counts in the effluent of the unit (greater than 75% reduction), but bacteria in more remote parts of the water system reached levels equal to or greater than pre-UV counts. Yeast reduction was considerably less, and a trend similar to that of the bacteria was observed in remote sections of the water system. It is concluded that UV irradiation is of limited value in the disinfection of marine mammal water. Factors contributing to the poor performance of the sterilizer were the long recycle time of the water and lack of a residual effect.

  20. The efficacy of UV irradiation in the microbial disinfection of marine mammal water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotte, S; Buck, J D

    1981-01-01

    A study was made on the efficacy of a commercial ultraviolet (UV) sterilizer in reducing the number of bacteria and yeasts ina saline, closed-system marine mammal complex. UV irradiation was effective in lowering bacterial counts in the effluent of the unit (greater than 75% reduction), but bacteria in more remote parts of the water system reached levels equal to or greater than pre-UV counts. Yeast reduction was considerably less, and a trend similar to that of the bacteria was observed in remote sections of the water system. It is concluded that UV irradiation is of limited value in the disinfection of marine mammal water. Factors contributing to the poor performance of the sterilizer were the long recycle time of the water and lack of a residual effect.

  1. Tritium activity levels in environmental water samples from different origins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, M.; Penalver, A.; Aguilar, C. [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Edifici CTT-FURV, Av. Paisos Catalans 18, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Borrull, F. [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Edifici CTT-FURV, Av. Paisos Catalans 18, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: francesc.borrull@urv.cat

    2007-09-15

    Tritium activity was determined in environmental waters from different areas of Catalonia, using a distillation procedure before liquid scintillation counting. The developed method was validated by analysing two samples from proficiency tests. In most of water samples (from rivers, rain, mineral bottled waters and tap waters) analysed, the activity values were lower or close to the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for our method which has a value of 0.6 Bq/l. However, the Ebro river samples had a mean activity around 3.6{+-}0.6Bq/l. The nuclear power station of Asco, which is located on the banks of this river, can be a source of tritium production and introduction into the environment, so a more exhaustive study of these waters was carried out. Tritium activities in this river were a long way above the normative limit in Spain for waters intended for human consumption, which is 100 Bq/l.

  2. Spallation occurrence from polyamide materials irradiated by thermal plasma with water absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Yasunori; Nakagawa, T.; Shinsei, N.; Uesugi, Y.; Ishijima, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper first describes the effect of water absorption in polyamide material irradiated by thermal plasmas on the occurrence of spallation phenomena. The interaction between polyamide materials and arc plasmas occurs particularly in the low voltage circuit breaker and aerospace fields. Spallation phenomena are those in which polymer particles are ejected from polymer bulk materials irradiated by high heat flux. To confirm the effect of water absorption into the polyamide material on spallation phenomena, polyamide specimens with and without water absorption were irradiated by Ar inductively coupled thermal plasma. The results show that the polyamide specimen with water absorption ejected spallation particles, whereas the polyamide specimen without water absorption were only slightly ejected, indicating that water absorption promotes the occurrence of spallation. The cooling effects of the spallation polyamide 66 (PA66) particles ablation were also estimated in hot air to assess the arc quenching ability from the spallation particle inclusion. This estimation showed that 10 and more PA66 particles inclusion might decrease the air temperature by 3000 K effectively, which can be useful to enhance arc quenching in circuit breakers working in air.

  3. The medical-irradiation characteristics for neutron capture therapy at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2002-10-01

    At the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor, the mix irradiation of thermal and epi-thermal neutrons, and the solo irradiation of epi-thermal neutrons are available additionally to the thermal neutron irradiation, and then the neutron capture therapy (NCT) at this facility became more flexible, after the update in 1996. The estimation of the depth dose distributions in NCT clinical irradiation, were performed for the standard irradiation modes of thermal, mixed and epi-thermal neutrons, from the both sides of experiment and calculation. On the assumption that the 10B concentration in tumor part was 40 ppm and the ratio of tumor to normal tissue was 3.5, the advantage depth were estimated to 5.4, 6.0, and 8.0, for the respective standard irradiation modes. It was confirmed that the various irradiation conditions can be selected according to the target-volume conditions, such as size, depth, etc. Besides, in the viewpoint of the radiation shielding for patient, it was confirmed that the whole-body exposure is effectively reduced by the new clinical collimators, compared with the old one.

  4. MCNPX calculations of dose rate distribution inside samples treated in the research gamma irradiating facility at CTEx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusin, Tiago; Rebello, Wilson F.; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Gomes, Renato G., E-mail: tiagorusin@ime.eb.b, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.b, E-mail: vellozo@cbpf.b, E-mail: renatoguedes@ime.eb.b [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Vital, Helio C., E-mail: vital@ctex.eb.b [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEx), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    A cavity-type cesium-137 research irradiating facility at CTEx has been modeled by using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The irradiator has been daily used in experiments to optimize the use of ionizing radiation for conservation of many kinds of food and to improve materials properties. In order to correlate the effects of the treatment, average doses have been calculated for each irradiated sample, accounting for the measured dose rate distribution in the irradiating chambers. However that approach is only approximate, being subject to significant systematic errors due to the heterogeneous internal structure of most samples that can lead to large anisotropy in attenuation and Compton scattering properties across the media. Thus this work is aimed at further investigating such uncertainties by calculating the dose rate distribution inside the items treated such that a more accurate and representative estimate of the total absorbed dose can be determined for later use in the effects-versus-dose correlation curves. Samples of different simplified geometries and densities (spheres, cylinders, and parallelepipeds), have been modeled to evaluate internal dose rate distributions within the volume of the samples and the overall effect on the average dose. (author)

  5. Degradation of methylene blue by radio frequency plasmas in water under ultraviolet irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehara, Tsunehiro; Nishiyama, Kyohei; Onishi, Shingo; Mukasa, Shinobu; Toyota, Hiromichi; Kuramoto, Makoto; Nomura, Shinfuku; Kawashima, Ayato

    2010-02-15

    The degradation of methylene blue by radio frequency (RF) plasmas in water under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was studied experimentally. When the methylene blue solution was exposed to RF plasma, UV irradiation from a mercury vapor lamp enhanced degradation significantly. A lamp without power supply also enhanced degradation since weak UV light was emitted weakly from the lamp due to the excitation of mercury vapor by stray RF power. Such an enhancement is explained by the fact that after hydrogen peroxide is produced via the recombination process of OH radicals around the plasma, OH radicals reproduced from hydrogen peroxide via the photolysis process degrade methylene blue.

  6. Mesos-scale modeling of irradiation in pressurized water reactor concrete biological shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pape, Yann [ORNL; Huang, Hai [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2016-01-01

    Neutron irradiation exposure causes aggregate expansion, namely radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE). The structural significance of RIVE on a portion of a prototypical pressurized water reactor (PWR) concrete biological shield (CBS) is investigated by using a meso- scale nonlinear concrete model with inputs from an irradiation transport code and a coupled moisture transport-heat transfer code. RIVE-induced severe cracking onset appears to be triggered by the ini- tial shrinkage-induced cracking and propagates to a depth of > 10 cm at extended operation of 80 years. Relaxation of the cement paste stresses results in delaying the crack propagation by about 10 years.

  7. Microwave-assisted headspace single-drop microextration of chlorobenzenes from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Lorena; Domini, Claudia E; Grané, Nuria; Psillakis, Elefteria; Canals, Antonio

    2007-05-29

    A one-step and in-situ sample preparation method used for quantifying chlorobenzene compounds in water samples has been developed, coupling microwave and headspace single-drop microextraction (MW-HS-SDME). The chlorobenzenes in water samples were extracted directly onto an ionic liquid single-drop in headspace mode under the aid of microwave radiation. For optimization, a Plackett-Burman screening design was initially used, followed by a mixed-level factorial design. The factors considered were: drop volume, aqueous sample volume, stirring speed, ionic strength, extraction time, ionic liquid type, microwave power and length of the Y-shaped glass-tube. The optimum experimental conditions found from this statistical evaluation were: a 5 microL microdrop of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate exposed for 20 min to the headspace of a 30 mL aqueous sample, irradiated by microwaves at 200 W and placed in a 50 mL spherical flask connected to a 25 cm Y-shaped glass-tube. Under the optimised experimental conditions, the response of a high performance liquid chromatographic system was found to be linear over the range studied and with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.9995 and 0.9999. The method showed a good level of repeatability, with relative standard deviations varying between 2.3 and 8.3% (n=5). Detection limits were found in the low microg L(-1) range varying between 0.016 and 0.039 microg L(-1). Overall, the performance of the proposed method demonstrated the favourable effect of microwave sample irradiation upon HS-SDME. Finally, recovery studies from different types of environmental water samples revealed that matrix had little effect upon extraction.

  8. Microwave-assisted headspace single-drop microextration of chlorobenzenes from water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, Lorena [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Universidad de Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Domini, Claudia E. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Universidad de Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Grane, Nuria [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Universidad de Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Psillakis, Elefteria [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Polytechneioupolis, GR-73100 Chania, Crete (Greece); Canals, Antonio [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Universidad de Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)]. E-mail: a.canals@ua.es

    2007-05-29

    A one-step and in-situ sample preparation method used for quantifying chlorobenzene compounds in water samples has been developed, coupling microwave and headspace single-drop microextraction (MW-HS-SDME). The chlorobenzenes in water samples were extracted directly onto an ionic liquid single-drop in headspace mode under the aid of microwave radiation. For optimization, a Plackett-Burman screening design was initially used, followed by a mixed-level factorial design. The factors considered were: drop volume, aqueous sample volume, stirring speed, ionic strength, extraction time, ionic liquid type, microwave power and length of the Y-shaped glass-tube. The optimum experimental conditions found from this statistical evaluation were: a 5 {mu}L microdrop of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate exposed for 20 min to the headspace of a 30 mL aqueous sample, irradiated by microwaves at 200 W and placed in a 50 mL spherical flask connected to a 25 cm Y-shaped glass-tube. Under the optimised experimental conditions, the response of a high performance liquid chromatographic system was found to be linear over the range studied and with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.9995 and 0.9999. The method showed a good level of repeatability, with relative standard deviations varying between 2.3 and 8.3% (n = 5). Detection limits were found in the low {mu}g L{sup -1} range varying between 0.016 and 0.039 {mu}g L{sup -1}. Overall, the performance of the proposed method demonstrated the favourable effect of microwave sample irradiation upon HS-SDME. Finally, recovery studies from different types of environmental water samples revealed that matrix had little effect upon extraction.

  9. Radon in water samples around Ningyo Toge area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Sadaaki [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Kamisaibara, Okayama (Japan). Ningyo Toge Works

    1997-02-01

    Radon concentrations of river water and drinking water were surveyed. Water samples were collected from the region around Ningyo-Toge Works which were positioned on a granitic layer having uranium deposit. Each sample was taken using a separating funnel and the radioactivity was counted by liquid scintillation counter (ALOKA, LB-2). Since there were old working places of mine in the region, mine drainages from them were also analyzed. The radon concentration of drinking water from the region ranged from 0.1 to 230 Bq/l. The samples with a higher activity than 100 Bq/l were water from springs or wells and the area of the highest Rn concentration was on a typical granitic layer, suggesting some geographic effects on Rn concentration. Some samples of drinking water had slightly higher levels of Rn, probably due to the utilization of underflow as its source. The mean concentration of Rn became higher in the order; river water, drinking water, mine drainage in the region. In addition, a negative correlation between Rn concentration of water and the river flow rate was observed in this region. (M.N.)

  10. Assessment of irradiation effects on beryllium reflector and heavy water tank of JRR-3M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, Yoji; Kakehuda, Kazuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    The JRR-3M, a swimming pool type research reactor with beryllium and heavy water reflectors, has been operated since 1990. Since the beryllium reflectors are close to fuel and receive high fast neutron fluence in a relatively short time, they may be subject to change their dimensions by swelling due mostly to entrapped helium gaseous. This may bend the reflectors to the outside and narrow gaps between the reflectors and the fuel elements. The gaps have been measured with an ultrasonic thickness gage in an annual inspection. The results in 1996 show that the maximum of expansion in the diametral directions was 0.6 mm against 1.6 mm of a managed value for replacement of the reflector. A heavy water tank of the JRR-3M is made of aluminum alloy A5052. Surveillance tests of the alloy have been conducted to evaluate irradiation effects of the heavy water tank. Five sets of specimens of the alloy have been irradiated in the beryllium reflectors where fast neutron flux is higher than that in the heavy water tank. In 1994, one set of specimens had been unloaded and carried out the post-irradiation tests. The results show that the heavy water tank preserved satisfactory mechanical properties. (author)

  11. UMTRA water sampling and analysis plan, Lakeview, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-29

    The purpose of this document is to provide background, guidance, and justification for water sampling activities for the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) processing and disposal sites. This water sampling and analysis plan will form the basis for groundwater sampling and analysis work orders (WSAWO) to be implemented during 1993. Monitoring at the former Lakeview processing site is for characterization purposes and in preparation for the risk assessment, scheduled for the fall of 1993. Compliance monitoring was conducted at the disposal site. Details of the sampling plan are discussed in Section 5.0.

  12. Improvement in properties of coal water slurry by combined use of new additive and ultrasonic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhaobing; Feng, Ruo; Zheng, Youfei; Fu, Xiaoru

    2007-07-01

    Coal water slurry (CWS) was prepared with a newly developed additive from naphthalene oil. The effects of ultrasonic irradiation on coal particle size distribution (PSD), adsorption behavior of additive in coal particles and the characteristics of CWS were investigated. Results showed that ultrasonic irradiation led to a higher proportion of fine coal in CWS and increased the saturated adsorption amount of additive in coal particles. In addition, the rheological behavior and static stability of CWS irradiated by ultrasonic wave were remarkably improved. The changes on viscosity of CWS containing 1% and 2% additive are qualitatively different with the increasing sonication time studied. The reason for the different effect of sonication time on CWS viscosity is presented in this study.

  13. physico-chemical properties of well water samples from some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Physico-Chemical Analysis: Water samples collected were analyzed by both classical and .... This and some other factors may be responsible for the ... Diatom (Bacillariophyta) diversity of an open access lagoon in. Lagos, Nigeria. Journal ...

  14. Interactions between dislocations and irradiation-induced defects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumel, Stéphanie; Van Duysen, Jean-Claude; Ruste, Jacky; Domain, Christophe

    2005-11-01

    The REVE project (REactor for Virtual Experiments) is an international effort aimed at developing tools to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactors materials. In the framework of this project, a European team developed a first tool, called RPV-1 designed for reactor pressure vessel steels. This article is the third of a series dedicated to the presentation of the codes and models used to build RPV-1. It describes the simplified approach adopted to simulate the irradiation-induced hardening. This approach relies on a characterization of the interactions between a screw dislocation and irradiation-induced defects from molecular dynamics simulations. The pinning forces exerted by the defects on the dislocation were estimated from the obtained results and some hypotheses. In RPV-1, these forces are used as input parameters of a Foreman and Makin-type code, called DUPAIR, to simulate the irradiation-induced hardening at 20 °C. The relevance of the proposed approach was validated by the comparison with experimental results. However, this work has to be considered as an initial step to facilitate the development of a first tool to simulate irradiation effects. It can be improved by many ways (e.g. by use of dislocation dynamics code).

  15. The effect of neutron irradiation defects on electrical resistivity in FZ-silicon samples irradiated at Es-Salam research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbaci, M. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire de Birine, BP 180, Ain Oussera W. Djelfa 17200 (Algeria)]. E-mail: abbacim@yahoo.fr; Meglali, O. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire de Birine, BP 180, Ain Oussera W. Djelfa 17200 (Algeria); Saim, A. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire de Birine, BP 180, Ain Oussera W. Djelfa 17200 (Algeria); Osmani, N. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire de Birine, BP 180, Ain Oussera W. Djelfa 17200 (Algeria); Doghmane, N. [Departement d' Electronique, Faculte des Sciences de l' Ingenieur, Universite Badji Mokhtar, BP 12, Annaba 23000 (Algeria)

    2006-09-15

    This paper reports the effect of neutron irradiation defects on electrical properties of n-type FZ-silicon via the measurements of electrical resistivity. For this purpose, FZ-silicon single crystal was irradiated with neutron fluences ranging between 1.54 x 10{sup 16} and 2.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. The samples irradiated at F {sub 1} = 1.54 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, F {sub 2} = 7.43 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} and F {sub 3} = 2.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} were isochronally annealed from room temperature up to 750 {sup o}C. It is found that, for fluences ranging respectively from 1.54 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} to 1.23 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} (stage I) and from 3.09 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to 2.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} (stage II) the resistivity is linearly related to the neutron fluence with two different slopes. The annealing temperature dependence on the electrical resistivity fits well the relation{rho} {sub 0} exp(-CT), where C is a constant depending on the neutron fluence and {rho} {sub 0} is approximately equal to the resistivity after irradiation. For annealing temperatures higher than 550 {sup o}C, we have found that the resistivity is a decreasing function with respect to the neutron fluence and the transmutation-doped phosphorus atoms become electrically active.

  16. ISS Potable Water Sampling and Chemical Analysis Results for 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, John E., II; Plumlee, Debrah K.; Wallace William T.; Alverson, James T.; Benoit, Mickie J.; Gillispie, Robert L.; Hunter, David; Kuo, Mike; Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Hudson, Edgar K.; Loh, Leslie J.; Gazda, Daniel B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper continues the annual tradition of summarizing at this conference the results of chemical analyses performed on archival potable water samples returned from the International Space Station (ISS). 2016 represented a banner year for life on board the ISS, including the successful conclusion for two crew members of a record one-year mission. Water reclaimed from urine and/or humidity condensate remained the primary source of potable water for the crew members of ISS Expeditions 46-50. The year 2016 was also marked by the end of a long-standing tradition of U.S. sampling and monitoring of Russian Segment potable water sources. Two water samples taken during Expedition 46 in February 2016 and returned on Soyuz 44, represented the final Russian Segment samples to be collected and analyzed by the U.S. side. Although anticipated for 2016, a rise in the total organic carbon (TOC) concentration of the product water from the U.S. water processor assembly due to breakthrough of organic contaminants from the system did not materialize, as evidenced by the onboard TOC analyzer and archive sample results.

  17. Optimization of enrichment processes of pentachlorophenol (PCP) from water samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ping; LIU Jun-xin

    2004-01-01

    The method of enriching PCP (pentachlorophenol) from aquatic environment by solid phase extraction (SPE) was studied.Several factors affecting the recoveries of PCP, including sample pH, eluting solvent, eluting volume and flow rate of water sample, were optimized by orthogonal array design(OAD). The optimized results were sample pH 4; eluting solvent, 100% methanol; eluting solvent volume, 2 mi and flow rate of water sample, 4 mi/min. A comparison is made between SPE and liquid-liquid extraction(LLE) method. The recoveries of PCP were in the range of 87.6 % 133.6 % and 79 %- 120.3 % for S PE and LLE, respectively. Important advantages of the SPE compared with the LLE include the short extraction time and reduced consumption of organic solvents. SPE can replace LLE for isolating and concentrating PCP from water samples.

  18. Contamination of Ground Water Samples from Well Installations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, Christian; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard; Simonsen, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Leaching of a plasticizer, N-butylbenzenesulfonamide, from ground water multilevel sampling installations in nylon has been demonstrated. The leaching resulted in concentrations of DOC and apparent AOX, both comparable with those observed in landfill contaminated ground waters. It is concluded th...

  19. Jeju ground water containing vanadium induced immune activation on splenocytes of low dose γ-rays-irradiated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Danbee; Joo, Haejin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Min Ju; Bing, So Jin; An, Subin; Kim, Hyunki; Kang, Kyung-goo; Lim, Yoon-Kyu; Jee, Youngheun

    2012-06-01

    Vanadium, an essential micronutrient, has been implicated in controlling diabetes and carcinogenesis and in impeding reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. γ-ray irradiation triggers DNA damage by inducing ROS production and causes diminution in radiosensitive immunocytes. In this study, we elucidate the immune activation capacities of Jeju water containing vanadium on immunosuppression caused by γ-ray irradiation, and identify its mechanism using various low doses of NaVO(3). We examined the intracellular ROS generation, DNA damage, cell proliferation, population of splenocytes, and cytokine/antibody profiles in irradiated mice drinking Jeju water for 180 days and in non-irradiated and in irradiated splenocytes both of which were treated with NaVO(3). Both Jeju water and 0.245 μM NaVO(3) attenuated the intracellular ROS generation and DNA damage in splenocytes against γ-ray irradiation. Splenocytes were significantly proliferated by the long-term intake of Jeju water and by 0.245 μM NaVO(3) treatment, and the expansion of B cells accounted for the increased number of splenocytes. Also, 0.245 μM NaVO(3) treatment showed the potency to amplify the production of IFN-γ and total IgG in irradiated splenocytes, which correlated with the expansion of B cells. Collectively, Jeju water containing vanadium possesses the immune activation property against damages caused by γ-irradiation.

  20. RAPID DETERMINATION OF {sup 210} PO IN WATER SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.

    2013-05-22

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that can be used for emergency response or routine water analyses. If a radiological dispersive device (RDD) event or a radiological attack associated with drinking water supplies occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of water samples, including drinking water, ground water and other water effluents. Current analytical methods for the assay of {sup 210}Po in water samples have typically involved spontaneous auto-deposition of {sup 210}Po onto silver or other metal disks followed by counting by alpha spectrometry. The auto-deposition times range from 90 minutes to 24 hours or more, at times with yields that may be less than desirable. If sample interferences are present, decreased yields and degraded alpha spectrums can occur due to unpredictable thickening in the deposited layer. Separation methods have focused on the use of Sr Resin, often in combination with 210Pb analysis. A new rapid method for {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that utilizes a rapid calcium phosphate co-precipitation method, separation using DGA Resin (N,N,N,N-tetraoctyldiglycolamide extractant-coated resin, Eichrom Technologies or Triskem-International), followed by rapid microprecipitation of {sup 210}Po using bismuth phosphate for counting by alpha spectrometry. This new method can be performed quickly with excellent removal of interferences, high chemical yields and very good alpha peak resolution, eliminating any potential problems with the alpha source preparation for emergency or routine samples. A rapid sequential separation method to separate {sup 210} Po and actinide isotopes was also developed. This new approach, rapid separation with DGA Resin plus microprecipitation for alpha source preparation, is a significant advance in radiochemistry for the rapid

  1. Oxygen Isotopic Analyses of Water Extracted from Lunar Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn Martinez, M.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen exists in lunar materials in distinct phases having unique sources and equilibration histories. The oxygen isotopic composition (δ17O, δ18O) of various components of lunar materials has been studied extensively, but analyses of water in these samples are relatively sparse [1-3]. Samples collected on the lunar surface reflect not only the composition of their source reservoirs but also contributions from asteroidal and cometary impacts, interactions with solar wind and cosmic radiation, among other surface processes. Isotopic characterization of oxygen in lunar water could help resolve the major source of water in the Earth-Moon system by revealing if lunar water is primordial, asteroidal, or cometary in origin [1]. Methods: A lunar rock/soil sample is pumped to high vacuum to remove physisorbed water before heating step-wise to 50, 150, and 1000°C to extract extraterrestrial water without terrestrial contamination. The temperature at which water is evolved is proportional to the strength with which the water is bound in the sample and the relative difficulty of exchanging oxygen atoms in that water. This allows for the isolated extraction of water bound in different phases, which could have different source reservoirs and/or histories, as evidenced by the mass (in)dependence of oxygen compositions. A low blank procedure was developed to accommodate the low water content of lunar material [4]. Results: Oxygen isotopic analyses of lunar water extracted by stepwise heating lunar basalts and breccias with a range of compositions, petrologic types, and surface exposure ages will be presented. The cosmic ray exposure age of these samples varies by two orders of magnitude, and we will consider this in discussing the effects of solar wind and cosmic radiation on the oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O). I will examine the implications of our water analyses for the composition of the oxygen-bearing reservoir from which that water formed, the effects of surface

  2. ENHANCED DAPI STAINING FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM IN WATER SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Method 1623 is used to detect and quantify the presence of {ital Cryptosporidium} spp. oocysts in water. The protocol consists of concentrating a sample, staining this concentrate with a fluorescent antibody, and examining the sample mi...

  3. Reliable SERS detection of nitrite based on pH and laser irradiance-dependent diazotization through a convenient sampling micro-chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mengyue; Fang, Wei; Ren, Jiaqiang; Shen, Aiguo; Hu, Jiming

    2016-08-15

    Nitrites (NO2(-) ions) in food and drink play an important role in human health but require complicated operations before detection. Herein, we present a rationally designed SERS-enabled micro-chamber that comprised a drawn glass capillary with a tiny orifice (∼50 μm) at the distal tip, wherein the gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are compactly coated on the inner wall surface. In this chamber, nitrites specifically trigger a pH and laser irradiance-dependent diazotization starting from p-aminothiophenol (PATP) absorbed onto the surface of Au NPs to form p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) molecules, in which the presence of NO2(-) ions above 30.7 μM (1.38 ppm) in the siphoned liquid sample can be identified relying on SERS peak (1141 cm(-1)) intensity of the emerging azo moiety. Except for pH conditions, laser irradiance is more important but easily neglected in previous studies, which is capable of preventing generation of errors when the detection sensitivity was pursued through increasing the laser power. In this case, several real samples (rather than simple water samples), including honey, pickled vegetable and fermented bean curd, had been successfully detected accurately through such a convenient sampling micro-chamber. The SERS-enabled device could potentially be facilely incorporated with portable Raman instruments for a special application of food inspection in rapid and field analysis of NO2(-) ions.

  4. Chapter A3. Cleaning of Equipment for Water Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. Chapter A3 describes procedures for cleaning the equipment used to collect and process samples of surface water and ground water and procedures for assessing the efficacy of the equipment-cleaning process. This chapter is designed for use with the other chapters of this field manual. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be posted on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed September 20, 2004).

  5. LIGHT WATER REACTOR ACCIDENT TOLERANT FUELS IRRADIATION TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, William Jonathan [Idaho National Laboratory; Barrett, Kristine Eloise [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) experiments is to test novel fuel and cladding concepts designed to replace the current zirconium alloy uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The objective of this Research and Development (R&D) is to develop novel ATF concepts that will be able to withstand loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period than the current fuel system while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, design basis, and beyond design basis events. It was necessary to design, analyze, and fabricate drop-in capsules to meet the requirements for testing under prototypic LWR temperatures in Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Three industry led teams and one DOE team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory provided fuel rodlet samples for their new concepts for ATR insertion in 2015. As-built projected temperature calculations were performed on the ATF capsules using the BISON fuel performance code. BISON is an application of INL’s Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE), which is a massively parallel finite element based framework used to solve systems of fully coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. Both 2D and 3D models were set up to examine cladding and fuel performance.

  6. Resistivity tomography study on samples with water-bearing structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The apparent resistivity of the samples with water-bearing configuration was measured by an electrode-array and 2-D resistivity images of these samples were reconstructed then. The obtained series of tomograms reveal the distribution and its variation of true resistivity within the samples caused by the changes of crack and liquid distribution. Applying this method to the simulation experiment on the electrical properties of rocks, the fracturing and water filling process, which produces the electrical changes, can be brought to light clearly.

  7. Unveiling the Surface Structure of Amorphous Solid Water via Selective Infrared Irradiation of OH Stretching Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Jennifer A; Fraser, Helen J; Roubin, Pascale; Coussan, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    In the quest to understand the formation of the building blocks of life, amorphous solid water (ASW) is one of the most widely studied molecular systems. Indeed, ASW is ubiquitous in the cold interstellar medium (ISM), where ASW-coated dust grains provide a catalytic surface for solid phase chemistry, and is believed to be present in the Earth's atmosphere at high altitudes. It has been shown that the ice surface adsorbs small molecules such as CO, N$_2$, or CH$_4$, most likely at OH groups dangling from the surface. Our study presents completely new insights concerning the behaviour of ASW upon selective infrared (IR) irradiation of its dangling modes. When irradiated, these surface H$_2$O molecules reorganise, predominantly forming a stabilised monomer-like water mode on the ice surface. We show that we systematically provoke "hole-burning" effects (or net loss of oscillators) at the wavelength of irradiation and reproduce the same absorbed water monomer on the ASW surface. Our study suggests that all dangl...

  8. Analytical techniques for steroid estrogens in water samples - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ting Yien; Praveena, Sarva Mangala; deBurbure, Claire; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Ismail, Sharifah Norkhadijah Syed; Rasdi, Irniza

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, environmental concerns over ultra-trace levels of steroid estrogens concentrations in water samples have increased because of their adverse effects on human and animal life. Special attention to the analytical techniques used to quantify steroid estrogens in water samples is therefore increasingly important. The objective of this review was to present an overview of both instrumental and non-instrumental analytical techniques available for the determination of steroid estrogens in water samples, evidencing their respective potential advantages and limitations using the Need, Approach, Benefit, and Competition (NABC) approach. The analytical techniques highlighted in this review were instrumental and non-instrumental analytical techniques namely gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA), radio immuno assay (RIA), yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay, and human breast cancer cell line proliferation (E-screen) assay. The complexity of water samples and their low estrogenic concentrations necessitates the use of highly sensitive instrumental analytical techniques (GC-MS and LC-MS) and non-instrumental analytical techniques (ELISA, RIA, YES assay and E-screen assay) to quantify steroid estrogens. Both instrumental and non-instrumental analytical techniques have their own advantages and limitations. However, the non-instrumental ELISA analytical techniques, thanks to its lower detection limit and simplicity, its rapidity and cost-effectiveness, currently appears to be the most reliable for determining steroid estrogens in water samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison between different types of glass and aluminum as containers for irradiation samples by neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sroor, A.; El-Dine, N. Walley; El-Shershaby, A.; Abdel-Haleem, A.S

    2000-01-01

    Three different types of glass and four different kinds of aluminum sheet have been analyzed using neutron activation analysis. The irradiation facilities of the first Egyptian research reactor (ET-RR-1) and a hyper-pure germanium (HPGe) detection system were used for the analysis. Among the 34 identified elements, the isotopes {sup 60}Co, {sup 65}Zn, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 123m}Te, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 152}Eu and {sup 182}Ta are of special significance because of their long half-lives, providing a background interference for analyzed samples. A comparison between the different types of containers was made to select the preferred one for sample irradiation.

  10. Sample port design for ballast water sampling: Refinement of guidance regarding the isokinetic diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wier, Timothy P; Moser, Cameron S; Grant, Jonathan F; First, Matthew R; Riley, Scott C; Robbins-Wamsley, Stephanie H; Drake, Lisa A

    2015-09-15

    By using an appropriate in-line sampling system, it is possible to obtain representative samples of ballast water from the main ballast line. An important parameter of the sampling port is its "isokinetic diameter" (DISO), which is the diameter calculated to determine the velocity of water in the sample port relative to the velocity of the water in the main ballast line. The guidance in the U.S. Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program protocol suggests increasing the diameter from 1.0× DISO (in which velocity in the sample port is equivalent to velocity in the main line) to 1.5-2.0× DISO. In this manner, flow velocity is slowed-and mortality of organisms is theoretically minimized-as water enters the sample port. This report describes field and laboratory trials, as well as computational fluid dynamics modeling, to refine this guidance. From this work, a DISO of 1.0-2.0× (smaller diameter sample ports) is recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adsorption of Water on JSC-1A Lunar Simulant Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goering, John; Sah, Shweta; Burghaus, Uwe; Street, Kenneth W.

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing probes sent to the moon in the 1990s indicated that water may exist in areas such as the bottoms of deep, permanently shadowed craters at the lunar poles, buried under regolith. Water is of paramount importance for any lunar exploration and colonization project which would require self-sustainable systems. Therefore, investigating the interaction of water with lunar regolith is pertinent to future exploration. The lunar environment can be approximated in ultra-high vacuum systems such as those used in thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Questions about water dissociation, surface wetting, degree of crystallization, details of water-ice transitions, and cluster formation kinetics can be addressed by TDS. Lunar regolith specimens collected during the Apollo missions are still available though precious, so testing with simulant is required before applying to use lunar regolith samples. Hence, we used for these studies JSC-1a, mostly an aluminosilicate glass and basaltic material containing substantial amounts of plagioclase, some olivine and traces of other minerals. Objectives of this project include: 1) Manufacturing samples using as little raw material as possible, allowing the use of surface chemistry and kinetics tools to determine the feasibility of parallel studies on regolith, and 2) Characterizing the adsorption kinetics of water on the regolith simulant. This has implications for the probability of finding water on the moon and, if present, for recovery techniques. For condensed water films, complex TDS data were obtained containing multiple features, which are related to subtle rearrangements of the water adlayer. Results from JSC-1a TDS studies indicate: 1) Water dissociation on JSC-1a at low exposures, with features detected at temperatures as high as 450 K and 2) The formation of 3D water clusters and a rather porous condensed water film. It appears plausible that the sub- m sized particles act as nucleation centers.

  12. Characterization of a clinical unit for digital radiography based on irradiation side sampling technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivetti, Stefano [Fisica Medica, Ospedale di Sassuolo S.p.A., 41049 Sassuolo (Italy); Lanconelli, Nico [Alma Mater Studiorum, Physics Department, University of Bologna, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Bertolini, Marco; Nitrosi, Andrea [Medical Physics Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera ASMN, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, 42123 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Burani, Aldo [Ospedale di Sassuolo S.p.A., 41049 Sassuolo (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: A characterization of a clinical unit for digital radiography (FUJIFILM FDR D-EVO) is presented. This system is based on the irradiation side sampling (ISS) technology and can be equipped with two different scintillators: one traditional gadolinium-oxysulphide phosphor (GOS) and a needle structured cesium iodide (CsI) phosphor panel.Methods: The characterization was achieved in terms of response curve, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and psychophysical parameters (contrast-detail analysis with an automatic reading of CDRAD images). For both scintillation screens the authors accomplished the measurements with four standard beam conditions: RAQ3, RQA5, RQA7, and RQA9.Results: At the Nyquist frequency (3.33 lp/mm) the MTF is about 35% and 25% for CsI and GOS detectors, respectively. The CsI scintillator has better noise properties than the GOS screen in almost all the conditions. This is particularly true for low-energy beams, where the noise for the GOS system can go up to a factor 2 greater than that found for CsI. The DQE of the CsI detector reaches a peak of 60%, 60%, 58%, and 50% for the RQA3, RQA5, RQA7, and RQA9 beams, respectively, whereas for the GOS screen the maximum DQE is 40%, 44%, 44%, and 35%. The contrast-detail analysis confirms that in the majority of cases the CsI scintillator is able to provide improved outcomes to those obtained with the GOS screen.Conclusions: The limited diffusion of light produced by the ISS reading makes possible the achievement of very good spatial resolution. In fact, the MTF of the unit with the CsI panel is only slightly lower to that achieved with direct conversion detectors. The combination of very good spatial resolution, together with the good noise properties reached with the CsI screen, allows achieving DQE on average about 1.5 times greater than that obtained with GOS. In fact, the DQE of unit equipped with CsI is comparable to the best

  13. A study on the irradiation embrittlement and recovery characteristics of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung; Song, Sook Hyang; Milan, Brumovsky [NRI Czech (Czech Republic)

    1999-03-01

    The neutron irradiation embrittlement phenomenon of light water RPV steels greatly affects the life span for safe operation of a reactor. Reliable evaluation and prediction of the embrittlement of RPV steels, especially of aged reactors, are of importance to the safe operation of a reactor. In addition, the thermal recovery of embrittled RPV has been recognized as an option for life extension. This study aimed to tracer/refine available technologies for embrittlement characterization and prediction, to prepare relevant materials for several domestic RPV steels of the embrittlement and recovery, and to find out possible remedy for steel property betterment. Small specimen test techniques, magnetic measurement techniques, and the Meechan and Brinkmann's recovery curve analysis method were examined/applied as the evaluation techniques. Results revealed a high irradiation sensitivity in YG 3 RPV steel. Further extended study may be urgently needed. Both the small specimen test technique for the direct determination of fracture toughness, and the magnetic measurement technique for embrittlement evaluation appeared to be continued for the technical improvement and data base preparation. Manufacturing process relevant to the heat treatment appeared to be improved in lowering the irradiation sensitivity of the steel. Further study is needed especially in applying the present techniques to the new structural materials under new irradiation environment of advanced reactors. (author)

  14. Analysis of sample and fuel pin irradiation experiments in Phenix for basic nuclear data validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Angelo, A.; Cleri, F. (ENEA, Casaccia Nuclear Research Centre, Dipartimento Reattori Veloci, 0060 Casaccia (IT)); Marimbeau, P.; Salvatores, M.; Grouiller, J.P. (Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, Service de Physique des Reacteurs et du Cycle, Dept. de Recherche Physique, 13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance (FR))

    1990-07-01

    This paper presents comparisons between calculations and experimental data from fuel irradiation experiments performed in Phenix. Both the French CARNAVAL-IV system and the recently developed JEF-1 basic data file are used. The global consistency of the results is excellent and the compared values are, in general, very satisfactory. In some cases, indications for evaluated data modifications are obtained.

  15. Impacts of Saharan dust on downward irradiance and photosynthetically available radiation in the water column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ohde

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A semi-empirical approach was used to quantify the modification of the underwater light field in amplitude (magnitude effect and spectral distribution (spectral effect by different atmospheric conditions altering the incident light. The approach based on an optical model in connection with radiation measurements in the area off Northwest Africa. Key inputs of the model were parameterized magnitude and spectral effects. Various atmospheric conditions were considered: clear sky, dusty sky without clouds, cloudy sky without dust and skies with different ratios of dust and clouds. Their impacts were investigated concerning the modification of the downward irradiance and photosynthetically available radiation in the water column. The impact on downward irradiance depended on the wavelength, the water depth, the optical water properties, the dust and cloud properties, and the ratio of clouds to dust. The influence of clouds on the amplitude can be much higher than that of dust. Saharan dust reduced the photosynthetically available radiation in the water column. Ocean regions were more influenced than coastal areas. Compensations of the magnitude and spectral effects were observed at special water depths in ocean regions and at atmospheric conditions with definite cloud to dust ratios.

  16. Profile sampling to characterize particulate lead risks in potable water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brandi; Masters, Sheldon; Edwards, Marc

    2014-06-17

    Traditional lead (Pb) profiling, or collecting sequential liters of water that flow from a consumer tap after a stagnation event, has recently received widespread use in understanding sources of Pb in drinking water and risks to consumer health, but has limitations in quantifying particulate Pb risks. A new profiling protocol was developed in which a series of traditional profiles are collected from the same tap at escalating flow rates. The results revealed marked differences in risks of Pb exposure from one consumer home to another as a function of flow rate, with homes grouped into four risk categories with differing flushing requirements and public education to protect consumers. On average, Pb concentrations detected in water at high flow without stagnation were at least three to four times higher than in first draw samples collected at low flow with stagnation, demonstrating a new "worst case" lead release scenario, contrary to the original regulatory assumption that stagnant, first draw samples contain the highest lead concentrations. Testing also revealed that in some cases water samples with visible particulates had much higher Pb than samples without visible particulates, and tests of different sample handling protocols confirmed that some EPA-allowed methods would not quantify as much as 99.9% of the Pb actually present (avg. 27% of Pb not quantified).

  17. Combination of hot-water surface pasteurization of whole fruit and low-dose gamma irradiation of fresh-cut cantaloupe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xuetong; Annous, Bassam A; Sokorai, Kimberly J B; Burke, Angela; Mattheis, James P

    2006-04-01

    Improvements in methods for disinfecting fresh-cut cantaloupe could reduce spoilage losses and reduce the risk of foodborne illness from human pathogen contamination. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using hot-water treatment in combination with low-dose irradiation to reduce native microbial populations while maintaining the quality of fresh-cut cantaloupe. Whole cantaloupes were washed in tap water at 20 or 76 degrees C for 3 min. Fresh-cut cantaloupe cubes, prepared from the washed fruit, were then packaged in clamshell containers, and half the samples were exposed to 0.5 kGy of gamma radiation. Native microflora populations and sensory qualities were evaluated during the subsequent 7 days of storage at 4 degrees C. The hot-water surface pasteurization reduced the microflora population by 3.3 log on the surface of whole fruits, resulting in a lower microbial load on the fresh-cut cubes compared with cubes cut from fruit treated with cold water. Irradiation of cubes prepared from untreated fruit to an absorbed dose of 0.5 kGy achieved a low microbial load similar to that of cubes prepared from hot-water-treated fruit. The combination of the two treatments was able to further reduce the microflora population. During storage, the headspace atmosphere of the packages was not significantly influenced by any of the treatments. Color, titratable acidity, pH, ascorbic acid, firmness, and drip loss were not consistently affected by treatment with irradiation, hot water, or the combination of the two. Cubes prepared from hot-water-treated whole fruit had slightly lower soluble solids content. The combination of hot-water pasteurization of whole cantaloupe and low-dose irradiation of packaged fresh-cut melon can reduce the population of native microflora while maintaining the quality of this product.

  18. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Durango, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Surface remedial action has been completed at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Durango, Colorado. Contaminated soil and debris have been removed from the former processing site and placed in the Bodo Canyon disposal cell. Ground water at the former uranium mill/tailings site and raffinate pond area has been contaminated by the former milling operations. The ground water at the disposal site was not impacted by the former milling operations at the time of the cell`s construction. Activities for fiscal 1994 involve ground water sampling and site characterization of the disposal site.

  19. Double-walled microspheres for the sustained release of a highly water soluble drug: characterization and irradiation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Teng Huar; Wang, Jianjun; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2002-10-30

    Composite double-walled microspheres with biodegradable poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) shells and poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) cores were fabricated with highly water-soluble etanidazole entrapped within the core as solid crystals. This paper discusses the characterization, in vitro release and the effects of irradiation on this class of microsphere. Through the variation of polymer mass ratios, predictable shell and core dimensions could be fabricated and used to regulate the release rates. A direct and simple method was devised to determine the composition of the shell and core polymer based on the different solubilities of the polymer pair in ethyl acetate. A distribution theory based on solubility parameter explains why highly hydrophilic etanidazole has the tendency to be distributed consistently to the more hydrophilic polymer. Release profiles for normal double-walled samples have about 80% of drug released over 10 days after the initial time lag, while for irradiated double-walled samples, the sustained release lasted for more than 3 weeks. Although sustained release was short of the desired 6-8 weeks required for therapy, a low initial burst of less than 5% and time lags that can be manipulated, allows for administration of these microspheres together with traditional ones to generate pulsatile or new type of releases. The effects of irradiation were also investigated to determine the suitability of these double-walled microspheres as delivery devices to be used in conjunction with radiotherapy. Typical therapeutic dosage of 50 Gy was found to be too mild to have noticeable effects on the polymer and its release profiles, while, sterilization dosages of 25 kGy, lowered the glass transition temperatures and crystalline melting point, indirectly indicating a decrease in molecular weight. This accelerated degradation of the polymer, hence releasing the drug.

  20. Water erosion tests on a tantalum sample: A short communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C. J.

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports results from an experiment exposing the hot isostatic pressed tantalum cladding of a tungsten spallation target sample to a 34 m/s water jet. The unpolished tantalum surface was placed under the jet for 4.5 months with a view to quantifying pitting and erosion. Micrographs and laser profilometry records of the sample surface taken before and after the experiment are reported here.

  1. Water and steam sampling systems; Provtagningssystem foer vatten och aanga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Mats

    2009-10-15

    The supervision of cycle chemistry can be divided into two parts, the sampling system and the chemical analysis. In modern steam generating plants most of the chemical analyses are carried out on-line. The detection limits of these analyzers are pushed downward to the ppt-range (parts per trillion), however the analyses are not more correct than the accuracy of the sampling system. A lot of attention has been put to the analyzers and the statistics to interpret the results but the sampling procedures has gained much less attention. This report aims to give guidance of the considerations to be made regarding sampling systems. Sampling is necessary since most analysis of interesting parameters cannot be carried out in- situ on-line in the steam cycle. Today's on-line instruments for pH, conductivity, silica etc. are designed to meet a water sample at a temperature of 10-30 deg C. This means that the sampling system has to extract a representative sample from the process, transport and cool it down to room temperature without changing the characteristics of the fluid. In the literature research work, standards and other reports can be found. Although giving similar recommendations in most aspects there are some discrepancies that may be confusing. This report covers all parts in the sampling system: Sample points and nozzles; Sample lines; Valves, regulating and on-off; Sample coolers; Temperature, pressure and flow rate control; Cooling water; and Water recovery. On-line analyzers connecting to the sampling system are not covered. This report aims to clarify what guidelines are most appropriate amongst the existing ones. The report should also give guidance to the design of the sampling system in order to achieve representative samples. In addition to this the report gives an overview of the fluid mechanics involved in sampling. The target group of this report is owners and operators of steam generators, vendors of power plant equipment, consultants working in

  2. Interactions of secondary particles with thorium samples in the setup QUINTA irradiated with 6 GeV deuterons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khushvaktov, J., E-mail: khushvaktov@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Physics ASRU, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Adam, J. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR PRI (Czech Republic); Baldin, A.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute for Advanced Studies “OMEGA”, Dubna (Russian Federation); Chilap, V.V. [Center of Physical and Technical Projects “Atomenergomash”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Furman, V.I.; Sagimbaeva, F.; Solnyshkin, A.A.; Stegailov, V.I.; Tichy, P.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V.M.; Tyutyunnikov, S.I.; Vespalec, R. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Vrzalova, J. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR PRI (Czech Republic); Yuldashev, B.S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Physics ASRU, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Wagner, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR PRI (Czech Republic); Zavorka, L.; Zeman, M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    The natural uranium assembly, QUINTA, was irradiated with 6 GeV deuterons. The {sup 232}Th samples were placed at the central axis of the setup QUINTA. The spectra of gamma rays emitted by the activated {sup 232}Th samples have been analysed and more than one hundred nuclei produced have been identified. For each of those products, reaction rates have been determined. The ratio of the weight of produced {sup 233}U to {sup 232}Th is presented. Experimental results were compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations by FLUKA code.

  3. Interactions of secondary particles with thorium samples in the setup QUINTA irradiated with 6 GeV deuterons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushvaktov, J.; Adam, J.; Baldin, A. A.; Chilap, V. V.; Furman, V. I.; Sagimbaeva, F.; Solnyshkin, A. A.; Stegailov, V. I.; Tichy, P.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V. M.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.; Vespalec, R.; Vrzalova, J.; Yuldashev, B. S.; Wagner, V.; Zavorka, L.; Zeman, M.

    2016-08-01

    The natural uranium assembly, QUINTA, was irradiated with 6 GeV deuterons. The 232Th samples were placed at the central axis of the setup QUINTA. The spectra of gamma rays emitted by the activated 232Th samples have been analysed and more than one hundred nuclei produced have been identified. For each of those products, reaction rates have been determined. The ratio of the weight of produced 233U to 232Th is presented. Experimental results were compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations by FLUKA code.

  4. Effect of gamma irradiation combined with hot water treatment on the texture, pulp color and sensory quality of ''Nahng Glahng Wahn'' mangoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacroix, M.; Jobin, M.; Beliveau, M.; Gagnon, M. (Canadian Irradiation Centre, Laval, PQ (Canada))

    1992-01-01

    Mangoes (Mangifera indica L.) from Thailand of the 'Nahng Glahng Wahn' variety were irradiated with a [sup 60] Co source at a dose of 0.63 kGy and a dose rate of 9.23 kGy/hr, with or without a hot water treatment prior to irradiation. The irradiation treatment had little effect on the texture and preserved the yellow color in the pulp. Test of sensory evaluation revealed that irradiated mango pulp was preferred for overall appearance, taste, texture and palatability. The appearance of whole irradiated mangoes was also preferred over that of the control mangoes. However, no significant differences were observed between irradiated and hot water dipped irradiated mangoes for all characteristics studied in mangoes pulp. The results showed that these treatments (hot water dip plus irradiation or irradiation alone) are useful and non-destructive methods to preserve consumer acceptability.

  5. Determination of estrogenic potential in waste water without sample extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avberšek, Miha; Žegura, Bojana; Filipič, Metka; Uranjek-Ževart, Nataša; Heath, Ester

    2013-09-15

    This study describes the modification of the ER-Calux assay for testing water samples without sample extraction (NE-(ER-Calux) assay). The results are compared to those obtained with ER-Calux assay and a theoretical estrogenic potential obtained by GC-MSD. For spiked tap and waste water samples there was no statistical difference between estrogenic potentials obtained by the three methods. Application of NE-(ER-Calux) to "real" influent and effluents from municipal waste water treatment plants and receiving surface waters found that the NE-(ER-Calux) assay gave higher values compared to ER-Calux assay and GC-MSD. This is explained by the presence of water soluble endocrine agonists that are usually removed during extraction. Intraday dynamics of the estrogenic potential of a WWTP influent and effluent revealed an increase in the estrogenic potential of the influent from 12.9 ng(EEQ)/L in the morning to a peak value of 40.0 ng(EEQ)/L in the afternoon. The estrogenic potential of the effluent was

  6. In situ sampling of interstitial water from lake sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, Albertus G.; van Raaphorst, Wim; Lijklema, Lambertus

    1982-01-01

    A sampler with a relatively high resolution has been developed, which allows interstitial water to be obtained from lake sediments at well defined depths, without serious disturbance of sediment structure. Oxidation effects are excluded. Sampling time is in the order of a day. Installation requires

  7. Filtration recovery of extracellular DNA from environmental water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    qPCR methods are able to analyze DNA from microbes within hours of collecting water samples, providing the promptest notification and public awareness possible when unsafe pathogenic levels are reached. Health risk, however, may be overestimated by the presence of extracellular ...

  8. determination of lead at nanogram level in water samples by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    concentration of Pb(II) in the range of 0.04–1.8 μg/mL for the system with a low ... storage battery, drainage from lead ore mines, paints, munitions, and ... Water samples were immediately filtered through cellulose nitrate (0.45 μm pore size, 47.

  9. Genotoxicity and Mutagenicity of Suspended Particulate Matter of River Water and Waste Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Reifferscheid

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspended particulate matter of samples of river water and waste water treatment plants was tested for genotoxicity and mutagenicity using the standardized umu assay and two versions of the Ames microsuspension assay. The study tries to determine the entire DNA-damaging potential of the water samples and the distribution of DNA-damaging substances among the liquid phase and solid phase. Responsiveness and sensitivity of the bioassays are compared.

  10. Synergistic effect of combination of Irganox 1010 and zinc stearate on thermal stabilization of electron beam irradiated HDPE/EVA both in hot water and oven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, S.; Khoylou, F.

    2007-11-01

    Thermo-oxidative stability of HDPE/EVA blends can be considerably increased by combination of a high-molecular weight phenolic antioxidant and zinc stearate. In this work, the post-irradiation thermal stability of HDPE/EVA blends has been studied. High-density polyethylene and its blends with ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer in both pure form and mixed with Irganox 1010 and zinc stearate were exposed to electron beam radiation at doses between 80 and 150 kGy, at room temperature, in air. In order to evaluate the thermal stability of the samples, post-irradiation heat treatments were done in both hot water bath at 95 °C and in an oven at 140 °C. The mechanical properties and changes in the chemical structure were determined during thermal aging in hot water and oven. The gel content was enhanced by increasing EVA concentration in all applied doses. The stabilized blends have lower gel content than the unstabilized samples. From the results of heat aging treatments it was observed that the thermal stability of the unstabilized blend samples was lower than HDPE. Thermal stability of the samples has been improved by incorporation of Irganox 1010 and zinc stearate. Formation of hydroxyl group was insignificant for stabilized samples during heat aging in both conditions. Also, the changes in the value of oxidation induction time (OIT) for the stabilized samples were negligible after prolonged immersion in hot water.

  11. Synergistic effect of combination of Irganox 1010 and zinc stearate on thermal stabilization of electron beam irradiated HDPE/EVA both in hot water and oven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanpour, S. [Gamma Irradiation Center, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, P. O. Box 11365-3486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mhassanpour2000@yahoo.com; Khoylou, F. [Gamma Irradiation Center, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, P. O. Box 11365-3486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-11-15

    Thermo-oxidative stability of HDPE/EVA blends can be considerably increased by combination of a high-molecular weight phenolic antioxidant and zinc stearate. In this work, the post-irradiation thermal stability of HDPE/EVA blends has been studied. High-density polyethylene and its blends with ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer in both pure form and mixed with Irganox 1010 and zinc stearate were exposed to electron beam radiation at doses between 80 and 150 kGy, at room temperature, in air. In order to evaluate the thermal stability of the samples, post-irradiation heat treatments were done in both hot water bath at 95 deg. C and in an oven at 140 deg. C. The mechanical properties and changes in the chemical structure were determined during thermal aging in hot water and oven. The gel content was enhanced by increasing EVA concentration in all applied doses. The stabilized blends have lower gel content than the unstabilized samples. From the results of heat aging treatments it was observed that the thermal stability of the unstabilized blend samples was lower than HDPE. Thermal stability of the samples has been improved by incorporation of Irganox 1010 and zinc stearate. Formation of hydroxyl group was insignificant for stabilized samples during heat aging in both conditions. Also, the changes in the value of oxidation induction time (OIT) for the stabilized samples were negligible after prolonged immersion in hot water.

  12. Elimination of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type B from drinking water by small-scale (personal-use) water purification devices and detection of BoNT in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörman, Ari; Nevas, Mari; Lindström, Miia; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa; Korkeala, Hannu

    2005-04-01

    Seven small-scale drinking water purification devices were evaluated for their capacity to eliminate botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type B from drinking water. Influent water inoculated with toxic Clostridium botulinum cultures and effluent purified water samples were tested for the presence of BoNT by using a standard mouse bioassay and two commercial rapid enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). The water purification devices based on filtration through ceramic or membrane filters with a pore size of 0.2 to 0.4 microm or irradiation from a low-pressure UV-lamp (254 nm) failed to remove BoNT from raw water (reduction of 2.3 log10 units). The rapid EIAs intended for the detection of BoNT from various types of samples failed to detect BoNT from aqueous samples containing an estimated concentration of BoNT of 396,000 ng/liter.

  13. Luminescence imaging of water during irradiation of X-ray photons lower energy than Cerenkov- light threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Koyama, Shuji; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-10-01

    Luminescence imaging of water using X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than maximum energy of ~200 keV is thought to be impossible because the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov- light. Contrary to this consensus assumption, we show that the luminescence imaging of water can be achieved by X-ray irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV. We placed water phantoms on a table with a conventional X-ray imaging system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during X-ray photon irradiation at energy below 120 keV. We also carried out such imaging of an acrylic block and plastic scintillator. The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during X-ray photon irradiation clearly showed X-ray photon distribution. The intensity of the X-ray photon images of the phantom increased almost proportionally to the number of X-ray irradiations. Lower-energy X-ray photon irradiation showed lower-intensity luminescence at the deeper parts of the phantom due to the higher X-ray absorption in the water phantom. Furthermore, lower-intensity luminescence also appeared at the deeper parts of the acrylic phantom due to its higher density than water. The intensity of the luminescence for water was 0.005% of that for plastic scintillator. Luminescence imaging of water during X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV was possible. This luminescence imaging method is promising for dose estimation in X-ray imaging systems.

  14. A new method of snowmelt sampling for water stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, D.; Ahmad, M.; Birks, S. J.; Bouchaou, L.; Brencic, M.; Butt, S.; Holko, L.; Jeelani, G.; Martinez, D. E.; Melikadze, G.; Shanley, J.B.; Sokratov, S. A.; Stadnyk, T.; Sugimoto, A.; Vreca, P.

    2014-01-01

    We modified a passive capillary sampler (PCS) to collect snowmelt water for isotopic analysis. Past applications of PCSs have been to sample soil water, but the novel aspect of this study was the placement of the PCSs at the ground-snowpack interface to collect snowmelt. We deployed arrays of PCSs at 11 sites in ten partner countries on five continents representing a range of climate and snow cover worldwide. The PCS reliably collected snowmelt at all sites and caused negligible evaporative fractionation effects in the samples. PCS is low-cost, easy to install, and collects a representative integrated snowmelt sample throughout the melt season or at the melt event scale. Unlike snow cores, the PCS collects the water that would actually infiltrate the soil; thus, its isotopic composition is appropriate to use for tracing snowmelt water through the hydrologic cycle. The purpose of this Briefing is to show the potential advantages of PCSs and recommend guidelines for constructing and installing them based on our preliminary results from two snowmelt seasons.

  15. Temporal Evolution of the High-energy Irradiation and Water Content of TRAPPIST-1 Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourrier, V.; de Wit, J.; Bolmont, E.; Stamenković, V.; Wheatley, P. J.; Burgasser, A. J.; Delrez, L.; Demory, B.-O.; Ehrenreich, D.; Gillon, M.; Jehin, E.; Leconte, J.; Lederer, S. M.; Lewis, N.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Van Grootel, V.

    2017-09-01

    The ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 hosts seven Earth-size transiting planets, some of which could harbor liquid water on their surfaces. Ultraviolet observations are essential to measuring their high-energy irradiation and searching for photodissociated water escaping from their putative atmospheres. Our new observations of the TRAPPIST-1 Lyα line during the transit of TRAPPIST-1c show an evolution of the star emission over three months, preventing us from assessing the presence of an extended hydrogen exosphere. Based on the current knowledge of the stellar irradiation, we investigated the likely history of water loss in the system. Planets b to d might still be in a runaway phase, and planets within the orbit of TRAPPIST-1g could have lost more than 20 Earth oceans after 8 Gyr of hydrodynamic escape. However, TRAPPIST-1e to h might have lost less than three Earth oceans if hydrodynamic escape stopped once they entered the habitable zone (HZ). We caution that these estimates remain limited by the large uncertainty on the planet masses. They likely represent upper limits on the actual water loss because our assumptions maximize the X-rays to ultraviolet-driven escape, while photodissociation in the upper atmospheres should be the limiting process. Late-stage outgassing could also have contributed significant amounts of water for the outer, more massive planets after they entered the HZ. While our results suggest that the outer planets are the best candidates to search for water with the JWST, they also highlight the need for theoretical studies and complementary observations in all wavelength domains to determine the nature of the TRAPPIST-1 planets and their potential habitability.

  16. Toxicity reduction for pharmaceuticals mixture in water by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boiani, Nathalia Fonseca; Tominaga, Flavio Kiyoshi; Borrely, Sueli Ivone, E-mail: flavio_tominaga@hotmail.com, E-mail: sborrely@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The incorrect disposal of products is committing the environment quality once the aquatic environment is the main vehicle for dispersion of pollutants. Among the highlighted contaminants there are the pharmaceuticals, which are also released to the aquatic environment through the domestic sewage, hospitals and effluents. The monitoring of these pharmaceuticals in the environment has grown, showing many of them as persistent pollutants. Pharmaceuticals from different therapeutic classes have been detected in domestic sewage, surface water and groundwater around the world. Several studies evidenced Fluoxetine Hydrochloride residues in waters. Another important product is the Propranolol, used for heart disease treatments as far as fluoxetine is applied for treating mental diseases. The objective of this study was to apply the radiation processing for the abatement of pollutant in waters. Electron beam accelerator was used during irradiation of the mixture (Propranolol + Fluoxetine Hydrochloride) in aqueous solution. Acute toxicity assays were carried out for Vibrio fischeri marine bacterium, 15 minutes exposure. The results showed that irradiation (2.5kGy and 5.0kGy) enhanced the average effective concentration of the mixture, which means reduction of toxicity (56.34%, 55.70% respectively). Inverse effect was obtained with 7.5 kGy and 10 kGy. (author)

  17. Robustly photogenerating H2 in water using FeP/CdS catalyst under solar irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huanqing; Lv, Xiao-Jun; Cao, Shuang; Zhao, Zong-Yan; Chen, Yong; Fu, Wen-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Photosplitting water for H2 production is a promising, sustainable approach for solar-to-chemical energy conversion. However, developing low-cost, high efficient and stable photocatalysts remains the major challenge. Here we report a composite photocatalyst consisting of FeP nanoparticles and CdS nanocrystals (FeP/CdS) for photogenerating H2 in aqueous lactic acid solution under visible light irradiation. Experimental results demonstrate that the photocatalyst is highly active with a H2-evolution rate of 202000 μmol h-1 g-1 for the first 5 h (106000 μmol h-1 g-1 under natural solar irradiation), which is the best H2 evolution activity, even 3-fold higher than the control in situ photo-deposited Pt/CdS system, and the corresponding to an apparent quantum efficiency of over 35% at 520 nm. More important, we found that the system exhibited excellent stability and remained effective after more than 100 h in optimal conditions under visible light irradiation. A wide-ranging analysis verified that FeP effectively separates the photoexcited charge from CdS and showed that the dual active sites in FeP enhance the activity of FeP/CdS photocatalysts.

  18. Irradiation treatment of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in water and wastewater: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianlong; Chu, Libing

    2016-08-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs), especially the pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) such as antibiotics and hormones have attracted great concerns worldwide for their persistence and potential threat to ecosystem and public health. This paper presents an overview on the ionizing irradiation-induced degradation of PPCPs in aqueous solution. Parameters that affect PPCPs degradation, such as the absorbed dose, solution pH, dose rate, water matrices and the presence of some inorganic ions and humic acid are evaluated. The mechanism and pathways of radiolytic degradation of PPCPs are reviewed. In many cases, PPCPs such as antibiotics and X-ray contrast agent could be removed completely by radiation, but a higher absorbed dose was needed for their mineralization and toxicity reduction. The combination of ionizing irradiation with other methods such as H2O2, ozonation and TiO2 nanoparticles could improve the degradation efficacy and reduce the cost. Ionizing irradiation is a promising alternative for degradation of PPCPs in aqueous solution.

  19. Synthesis of hemicellulose-acrylic acid graft copolymer super water absorbent resin by ultrasonic irradiation technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang LIU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The hemicellulose super water absorbent resin is prepared by using ultrasonic irradiation technology, with the waste liquid produced during the preparation of viscose fiber which contains a large amount of hemicellulose as raw material, acrylic acid as graft monomer, N,N’-methylene bis acrylamide (NMBA as cross linking agent, and (NH42S2O8-NaHSO3 as the redox initiation system. The synthesis conditions, structure and water absorption ability of resin are discussed. The results indicate that water absorbency of the resin is 311 g/g, the tap water absorbency is 102 g/g, the normal saline absorbency is 55 g/g, and the artificial urine absorbency is 31 g/g under the optimal synthesis conditions, so the resin has great water absorption rate and water retaining capacity. The FT-IR and SEM analysis shows that the resin with honeycomb network structure is prepared. The successfully synthesized of the resin means that the hemicellulose waste liquid can be highly effectively recycled, and it provides a kind of new raw material for the synthesis of super water absorbent resin.

  20. An improved method for concentrating rotavirus from water samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittigul Leera

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified adsorption-elution method for the concentration of seeded rotavirus from water samples was used to determine various factors which affected the virus recovery. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the rotavirus antigen after concentration. Of the various eluents compared, 0.05M glycine, pH 11.5 gave the highest rotavirus antigen recovery using negatively charged membrane filtration whereas 2.9% tryptose phosphate broth containing 6% glycine; pH 9.0 was found to give the greatest elution efficiency when a positively charged membrane was used. Reconcentration of water samples by a speedVac concentrator showed significantly higher rotavirus recovery than polyethylene glycol precipitation through both negatively and positively charged filters (p-value 1,800 MPN/100 ml were observed but rotavirus was not detected in any sample. This study suggests that the speedVac reconcentration method gives the most efficient rotavirus recovery from water samples.

  1. Americium, curium and neodymium analysis in ECRIX-H irradiated pellet. Sample preparation for TIMS measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esbelin, E.; Buravand, E. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France). Centre de Marcoule; Bejaoui, S.; Lamontagne, J.; Bonnerot, J.M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France). Centre de Cadarache

    2013-08-01

    This paper concerns quantitative isotopic analysis of Am, Cm and Nd contained in an irradiated AmO{sub 1.62}/MgO pellet. The complete analysis protocol is described, from dissolution of the pellets in a shielded line to the laboratory glove separation processes box for TIMS analysis. Emphasis is placed on the separation processes: by ion exchange resin in a hot cell and by HPLC in the laboratory. Intermediate measurements by X-ray fluorescence, alpha spectrometry, and ICP-AES are described. (orig.)

  2. Water-filtered infrared a irradiation in combination with visible light inhibits acute chlamydial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Marti

    Full Text Available New therapeutic strategies are needed to overcome drawbacks in treatment of infections with intracellular bacteria. Chlamydiaceae are Gram-negative bacteria implicated in acute and chronic diseases such as abortion in animals and trachoma in humans. Water-filtered infrared A (wIRA is short wavelength infrared radiation with a spectrum ranging from 780 to 1400 nm. In clinical settings, wIRA alone and in combination with visible light (VIS has proven its efficacy in acute and chronic wound healing processes. This is the first study to demonstrate that wIRA irradiation combined with VIS (wIRA/VIS diminishes recovery of infectious elementary bodies (EBs of both intra- and extracellular Chlamydia (C. in two different cell lines (Vero, HeLa regardless of the chlamydial strain (C. pecorum, C. trachomatis serovar E as shown by indirect immunofluorescence and titration by subpassage. Moreover, a single exposure to wIRA/VIS at 40 hours post infection (hpi led to a significant reduction of C. pecorum inclusion frequency in Vero cells and C. trachomatis in HeLa cells, respectively. A triple dose of irradiation (24, 36, 40 hpi during the course of C. trachomatis infection further reduced chlamydial inclusion frequency in HeLa cells without inducing the chlamydial persistence/stress response, as ascertained by electron microscopy. Irradiation of host cells (HeLa, Vero neither affected cell viability nor induced any molecular markers of cytotoxicity as investigated by Alamar blue assay and Western blot analysis. Chlamydial infection, irradiation, and the combination of both showed a similar release pattern of a subset of pro-inflammatory cytokines (MIF/GIF, Serpin E1, RANTES, IL-6, IL-8 and chemokines (IL-16, IP-10, ENA-78, MIG, MIP-1α/β from host cells. Initial investigation into the mechanism indicated possible thermal effects on Chlamydia due to irradiation. In summary, we demonstrate a non-chemical reduction of chlamydial infection using the combination

  3. Water-Filtered Infrared A Irradiation in Combination with Visible Light Inhibits Acute Chlamydial Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Hanna; Koschwanez, Maria; Pesch, Theresa; Blenn, Christian; Borel, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    New therapeutic strategies are needed to overcome drawbacks in treatment of infections with intracellular bacteria. Chlamydiaceae are Gram-negative bacteria implicated in acute and chronic diseases such as abortion in animals and trachoma in humans. Water-filtered infrared A (wIRA) is short wavelength infrared radiation with a spectrum ranging from 780 to 1400 nm. In clinical settings, wIRA alone and in combination with visible light (VIS) has proven its efficacy in acute and chronic wound healing processes. This is the first study to demonstrate that wIRA irradiation combined with VIS (wIRA/VIS) diminishes recovery of infectious elementary bodies (EBs) of both intra- and extracellular Chlamydia (C.) in two different cell lines (Vero, HeLa) regardless of the chlamydial strain (C. pecorum, C. trachomatis serovar E) as shown by indirect immunofluorescence and titration by subpassage. Moreover, a single exposure to wIRA/VIS at 40 hours post infection (hpi) led to a significant reduction of C. pecorum inclusion frequency in Vero cells and C. trachomatis in HeLa cells, respectively. A triple dose of irradiation (24, 36, 40 hpi) during the course of C. trachomatis infection further reduced chlamydial inclusion frequency in HeLa cells without inducing the chlamydial persistence/stress response, as ascertained by electron microscopy. Irradiation of host cells (HeLa, Vero) neither affected cell viability nor induced any molecular markers of cytotoxicity as investigated by Alamar blue assay and Western blot analysis. Chlamydial infection, irradiation, and the combination of both showed a similar release pattern of a subset of pro-inflammatory cytokines (MIF/GIF, Serpin E1, RANTES, IL-6, IL-8) and chemokines (IL-16, IP-10, ENA-78, MIG, MIP-1α/β) from host cells. Initial investigation into the mechanism indicated possible thermal effects on Chlamydia due to irradiation. In summary, we demonstrate a non-chemical reduction of chlamydial infection using the combination of water

  4. Large-scale Samples Irradiation Facility at the IBR-2 Reactor in Dubna

    CERN Document Server

    Cheplakov, A P; Golubyh, S M; Kaskanov, G Ya; Kulagin, E N; Kukhtin, V V; Luschikov, V I; Shabalin, E P; León-Florián, E; Leroy, C

    1998-01-01

    The irradiation facility at the beam line no.3 of the IBR-2 reactor of the Frank Laboratory for Neutron Physics is described. The facility is aimed at irradiation studies of various objects with area up to 800 cm$^2$ both at cryogenic and ambient temperatures. The energy spectra of neutrons are reconstructed by the method of threshold detector activation. The neutron fluence and $\\gamma$ dose rates are measured by means of alanine and thermoluminescent dosimeters. The boron carbide and lead filters or $(n/\\gamma)$ converter provide beams of different ratio of doses induced by neutrons and photons. For the lead filter, the flux of fast neutrons with energy more than 0.1 MeV is $1.4 \\cdot 10^{10}$ \\fln and the neutron dose is about 96\\% of the total radiation dose. For the $(n/\\gamma)$ converter, the $\\gamma$ dose rate is $\\sim$500 Gy h$^{-1}$ which is about 85\\% of the total dose. The radiation hardness tests of GaAs electronics and materials for the ATLAS detector to be put into operation at the Large Hadron ...

  5. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by U-235 fission neutrons: I. Irradiation of human blood samples in the "dry cell" of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajgelj, A; Lakoski, A; Horvat, D; Remec, I; Skrk, J; Stegnar, P

    1991-11-01

    A set-up for irradiation of biological samples in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana is described. Threshold activation detectors were used for characterisation of the neutron flux, and the accompanying gamma dose was measured by TLDs. Human peripheral blood samples were irradiated "in vitro" and biological effects evaluated according to the unstable chromosomal aberrations induced. Biological effects of two types of cultivation of irradiated blood samples, the first immediately after irradiation and the second after 96 h storage, were studied. A significant difference in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations between these two types of samples was obtained, while our dose-response curve fitting coefficients alpha 1 = (7.71 +/- 0.09) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (immediate cultivation) and alpha 2 = (11.03 +/- 0.08) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (96 h delayed cultivation) are in both cases lower than could be found in the literature.

  6. Comparison of the Organic Composition of Cometary Samples with Residues Formed from the UV Irradiation of Astrophysical Ice Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, S. N.; Nuevo, M.; Sandford, S. A.; Cody, G. D.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Stroud, R. M.; DeGregorio, B. T.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Stardust mission successfully collected material from Comet 81P/Wild 2 [1], including authentic cometary grains [2]. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy analysis of these samples indicates the presence of oxygen-rich and nitrogen-rich organic materials, which contain a broad variety of functional groups (carbonyls, C=C bonds, aliphatic chains, amines, arnides, etc.) [3]. One component of these organics appears to contain very little aromatic carbon and bears some similarity to the organic residues produced by the irradiation of ices of interstellar/cometary composition, Stardust samples were also recently shown to contain glycine, the smallest biological amino acid [4]. Organic residues produced froth the UV irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs are already known to contain a large suite of organic molecules including amino acids [5-7], amphiphilic compounds (fatty acids) [8], and other complex species. This work presents a comparison between XANES spectra measured from organic residues formed in the laboratory with similar data of cometary samples collected by the Stardust mission

  7. Simulated Irradiation of Samples in HFIR for use as Possible Test Materials in the MPEX (Material Plasma Exposure Experiment) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The importance of Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) facility will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. The project presented in this paper involved performing assessments of the induced radioactivity and resulting radiation fields of a variety of potential fusion reactor materials. The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR; generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. These state-of-the-art simulation methods were used in addressing the challenge of the MPEX project to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

  8. Influence of ageing on Raman spectra and the conductivity of monolayer graphene samples irradiated by heavy and light ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butenko, A.; Zion, E.; Richter, V.; Sharoni, A. [Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Kaganovskii, Yu.; Wolfson, L.; Kogan, E.; Kaveh, M.; Shlimak, I. [Department of Physics, Jack and Pearl Resnick Institute, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2016-07-28

    The influence of long-term ageing (about one year) on the Raman scattering (RS) spectra and the temperature dependence of conductivity has been studied in two series of monolayer graphene samples irradiated by different doses of C{sup +} and Xe{sup +} ions. It is shown that the main result of ageing consists of changes in the intensity and position of D- and G- and 2D-lines in RS spectra and in an increase of the conductivity. The observed effects are explained in terms of an increase of the radius of the “activated” area around structural defects.

  9. Use of Cdse/ZnS quantum dots for sensitive detection and quantification of paraquat in water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durán, Gema M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry and Food Technology, University of Castilla – La Mancha, Avenida Camilo José Cela, 10, 13004 Ciudad Real (Spain); IRICA (Regional Institute of Applied Scientific Research), Avenida Camilo José Cela, s/n., 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Contento, Ana M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry and Food Technology, University of Castilla – La Mancha, Avenida Camilo José Cela, 10, 13004 Ciudad Real (Spain); Ríos, Ángel, E-mail: Angel.Rios@uclm.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry and Food Technology, University of Castilla – La Mancha, Avenida Camilo José Cela, 10, 13004 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2013-11-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Analytical use of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. •Methodology for water solubilization of CdSe/ZnS QDs. •Sensitive and selective reaction with paraquat herbicide. •Application to water samples. -- Abstract: Based on the highly sensitive fluorescence change of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QD) by paraquat herbicide, a simple, rapid and reproducible methodology was developed to selectively determine paraquat (PQ) in water samples. The methodology enabled the use of simple pretreatment procedure based on the simple water solubilization of CdSe/ZnS QDs with hydrophilic heterobifunctional thiol ligands, such as 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA), using microwave irradiation. The resulting water-soluble QDs exhibit a strong fluorescence emission at 596 nm with a high and reproducible photostability. The proposed analytical method thus satisfies the need for a simple, sensible and rapid methodology to determine residues of paraquat in water samples, as required by the increasingly strict regulations for health protection introduced in recent years. The sensitivity of the method, expressed as detection limits, was as low as 3.0 ng L{sup −1}. The lineal range was between 10–5 × 10{sup 3} ng L{sup −1}. RSD values in the range of 71–102% were obtained. The analytical applicability of proposed method was demonstrated by analyzing water samples from different procedence.

  10. Calcium Hardness Analysis of Water Samples Using EDXRF Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanan Deep

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium hardness of water samples has been determined using a method based upon the Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF technique for elemental analysis. The minimum detection limit for Ca has been found in the range 0.1-100ppm. The experimental approach and analytical method for calcium studies seem satisfactory for the purpose and can be utilized for similar investigations.

  11. Spectrophotometric Determination of Fenpropathrin in its Formulations and Water Samples

    OpenAIRE

    B. Krishna Priya; Subrahmanyam, P.; Dakshayani, K.; P. Chiranjeevi

    2007-01-01

    Novel spectrophotometric methods were developed for the determination of fenpropathrin in insecticidal formulations and water samples. The methods were based on the hydrolysis of fenpropathrin with ethanolic KOH to form 3-phenoxy benzaldehyde. The resultant aldehyde group was condensed with anthranilic acid in presence of basic medium to form yellowish red color product having λmax of 485 nm or condensed with 2-chloro phenyl hydrazine to form pink color product having λmax of 557 nm. The colo...

  12. An opacity-sampled treatment of water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, David R.; Augason, Gordon C.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1989-01-01

    Although the bands of H2O are strong in the spectra of cool stars and calculations have repeatedly demonstrated their significance as opacity sources, only approximate opacities are currently available, due both to the difficulty of accounting for the millions of lines involved and to the inadequacy of laboratory and theoretical data. To overcome these obstacles, a new treatment is presented, based upon a statistical representation of the water vapor spectrum derived from available laboratory data. This statistical spectrum of water vapor employs an exponential distribution of line strengths and random positions of lines whose overall properties are forced to reproduce the mean opacities observed in the laboratory. The resultant data set is then treated by the opacity-sampling method exactly as are all other lines, both molecular and atomic. Significant differences are found between the results of this improved treatment and the results obtained with previous treatments of water-vapor opacity.

  13. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    CERN Document Server

    Gkinis, V; Blunier, T; Bigler, M; Schüpbach, S; Kettner, E; Johnsen, S J

    2014-01-01

    A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneous water isotopic analysis of $\\delta^{18}$O and $\\delta$D on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub ${\\mu}$l amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a home made oven. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW--SLAP scale. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1 permil and 0.5 permil for $\\delta^{18}$O and $\\delta$D, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sampl...

  14. A General,Highly Efficient Ullmann C-O Coupling Reaction under Microwave Irradiation and the Effects of Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU,Xin-Hai; CHEN,Gong; MA,Yan; SONG,Hua-Can; XU,Zun-Le; WAN,Yi-Qian

    2007-01-01

    A general,rapid and highly efficient method for the synthesis of diaryl ethers under the assistance of microwave irradiation was described.A series of diaryl ethers were prepared by direct coupling of phenols and aryl halides in good to excellent yields in anhydrous DMF or NMP at 150℃ within 20 min.The presence of water was found to have a significant impact on the Ullmann C-O coupling reaction between aryl halides and phenols under microwave irradiation.

  15. The role of free and bound water in irradiation preservation: Free radical damage as a function of the physical state of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemeyer, Gary; Dollar, A.M.

    1964-01-01

    English sole fillets previously equilibrated with aqueous 0.1% cysteine were dehydrated by three methods to moisture levels ranging from 2 to 72%. Model systems using cellulose to replace the fish tissue were also used. The samples were irradiated at 1 Mrad in an air, nitrogen, or oxygen atmosphere. The destruction of −SH groups was measured and related to the amount and physical state of the tissue water. As free water was removed, destruction steadily increased, reaching a maximum at about 20% moisture. Destruction decreased markedly at moisture levels below 10%, and calorimetric measurements confirmed that 10% moisture was about the level of bound water in this species. These data suggest that dehydration favors the reaction of solute molecules with free radicals formed in the free water of muscle cells. At moisture levels greater than about 20%, simple free radical recombination is more likely than reaction with solute molecules, while below 20% moisture the reverse is true. The calculated α values support this conclusion, as do the results from model systems using cellulose.

  16. Data Report on Post-Irradiation Dimensional Change of AGC-1 Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes the initial dimensional changes for loaded and unloaded AGC-1 samples. The dimensional change for all samples is presented as a function of dose. The data is further presented by graphite type and applied load levels to illustrate the differences between graphite forming processes and stress levels within the graphite components. While the three different loads placed on the samples have been verified [ ref: Larry Hull’s report] verification of the AGC-1 sample temperatures and dose levels are expected in the summer of 2012. Only estimated dose and temperature values for the samples are presented in this report to allow a partial analysis of the results.

  17. Solar UV-treatment of water samples for stripping-voltammetric determination of trace heavy metals in Awash river, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelaneh Woldemichael

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report about testing a new mobile and sustainable water sample digestion method in a preliminary field trial in Ethiopia. In order to determine heavy metals at the ultra-trace level by stripping voltammetric techniques in water samples from Awash River, we applied our new method of solar UV-assisted sample pretreatment to destroy the relevant interfering dissolved organic matter. The field tests revealed that 24 h of solar UV irradiation were sufficient to achieve the same sample pretreatment results as with classic digestion method based on intense and hard UV. Analytical results of this study suggest that both a hydroelectric power station and agrichemical applications at Koka Lake have increased the levels of the investigated metals zinc, cadmium, lead, copper, cobalt, nickel, and uranium.

  18. Electron beam irradiation enhances the digestibility and fermentation yield of water-soaked lignocellulosic biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Seop Bak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to overcome the limitation of commercial electron beam irradiation (EBI, lignocellulosic rice straw (RS was pretreated using water soaking-based electron beam irradiation (WEBI. This environment-friendly pretreatment, without the formation (or release of inhibitory compounds (especially hydroxymethylfurfural and furfural, significantly increased the enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation yields of RS. Specifically, when water-soaked RS (solid:liquid ratio of 100% was treated with WEBI doses of 1 MeV at 80 kGy, 0.12 mA, the glucose yield after 120 h of hydrolysis was 70.4% of the theoretical maximum. This value was predominantly higher than the 29.5% and 52.1% measured from untreated and EBI-treated RS, respectively. Furthermore, after simultaneous saccharification and fermentation for 48 h, the ethanol concentration, production yield, and productivity were 9.3 g/L, 57.0% of the theoretical maximum, and 0.19 g/L h, respectively. Finally, scanning electron microscopy images revealed that WEBI induced significant ultrastructural changes to the surface of lignocellulosic fibers.

  19. Monitoring of fluoride in water samples using a smartphone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Saurabh [Akvo Foundation (Netherlands); Krishnan, Sunderrajan [INREM Foundation (India); Rajkumar, Samuel; Halery, Nischal; Balkunde, Pradeep [Akvo Foundation (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    In several parts of India, groundwater is the only reliable, year round source for drinking water. Prevention of fluorosis, a chronic disease resulting from excess intake of fluoride, requires the screening of all groundwater sources for fluoride in endemic areas. In this paper, the authors present a field deployable colorimetric analyzer based on an inexpensive smartphone embedded with digital camera for taking photograph of the colored solution as well as an easy-fit, and compact sample chamber (Akvo Caddisfly). Phones marketed by different smartphone makers were used. Commercially available zirconium xylenol orange reagent was used for determining fluoride concentration. A software program was developed to use with the phone for recording and analyzing the RGB color of the picture. Linear range for fluoride estimation was 0–2 mg l{sup −1}. Around 200 samples, which consisted of laboratory prepared as well as field samples collected from different locations in Karnataka, India, were tested with Akvo Caddisfly. The results showed a significant positive correlation between Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) method and Akvo Caddisfly (Phones A, B and C), with correlation coefficient ranging between 0.9952 and 1.000. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean fluoride content values between ISE and Phone B and C except for Phone A. Thus the smartphone method is economical and suited for groundwater fluoride analysis in the field. - Highlights: • Fluoride is an inorganic pollutant in ground water, affecting human health. • A colorimetric method for measurement of fluoride in drinking water with smartphone • Measurement is by mixing water with zirconyl xylenol orange complex reagent. • Results are comparable with laboratory-based ion selective fluoride electrode method.

  20. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, Valentina, E-mail: v.raimondi@ifac.cnr.it [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cucci, Costanza [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cuzman, Oana [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage-National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy); Fornacelli, Cristina [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Galeotti, Monica [Opificio delle Pietre Dure (OPD), Firenze (Italy); Gomoiu, Ioana [National University of Art, Bucharest (Romania); Lognoli, David [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Mohanu, Dan [National University of Art, Bucharest (Romania); Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Tiano, Piero [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage-National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2} to 1 mJ/cm{sup 2} and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  1. Development and clinical application of a length-adjustable water phantom for total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Wei; Yao, Sheng-Yu; Zhang, Tie-Ning; Zhu, Zhen-Hua; Hu, Zhe-Kai; Lu, Xun

    2012-08-01

    A new type of water phantom which would be specialised for the absorbed dose measurement in total body irradiation (TBI) treatment is developed. Ten millimetres of thick Plexiglas plates were arranged to form a square cube with 300 mm of edge length. An appropriate sleeve-type piston was installed on the side wall, and a tabular Plexiglas piston was positioned inside the sleeve. By pushing and pulling the piston, the length of the self-made water phantom could be varied to meet the required patients' physical sizes. To compare the international standard water phantom with the length-adjustable and the Plexiglas phantoms, absorbed dose for 6-MV X ray was measured by an ionisation chamber at different depths in three kinds of phantoms. In 70 cases with TBI, midplane doses were metered using the length-adjustable and the Plexiglas phantoms for simulating human dimensions, and dose validation was synchronously carried out. There were no significant statistical differences, p > 0.05, through statistical processing of data from the international standard water phantom and the self-designed one. There were significant statistical differences, p body width. Obviously, the difference had a positive correlation with the body width. The results proved that the new length-adjustable water phantom is more accurate for simulating human dimensions than Plexiglas phantom.

  2. Shielding by Water and OH in FUV and X-ray Irradiated Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Ádámkovics, Máté; Najita, Joan R

    2014-01-01

    We present an integrated thermal-chemical model for the atmosphere of the inner region of a protoplanetary disk that includes irradiation by both far ultraviolet (FUV) and X-ray radiation. We focus on how the photodissociation of water and OH affects the abundances of these and related species and how it contributes to the heating of the atmosphere. The dust in the atmosphere plays several important roles, primarily as the site of H$_2$ formation and by absorbing the FUV. Large amounts of water can be synthesized within the inner 4 AU of a disk around a typical classical T~Tauri star. OH is found primarily at the top of a warm region where the gas temperature is $T_g \\approx 650 - 1000$ K and water below it where the temperature is lower, $T_g \\approx 250 - 650$ K. The amounts of water and OH and the temperatures of the regions in which they formed are in agreement with recent Spitzer measurements and support the notion of it in situ production of water in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. We find th...

  3. Detection of solar wind-produced water in irradiated rims on silicate minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, John P; Ishii, Hope A; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J; Ciston, James; Nielsen, Michael H; Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C

    2014-02-04

    The solar wind (SW), composed of predominantly ∼1-keV H(+) ions, produces amorphous rims up to ∼150 nm thick on the surfaces of minerals exposed in space. Silicates with amorphous rims are observed on interplanetary dust particles and on lunar and asteroid soil regolith grains. Implanted H(+) may react with oxygen in the minerals to form trace amounts of hydroxyl (-OH) and/or water (H2O). Previous studies have detected hydroxyl in lunar soils, but its chemical state, physical location in the soils, and source(s) are debated. If -OH or H2O is generated in rims on silicate grains, there are important implications for the origins of water in the solar system and other astrophysical environments. By exploiting the high spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopy and valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we detect water sealed in vesicles within amorphous rims produced by SW irradiation of silicate mineral grains on the exterior surfaces of interplanetary dust particles. Our findings establish that water is a byproduct of SW space weathering. We conclude, on the basis of the pervasiveness of the SW and silicate materials, that the production of radiolytic SW water on airless bodies is a ubiquitous process throughout the solar system.

  4. ApoE isoform modulates effects of cranial ⁵⁶Fe irradiation on spatial learning and memory in the water maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeiser, Lauren A; Villasana, Laura E; Raber, Jacob

    2013-01-15

    Apolipoprotein E, which plays an important role in lipid transport and metabolism and neuronal repair, might modulate the CNS risk following (56)Fe irradiation exposure during space missions. In this study, we investigated this risk by behavioral and cognitive testing male E2, E3, and E4 mice 3 months following cranial (56)Fe irradiation. In the open field, mice irradiated with 2 Gy showed higher activity levels than sham-irradiated mice or mice irradiated with 1 Gy. In addition, E2 mice showed higher activity and lower measures of anxiety than E3 and E4 mice in the open field and elevated zero maze. During hidden platform training, sham-irradiated mice showed most robust learning, 1 Gy irradiated mice reduced learning, and 2 Gy irradiated mice no improvement over the four sessions. In the water maze probe trials, sham-irradiated E2, E3, and E4 mice and E2 and E4 mice irradiated with 1 Gy showed spatial memory retention, but E3 mice irradiated with 1 Gy, and E2, E3, and E4 mice irradiated with 2 Gy did not. Thus, cranial (56)Fe irradiation increases activity levels in the open field and impairs spatial learning and memory in the water maze. E3 mice are more susceptible than E2 or E4 mice to impairments in spatial memory retention in the water maze, indicating that apoE isoform modulates the CNS risk following space missions.

  5. Using high frequency water quality data to assess sampling strategies for the EU Water Framework Directive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeffington, R. A.; Halliday, S. J.; Wade, A. J.; Bowes, M. J.; Loewenthal, M.

    2015-01-01

    The EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) requires that the ecological and chemical status of water bodies in Europe should be assessed, and action taken where possible to ensure that at least "good" quality is attained in each case by 2015. This paper is concerned with the accuracy and precision with which chemical status in rivers can be measured given certain sampling strategies, and how this can be improved. High frequency (hourly) chemical data from four rivers in southern England were subsampled to simulate different sampling strategies for four parameters used for WFD classification: dissolved phosphorus, dissolved oxygen, pH and water temperature. These data sub-sets were then used to calculate the WFD classification for each site. Monthly sampling was less precise than weekly sampling, but the effect on WFD classification depended on the closeness of the range of concentrations to the class boundaries. In some cases, monthly sampling for a year could result in the same water body being assigned to one of 3 or 4 WFD classes with 95% confidence, whereas with weekly sampling this was 1 or 2 classes for the same cases. In the most extreme case, random sampling effects could result in the same water body being assigned to any of the 5 WFD quality classes. The width of the weekly sampled confidence intervals was about 33% that of the monthly for P species and pH, about 50% for dissolved oxygen, and about 67% for water temperature. For water temperature, which is assessed as the 98th percentile in the UK, monthly sampling biases the mean downwards by about 1 °C compared to the true value, due to problems of assessing high percentiles with limited data. Confining sampling to the working week compared to all seven days made little difference, but a modest improvement in precision could be obtained by sampling at the same time of day within a 3 h time window, and this is recommended. For parameters with a strong diel variation, such as dissolved oxygen, the value

  6. Radiolytic corrosion of uranium dioxide induced by He{sup 2+} localized irradiation of water: Role of the produced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} distance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traboulsi, Ali [SUBATECH, UMR 6457, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, 4, Rue Alfred Kastler, La Chantrerie BP 20722, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Vandenborre, Johan, E-mail: johan.vandenborre@subatech.in2p3.fr [SUBATECH, UMR 6457, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, 4, Rue Alfred Kastler, La Chantrerie BP 20722, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Blain, Guillaume [SUBATECH, UMR 6457, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, 4, Rue Alfred Kastler, La Chantrerie BP 20722, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Humbert, Bernard [Institut de Matériaux Jean Rouxel, UMR 6502, Université de Nantes – CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinnière, BP 32229, 44340 Nantes (France); Haddad, Ferid [SUBATECH, UMR 6457, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, 4, Rue Alfred Kastler, La Chantrerie BP 20722, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Cyclotron Arronax, 1 rue Arronax, CS 10112, 44817 Saint Herblain Cedex (France); Fattahi, Massoud [SUBATECH, UMR 6457, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, 4, Rue Alfred Kastler, La Chantrerie BP 20722, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2015-12-15

    The short-range (few μm in water) of the α-emitting from the spent fuel involves that the radiolytic corrosion of this kind of sample occurs at the solid/solution interface. In order to establish the role of localization of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} species produced by the He{sup 2+} particle beam in water from the surface, we perform UO{sub 2} radiolytic corrosion experiment with different distance between H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production area and UO{sub 2} surface. Then, in this work, the radiolytic corrosion of UO{sub 2} particles by oxidative species produced by {sup 4}He{sup 2+} radiolysis of water was investigated in open to air atmosphere. The dose rate, the localization of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced by water radiolysis and the grain boundaries present on the surface of the particles were investigated. UO{sub 2} corrosion was investigated by in situ (during irradiation) characterization of the solid surface, analysis of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced by water radiolysis and quantification of the uranium species released into the solution during irradiation. Characterization of the UO{sub 2} particles, surface and volume, was realized by Raman spectroscopy. UV–vis spectrophotometry was used to monitor H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced by water radiolysis and in parallel the soluble uranium species released into the solution were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. During the He{sup 2+} irradiation of ultra-pure water in contact with the UO{sub 2} particles, metastudtite phase was formed on the solid surface indicating an oxidation process of the particles by the oxidative species produced by water radiolysis. This oxidation occurred essentially on the grain boundaries and was accompanied by migration of soluble uranium species (U(VI)) into the irradiated solution. Closer to the surface the localization of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formation, higher the UO{sub 2} oxidation process occurs, whereas the dose rate had no effect on it. Simultaneously, closer to the surface

  7. Ion Chromatographic Analyses of Sea Waters, Brines and Related Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Gros

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the ion chromatographic methods for the analyses of natural waters with high ionic strength. At the beginning a natural diversity in ionic composition of waters is highlighted and terminology clarified. In continuation a brief overview of other review articles of potential interest is given. A review of ion chromatographic methods is organized in four sections. The first section comprises articles focused on the determination of ionic composition of water samples as completely as possible. The sections—Selected Anions, Selected Cations and Metals—follow. The most essential experimental conditions used in different methods are summarized in tables for a rapid comparison. Techniques encountered in the reviewed articles comprise: direct determinations of ions in untreated samples with ion- or ion-exclusion chromatography, or electrostatic ion chromatography; matrix elimination with column-switching; pre-concentration with a chelation ion chromatography and purge-and-trap pre-concentration. Different detection methods were used: non-suppressed conductometric or suppressed conductometric, direct spectrometric or spectrometric after a post-column derivetization, and inductively coupled plasma in combination with optical emission or mass spectrometry.

  8. Visualizing Water Quality Sampling-Events in Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Bolt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Water quality sampling in Florida is acknowledged to be spatially and temporally variable. The rotational monitoring program that was created to capture data within the state’s thousands of miles of coastline and streams, and millions of acres of lakes, reservoirs, and ponds may be partly responsible for inducing the variability as an artifact. Florida’s new dissolved-oxygen-standard methodology will require more data to calculate a percent saturation. This additional data requirement’s impact can be seen when the new methodology is applied retrospectively to the historical collection. To understand how, where, and when the methodological change could alter the environmental quality narrative of state waters requires addressing induced bias from prior sampling events and behaviors. Here stream and coastal water quality data is explored through several modalities to maximize understanding and communication of the spatiotemporal relationships. Previous methodology and expected-retrospective calculations outside the regulatory framework are found to be significantly different, but dependent on the spatiotemporal perspective. Data visualization is leveraged to demonstrate these differences, their potential impacts on environmental narratives, and to direct further review and analysis.

  9. Adsorption of Water on Simulated Moon Dust Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goering, John P.; Sah, Shweta; Burghaus, Uwe; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    A lunar regolith simulant dust sample (JSC-1a) supported on a silica wafer (SiO2/Si(111)) has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The adsorption kinetics of water has been studied primarily by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and also by collecting isothermal adsorption transients. The support has been characterized by water TDS. JSC-1a consists mostly of aluminosilicate glass and other minerals containing Fe, Na, Ca, and Mg. The particle sizes span the range from a few microns up to 100 microns. At small exposures, H2O TDS is characterized by broad (100 to 450 K) structures; at large exposures distinct TDS peaks emerge that are assigned to amorphous solid water (145 K) and crystalline ice (165 K). Water dissociates on JSC-1a at small exposures but not on the bare silica support. It appears that rather porous condensed ice layers form at large exposures. At thermal impact energies, the initial adsorption probability amounts to 0.92+/-0.05.

  10. REDUCTION OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES IN WATER BY APPLICATION OF ULTRASOUND WAVES AND ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Mahvi ، A. Maleki ، R. Rezaee ، M. Safari

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Humic substances mainly humic acids constitute the major fraction of natural organic matter in water supplies. They play an important role in the formation of harmful disinfection by products. Degradation of humic acids by means of ultraviolet radiation and ultrasonic irradiation processes was investigated in a laboratory-scale batch photoreactor equipped with an 300 W immersed-type medium-pressure mercury vapour lamp and sonoreactor with low frequency (42 kHz plate type transducer at 170 W of acoustic power with emphasis on the effect of various parameters on degradation efficiency. Experiments were performed at humic acids initial concentrations varying between 2.5-10 mg/L. Oxidation of humic substances has been followed over time by measuring total organic carbon and UV absorbance in 254 nm and 436 nm. Initial results indicated a strong capacity of photolysis for degradation of humic substances. The results also showed that ultrasonic alone cannot be an efficient method for degradation of humic substances in comparison with UV process. The maximum degradation efficiency of humic substances after 90 min of irradiation, however, was only 5.7% and reached a maximum value of 9.5% after 300 min of irradiation. It was found that total organic carbon can be removed effectively by photolysis. It was also found that lower concentrations of humic substances favor the humic substances degradation. Also, the experimental results indicated that the kinetics of ultrasono-oxidation and photo-oxidation processes fit well by pseudo-first order kinetics.

  11. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan describes planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site in Salt Lake City, Utah. This plan identifies and justifies sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring of ground water, sediments, and surface waters at monitoring stations on the site.

  12. Water flow on erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser irradiation: effects on dental tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Vivian; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2009-09-01

    Since lasers were introduced in dentistry, there has been considerable advancement in technology. Several wavelengths have been investigated as substitutes for high-speed air turbine. Owing to its high absorbability in water and hydroxyapatite, the erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser has been of great interest among dental practitioners and scientists. In spite of its great potential for hard tissue ablation, Er:YAG laser effectiveness and safety is directly related to an adequate setting of the working patterns. It is assumed that the ablation rate is influenced by certain conditions, such as water content of the target tissue, and laser parameters. It has been shown that Er:YAG irradiation with water coolant attenuates temperature rise and, hence, minimizes the risk of thermally induced pulp injury. It also increases ablation efficiency and enhances adhesion to the lased dental tissue. The aim of this review was to obtain insights into the ablation process and to discuss the effects of water flow on dental tissue ablation using Er:YAG laser.

  13. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gkinis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a~home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW–SLAP scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on the water concentration in the optical cavity. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1‰ and 0.5‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the temporal resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to

  14. Influence of photo- and thermal bleaching on pre-irradiation low water peak single mode fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jianchong; Wen, Jianxiang; Luo, Wenyun; Xiao, Zhongyin; Chen, Zhenyi; Wang, Tingyun

    2011-12-01

    Reducing the radiation-induced transmission loss in low water peak single mode fiber (LWP SMF) has been investigated by using photo-bleaching method with 980nm pump light source and using thermal-bleaching method with temperature control system. The results show that the radiation-induced loss of pre-irradiation optical fiber can be reduced effectively with the help of photo-bleaching or thermal-bleaching. Although the effort of photo-bleaching is not as significant as thermal-bleaching, by using photo-bleaching method, the loss of fiber caused by radiation-induced defects can be reduced best up to 49% at 1310nm and 28% at 1550nm in low pre-irradiation condition, the coating of the fiber are not destroyed, and the rehabilitating time is just several hours, while self-annealing usually costs months' time. What's more, the typical high power LASER for photo-bleaching can be 980nm pump Laser Diode, which is very accessible.

  15. Energy related germination and survival rates of water-imbibed Arabidopsis seeds irradiated with protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, H.L. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xue, J.M. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Lai, J.N. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, J.Y. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, W.M. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Miao, Q. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yan, S. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhao, W.J. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); He, F. [School of Life Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gu, H.Y. [School of Life Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Y.G. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)]. E-mail: ygwang@pku.edu.cn

    2006-04-15

    In order to investigate the influence of ion energy on the germination and survival rates, water-imbibed Arabidopsis seeds were irradiated with protons in atmosphere. The ion fluence used in this experiment was in the range of 4 x 10{sup 9}-1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. The ion energy is from 1.1 MeV to 6.5 MeV. According to the structure of the seed and TRIM simulation, the ions with the energy of 6.5 MeV can irradiate the shoot apical meristem directly whereas the ions with the energy of 1.1 MeV cannot. The results showed that both the germination and survival rates decrease while increasing the ion fluence, and the fluence-respond curve for each energy has different character. Besides the shoot apical meristem (SAM), which is generally considered as the main radiobiological target, the existence of a secondary target around SAM is proposed in this paper.

  16. Study of atomic clusters in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel surveillance samples by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammelli, S. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gauss-Str. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)], E-mail: Sebastiano.cammelli@psi.ch; Degueldre, C.; Kuri, G.; Bertsch, J. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R. [Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gauss-Str. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2009-03-31

    Copper and nickel impurities in nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel can form nano-clusters, which have a strong impact on the ductile-brittle transition temperature of the material. Thus, for control purposes and simulation of long irradiation times, surveillance samples are submitted to enhanced neutron irradiation. In this work, surveillance samples from a Swiss nuclear power plant were investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). The density of Cu and Ni atoms determined in the first and second shells around the absorber is affected by the irradiation and temperature. The comparison of the EXAFS data at Cu and Ni K-edges shows that these elements reside in arrangements similar to bcc Fe. However, the EXAFS analysis reveals local irradiation damage in the form of vacancy fractions, which can be determined with a precision of {approx}5%. There are indications that the formation of Cu and Ni clusters differs significantly.

  17. An experiment in representative ground-water sampling for water- quality analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntzinger, T.L.; Stullken, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    Obtaining a sample of groundwater that accurately represents the concentration of a chemical constituent in an aquifer is an important aspect of groundwater-quality studies. Varying aquifer and constituent properties may cause chemical constituents to move within selectively separate parts of the aquifer. An experiment was conducted in an agricultural region in south-central Kansas to address questions related to representative sample collection. Concentrations of selected constituents in samples taken from observation wells completed in the upper part of the aquifer were compared to concentrations in samples taken from irrigation wells to determine if there was a significant difference. Water in all wells sampled was a calcium bicarbonate type with more than 200 mg/L hardness and about 200 mg/L alkalinity. Sodium concentrations were also quite large (about 40 mg/L). There was a significant difference in the nitrite-plus-nitrate concentrations between samples from observation and irrigation wells. The median concentration of nitrite plus nitrate in water from observation wells was 5.7 mg/L compared to 3.4 mg/L in water from irrigation wells. The differences in concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and sodium (larger in water from irrigation wells) were significant at the 78% confidence level but not at the 97% confidence level. Concentrations of the herbicide, atrazine, were less than the detection limit of 0.1 micrograms/L in all but one well. (USGS)

  18. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Riverton, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    Surface remediation was completed at the former uranium mill site in Riverton, Wyoming, in 1990. Residual radioactive materials (contaminated soil and debris) were removed and disposed of at Union Carbide Corporation`s (Umetco) nearby Gas Hills Title 2 facility. Ground water in the surficial and semiconfined aquifers (known collectively as the `uppermost aquifer`) below the former mill and tailings site has been contaminated. No contamination has been detected in the deeper, confined sandstone aquifer. The contaminant plume extends off site to the south and east. The plume is constrained by surface wetlands and small streams to the east and west of the site and by the Little Wind River to the south. Fifteen monitor wells installed in 1993 were sampled to better define the contaminant plume and to provide additional water quality data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples also were collected from domestic wells in response to a request by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality in January 1994. No contamination attributable to the former uranium milling operations have ever been detected in any of the domestic wells used for potable supplies.

  19. Quality of nutrient data from streams and ground water sampled during water years 1992-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, David K.; Titus, Cindy J.

    2005-01-01

    Proper interpretation of water-quality data requires consideration of the effects that bias and variability might have on measured constituent concentrations. In this report, methods are described to estimate the bias due to contamination of samples in the field or laboratory and the variability due to sample collection, processing, shipment, and analysis. Contamination can adversely affect interpretation of measured concentrations in comparison to standards or criteria. Variability can affect interpretation of small differences between individual measurements or mean concentrations. Contamination and variability are determined for nutrient data from quality-control samples (field blanks and replicates) collected as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program during water years 1992-2001. Statistical methods are used to estimate the likelihood of contamination and variability in all samples. Results are presented for five nutrient analytes from stream samples and four nutrient analytes from ground-water samples. Ammonia contamination can add at least 0.04 milligram per liter in up to 5 percent of all samples. This could account for more than 22 percent of measured concentrations at the low range of aquatic-life criteria (0.18 milligram per liter). Orthophosphate contamination, at least 0.019 milligram per liter in up to 5 percent of all samples, could account for more than 38 percent of measured concentrations at the limit to avoid eutrophication (0.05 milligram per liter). Nitrite-plus-nitrate and Kjeldahl nitrogen contamination is less than 0.4 milligram per liter in 99 percent of all samples; thus there is no significant effect on measured concentrations of environmental significance. Sampling variability has little or no effect on reported concentrations of ammonia, nitrite-plus-nitrate, orthophosphate, or total phosphorus sampled after 1998. The potential errors due to sampling variability are greater for the Kjeldahl nitrogen analytes and

  20. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gkinis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We build an interface between an Infra Red Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (IR-CRDS and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100 % efficiency in a home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on humidity levels. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1 ‰ and 0.5 ‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to be deployed for field ice core studies. We present data acquired in the

  1. Design and operation of gamma scan and fission gas sampling systems for characterization of irradiated commercial nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, C.A.; Thornhill, R.E.; Mellinger, G.B.

    1989-09-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is to acquire and characterize spent fuels used in waste form testing related to nuclear waste disposal. The initial steps in the characterization of a fuel rod consist of gamma scanning the rod and sampling the gas contained in the fuel rod (referred to as fission gas sampling). The gamma scan and fission gas sampling systems used by the MCC are adaptable to a wide range of fuel types and have been successfully used to characterize both boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods. This report describes the design and operation of systems used to gamma scan and fission gas sample full-length PWR and BWR fuel rods. 1 ref., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  2. First-Principles Investigation of Electronic Excitation Dynamics in Water under Proton Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Kyle; Kanai, Yosuke

    2015-03-01

    A predictive and quantitative understanding of electronic excitation dynamics in water under proton irradiation is of great importance in many technological areas ranging from utilizing proton beam therapy to preventing nuclear reactor damages. Despite its importance, an atomistic description of the excitation mechanism has yet to be fully understood. Identifying how a high-energy proton dissipates its kinetic energy into the electronic excitation is crucial for predicting atomistic damages, later resulting in the formation of different chemical species. In this work, we use our new, large-scale first-principles Ehrenfest dynamics method based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory to simulate the electronic response of bulk water to a fast-moving proton. In particular, we will discuss the topological nature of the electronic excitation as a function of the proton velocity. We will employ maximally-localized functions to bridge our quantitative findings from first-principles simulations to a conceptual understanding in the field of water radiolysis.

  3. Surface temperature measurements of a levitated water drop during laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Cody; Tracey, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Simulation of high energy laser propagation and scattering in the maritime environment is problematic, due to the high liklihood of turbulence, fog, and rain or sea spray within the beam path. Laser interactions with large water drops (diameters of approximately 1-mm), such as those found in a light rain, have received relatively less attention. In this regime a high energy laser will rapidly heat and vaporize a water drop as it traverses the beam path, but the exact heating / vaporization rate, its dependence on impurities, and ancillary effects on the drop or surroundings are unclear. In this work we present surface temperature measurements of a water drop obtained using a FLIR IR camera. The drop is acoustically levitated, and subject to a continuous wave laser with a wavelength of 1070-nm and a mean irradiance of approximately 500 W/cm2. These measurements show that the steady-state surface temperature of the drop is well below the saturation temperature, yet based on the time history of the drop volume vaporization begins almost immediately upon laser strike. Inferences on the turbulence characteristics within the drop are also made from measurements of the fluctuations in the surface temperature. Supported by ONR, HEL-JTO, and USNA Trident Scholar Program.

  4. Measurements of solar spectral downwelling irradiance in the water column of a large reservoir in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potes, Miguel; João Costa, Maria; Salgado, Rui; Morais, Manuela; Bortoli, Daniele; Kostadinov, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Periodic profiles of spectral downwelling irradiance were performed at Alqueva reservoir, southeast of Portugal, with a new apparatus developed by the team. The device presents a hemispherical tip (180° of FOV) allowing measurements to be independent of solar zenith angle. It is coupled to a portable spectroradiometer through a fiber bundle driven by a customized frame for protection and to keep the tip pointing to the zenith direction in underwater environment. The profiles obtained can be used to estimate the spectral and broadband light attenuation coefficients in the water column. The attenuation coefficients are relevant for the water surface layer energy budget, in particular, this coefficient is important in the computation of the water surface temperature, which is a key parameter for heat and moisture transfers between the reservoirs and the atmosphere, namely by the lake models. A comparison measurement was performed with this new apparatus (180° of FOV) and the previous device (22° of FOV) in order to demonstrate the importance of using the hemispherical radiance. The comparison show resembling results between both devices, however the previous device tends to underestimate the attenuation coefficient and increase the degree of uncertainty.

  5. Double modulation pyrometry: A radiometric method to measure surface temperatures of directly irradiated samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potamias, Dimitrios; Alxneit, Ivo; Wokaun, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    The design, implementation, calibration, and assessment of double modulation pyrometry to measure surface temperatures of radiatively heated samples in our 1 kW imaging furnace is presented. The method requires that the intensity of the external radiation can be modulated. This was achieved by a rotating blade mounted parallel to the optical axis of the imaging furnace. Double modulation pyrometry independently measures the external radiation reflected by the sample as well as the sum of thermal and reflected radiation and extracts the thermal emission as the difference of these signals. Thus a two-step calibration is required: First, the relative gains of the measured signals are equalized and then a temperature calibration is performed. For the latter, we transfer the calibration from a calibrated solar blind pyrometer that operates at a different wavelength. We demonstrate that the worst case systematic error associated with this procedure is about 300 K but becomes negligible if a reasonable estimate of the sample's emissivity is used. An analysis of the influence of the uncertainties in the calibration coefficients reveals that one (out of the five) coefficient contributes almost 50% to the final temperature error. On a low emission sample like platinum, the lower detection limit is around 1700 K and the accuracy typically about 20 K. Note that these moderate specifications are specific for the use of double modulation pyrometry at the imaging furnace. It is mainly caused by the difficulty to achieve and maintain good overlap of the hot zone with a diameter of about 3 mm Full Width at Half Height and the measurement spot both of which are of similar size.

  6. Monitoring of fluoride in water samples using a smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Saurabh; Krishnan, Sunderrajan; Rajkumar, Samuel; Halery, Nischal; Balkunde, Pradeep

    2016-05-01

    In several parts of India, groundwater is the only reliable, year round source for drinking water. Prevention of fluorosis, a chronic disease resulting from excess intake of fluoride, requires the screening of all groundwater sources for fluoride in endemic areas. In this paper, the authors present a field deployable colorimetric analyzer based on an inexpensive smartphone embedded with digital camera for taking photograph of the colored solution as well as an easy-fit, and compact sample chamber (Akvo Caddisfly). Phones marketed by different smartphone makers were used. Commercially available zirconium xylenol orange reagent was used for determining fluoride concentration. A software program was developed to use with the phone for recording and analyzing the RGB color of the picture. Linear range for fluoride estimation was 0-2mgl(-1). Around 200 samples, which consisted of laboratory prepared as well as field samples collected from different locations in Karnataka, India, were tested with Akvo Caddisfly. The results showed a significant positive correlation between Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) method and Akvo Caddisfly (Phones A, B and C), with correlation coefficient ranging between 0.9952 and 1.000. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean fluoride content values between ISE and Phone B and C except for Phone A. Thus the smartphone method is economical and suited for groundwater fluoride analysis in the field.

  7. Study of DNA damage with a new system for irradiation of samples in a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: mrgual@instec.c [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, InSTEC, Avenida Salvador Allende y Luaces, Quinta de Los Molinos, Plaza de la Revolucion, Havana, AP 6163 (Cuba); Milian, Felix M. [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, UESC (Brazil); Deppman, Airton [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Sao Paulo, IF-USP, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, no. 187, Ciudade Universitaria, Butanta, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Coelho, Paulo R.P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, we report results of a quantitative analysis of the effects of neutrons on DNA, and, specifically, the production of simple and double breaks of plasmid DNA in aqueous solutions with different concentrations of free-radical scavengers. The radiation damage to DNA was evaluated by electrophoresis through agarose gels. The neutron and gamma doses were measured separately with thermoluminescent detectors. In this work, we have also demonstrated usefulness of a new system for positioning and removing samples in channel BH3 of the IEA-R1 reactor at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (Brazil) without necessity of interrupting the reactor operation.

  8. Thermal inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Sterne in irradiated ground beef heated in a water bath or cooked on commercial grills

    Science.gov (United States)

    The thermal stability of heat-shocked and non heat-shocked spores of the virulence-attenuated Sterne strain of Bacillus anthracis was evaluated at select temperatures in irradiated, raw ground beef (25% fat) heated in a water bath or cooked using two different commercial grills. For the former, 3-g ...

  9. Liquid Water from First Principles: Validation of Different Sampling Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundy, C J; Kuo, W; Siepmann, J; McGrath, M J; Vondevondele, J; Sprik, M; Hutter, J; Parrinello, M; Mohamed, F; Krack, M; Chen, B; Klein, M

    2004-05-20

    A series of first principles molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations were carried out for liquid water to assess the validity and reproducibility of different sampling approaches. These simulations include Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations using the program CPMD with different values of the fictitious electron mass in the microcanonical and canonical ensembles, Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics using the programs CPMD and CP2K in the microcanonical ensemble, and Metropolis Monte Carlo using CP2K in the canonical ensemble. With the exception of one simulation for 128 water molecules, all other simulations were carried out for systems consisting of 64 molecules. It is found that the structural and thermodynamic properties of these simulations are in excellent agreement with each other as long as adiabatic sampling is maintained in the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations either by choosing a sufficiently small fictitious mass in the microcanonical ensemble or by Nos{acute e}-Hoover thermostats in the canonical ensemble. Using the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr exchange and correlation energy functionals and norm-conserving Troullier-Martins or Goedecker-Teter-Hutter pseudopotentials, simulations at a fixed density of 1.0 g/cm{sup 3} and a temperature close to 315 K yield a height of the first peak in the oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function of about 3.0, a classical constant-volume heat capacity of about 70 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1}, and a self-diffusion constant of about 0.1 Angstroms{sup 2}/ps.

  10. Study of DNA damage with a new system for irradiation of samples in a nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gual, Maritza R; Milian, Felix M; Deppman, Airton; Coelho, Paulo R P

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we report results of a quantitative analysis of the effects of neutrons on DNA, and, specifically, the production of simple and double breaks of plasmid DNA in aqueous solutions with different concentrations of free-radical scavengers. The radiation damage to DNA was evaluated by electrophoresis through agarose gels. The neutron and gamma doses were measured separately with thermoluminescent detectors. In this work, we have also demonstrated usefulness of a new system for positioning and removing samples in channel BH#3 of the IEA-R1 reactor at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (Brazil) without necessity of interrupting the reactor operation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. UV irradiation induced transformation of TiO2 nanoparticles in water: aggregation and photoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Guo, Liang-Hong; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Lixia

    2014-10-21

    Transformation of nanomaterials in aqueous environment has significant impact on their behavior in engineered application and natural system. In this paper, UV irradiation induced transformation of TiO2 nanoparticles in aqueous solutions was demonstrated, and its effect on the aggregation and photocatalytic reactivity of TiO2 was investigated. UV irradiation of a TiO2 nanoparticle suspension accelerated nanoparticle aggregation that was dependent on the irradiation duration. The aggregation rate increased from UV irradiation which might be responsible for the change of surface charge and aggregation rate. UV irradiation also changed the photocatalytic degradation rate of Rhodamine B by TiO2, which initially increased with irradiation time, then decreased. Based on the photoluminescence decay and photocurrent collection data, the change was attributed to the variation in interparticle charge transfer kinetics. These results highlight the importance of light irradiation on the transformation and reactivity of TiO2 nanomaterials.

  12. Evaluation of selected information on splitting devices for water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capel, P.D.; Larson, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Four devices for splitting water samples into representative aliquots are used by the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division. A thorough evaluation of these devices (14-liter churn, 8-liter churn, plastic cone, and Teflon cone) encompasses a wide variety of concerns, based on both chemical and physical considerations. This report surveys the existing data (as of April 1994) on cleaning efficiency and splitting capability of these devices and presents the data in a systematic framework for evaluation. From the existing data, some of these concerns are adequately or partially addressed, but the majority of concerns could not be addressed because of the lack of data. In general, the existing cleaning and transport protocols are adequate at the milligram per liter level, but the adequacy is largely unknown for trace elements and organic chemicals at lower concen- trations. The existing data indicate that better results are obtained when the splitters are cleaned in the laboratory rather than in the field. Two conclusions that can be reached on the splitting capability of solids are that more work must be done with all four devices to characterize and quantify their limitations and range of usefulness, and that the 14-liter churn (and by association, the 8-liter churn) is not useful in obtaining representative splits of sand-sized particles.

  13. Voltammetric Determination of Ni and Co in Water Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Melian, Jose Alberto; Dona-Rodriguez, Jose Miguel; Hernandez-Brito, Joaquin; Perez Pena, Jesus

    1997-12-01

    Stripping voltammetry has attracted considerable attention for the determination of trace and ultratrace metals. This is mainly due to its high sensitivity and low cost of instrumentation. In adsorptive stripping voltammetry an organometallic complex is formed by the addition of a suitable ligand to the sample. The complex is adsorbed onto the Hg-drop by the application of the proper adsorption potential (more positive than E1/2) and solution stirring. After an adsorption period a cathodic (negative going) potential scan is applied and the metal concentration is calculated by the standard addition method. Nickel is found in natural waters at nM levels and is closely related with phosphates and silicates. Cobalt is a component of vitamin B12 and occurs in natural waters at concentration about 0.1 nM. We propose the voltammetric analysis of these elements by adsorptive stripping voltammetry as an introductory laboratory experiment for advanced chemistry or for chemical or environmental engineering students. The experiment has been proven to be very suitable for the laboratory part of the instrumental analysis course at the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain). In general, about 70% of the students have obtained good agreement (less than 10% of difference) between their results and the expected ones. Two hours is enough for the overall instrumental performance and the preparation of Ni and Co standards.

  14. A fast method to prepare water samples for 15N analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖化云; 刘丛强

    2001-01-01

    Automatic element analyser is often used to prepare organic matters tor 15N analysis. It is seldom used to prepare water samples. Water samples are conventionally dealt with by Kjeldahl-Rittenberg technique. But it requires tedious and labor-intensive sample preparation. A fast and reliable method is proposed in this paper to prepare water samples for 15N analysis.

  15. On the dissociative electron attachment as a potential source of molecular hydrogen in irradiated liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobut, V.; Jay-Gerin, J.-P.; Frongillo, Y. [Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Faculte de Medecine; Patau, J.P. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France)

    1996-02-01

    In the radiolysis of liquid water, different mechanisms for the formation of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) are involved at different times after the initial energy disposition. It has been suggested that the contributions of the e{sub aq}{sup -} + e{sub aq}{sup -}, H + e{sub aq}{sup -} and H + H reactions between hydrated electrons (e{sub aq}{sup -}) and hydrogen atoms in the spurs are not sufficient to account for all of the observed H{sub 2} yield (0.45 molecules/100 eV) on the microsecond time scale. Addressing the question of the origin of an unscavengeable H{sub 2} yield of 0.15 molecules/100 eV produced before spur expansion, we suggest that the dissociative capture of the so-called vibrationally-relaxing electrons by H{sub 2}O molecules is a possible pathway for the formation of part of the initial H{sub 2} yield. Comparison of recent dissociative-electron-attachment H{sup -}-anion yield-distribution measurements from amorphous H{sub 2}O films with the energy spectrum of vibrationally-relaxing electrons in irradiated liquid water, calculated by Monte Carlo simulations, plays in favor of this hypothesis. (author).

  16. Determination of trihalomethanes in water samples: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Pavon, Jose Luis [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain)], E-mail: jlpp@usal.es; Herrero Martin, Sara; Garcia Pinto, Carmelo; Moreno Cordero, Bernardo [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2008-11-23

    This article reviews the most recent literature addressing the analytical methods applied for trihalomethanes (THMs) determination in water samples. This analysis is usually performed with gas chromatography (GC) combined with a preconcentration step. The detectors most widely used in this type of analyses are mass spectrometers (MS) and electron capture detectors (ECD). Here, we review the analytical characteristics, the time required for analysis, and the simplicity of the optimised methods. The main difference between these methods lies in the sample pretreatment step; therefore, special emphasis is placed on this aspect. The techniques covered are direct aqueous injection (DAI), liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), headspace (HS), and membrane-based techniques. We also review the main chromatographic columns employed and consider novel aspects of chromatographic analysis, such as the use of fast gas chromatography (FGC). Concerning the detection step, besides the common techniques, the use of uncommon detectors such as fluorescence detector, pulsed discharge photoionization detector (PDPID), dry electrolytic conductivity detector (DELCD), atomic emission detector (AED) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for this type of analysis is described.

  17. Ion Irradiation of Ethane and Water Mixture Ice at 15 K: Implications for the Solar System and the ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, A. L. F.; da Silveira, E. F.; Fulvio, D.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P.

    2016-06-01

    Solid water has been observed on the surface of many different astronomical objects and is the dominant ice present in the universe, from the solar system (detected on the surface of some asteroids, planets and their satellites, trans-Neptunian objects [TNOs], comets, etc.) to dense cold interstellar clouds (where interstellar dust grains are covered with water-rich ices). Ethane has been detected across the solar system, from the atmosphere of the giant planets and the surface of Saturn’s satellite Titan to various comets and TNOs. To date, there were no experiments focused on icy mixtures of C2H6 and H2O exposed to ion irradiation simulating cosmic rays, a case study for many astronomical environments in which C2H6 has been detected. In this work, the radiolysis of a C2H6:H2O (2:3) ice mixture bombarded by a 40 MeV58Ni11+ ion beam is studied. The chemical evolution of the molecular species existing in the sample is monitored by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The analysis of ethane, water, and molecular products in solid phase was performed. Induced chemical reactions in C2H6:H2O ice produce 13 daughter molecular species. Their formation and dissociation cross sections are determined. Furthermore, atomic carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen budgets are determined and used to verify the stoichiometry of the most abundantly formed molecular species. The results are discussed in the view of solar system and interstellar medium chemistry. The study presented here should be regarded as a first step in laboratory works dedicated to simulate the effect of cosmic radiation on multicomponent mixtures involving C2H6 and H2O.

  18. Sampling and analysis for radon-222 dissolved in ground water and surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWayne, Cecil L.; Gesell, T.F.

    1992-01-01

    Radon-222 is a naturally occurring radioactive gas in the uranium-238 decay series that has traditionally been called, simply, radon. The lung cancer risks associated with the inhalation of radon decay products have been well documented by epidemiological studies on populations of uranium miners. The realization that radon is a public health hazard has raised the need for sampling and analytical guidelines for field personnel. Several sampling and analytical methods are being used to document radon concentrations in ground water and surface water worldwide but no convenient, single set of guidelines is available. Three different sampling and analytical methods - bubbler, liquid scintillation, and field screening - are discussed in this paper. The bubbler and liquid scintillation methods have high accuracy and precision, and small analytical method detection limits of 0.2 and 10 pCi/l (picocuries per liter), respectively. The field screening method generally is used as a qualitative reconnaissance tool.

  19. Sampling trace organic compounds in water: a comparison of a continuous active sampler to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coes, Alissa L.; Paretti, Nicholas V.; Foreman, William T.; Iverson, Jana L.; Alvarez, David A.

    2014-01-01

    A continuous active sampling method was compared to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods for the sampling of trace organic compounds (TOCs) in water. Results from each method are compared and contrasted in order to provide information for future investigators to use while selecting appropriate sampling methods for their research. The continuous low-level aquatic monitoring (CLAM) sampler (C.I.Agent® Storm-Water Solutions) is a submersible, low flow-rate sampler, that continuously draws water through solid-phase extraction media. CLAM samplers were deployed at two wastewater-dominated stream field sites in conjunction with the deployment of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and the collection of discrete (grab) water samples. All samples were analyzed for a suite of 69 TOCs. The CLAM and POCIS samples represent time-integrated samples that accumulate the TOCs present in the water over the deployment period (19–23 h for CLAM and 29 days for POCIS); the discrete samples represent only the TOCs present in the water at the time and place of sampling. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis were used to examine patterns in both TOC detections and relative concentrations between the three sampling methods. A greater number of TOCs were detected in the CLAM samples than in corresponding discrete and POCIS samples, but TOC concentrations in the CLAM samples were significantly lower than in the discrete and (or) POCIS samples. Thirteen TOCs of varying polarity were detected by all of the three methods. TOC detections and concentrations obtained by the three sampling methods, however, are dependent on multiple factors. This study found that stream discharge, constituent loading, and compound type all affected TOC concentrations detected by each method. In addition, TOC detections and concentrations were affected by the reporting limits, bias, recovery, and performance of each method.

  20. Sampling trace organic compounds in water: a comparison of a continuous active sampler to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coes, Alissa L; Paretti, Nicholas V; Foreman, William T; Iverson, Jana L; Alvarez, David A

    2014-03-01

    A continuous active sampling method was compared to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods for the sampling of trace organic compounds (TOCs) in water. Results from each method are compared and contrasted in order to provide information for future investigators to use while selecting appropriate sampling methods for their research. The continuous low-level aquatic monitoring (CLAM) sampler (C.I.Agent® Storm-Water Solutions) is a submersible, low flow-rate sampler, that continuously draws water through solid-phase extraction media. CLAM samplers were deployed at two wastewater-dominated stream field sites in conjunction with the deployment of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and the collection of discrete (grab) water samples. All samples were analyzed for a suite of 69 TOCs. The CLAM and POCIS samples represent time-integrated samples that accumulate the TOCs present in the water over the deployment period (19-23 h for CLAM and 29 days for POCIS); the discrete samples represent only the TOCs present in the water at the time and place of sampling. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis were used to examine patterns in both TOC detections and relative concentrations between the three sampling methods. A greater number of TOCs were detected in the CLAM samples than in corresponding discrete and POCIS samples, but TOC concentrations in the CLAM samples were significantly lower than in the discrete and (or) POCIS samples. Thirteen TOCs of varying polarity were detected by all of the three methods. TOC detections and concentrations obtained by the three sampling methods, however, are dependent on multiple factors. This study found that stream discharge, constituent loading, and compound type all affected TOC concentrations detected by each method. In addition, TOC detections and concentrations were affected by the reporting limits, bias, recovery, and performance of each method.

  1. Modification of water absorption capacity of a plastic based on bean protein using gamma irradiated starches as additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeber, E. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Grupo de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gonzalez, M.E. [Comision Nacional Energia Atomica, Av. Del Libertador 8250, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gavioli, N. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Grupo de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Salmoral, E.M. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Grupo de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: esalmor@fi.uba.ar

    2007-01-15

    Some properties of a bean protein-starch plastic were modified by irradiation of the starch. Two kinds of starch from bean and cassava were irradiated with doses until 50 kGy before their inclusion in the composite. Water absorption of the resultant product was reduced by 36% and 60% in materials containing bean and cassava starch, respectively. A large decline in the elongation is observed till 10 kGy in both materials, while tensile strength diminished by 11% in the cassava composite.

  2. Evidence of 2,7/2,8-dibenzodichloro-p-dioxin as a photodegradation product of triclosan in water and wastewater samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezcua, Milagros; Gomez, M. Jose; Ferrer, Imma; Aguera, Ana; Hernando, M. Dolores; Fernandez-Alba, Amadeo R

    2004-10-25

    A photodegradation study of triclosan, a commonly used antimicrobial agent, was carried out in order to investigate the formation of dibenzodichlorodioxin as a by-product of photodegradation in various environmental matrices and under different conditions. Deionized water and wastewater samples, spiked at 8 {mu}g/mL with triclosan, were irradiated with natural sunlight. Aliquots of the spiked water samples were taken at different times of irradiation and compounds were isolated from the water samples by solid-phase extraction. Separation and detection of the compounds and degradation products was accomplished by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A major photolysis degradation product of triclosan, 2,7/2,8-dibenzodichloro-p-dioxin, was identified in wastewater samples. The photolysis experiment showed the simultaneous disappearance of triclosan and the appearance of the dioxin dependent on the pH and the organic matter content. Furthermore, a pilot survey monitoring for influent and effluent waters from a wastewater treatment plant was carried out. The presence of triclosan in all wastewater samples analyzed was revealed and dioxin was found in 80% of the cases, in influents and effluents, thus indicating its input and persistence through the wastewater treatment process. This represents a major finding since dioxins are more toxic than triclosan. Moreover, the presence of such compounds in wastewaters revealed the immediate need to improve the ''classical'' water treatment techniques, as well as considering limitation in water re-use.

  3. Analysis of 2-alkylcyclobutanones in cashew nut, nutmeg, apricot kernel, and pine nut samples: re-evaluating the uniqueness of 2-alkylcyclobutanones for irradiated food identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Elvis M K; Tang, Phyllis N Y; Ye, Yuran; Chan, Wan

    2013-10-16

    2-Alkylcyclobutanones (2-ACBs) have long been considered as unique radiolytic products that can be used as indicators for irradiated food identification. A recent report on the natural existence of 2-ACB in non-irradiated nutmeg and cashew nut samples aroused worldwide concern because it contradicts the general belief that 2-ACBs are specific to irradiated food. The goal of this study is to test the natural existence of 2-ACBs in nut samples using our newly developed liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method with enhanced analytical sensitivity and selectivity ( Ye , Y. ; Liu , H. ; Horvatovich , P. ; Chan , W. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric analysis of 2-alkylcyclobutanones in irradiated chicken by precolumn derivatization with hydroxylamine . J. Agric. Food Chem. 2013 , 61 , 5758 - 5763 ). The validated method was applied to identify 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) and 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone (2-TCB) in nutmeg, cashew nut, pine nut, and apricot kernel samples (n = 22) of different origins. Our study reveals that 2-DCB and 2-TCB either do not exist naturally or exist at concentrations below the detection limit of the existing method. Thus, 2-DCB and 2-TCB are still valid to be used as biomarkers for identifying irradiated food.

  4. Evaluation of the thermal neutron flux in samples of Al–Au alloy irradiated in the carrousel channels of the TRIGA MARK I IPR-R1 reactor using MCNP code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomé, J.A.D.; Guerra, B.T. [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627 – PCA1 – Anexo Engenharia – Pampulha, CEP 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Pereira, C., E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627 – PCA1 – Anexo Engenharia – Pampulha, CEP 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Menezes, M.Â.B.C. de [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Campus da UFMG, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627 31270-901, P.O. Box 941, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Silva, C.A.M. da [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627 – PCA1 – Anexo Engenharia – Pampulha, CEP 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Dalle, H.M. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Campus da UFMG, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627 31270-901, P.O. Box 941, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • The TRIGA IPR-R1 was modelled using MCNP. • The thermal neutron flux through the samples in eleven irradiation channels was obtained. • The simulated results were compared to experimental values. • The relative error, the relative trend, the z-score test and uncertainty were analysed. - Abstract: The TRIGA IPR-R1 was modelled using MCNP. The model consists of a cylinder filled with water, fuel elements, radial reflectors, central tube, control rods and neutron source. Around the core is placed the Rotary Specimen Rack (RSR) with adequate groove to insert the samples to irradiation. The values of the thermal neutron flux through the samples in eleven irradiation channels were simulated and compared to the experimental results to validate the model. After that, the values of the thermal neutron flux, in the same channels, were simulated on two horizontal planes at different heights and compared to validate the model. These channels were characterized as representative channels of the neutron flux distribution in the RSR. To evaluate the results, the relative errors, the relative trend, the z-score test and the relevance to a confidence interval of 95% were analysed. Good agreement has been obtained for the most channels when compared with the experimental results.

  5. Mechanism of Irradiation Assisted Cracking of Core Components in Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, Gary S; Atzmon, Michael; Wang, Lumin

    2003-04-28

    The overall goal of the project is to determine the mechanism of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). IASCC has been linked to hardening, microstructural and microchemical changes during irradiation. Unfortunately, all of these changes occur simultaneously and at similar rates during irradiation, making attribution of IASCC to any one of these features nearly impossible to determine. The strategy set forth in this project is to develop means to separate microstructural from microchemical changes to evaluate each separately for their effect on IASCC. In the first part, post irradiation annealing (PIA) treatments are used to anneal the irradiated microstructure, leaving only radiation induced segregation (RIS) for evaluation for its contribution to IASCC. The second part of the strategy is to use low temperature irradiation to produce a radiation damage dislocation loop microstructure without radiation induced segregation in order to evaluate the effect of the dislocation microstructure alone.

  6. Self-overcoming of the boiling condition by pressure increment in a water target irradiated by proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Bong Hwan, E-mail: burnn@kirams.re.kr [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRMAS), 75 Nowon-Gil, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Joonsun; Jung, In Su; Ram, Han Ga; Park, Yeun Soo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRMAS), 75 Nowon-Gil, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyung Hee [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-11

    An experiment was conducted to examine and visualize the boiling phenomena inside a water target by irradiating it with a proton beam from MC-50 cyclotron. The boiling phenomena were recorded with a CMOS camera. While an increase of the fraction of the water vapor volume is generally considered to be normal when water is boiled by a proton beam, our experiment showed the opposite result. The volume expansion of the liquid water exceeded the compressibility of the initial air volume. A grid structure in front of the entrance window foil held the target volume constant. Therefore, the phenomena inside the target underwent an isochoric process, and the pressure inside the target was increased rapidly beyond the pressure at the boiling point. Consequently, there was no more bulk boiling in the Bragg-peak region in the target water. Our results show that the boiling of the water can be controlled by controlling the equilibrium pressure of the water target.

  7. Iron analysis in atmospheric water samples by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in water-methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofikitis, A M; Colin, J L; Desboeufs, K V; Losno, R

    2004-01-01

    To distinguish between Fe(II) and Fe(III) species in atmospheric water samples, we have adapted an analytical procedure based on the formation of a specific complex between Fe(II) and ferrozine (FZ) on a chromatographic column. After elution of Fe(III), the Fe(II) complex is recovered with water-methanol (4:1). The possibility of trace iron measurements in this complex medium by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry has been investigated. A simplex optimization routine was required to complete the development of the analytical method.

  8. Sequential water disinfection using UV irradiation and iodination for long-term space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Kelly

    As part of the NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training for Advanced Life Support (NSCORT-ALS), a disinfection process, which uses ultraviolet (UV) radiation as the primary disinfectant and iodine as the secondary disinfectant, was investigated. The purpose of this research was to support NASA's goal of long-term space missions to destinations such as Mars. Long-term space missions typically refer to missions with durations of one (1) to five (5) years. For a hypothetical mission to Mars, the length of the mission is estimated to be 600 days. All of the items required for survival of the six person crew would need to be readily available during the mission, including safe potable water. Due to cost and logistical considerations associated with supplying the crew with earth-based potable water for the entire mission duration, closed-loop water treatment processes, in which a finite amount of water is continuously used and re-used, are being considered. Closed-loop treatment systems are comprised of many individual processes. The subject research is focused on the water disinfection process using ultraviolet (UV) radiation as the primary disinfectant and a chemical disinfectant (iodine) as the residual disinfectant. The four main research objectives completed as part of this research are summarized below. (1) Developed a tool that allowed iodine species and concentrations to be predicted based on system characteristics, such as pH and redox potential. (2) Investigated the disinfection efficacy of UV radiation and iodine using a challenge microorganism (Bacillus subtilis spores). Effort was placed on characterizing the response of B. subtilis spores to sequential disinfection (i.e. UV then iodine). Inactivation models were developed to describe the inactivation kinetics. (3) Evaluated a chemical actinometer to monitor the minimum dose within a UV reactor. A continuous-form irradiance field model was developed to estimate the output of a cylindrical non

  9. Ultraviolet-irradiation induced and spontaneous mutation of Rhizobium trifolii 11B in relation to water-soluble and water-insoluble polysaccharide production ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghai, J.; Ghai, S.K.; Kalra, M.S. (Punjab Agricultural Univ., Ludhiana (India))

    1985-02-01

    Rhizobium trifolii 11B was u.v. irradiated and nine u.v. mutants have been isolated. Among the mutants, only one, R. trifolii 21M11B, produced more (752 mg/100 ml) water-soluble polysaccharide than the parent (704 mg/100 ml). The composition of water-soluble polysaccharide from u.v. mutants differed from that of the parent, R. trifolii 11B, and none of its u.v. mutants produced water-insoluble polysaccharide as detected by the Aniline Blue method. Storage of u.v. mutants for 2 months at 5/sup 0/C gave four spontaneous variants which acquired the ability to produce water-insoluble polysaccharide. The spontaneous mutants also retained their water-soluble polysaccharide producing ability. The water-soluble polysaccharide produced by these mutants was characterized as curdlan type. The chemistry of water-soluble and water-insoluble polysaccharides was also ascertained.

  10. Flow cytometric applicability to evaluate UV inactivation of phytoplankton in marine water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Ranveig Ottoey; Hess-Erga, Ole-Kristian; Larsen, Aud; Thuestad, Gunnar; Tobiesen, August; Hoell, Ingunn Alne

    2015-07-15

    Disinfection of microbes is of importance to prevent the spread of pathogens and non-indigenous species in the environment. Here we test the applicability of using flow cytometry (FCM) to evaluate inactivation of the phytoplankter Tetraselmis suecica after UV irradiation and labeling with the esterase substrate 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate acetoxymethyl ester (CFDA-AM). Non-irradiated and UV irradiated samples were analyzed with the plate count technique and FCM for 24 days. The numbers of colony forming units were used as a standard to develop a FCM protocol. Our protocol readily distinguishes live and dead cells, but challenges were encountered when determining whether UV damaged cells are dying or repairable. As damaged cells can represent a risk to aquatic organisms and/or humans, this was taken into account when developing the FCM protocol. In spite of the above mentioned challenges we argue that FCM represents an accurate and rapid method to analyze T. suecica samples.

  11. Photochemical transformation of zearalenone in aqueous solutions under simulated solar irradiation: Kinetics and influence of water constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emídio, Elissandro S; Calisto, Vânia; de Marchi, Mary Rosa R; Esteves, Valdemar I

    2017-02-01

    The presence of estrogenic mycotoxins, such as zearalenone (ZEN), in surface waters is an emerging environmental issue. Little is known about its phototransformation behavior, which may influence its environmental fate. In this context, the phototransformation of ZEN was investigated in pure water, river water and estuarine water using simulated sunlight irradiation. Kinetic studies revealed that two concomitant processes contribute to the fate of ZEN under solar irradiation: photoisomerization and photodegradation. This phototransformation followed a pseudo-first order kinetics. ZEN degrades quickly in natural waters and slowly in deionized water, with half-lives (t1/2) of 28 ± 4 min (estuarine water), 136 ± 21 min (river water) and 1777 ± 412 min (deionized water). The effects of different water constituents on the phototransformation of ZEN in aqueous solution have been assessed (NaCl, Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(3+), NO3(-) and oxalate ions, synthetic seawater, Fe(III)-oxalate and Mg(II)-oxalate complexes, humic acids, fulvic acids and XAD-4 fraction). In the presence of synthetic seawater salt (t1/2 = 18 ± 5 min) and Fe(III)-oxalate complexes (t1/2 = 61 ± 9 min), the transformation rate increased considerably in relation to other water constituents tested. The solution pH also had a considerable effect in the kinetics with maximum transformation rates occurring around pH 8.5. These results allow us to conclude that phototransformation by solar radiation can be an important degradation pathway of ZEN in natural waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Real-time analysis of water movement in plant sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokota, Harumi; Furukawa, Jun; Tanoi, Keitaro [Graduate School, Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    To know the effect of drought stress on two cultivars of cowpea, drought tolerant (DT) and drought sensitive (DS), and to estimate vanadium treatment on plant activity, we performed real time{sup 18}F labeled water uptake measurement by PETIS. Fluoride-18 was produced by bombarding a cubic ice target with 50 MeV protons using TIARA AVF cyclotron. Then {sup 18}F labeled water was applied to investigate water movement in a cowpea plant. Real time water uptake manner could be monitored by PETIS. After the analysis by PETIS, we also measured the distribution of {sup 18}F in a whole plant by BAS. When a cowpea plant was treated with drought stress, there was a difference in water uptake manner between DT and DS cultivar. When a cowpea plant was treated with V for 20 hours before the water uptake experiment, the total amount of {sup 18}F labeled water absorption was found to be drastically decreased. (author)

  13. Sampling and Analysis for Lead in Water and Soil Samples on a University Campus: A Student Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butala, Steven J.; Zarrabi, Kaveh

    1995-01-01

    Describes a student research project that determined concentrations of lead in water drawn from selected drinking fountains and in selected soil samples on the campus of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. (18 references) (DDR)

  14. Representation of solid and nutrient concentrations in irrigation water from tailwater recovery systems by surface water grab samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailwater recovery (TWR) systems are being implemented on agricultural landscapes to create an additional source of irrigation water. Existing studies have sampled TWR systems using grab samples; however, the applicability of solids and nutrient concentrations in these samples to water being irrigat...

  15. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  16. Changes in the Lipid Fraction of Eel Gills after Ionizing Irradiation in Vivo and a Shift from Fresh to Sea Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max

    1975-01-01

    by γ-irradiation. Similarly, γ-irradiation intensified a relatively enhanced incorporation in sea water of 32 P activity into lecithin, and there was a relatively increased synthesis of certain 14 C-labeled unsaturated fatty acids (mainly ${\\rm C}_{16\\colon 1}$) in the gills of animals that had both...

  17. An analytical two-flow model to simulate the distribution of irradiance in coastal waters with a wind-roughed surface and bottom reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei-Ming

    1997-06-01

    An analytical two-flow model is derived from the radiative transfer equation to simulate the distribution of irradiance in coastal waters with a wind-roughed surface and bottom reflectance. The model utilizes unique boundary conditions, including the surface slope of the downwelling and upwelling irradiance as well as the influence of wind and bottom reflectance on simulated surface reflectance. The developed model provides a simple mathematical concept for understanding the irradiant light flux and associated processes in coastal or fresh water as well as turbid estuarine waters. The model is applied to data from the Banana River and coastal Atlantic Ocean water off the east coast of central Florida, USA. The two-flow irradiance model is capable of simulating realistic above-surface reflectance signatures under wind-roughened air-water surface given realistic input parameters including a specular flux conversion coefficient, absorption coefficient, backscattering coefficient, atmospheric visibility, bottom reflectance, and water depth. The root-mean-squared error of the calculated above-surface reflectances is approximately 3% in the Banana River and is less than 15% in coastal Atlantic Ocean off the east of Florida. Result of the subsurface reflectance sensitivity analysis indicates that the specular conversion coefficient is the most sensitive parameter in the model, followed by the beam attenuation coefficient, absorption coefficient, water depth, backscattering coefficient, specular irradiance, diffuse irradiance, bottom reflectance, and wind speed. On the other hand, result of the above-surface reflectance sensitivity analysis indicates that the wind speed is the most important parameter, followed by bottom reflectance, attenuation coefficient, water depth, conversion coefficient, specular irradiance, downwelling irradiance, absorption coefficient, and backscattering coefficient. Model results depend on the accuracy of these parameters to a large degree and

  18. Determination of 2-alkylcyclobutanones in ultraviolet light-irradiated fatty acids, triglycerides, corn oil, and pork samples: Identifying a new source of 2-alkylcyclobutanones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangpeng; Chan, Wan

    2017-02-15

    Previous studies have established that 2-alkylcyclobutanones (2-ACBs) are unique radiolytic products in lipid-containing foods that could only be formed through exposure to ionizing radiation, but not by any other means of physical/heat treatment methods. Therefore, 2-ACBs are currently the marker molecules required by the European Committee for Standardization to be used to identify foods irradiated with ionizing irradiation. Using a spectrum of state-of-the-art analytical instruments, we present in this study for the first time that the generation of 2-ACBs was also possible when fatty acids and triglycerides are exposed to a non-ionizing, short-wavelength ultraviolet (UV-C) light source. An irradiation dosage-dependent formation of 2-ACBs was also observed in UV-C irradiated fatty acids, triglycerides, corn oil, and pork samples. With UV-C irradiation becoming an increasingly common food treatment procedure, it is anticipated that the results from this study will alert food scientists and regulatory officials to a potential new source for 2-ACBs.

  19. Inactivation of Enterococcus faecalis by TiO2-mediated UV and solar irradiation in water and wastewater: culture techniques never say the whole truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venieri, Danae; Chatzisymeon, Efthalia; Gonzalo, Maria S; Rosal, Roberto; Mantzavinos, Dionissios

    2011-11-01

    In this work, the disinfection efficiency of water and secondary treated wastewater by means of UV-A, UV-C and solar irradiation in the presence or absence of TiO(2), using a reference strain of Enterococcus faecalis as faecal indicator, was evaluated. Operating parameters such as TiO(2) loading (0-1500 mg L(-1)), initial bacterial concentration (2 × 10(2)-10(8) CFU mL(-1)) and treatment time (up to 120 min) were assessed concerning their impact on disinfection. E. faecalis inactivation was monitored by the conventional culture method and real-time PCR. Regarding photocatalytic treatment, disinfection efficiency was improved by increasing TiO(2) concentration and bacterial inactivation took place in relatively short treatment times. Comparing the three disinfection methods, it was observed that UV-C irradiation yielded a better efficiency during water treatment than UV-A and solar irradiation. Furthermore, UV-A was more efficient than solar irradiation in the presence of the same loading of TiO(2). Regarding real wastewater, it was observed that only UV-C irradiation was capable of totally inactivating E. faecalis population in a short time. Screening the results obtained from both applied techniques (culture method and real-time PCR), there was a discrepancy, regarding the recorded time periods of total bacterial inactivation. Real-time PCR data revealed that longer periods are needed for 100% bacterial reduction during the treatments tested compared to the estimated time by culture method. This is probably attributed to the phenomenon of "viable but not culturable bacteria", caused by stressed conditions induced during disinfection experiments. Taking into account the contrast of results and in order to perform a thorough evaluation of disinfection techniques, conventional culture method should be accompanied by a DNA-based method. According to our findings, real-time PCR proved to be a reliable and accurate molecular tool for the identification and

  20. Irradiation resistance of silicon carbide joint at light water reactor-relevant temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, T.; Katoh, Y.; Kiggans, J. O.; Hinoki, T.; Khalifa, H. E.; Deck, C. P.; Back, C. A.

    2017-05-01

    Monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) to SiC plate joints were fabricated and irradiated with neutrons at 270-310 °C to 8.7 dpa for SiC. The joining methods included solid state diffusion bonding using titanium and molybdenum interlayers, SiC nanopowder sintering, reaction sintering with a Ti-Si-C system, and hybrid processing of polymer pyrolysis and chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). All the irradiated joints exhibited apparent shear strength of more than 84 MPa on average. Significant irradiation-induced cracking was found in the bonding layers of the Ti and Mo diffusion bonds and Ti-Si-C reaction sintered bond. The SiC-based bonding layers of the SiC nanopowder sintered and hybrid polymer pyrolysis and CVI joints all showed stable microstructure following the irradiation.

  1. Modification of the silver nanoparticles size-distribution by means of laser light irradiation of their water suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, A.S., E-mail: anastas_nklv@yahoo.com [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tsarigradsko Chaussee 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Nikov, R.G.; Dimitrov, I.G.; Nedyalkov, N.N.; Atanasov, P.A. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tsarigradsko Chaussee 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Alexandrov, M.T. [Institute of Experimental Pathology and Parasitology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, G. Bonchev Street, bl. 25, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Karashanova, D.B. [Institute of Optical Materials and Technologies, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, G. Bonchev Street, bl. 109, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2013-09-01

    Contamination-free Ag nanoparticles were produced by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation (10 Hz repetition rate, 15 ns pulse duration) of a solid target immersed in double distilled water. The size distribution observed of the NPs is wider compared to those obtained by other preparation methods, mainly chemical. To modify it and make the NPs more appropriate for biological application, the fabricated suspensions were irradiated by an unfocused laser beam. The fundamental wavelength (λ = 1064 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser system was used for Ag NPs preparation. It lies outside their surface plasmon absorption band and was chosen to avoid self-absorption during ablation by already formed NPs. Excluding a possible absorption in the preparation stage provides a better control of the irradiation influence. The following irradiation of the suspension obtained was performed by the third (λ{sub THG} = 355 nm) harmonic of the laser system, which was chosen due to its positioning within the corresponding surface plasmon absorption band. The changes of the NPs characteristics caused by different laser fluence and duration of irradiation were traced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confirmed by optical transmission measurements in the near UV and the visible region. A considerable narrowing (by about of a factor of three) of the surface plasmon extinction band was achieved, which is evidence of narrowing of the particles size distribution and approach of their shape to the ideal spherical.

  2. Hydrogen-Rich Water Ameliorates Total Body Irradiation-Induced Hematopoietic Stem Cell Injury by Reducing Hydroxyl Radical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junling Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined whether consumption of hydrogen-rich water (HW could ameliorate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC injury in mice with total body irradiation (TBI. The results indicated that HW alleviated TBI-induced HSC injury with respect to cell number alteration and to the self-renewal and differentiation of HSCs. HW specifically decreased hydroxyl radical (OH∙ levels in the c-kit+ cells of 4 Gy irradiated mice. Proliferative bone marrow cells (BMCs increased and apoptotic c-kit+ cells decreased in irradiated mice uptaken with HW. In addition, the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI of γ-H2AX and percentage of 8-oxoguanine positive cells significantly decreased in HW-treated c-kit+ cells, indicating that HW can alleviate TBI-induced DNA damage and oxidative DNA damage in c-kit+ cells. Finally, the cell cycle (P21, cell apoptosis (BCL-XL and BAK, and oxidative stress (NRF2, HO-1, NQO1, SOD, and GPX1 proteins were significantly altered by HW in irradiated mouse c-kit+ cells. Collectively, the present results suggest that HW protects against TBI-induced HSC injury.

  3. The study of neutron spectra in water bath from Pb target irradiated by 250MeV/u protons

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yanyan; Ju, Yongqin; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Hongbin; Chen, Liang; Ge, Honglin; Luo, Peng; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Yanbin; Li, Jianyang; Xu, Junkui; Wang, Songlin; Yang, Yongwei; Yang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The spallation neutrons were produced by the irradiation of Pb with 250 MeV protons. The Pb target was surrounded by water which was used to slow down the emitted neutrons. The moderated neutrons in the water bath were measured by using the resonance detectors of Au, Mn and In with Cd cover. According to the measured activities of the foils, the neutron flux at different resonance energy were deduced and the epithermal neutron spectra were proposed. Corresponding results calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX were compared with the experimental data to check the validity of the code.

  4. Atom-efficient coupling reaction of aryl bromideswith sodium tetraphenylborate catalyzed by reusable Pd/C in water under focused microwave irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Bai

    2009-01-01

    A rapid and heterogeneous Pal/C-catalyzed atom-efficient phenylation of aryl bromides by sodium tetraphenylborate takes place under focused microwave irradiation in water.The palladium catalyst can be easily recovered and reused.

  5. Produced water chemistry data for samples from four petroleum wells, Southern San Joaquin Valley, California, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy A.; Kulongoski, Justin; McMahon, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board collected produced water samples from four petroleum wells in the southern San Joaquin Valley on November 5, 2014. This digital dataset contains the site information, analyzing laboratories and methods, and water chemistry and quality control results for these samples. Water chemistry results include concentrations of dissolved hydrocarbon gases and their isotopic composition; concentrations of inorganic constituents including salinity, major ions, and nutrients; dissolved organic carbon; and stable isotopes of water and strontium dissolved in water. Samples were analyzed by 5 laboratories operated or contracted by the USGS.

  6. 40 CFR 258.53 - Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....53 Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements. (a) The ground-water monitoring program must... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements. 258.53 Section 258.53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  7. bacteriological analysis of well water samples in sagamu.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    Due to increasing cases of water-borne diseases in recent times, this study was carried out ... are not safe microbiologically for drinking without additional treatment such as boiling ... fever and Cholera. .... The spread of diseases through faecal.

  8. Chlorine inactivation of Tubifex tubifex in drinking water and the synergistic effect of sequential inactivation with UV irradiation and chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiao-Bao; Li, Zhi-Hong; Long, Yuan-Nan; He, Pan-Pan; Xu, Chao

    2017-06-01

    The inactivation of Tubifex tubifex is important to prevent contamination of drinking water. Chlorine is a widely-used disinfectant and the key factor in the inactivation of T. tubifex. This study investigated the inactivation kinetics of chlorine on T. tubifex and the synergistic effect of the sequential use of chlorine and UV irradiation. The experimental results indicated that the Ct (concentration × timereaction) concept could be used to evaluate the inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex with chlorine, thus allowing for the use of a simpler Ct approach for the assessment of T. tubifex chlorine inactivation requirements. The inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be well-fitted to a delayed pseudo first-order Chick-Watson expression. Sequential experiments revealed that UV irradiation and chlorine worked synergistically to effectively inactivate T. tubifex as a result of the decreased activation energy, Ea, induced by primary UV irradiation. Furthermore, the inactivation effectiveness of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be affected by several drinking water quality parameters including pH, turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand with potassium permanganate (CODMn) concentration. High pH exhibited pronounced inactivation effectiveness and the decrease in turbidity and CODMn concentrations contributed to the inactivation of T. tubifex.

  9. Comparison of N-nitrosodiethylamine degradation in water by UV irradiation and UV/O3: efficiency, product and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingbing; Chen, Zhonglin; Qi, Fei; Ma, Jun; Wu, Fengchang

    2010-07-15

    N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) is a member of nitrosamines, which is strong carcinogenic. In order to explore an effective treatment method for NDEA removal from water, sole UV irradiation and UV/O(3) were carried out in this study. The removal efficiency, degradation products and pathways were compared between those two processes. Results showed that NDEA removal efficiency achieved 99% within 15 min by both UV and UV/O(3). Degradation reaction well followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. Water pH had different effect on NDEA degradation in those two processes. Acidic and neutral conditions were good for NDEA degradation by sole UV irradiation. However, NDEA underwent rapid degradation under various pH conditions in the UV/O(3) process. Though the ozone introduction in the UV/O(3) process had little effect on NDEA degradation efficiency, it had significant effect on its degradation products and pathways. Methylamine, dimethylamine, ethylamine and diethylamine were observed as aliphatic amine products of NDEA degradation in both two processes. They were assumed to arise due to N-N bond fission under UV irradiation, or due to the reaction of NDEA and hydroxyl radicals in the UV/O(3) process.

  10. Study of the iron corrosion at the interface of different media (water, air) submitted to protons irradiation; Etude de la corrosion du fer a l'interface de differents milieux (eau, air) soumis a l'irradiation de protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapuerta, S

    2005-10-15

    During the deep geological disposal, stainless steel containers of the vitrified waste will be put in carbon steel overpacks. After the closing of the storage site, overpacks will be in contact with a humid air and a radioactive medium. After hundred years, overpacks could be in contact with water radiolysis in an anoxic medium. In this context, my PhD work is a fundamental study which is the understanding of the corrosion mechanisms of pure iron under proton irradiation. This corrosion is affected by the contact of iron with different atmospheres (air, nitrogen) and water. In the case of the atmospheric iron corrosion under irradiation, we have studied the influence of the proton beam flux. During this work, we have characterized the structure of the oxides formed at the iron surface. The structure formed does not correspond to iron oxides and hydroxides indexed. However, we have shown that the oxide structure is close to that of lepidocrocite and bernalite. Moreover, we have determined the oxygen diffusion coefficient in iron under irradiation and we have shown that the irradiation accelerates of 6 orders of magnitude the iron corrosion. In addition, the irradiations which were realized in different gas have put in evidence the negligible role of nitrates, and the importance of the O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O coupling on the iron corrosion. Finally, we have shown the influence of the relative humidity, the maximum of the corrosion being observed for a relative humidity close to 45%. In the case of the iron corrosion in aqueous media under irradiation, the influence of the oxygen dissolved in water has been studied using a surface marker. We have put in evidence that the corrosion is twice more significant in aerated medium than in deaerated medium. Moreover, the influence of radicals has been shown. An irradiated sample is more corroded than a sample put in contact with a H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution. Finally, the follow-up of the iron potential under irradiation have shown

  11. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  12. Thermoluminescence study of Cu and Ag doped lithium tetraborate samples synthesized by water/solution assisted method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiyagarajan, S.; Kumar, S.; Vallejo, M.; Sosa, M. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Velusamy, J., E-mail: thiya93@gmail.com [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Apdo. Postal 1-948, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper lithium tetraborate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) was produced by water/solution assisted synthesis method. Transition metals, such as Cu and Ag were used to dope Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} in order to enhance its thermoluminescent properties. The heating temperature parameters for synthesis were 750 degrees Celsius for 2 hours and 150 degrees Celsius for another 2 hours. The samples produced by water assisted method were doped at different doping percentage (0.08, 0.12, 0.5, 0.1 and 1%) of Cu and Ag. Pellets of samples were prepared and there were irradiated with different doses (58, 100, 500 and 945 mGy) by using and X-ray source. The characteristics of undoped and doped Li{sub 2}B-4O{sub 7} were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (Sem), photoluminescence and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The chemical composition and their morphologies of the obtained Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu, Ag was confirmed by XRD and Sem results. The most intense peak of the XRD pattern of the lithium tetraborate sample was determined by comparing to the reference data and was found to have a tetragonal structure. The thermoluminescent glow curves of the pellets exposed to different doses exhibited a clear response to X-ray irradiation. Especially Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu presented a good glow curve in all kind of doses. The experimental results showed that this could have good potential applications in radiation dosimetry. The order of kinetics (b), frequency factor (s) and activation energy (E) or the trapping parameters were calculated using peak shape method. (Author)

  13. Nutritional value of silk powder from irradiated silk waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunjob, Malee; Lakshanasomya, Niphaporn [Department of Medical Sciences, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Meesilpa, Prateep [Department of Agriculture, Bangkok (Thailand); Sudatis, Boonya [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2002-03-01

    Silk waste from Thai reeling factory was developed into purified silk protein. Cleanliness of silk filaments by boiling in water was firstly needed. After air drying, they were irradiated with Gamma ray using Cobalt-60 at doses of 750 and 1,000 kGy, then the irradiated silk filaments were dissolved in calcium chloride-ethanol-water solution. The next steps would be dialysis followed by freezed dried process to obtain irradiated silk powder. Two samples of 750 and 1,000 kGy irradiated silk powder were analyzed for nutritional components compared with non irradiated silk filaments. It was found that, the fat content in two irradiated samples was distinctive lower than the non irradiated one, however the protein content was nearly the same in three samples. In addition the moisture content in two irradiated samples was distinctive higher than the non irradiated one. These results show that irradiation technique is useful for development of valuable silk protein as biomaterial. (author)

  14. METALS IN GROUND WATER: SAMPLING ARTIFACTS AND REPRODUCIBILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field studies evaluated sampling procedures for determination of aqueous inorganic geochemistry and assessment of contaminant transport by colloidal mobility. esearch at three different metal-contaminated sites has shown that 0.45 tm filtration has not removed potentially mobile ...

  15. Passive sampling of perfluorinated chemicals in water: Flow rate effects on chemical uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaserzon, S.L.; Vermeirssen, E.L.M.; Hawker, D.W.; Kennedy, K.; Bentley, C.; Thompson, J.; Booij, K.; Mueller, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    A recently developed modified polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) provides a means for monitoring perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) in water. However, changes in external flow rates may alter POCIS sampling behaviour and consequently affect estimated water concentrations of analytes. In

  16. High-frequency isotopic analysis of liquid water samples in the field - initial results from continuous water sampling and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Freyberg, Jana; Studer, Bjørn; Kirchner, James

    2016-04-01

    Studying rapidly changing hydrochemical signals in catchments can help to improve our mechanistic understanding of their water flow pathways and travel times. For these purposes, stable water isotopes (18O and 2H) are commonly used as natural tracers. However, high-frequency isotopic analyses of liquid water samples are challenging. One must capture highly dynamic behavior with high precision and accuracy, but the lab workload (and sample storage artifacts) involved in collecting and analyzing thousands of bottled samples should also be avoided. Therefore, we have tested Picarro, Inc.'s newly developed Continuous Water Sampler Module (CoWS), which is coupled to their L2130-i Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer to enable real-time on-line measurements of 18O and 2H in liquid water samples. We coupled this isotope analysis system to a dual-channel ion chomatograph (Metrohm AG, Herisau, Switzerland) for analysis of major cations and anions, as well as a UV-Vis spectroscopy system (s::can Messtechnik GmbH, Vienna, Austria) and electrochemical probes for characterization of basic water quality parameters. The system was run unattended for up to a week at a time in the laboratory and at a small catchment. At the field site, stream-water and precipitation samples were analyzed, alternating at sub-hourly intervals. We observed that measured isotope ratios were highly sensitive to the liquid water flow rate in the CoWS, and thus to the hydraulic head difference between the CoWS and the samples from which water was drawn. We used a programmable high-precision dosing pump to control the injection flow rate and eliminate this flow-rate artifact. Our experiments showed that the precision of the CoWS-L2130-i-system for 2-minute average values was typically better than 0.06‰ for δ18O and 0.16‰ for δ2H. Carryover effects were 1% or less between isotopically contrasting water samples for 30-minute sampling intervals. Instrument drift could be minimized through periodic analysis of

  17. June 2011 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-10-01

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analyses. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743. Produced water samples were not collected at locations 30-039-30161 and 30-039-21744 because of the lack of water. Samples were not collected from location 30-039-29988 because the well was shut-in.

  18. Sample container and storage for paclobutrazol monitoring in irrigation water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paclobutrazol is a plant growth retardant commonly used on greenhouse crops. Residues from paclobutrazol applications can accumulate in recirculated irrigation water. Given that paclobutrazol has a long half-life and potential biological activity in parts per billion concentrations, it would be de...

  19. Beryllium-10 concentrations in water samples of high northern latitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobl, C.; Eisenhauer, A.; Schulz, V.; Baumann, S.; Mangini, A. [Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften, Heildelberg (Germany); Kubik, P.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    {sup 10}Be concentrations in the water column of high northern latitudes were not available so far. We present different {sup 10}Be profiles from the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, the Arctic Ocean, and the Laptev Sea. (author) 3 fig., 3 refs.

  20. Determination of Phenols in Water Samples using a Supported ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    industries.1 Phenols are also used as part of the raw materials in the production of a large ... during wastewater treatment, since chlorine is added as a disinfectant. ... European Union have listed phenols as priority pollutants. The official ... biological fluids15 and organotin compounds in natural waters.16. 2. Experimental.

  1. Effect of UV irradiation on adsorption/desorption of oxygen and water on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muckley, Eric S.; Nelson, Anthony J.; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Ivanov, Ilia N.

    2016-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films composed of semiconducting single wall nanotubes (s-SWNTs), metallic single wall nanotubes (m-SWNTs), and multiwall nanotubes (MWNTs) were exposed to O2 and H2O vapor in the dark and under UV irradiation. Changes in the film conductivity and mass were measured in situ. We find that UV irradiation increases the resistive response of CNT films to O2 and H2O by more than an order of magnitude. In m-SWNT and MWNT films, UV irradiation changes the sign of the resistive response to O2 and H2O by generating free charge carriers. S-SWNTs show the largest UV-induced resistive response and exhibit weakening of van der Waals interactions with the QCM crystal when exposed to gas/vapor.

  2. Effect of UV irradiation on the dynamics of oxygen and water interaction with carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Anthony J [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films composed of semiconducting single wall nanotubes (s-SWNTs), metallic single wall nanotubes (m-SWNTs), and multiwall nanotubes (MWNTs) were exposed to O2 and H2O vapor in the dark and under UV irradiation. Changes in the film conductivity and mass were measured in situ. We find that UV irradiation increases the resistive response of CNT films to O2 and H2O by more than an order of magnitude. In m-SWNT and MWNT films, UV irradiation changes the sign of the resistive response to O2 and H2O by generating free charge carriers. S-SWNTs show the largest UV-induced resistive response and exhibit weakening of van der Waals interactions with the QCM crystal when exposed to gas/vapor.

  3. Water Column Sampling Capabilities of the NEPTUNE Canada Regional Cabled Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaly, S. F.; Neptune Canada Science

    2010-12-01

    The NEPTUNE Canada Regional Observatory affords a wide range of opportunities to conduct adaptive and high-temporal resolution water column property studies. Intensive sites are located in a shallow near-shore environment (Folger Passage), a shelf-slope-break region (Barkley Upper Slope) and a deep offshore mid-ocean spreading centre (Endeavour Ridge). The Folger Passage site has instrument platforms at 100 m and 23 m which are located near the mouth of Barkley Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island. Instruments include upward-looking surface-wave resolving Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs), multi-frequency echo-sounders to measure backscatter from zooplankton and bottom pressure recorders to assess long-wave variability (e.g. tsunami, shelf waves, tidal). The near-bottom water column is sampled for salinity, temperature, oxygen, chlorophyll, turbidity, photosynthetically active light and, in addition, there are fine scale measurements of the velocity structure of the bottom-boundary layer. Water column measurements at the 400 metre deep Barkley Upper Slope site are facilitated by a world leading Vertical Profiling System (VPS). This winch operated system will profile a suite of instruments through the water column at up to 4 cycles per day. Optical measurements consist of a pair of hyperspectral radiometers to characterise downwelling irradiation and upwelling radiance, backscatter fluorescence for chlorophyll, and an optode to determine oxygen levels. A pumped CTD will provide salinity, temperature, depth as well as plumbing for a nitrate sensor, a coloured dissolved organic matter sensor and a pCO2 sensor. Acoustic instruments on the profiler consist of a 400 kHz ADCP, 200 kHz echosounder and a broad band hydrophone. With these instruments we expect to be able to explore the covariation of physical and chemical parameters with impact at a range of trophic levels, up to and including marine mammals. At the base of the VPS there is a long range ADCP

  4. Irradiation tests of texture controlled cladding for pressurized water reactor in foreign reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukawa, Kazunori [Hokkaido Electric Power Co., Inc., Sapporo (Japan); Abeta, Sadaaki

    1996-12-01

    PWR electric power companies and makers are promoting a high burn-up program for nuclear fuel aiming at reducing spent fuel. PCI tolerance performance of fuel clad is desirable to promote a high burnup program. It is clear that when we change the direction of a Zircaloy crystal structure by improving a manufacture process (texture control), PCI tolerance performance greatly improved. In this study, an improved clad was burnt in a R2 reactor to 61.5 GWd/t and a power ramp test was carried out in Sweden. Based on irradiation data, power ramp test data and post irradiation examination data, improvement of PCI tolerance performance was confirmed. (author)

  5. Stability studies of propoxur herbicide in environmental water samples by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Lee, Hian Kee

    2003-10-01

    Liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry has been investigated for the analysis of polar pesticides in water. The degradation behavior of propoxur, selected as a model pesticide belonging to the N-methylcarbamate group, in various aqueous matrices (Milli-Q water, drinking water, rain water, seawater and river water) was investigated. Two interfaces of atmospheric pressure ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization (ESI), were compared during the study. Propoxur and its transformation product (N-methylformamide) were best ionized as positive ions with both APCI and ESI, while another transformation product (2-isopropoxyphenol) yielded stronger signals as negative ions only with APCI. In addition, the effects of various pH, matrix type and irradiation sources (sunlight, darkness, indoor lighting and artificial UV lamp) on the chemical degradation (hydrolysis) were also assessed. From the kinetic studies of degradation, it was found that the half-life of propoxur was reduced from 327 to 161 h in Milli-Q water with variation of irradiation conditions from dark to sunlight exposure. Degradation rates largely increased with increasing pH. The half-life of the target compound dissolved in Milli-Q water under darkness decreased from 407 to 3 h when the pH of Milli-Q water was increased from 5 to 8.5. These suggest that hydrolysis of propoxur is light-intensity and pH-dependent. In order to mimic contaminated natural environmental waters, propoxur was spiked into real water samples at 30 microg/l. The degradation of propoxur in such water samples under various conditions were studied in detail and compared. With the ion trap run in a time-scheduled single ion monitoring mode, typical limits of detection of the instrument were in the range of 1-10 microg/l.

  6. Quantitative morphology and water distribution of bronchial biopsy samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, D. R.; Wise, R.; Andrews, J. M.; HONEYBOURNE, D

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An approach to the study of the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the lung is to measure their concentrations in bronchial biopsy specimens. The main criticism of this technique is that bronchial biopsy specimens consist of more than one tissue type and that drugs are often not distributed evenly. The morphology of bronchial biopsy specimens and the distribution of water between the extracellular and the intracellular compartments is therefore important. METHODS: Fifteen subjects under...

  7. The Influence of Pumping on Observed Bacterial Counts in Groundwater Samples: Implications for Sampling Protocol and Water Quality Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuskanich, J.; Novakowski, K.; Anderson, B.

    2008-12-01

    Drinking water quality has become an important issue in Ontario following the events in Walkerton in 2000. Many rural communities are reliant on private groundwater wells for drinking water, and it is the responsibility of the owner to have the water tested to make sure it is safe for human consumption. Homeowners can usually take a sample to the local health unit for total coliform and E. Coli analysis at no charge to determine if the water supply is being tainted by surface water or fecal matter, both of which could indicate the potential for negative impacts on human health. However, is the sample coming out of the tap representative of what is going on the aquifer? The goal of this study is to observe how bacterial counts may vary during the course of well pumping, and how those changing results influence the assessment of water quality. Multiple tests were conducted in bedrock monitoring wells to examine the influence of pumping rate and pumped volume on observed counts of total coliform, E. Coli, fecal streptococcus, fecal coliform and heterotrophic plate count. Bacterial samples were collected frequently during the course of continuous purging events lasting up to 8 hours. Typical field parameters (temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen and ORP) were also continuously monitored during the course of each test. Common practice in groundwater studies is to wait until these parameters have stabilized or three well volumes have been removed prior to sampling, to ensure the sample is taken from new water entering the well from the aquifer, rather than the original water stored in the borehole prior to the test. In general, most bacterial counts were low, but did go above the drinking water standard of 0 counts/100mL (total coliform and E. Coli) at times during the tests. Results show the greatest variability in the observed bacterial counts at the onset of pumping prior to the removal of three well volumes. Samples taken after the removal of three well

  8. LTRM Water Quality Sampling Strata, UMRS La Grange Reach

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The data set includes delineation of sampling strata for the six study reaches of the UMRR Program’s LTRM element. Separate strata coverages exist for each of the...

  9. Assessment of the total uranium concentration in surface and underground water samples from the Caetite region, Bahia, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Julia Grasiela Batista; Geraldo, Luiz Paulo [Centro Universitario da Fundacao Educacional de Barretos (UNIFEB), (SP) (Brazil); Yamazaki, Ione Makiko [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    At the region of Caetite, BA, it is located the largest uranium mine in exploration at present days in Brazil. During the uranium extraction process, it may be having an environmental contamination by this heavy metal due to rain water and other natural transport mechanism, with potential exposition risk to the local population. The aim of this work was to investigate the total uranium concentration in surface and underground water samples collected at the Caetite region, using the nuclear track registration technique (SSNTD) in a polycarbonate plastic. A 100 mL volume of water samples were initially treated in 10 mL of HNO{sub 3} (PA) and concentrated by evaporation at a temperature around 80 deg C. The resulting residue was diluted to a total volume of 25 mL without pass it to a filter. About 10 {mu}L of this solution was deposited on the plastic detector surface (around 1.0 cm{sup 2} area) together with 5 {mu}L of a Cyastat detergent solution (5%) and evaporated under an infrared lamp. All the resulting deposits of non volatile constituents were irradiated, together with a uranium standard sample, at the IPEN-IEA-R1 (3.5 MW) nuclear reactor for approximately 3 min. After irradiations, chemical etching of the plastic detectors was carried out at 60 deg C, for 65 min. in a NaOH (6N) solution. The fission tracks were counted scanning all the deposit area of the polycarbonate plastic detector with a system consisting of an optical microscope together with a video camera and TV monitor. The average values of uranium concentrations obtained in this work ranged from (0.95{+-}0.19) {mu}g.L{sup -1} to (25.60{+-}3.3) {mu}g.L{sup -1}. These results were compared to values reported in the literature for water samples from other regions and discussed in terms of safe limits recommended by WHO -World Health Organization and CONAMA - Conselho Nacional do Meio Ambiente. (author)

  10. July 2010 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plessinger, Mark [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Broomfield, CO (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis was conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites. (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analysis. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. An additional water sample was collected from well 29-6 Water Hole for analysis of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743.

  11. Fullerene-catalyzed reduction of azo derivatives in water under UV irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Yong

    2012-09-27

    Metal-free fullerene (C60) was found to be an effective catalyst for the reduction of azo groups in basic aqueous solution under UV irradiation in the presence of NaBH4. Use of NaBH4 by itself is not sufficient to reduce the azo dyes without the assistance of a metal catalyst such as Pd and Ag. Experimental and theoretical results suggest that C 60 catalyzes this reaction by using its vacant orbital to accept the electron in the bonding orbital of azo dyes, which leads to the activation of the N=N bond. UV irradiation increases the ability of C60 to interact with electron-donor moieties in azo dyes. Filling a vacancy: Experimental and theoretical methods have been combined to show that C60-catalyzed reductions of azo compounds form aromatic amines under UV irradiation (see scheme). The obtained results show that C60 acts as an electron acceptor to catalyze the reduction of azo compounds, and the role of UV irradiation is to increase the ability of C60 to interact with electron-donor moieties in azo compounds. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Presence of Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia in water samples from Southeast Asia: towards an integrated water detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Thulasi; Abd Majid, Mohamad Azlan; Onichandran, Subashini; Jaturas, Narong; Andiappan, Hemah; Salibay, Cristina C; Tabo, Hazel A L; Tabo, Norbel; Dungca, Julieta Z; Tangpong, Jitbanjong; Phiriyasamith, Sucheep; Yuttayong, Boonyaorn; Polseela, Raxsina; Do, Binh Nhu; Sawangjaroen, Nongyao; Tan, Tian-Chye; Lim, Yvonne A L; Nissapatorn, Veeranoot

    2016-01-13

    Access to clean and safe drinking water that is free from pathogenic protozoan parasites, especially Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia that cause gastrointestinal illness in humans, is still an issue in Southeast Asia (SEA). This study is the first attempt to detect the aforementioned protozoan parasites in water samples from countries in SEA, using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. A total of 221 water samples of 10 l each were collected between April and October 2013 from Malaysia (53), Thailand (120), the Philippines (33), and Vietnam (15). A physicochemical analysis was conducted. The water samples were processed in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency's methods 1622/1623.1, microscopically observed and subsequently screened using qPCR assays. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in treated water samples from the Philippines (1/10), with a concentration of 0.06 ± 0.19 oocyst/L, and untreated water samples from Thailand (25/93), Malaysia (17/44), and the Philippines (11/23), with concentrations ranging from 0.13 ± 0.18 to 0.57 ± 1.41 oocyst/L. Giardia cysts were found in treated water samples from the Philippines (1/10), with a concentration of 0.02 ± 0.06 cyst/L, and in untreated water samples from Thailand (20/93), Vietnam (5/10), Malaysia (22/44), and the Philippines (16/23), with concentrations ranging from 0.12 ± 0.3 to 8.90 ± 19.65 cyst/L. The pathogens C. parvum and G. lamblia were detected using using qPCR assays by targeting the 138-bp fragment and the small subunit gene, respectively. C. parvum was detected in untreated water samples from the Philippines (1/23) and Malaysia (2/44), whilst, G. lamblia detected was detected in treated water samples from the Philippines (1/10) and in untreated water samples from Thailand (21/93), Malaysia (12/44), and the Philippines (17/23). Nitrate concentration was found to have a high positive correlation with (oo)cyst (0.993). The presence of

  13. Plasmonic formation mechanism of periodic 100-nm-structures upon femtosecond laser irradiation of silicon in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrien, T. J.-Y.; Koter, R.; Krüger, J.; Höhm, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Bonse, J.

    2014-08-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon irradiation of silicon by multiple (N = 100) linearly polarized Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser pulses (duration τ = 30 fs, center wavelength λ0 ˜ 790 nm) is studied experimentally in air and water environment. The LIPSS surface morphologies are characterized by scanning electron microscopy and their spatial periods are quantified by two-dimensional Fourier analyses. It is demonstrated that the irradiation environment significantly influences the periodicity of the LIPSS. In air, so-called low-spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL) were found with periods somewhat smaller than the laser wavelength (ΛLSFL ˜ 0.7 × λ0) and an orientation perpendicular to the laser polarization. In contrast, for laser processing in water a reduced ablation threshold and LIPSS with approximately five times smaller periods ΛLIPSS ˜ 0.15 × λ0 were observed in the same direction as in air. The results are discussed within the frame of recent LIPSS theories and complemented by a thin film based surface plasmon polariton model, which successfully describes the tremendously reduced LIPSS periods in water.

  14. Plasmonic formation mechanism of periodic 100-nm-structures upon femtosecond laser irradiation of silicon in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrien, T. J.-Y., E-mail: thibault.derrien@gmail.com; Koter, R.; Krüger, J.; Bonse, J., E-mail: joern.bonse@bam.de [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und –prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Höhm, S.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Staße 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-08-21

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon irradiation of silicon by multiple (N = 100) linearly polarized Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser pulses (duration τ = 30 fs, center wavelength λ{sub 0} ∼ 790 nm) is studied experimentally in air and water environment. The LIPSS surface morphologies are characterized by scanning electron microscopy and their spatial periods are quantified by two-dimensional Fourier analyses. It is demonstrated that the irradiation environment significantly influences the periodicity of the LIPSS. In air, so-called low-spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL) were found with periods somewhat smaller than the laser wavelength (Λ{sub LSFL} ∼ 0.7 × λ{sub 0}) and an orientation perpendicular to the laser polarization. In contrast, for laser processing in water a reduced ablation threshold and LIPSS with approximately five times smaller periods Λ{sub LIPSS} ∼ 0.15 × λ{sub 0} were observed in the same direction as in air. The results are discussed within the frame of recent LIPSS theories and complemented by a thin film based surface plasmon polariton model, which successfully describes the tremendously reduced LIPSS periods in water.

  15. Effects of (60)Co gamma irradiation on behavior and gill histoarchitecture of giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (DE MAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalin, A; Broos, K V; Sadiq Bukhari, A; Syed Mohamed, H E; Singhal, R K; Venu-babu, P

    2013-06-01

    Present study was designed to observe the effects of (60)Co gamma radiation in behavioral and histological changes in the gills of giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The adult prawns were irradiated with four different dose levels (3mGy, 30mGy, 300mGy and 3000mGy) and the control group (without irradiation) was maintained separately. Behavioral changes like hyperactivity, loss of balance, reduced swimming rate, slower rate of food intake and convulsions were observed in higher dose levels of 300mGy and 3000mGy. The histological alterations such as accumulated haemocytes in haemocoelic spaces, abnormal gill tips, lifted lamellar epithelium, swollen and fused lamellae, hyperplasic, necrotic, clavate-globate and complete disorganization of lamellae were observed in (60)Co gamma irradiated prawns. Significantly more considerable histological alterations were observed in the highest dose level of 3000mGy, but no mortality was evidenced. This study serves as biomonitoring tool to assess the radiation pollution in the aquatic environment.

  16. Microstructural study of Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}/Ag samples irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays at high doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, R. [Programa de Postgrado en Fisica de Materiales, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Apartado Postal 2681, CP 22800, Ensenada, BC (Mexico); Galvan, D.H. [CECIMAC-UNAM, Apartado Postal 2681, CP 22800, Ensenada, BC (Mexico); Adem, E. [Instituto de Fisica-UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, CP 01000, Mexico DF (Mexico); Bartolo-Perez, P. [CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Maple, M.B. [Physics Department and Institute for Pure and Applied Physical Sciences, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    We have investigated the damage induced by irradiation in Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} silver added samples. The samples were prepared with 0 and 6.5 wt% of silver and irradiated by high-energy {gamma} irradiation (50-150 Mrad). The roles of silver and dosage irradiation are discussed in terms of their effects on microstructure, crystallinity, critical temperature (T{sub c}) and zero-resistance temperature (T{sub 0}). After irradiation, T{sub c} decreased while the room-temperature electrical resistance increased by a factor of 8 for some of the samples. The difference in T{sub 0} between irradiated and non-irradiated YBCO samples was of the order of 10 K. We have found that the difference is bigger for silver-added samples. We have also observed several changes in diffraction patterns of YBCO and YBCO-silver samples. SEM images, EDS and XPS analysis showed that silver resided inside the grains as single atoms and as metallic clusters. The relative concentrations of the elements in samples were quantified by Auger electron spectroscopy. The values showed a gradual increase for radiation doses ranging between 0 and 100 Mrad. For doses up to 100 Mrad, J{sub c} decreased because of the weak-link breakage induced by high doses of {gamma} rays. (author)

  17. Mechanical properties of SiC composites neutron irradiated under light water reactor relevant temperature and dose conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki; Katoh, Yutai

    2017-10-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC matrix (SiC/SiC) composites are being actively investigated for use in accident-tolerant core structures of light water reactors (LWRs). Owing to the limited number of irradiation studies previously conducted at LWR-coolant temperature, this study examined SiC/SiC composites following neutron irradiation at 230-340 °C to 2.0 and 11.8 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. The investigated materials were chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC/SiC composites with three different reinforcement fibers. The fiber materials were monolayer pyrolytic carbon (PyC) -coated Hi-Nicalon™ Type-S (HNS), Tyranno™ SA3 (SA3), and SCS-Ultra™ (SCS) SiC fibers. The irradiation resistance of these composites was investigated based on flexural behavior, dynamic Young's modulus, swelling, and microstructures. There was no notable mechanical properties degradation of the irradiated HNS and SA3 SiC/SiC composites except for reduction of the Young's moduli by up to 18%. The microstructural stability of these composites supported the absence of degradation. In addition, no progressive swelling from 2.0 to 11.8 dpa was confirmed for these composites. On the other hand, the SCS composite showed significant mechanical degradation associated with cracking within the fiber. This study determined that SiC/SiC composites with HNS or SA3 SiC/SiC fibers, a PyC interphase, and a CVI SiC matrix retain their properties beyond the lifetime dose for LWR fuel cladding at the relevant temperature.

  18. Formulation of Oil-in-Water Cream from Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. Pericarp Extract Preserved by Gamma Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Isabella

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to formulate mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. pericarp extract into oil-in-water (O/W cream which stable and durable. In order to improve the shelf life durability of the formula, the irradiation of formula using gamma rays from cobalt-60 was done. The concentrations of extract were varied to 1, 2 and 3% and were irradiated by gamma rays with doses of 5, 7.5 and 10 kGy. Physicochemical and microbiological properties of these formulas were carried out for 90 days stored at 30 ± 2°C and 40 ± 2°C. It was found that both of physicochemical and microbiological properties of the formulas were changed by extract concentrations and after irradiation. The irradiated formulas with dose up to 7.5 kGy, which were stored at 30 ± 2°C and 40 ± 2°C, presented acceptable physicochemical and microbiological stability for at least 90 days. Analysis by TLC (Thin Layer Chromatography-densitometry to study decomposition of G. mangostana pericarp extract cream formulas was carried out 24 h after preparation and 90 day after storage. The result of TLC-densitometry analysis showed that G. mangostana pericarp extract in the cream formulas did not develope significant decomposition after 90 days of storage. Decontamination dose for all formulas was found to be about 7.5 kGy. At this condition, the bacteria and mold-yeast have been killed, without reducing the antioxidant activity

  19. Isolation and Identification of Parasitic Protozoa in Sampled Water From the Southwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiei

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background In spite of promotion of people’s hygiene in the recent years, parasitic infection problems are present in many parts of the world especially in tropical and subtropical areas. Water is one of the major sources for acquiring parasitic infections, especially protozoan parasites. Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the present parasitic agents in river, tap water and filtrated water in the western part of Ahvaz city. Materials and Methods Forty-four water samples were collected from different sources of the studied area. The samples were examined by routine parasitology methods using light microscopy. Results Twenty-eight out of 44 water samples were positive for parasitic contamination with cysts and oocysts of four parasitic protozoa including: 50% Entamoeba spp (22 out of 44 samples, 27.27% Cryptosporidium spp (12 out of 44 samples, 13.63% Blastocystis spp (6 out of 44 samples and 9.09% Giardia spp (4 out of 44 samples. Conclusions The parasite infection rate in water is high and deficits of water quality should be solved by water organization responders. It is strongly recommended to use home filtration systems for consumption of safe water.

  20. Effect of ozonation and UV irradiation with direct filtration on disinfection and disinfection by-product precursors in drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirsardari, Y; Yu, Q; Willams, P

    2001-09-01

    Pilot plant studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of pre-ozonation and ultraviolet irradiation on disinfection, disinfection by-product precursors and water quality in a direct filtration water treatment system. Disinfection parameters including total coliforms, faecal coliforms and heterotrophic plate count were investigated. Total organic carbon (TOC), trihalomethanes (THMs), total organic halides (TOX), filtered water turbidity and colour were also evaluated. It was found that advanced pre-oxidation processes (ozonation and UV irradiation) significantly increase the level of disinfection of raw water. Removal of total trihalomethanes and total organic halides precursors improved with ozonation and UV irradiation, compared to no oxidation treatment in direct filtration and/or in conventional water treatment. All coliforms (total and faecal) were completely destroyed by ozonation alone, and also with ozonation in conjunction with UV irradiation. However, the heterotrophic plate count was not significantly reduced at an ozone residual concentration of 0.1 mg l(-1). This suggests that disinfection efficiency is strongly influenced by competition reactions of organic and inorganic compounds with ozone. Precursors of total trihalomethanes and total organic halides were reduced by 90% and 98%, respectively, with advanced pre-oxidation processes. Water quality parameters were improved by the pre-ozonation and UV irradiation treatment system.

  1. Water Sample Analysis With the Integrated Virus Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ultrafiltered to reduce and concentrate the volume from 1 L to 1.2 mL. This ultrafiltration (UF) was accomplished in -60 min. The remaining volume was...collected and analyzed with the IVDS. In general, the samples were concentrated with the tangential flow ( ultrafiltration ) filter system before IVDS...Biological Center: Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 1999; UNCLASSIFIED Report (AD-A368 535). 2. Wick, C.H.; McCubbin, P.E. Removing Complex Growth Media from MS2

  2. 40 CFR 257.23 - Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and analysis requirements. (a) The ground-water monitoring program must include consistent sampling... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements. 257.23 Section 257.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  3. Development of Sampling and Preservation Techniques to Retard Chemical and Biological Changes in Water Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-24

    accomplishing the original scope of work (development of sampling and pres- ervation techniques). System No. I is described in Table 1. Quadruplicate SARM ...Rate: 1.0 ml/min Injection Volume: 40-100 p1 Quadruplicate SARM reference solutions were analyzed for the four munitions at the following concentration...tion of SARM Reference Solutions of DNP, RDX, TNBI DNB, 2,4-DNT, TNT, Tetryl, and DPA ...... .............. A-6 2 Statistical Evaluation of DNP in

  4. USDA Forest Service national protocols for sampling air pollution-sensitive waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. J. Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    The first step in designing a surface water sampling program is identifying one or more problems or questions that require information on water quality. Common water quality problems include nutrient enrichment (from a variety of causes), effects of atmospheric deposition (acidification, eutrophication, toxicity), and effects of major disturbances such as fire or pest...

  5. Multiple-barrier disinfection by chlorination and UV irradiation for desalinated drinking waters: chlorine photolysis and accelerated lamp-sleeve fouling effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wait, Isaac W

    2008-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to quantify interaction effects between UV irradiation and chlorination for desalinated drinking water. The rate of chlorine photolysis in desalinated water was characterized using a low-pressure UV lamp and chlorine doses typical of drinking water treatment and was found to be lower than reported photolysis rates for treated surface water. Results indicate that, for most desalinated water applications, reduction in free chlorine is likely to be limited, but, depending on the UV dose used, not necessarily negligible. Investigation of the potential for reactor lamp-sleeve fouling included mineral speciation and solubility modeling and showed that chlorination of desalinated water before UV disinfection may increase lamp-sleeve fouling, particularly for point-of-use reactors. UV irradiation before chlorination may minimize fouling. Overall results point to the variable nature of UV lamp-sleeve fouling and chlorine photolysis and an intrinsic dependence on local water chemistry conditions.

  6. New mechanical samples positioning system for irradiations on a radial channel at nuclear research reactor in a full-power continuous operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: mrgual@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, InSTEC, Havana (Cuba); Mas, Felix, E-mail: felix_mas_milian@yahoo.com [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Sao Paulo, IF-USP, Rua do Matao, trav R., no. 187, Cidade Universitaria, Butanta, CEP 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Deppman, Airton, E-mail: deppman@if.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Sao Paulo, IF-USP, Rua do Matao, trav R., no. 187, Cidade Universitaria, Butanta, CEP 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Coelho, Paulo R.P., E-mail: prcoelho@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Travessa R, 400, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    This paper describes a new mechanical samples positioning system that allows the safe placement and removal of biological samples for prolonged irradiation, in a nuclear reactor during full-power continuous operation. Also presented herein the materials of construction and operating principles. Additionally, this sample positioning system is compared with an existing pneumatic and automated transfer system, already available at the research reactors. The system consists of a mechanical arm with a claw, which can deliver the samples for irradiations without reactor shutdown. It was installed in the IEA-R1 research reactor at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, Brazil, and for the past 5 years, the system has successfully operated and allowed the conducting of important experiments. As a result of its introduction, the facility has been in a position to positively respond to the increased demand in studies of biology, medicine, physics, engineering, detector/dosimeter calibrations, etc. It is one example of the appropriated technologies that save energy and resources.

  7. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Leg 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayles, Fred L.; Manheim, Frank T.; Waterman, Lee S.

    1973-01-01

    Analyses of pore fluids from reducing environments demonstrate that reduction of SO4 is accompanied by large increases in alkalinity and strong depletion of Ca and Mg. The data are compatible with a model of replacement of Fe3+ in clay lattices by Mg from the interstitial solutions and the precipitation of pyrite. Depletions of Na in the interstitial solutions are related to Mg losses by a ratio of approximately 1:3. Pore fluids from oxidizing pelagic sediments exhibit little SO4 depletion. Losses of Mg are accompanied by the addition of Ca to the pore solutions on a nearly 1:1 basis. Strong Sr enrichment is also found in these solutions. The magnitude of the Sr increase suggests that considerable carbonate recrystallization has occurred. As part of an extensive interlaboratory and analytical calibration, the effect of squeezing sediment at different temperatures has been studied in depth. Samples of a variety of lithologies have been included. Enrichment of K by as much as 24 percent and depletion of Mg and Ca by up to 7 percent occurs during warming. However, no significant effect upon Cl and SO4 could be detected. The strongest effects are seen in the minor constituents studied. On warming, Sr, Si, and B are enriched as much as 19, 40, and 60 percent, respectively. The size of the observed concentration changes varies with the mineralogy of the sediment, but is significant in all types studied, particularly with regards to Mg and K.

  8. ANALYSIS OF SELECTED FLUORIDE WATER SAMPLES OF DIFFERENT AREAS OF JAIPUR, RAJASTHAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Dhingra

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to assess the fluoride concentration in groundwater in some rural areas of Jaipur city (Rajasthan, India, where groundwater is the main source of drinking water. Due to increased population, urbanization, industrialization, use of fertilizers water is highly polluted with different harmful contaminants. In present analysis a review of fluoride toxicity in drinking water along with the various deflouridation processes has been analyzed. Drinking water quality of 11 different places of Jaipur District was analyzed to identify the fluoride content in water. The drinking water samples were collected in clean polythene one liter cans and subjected for analysis in laboratory.

  9. Determination of pyridine in soil and water samples of a polluted area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.J.B.; Renesse van Duivenbode, J.A.D. van

    1994-01-01

    A method for the analyses of pyridine in environmental samples is described. For soil samples a distillation procedure followed by an extraction, an acidic extraction or a Soxhlet extraction can be used. For water samples a distillation procedure followed by extraction can be employed. Deuterated py

  10. Water and stream-sediment sampling techniques for use in uranium exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenrich-Verbeek, Karen J.

    1976-01-01

    Methods of sampling water and stream sediments for uranium were established in this study. Water samples should be taken using a US DH-48 water sampler across the stream channel and should be filtered and acidified in situ. Stream sediments should be taken as a composite sample up and across the axis of the channel. Only sediment fractions less than 90 ?m (170 mesh) should be analyzed for uranium. The elements As, Ca, Al, B, Mg, K, and Na exhibit a positive correlation with uranium in surface waters, while a much larger suite of elements exhibit a positive correlation with uranium in stream sediments: K, Mn, Mg, Ti, Ca, Al, Fe, Pb, Cr, Y, Zr, Li, Zn, Th, and As. Analyses have revealed that anomalies detected in either the dissolved or suspended fractions of water, or the stream sediments, are frequently not reflected in the other two; hence, all three should be sampled and analyzed.

  11. Recovery of diverse microbes in high turbidity surface water samples using dead-end ultrafiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mull, Bonnie; Hill, Vincent R.

    2015-01-01

    Dead-end ultrafiltration (DEUF) has been reported to be a simple, field-deployable technique for recovering bacteria, viruses, and parasites from large-volume water samples for water quality testing and waterborne disease investigations. While DEUF has been reported for application to water samples having relatively low turbidity, little information is available regarding recovery efficiencies for this technique when applied to sampling turbid water samples such as those commonly found in lakes and rivers. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a DEUF technique for recoveringMS2 bacteriophage, enterococci, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in surface water samples having elevated turbidity. Average recovery efficiencies for each study microbe across all turbidity ranges were: MS2 (66%), C. parvum (49%), enterococci (85%), E. coli (81%), and C. perfringens (63%). The recovery efficiencies for MS2 and C. perfringens exhibited an inversely proportional relationship with turbidity, however no significant differences in recovery were observed for C. parvum, enterococci, or E. coli. Although ultrafilter clogging was observed, the DEUF method was able to process 100-L surface water samples at each turbidity level within 60 min. This study supports the use of the DEUF method for recovering a wide array of microbes in large-volume surface water samples having medium to high turbidity. PMID:23064261

  12. First Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence round-robin test of water samples: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgese, Laura; Bilo, Fabjola [Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Tsuji, Kouichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan); Fernández-Ruiz, Ramón [Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigación (SIdI), Laboratorio de TXRF, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Margui, Eva [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Girona (Spain); Streli, Christina [TU Wien, Atominstitut,Radiation Physics, Vienna (Austria); Pepponi, Giancarlo [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Povo, Trento (Italy); Stosnach, Hagen [Bruker Nano GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Yamada, Takashi [Rigaku Corporation, Takatsuki, Osaka (Japan); Vandenabeele, Peter [Department of Archaeology, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Maina, David M.; Gatari, Michael [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Nairobi, Nairobi (Kenya); Shepherd, Keith D.; Towett, Erick K. [World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), Nairobi (Kenya); Bennun, Leonardo [Laboratorio de Física Aplicada, Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción (Chile); Custo, Graciela; Vasquez, Cristina [Gerencia Química, Laboratorio B025, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, San Martín (Argentina); Depero, Laura E., E-mail: laura.depero@unibs.it [Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy)

    2014-11-01

    Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) is a mature technique to evaluate quantitatively the elemental composition of liquid samples deposited on clean and well polished reflectors. In this paper the results of the first worldwide TXRF round-robin test of water samples, involving 18 laboratories in 10 countries are presented and discussed. The test was performed within the framework of the VAMAS project, interlaboratory comparison of TXRF spectroscopy for environmental analysis, whose aim is to develop guidelines and a standard methodology for biological and environmental analysis by means of the TXRF analytical technique. - Highlights: • The discussion of the first worldwide TXRF round-robin test of water samples (18 laboratories of 10 countries) is reported. • Drinking, waste, and desalinated water samples were tested. • Data dispersion sources were identified: sample concentration, preparation, fitting procedure, and quantification. • The protocol for TXRF analysis of drinking water is proposed.

  13. A QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF THE WATER DISTRIBUTION IN A SOIL SAMPLE USING NEUTRON IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Šácha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical method by Kang et al. recently proposed for correcting two-dimensional neutron radiography for water quantification in soil. The method was tested on data from neutron imaging of the water infiltration in a soil sample. The raw data were affected by neutron scattering and by beam hardening artefacts. Two strategies for identifying the correction parameters are proposed in this paper. The method has been further developed for the case of three-dimensional neutron tomography. In a related experiment, neutron imaging is used to record ponded-infiltration experiments in two artificial soil samples. Radiograms, i.e., two-dimensional projections of the sample, were acquired during infiltration. A calculation was made of the amount of water and its distribution within the radiograms, in the form of two-dimensional water thickness maps. Tomograms were reconstructed from the corrected and uncorrected water thickness maps to obtain the 3D spatial distribution of the water content within the sample. Without the correction, the beam hardening and the scattering effects overestimated the water content values close to the perimeter of the sample, and at the same time underestimated the values close to the centre of the sample. The total water content of the entire sample was the same in both cases. The empirical correction method presented in this study is a relatively accurate, rapid and simple way to obtain the quantitatively determined water content from two-dimensional and three-dimensional neutron images. However, an independent method for measuring the total water volume in the sample is needed in order to identify the correction parameters.

  14. Determination of uranium concentration and burn-up of irradiated reactor fuel in contaminated areas in Belarus using uranium isotopic ratios in soil samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironov, V.P.; Matusevich, J.L.; Kudrjashov, V.P.; Ananich, P.I.; Zhuravkov, V.V. [Inst. of Radiobiology, Minsk Univ. (Belarus); Boulyga, S.F. [Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Becker, J.S. [Central Div. of Analytical Chemistry, Research Centre Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    An analytical method is described for the estimation of uranium concentrations, of {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U and {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U isotope ratios and burn-up of irradiated reactor uranium in contaminated soil samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Experimental results obtained at 12 sampling sites situated on northern and western radioactive fallout tails 4 to 53 km distant from Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) are presented. Concentrations of irradiated uranium in the upper 0-10 cm soil layers at the investigated sampling sites varied from 2.1 x 10{sup -9}g/g to 2.0 x 10{sup -6}g/g depending mainly on the distance from Chernobyl NPP. A slight variation of the degree of burn-up of spent reactor uranium was revealed by analyzing {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U and {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U isotope ratios and the average value amounted to 9.4{+-}0.3 MWd/(kg U). (orig.)

  15. Effect of electron beam irradiation and microencapsulation on the flame retardancy of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer materials during hot water ageing test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Haibo; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Bibo; Yu, Bin; Shi, Yongqian; Song, Lei; Kundu, Chanchal Kumar; Tao, Youji; Jie, Ganxin; Feng, Hao; Hu, Yuan

    2017-04-01

    Microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate (MCAPP) in combination with polyester polyurethane (TPU) was used to flame retardant ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA). The EVA composites with different irradiation doses were immersed in hot water (80 °C) to accelerate ageing process. The microencapsulation and irradiation dose ensured positive impacts on the properties of the EVA composites in terms of better dimensional stability and flame retardant performance. The microencapsulation of APP could lower its solubility in water and the higher irradiation dose led to the more MCAPP immobilized in three dimensional crosslinked structure of the EVA matrix which could jointly enhance the flame retardant and electrical insulation properties of the EVA composites. So, the EVA composites with 180 kGy irradiation dose exhibited better dimensional stability than the EVA composites with 120 kGy due to the higher crosslinking degree. Moreover, the higher irradiation dose lead to the more MCAPP immobilizated in crosslinked three-dimensional structure of EVA, enhancing the flame retardancy and electrical insulation properties of the EVA composites. After ageing test in hot water at 80 °C for 2 weeks, the EVA/TPU/MCAPP composite with 180 kGy could still maintain the UL-94 V-0 rating and the limiting oxygen index (LOI) value was as high as 30%. This investigation indicated the flame retardant EVA cable containing MCAPP could achieve stable properties and lower electrical fire hazard risk during long-term hot water ageing test.

  16. Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goovaerts, Pierre

    2017-07-15

    The delay in reporting high levels of lead in Flint drinking water, following the city's switch to the Flint River as its water supply, was partially caused by the biased selection of sampling sites away from the lead pipe network. Since Flint returned to its pre-crisis source of drinking water, the State has been monitoring water lead levels (WLL) at selected "sentinel" sites. In a first phase that lasted two months, 739 residences were sampled, most of them bi-weekly, to determine the general health of the distribution system and to track temporal changes in lead levels. During the same period, water samples were also collected through a voluntary program whereby concerned citizens received free testing kits and conducted sampling on their own. State officials relied on the former data to demonstrate the steady improvement in water quality. A recent analysis of data collected by voluntary sampling revealed, however, an opposite trend with lead levels increasing over time. This paper looks at potential sampling bias to explain such differences. Although houses with higher WLL were more likely to be sampled repeatedly, voluntary sampling turned out to reproduce fairly well the main characteristics (i.e. presence of lead service lines (LSL), construction year) of Flint housing stock. State-controlled sampling was less representative; e.g., sentinel sites with LSL were mostly built between 1935 and 1950 in lower poverty areas, which might hamper our ability to disentangle the effects of LSL and premise plumbing (lead fixtures and pipes present within old houses) on WLL. Also, there was no sentinel site with LSL in two of the most impoverished wards, including where the percentage of children with elevated blood lead levels tripled following the switch in water supply. Correcting for sampling bias narrowed the gap between sampling programs, yet overall temporal trends are still opposite.

  17. Design, analysis, and interpretation of field quality-control data for water-sampling projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, David K.; Schertz, Terry L.; Martin, Jeffrey D.; Sandstrom, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    The process of obtaining and analyzing water samples from the environment includes a number of steps that can affect the reported result. The equipment used to collect and filter samples, the bottles used for specific subsamples, any added preservatives, sample storage in the field, and shipment to the laboratory have the potential to affect how accurately samples represent the environment from which they were collected. During the early 1990s, the U.S. Geological Survey implemented policies to include the routine collection of quality-control samples in order to evaluate these effects and to ensure that water-quality data were adequately representing environmental conditions. Since that time, the U.S. Geological Survey Office of Water Quality has provided training in how to design effective field quality-control sampling programs and how to evaluate the resultant quality-control data. This report documents that training material and provides a reference for methods used to analyze quality-control data.

  18. Idaho's surface-water-quality monitoring program: results from five sites sampled during water years 1990-93

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1994-01-01

    In 1990, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Division of Environmental Quality, implemented a statewide water-quality monitoring program in response to Idaho's antidegradation policy as required by the Clean Water Act. The program objective is to provide water-quality managers with a coordinated statewide network to detect trends in surface-water quality. The monitoring program includes the collection and analysis of samples from 56 sites on the Bear, Clearwater, Kootenai, Pend Oreille, Salmon, Snake, and Spokane Rivers and their tributaries (fig. 1). Samples are collected every year at 5 sites (annual sites) in drainage basins where long-term water-quality management is practiced, every other year at 19 sites (biennial sites) in basins where land and water uses change slowly, and every third year at 32 sites (triennial sites) where future development may affect water quality. Each year, 25 of the 56 sites are sampled. This report discusses results of sampling at five annual sites. During water years 1990-93 (October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1993), samples were collected six times per year at the five annual sites (fig. 1). Onsite analyses were made for discharge, specific conductance, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, bacteria (fecal coliform and fecal streptococci), and alkalinity. Laboratory analyses were made for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, and suspended sediment. Suspended sediment, nitrate, fecal coliform, trace elements, and specific conductance were used to characterize surface-water quality. Because concentrations of all trace elements except zinc were near detection limits, only zinc is discussed.

  19. Removal of compounds used as plasticizers and herbicides from water by means of gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Utrilla, José; Daiem, Mahmoud M Abdel; Sánchez-Polo, Manuel; Ocampo-Pérez, Raúl; López-Peñalver, Jesús J; Velo-Gala, Inmaculada; Mota, Antonio J

    2016-11-01

    Gamma radiation has been used to induce the degradation of compounds used as plasticizers and herbicides such as phthalic acid (PA), bisphenol A (BPA), diphenolic acid (DPA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D), and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in aqueous solution, determining the dose constants, removal percentages, and radiation-chemical yields. The reaction rate constants of hydroxyl radical (HO), hydrated electron (eaq(-)) and hydrogen atom (H) with these pollutants were also obtained by means of competition kinetics, using 3-aminopyridine and atrazine as reference compounds. The results indicated that the elimination of these pollutants with gamma radiation mainly follows the oxidative pathway through reaction with HO radicals. The degradation by-products from the five pollutants were determined, detecting that the hydroxylation of the corresponding parent compounds was the main chemical process in the degradation of the pollutants. Moreover, a high decrease in the chemical oxygen demand has been observed for all pollutants. As expected, the degradation by-products generated by the irradiation of PA, BPA and DPA showed a lower toxicity than the parent compounds, however, in the case of 2,4-D and MCPA irradiation, interestingly, their by-products were more toxic than the corresponding original compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection of Acanthamoeba and Toxoplasma in River Water Samples by Molecular Methods in Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Mahmoudi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Free-living amoebae such as Acanthamoeba species may act as carriers of Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma oocysts, thus, may play an important role in the water-borne transmission of these parasites. In the present study, a loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP method for detection of Toxoplasma and a PCR assay were developed for investigation of Acanthamoeba in environmental water samples.A total of 34 samples were collected from the surface water in Guilan Province. Water samples were filtrated with membrane filters and followed by DNA extraction. PCR and LAMP methods used for detection of the protozoan parasites Acanthamoeba and Toxoplasma respectively.Totally 30 and 2 of 34 samples were positive for Acanthamoeba and Toxoplasma oocysts respectively. Two samples were positive for both investigated parasites.The investigated water supplies, are contaminated by Toxoplasma and Acanthamoeba (oocystes. Acanthamoeba may play an important role in water-borne transmission of Toxoplasma in the study area. For the first time in Iran, protocol of LAMP method was used effectively for the detection of Toxoplasma in surface water samples in Iran.

  1. Identification and quantification of pesticide residues in water samples of Dhamrai Upazila, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanuzzaman, M.; Rahman, M. A.; Salam, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    Being agricultural country, different types of pesticides are widely used in Bangladesh to prevent the crop losses due to pest attack which are ultimately drain to the water bodies. The present study was conducted to identify and quantify the organochlorine (DDT, DDE and DDD), organophosphorus (malathion, diazinon and chloropyrifos) and carbamate (carbaryl) residues in water samples of different sources from Dhamrai upazila of Bangladesh using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipped with ultra violate (UV) detector. Thirty water samples from fish pond, cultivated land and tube-well were collected in winter season to analyze the pesticide residues. Among the organophosphorus pesticides, malathion was present in seven water samples ranging from 42.58 to 922.8 μg/L, whereas diazinon was detected in water sample-8 (WS-8) and the concentration was 31.5 μg/L. None of the tested water samples was found to be contaminated with chlorpyrifos, carbaryl or DDT and its metabolites (DDE and DDD). Except for a tube-well water sample, concentrations of the detected residues are above the acceptable limit for human body as assigned by different organizations. To avoid the possible health hazards, the indiscriminate application of pesticides should be restricted and various substitute products like bio-pesticide should be introduced in a broad scale as soon as possible.

  2. Preconcentration and determination of heavy metals in water, sediment and biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    Shirkhanloo Hamid; Mousavi Zavvar Hassan; Rouhollahi Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a simple, sensitive and accurate column preconcentration method was developed for the determination of Cd, Cu and Pb ions in river water, urine and sediment samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure is based on the retention of the analytes on a mixed cellulose ester membrane (MCEM) column from buffered sample solutions and then their elution from the column with nitric acid. Several parameters, such as pH of the sample solution, volume of the sample ...

  3. Arsenic-related water quality with depth and water quality of well-head samples from production wells, Oklahoma, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Carol J.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Greer, James R.; Smith, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey well profiler was used to describe arsenic-related water quality with well depth and identify zones yielding water with high arsenic concentrations in two production wells in central and western Oklahoma that yield water from the Permian-aged Garber-Wellington and Rush Springs aquifers, respectively. In addition, well-head samples were collected from 12 production wells yielding water with historically large concentrations of arsenic (greater than 10 micrograms per liter) from the Garber-Wellington aquifer, Rush Springs aquifer, and two minor aquifers: the Arbuckle-Timbered Hills aquifer in southern Oklahoma and a Permian-aged undefined aquifer in north-central Oklahoma. Three depth-dependent samples from a production well in the Rush Springs aquifer had similar water-quality characteristics to the well-head sample and did not show any substantial changes with depth. However, slightly larger arsenic concentrations in the two deepest depth-dependent samples indicate the zones yielding noncompliant arsenic concentrations are below the shallowest sampled depth. Five depth-dependent samples from a production well in the Garber-Wellington aquifer showed increases in arsenic concentrations with depth. Well-bore travel-time information and water-quality data from depth-dependent and well-head samples showed that most arsenic contaminated water (about 63 percent) was entering the borehole from perforations adjacent to or below the shroud that overlaid the pump. Arsenic concentrations ranged from 10.4 to 124 micrograms per liter in 11 of the 12 production wells sampled at the well head, exceeding the maximum contaminant level of 10 micrograms per liter for drinking water. pH values of the 12 well-head samples ranged from 6.9 to 9. Seven production wells in the Garber-Wellington aquifer had the largest arsenic concentrations ranging from 18.5 to 124 micrograms per liter. Large arsenic concentrations (10.4-18.5) and near neutral to slightly alkaline

  4. A two-step photoexcitation system for photocatalytic water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen under visible light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Ryu

    2011-10-01

    The developments of water-splitting systems that can efficiently use visible light have been a major challenge for many years in order to realize efficient conversion of solar light. We have developed a new type of photocatalysis system that can split water into H2 and O2 under visible light irradiation, which was inspired by the two-step photoexcitation (Zscheme) mechanism of natural photosynthesis in green plants. In this system, the water splitting reaction is broken up into two stages: one for H2 evolution and the other for O2 evolution; these are combined by using a shuttle redox couple (Red/Ox) in the solution. The introduction of a Z-scheme mechanism reduces the energy required to drive each photocatalysis process, extending the usable wavelengths significantly (~460 nm for H2 evolution and ~600 nm for O2evolution) from that in conventional water splitting systems (~460 nm) based on one-step photoexcitation in single semiconductor material.

  5. “Nanofiltration” Enabled by Super-Absorbent Polymer Beads for Concentrating Microorganisms in Water Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xing; Bahnemann, Janina; Wang, Siwen; Yang, Yang; Hoffmann, Michael R.

    2016-02-01

    Detection and quantification of pathogens in water is critical for the protection of human health and for drinking water safety and security. When the pathogen concentrations are low, large sample volumes (several liters) are needed to achieve reliable quantitative results. However, most microbial identification methods utilize relatively small sample volumes. As a consequence, a concentration step is often required to detect pathogens in natural waters. Herein, we introduce a novel water sample concentration method based on superabsorbent polymer (SAP) beads. When SAP beads swell with water, small molecules can be sorbed within the beads, but larger particles are excluded and, thus, concentrated in the residual non-sorbed water. To illustrate this approach, millimeter-sized poly(acrylamide-co-itaconic acid) (P(AM-co-IA)) beads are synthesized and successfully applied to concentrate water samples containing two model microorganisms: Escherichia coli and bacteriophage MS2. Experimental results indicate that the size of the water channel within water swollen P(AM-co-IA) hydrogel beads is on the order of several nanometers. The millimeter size coupled with a negative surface charge of the beads are shown to be critical in order to achieve high levels of concentration. This new concentration procedure is very fast, effective, scalable, and low-cost with no need for complex instrumentation.

  6. "Nanofiltration" Enabled by Super-Absorbent Polymer Beads for Concentrating Microorganisms in Water Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xing; Bahnemann, Janina; Wang, Siwen; Yang, Yang; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2016-02-15

    Detection and quantification of pathogens in water is critical for the protection of human health and for drinking water safety and security. When the pathogen concentrations are low, large sample volumes (several liters) are needed to achieve reliable quantitative results. However, most microbial identification methods utilize relatively small sample volumes. As a consequence, a concentration step is often required to detect pathogens in natural waters. Herein, we introduce a novel water sample concentration method based on superabsorbent polymer (SAP) beads. When SAP beads swell with water, small molecules can be sorbed within the beads, but larger particles are excluded and, thus, concentrated in the residual non-sorbed water. To illustrate this approach, millimeter-sized poly(acrylamide-co-itaconic acid) (P(AM-co-IA)) beads are synthesized and successfully applied to concentrate water samples containing two model microorganisms: Escherichia coli and bacteriophage MS2. Experimental results indicate that the size of the water channel within water swollen P(AM-co-IA) hydrogel beads is on the order of several nanometers. The millimeter size coupled with a negative surface charge of the beads are shown to be critical in order to achieve high levels of concentration. This new concentration procedure is very fast, effective, scalable, and low-cost with no need for complex instrumentation.

  7. Determination of natural radioactivity by gross alpha and beta measurements in ground water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhan, S; Ozçitak, E; Taşkin, H; Varinlioğlu, A

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the activity concentrations of the gross α and β in ground water samples collected from the different drilled wells in Nevşehir province were measured to assess annual effective dose due to the ingestion of the water samples. Nevşehir province is one of the major cities of Cappadocia Region which is a popular tourist destination as it has many areas with unique geological, historic, and cultural features. Sampling and measurements were carried out in the autumn of 2011 and the spring of 2012. The values of the activity concentrations of the gross α and β measured in the water samples ranged from 80 to 380 mBq L(-1) with a mean of 192 mBq L(-1) and 120-3470 mBq L(-1) with a mean of 579 mBq L(-1) respectively. All values of the gross α were lower than the limit value of 500 mBq L(-1) while two ground water samples were found to have gross β activity concentrations of greater than 1000 mBq L(-1). Therefore two water samples were the subject of further radioisotope-specific analysis. The obtained result indicated that the elevated activity concentrations of the gross β in these water samples are dominated by (40)K activity. Annual effective doses ranged from 0.04 to 0.20 mSv y(-1).

  8. Genotypic Characterization of Cryptosporidium hominis from Water Samples in São Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Ronalda S.; Dropa, Milena; Fernandes, Licia N.; Carvalho, Terezinha T.; Sato, Maria Inês Z.; Soares, Rodrigo M.; Matté, Glavur R.; Matté, Maria Helena

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium has emerged as one of the most important water contaminants, causing waterborne outbreaks of diarrheal diseases worldwide. The small size of oocysts under the microscope and the possibility of changes in characteristics of oocysts, mainly in environmental samples, make the taxonomy of the genus difficult if morphologic characteristics are considered. This limitation encouraged the application of molecular methods to identify this microorganism. The aim of this study was to detect and identify by nested-polymerase chain reaction oocysts of Cryptosporidium present in water samples in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Water samples were concentrated through a membrane filter, DNA was extracted by using a standard technique, and both amplification reactions used forward and reverse oligonucleotides that were complementary to Cryptosporidium 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Thirty water samples from different sites of collection in the state of São Paulo were evaluated. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 30% of the samples. By genoptyping, C. hominis and Cryptosporidium sp. were identified in recreational water and C. meleagridis was identified in surface water samples. This is the first report of C. hominis in environmental samples in Brazil. Although identification of Cryptosporidium is still a difficult task, molecular methods are essential for specific identification and are a helpful tool to aid to understand the epidemiology of this parasite in Brazil. PMID:22049036

  9. Sampling vadose-zone water for a volatile organic compound at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A.; Cho, H. Jean; Jaffe, Peter R.; MacLeod, Cecilia L.; Koehnlein, Susan A.

    1992-01-01

    A new method of collecting samples of unsaturated-zone water for quantitative analysis for a volatile organic compound, trichloroethene (TCE), was compared to three other, previously described sampling methodologies in the laboratory and in the field. In the laboratory, prepared water samples containing TCE in a known concentration (20 µg/L) were sampled repeatedly by using each of the four methods to quantify method precision and accuracy. To compare the four methods in the field, unsaturated-zone water above a TCE-contaminated water-table aquifer was transferred from a depth of 2 m to land surface with 0.15-m-long suction lysimeters attached to 1.85-m lengths of stainless-steel tubing. Statistical analyses of the laboratory and field data indicate that the new method, which involves collecting the water samples in gas-tight glass syringes, is superior to the other three methods for the quantitative sampling and analysis of TCE on the basis of its high precision and accuracy and ease of use. This method was used to collect additional samples from the field site to quantify the spatial variability of TCE concentrations in the unsaturated-zone water. Results of analysis of variance of the data indicate that the spatial concentration variability is important, and that differences in TCE concentration are statistically significant for horizontal distances less than 3.6 m.

  10. Genotoxicity assessment of water sampled from R-11 reservoir by means of allium test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukatich, E.; Pryakhin, E. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (Russian Federation); Geraskin, S. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The Mayak PA was the first enterprise for the production of weapon-grade plutonium in Russia and it incorporates uranium-graphite reactors for plutonium production and radiochemical facilities for its separation. Radiochemical processing resulted in huge volumes of liquid radioactive wastes of different specific activities. To reduce the radionuclides release into the environment, a system of bypasses and ponds (the Techa Cascade Reservoirs system) to store low-activity liquid wastes has been constructed in the upper reaches of the Techa River. Currently, industrial reservoirs of Mayak PA contain over 350 million m{sup 3} of low-level radioactive liquid wastes with total activity over 7.4 x 10{sup 15} Bq. Reservoir R-11 is the final reservoir in the Techa Cascade Reservoirs system. The average specific activity of main radionuclides in the water of R-11 are: {sup 90}Sr - 1.4x10{sup 3} Bq/l; {sup 137}Cs - 3 Bq/l; {sup 3}H - 7x10{sup 2} Bq/l; α-emitting radionuclides - 2.6 x 10{sup -1} Bq/l. In our study the Allium-test was employed to estimate reservoir R-11 water genotoxic effects. In 2012, 3 water samples were collected in different parts of reservoir R-11. Water samples from the Shershnevskoye reservoir (artificial reservoir on the Miass River designed for Chelyabinsk city water supply) were used as natural control. Samples of distilled and bottled water were used as an additional laboratory control. The common onion, Allium cepa L. (Stuttgarter Riesen) was used. Healthy equal-sized bulbs were soaked for 24 hours at +4±2 deg. C to synchronize cell division. The bulbs were maintained in distilled water at +23 deg. C until roots have grown up to 2±1 mm length and then plunged into water samples. Control samples remained in distilled and bottled water as well as in water samples from the Shershnevskoye reservoir (natural control). Roots of the 18±3 mm length were randomly sampled and fixed in an alcohol/acetic acid mixture. For microscopic analysis, squashed

  11. Multifunctional graphene oxide-TiO₂-Ag nanocomposites for high performance water disinfection and decontamination under solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Bai, Hongwei; Liu, Jincheng; Sun, Darren D

    2013-10-15

    Multifunctional nanocomposites (GO-TiO2-Ag) integrating 2D GO sheets, 1D TiO2 nanorods and 0D Ag nanoparticles were synthesized via a facile two-phase method and characterized by various analytical techniques including TEM, EDS and XRD. The GO-TiO2-Ag nanocomposites demonstrate remarkably enhanced photocatalytic activities in degrading AO 7 and phenol under solar irradiation compared with GO-TiO2 and GO-Ag. They also exhibit excellent intrinsic antibacterial activity toward Escherichia coli, as well as significantly enhanced photo-biocidal capability over GO-TiO2 and GO-Ag. Through systematically investigating the influence of Ag content in the nanocomposites for their photocatalytic activities, it indicates that the optimal Ag content in the GO-TiO2-Ag nanocomposites varies for dye degradation and for phenol/bacterial degradation with different mechanisms. The superior photocatalytic activities under solar irradiation and the easy recovery make the GO-TiO2-Ag nanocomposites a good promising candidate for water purification.

  12. Use of an Electronic Tongue System and Fuzzy Logic to Analyze Water Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Guilherme S.; Paterno, Leonardo G.; Fonseca, Fernando J.

    2009-05-01

    An electronic tongue (ET) system incorporating 8 chemical sensors was used in combination with two pattern recognition tools, namely principal component analysis (PCA) and Fuzzy logic for discriminating/classification of water samples from different sources (tap, distilled and three brands of mineral water). The Fuzzy program exhibited a higher accuracy than the PCA and allowed the ET to classify correctly 4 in 5 types of water. Exception was made for one brand of mineral water which was sometimes misclassified as tap water. On the other hand, the PCA grouped water samples in three clusters, one with the distilled water; a second with tap water and one brand of mineral water, and the third with the other two other brands of mineral water. Samples in the second and third clusters could not be distinguished. Nevertheless, close grouping between repeated tests indicated that the ET system response is reproducible. The potential use of the Fuzzy logic as the data processing tool in combination with an electronic tongue system is discussed.

  13. Environmental contaminants in water, sediment and biological samples from Playa Lakes in southeastern New Mexico - 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment, water, bird tissue, and invertebrates were collected from 10 playa lakes in Southeastern New Mexico in 1991 and 1992. These samples were analyzed for a...

  14. Guidelines for collection and field analysis of water-quality samples from streams in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, F.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Dorsey, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    This manual provides standardized guidelines and quality-control procedures for the collection and preservation of water-quality samples and defines procedures for making field analyses of unstable constituents or properties.

  15. Geochemistry of Water Samples in the US from the NURE-HSSR Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analyses of water samples throughout the U.S. collected by the hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance (HSSR) phase of the National Uranium...

  16. Instrumental neutron activation analysis data for cloud-water particulate samples, Mount Bamboo, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Neng-Huei; Sheu, Guey-Rong; Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Debey, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Cloud water was sampled on Mount Bamboo in northern Taiwan during March 22-24, 2002. Cloud-water samples were filtered using 0.45-micron filters to remove particulate material from the water samples. Filtered particulates were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) at the U.S. Geological Survey National Reactor Facility in Denver, Colorado, in February 2012. INAA elemental composition data for the particulate materials are presented. These data complement analyses of the aqueous portion of the cloud-water samples, which were performed earlier by the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, National Central University, Taiwan. The data are intended for evaluation of atmospheric transport processes and air-pollution sources in Southeast Asia.

  17. Exploring the Legionella pneumophila positivity rate in hotel water samples from Antalya, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepin Özen, Nevgün; Tuğlu Ataman, Şenay; Emek, Mestan

    2017-03-29

    The genus Legionella is a fastidious Gram-negative bacteria widely distributed in natural waters and man made water supply systems. Legionella pneumophila is the aetiological agent of approximately 90% of reported Legionellosis cases, and serogroup 1 is the most frequent cause of infections. Legionnaires' disease is often associated with travel and continues to be a public health concern at present. The correct water management quality practices and rapid methods for analyzing Legionella species in environmental water is a key point for the prevention of Legionnaires' disease outbreaks. This study aimed to evaluate the positivity rates and serotyping of Legionella species from water samples in the region of Antalya, Turkey, which is an important tourism center. During January-December 2010, a total of 1403 samples of water that were collected from various hotels (n = 56) located in Antalya were investigated for Legionella pneumophila. All samples were screened for L. pneumophila by culture method according to "ISO 11731-2" criteria. The culture positive Legionella strains were serologically identified by latex agglutination test. A total of 142 Legionella pneumophila isolates were recovered from 21 (37.5%) of 56 hotels. The total frequency of L. pneumophila isolation from water samples was found as 10.1%. Serological typing of 142 Legionella isolates by latex agglutination test revealed that strains belonging to L. pneumophila serogroups 2-14 predominated in the examined samples (85%), while strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 were less numerous (15%). According to our knowledge, our study with the greatest number of water samples from Turkey demonstrates that L. pneumophila serogroups 2-14 is the most common isolate. Rapid isolation of L. pneumophila from environmental water samples is essential for the investigation of travel related outbreaks and the possible resources. Further studies are needed to have epidemiological data and to determine the types of L

  18. Development of a protocol for sampling and analysis of ballast water in Jamaica

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Achsah A.; Webber, Mona K.; Buddo, Dayne; Webber, Dale

    2014-01-01

     The transfer of ballast by the international shipping industry has negatively impacted the environment. To design such a protocol for the area, the ballast water tanks of seven bulk cargo vessels entering a Jamaican port were sampled between January 28, 2010 and August 17, 2010. Vessels originated from five ports and used three main routes, some of which conducted ballast water exchange. Twenty-six preserved and 22 live replicate zooplankton samples were obtained. Abundance and richness were...

  19. Relative effects of bacterial and protozoan predators on survival of Escherichia coli in estuarine water samples.

    OpenAIRE

    McCambridge, J; McMeekin, T A

    1980-01-01

    The relative effect of protozoan and bacterial predators on the survival of Escherichia coli in estuarine water samples was examined. Predacious protozoa exerted their major influence on E. coli destruction during the first 2 days of a 10-day-decline period. Inhibition of protozoa after day 2 had little effect on E. coli survival. Bacterial predators also contributed to E. coli destruction but in natural estuarine water samples were maintained at lower levels due to "grazing" by predacious pr...

  20. Influence of organic manure amendments on water repellency, water entry value, and water retention of soil samples from a tropical Ultisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyanage T.D.P.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lowered stability of soil aggregates governed by insufficient organic matter levels has become a major concern in Sri Lanka. Although the use of organic manure with water repellent properties lowers the wetting rates and improves the stability of soil aggregates, its effects on soil hydrophysical properties are still not characterized. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the relation of water repellency induced by organic manure amendments to the water entry value and water retention of a Sri Lankan Ultisol. The soil was mixed with ground powders of cattle manure (CM, goat manure (GM, Gliricidia maculata (GL and hydrophobic Casuarina equisetifolia (CE leaves to obtain samples ranging from non-repellent to extremely water repellent, in two series. Series I was prepared by mixing GL and CE with soil (5, 10, 25, 50%. Series II consisted of 5% CM, GM, and GL, with (set A and without (set B intermixed 2% CE. Water repellency, water entry value, and water retention of samples were determined in the laboratory. Soil-water contact angle increased with increasing organic matter content in all the samples showing positive linear correlations. Although the samples amended with CE showed high soil-water contact angles in series I, set A (without 2% CE and set B (with 2% CE in series II did not show a noticeable difference, where >80% of the samples had soil-water contact angles <90°. Water entry value (R2 = 0.83–0.92 and the water retention at 150 cm suction (R2 = 0.69–0.8 of all the samples increased with increasing soil-water contact angles showing moderate to strong positive linear correlations. However, set A (without 2% CE and set B (with 2% CE in series II did not differ noticeably. Water entry value of about 60% the samples was <2.5 cm. Mixing of a small amount (2% of hydrophobic organic matter with commonly used organic manures slightly increased the water repellency of sample soils, however not up to detrimental levels. It

  1. Review of robust measurement of phosphorus in river water: sampling, storage, fractionation and sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. P. Jarvie

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews current knowledge on sampling, storage and analysis of phosphorus (P in river waters. Potential sensitivity of rivers with different physical, chemical and biological characteristics (trophic status, turbidity, flow regime, matrix chemistry is examined in terms of errors associated with sampling, sample preparation, storage, contamination, interference and analytical errors. Key issues identified include: The need to tailor analytical reagents and concentrations to take into account the characteristics of the sample matrix. The effects of matrix interference on the colorimetric analysis. The influence of variable rates of phospho-molybdenum blue colour formation. The differing responses of river waters to physical and chemical conditions of storage. The higher sensitivities of samples with low P concentrations to storage and analytical errors. Given high variability of river water characteristics in space and time, no single standardised methodology for sampling, storage and analysis of P in rivers can be offered. ‘Good Practice’ guidelines are suggested, which recommend that protocols for sampling, storage and analysis of river water for P is based on thorough site-specific method testing and assessment of P stability on storage. For wider sampling programmes at the regional/national scale where intensive site-specific method and stability testing are not feasible, ‘Precautionary Practice’ guidelines are suggested. The study highlights key areas requiring further investigation for improving methodological rigour. Keywords: phosphorus, orthophosphate, soluble reactive, particulate, colorimetry, stability, sensitivity, analytical error, storage, sampling, filtration, preservative, fractionation, digestion

  2. Atrazine, triketone herbicides, and their degradation products in sediment, soil and surface water samples in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchanska, Hanna; Sajdak, Marcin; Szczypka, Kornelia; Swientek, Angelika; Tworek, Martyna; Kurek, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the sediment, soil and surface water contamination with selected popular triketone herbicides (mesotrione (MES) and sulcotrione(SUL)), atrazine (ATR) classified as a possible carcinogen and endocrine disrupting chemical, as well as their degradation products, in Silesia (Poland). Seventeen sediment samples, 24 soil samples, and 64 surface water samples collected in 2014 were studied. After solid-liquid extraction (SLE) and solid phase extraction (SPE), analytes were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detection (DAD). Ten years after the withdrawal from the use, ATR was not detected in any of the collected samples; however, its degradation products are still present in 41 % of sediment, 71 % of soil, and 8 % of surface water samples. SUL was determined in 85 % of soil samples; its degradation product (2-chloro-4-(methylosulfonyl) benzoic acid (CMBA)) was present in 43 % of soil samples. In 17 % of sediment samples, CMBA was detected. Triketones were detected occasionally in surface water samples. The chemometric analysis (clustering analysis (CA), single-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), N-Way ANOVA) was applied to find relations between selected soil and sediment parameters and herbicides concentration. In neither of the studied cases a statistically significant relationship between the concentrations of examined herbicides, their degradation products and soil parameters (organic carbon (OC), pH) was observed.

  3. Multistage plasma initiation process by pulsed CO2 laser irradiation of a Ti sample in an ambient gas (He, Ar, or N2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, J.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Dubreuil, B.

    1993-02-01

    New experimental results are reported on plasma initiation in front of a titanium sample irradiated by ir (λ=10.6 μm) laser pulses in an ambient gas (He, Ar, and N2) at pressures ranging from several Torr up to the atmosphere. The plasma is studied by space- and time-resolved emission spectroscopy, while sample vaporization is probed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Threshold laser intensities leading to the formation of a plasma in the vapor and in the ambient gases are determined. Experimental results support the model of a vaporization mechanism for the plasma initiation (vaporization-initiated plasma breakdown). The plasma initiation is described by simple numerical criteria based on a two-stage process. Theoretical predictions are found to be in a reasonable agreement with the experiment. This study provides also a clear explanation of the influence of the ambient gas on the laser beam-metal surface energy transfer. Laser irradiation always causes an important vaporization when performed in He, while in the case of Ar or N2, the interaction is reduced in heating and vaporization of some surface defects and impurities.

  4. Soil and Water – What is Detectable through Microbiological Sample Preparation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concerns of a potential terrorist’s use of biological agents in soil and ground water are articulated by comparisons to major illnesses in this Country involving contaminated drinking water sources. Objectives are focused on the importance of sample preparation in the rapid, ...

  5. Natural radioactivity in various water samples and radiation dose estimations in Bolu province, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorur, F Korkmaz; Camgoz, H

    2014-10-01

    The level of natural radioactivity for Bolu province of north-western Turkey was assessed in this study. There is no information about radioactivity measurement reported in water samples in the Bolu province so far. For this reason, gross α and β activities of 55 different water samples collected from tap, spring, mineral, river and lake waters in Bolu were determined. The mean activity concentrations were 68.11 mBq L(-1), 169.44 mBq L(-1) for gross α and β in tap water. For all samples the gross β activity is always higher than the gross α activity. All value of the gross α were lower than the limit value of 500 mBq L(-1) while two spring and one mineral water samples were found to have gross β activity concentrations of greater than 1000 mBq L(-1). The associated age-dependent dose from all water ingestion in Bolu was estimated. The total dose for adults had an average value exceeds the WHO recommended limit value. The risk levels from the direct ingestion of the natural radionuclides in tap and mineral water in Bolu were determinated. The mean (210)Po and (228)Ra risk the value of tap and mineral waters slightly exceeds what some consider on acceptable risk of 10(-4) or less.

  6. Geothermal water and gas: collected methods for sampling and analysis. Comment issue. [Compilation of methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, J.G.; Serne, R.J.; Shannon, D.W.; Woodruff, E.M.

    1976-08-01

    A collection of methods for sampling and analysis of geothermal fluids and gases is presented. Compilations of analytic options for constituents in water and gases are given. Also, a survey of published methods of laboratory water analysis is included. It is stated that no recommendation of the applicability of the methods to geothermal brines should be assumed since the intent of the table is to encourage and solicit comments and discussion leading to recommended analytical procedures for geothermal waters and research. (WHK)

  7. High Refractive Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Films Prepared by Low Water Sol-Gel and UV-Irradiation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Yuan Ma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic-inorganic hybrid sols (Ti–O–Si precursor were first synthesized by the sol-gel method at low addition of water, and were then employed to prepare a highly refractive hybrid optical film. This film was obtained by blending the Ti–O–Si precursor with 2-phenylphenoxyethyl acrylate (OPPEA to perform photo-polymerization by ultraviolet (UV irradiation. Results show that the film transparency of poly(Ti–O–Si precursor-co-OPPEA film is higher than that of a pure poly(Ti–O–Si precursor film, and that this poly(Ti–O–Si precursor-co-OPPEA hybrid film exhibits a high transparency of ~93.7% coupled with a high refractive index (n of 1.83 corresponding to a thickness of 2.59 μm.

  8. Hydrogen migration within a water molecule: formation of HD+ upon irradiation of HOD with intense, ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Deepak; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Vasa, Parinda

    2017-08-01

    We have carried out velocity map imaging experiments on HOD molecules irradiated by 10 fs long pulses of intense (˜1 PW cm-2) laser light (800 nm). We have detected HD+ ions as a signature of unimolecular hydrogen migration within the water molecule; ion momentum maps measured at different laser polarizations yield evidence that such hydrogen migration occurs on ultrafast timescales. We have been able to utilize the momentum maps to deduce that (i) the HD+ ion that is formed is vibrationally excited, and (ii) that the electronic state of the precursor HOD2+ dication has an essentially linear geometrical structure with elongated O-H and O-D bonds. Our results are in agreement with expectations from ab initio quantum chemical computations of potential energy surfaces of the lowest-energy states of HOD, HOD+ and HOD2+.

  9. Classification and authentication of unknown water samples using machine learning algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Palash K; Panchariya, P C; Kundu, Madhusree

    2011-07-01

    This paper proposes the development of water sample classification and authentication, in real life which is based on machine learning algorithms. The proposed techniques used experimental measurements from a pulse voltametry method which is based on an electronic tongue (E-tongue) instrumentation system with silver and platinum electrodes. E-tongue include arrays of solid state ion sensors, transducers even of different types, data collectors and data analysis tools, all oriented to the classification of liquid samples and authentication of unknown liquid samples. The time series signal and the corresponding raw data represent the measurement from a multi-sensor system. The E-tongue system, implemented in a laboratory environment for 6 numbers of different ISI (Bureau of Indian standard) certified water samples (Aquafina, Bisleri, Kingfisher, Oasis, Dolphin, and McDowell) was the data source for developing two types of machine learning algorithms like classification and regression. A water data set consisting of 6 numbers of sample classes containing 4402 numbers of features were considered. A PCA (principal component analysis) based classification and authentication tool was developed in this study as the machine learning component of the E-tongue system. A proposed partial least squares (PLS) based classifier, which was dedicated as well; to authenticate a specific category of water sample evolved out as an integral part of the E-tongue instrumentation system. The developed PCA and PLS based E-tongue system emancipated an overall encouraging authentication percentage accuracy with their excellent performances for the aforesaid categories of water samples.

  10. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  11. Qualilty, isotopes, and radiochemistry of water sampled from the Upper Moenkopi Village water-supply wells, Coconino County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruth, Rob; Beisner, Kimberly; Smith, Greg

    2013-01-01

    The Hopi Tribe Water Resources Program has granted contracts for studies to evaluate water supply conditions for the Moenkopi villages in Coconino County, Arizona. The Moenkopi villages include Upper Moenkopi Village and the village of Lower Moencopi, both on the Hopi Indian Reservation south of the Navajo community of Tuba City. These investigations have determined that water supplies are limited and vulnerable to several potential sources of contamination, including the Tuba City Landfill and a former uranium processing facility known as the Rare Metals Mill. Studies are ongoing to determine if uranium and other metals in groundwater beneath the landfill are greater than regional groundwater concentrations. The source of water supply for the Upper Moenkopi Village is three public-supply wells. The wells are referred to as MSW-1, MSW-2, and MSW-3 and all three wells obtain water from the regionally extensive N aquifer. The N aquifer is the principal aquifer in this region of northern Arizona and consists of thick beds of sandstone between less permeable layers of siltstone and mudstone. The relatively fine-grained character of the N aquifer inhibits rapid movement of water and large yields to wells. In recent years, water levels have declined in the three public-supply wells, causing concern that the current water supply will not be able to accommodate peak demand and allow for residential and economic growth. Analyses of major ions, nutrients, selected trace metals, stable and radioactive isotopes, and radiochemistry were performed on the groundwater samples from the three public-supply wells to describe general water-quality conditions and groundwater ages in and immediately surrounding the Upper Moenkopi Village area. None of the water samples collected from the public-supply wells exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards. The ratios of the major dissolved ions from the samples collected from MSW-1 and MSW-2 indicate

  12. Classification of Water Masses and Targeted Sampling of Ocean Plankton Populations by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Ryan, J. P.; Bellingham, J. G.; Harvey, J.; McEwen, R.; Chavez, F.; Scholin, C.

    2011-12-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are playing an increasingly active role in oceanographic surveys due to their mobility, efficiency, and growing intelligence. The Dorado AUV is equipped with a comprehensive suite of in situ sensors and ten 1.8-liter water samplers (called "gulpers"). During an October 2010 experiment in Monterey Bay, the AUV ran our autonomous peak-capture algorithm to acquire chlorophyll/backscatter peak samples from a phytoplankton bloom, allowing biologists to successfully monitor fluctuations in harmful microalgae (Psuedo-nitzschia spp.), the toxin they produce (domoic acid), and co-occurring zooplankton (invertebrate larvae and copepods) over space and time. For further investigations of the complex marine ecosystem in northern Monterey Bay, we set a more challenging goal: when the AUV flies from an upwelling shadow region (stratified water column) through an upwelling front into newly upwelled water, can it autonomously distinguish among water columns with different vertical structures and accordingly sample plankton populations on either side of, as well as within, the upwelling front? To achieve this goal, we have developed two new algorithms, one for distinguishing upwelling water columns from stratified water columns based on the vertical homogeneity of temperature, and the other for detecting an upwelling front based on the horizontal gradient of temperature. For acquiring targeted water samples, the 10 gulpers are appropriately allocated to the two distinct water columns and the front. Lockout time intervals between triggerings are set to prevent "dense triggerings". During our June 2011 experiment, the Dorado AUV flew westward from an upwelling shadow region (stratified water column) through an upwelling front, and into an upwelling water column. Three gulpers were allocated to the stratified water column, four to the front, and the remaining three to the upwelling water column. The AUV successfully detected and acquired targeted

  13. Assessment of water quality index of bore well water samples from some selected locations of South Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, S; Patel, H M; Srivastava, P K; Bafna, A M

    2013-10-01

    The present study calculates the water quality index (WQI) of some selected sites from South Gujarat (India) and assesses the impact of industries, agriculture and human activities. Chemical parameters were monitored for the calculation of WQI of some selected bore well samples. The results revealed that the WQI of the some bore well samples exceeded acceptable levels due to the dumping of wastes from municipal, industrial and domestic sources and agricultural runoff as well. Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) was implemented for interpolation of each water quality parameter (pH, EC, alkalinity, total hardness, chloride, nitrate and sulphate) for the entire sampled area. The bore water is unsuitable for drinking and if the present state of affairs continues for long, it may soon become an ecologically dead bore.

  14. Photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from glycerol and water over nickel-hybrid cadmium sulfide quantum dots under visible-light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiu-Ju; Li, Zhi-Jun; Li, Xu-Bing; Fan, Xiang-Bing; Meng, Qing-Yuan; Yu, Shan; Li, Cheng-Bo; Li, Jia-Xin; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2014-05-01

    Natural photosynthesis offers the concept of storing sunlight in chemical form as hydrogen (H2), using biomass and water. Herein we describe a robust artificial photocatalyst, nickel-hybrid CdS quantum dots (Nih-CdS QDs) made in situ from nickel salts and CdS QDs stabilized by 3-mercaptopropionic acid, for visible-light-driven H2 evolution from glycerol and water. With visible light irradiation for 20 h, 403.2 μmol of H2 was obtained with a high H2 evolution rate of approximately 74.6 μmol h(-1)  mg(-1) and a high turnover number of 38 405 compared to MPA-CdS QDs (mercaptopropionic-acid-stabilized CdS quantum dots). Compared to CdTe QDs and CdSe QDs, the modified CdS QDs show the greatest affinity toward Ni(2+) ions and the highest activity for H2 evolution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), and photophysical studies reveal the chemical nature of the Nih-CdS QDs. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and terephthalate fluorescence measurements clearly demonstrate water splitting to generate ⋅OH radicals. The detection of DMPO-H and DMPO-C radicals adduct in EPR also indicate that ⋅H radicals and ⋅C radicals are the active species in the catalytic cycle.

  15. Determination of natural uranium, thorium and radium isotopes in water and soil samples by alpha spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Le Cong; Tao, Chau Van; Thong, Luong Van; Linh, Duong Mong [University of Science Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam). Faculty of Physics and Engineering Physics; Dong, Nguyen Van [University of Science Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam). Faculty of Chemistry

    2011-08-15

    In this study, a simple procedure for the determination of natural uranium, thorium and radium isotopes in water and soil samples by alpha spectroscopy is described. This procedure allows a sequential extraction polonium, uranium, thorium and radium radionuclides from the same sample in two to three days. It was tested and validated with the analysis of certified reference materials from the IAEA. (orig.)

  16. Use of passive sampling devices for monitoring and compliance checking of POP concentrations in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohmann, R.; Booij, K.; Smedes, F.; Vrana, B.

    2012-01-01

    The state of the art of passive water sampling of (nonpolar) organic contaminants is presented. Its suitability for regulatory monitoring is discussed, with an emphasis on the information yielded by passive sampling devices (PSDs), their relevance and associated uncertainties. Almost all persistent

  17. Controllability of depth dose distribution for neutron capture therapy at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2002-10-01

    The updating construction of the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor has been performed from November 1995 to March 1996 mainly for the improvement in neutron capture therapy. On the performance, the neutron irradiation modes with the variable energy spectra from almost pure thermal to epi-thermal neutrons became available by the control of the heavy-water thickness in the spectrum shifter and by the open-and-close of the cadmium and boral thermal neutron filters. The depth distributions of thermal, epi-thermal and fast neutron fluxes were measured by activation method using gold and indium, and the depth distributions of gamma-ray absorbed dose rate were measured using thermo-luminescent dosimeter of beryllium oxide for the several irradiation modes. From these measured data, the controllability of the depth dose distribution using the spectrum shifter and the thermal neutron filters was confirmed.

  18. Proton transfer pathways in an aspartate-water cluster sampled by a network of discrete states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidelbach, Marco; Betz, Fridtjof; Mäusle, Raquel Maya; Imhof, Petra

    2016-08-01

    Proton transfer reactions are complex transitions due to the size and flexibility of the hydrogen-bonded networks along which the protons may ;hop;. The combination of molecular dynamics based sampling of water positions and orientations with direct sampling of proton positions is an efficient way to capture the interplay of these degrees of freedom in a transition network. The energetically most favourable pathway in the proton transfer network computed for an aspartate-water cluster shows the pre-orientation of water molecules and aspartate side chains to be a pre-requisite for the subsequent concerted proton transfer to the product state.

  19. Disinfection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis in drinking tap water using ultraviolet germicidal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavano, Giuditta Fiorella; De Santi, Mauro; Sisti, Maurizio; Amagliani, Giulia; Brandi, Giorgio

    2017-09-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are resistant to conventional water treatments, and are opportunistic human pathogen, particularly in hospitalized patients. The aim of this investigation was to assess the effectiveness of an ultraviolet UV-C lamp treatment against Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis in drinking tap water. Ultraviolet treatments (0 - 192 mJ/cm(2)) were performed using UV lamp immerged onto cylindrical glass tubes containing artificially contaminated water. The results showed that susceptibility to UV varied considerably according to the strains and the diameter of the tube. With a dose of 32 mJ/cm(2), a significant inactivation (pUV disinfection of drinking water. In conclusion, it may be difficult to standardize a UV dose for the elimination of waterborne mycobacteria.

  20. Recolonization by heterotrophic bacteria after UV irradiation or ozonation of seawater; a simulation of ballast water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess-Erga, Ole-Kristian; Blomvågnes-Bakke, Bente; Vadstein, Olav

    2010-10-01

    Transport of ballast water with ships represents a risk for introduction of foreign species. If ballast water is treated during uptake, there will be a recolonization of the ballast water by heterotrophic bacteria during transport. We investigated survival and succession of heterotrophic bacteria after disinfection of seawater in the laboratory, representing a model system of ballast water treatment and transport. The seawater was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, ozone (2 doses) or no treatment, incubated for 16 days and examined with culture-dependent and -independent methods. The number of colony-forming units (CFU) was reduced below the detection level after disinfection with UV and high ozone dose (700 mV), and 1% of the initial level for the low ozone dose (400 mV). After less than 3 days, the CFU was back or above the starting point for the control, UV and low ozone treatment, whereas it took slightly more than 6 days for the high ozone treatment. Disinfection increased substrate availability and reduced cell densities. Lack of competition and predation induced the recolonization by opportunistic bacteria (r-strategists), with significant increase in bacterial numbers and a low diversity (based on DGGE band pattern). All cultures stabilized after the initial recolonization phase (except Oz700) where competition due to crowding and nutrient limitation favoured bacteria with high substrate affinity (K-strategists), resulting in higher species richness and diversity (based on DGGE band pattern). The bacterial community was significantly altered qualitatively and quantitatively and may have a higher potential as invaders in the recipient depending on disinfection method and the time of release. These results have implications for the treatment strategy used for ballast water.

  1. Comparison of sampling strategies for monitoring water quality in mesoscale Canadian Prairie watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Cody; Petzold, Halya; Penner, Amber; Ali, Genevieve

    2015-07-01

    The Canadian Prairies are subject to cold winter dynamics, spring snowmelt runoff, and summer storms; a process variability that makes it difficult to identify an adequate sampling strategy for capturing representative water quality data. Hence, our research objective was to compare multiple water quality sampling strategies for Prairie watersheds and rank them based on operational and statistical criteria. The focus was on the Catfish Creek Watershed (Manitoba, Canada), which drains into the hypereutrophic Lake Winnipeg. Water samples were collected every 7 h during the 2013 open-water season and notably analyzed for nitrate and orthophosphate. The original high-frequency dataset (7 h) was then deconstructed into lower-frequency datasets to mimic strategies involving sample collection on a daily, weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, and seasonal basis. A comparison and decision matrix was also built to assess the ability of the lower-frequency datasets to retain the statistical properties of the original (7 h) dataset. Results indicate that nutrient concentrations vary significantly over short timescales and are affected by both sampling time (day versus night) and water level fluctuations. The decision matrix revealed that seasonal sampling is sufficient when the goal is only to capture mean water quality conditions; however, sub-daily to daily sampling is required for accurate process signal representation. While we acknowledge that sampling programs designed by researchers and public agencies are often driven by different goals, we found daily sampling to be the most parsimonious strategy for the study watershed and suggest that it would help to better quantify nutrient loads to Lake Winnipeg.

  2. DETERMINATION OF ORGANOCHLORINE PESTICIDES IN DRINKING WATERS SAMPLED FROM CLUJ AND HUNEDOARA COUNTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA-ELISABETA LOVÁSZ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of organochlorine pesticides in drinking waterssampled from Cluj and Hunedoara counties. Pesticides are found scattered indifferent environmental factors (water, air, soil wherefrom they are drawn off byvegetal and animal organisms. Water pollution by pesticides results from the plantprotection products industry and also from massive application of these resourcesin agriculture and other branches of economy. Pesticides can reach surface wateralong with dripping waters and by infiltration may reach the groundwater layers,organochlorine pesticides are most often found in the water sources (dieldrin,endrin, DDT, aldrin, lindane, heptachlor, etc. due to their increased persistence inthe external environment. This study followed up the determination oforganochlorine pesticides in 14 drinking water samples collected from the outputof water treatment plants in Cluj and Hunedoara counties that process surfacewater and deep-water sources. For identification of organochlorine pesticides, thegas chromatographic method after liquid-liquid extraction was used, by a gascromatograph Shimadzu GC 2010 with detector ECD (Electron CaptureDetection. There were not detected higher values than the method detection limit(0.01 μg/l in the drinking water samples collected and analyzed for both totalorganochlorine pesticides and components, which were well below the maximumconcentration admitted by Law 452/2002 regarding drinking water quality. Resultsare correlated with the sanitary protection areas for water sources and with the useof agricultural lands in the area. The solution to reduce risk of pesticides use isecological agriculture , which gains increasingly more ground in Romania too.

  3. Identification of Phyllosilicates in Mudstone Samples Using Water Releases Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogancamp, J. V. (Clark); Ming, D. W.; McAdam, A. C.; Archer, P. D.; Morris, R. V.; Bristow, T. F.; Rampe, E. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Gellert, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on board the Curiosity Rover has detected high temperature water releases from mud-stones in the areas of Yellowknife Bay, Pahrump Hills, Naukluft Plateau, and Murray Buttes in Gale crater. Dehydroxylation of phyllosilicates may have caused the high temperature water releases observed in these samples. Because each type of phyllosilicate undergoes dehydroxylation at distinct temperatures, these water releases can be used to help constrain the type of phyllosilicate present in each sample.

  4. Concentrations of some heavy metals in underground water samples from a Nigerian crude oil producing community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejike, Chukwunonso E C C; Eferibe, Chinedu O; Okonkwo, Francis O

    2017-03-01

    Pollution due to oil exploration activities in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria and government under-investments in potable water infrastructure has led to the dependence of the population on personal boreholes. Yet, there are little quality or surveillance reports on such waters. The concentrations of heavy metals in underground water samples from an oil producing area, Umuebulu, in the Niger Delta were therefore investigated. Water samples were collected from three test points, each approximately 300 m from (1) wellhead area (WHA), (2) flare area (FA) and (3) effluent discharge area (EDA), and one control point located 10 km away from any oil-related activity. The concentrations of lead, arsenic and cadmium were determined in the samples using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. All three heavy metals were present in the test, and control water samples at concentrations significantly (P  FA > WHA > Control. Appropriate water treatment and surveillance is warranted and therefore recommended for underground water resources of the studied community.

  5. Effects of sterilization treatments on the analysis of TOC in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yiming; Xu, Lingfeng; Gong, Dongqin; Lu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Decomposition experiments conducted with and without microbial processes are commonly used to study the effects of environmental microorganisms on the degradation of organic pollutants. However, the effects of biological pretreatment (sterilization) on organic matter often have a negative impact on such experiments. Based on the principle of water total organic carbon (TOC) analysis, the effects of physical sterilization treatments on determination of TOC and other water quality parameters were investigated. The results revealed that two conventional physical sterilization treatments, autoclaving and 60Co gamma-radiation sterilization, led to the direct decomposition of some organic pollutants, resulting in remarkable errors in the analysis of TOC in water samples. Furthermore, the extent of the errors varied with the intensity and the duration of sterilization treatments. Accordingly, a novel sterilization method for water samples, 0.45 microm micro-filtration coupled with ultraviolet radiation (MCUR), was developed in the present study. The results indicated that the MCUR method was capable of exerting a high bactericidal effect on the water sample while significantly decreasing the negative impact on the analysis of TOC and other water quality parameters. Before and after sterilization treatments, the relative errors of TOC determination could be controlled to lower than 3% for water samples with different categories and concentrations of organic pollutants by using MCUR.

  6. Set Up of an Automatic Water Quality Sampling System in Irrigation Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Heinz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a high-resolution automatic sampling system for continuous in situ measurements of stable water isotopic composition and nitrogen solutes along with hydrological information. The system facilitates concurrent monitoring of a large number of water and nutrient fluxes (ground, surface, irrigation and rain water in irrigated agriculture. For this purpose we couple an automatic sampling system with a Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometry System (WS-CRDS for stable water isotope analysis (δ2H and δ18O, a reagentless hyperspectral UV photometer (ProPS for monitoring nitrate content and various water level sensors for hydrometric information. The automatic sampling system consists of different sampling stations equipped with pumps, a switch cabinet for valve and pump control and a computer operating the system. The complete system is operated via internet-based control software, allowing supervision from nearly anywhere. The system is currently set up at the International Rice Research Institute (Los Baños, The Philippines in a diversified rice growing system to continuously monitor water and nutrient fluxes. Here we present the system’s technical set-up and provide initial proof-of-concept with results for the isotopic composition of different water sources and nitrate values from the 2012 dry season.

  7. Analysis of bromate in drinking water using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry without sample pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Koji; Asami, Mari; Takei, Kanako; Akiba, Michihiro

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method for determining bromate in drinking water was developed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The (18)O-enriched bromate was used as an internal standard. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of bromate was 0.2 µg/L. The peak of bromate was separated from those of coexisting ions (i.e., chloride, nitrate and sulfate). The relative and absolute recoveries of bromate in two drinking water samples and in a synthesized ion solution (100 mg/L chloride, 10 mg N/L nitrate, and 100 mg/L sulfate) were 99-105 and 94-105%, respectively. Bromate concentrations in 11 drinking water samples determined by LC-MS/MS were water without sample pretreatment.

  8. Difficulties in obtaining representative samples for compliance with the Ballast Water Management Convention

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Carney, K.J.; Basurko, O.C.; Pazouki, K.; Marsham, S.; Delany, J.E.; Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.; Mesbahi, E.

    ). This study has shown the effect that low sampling frequency has on the accuracy of data obtained from a 1 tonne storage tank. In reality ships can carry between 100 and 100,000 tonnes of ballast water and discharge at flow rates of 100 to over 3000 m3hr-1... and uncertainty in the accuracy of data obtained from collecting only three replicate samples at three sampling points on discharge of ballast water will, in reality, be much greater than that seen in this study. Previous studies have used different...

  9. Occurrence of Selected Pharmaceutical and Organic Wastewater Compounds in Effluent and Water Samples from Municipal Wastewater and Drinking-Water Treatment Facilities in the Tar and Cape Fear River Basins, North Carolina, 2003-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Samples of treated effluent and treated and untreated water were collected at 20 municipal wastewater and drinkingwater treatment facilities in the Tar and Cape Fear River basins of North Carolina during 2003 and 2005. The samples were analyzed for a variety of prescription and nonprescription pharmaceutical compounds and a suite of organic compounds considered indicative of wastewater. Concentrations of these compounds generally were less than or near the detection limits of the analytical methods used during this investigation. None of these compounds were detected at concentrations that exceeded drinking-water standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Bromoform, a disinfection byproduct, was the only compound detected at a concentration that exceeded regulatory guidelines. The concentration of bromoform in one finished drinking-water sample, 26 micrograms per liter, exceeded North Carolina water-quality criteria. Drinking-water treatment practices were effective at removing many of the compounds detected in untreated water. Disinfection processes used in wastewater treatment - chlorination or irradiation with ultraviolet light - did not seem to substantially degrade the organic compounds evaluated during this study.

  10. Aqueous Processing of Atmospheric Organic Particles in Cloud Water Collected via Aircraft Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Eric J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Wirth, Christopher; Shepson, Paul B.; Stirm, Brian H.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2015-07-21

    Cloud water and below-cloud atmospheric particle samples were collected onboard a research aircraft during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) over a forested region of Alabama in June 2013. The organic molecular composition of the samples was studied to gain insights into the aqueous-phase processing of organic compounds within cloud droplets. High resolution mass spectrometry with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization and direct infusion electrospray ionization were utilized to compare the organic composition of the particle and cloud water samples, respectively. Isoprene and monoterpene-derived organosulfates and oligomers were identified in both the particles and cloud water, showing the significant influence of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation above the forested region. While the average O:C ratios of the organic compounds were similar between the atmospheric particle and cloud water samples, the chemical composition of these samples was quite different. Specifically, hydrolysis of organosulfates and formation of nitrogen-containing compounds were observed for the cloud water when compared to the atmospheric particle samples, demonstrating that cloud processing changes the composition of organic aerosol.

  11. Calculating of river water quality sampling frequency by the analytic hierarchy process (AHP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Huu Tuan; Lo, Shang-Lien; Phan Thi, Lan Anh

    2013-01-01

    River water quality sampling frequency is an important aspect of the river water quality monitoring network. A suitable sampling frequency for each station as well as for the whole network will provide a measure of the real water quality status for the water quality managers as well as the decision makers. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is an effective method for decision analysis and calculation of weighting factors based on multiple criteria to solve complicated problems. This study introduces a new procedure to design river water quality sampling frequency by applying the AHP. We introduce and combine weighting factors of variables with the relative weights of stations to select the sampling frequency for each station, monthly and yearly. The new procedure was applied for Jingmei and Xindian rivers, Taipei, Taiwan. The results showed that sampling frequency should be increased at high weighted stations while decreased at low weighted stations. In addition, a detailed monitoring plan for each station and each month could be scheduled from the output results. Finally, the study showed that the AHP is a suitable method to design a system for sampling frequency as it could combine multiple weights and multiple levels for stations and variables to calculate a final weight for stations, variables, and months.

  12. A culture independent method for the detection of Aeromonas sp. from water samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadua Latif-Eugenín

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Aeromonas is present in a wide variety of water environments and is recognised as potentially pathogenic to humans and animals. Members of this genus are often confused with Vibrio when using automated, commercial identification systems that are culture-dependent. This study describes a polymerase chain reaction (PCR detection method for Aeromonas that is culture- independent and that targets the glycerophospholopid-cholesterol acyltransferase (gcat gene, which is specific for this genus. The GCAT-PCR was 100% specific in artificially inoculated water samples, with a detection limit that ranged from 2.5 to 25 cfu/mL. The success at detecting this pathogen in 86 water samples using the GCAT-PCR method was identical to the conventional culturing method when a pre-enrichment step was carried out, yielding 83.7% positive samples. On the other hand, without a pre-enrichment step, only 77.9% of the samples were positive by culturing and only 15.1% with the GCATPCR. However, 83.7% positive samples were obtained for the GCAT-PCR when the water volume for the DNA extraction was increased from 400 μL to 4 mL. The proposed molecular method is much faster (5 or 29 h than the culturing method (24 or 48 h whether performed directly or after a pre-enrichment step and it will enable the fast detection of Aeromonas in water samples helping to prevent a possible transmission to humans.

  13. Using high-frequency water quality data to assess sampling strategies for the EU Water Framework Directive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeffington, R. A.; Halliday, S. J.; Wade, A. J.; Bowes, M. J.; Loewenthal, M.

    2015-05-01

    The EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) requires that the ecological and chemical status of water bodies in Europe should be assessed, and action taken where possible to ensure that at least "good" quality is attained in each case by 2015. This paper is concerned with the accuracy and precision with which chemical status in rivers can be measured given certain sampling strategies, and how this can be improved. High-frequency (hourly) chemical data from four rivers in southern England were subsampled to simulate different sampling strategies for four parameters used for WFD classification: dissolved phosphorus, dissolved oxygen, pH and water temperature. These data sub-sets were then used to calculate the WFD classification for each site. Monthly sampling was less precise than weekly sampling, but the effect on WFD classification depended on the closeness of the range of concentrations to the class boundaries. In some cases, monthly sampling for a year could result in the same water body being assigned to three or four of the WFD classes with 95% confidence, due to random sampling effects, whereas with weekly sampling this was one or two classes for the same cases. In the most extreme case, the same water body could have been assigned to any of the five WFD quality classes. Weekly sampling considerably reduces the uncertainties compared to monthly sampling. The width of the weekly sampled confidence intervals was about 33% that of the monthly for P species and pH, about 50% for dissolved oxygen, and about 67% for water temperature. For water temperature, which is assessed as the 98th percentile in the UK, monthly sampling biases the mean downwards by about 1 °C compared to the true value, due to problems of assessing high percentiles with limited data. Low-frequency measurements will generally be unsuitable for assessing standards expressed as high percentiles. Confining sampling to the working week compared to all 7 days made little difference, but a modest

  14. Detection of protozoa in water samples by formalin/ether concentration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora-Suarez, Fabiana; Rivera, Raul; Triviño-Valencia, Jessica; Gomez-Marin, Jorge E

    2016-09-01

    Methods to detect protozoa in water samples are expensive and laborious. We evaluated the formalin/ether concentration method to detect Giardia sp., Cryptosporidium sp. and Toxoplasma in water. In order to test the properties of the method, we spiked water samples with different amounts of each protozoa (0, 10 and 50 cysts or oocysts) in a volume of 10 L of water. Immunofluorescence assay was used for detection of Giardia and Cryptosporidium. Toxoplasma oocysts were identified by morphology. The mean percent of recovery in 10 repetitions of the entire method, in 10 samples spiked with ten parasites and read by three different observers, were for Cryptosporidium 71.3 ± 12, for Giardia 63 ± 10 and for Toxoplasma 91.6 ± 9 and the relative standard deviation of the method was of 17.5, 17.2 and 9.8, respectively. Intraobserver variation as measured by intraclass correlation coefficient, was fair for Toxoplasma, moderate for Cryptosporidium and almost perfect for Giardia. The method was then applied in 77 samples of raw and drinkable water in three different plant of water treatment. Cryptosporidium was found in 28 of 77 samples (36%) and Giardia in 31 of 77 samples (40%). Theses results identified significant differences in treatment process to reduce the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium. In conclusion, the formalin ether method to concentrate protozoa in water is a new alternative for low resources countries, where is urgently need to monitor and follow the presence of theses protozoa in drinkable water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The natural and artificial radionuclides in drinking water samples and consequent population doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydan Altıkulaç

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Concentration levels of 226Ra, 228Ra, 40K and 137Cs were determined in 52 drinking water samples collected from the different supplies in Samsun province to evaluate annual effective dose due to the ingestion of the drinking water samples. The activity concentrations of 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K natural radionuclides in the drinking water samples varied from <27 to 2431 mBq L−1, <36 to 270 mBq L−1 and <47 to 2880 mBq L−1 respectively. The activity concentrations of the artificial radionuclide 137Cs in the drinking water samples were lower than minimum detectable activity except in one drinking water sample (DW14 with an associated activity concentration of 2576 mBq L−1. Contributions of the consumed water samples to annual effective dose from 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K varied from 1.6 to 33.4 μSv y−1 with a mean of 6.1 μSv y−1, 2.2 to 46.8 μSv y−1 with a mean of 8.6 μSv y−1, 4.7 to 97.5 μSv y−1 with a mean of 17.9 μSv y−1 for infants, children and adults, respectively. The results showed that all values of the annual effective dose of ingestion of these water samples were below the individual dose criterion of 100 μSv y−1 reported by World Health Organization (WHO.

  16. Effect of gamma irradiation on physical characteristics of Jordanian durum wheat and quality of semolina and lasagna products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzeh, F.S. [Department of Nutrition and Food Technology, University of Jordan, Queen-Rania, Amman (Jordan)], E-mail: firasazzeh@yahoo.com; Amr, A.S. [Department of Nutrition and Food Technology, University of Jordan, Queen-Rania, Amman (Jordan)

    2009-09-15

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of using varying gamma irradiation doses on the physiochemical and rheological properties of semolina and its products. Ash, protein and water content were not influenced with gamma irradiation, while falling number and fungi counts decreased with increasing irradiation dose. Irradiation adversely affected wet gluten at 5 kGy dose. Dough stability was deteriorated vigorously with increasing irradiation dose. Sensory evaluation showed that lasagna produced from 0.25- and 1 kGy-irradiated semolina did not show any significant differences as compared with the control sample.

  17. Three-component U-Pu-Th fuel for plutonium irradiation in heavy water reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peel Ross

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses concepts for three-component fuel bundles containing plutonium, uranium and thorium for use in pressurised heavy water reactors, and cases for and against implementation of such a nuclear energy system in the United Kingdom. Heavy water reactors are used extensively in Canada, and are deploying within India and China, whilst the UK is considering the use of heavy water reactors to manage its plutonium inventory of 140 tonnes. The UK heavy water reactor proposal uses a mixed oxide (MOX fuel of plutonium in depleted uranium, within the enhanced CANDU-6 (EC-6 reactor. This work proposes an alternative heterogeneous fuel concept based on the same reactor and CANFLEX fuel bundle, with eight large-diameter fuel elements loaded with natural thorium oxide and 35 small-diameter fuel elements loaded with a MOX of plutonium and reprocessed uranium stocks from UK MAGNOX and AGR reactors. Indicative neutronic calculations suggest that such a fuel would be neutronically feasible. A similar MOX may alternatively be fabricated from reprocessed <5% enriched light water reactor fuel, such as the fuel of the AREVA EPR reactor, to consume newly produced plutonium from reprocessing, similar to the DUPIC (direct use of PWR fuel in CANDU process.

  18. Preparation of testate amoebae samples affects water table depth reconstructions in peatland palaeoecological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Avel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In peatland palaeoecological studies, the preparation of peat samples for testate amoebae (TA analysis involves boiling of samples and microsieving them through a 15-μm sieve. We studied the effect of these preparation stages on the estimation of TA assemblages and on the reconstruction of water table depths (WTD. Our results indicate that the TA assemblages of boiled and unboiled samples are not significantly different, while microsieving reduces the concentration of small TA taxa and results in significantly different TA assemblages. The differences between microsieved and unsieved TA assemblages were reflected also in predicted values of WTD, which indicated drier conditions in case of unsieved samples than in microsieved samples. We conclude that the boiling of samples might be omitted if TA are extracted from the fresh peat samples. Microsieving may lead to erroneous palaeoecological WTD reconstructions and should be avoided if small TA taxa are present in samples.

  19. Hydrogen isotopes from source water to leaf lipid in a continental-scale sample network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Daniel; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Sedimentary plant waxes are useful paleoclimate proxies because they are preserved in depositional settings on geologic timescales and the isotopic composition of the hydrogen in these molecules reflects that of the source water available during biosynthesis. This application is based largely on empirical calibrations that have demonstrated continental-scale correlations between source water and lipid hydrogen isotope values. However, the importance of variable net isotopic fractionation between source water and lipid for different species and environmental conditions is increasingly recognized. Isotopic enrichment of leaf water during transpiration is key among these secondary factors, and is itself sensitive to changes in hydroclimate. Leaf water enrichment also occurs prior to photosynthetic water uptake, and is therefore independent from cellular-level biomarker synthesis. Mechanistic models can predict the mean leaf water hydrogen isotope composition from readily available meteorological variables. This permits global-scale isoscape maps of leaf water isotopic composition and enrichment above source water to be generated, but these models have not been widely validated at continental spatial scales. We have established a network of twenty-one sites across Europe where we are sampling for leaf-, xylem-, and soil-water isotopes (H and O) at approximately 5-week intervals over the summer growing season. We augment the sample set with weekly to monthly precipitation samples and early- and late-season plant wax lipid samples. Collaborators at each site are conducting the sampling, and most sites are members of the FLUXNET tower network that also record high-resolution meteorological data. We present information on the implementation of the network and preliminary results from the 2014 summer season. The complete dataset will be used to track the evolution of water isotopes from source to leaf water and from leaf water to lipid hydrogen across diverse environments

  20. Solid-phase microextraction for the analysis of short-chain chlorinated paraffins in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, P; Santos, F J; Galceran, M T

    2003-01-10

    A novel solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method coupled to gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-ECD) was developed as an alternative to liquid-liquid and solid-phase extraction for the analysis of short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) in water samples. The extraction efficiency of five different commercially available fibres was evaluated and the 100-microm polydimethylsiloxane coating was the most suitable for the absorption of the SCCPs. Optimisation of several SPME parameters, such as extraction time and temperature, ionic strength and desorption time, was performed. Quality parameters were established using Milli-Q, tap water and river water. Linearity ranged between 0.06 and 6 microg l(-1) for spiked Milli-Q water and between 0.6 and 6 microg l(-1) for natural waters. The precision of the SPME-GC-ECD method for the three aqueous matrices was similar and gave relative standard deviations (RSD) between 12 and 14%. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.02 microg l(-1) for Milli-Q water and 0.3 microg l(-1) for both tap water and river water. The optimised SPME-GC-ECD method was successfully applied to the determination of SCCPs in river water samples.

  1. Monitoring water quality in Toronto's urban stormwater ponds: Assessing participation rates and data quality of water sampling by citizen scientists in the FreshWater Watch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew B; Frost, Paul C

    2017-08-15

    From 2013 to 2015, citizen scientist volunteers in Toronto, Canada were trained to collect and analyze water quality in urban stormwater ponds. This volunteer sampling was part of the research program, FreshWater Watch (FWW), which aimed to standardize urban water sampling efforts from around the globe. We held training sessions for new volunteers twice yearly and trained a total of 111 volunteers. Over the course of project, ~30% of volunteers participated by collecting water quality data after the training session with 124 individual sampling events at 29 unique locations in Toronto, Canada. A few highly engaged volunteers were most active, with 50% of the samples collected by 5% of trainees. Stormwater ponds generally have poor water quality demonstrated by elevated phosphate concentrations (~30μg/L), nitrate (~427μg/L), and turbidity relative to Canadian water quality standards. Compared to other urban waterbodies in the global program, nutrient concentrations in Toronto's urban stormwater ponds were lower, while turbidity was not markedly different. Toronto FWW (FWW-TO) data was comparable to that measured by standard lab analyses and matched results from previous studies of stormwater ponds in Toronto. Combining observational and chemical data acquired by citizen scientists, macrophyte dominated ponds had lower phosphate concentrations while phytoplankton dominated ponds had lower nitrate concentrations, which indicates a potentially important and unstudied role of internal biogeochemical processes on pond nutrient dynamics. This experience in the FWW demonstrates the capabilities and constraints of citizen science when applied to water quality sampling. While analytical limits on in-field analyses produce higher uncertainty in water quality measurements of individual sites, rapid data collection is possible but depends on the motivation and engagement of the group of volunteers. Ongoing efforts in citizen science will thus need to address sampling effort

  2. Effect of proton irradiation on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Ok; Hwang, Mi Jin; Kim, Sung Woo; Hwang, Seong Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) involves the cracking and failure of materials under irradiation environment in nuclear power plant water environment. The major factors and processes governing an IASCC are suggested by others. The IASCC of the reactor core internals due to the material degradation and the water chemistry change has been reported in high stress stainless steel components, such as fuel elements (Boiling Water Reactors) in the 1960s, a control rod in the 1970s, and a baffle former bolt in recent years of light water reactors (Pressurized Water Reactors). Many irradiated stainless steels that are resistant to inergranular cracking in 288 .deg. C argon are susceptible to IG cracking in the simulated BWR environment at the same temperature. Under the circumstances, a lot works have been performed on IASCC in BWR. Recent efforts have been devoted to investigate an IASCC in a PWR, but the mechanism in a PWR is not fully understood yet as compared with that in a BWR owing to a lack of data from laboratories and fields. Therefore, it is strongly necessary to review and analyze recent researches of an IASCC in both BWR and PWR for establishing a proactive management technology for the IASCC of core internals in Korean PWRs. The objective of this research to find IASCC behavior of proton irradiated 316 stainless steels in a high-temperature water chemistry environment. The IASCC initiation susceptibility on 1, 3, 5 DPA proton irradiated 316 austenite stainless steel was evaluated in PWR environment. SCC area ratio on the fracture surface was similar regardless of irradiation level. Total crack length on the irradiated surface increases in order of specimen 1, 3, 5 DPA. The total crack length at the side surface is a better measure in evaluating IASCC initiation susceptibility for proton-irradiated samples.

  3. Irradiation, microwave and alternative energy-based treatments for low water activity foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is an increasing recognition of low water activity foods as vectors for human pathogens. Partially or fully dried agricultural commodities, along with modern formulated dried food products, are complex, and designed to meet a variety of nutritional, sensory, and market-oriented goal. This comp...

  4. Preconcentration and determination of heavy metals in water, sediment and biological samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirkhanloo Hamid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a simple, sensitive and accurate column preconcentration method was developed for the determination of Cd, Cu and Pb ions in river water, urine and sediment samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure is based on the retention of the analytes on a mixed cellulose ester membrane (MCEM column from buffered sample solutions and then their elution from the column with nitric acid. Several parameters, such as pH of the sample solution, volume of the sample and eluent and flow rates of the sample were evaluated. The effects of diverse ions on the preconcentration were also investigated. The recoveries were >95 %. The developed method was applied to the determination of trace metal ions in river water, urine and sediment samples, with satisfactory results. The 3δ detection limits for Cu, Pb and Cd were found to be 2, 3 and 0.2 μg dm−3, respectively. The presented procedure was successfully applied for determination of the copper, lead and cadmium contents in real samples, i.e., river water and biological samples.

  5. Leaf water and plant wax hydrogen isotopes in a European sample network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. B.; Kahmen, A.

    2014-12-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition of plant waxes in sediments is now routinely used as a hydroclimate proxy. This application is based largely on empirical calibrations that have demonstrated continental-scale correlations between source water and lipid hydrogen isotope values. But at smaller spatial scales and for individual locations it is increasingly recognized that factors that modify apparent fractionation between source water and leaf lipid hydrogen isotope values must also be considered. Isotopic enrichment of leaf water during transpiration is key among these secondary factors, and is itself sensitive to changes in hydroclimate. Leaf water enrichment also occurs prior to photosynthetic water uptake, and is therefore independent from cellular-level biomarker synthesis. Recent advances in theory have permitted mechanistic models to be developed that can be used to predict the mean leaf water hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition from readily available meteorological variables. This permits global-scale isoscape maps of leaf water isotopic composition and enrichment above source water to be generated, but these models have not been widely validated at continental spatial scales. We have established a network of twenty-one sites across Europe where we are sampling for leaf-, xylem-, and soil-water isotopes (H and O) at approximately 5-week intervals over the summer growing season. We augment the sample set with weekly to monthly precipitation samples and early- and late-season plant wax lipid samples. Collaborators at each site are conducting the sampling, and most sites are members of the FLUXNET tower network that also record high-resolution meteorological data. We present information on the implementation of the network and preliminary results from the 2014 summer season. The complete dataset will be used to track the evolution of water isotopes from source to leaf water and from leaf water to lipid hydrogen across diverse environments. This will provide

  6. Cyto- and genotoxic potential of water samples from polluted areas in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alija, Avdulla J; Bajraktari, Ismet D; Bresgen, Nikolaus; Bojaxhi, Ekramije; Krenn, Margit; Asllani, Fisnik; Eckl, Peter M

    2016-09-01

    Reports on the state of the environment in Kosovo have emphasized that river and ground water quality is affected by pollution from untreated urban water as well as the waste water from the industry. One of the main contributors to this pollution is located in Obiliq (coal power plants). Prishtina-the capital city of Kosovo-is heavily influenced too. Furthermore, the pollutants combined together with those from heavy traffic are dissolved in Prishtina runoff water, which is discharged into the creek entering the river Sitnica together with urban waste water. The available data show the complex pollution with excessive quantities of nitrites, suspended materials, organic compounds, detergents, heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, etc. In this study, the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of water samples taken at these sites was tested in primary rat hepatocytes. The results obtained indicate that water samples collected in Prishtina and Obiliq had a significant cytotoxic potential in primary rat hepatocyte cultures even when diluted to 1 %. The increased cytotoxicity, however, was not accompanied by an increased genotoxicity as measured by the percentage of micronucleated cells. Further investigations addressing the chemical composition of the samples and the identification of the toxicants responsible for the cytotoxic effects found will be carried out in a next step.

  7. Study of neutron spectra in a water bath from a Pb target irradiated by 250 MeV protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Ju, Yong-Qin; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Chen, Liang; Ge, Hong-Lin; Wan, Bo; Luo, Peng; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Li, Jian-Yang; Xu, Jun-Kui; Wang, Song-Lin; Yang, Yong-Wei; Yang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Spallation neutrons were produced by the irradiation of Pb with 250 MeV protons. The Pb target was surrounded by water which was used to slow down the emitted neutrons. The moderated neutrons in the water bath were measured by using the resonance detectors of Au, Mn and In with a cadmium (Cd) cover. According to the measured activities of the foils, the neutron flux at different resonance energies were deduced and the epithermal neutron spectra were proposed. Corresponding results calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX were compared with the experimental data to check the validity of the code. The comparison showed that the simulation could give a good prediction for the neutron spectra above 50 eV, while the finite thickness of the foils greatly effected the experimental data in low energy. It was also found that the resonance detectors themselves had great impact on the simulated energy spectra. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation and Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (11305229, 11105186, 91226107, 91026009, XDA03030300)

  8. Laser irradiation in water for the novel, scalable synthesis of black TiOx photocatalyst for environmental remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbone, Massimo; Boutinguiza, Mohamed; Privitera, Vittorio; Grimaldi, Maria Grazia

    2017-01-01

    Since 1970, TiO2 photocatalysis has been considered a possible alternative for sustainable water treatment. This is due to its material stability, abundance, nontoxicity and high activity. Unfortunately, its wide band gap (≈3.2 eV) in the UV portion of the spectrum makes it inefficient under solar illumination. Recently, so-called “black TiO2” has been proposed as a candidate to overcome this issue. However, typical synthesis routes require high hydrogen pressure and long annealing treatments. In this work, we present an industrially scalable synthesis of TiO2-based material based on laser irradiation. The resulting black TiOx shows a high activity and adsorbs visible radiation, overcoming the main concerns related to the use of TiO2 under solar irradiation. We employed a commercial high repetition rate green laser in order to synthesize a black TiOx layer and we demonstrate the scalability of the present methodology. The photocatalyst is composed of a nanostructured titanate film (TiOx) synthetized on a titanium foil, directly back-contacted to a layer of Pt nanoparticles (PtNps) deposited on the rear side of the same foil. The result is a monolithic photochemical diode with a stacked, layered structure (TiOx/Ti/PtNps). The resulting high photo-efficiency is ascribed to both the scavenging of electrons by Pt nanoparticles and the presence of trap surface states for holes in an amorphous hydrogenated TiOx layer. PMID:28243557

  9. Laser irradiation in water for the novel, scalable synthesis of black TiOx photocatalyst for environmental remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Zimbone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1970, TiO2 photocatalysis has been considered a possible alternative for sustainable water treatment. This is due to its material stability, abundance, nontoxicity and high activity. Unfortunately, its wide band gap (≈3.2 eV in the UV portion of the spectrum makes it inefficient under solar illumination. Recently, so-called “black TiO2” has been proposed as a candidate to overcome this issue. However, typical synthesis routes require high hydrogen pressure and long annealing treatments. In this work, we present an industrially scalable synthesis of TiO2-based material based on laser irradiation. The resulting black TiOx shows a high activity and adsorbs visible radiation, overcoming the main concerns related to the use of TiO2 under solar irradiation. We employed a commercial high repetition rate green laser in order to synthesize a black TiOx layer and we demonstrate the scalability of the present methodology. The photocatalyst is composed of a nanostructured titanate film (TiOx synthetized on a titanium foil, directly back-contacted to a layer of Pt nanoparticles (PtNps deposited on the rear side of the same foil. The result is a monolithic photochemical diode with a stacked, layered structure (TiOx/Ti/PtNps. The resulting high photo-efficiency is ascribed to both the scavenging of electrons by Pt nanoparticles and the presence of trap surface states for holes in an amorphous hydrogenated TiOx layer.

  10. Laser irradiation in water for the novel, scalable synthesis of black TiO x photocatalyst for environmental remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbone, Massimo; Cacciato, Giuseppe; Boutinguiza, Mohamed; Privitera, Vittorio; Grimaldi, Maria Grazia

    2017-01-01

    Since 1970, TiO2 photocatalysis has been considered a possible alternative for sustainable water treatment. This is due to its material stability, abundance, nontoxicity and high activity. Unfortunately, its wide band gap (≈3.2 eV) in the UV portion of the spectrum makes it inefficient under solar illumination. Recently, so-called "black TiO2" has been proposed as a candidate to overcome this issue. However, typical synthesis routes require high hydrogen pressure and long annealing treatments. In this work, we present an industrially scalable synthesis of TiO2-based material based on laser irradiation. The resulting black TiO x shows a high activity and adsorbs visible radiation, overcoming the main concerns related to the use of TiO2 under solar irradiation. We employed a commercial high repetition rate green laser in order to synthesize a black TiO x layer and we demonstrate the scalability of the present methodology. The photocatalyst is composed of a nanostructured titanate film (TiO x ) synthetized on a titanium foil, directly back-contacted to a layer of Pt nanoparticles (PtNps) deposited on the rear side of the same foil. The result is a monolithic photochemical diode with a stacked, layered structure (TiO x /Ti/PtNps). The resulting high photo-efficiency is ascribed to both the scavenging of electrons by Pt nanoparticles and the presence of trap surface states for holes in an amorphous hydrogenated TiO x layer.

  11. Comparison of POCIS passive samplers vs. composite water sampling: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criquet, Justine; Dumoulin, David; Howsam, Michael; Mondamert, Leslie; Goossens, Jean-François; Prygiel, Jean; Billon, Gabriel

    2017-12-31

    The relevance of Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS) was evaluated for the assessment of concentrations of 46 pesticides and 19 pharmaceuticals in a small, peri-urban river with multi-origin inputs. Throughout the period of POCIS deployment, 24h-average water samples were collected automatically, and showed the rapid temporal evolution of concentrations of several micropollutants, as well as permitting the calculation of average concentrations in the water phase for comparison with those estimated from POCIS passive samplers. In the daily water samples, cyproconazol, epoxyconazol and imidacloprid showed high temporal variations with concentrations ranging from under the limit of detection up to several hundreds of ngL(-1). Erythromycin, cyprofloxacin and iopromide also increased rapidly up to tens of ngL(-1) within a few days. Conversely, atrazine, caffeine, diclofenac, and to a lesser extent carbamazepine and sucralose, were systematically present in the water samples and showed limited variation in concentrations. For most of the substances studied here, the passive samplers gave reliable average concentrations between the minimal and maximal daily concentrations during the time of deployment. For pesticides, a relatively good correlation was clearly established (R(2)=0.89) between the concentrations obtained by POCIS and those gained from average water samples. A slight underestimation of the concentration by POCIS can be attributed to inappropriate sampling rates extracted from the literature and for our system, and new values are proposed. Considering the all data set, 75% of the results indicate a relatively good agreement between the POCIS and the average water samples concentration (values of the ratio ranging between 0,33 and 3). Note further that this agreement between these concentrations remains valid considering different sampling rates extracted from the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of holding time and measurement error on culturing Legionella in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanders, W Dana; Kirkland, Kimberly H; Shelton, Brian G

    2014-10-01

    Outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease require environmental testing of water samples from potentially implicated building water systems to identify the source of exposure. A previous study reports a large impact on Legionella sample results due to shipping and delays in sample processing. Specifically, this same study, without accounting for measurement error, reports more than half of shipped samples tested had Legionella levels that arbitrarily changed up or down by one or more logs, and the authors attribute this result to shipping time. Accordingly, we conducted a study to determine the effects of sample holding/shipping time on Legionella sample results while taking into account measurement error, which has previously not been addressed. We analyzed 159 samples, each split into 16 aliquots, of which one-half (8) were processed promptly after collection. The remaining half (8) were processed the following day to assess impact of holding/shipping time. A total of 2544 samples were analyzed including replicates. After accounting for inherent measurement error, we found that the effect of holding time on observed Legionella counts was small and should have no practical impact on interpretation of results. Holding samples increased the root mean squared error by only about 3-8%. Notably, for only one of 159 samples, did the average of the 8 replicate counts change by 1 log. Thus, our findings do not support the hypothesis of frequent, significant (≥= 1 log10 unit) Legionella colony count changes due to holding.

  13. Contactless conductometric determination of methanol and ethanol in samples containing water after their electrophoretic desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tůma, Petr; Opekar, František

    2015-08-01

    Determination of the contents of methanol and ethanol in aqueous solutions was performed by measuring the permittivity of solutions using a contactless conductivity detector (C(4) D) normally used for detection in capillary electrophoresis. The detection cell is a section of a fused silica capillary with an internal diameter of 50 μm with a pair of conductivity electrodes on the external walls. The C(4) D response to samples of methanol/water and ethanol/water mixtures is linear in the concentration interval of approx. 40-100% v/v alcohol content. In the analysis of technical samples of methanol and ethanol, the determination is disturbed by the presence of even trace amounts of salts. This interference can be effectively eliminated by integrated electrophoretic desalination of the sample by the application of a direct current electric voltage with a magnitude of 10 kV to the capillary with the injected sample zone. Under these conditions, the ions migrate out of the sample zone and the detector response is controlled purely by the permittivity of the solvent/water zone. Desalinating is effective for NaCl contents in the range from 0 to 5 mmol/L NaCl. The effectiveness of the desalinating process has been verified on MeOH/water samples and in determination of the ethanol content in distilled beverages normally available in the retail network.

  14. Pathogenic Vibrio Strains Isolated from Human Stool and Water Samples from Western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselida Achieng Owuor

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Investigate the type of pathogenic Vibrio strains from water and stool samples collected from Migori, SonduMiriu, Nyando and Yala regions in Western Kenya. Methods: A total of 811 samples (596 water and 215 stool samples were collected during the study periods of May to December 2013 and August to September 2014. Pathogenic Vibrio strains were identified through culturing in TCBS Agar, followed by oxidation, string and serological (polyvalent tests, respectively. The PCR analysis was done using combined primers targeting Vibrionaceae 16SrRNA and species specific primers for V. vulnificus and V. cholerae. Results: The results showed the presence of V. vulnificus and V. cholerae. However, V. parahaemolyticus was not found in any of the samples. The PCR results for 16SrRNA, Vib 1, and Vib 2 showed polymorphism in the genes, this was an indication of cross combination of genes from more than one strain in one isolate. Conclusion: The study showed the presence of V. cholerae (Ogawa and Inaba in water and human stool samples. Type B V. vulnificus was detected in the water sample collected from River Migori. This information is of essence in controlling and managing cholera in the western part of Kenya. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(1: 1-7

  15. Active Sampling Device for Determining Pollutants in Surface and Pore Water - the In Situ Sampler for Biphasic Water Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supowit, Samuel D.; Roll, Isaac B.; Dang, Viet D.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2016-02-01

    We designed and evaluated an active sampling device, using as analytical targets a family of pesticides purported to contribute to honeybee colony collapse disorder. Simultaneous sampling of bulk water and pore water was accomplished using a low-flow, multi-channel pump to deliver water to an array of solid-phase extraction cartridges. Analytes were separated using either liquid or gas chromatography, and analysis was performed using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Achieved recoveries of fipronil and degradates in water spiked to nominal concentrations of 0.1, 1, and 10 ng/L ranged from 77 ± 12 to 110 ± 18%. Method detection limits (MDLs) were as low as 0.040-0.8 ng/L. Extraction and quantitation of total fiproles at a wastewater-receiving wetland yielded concentrations in surface water and pore water ranging from 9.9 ± 4.6 to 18.1 ± 4.6 ng/L and 9.1 ± 3.0 to 12.6 ± 2.1 ng/L, respectively. Detected concentrations were statistically indistinguishable from those determined by conventional, more laborious techniques (p > 0.2 for the three most abundant fiproles). Aside from offering time-averaged sampling capabilities for two phases simultaneously with picogram-per-liter MDLs, the novel methodology eliminates the need for water and sediment transport via in situ solid phase extraction.

  16. Catalyzed Water Oxidation by Solar Irradiation of Band-Gap-Narrowed Semiconductors (Part 1. Overview).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita,E.; Khalifah, P.; Lymar, S.; Muckerman, J.T.; Rodgriguez, J.

    2008-03-18

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Investigate the catalysis of water oxidation by cobalt and manganese hydrous oxides immobilized on titania or silica nanoparticles, and dinuclear metal complexes with quinonoid ligands in order to develop a better understanding of the critical water oxidation chemistry, and rationally search for improved catalysts. (2) Optimize the light-harvesting and charge-separation abilities of stable semiconductors including both a focused effort to improve the best existing materials by investigating their structural and electronic properties using a full suite of characterization tools, and a parallel effort to discover and characterize new materials. (3) Combine these elements to examine the function of oxidation catalysts on Band-Gap-Narrowed Semiconductor (BGNSC) surfaces and elucidate the core scientific challenges to the efficient coupling of the materials functions.

  17. Femtosecond laser irradiation of the fluorescent molecules-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Taiga; Shibata, Akimichi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2017-09-01

    Molecular release from scaffolds is desired for tailoring cell-compatible tissue engineering. Several methods have been proposed to control molecular release, such as annealing, plasma treatment, and laser processing. In this study, we describe the alteration of Rhodamine B (RhB)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) after femtosecond laser irradiation, which was evaluated on the basis of the water absorption and mass remaining. Fluorescence measurement of released RhB molecules revealed the acceleration of the molecular release upon 400-nm laser irradiation, whereas 800-nm laser irradiation did not induce a comparable degree of change compared with non-irradiated samples. The result of the water absorption measurement indicates that the large amount of water absorption of 400-nm laser-irradiated PLGA sample may accelerate the diffusion of the loaded molecules through absorbing water, which resulted in the faster molecular release.

  18. Spectrophotometric analysis of irradiated spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josimovic, L.; Cudina, I.

    1987-01-01

    Seven different spices (thyme, cinnamon, coriander, caraway, pimento, paprika, black pepper) were treated by gamma radiation at an absorbed dose of 10 kGy, and the effect on chemical quality was determined. The effects of this dose were assessed by spectrophotometric analysis of some water-soluble constituents of spices (carbohydrates; carbonyl compounds) and on the content of water-insoluble steam-volatile oils. The colour of paprika and the content of piperine in pepper held in different packaging materials were measured in unirradiated and irradiated samples as a function of storage time. In all cases irradiation does not bring about any distinct qualitative or quantitative chemical changes based on spectrophotometric analysis of spice extracts.

  19. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SELECTED GROUND WATER SAMPLES OF RURAL AREAS OF JAIPUR, RAJASTHAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Dhingra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to assess the status of the groundwater in rural areas of Jaipur city. People on globe are under tremendous threat due to undesired changes in the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of air, water and soil. Due to increased population, urbanization, industrialization, use of fertilizers water is highly polluted with different harmful contaminants Natural water resources are being contaminated due to weathering of rocks and leaching of soil, mining processing etc. It is necessary that quality of drinking water should be checked at regular time interval to prevent various water born diseases. In present analysis physico-chemical parameter of drinking water viz. pH, hardness, TDS, residual chlorine, dissolved oxygen, electrical conductivity, Free CO2 have been analyzed. Drinking water quality of 8 villages of Amber District Jaipur, Rajasthan was analyzed to identify the nature and quality of water. The drinking water samples were collected in clean polythene one liter cans and subjected for analysis in laboratory. The main objective of the present paper is to aware people of concerned area about the water quality and concerned health hazards.

  20. Using SPMDs for monitoring hydrophobic organic compounds in urban river water in Korea compared with using conventional water grab samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Un-Jung; Kim, Hee Young; Alvarez, David A.; Lee, In-Seok; Oh, Jeong-Eun

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to verify the effectiveness of semi-permeablemembrane devices (SPMDs) formonitoring hydrophobic organic compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), that are not easy to detect using conventional grab samples (because of their low concentrations), in water.We used SPMDs and grab samples to monitor PCBs and PBDEs upstream and downstream of a sewage treatment plant (STP) in the Suyeong River in Busan, Korea. Concentrations in three different phases (freely dissolved, apparently dissolved, and particulate) were measured, to investigate the aquatic fate of PCBs and PBDEs. The freely dissolved (SPMD) concentrations were 2–3 times higher than the apparently dissolved and particulate phase (grab sample) concentrations. No meaningful relationships were found between the total PCB and PBDE concentrations of the grab sample and SPMD sample because of the different partitioning behaviors and detection frequencies of the individual chemicals. However, the summed concentrations of specific PCB and PBDE congeners (that were abundant in all samples) in the grab and SPMD samples correlated well (r2 = 0.7451 for PCBs 28 + 52 + 153, r2 = 0.9987 for PBDEs 28 + 47 + 99). The PBDE concentrations measured using SPMDs decreased with increasing distance from the STP, but no apparent dilution effect was found in the grab samples. Our results show that SPMDs could be used to support grab sampling for specific chemicals, or to trace chemical sources (such as STPs) to the aquatic environment.

  1. Application of ZnO single crystals for light-induced water splitting under UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhak, Yuriy, E-mail: suhak@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Izdebska, Katarzyna; Skupiński, Paweł; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Reszka, Anna; Sybilski, Piotr; Kowalski, Bogdan J.; Mycielski, Andrzej; Zytkiewicz, Zbigniew R. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Soszko, Michał [Industrial Chemistry Research Institute, Rydygiera 8, 01-793 Warsaw (Poland); Suchocki, Andrzej [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Physics, University of Bydgoszcz, Weyssenhoffa 11, 85-072 Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    2014-02-14

    This paper presents experimental results of implementation of ZnO single crystals as photoanodes in photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells for hydrogen generation through the process of water splitting. Both, as-grown and O{sub 2}-annealed ZnO single crystals were investigated for this purpose. A 351 nm argon laser line was used as the light source. The XRD investigations showed that used ZnO crystals are of good crystalline quality. It was found that the as-grown ZnO single crystals possess higher conversion efficiencies comparing to the O{sub 2}-annealed one. The photocurrent density was found to increase significantly with the increase of external bias applied and excitation light intensity. Time dependent photocurrent density characteristics showed that the decay of photocurrent density was not observed within the measurement time. The differences in behaviour of the as-grown and the annealed in O{sub 2} ZnO single crystals are discussed in terms of crystals intrinsic defects. - Highlights: • ZnO single crystals show excellent performance as photoanodes for water splitting. • ZnO single crystals showed good stability in aqueous solution. • Mid-gap band state introduction does not influence the efficiency of water splitting.

  2. Detection of Flavobacterium psychrophilum from fish tissue and water samples by PCR amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, T.; Madsen, Lone; Bruun, Morten Sichlau

    2000-01-01

    Rainbow trout fry syndrome and cold-water disease, caused by Flavobacterium psychrophilum, are important diseases in farmed salmonids. Some of the presently available techniques for the detection of Fl. psychrophilum are either time consuming or lack sufficient sensitivity. In the present...... investigation, the possible detection of Fl. psychrophilum from fish tissue and water samples was examined using nested PCR with DNA probes against a sequence of the 16S rRNA genes. The DNA was extracted using Chelex(R) 100 chelating resin. The primers, which were tested against strains isolated from diseased...... to be more sensitive than agar cultivation of tissue samples from the brain of rainbow trout injected with Fl. psychrophilum. In non-sterile fresh water seeded with Fl. psychrophilum the detection limit of the PCR- assay was 1.7 cfu in the PCR tube, corresponding to 110 cfu ml(-1) water. The PCR...

  3. Study of electromagnetic and acoustic emission in creep experiments of water-containing rock samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Hong-wen; ZHANG Zhong-yu; XU Guo-an

    2008-01-01

    Based on biaxial shear creep tests conducted on rock samples with different water contents, we present the results of our study on the regularities of electromagnetic and acoustic emission during the process of creep experiments in which we have ana-lyzed the contribution of water to the occurrence of electromagnetic radiation. The result shows that in the creep-fracturing course of rock samples, when the water content increases, the initial frequency and amplitude of electromagnetic and acoustic emission also increases, but at a decreasing growth rate caused by loading stress. This can be used as a criterion for the long-term stability of rock masses under conditions of repeated inundation and discharge of water.

  4. Effect of gamma irradiation on the physicochemical properties of alkali-extracted rice starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwar, Bilal Ahmad; Shah, Asima; Gani, Asir; Rather, Sajad Ahmad; Wani, Sajad Mohd.; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Masoodi, Farooq Ahmad; Gani, Adil

    2014-06-01

    Starches isolated from two newly released rice varieties (K-322 and K-448) were subject to irradiation at 0, 5, 10, and 20 kGy doses. Comparative study between native (not irradiated) and irradiated starch samples was carried out to evaluate the changes in physicochemical, morphological and pasting properties due to gamma irradiation. Significant decrease was found in apparent amylose content, pH, swelling power, syneresis, and pasting properties, whereas carboxyl content, water absorption capacity, and transmittance were found to increase with the increase in irradiation dose. Granule morphology of native and irradiated starches under scanning electron microscope revealed that granules were polygonal or irregular in shape. The starch granules were somewhat deformed by gamma irradiation. X-ray diffraction pattern showed A type of pattern in native as well as irradiated starches.

  5. Lead Concentration Levels in Water Samples Collected in Alameda County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethy, D.; Hoang, R.; Yu, I.; Hernandez, N.; Fang, K.; Zhang, W.; Li, J.; Munui, K. N.; Sot, R.; Luong, K.; Bonzo, R.; Sankar, R.; Chiu, D.; Rodriguez, V. A.

    2016-12-01

    The recent health crisis in Flint, Michigan has attracted an amount of interest in other public utilities' water supplies and infrastructure with regards to concerns over the presence of lead. In an effort to begin assessing the potential for a health crisis similar to that experienced in Flynt, during 2016 our team measured lead concentration levels in water samples by collected in Alameda County. More than 12 sites were selected from which samples were collected. These sites included parks, schools, and private residences. At each site 500mL samples were collected and prepared for later analysis. Samples were subjected to an analytical chemistry technique designed to isolate and concentrate lead to detectable levels of 1 part per billion (ppb). All 8 samples yielded detectable levels of lead; all samples were also well below the EPA regulatory 15 ppb. Two samples collected in West Oakland parks were found to have the highest and lowest levels: DeFremery (4 ppb) and Raimondi (1ppb), respectively. Though preliminary in nature, results from this study suggest that further investigations should be undertaken to assess possible lead contamination associated with drinking water sources in Alameda County.

  6. Water column and bed-sediment core samples collected from Brownlee Reservoir near Oxbow, Oregon, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosness, Ryan L.; Naymik, Jesse; Hopkins, Candice B.; DeWild, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Idaho Power Company, collected water-column and bed-sediment core samples from eight sites in Brownlee Reservoir near Oxbow, Oregon, during May 5–7, 2012. Water-column and bed-sediment core samples were collected at each of the eight sites and analyzed for total mercury and methylmercury. Additional bed-sediment core samples, collected from three of the eight sites, were analyzed for pesticides and other organic compounds, trace metals, and physical characteristics, such as particle size. Total mercury and methylmercury were detected in each of the water column and bed-sediment core samples. Only 17 of the 417 unique pesticide and organic compounds were detected in bed-sediment core samples. Concentrations of most organic wastewater compounds detected in bed sediment were less than the reporting level. Trace metals detected were greater than the reporting level in all the bed-sediment core samples submitted for analysis. The particle size distribution of bed-sediment core samples was predominantly clay mixed with silt.

  7. Detection by PCR of pathogenic protozoa in raw and drinkable water samples in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triviño-Valencia, Jessica; Lora, Fabiana; Zuluaga, Juan David; Gomez-Marin, Jorge E

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the presence of DNA of Giardia, Toxoplasma, and Cryptosporidium by PCR, and of Giardia and Cryptosporidium genera by immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT), in water samples, before, during, and after plant treatment for drinkable water. We applied this method in 38 samples of 10 l of water taken from each of the water treatment steps and in 8 samples taken at home (only for Toxoplasma PCR) in Quindio region in Colombia. There were 8 positive samples for Cryptosporidium parvum (21 %), 4 for Cryptosporidium hominis (10.5 %), 27 for Toxoplasma gondii (58.6 %), 2 for Giardia duodenalis assemblage A (5.2 %), and 5 for G. duodenalis assemblage B (13.1 %). By IFAT, 23 % were positive for Giardia and 21 % for Cryptosporidium. An almost perfect agreement was found between IFAT and combined results of PCR, by Kappa composite proportion analysis. PCR positive samples were significantly more frequent in untreated raw water for C. parvum (p = 0.02). High mean of fecal coliforms, high pH values, and low mean of chlorine residuals were strongly correlated with PCR positivity for G. duodenalis assemblage B. High pH value was correlated with PCR positivity for C. parvum. Phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences was possible, showing water and human clinical sequences for Toxoplasma within the same phylogenetic group for B1 repeated sequence. PCR assay is complementary to IFAT assay for monitoring of protozoa in raw and drinkable water, enabling species identification and to look for phylogenetic analysis in protozoa from human and environmental sources.

  8. The correlation of arsenic levels in drinking water with the biological samples of skin disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: tgkazi@yahoo.com; Arain, Muhammad Balal [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: bilal_ku2004@yahoo.com; Baig, Jameel Ahmed [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: jab_mughal@yahoo.com; Jamali, Muhammad Khan [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: mkhanjamali@yahoo.com; Afridi, Hassan Imran [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: hassanimranafridi@yahoo.com; Jalbani, Nusrat [Pakistan Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, University Road Karachi-75280 (Pakistan)], E-mail: nusratjalbani_21@yahoo.com; Sarfraz, Raja Adil [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: rajaadilsarfraz@gmail.com; Shah, Abdul Qadir [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: aqshah07@yahoo.com; Niaz, Abdul [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: niazchemist2k6@yahoo.com

    2009-01-15

    Arsenic (As) poisoning has become a worldwide public health concern. The skin is quite sensitive to As and skin lesions are the most common and earliest nonmalignant effects associated to chronic As exposure. In 2005-2007, a survey was carried out on surface and groundwater arsenic contamination and relationships between As exposure via the drinking water and related adverse health effects (melanosis and keratosis) on villagers resides on the banks of Manchar lake, southern part of Sindh, Pakistan. We screened the population from arsenic-affected villages, 61 to 73% population were identified patients suffering from chronic arsenic toxicity. The effects of As toxicity via drinking water were estimated by biological samples (scalp hair and blood) of adults (males and females), have or have not skin problem (n = 187). The referent samples of both genders were also collected from the areas having low level of As (< 10 {mu}g/L) in drinking water (n = 121). Arsenic concentration in drinking water and biological samples were analyzed using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The range of arsenic concentrations in lake surface water was 35.2-158 {mu}g/L, which is 3-15 folds higher than World Health Organization [WHO, 2004. Guidelines for drinking-water quality third ed., WHO Geneva Switzerland.]. It was observed that As concentration in the scalp hair and blood samples were above the range of permissible values 0.034-0.319 {mu}g As/g for hair and < 0.5-4.2 {mu}g/L for blood. The linear regressions showed good correlations between arsenic concentrations in water versus hair and blood samples of exposed skin diseased subjects (R{sup 2} = 0.852 and 0.718) as compared to non-diseased subjects (R{sup 2} = 0.573 and 0.351), respectively.

  9. Field portable mobile phone based fluorescence microscopy for detection of Giardia lamblia cysts in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan Koydemir, Hatice; Gorocs, Zoltan; McLeod, Euan; Tseng, Derek; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-01

    Giardia lamblia is a waterborne parasite that causes an intestinal infection, known as giardiasis, and it is found not only in countries with inadequate sanitation and unsafe water but also streams and lakes of developed countries. Simple, sensitive, and rapid detection of this pathogen is important for monitoring of drinking water. Here we present a cost-effective and field portable mobile-phone based fluorescence microscopy platform designed for automated detection of Giardia lamblia cysts in large volume water samples (i.e., 10 ml) to be used in low-resource field settings. This fluorescence microscope is integrated with a disposable water-sampling cassette, which is based on a flow-through porous polycarbonate membrane and provides a wide surface area for fluorescence imaging and enumeration of the captured Giardia cysts on the membrane. Water sample of interest, containing fluorescently labeled Giardia cysts, is introduced into the absorbent pads that are in contact with the membrane in the cassette by capillary action, which eliminates the need for electrically driven flow for sample processing. Our fluorescence microscope weighs ~170 grams in total and has all the components of a regular microscope, capable of detecting individual fluorescently labeled cysts under light-emitting-diode (LED) based excitation. Including all the sample preparation, labeling and imaging steps, the entire measurement takes less than one hour for a sample volume of 10 ml. This mobile phone based compact and cost-effective fluorescent imaging platform together with its machine learning based cyst counting interface is easy to use and can even work in resource limited and field settings for spatio-temporal monitoring of water quality.

  10. Assessment of Heavy Metals in Water Samples of Certain Locations Situated Around Tumkur, Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vijaya Bhaskar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface water and groundwater samples of certain locations namely Kallambella, Bugudanahalli, Maidala, Honnudike, Kunigal, Kadaba and Hebbur, situated around Tumkur were assessed in the month of September 2008 for pH, EC and heavy metals Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Zn and Ni. The pH vales of surface waters were in alkaline range of 7.8-8.2 and are well within safe limits for crop production. The pH of ground- water was in the range of 7.6-8.4. The conductivity was in the range of 0.20-0.68 mS/cm and 0.34-2.44 mS/cm for surface and groundwaters respectively. High EC value of Kallambella groundwater accounts for its salinity. All surface waters except Honnudike and Hebbur samples contain low concentrations of these metals and are ideal for irrigation. Though the samples from Honnudike, Kadaba and Hebbur have high iron concentration, only Honnudike and Hebbur samples have exceeded the limit of 5 mg/L required for irrigation. In groundwaters the concentrations of all these heavy metals except copper are also well in permissible limits and suitable for drinking. Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn were detected in all the samples and found in the range of 0.094-0.131, 0.958-12.537, 0.020-0.036 and 0.082-1.139 mg/L respectively in surface waters and these are in the range of 0.132-0.142, 0.125-1.014, 0.028-0.036 and 0.003-0.037 mg/L in ground- waters. The elements cadmium, mercury and manganese are absent in all the samples.

  11. Quantitative Detection of Trace Malachite Green in Aquiculture Water Samples by Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaowei; Yang, Shuiping; Chingin, Konstantin; Zhu, Liang; Zhang, Xinglei; Zhou, Zhiquan; Zhao, Zhanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to malachite green (MG) may pose great health risks to humans; thus, it is of prime importance to develop fast and robust methods to quantitatively screen the presence of malachite green in water. Herein the application of extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) has been extended to the trace detection of MG within lake water and aquiculture water, due to the intensive use of MG as a biocide in fisheries. This method has the advantage of obviating offline liquid-liquid extraction or tedious matrix separation prior to the measurement of malachite green in native aqueous medium. The experimental results indicate that the extrapolated detection limit for MG was ~3.8 μg·L(-1) (S/N = 3) in lake water samples and ~0.5 μg·L(-1) in ultrapure water under optimized experimental conditions. The signal intensity of MG showed good linearity over the concentration range of 10-1000 μg·L(-1). Measurement of practical water samples fortified with MG at 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg·L(-1) gave a good validation of the established calibration curve. The average recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) of malachite green in lake water and Carassius carassius fish farm effluent water were 115% (6.64% RSD), 85.4% (9.17% RSD) and 96.0% (7.44% RSD), respectively. Overall, the established EESI-MS/MS method has been demonstrated suitable for sensitive and rapid (<2 min per sample) quantitative detection of malachite green in various aqueous media, indicating its potential for online real-time monitoring of real life samples.

  12. Demonstration/Validation of the Snap Sampler Passive Ground Water Sampling Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    direction, although the direction of groundwater movement locally is influenced by water -supply wells and by groundwater extraction and treatment systems...Validation of the Snap Sampler Passive Ground Water Sampling Device June 2011 i COST & PERFORMANCE REPORT Project: ER-200630 TABLE OF CONTENTS...range of analyte types. These included dissolved and total inorganics (including non-metal anions, metalloids , and metals) and four volatile organic

  13. SAMPLING AND ANALYTICAL METHOD FOR GEOCHEMICAL SURVEY OF DISSOLVED GASES IN BRACKISH THERMAL WATERS

    OpenAIRE

    Liotta, Marcello; Martelli, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Dissolved gases are often utilized in geochemical studies for investigating hydrothermal and/or magmatic contributions to shallow aquifers. Between the several methods applied for analyzing dissolved gases in water, the head space equilibration technique is probably the most used because it does not require any strain before or during the water sampling in the field and can be adapted to various aims in the laboratory, with multispecies analysis by common gas chromatography. This type of tech...

  14. Exploring water cycle dynamics by sampling multiple stable water isotope pools in a developed landscape in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowski, Natalie; Kraft, Philipp; Pferdmenges, Jakob; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-09-01

    A dual stable water isotope (δ2H and δ18O) study was conducted in the developed (managed) landscape of the Schwingbach catchment (Germany). The 2-year weekly to biweekly measurements of precipitation, stream, and groundwater isotopes revealed that surface and groundwater are isotopically disconnected from the annual precipitation cycle but showed bidirectional interactions between each other. Apparently, snowmelt played a fundamental role for groundwater recharge explaining the observed differences to precipitation δ values. A spatially distributed snapshot sampling of soil water isotopes at two soil depths at 52 sampling points across different land uses (arable land, forest, and grassland) revealed that topsoil isotopic signatures were similar to the precipitation input signal. Preferential water flow paths occurred under forested soils, explaining the isotopic similarities between top- and subsoil isotopic signatures. Due to human-impacted agricultural land use (tilling and compression) of arable and grassland soils, water delivery to the deeper soil layers was reduced, resulting in significant different isotopic signatures. However, the land use influence became less pronounced with depth and soil water approached groundwater δ values. Seasonally tracing stable water isotopes through soil profiles showed that the influence of new percolating soil water decreased with depth as no remarkable seasonality in soil isotopic signatures was obvious at depths > 0.9 m and constant values were observed through space and time. Since classic isotope evaluation methods such as transfer-function-based mean transit time calculations did not provide a good fit between the observed and calculated data, we established a hydrological model to estimate spatially distributed groundwater ages and flow directions within the Vollnkirchener Bach subcatchment. Our model revealed that complex age dynamics exist within the subcatchment and that much of the runoff must has been stored

  15. Set Up of an Automatic Water Quality Sampling System in Irrigation Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Emanuel; Kraft, Philipp; Buchen, Caroline; Frede, Hans-Georg; Aquino, Eugenio; Breuer, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    Climate change has already a large impact on the availability of water resources. Many regions in South-East Asia are assumed to receive less water in the future, dramatically impacting the production of the most important staple food: rice (Oryza sativa L.). Rice is the primary food source for nearly half of the World's population, and is the only cereal that can grow under wetland conditions. Especially anaerobic (flooded) rice fields require high amounts of water but also have higher yields than aerobic produced rice. In the past different methods were developed to reduce the water use in rice paddies, like alternative wetting and drying or the use of mixed cropping systems with aerobic (non-flooded) rice and alternative crops such as maize. A more detailed understanding of water and nutrient cycling in rice-based cropping systems is needed to reduce water use, and requires the investigation of hydrological and biochemical processes as well as transport dynamics at the field scale. New developments in analytical devices permit monitoring parameters at high temporal resolutions and at acceptable costs without much necessary maintenance or analysis over longer periods. Here we present a new type of automatic sampling set-up that facilitates in situ analysis of hydrometric information, stable water isotopes and nitrate concentrations in spatially differentiated agricultural fields. The system facilitates concurrent monitoring of a large number of water and nutrient fluxes (ground, surface, irrigation and rain water) in irrigated agriculture. For this purpose we couple an automatic sampling system with a Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometry System (WS-CRDS) for stable water isotope analysis (δ2H and δ18O), a reagentless hyperspectral UV photometer for monitoring nitrate content and various water level sensors for hydrometric information. The whole system is maintained with special developed software for remote control of the system via internet. We

  16. Hydrochemical reactions and origin of offshore relatively fresh pore water from core samples in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Hiu Tung; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    2016-06-01

    The existence of relatively fresh pore water offshore has been well recognised over the globe but studies on the chemistry of the pore water from offshore geological formations are extremely limited. This study aims to characterize the hydrochemistry of the submarine groundwater body in Hong Kong. It looks into the major ion concentrations and the stable isotopic compositions of pore water extracted from core samples from an offshore 42.30-m vibrocore in the southwestern Hong Kong waters. A minimum Cl- level of about one-third of that in typical seawater was noted in the terrestrial sediments, suggesting the presence of offshore relatively fresh water. Unexpectedly high NH4+ levels are attributed to organic matter decomposition in the terrestrial sediments. The leaching of shells due to exposure of marine sediments at sea-level low stands raises the Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentrations. Base Exchange Indices show weak cation exchange reactions in which Na+ and K+ are released while Mg2+ and Ca2+ are adsorbed. Isotopic compositions of pore water reveal that the low-salinity water is probably the relic water sequestered in fluvial systems during relative sea-level low stands. Cores properly stored in a freezer for a long time has been used to study the pore water chemistry. For the first time, this study introduces an approach to correct the measured data by considering the possible evaporation effect during the transportation and storage of the samples. Corrections for evaporation were applied to the major ion concentrations and the stable isotopic compositions of pore water measured. It is found that the corrections determined by the Cl- mass balance approach are more reliable. The corrected measurements give more reasonable observations and hence allow sensible conclusions on the hydrochemical reactions and the origin of pore water.

  17. Demonstration of the Enhanced Disinfection of E. coli Water Contamination by Associated Solar Irradiation with Potassium Persulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    GHANIZADEH, Ghader; NASERI ARA, Ali; ESMAILI, Davoud; MASOUMBEIGI, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tremendous amount of researches have investigated the issue of water photodisnfection. The aim of this research is to illustrate the influences of bacterial density, turbidity, exposure time and potassium persulfate (KPS) dosage on the efficacy of associated solar disinfection (SODIS) with KPS for E. coli (ATCC: 25922) eradication as an efficient and inexpensive process. Methods: Desired bacterial density and turbidity was achieved by spiking of 0.5 Mc Farland (1.5×108 cell/ml) and sterile soil slurry in 1 liter of the commercially bottled water. Results: The highest value of UVA solar irradiation measured at 13.30 p.m was 5510 μW/Cm2. Increase of bacterial density from 1000 to 1500 cell/ml led to an increase in disinfection lapse time, except in 2 mMol/l KPS. Spiking of 0.1 mMol/l of KPS was not effective; however, increase of KPS dosage from 0.1 mMol/l to 0.7, 1.5 and 2 mMol/l led to the enhancement of disinfection time from 4 h to 3 h and 1 h, respectively. For bacterial density of 1000 cell/ml, increasing KPS dosage up to 0.7 mMol/l had no improved effect; however, beyond this dosage the disinfection time decreased to 1 h. Without KPS and up to 150 NTU within 4 h exposure time, E. coli disinfection was completed. In 2 mMol/l KPS and 1000 and 1500 cell/ml, the 2 h contact time was sufficient up to 150 and 100 NTU, respectively; moreover, complete disinfection was not achieved at higher turbidity. Conclusion: Association of KPS with SODIS can lead to decreasing of water disinfection time. PMID:26576351

  18. UV-Vis, infrared, and mass spectroscopy of electron irradiated frozen oxygen and carbon dioxide mixtures with water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I. [W. M. Keck Research Laboratory in Astrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Strazzulla, Giovanni [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-01

    Ozone has been detected on the surface of Ganymede via observation of the Hartley band through the use of ultraviolet spectroscopy and is largely agreed upon to be formed by radiolytic processing via interaction of magnetospheric energetic ions and/or electrons with oxygen-bearing ices on Ganymede's surface. Interestingly, a clearly distinct band near 300 nm within the shoulder of the UV-Vis spectrum of Ganymede was also observed, but currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. Consequently, the primary motivation behind this work was the collection of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy of ozone formation by energetic electron bombardment of a variety of oxygen-bearing ices (oxygen, carbon dioxide, water) relevant to this moon as well as other solar system. Ozone was indeed synthesized in pure ices of molecular oxygen, carbon dioxide and a mixture of water and oxygen, in agreement with previous studies. The Hartley band of the ozone synthesized in these ice mixtures was observed in the UV-Vis spectra and compared with the spectrum of Ganymede. In addition, a solid state ozone absorption cross section of 6.0 ± 0.6 × 10{sup –17} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup –1} was obtained from the UV-Vis spectral data. Ozone was not produced in the irradiated carbon dioxide-water mixtures; however, a spectrally 'red' UV continuum is observed and appears to reproduce well what is observed in a large number of icy moons such as Europa.

  19. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of trace amounts of lead in environmental water samples with complicated matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabarczyk M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive, simple and fast adsorptive stripping voltammetric procedure for trace determination of lead in environmental water samples has been developed. The method is based on adsorptive accumulation of the Pb(II-cupferron complex onto a hanging mercury drop electrode, followed by the reduction of the adsorbed species by a voltammetric scan using differential pulse modulation. The interference from surface active substances was eliminated by adsorption of interferents onto an Amberlite XAD-16 resin. Optimumconditions for removing the surfactants by mixing the analysed sample with resin were evaluated. The accuracy of the method was tested by analyzing certified reference material (SPS-WW1 Waste Water.

  20. Development of a protocol for sampling and analysis of ballast water in Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achsah A Mitchell

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of ballast by the international shipping industry has negatively impacted the environment. To design such a protocol for the area, the ballast water tanks of seven bulk cargo vessels entering a Jamaican port were sampled between January 28, 2010 and August 17, 2010. Vessels originated from five ports and used three main routes, some of which conducted ballast water exchange. Twenty-six preserved and 22 live replicate zooplankton samples were obtained. Abundance and richness were higher than at temperate ports. Exchange did not alter the biotic composition but reduced the abundance. Two of the live sample replicates, containing 31.67 and 16.75 viable individuals m-3, were non-compliant with the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments. Approximately 12% of the species identified in the ballast water were present in the waters nearest the port in 1995 and 11% were present in the entire bay in 2005. The protocol designed from this study can be used to aid the establishment of a ballast water management system in the Caribbean or used as a foundation for the development of further protocols.

  1. Field sampling of soil pore water to evaluate trace element mobility and associated environmental risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo, E-mail: eduardo.moreno@uam.es [Departamento de Quimica Agricola, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Beesley, Luke [James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom); Lepp, Nicholas W. [35, Victoria Road, Formby, Liverpool L37 7DH (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Nicholas M. [Department of Ecology, Lincoln University, Lincoln 7647, PO Box 84 (New Zealand); Hartley, William [School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Cockcroft Building, Salford, M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Clemente, Rafael [Dep. of Soil and Water Conservation and Organic Waste Management, CEBAS-CSIC, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, PO Box 164, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    Monitoring soil pollution is a key aspect in sustainable management of contaminated land but there is often debate over what should be monitored to assess ecological risk. Soil pore water, containing the most labile pollutant fraction in soils, can be easily collected in situ offering a routine way to monitor this risk. We present a compilation of data on concentration of trace elements (As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in soil pore water collected in field conditions from a range of polluted and non-polluted soils in Spain and the UK during single and repeated monitoring, and propose a simple eco-toxicity test using this media. Sufficient pore water could be extracted for analysis both under semi-arid and temperate conditions, and eco-toxicity comparisons could be effectively made between polluted and non-polluted soils. We propose that in-situ pore water extraction could enhance the realism of risk assessment at some contaminated sites. - Highlights: > In situ pore water sampling successfully evaluates trace elements mobility in soils. > Field sampling proved robust for different soils, sites and climatic regimes. > Measurements may be directly related to ecotoxicological assays. > Both short and long-term monitoring of polluted lands may be achieved. > This method complements other widely used assays for environmental risk assessment. - In situ pore water sampling from a wide variety of soils proves to be a beneficial application to monitor the stability of pollutants in soils and subsequent risk through mobility.

  2. [Rapid detection of rotavirus in water samples using immunomagnetic separation combined with real time PCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wan; He, Miao; Li, Dan; Shi, Han-Chang; Liu, Li

    2009-05-15

    A quantitative and rapid detection method for rotavirus in water samples was developed, by using immunomagnetic separation combined with reverse transcription and real time polymerase chain reaction (IMS-RT-real time PCR). Magnetic beads coated with antibodies directed against group A rotavirus were used to capture and purify the virus in water samples. The experimental results showed that IMS was optimized when 1 mL samples were supplemented with 10 microL of immunomagnetic beads, 2.5 microL of Tween 20 and incubated for 2 h. The IMS method was employed in the detection of rotavirus in seeded virus eluant such as 3% beef extract successfully and thus manifested its compatibility with established virus concentration methods. The IMS-RT-real time PCR method could yield quantitative results within about 5 h with a detection limit at 1 x 10(4) copies/mL (equivalent to 3-4 PFU/mL). The method exhibited a high level correlation (R2 = 0.9816) with cell culture assay, indicating that it could perform as well as cell culture assay does in infection tests. And the method functioned satisfactorily in seeded concentrate of secondary waste water treatment plant effluent, reclaimed water, surface water and tap water.

  3. Gross-beta activity in ground water: natural sources and artifacts of sampling and laboratory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Alan H.

    1995-01-01

    Gross-beta activity has been used as an indicator of beta-emitting isotopes in water since at least the early 1950s. Originally designed for detection of radioactive releases from nuclear facilities and weapons tests, analysis of gross-beta activity is widely used in studies of naturally occurring radioactivity in ground water. Analyses of about 800 samples from 5 ground-water regions of the United States provide a basis for evaluating the utility of this measurement. The data suggest that measured gross-beta activities are due to (1) long-lived radionuclides in ground water, and (2) ingrowth of beta-emitting radionuclides during holding times between collection of samples and laboratory measurements.Although40K and228Ra appear to be the primary sources of beta activity in ground water, the sum of40K plus228Ra appears to be less than the measured gross-beta activity in most ground-water samples. The difference between the contribution from these radionuclides and gross-beta activity is most pronounced in ground water with gross-beta activities > 10 pCi/L, where these 2 radionuclides account for less than one-half the measured ross-beta activity. One exception is groundwater from the Coastal Plain of New Jersey, where40K plus228Ra generally contribute most of the gross-beta activity. In contrast,40K and228Ra generally contribute most of beta activity in ground water with gross-beta activities measure all beta activity in ground water. Although3H contributes beta activity to some ground water, it is driven from the sample before counting and therefore is not detected by gross-beta measurements. Beta-emitting radionuclides with half-lives shorter than a few days can decay to low values between sampling and counting. Although little is known about concentrations of most short-lived beta-emitting radionuclides in environmental ground water (water unaffected by direct releases from nuclear facilities and weapons tests), their activities are expected to be low.Ingrowth of

  4. Adaptive Kalman Filter Based on Adjustable Sampling Interval in Burst Detection for Water Distribution System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doo Yong Choi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rapid detection of bursts and leaks in water distribution systems (WDSs can reduce the social and economic costs incurred through direct loss of water into the ground, additional energy demand for water supply, and service interruptions. Many real-time burst detection models have been developed in accordance with the use of supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA systems and the establishment of district meter areas (DMAs. Nonetheless, no consideration has been given to how frequently a flow meter measures and transmits data for predicting breaks and leaks in pipes. This paper analyzes the effect of sampling interval when an adaptive Kalman filter is used for detecting bursts in a WDS. A new sampling algorithm is presented that adjusts the sampling interval depending on the normalized residuals of flow after filtering. The proposed algorithm is applied to a virtual sinusoidal flow curve and real DMA flow data obtained from Jeongeup city in South Korea. The simulation results prove that the self-adjusting algorithm for determining the sampling interval is efficient and maintains reasonable accuracy in burst detection. The proposed sampling method has a significant potential for water utilities to build and operate real-time DMA monitoring systems combined with smart customer metering systems.

  5. Evaluation of sampling devices for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface microlayer coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitart, C; García-Flor, N; Dachs, J; Bayona, J M; Albaigés, J

    2004-05-01

    The sea surface microlayer (SML) may play an important role on the transport and fate of persistent organic pollutants in the marine environment. In order to evaluate the appropriateness of a number of sampling devices for the analysis of 14 parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (3-5 aromatic rings), marine SML waters were sampled using a glass plate, a rotating drum/roller, a metal screen and a surface slick sampler. The underlying waters were also sampled for the determination of the corresponding enrichment factors (EF = [C](microlayer)/[C](underlying water)). The EFs were phase dependent, ranging from 1 to 3 for the dissolved phase and between 4 and 7 for the particulate phase. In order to better assess the performance of the different sampling methods, in terms of phase partitioning, the truly dissolved and colloidal phases were also estimated. Generally, no significant differences were found for the enrichment factors provided by the different methods, due to the observed large variability in concentrations that can be attributed to small-scale coastal processes. However, the metal screen is recommended as the most efficient sampling method for the study of PAHs taking into account the amount of water collected versus time.

  6. Collecting a better water-quality sample: Reducing vertical stratification bias in open and closed channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, William R.

    2017-01-01

    Collection of water-quality samples that accurately characterize average particle concentrations and distributions in channels can be complicated by large sources of variability. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a fully automated Depth-Integrated Sample Arm (DISA) as a way to reduce bias and improve accuracy in water-quality concentration data. The DISA was designed to integrate with existing autosampler configurations commonly used for the collection of water-quality samples in vertical profile thereby providing a better representation of average suspended sediment and sediment-associated pollutant concentrations and distributions than traditional fixed-point samplers. In controlled laboratory experiments, known concentrations of suspended sediment ranging from 596 to 1,189 mg/L were injected into a 3 foot diameter closed channel (circular pipe) with regulated flows ranging from 1.4 to 27.8 ft3 /s. Median suspended sediment concentrations in water-quality samples collected using the DISA were within 7 percent of the known, injected value compared to 96 percent for traditional fixed-point samplers. Field evaluation of this technology in open channel fluvial systems showed median differences between paired DISA and fixed-point samples to be within 3 percent. The range of particle size measured in the open channel was generally that of clay and silt. Differences between the concentration and distribution measured between the two sampler configurations could potentially be much larger in open channels that transport larger particles, such as sand.

  7. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Falls City, Texas. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Falls City, Texas, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP). The following plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, and sampling frequency for the routine monitoring stations at the site. The ground water data are used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. The Falls City site is in Karnes County, Texas, approximately 8 miles [13 kilometers southwest of the town of Falls City and 46 mi (74 km) southeast of San Antonio, Texas. Before surface remedial action, the tailings site consisted of two parcels. Parcel A consisted of the mill site, one mill building, five tailings piles, and one tailings pond south of Farm-to-Market (FM) Road 1344 and west of FM 791. A sixth tailings pile designated Parcel B was north of FM 791 and east of FM 1344.

  8. Bioastrophysical Aspects of Low Energy Ion Irradiation of Frozen Anthracene Containing Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuleta, M.; Gabla, L.; Madej, J.

    2001-08-13

    The origin of life on Earth remains a fascinating mystery in spite of many theories existing on this subject. However, it seems that simple prebiotic molecules could play an essential role in the formation of more complex organisms. In our experiment, we synthesized a class of these molecules (quinones) bombarding frozen anthracene containing water with low energy hydrogen ions. This experiment roughly simulated the astrophysical conditions which one can find in the solar system. Thus, we can hypothesize that prebiotic molecules could be created by interaction of the solar wind with interplanetary dust grains. The delivery of these molecules to early Earth may have contributed to the generation of life on our planet.

  9. Umbrella sampling of proton transfer in a creatine-water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, Olga; Bachert, Peter; Imhof, Petra

    2014-04-01

    Proton transfer reactions are among the most common processes in chemistry and biology. Proton transfer between creatine and surrounding solvent water is underlying the chemical exchange saturation transfer used as a contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. The free energy barrier, determined by first-principles umbrella sampling simulations (EaDFT 3 kcal/mol) is in the same order of magnitude as the experimentally obtained activation energy. The underlying mechanism is a first proton transfer from the guanidinium group to the water pool, followed by a second transition where a proton is "transferred back" from the nearest water molecule to the deprotonated nitrogen atom of creatine.

  10. Water-quality sampling by the U.S. Geological Survey-Standard protocols and procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Franceska D.

    2010-01-01

    Thumbnail of and link to report PDF (1.0 MB) The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) develops the sampling procedures and collects the data necessary for the accurate assessment and wise management of our Nation's surface-water and groundwater resources. Federal and State agencies, water-resource regulators and managers, and many organizations and interested parties in the public and private sectors depend on the reliability, timeliness, and integrity of the data we collect and the scientific soundness and impartiality of our data assessments and analysis. The standard data-collection methods uniformly used by USGS water-quality personnel are peer reviewed, kept up-to-date, and published in the National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/).

  11. Hydrogeology and Physical Characteristics of Water Samples at the Red River Aluminum Site, Stamps, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, J. B.; Stanton, G. P.; Freiwald, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    The Red River Aluminum site near Stamps, Arkansas, contains waste piles of salt cake and metal byproducts from the smelting of aluminum. The waste piles are subjected to about 50 inches of rainfall a year, resulting in the dissolution of the salts and metal. To assess the potential threat to underlying ground-water resources at the site, its hydrogeology was characterized by measuring water levels and field parameters of water quality in 23 wells and at 2 surface-water sites. Seventeen of these monitor wells were constructed at various depths for this study to allow for the separate characterization of the shallow and deep ground-water systems, the calculation of vertical gradients, and the collection of water samples at different depths within the flow system. Lithologic descriptions from drill-hole cuttings and geophysical logs indicate the presence of interbedded sands, gravels, silts, and clays to depths of 65 feet. The regionally important Sparta aquifer underlies the site. Water levels in shallow wells indicate radial flow away from the salt-cake pile located near the center of the site. Flow in the deep system is to the west and southwest toward Bodcau Creek. Water-level data from eight piezometer nests indicate a downward hydraulic gradient from the shallow to deep systems across the site. Values of specific conductance (an indicator of dissolved salts) ranged from 215 to 196,200 microsiemens per centimeter and indicate that saline waters are being transported horizontally and vertically downward away from the site.

  12. Metal quantification in water and sediment samples of billings reservoir by SR-TXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampaio, Sergio Arnaud; Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mails: silvana@fec.unicamp.br; sergioarnaud@hotmail.com; Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br

    2007-07-01

    Billings is the largest reservoir water of the metropolitan Sao Paulo area, with approximately 100km{sup 2} of water. Its basin hydrographic occupies more than 500km{sup 2} in six cities. It concentrates the largest industrial park of South America and only its margins are busy for almost a million inhabitants. The quality of its waters is, therefore, constant of concern of the whole society. In this work the Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X Ray Fluorescence (SR-TXRF) is applied for the identification and quantification of metals in waters and sediments of the Billings dam. A comparison of the levels of metals found with the maximum permissive limits established by the Brazilian legislation was made. The purpose of social context is to contribute for the preservation of the local springs and the rational use of its waters. For the field work they were chosen 19 collection points, included the margins and the central portion of the dam, in agreement with similar approaches the those adopted by the Company of Technology of Environmental Sanitation of Sao Paulo State (CETESB).The water and sediment samples, as well as the certified and standard samples, were analyzed at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), Campinas, SP, Brazil. Results indicate that the water and the sediments of the reservoir have concentrations above the legal limits. (author)

  13. An investigation of reactivity effect due to inadvertent filling of the irradiation channels with water in NIRR-1 Nigeria Research Reactor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliyasu, U; Ibrahim, Y V; Umar, Sadiq; Agbo, S A; Jibrin, Y

    2017-02-09

    Investigation of reactivity variation due to flooding of the irradiation channels of Nigeria Research Reactor (NIRR-1) a low power miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR) located at the Centre for Energy Research and Training, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria Nigeria using the MCNP code for High Enrich Uranium (HEU) and Low Enrich Uranium (LEU) core has been simulated in this present study. In this work, the excess reactivity worth of flooding HEU core for 1 inner, 2 inner, 3 inner, 4 inner and all inner are 0.318mk, 0.577mk, 0.318mk, 1.204mk and 1.503mk respectively, and outer irradiation channels are 0.119mk, 0.169mk, 0.348mk, 0.438mk and 0.418mk respectively, the highest excess reactivity result from flooding both inner and outer irradiation channels is 2.04mk (±1.72×10(-7)), the excess reactivity for LEU core was 0.299mk, 0.568mk, 0.896mk, 1.195mk and 1.524mk in the inner irradiation channels, and the outer irradiation channels are 0.129mk, 0.189mk, 0.219mk, 0.269mk and 0.548mk where the highest excess reactivity was 1.942mk (±1.64×10(-7)) resulting from flooding inner and outer irradiation channels. The reactivity induced by flooding of the irradiation channels of NIRR-1 with water is within design safety limit enshrined in Safety Analysis Report of NIRR-1. The results also compare well with literature.

  14. Yield of OH radicals in water under heavy ion irradiation. Dependence on mass, specific energy, and elapsed time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Dependence of yields of OH (hydroxyl) radicals on the mass and specific energy of heavy ions and elapsed time after irradiation was investigated, to understand chemical reactions of aqueous solutions. The yields of irradiation products of phenol, super-linearly increased with the incident energy of He, C, and Ne ions ranging from 2 to 18 MeV/u. The yields of the OH radicals were estimated by analyzing the yields of the irradiation products of phenol.The yields of the OH radicals increased with the specific energy for each ion, but decreased both with the mass of each ion at the same specific energy and elapsed time after irradiation.

  15. Screening and Quantification of Aliphatic Primary Alkyl Corrosion Inhibitor Amines in Water Samples by Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Maher, Simon; Damon, Deidre E; Barrett, Richard M; Syed, S U; Heeren, Ron M A; Taylor, Stephen; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K

    2016-01-19

    Direct analysis and identification of long chain aliphatic primary diamine Duomeen O (n-oleyl-1,3-diaminopropane), corrosion inhibitor in raw water samples taken from a large medium pressure water tube boiler plant water samples at low LODs (corrosion inhibitors in an industrial water boiler plant and other related samples in the water treatment industry. This approach was applied for the analysis of three complex water samples including feedwater, condensate water, and boiler water, all collected from large medium pressure (MP) water tube boiler plants, known to be dosed with varying amounts of polyamine and amine corrosion inhibitor components. Polyamine chemistry is widely used for example in large high pressure (HP) boilers operating in municipal waste and recycling facilities to prevent corrosion of metals. The samples used in this study are from such a facility in Coventry waste treatment facility, U.K., which has 3 × 40 tonne/hour boilers operating at 17.5 bar.

  16. Storage of natural water samples and preservation techniques for pharmaceutical quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mompelat, S; Jaffrezic, A; Jardé, E; Le Bot, B

    2013-05-15

    In order to perform a human and ecological risk assessment of pharmaceutical products (PPs) in natural waters, it is necessary to accurately quantify a broad variety of PPs at low concentrations. Although numerous currently implemented analytical methodologies, less is known about the preservation of PPs in natural water samples within the period before analysis (holding time, storage conditions). This paper is the first literature review about the stability of PPs in natural waters (surface and groundwaters) during sample storage. The current work focuses on a comparison of the performances of the available preservation techniques (filtration, container materials, storage temperature, preservative agents, etc.) for PPs in samples. All 58 reviewed PPs may be successfully stabilized during 7 days in surface waters by at least one appropriate methodology regarding temperature, acidic and non-acidic preservatives. When temperature is not a sufficient preservation parameter for some PPs (hormones and fluoxetine) its combination with the addition of chemical agents into the samples may prolong the integrity of the PPs during storage in surface water. There is a strong need to use standard protocols to assess and compare the stability of PPs in environmental water matrices during storage as well as during analytical preparation or analysis (European criteria 2002/657/EC). Since the stability of PPs during sample storage is a critical parameter that could call into question the quality of the data provided for the concentrations, the design of stability studies should rigorously take into account all critical parameters that could impact the concentrations of the PPs with time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Robowell: An automated process for monitoring ground water quality using established sampling protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, G.E.; Smith, K.P.

    1999-01-01

    Robowell is an automated process for monitoring selected ground water quality properties and constituents by pumping a well or multilevel sampler. Robowell was developed and tested to provide a cost-effective monitoring system that meets protocols expected for manual sampling. The process uses commercially available electronics, instrumentation, and hardware, so it can be configured to monitor ground water quality using the equipment, purge protocol, and monitoring well design most appropriate for the monitoring site and the contaminants of interest. A Robowell prototype was installed on a sewage treatment plant infiltration bed that overlies a well-studied unconfined sand and gravel aquifer at the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, during a time when two distinct plumes of constituents were released. The prototype was operated from May 10 to November 13, 1996, and quality-assurance/quality-control measurements demonstrated that the data obtained by the automated method was equivalent to data obtained by manual sampling methods using the same sampling protocols. Water level, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and dissolved ammonium were monitored by the prototype as the wells were purged according to U.S Geological Survey (USGS) ground water sampling protocols. Remote access to the data record, via phone modem communications, indicated the arrival of each plume over a few days and the subsequent geochemical reactions over the following weeks. Real-time availability of the monitoring record provided the information needed to initiate manual sampling efforts in response to changes in measured ground water quality, which proved the method and characterized the screened portion of the plume in detail through time. The methods and the case study described are presented to document the process for future use.

  18. Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2009-12-14

    As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

  19. Cosmogenic nuclides in core samples of the Chico L6 chondrite - Evidence for irradiation under high shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, D. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Albrecht, A. A.; Vogt, S.; Herzog, G. F.; Klein, J.; Fink, D.; Dezfouly-Arjomandy, B.; Middleton, R.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of core samples obtained from different depths of the Chico (New Mexico) L6 chondrite for various cosmogenic nuclides (Be-10, Al-26, and stable isotopes of He, Ne, and Ar). The relationships between the measured abundances of cosmogenic nuclides and cosmogenic Ne-22/Ne-21 ratio were compared with predictions of recent semiempirical models of Graf et al. (1990) and Reedy (1991), and it was found that both models closely reproduce the observed trends and absolute values of the data obtained. Noble gas data indicate that Chico experienced shielding similar to that of Jilin and greater than those of the Knyahinya or the Keyes chondrites. The exposure history for Chico is discussed.

  20. A Monte Carlo calculation of subexcitation and vibrationally-relaxing electron spectra in irradiated liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobut, V.; Frongillo, Y.; Jay-Gerin, J.-P. (Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Faculte de Medecine); Patau, J.-P. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France))

    1992-12-01

    An energy spectrum of ''subexcitation electrons'' produced in liquid water by electrons with initial energies of a few keV is obtained by using a Monte Carlo transport simulation calculation. It is found that the introduction of vibrational-excitation cross sections leads to the appearance of a sharp peak in the probability density function near the electronic-excitation threshold. Electrons contributing to this peak are shown to be more naturally described if a novel energy spectrum, that we propose to name ''vibrationally-relaxing electron'' spectrum, is introduced. The corresponding distribution function is presented, and an empirical expression of it is given. (author).

  1. Extraction of pesticides in water samples using vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chunhong; Zhu, Xiaodan; Wang, Jihua; Zhao, Ercheng; He, Min; Chen, Li; Yu, Pingzhong

    2010-09-10

    A simple solvent microextraction method termed vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLME) coupled with gas chromatography micro electron-capture detector (GC-microECD) has been developed and used for the pesticide residue analysis in water samples. In the VALLME method, aliquots of 30 microL toluene used as extraction solvent were directly injected into a 25 mL volumetric flask containing the water sample. The extraction solvent was dispersed into the water phase under vigorously shaking with the vortex. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the proposed VALLME such as extraction solvent, vortex time, volumes of extraction solvent and salt addition were investigated. Under the optimum condition, enrichment factors (EFs) in a range of 835-1115 and limits of detection below 0.010 microg L(-1) were obtained for the determination of target pesticides in water. The calculated calibration curves provide high levels of linearity yielding correlation coefficients (r(2)) greater than 0.9958 with the concentration level ranged from 0.05 to 2.5 microg L(-1). Finally, the proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of pesticides from real water samples and acceptable recoveries over the range of 72-106.3% were obtained.

  2. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation, pulsed electric field, hot water and ethanol vapours treatment on functional properties of mung bean sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Ankit; Siddiqui, Saleem; Upadhyay, Neelam; Soni, Jyoti

    2014-04-01

    The present investigation was conducted with the objective to study the effects of various treatments and storage conditions on ascorbic acid, total phenols, antioxidant activity and polyphenol oxidase activity of mung bean sprouts. The sprouts subjected to various treatments viz., pulsed electric field (PEF) (10,000 V for 10 s), hot water dip (HWD) (50 °C for 2 min), ethanol vapours (1 h) and UV-Irradiation (10 kJm(-2) in laminar flow chamber for 1 h); and then stored at room (25 ± 1 °C) and low (7 ± 1 °C) temperature conditions. The sprouts were analyzed regularly at 24 h interval till end of shelf life. Different treatments given to sprouts resulted in differential effect on various parameters. The ascorbic acid, total phenols and antioxidant activity were highest in ethanol vapours treated sprouts. There was a general decrease in polyphenol oxidase activity by various treatments. During storage ascorbic acid, total phenols and antioxidant activity of sprouts first increased and then decreased significantly, however, for polyphenol oxidase activity a progressive increase with increase in storage period was observed. The trends were similar at room and low temperature storage conditions. Thus, it can be concluded that the ethanol vapours significantly improved the ascorbic acid content, total phenols and antioxidant activity of mung bean sprouts, both at room as well as low temperature conditions of storage.

  3. Dual-scale nanoripple/nanoparticle-covered microspikes on silicon by femtosecond double pulse train irradiation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ge; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xin; Xu, Yongda; Shi, Xuesong; Yan, Ruyu; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-07-01

    Novel dual-scale structures were obtained by femtosecond double pulse train (subpulse delay Δt > 0 ps) one-step irradiating silicon in water. The dual-scale structures consist of microspikes of ∼2 μm width and ∼0.5 μm height, and nanoripples with a mean period of 146 nm or nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 90 nm which entirely cover on the microspikes, for linearly polarized or circularly polarized femtosecond laser respectively. The formation of dual-scale structures involves the following processes: (1) Continuously laser energy deposited at femtosecond to picosecond timescales within silicon surfaces and central regions, will result in enhanced capillary waves and thinner melted silicon layers. Hence, the microspikes can be induced at laser fluences below ablation threshold; (2) Later (>500-800 pulses), a mass of debris and bubbles produced will lead to the remarkably and uniformly scattering or shielding of subsequent incident laser energy. Hence, the nanostructures can be induced. The novel structures exhibit high-sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering with an enhancement factor of 108 for Rhodamine 6G detecting. Besides, the novel structures have application potentials in improving the silicon hydrophobicity, antireflection, etc.

  4. New technologies to detect and monitor Phytophthora ramorum in plant, soil, and water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Russell; Nathan McOwen; Robert Bohannon

    2013-01-01

    The focus of our research efforts has been to develop methods to quickly identify plants, soil, and water samples infested with Phytophthora spp., and to rapidly confirm the findings using novel isothermal DNA technologies suitable for field use. These efforts have led to the development of a rapid Immunostrip® that reliably detects...

  5. Passive sampling of perfluorinated chemicals in water: In-situ calibration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaserzon, S.L.; Hawker, D.W.; Booij, K.; O'Brien, D.S.; Kennedy, K.; Vermeirssen, E.L.M.; Mueller, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) have been recognised as environmental pollutants that require monitoring. A modified polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) is able to quantify aqueous PFCs. However, with varying external water velocity, PFC sampling rates (R-s) may change, affecting

  6. Measurement of the tritium concentration in the fractionated distillate from environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Robert; Eddy, Teresa; Kuhne, Wendy; Jannik, Tim; Brandl, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Standard procedures for the measurement of tritium in water samples often require distillation of an appropriate sample aliquot. This distillation process may result in a fractionation of tritiated water and regular light water due to the vapor pressure isotope effect, introducing either a bias or an additional contribution to the total tritium measurement uncertainty. The current study investigates the relative change in vapor pressure isotope effect in the course of the distillation process, distinguishing it from and extending previously published measurements. The separation factor as a quantitative measure of the vapor pressure isotope effect is found to assume values of 1.04 ± 0.036, 1.05 ± 0.026, and 1.07 ± 0.038, depending on the vigor of the boiling process during distillation of the sample. A lower heat setting in the experimental setup, and therefore a less vigorous boiling process, results in a larger value for the separation factor. For a tritium measurement in water samples where the first 5 mL are discarded, the tritium concentration could be underestimated by 4-7%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sampling design for compliance monitoring of surface water quality: A case study in a Polder area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.; Knotters, M.

    2008-01-01

    International agreements such as the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) ask for efficient sampling methods for monitoring natural resources. In this paper a general methodology for designing efficient, statistically sound monitoring schemes is described. An important decision is the choice between a

  8. Evaluation of polyethersulfone performance for the microextraction of polar chlorinated herbicides from environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Ailette; Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; Cela, Rafael; Möder, Monika; Rodríguez, Isaac

    2014-05-01

    In this work, the suitability of bulk polyethersulfone (PES) for sorptive microextraction of eight polar, chlorinated phenoxy acids and dicamba from environmental water samples is assessed and the analytical features of the optimized method are compared to those reported for other microextraction techniques. Under optimized conditions, extractions were performed with samples (18 mL) adjusted at pH 2 and containing a 30% (w/v) of sodium chloride, using a tubular PES sorbent (1 cm length × 0.7 mm o.d., sorbent volume 8 µL). Equilibrium conditions were achieved after 3h of direct sampling, with absolute extraction efficiencies ranging from 39 to 66%, depending on the compound. Analytes were recovered soaking the polymer with 0.1 mL of ethyl acetate, derivatized and determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Achieved quantification limits (LOQs) varied between 0.005 and 0.073 ng mL(-1). After normalization with the internal surrogate (IS), the efficiency of the extraction was only moderately affected by the particular characteristics of different water samples (surface and sewage water); thus, pseudo-external calibration, using spiked ultrapure water solutions, can be used as quantification technique. The reduced cost of the PES polymer allowed considering it as a disposable sorbent, avoiding variations in the performance of the extraction due to cross-contamination problems and/or surface modification with usage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Toxicological validation of a procedure for extracting organic micropollutants form water samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaal MA; Folkerts AJ; Kamp RE van de; Struijs J; ECO

    1999-01-01

    A procedure, developed to extract micropollutants from water samples into a concentrate that is suitable for the performance of aquatic toxicity tests, was toxicologically validated. Toxicity of known cocktail of toxicants concentrated to a level measurable in short-term toxicity tests was measured

  10. Water sampling at the Berge Helene FPSO at Chinguetti field in Mauritania using passive samplers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korytar, P.; Galien, van der W.

    2007-01-01

    Three rounds of water sampling were performed at the Berge Helene FPSO at the Chinguetti field in Mauritania using passive samplers attached to the FPSO to determine the levels of contamination that could potentially accumulate in organisms. Two rounds were carried out prior to the commencement of

  11. Sample preparation for combined chemical analysis and bioassay application in water quality assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, A.; Schriks, M.; Brand, W; Bäuerlein, P.S.; van der Kooi, M.M.E.; van Doorn, R.H.; Emke, E.; Reus, A.; van der Linden, S.; de Voogt, P.; Heringa, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of in vitro bioassays and chemical screening can provide a powerful toolbox to determine biologically relevant compounds in water extracts. In this study, a sample preparation method is evaluated for the suitability for both chemical analysis and in vitro bioassays. A set of 39 chemi

  12. Toxicological validation of a procedure for extracting organic micropollutants form water samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaal MA; Folkerts AJ; Kamp RE van de; Struijs J; ECO

    1999-01-01

    A procedure, developed to extract micropollutants from water samples into a concentrate that is suitable for the performance of aquatic toxicity tests, was toxicologically validated. Toxicity of known cocktail of toxicants concentrated to a level measurable in short-term toxicity tests was measured

  13. Determination of aniline in environmental water samples by alternating-current oscillopolarographic titration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Ping Xiao; Qing Xiang Zhou; Xiao Ke Tian; Hua Hua Bai; Xian Fa Su

    2007-01-01

    A new method for the determination of aniline in environmental water based on oscillopolarographic titration was presented in this paper.Several factors including the kind, concentration, and volume of acid, the dosage of potassium bromide, the temperature and concentration of concomitant substances were investigated in detail.The experimental results indicated that this method was simple, rapid, and sensitive.The linear range was 8.367 x 10-4 to 2.789 x 10-2 mol L-1, the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was lower than 0.96%, and the spiked recoveries of aniline in environmental water samples were in the range of 99.4-106.9% under the optimal conditions.The results indicated that the present method could be used as an alternative method for aniline determination in realworld water samples.

  14. Methods for collecting benthic invertebrate samples as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffney, Thomas F.; Gurtz, Martin E.; Meador, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Benthic invertebrate communities are evaluated as part of the ecological survey component of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. These biological data are collected along with physical and chemical data to assess water-quality conditions and to develop an understanding of the factors that affect water-quality conditions locally, regionally, and nationally. The objectives of benthic invertebrate community characterizations are to (1) develop for each site a list of tax a within the associated stream reach and (2) determine the structure of benthic invertebrate communities within selected habitats of that reach. A nationally consistent approach is used to achieve these objectives. This approach provides guidance on site, reach, and habitat selection and methods and equipment for qualitative multihabitat sampling and semi-quantitative single habitat sampling. Appropriate quality-assurance and quality-control guidelines are used to maximize the ability to analyze data within and among study units.

  15. Sample dimensions effect on prediction of soil water retention curve and saturated hydraulic conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Taslimitehrani, Vahid; Dong, Guozhu; Pachepsky, Yakov A.

    2015-09-01

    Soil water retention curve (SWRC) and saturated hydraulic conductivity (SHC) are key hydraulic properties for unsaturated zone hydrology and groundwater. Not only the SWRC and SHC measurements are time-consuming, but also their results are scale dependent. Although prediction of the SWRC and SHC from available parameters, such as textural data, organic matter, and bulk density have been under investigation for decades, up to now no research has focused on the effect of sample dimensions on the soil hydraulic properties pedotransfer functions development. The main purpose here is investigating sample internal diameter and height (or length) effects on the prediction of the soil water retention curve and the saturated hydraulic conductivity. We, therefore, develop pedotransfer functions using a novel approach called contrast pattern aided regression (CPXR) and consider the sample dimensions as input variables. Two datasets including 210 and 213 soil samples with known sample dimensions were extracted from the UNSODA database to develop and evaluate pedotransfer functions for the SWRC and SHC, respectively. The 10-fold cross-validation method is applied to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the proposed regression-based models. Our results show that including sample dimensions, such as sample internal diameter and height (or length) could substantially improve the accuracy of the SWRC and SHC pedotransfer functions developed using the CPXR method.

  16. High-resolution passive sampling of dissolved methane in the water column of lakes in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A. E.; Cadieux, S. B.; White, J. R.; Pratt, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic lakes are important participants in the global carbon cycle, releasing methane in a warming climate and contributing to a positive feedback to climate change. In order to yield detailed methane budgets and understand the implications of warming on methane dynamics, high-resolution profiles revealing methane behavior within the water column need to be obtained. Single day sampling using disruptive techniques has the potential to result in biases. In order to obtain high-resolution, undisturbed profiles of methane concentration and isotopic composition, this study evaluates a passive sampling method over a multi-day equilibration period. Selected for this study were two small lakes (Gatos Research Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer. PDB sampling and pump sampling resulted in statistically similar concentrations (R2=0.89), ranging from 0.85 to 135 uM from PDB and 0.74 to 143 uM from pump sampling. In anoxic waters of the lake, where concentrations were high enough to yield robust isotopic results on the LGR MCIA, δ13C were also similar between the two methods, yielding -73‰ from PDB and -74‰ from pump sampling. Further investigation will produce results for a second lake and methane carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition for both lakes. Preliminary results for this passive sampling method are promising. We envision the use of this technique in future studies of dissolved methane and expect that it will provide a more finely resolved vertical profile, allowing for a more complete understanding of lacustrine methane dynamics.

  17. Effect of preservation method on the assessment of bacterial community structure in soil and water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatangelo, Valeria; Franzetti, Andrea; Gandolfi, Isabella; Bestetti, Giuseppina; Ambrosini, Roberto

    2014-07-01

    The methods used in sample preservation may affect the description of the microbial community structure by DNA-based techniques. This study aims at evaluating the effect of different storage conditions, including freezing, adding two liquid-based preservatives or simply storing samples with no preservative, on the structure of the microbial communities in aliquots of organic-rich soil and water samples as revealed by a terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The results showed that the number of terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) detected in soil aliquots stored with LifeGuard(™) solution was significantly lower than that of samples analyzed immediately after sampling. Moreover, cluster and PCA analyses showed that soil aliquots stored using LifeGuard(™) clustered separately from those stored with the other methods. Conversely, soil and water aliquots stored with DMSO-EDTA-salt solution did not show either significant reduction in the number of TRFs or any change in the structure of the microbial community. Finally, the number of TRFs and the structure of microbial communities from soil aliquots stored with no preservative did not differ from those of aliquots analyzed immediately after sampling. Preservation methods should therefore be accurately evaluated before collecting samples that have to be stored for long time before DNA extraction.

  18. Irradiated chitosan nanoparticle as a water-based antioxidant and reducing agent for a green synthesis of gold nanoplatforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasanphan, Wanvimol; Rattanawongwiboon, Thitirat; Choofong, Surakarn; Güven, Olgun; Katti, Kattesh K.

    2015-01-01

    The idea of preparing water-soluble chitosan and observing its nanostructural morphology are proposed using irradiation process. The water-soluble chitosan nanoparticles (WSCS-NPs) properties were assessed for a possible use as an antioxidant and reducing agent for a green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The characteristics of WSCS-NPs were verified using FT-IR, XRD, C H N analyzer and TGA. The nanostructural morphology was investigated using SEM and TEM. The number average molecular weight of WSCS-NPs was as low as 3800 g/mol with narrow polydispersity of 1.26. The average hydrodynamic diameter of WSCS-NPs was 15.40±0.47 nm. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity of WSCS-NPs at 0.1 mg/mL was up to 80%, while the original CS exhibited no antioxidant activity. An effective concentration of WSCS-NPs to reduce DPPH free radicals (150 μM) by 50% is as low as 0.025 mg/mL. The in vitro cytotoxicity test by MTT assay demonstrated that WSCS-NPs are non-toxic with an IC50 of 2000 μg/mL. The WSCS-NPs are efficient reducing and stabilizing agent for producing stable colloidal AuNPs. The achievement of the WSCS-NPs and its ability to create AuNPs would be a part of growing interest of green nanotechnology in biomedicine.

  19. Letter Report: Stable Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotope Analysis of B-Complex Perched Water Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moran, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nims, Megan K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saunders, Danielle L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-04-13

    Fine-grained sediments associated with the Cold Creek Unit at Hanford have caused the formation of a perched water aquifer in the deep vadose zone at the B Complex area, which includes waste sites in the 200-DV-1 Operable Unit and the single-shell tank farms in Waste Management Area B-BX-BY. High levels of contaminants, such as uranium, technetium-99, and nitrate, make this aquifer a continuing source of contamination for the groundwater located a few meters below the perched zone. Analysis of deuterium (2H) and 18-oxygen (18O) of nine perched water samples from three different wells was performed. Samples represent time points from hydraulic tests performed on the perched aquifer using the three wells. The isotope analyses showed that the perched water had δ2H and δ18O ratios consistent with the regional meteoric water line, indicating that local precipitation events at the Hanford site likely account for recharge of the perched water aquifer. Data from the isotope analysis can be used along with pumping and recovery data to help understand the perched water dynamics related to aquifer size and hydraulic control of the aquifer in the future.

  20. Determination of air-loop volume and radon partition coefficient for measuring radon in water sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kil Yong; Burnett, William C

    A simple method for the direct determination of the air-loop volume in a RAD7 system as well as the radon partition coefficient was developed allowing for an accurate measurement of the radon activity in any type of water. The air-loop volume may be measured directly using an external radon source and an empty bottle with a precisely measured volume. The partition coefficient and activity of radon in the water sample may then be determined via the RAD7 using the determined air-loop volume. Activity ratios instead of absolute activities were used to measure the air-loop volume and the radon partition coefficient. In order to verify this approach, we measured the radon partition coefficient in deionized water in the temperature range of 10-30 °C and compared the values to those calculated from the well-known Weigel equation. The results were within 5 % variance throughout the temperature range. We also applied the approach for measurement of the radon partition coefficient in synthetic saline water (0-75 ppt salinity) as well as tap water. The radon activity of the tap water sample was determined by this method as well as the standard RAD-H2O and BigBottle RAD-H2O. The results have shown good agreement between this method and the standard methods.

  1. Effect of gamma irradiation on microbial load and sensory characteristics of aniseed (Pimpinella anisum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bachir, M

    2007-07-01

    Seeds of anise (Pimpinella anisum) were exposed to doses of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20kGy in a (60)Co package irradiator. Irradiated and unirradiated samples were stored at room temperature. Microbial populations on seeds, total and inorganic soluble solids in water extract and sensory properties of the latter were evaluated after 0, 6 and 12 months of storage. Results indicated that gamma irradiation reduced the aerobic plate counts of aniseed. Immediately after irradiation, the total soluble solids in an extract of irradiated seeds were greater than those of unirradiated ones. The total soluble solids in an extract of irradiated and un-irradiated seeds increased after 6 and 12 months of storage. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) in inorganic soluble solids between the water extract of irradiated and unirradiated aniseeds. Sensory evaluation indicated that gamma irradiation improved sensory characteristics of aniseed water extract tested immediately after irradiation; however, after 12 months of storage, no significant differences (p>0.05) were found in color, taste or flavor between extract of irradiated and unirradiated seeds.

  2. Disinfection of water and wastewater by UV-A and UV-C irradiation: application of real-time PCR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzisymeon, Efthalia; Droumpali, Ariadni; Mantzavinos, Dionissios; Venieri, Danae

    2011-03-02

    The disinfection efficiency of synthetic and real wastewater by means of UV-A and UV-C irradiation in the presence or absence of TiO(2) was investigated. A reference strain of Escherichia coli suspended in sterile 0.8% (w/v) NaCl aqueous solution was used as a synthetic wastewater, while real wastewater samples were collected from the outlet of the secondary treatment of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. E. coli inactivation was monitored both by the conventional culture technique and by the real-time PCR method. Culture method showed that UV-C irradiation (11 W lamp) achieved total E. coli inactivation of 100% within 3 min of photolytic treatment. On the other hand, UV-A (9 W lamp)/TiO(2); [TiO(2)]=200 mg L(-1) (i.e. best operating conditions) required 60 min to achieve total disinfection of the synthetic wastewater. Real time PCR revealed compatible results, regarding the better efficiency of UV-C. However, it showed different times of bacterial inactivation, probably due to the phenomenon of "viable but not culturable bacteria". Disinfection durability tests in the dark and under natural sunlight irradiation showed that there is cell repair when UV-C irradiation is used for synthetic wastewater disinfection. Regarding real wastewater it was observed that only UV-C irradiation was capable of totally inactivating E. coli population in short time. Comparing results obtained from both methods, real time PCR proved to be more reliable and accurate, concerning the bacterial detection and enumeration in aquatic samples after the application of UV irradiation.

  3. Summary of inorganic compositional data for groundwater, soil-water, and surface-water samples collected at the Headgate Draw subsurface drip irrigation site, Johnson County, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Zupancic, John W.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a 5-year project on the impact of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) application of coalbed-methane (CBM) produced waters, water samples were collected from the Headgate Draw SDI site in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. This research is part of a larger study to understand short- and long-term impacts on both soil and water quality from the beneficial use of CBM waters to grow forage crops through use of SDI. This document provides a summary of the context, sampling methodology, and quality assurance and quality control documentation of samples collected prior to and over the first year of SDI operation at the site (May 2008-October 2009). This report contains an associated database containing inorganic compositional data, water-quality criteria parameters, and calculated geochemical parameters for samples of groundwater, soil water, surface water, treated CBM waters, and as-received CBM waters collected at the Headgate Draw SDI site.

  4. Summary of Inorganic Compositional Data for Groundwater, Soil-Water, and Surface-Water Samples at the Headgate Draw Subsurface Drip Irrigation Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Zupanic, John W.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a 5-year project on the impact of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) application of coalbed-methane (CBM) produced waters, water samples were collected from the Headgate Draw SDI site in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. This research is part of a larger study to understand short- and long-term impacts on both soil and water quality from the beneficial use of CBM waters to grow forage crops through use of SDI. This document provides a summary of the context, sampling methodology, and quality assurance and quality control documentation of samples collected prior to and over the first year of SDI operation at the site (May 2008-October 2009). This report contains an associated database containing inorganic compositional data, water-quality criteria parameters, and calculated geochemical parameters for samples of groundwater, soil water, surface water, treated CBM waters, and as-received CBM waters collected at the Headgate Draw SDI site.

  5. Solid phase extraction and determination of carbamate pesticides in water samples by reverse-phase HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Tovar, J.; Santos-Delgado, M.J. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    Solid phase extraction. SPE. using C{sub 1}8 bonded silica cartridges for trace amounts determination of carbaryl, propoxur, thiram, propham and methiocarb in water samples was studied and the breakthrough volume of the cartridges was established. The high enrichment factor and large injection volume admissible in the isocratic reverse-phase HPLC system allows pesticides determination with UV detection at 22o nm even at a concentration lower than 0.05 mug/L. Purified tap natural and underground water samples were spiked with carbamate pesticides in the concentration range 0.16-16.0 mug/L. Large volumes of samples (up to 2L) were passed through available C{sub 1}8, cartridges and eluted with acetonitrile. The preconcentrated samples were analyzed by HPLC using a Spherisorb ODS column with a 42.58 acetonitrile-water mobile phase. From replicate samples, recovery for the pesticides ranged from 79.0 to 103.7% except for thiran which is not retained. Tehe relative standard deviation (n=4 at 0.16 to 1.61 mug/L concetration level) range from 1.1 to 6.8%. (Author) 14 refs.

  6. Application of hollow cylindrical wheat stem for electromembrane extraction of thorium in water samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Barkhordar, Afsaneh

    2015-01-01

    In this study, wheat stem was used for electromembrane extraction (EME) for the first time. The EME technique involved the use of a wheat stem whose channel was filled with 3 M HCl, immersed in 10 mL of an aqueous sample solution. Thorium migrated from aqueous samples, through a thin layer of 1-o......, an enrichment factor of 50 and a limit of detection of 0.29 ng mL1 was obtained for thorium. The developed procedure was then applied to the extraction and determination of thorium in water samples and in reference material.......In this study, wheat stem was used for electromembrane extraction (EME) for the first time. The EME technique involved the use of a wheat stem whose channel was filled with 3 M HCl, immersed in 10 mL of an aqueous sample solution. Thorium migrated from aqueous samples, through a thin layer of 1...

  7. Determination of colloidal and dissolved silver in water samples using colorimetric solid-phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, April A; Lipert, Robert J; Porter, Marc D

    2010-03-15

    The increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics has led to resurgence in the use of silver as a biocidal agent in applications ranging from washing machine additives to the drinking water treatment system on the International Space Station (ISS). However, growing concerns about the possible toxicity of colloidal silver to bacteria, aquatic organisms and humans have led to recently issued regulations by the US EPA and FDA regarding the usage of silver. As part of an ongoing project, we have developed a rapid, simple method for determining total silver, both ionic (silver(I)) and colloidal, in 0.1-1mg/L aqueous samples, which spans the ISS potable water target of 0.3-0.5mg/L (total silver) and meets the US EPA limit of 0.1mg/L in drinking water. The method is based on colorimetric solid-phase extraction (C-SPE) and involves the extraction of silver(I) from water samples by passage through a solid-phase membrane impregnated with the colorimetric reagent DMABR (5-[4-(dimethylamino)benzylidene]rhodanine). Silver(I) exhaustively reacts with impregnated DMABR to form a colored compound, which is quantified using a handheld diffuse reflectance spectrophotometer. Total silver is determined by first passing the sample through a cartridge containing Oxone, which exhaustively oxidizes colloidal silver to dissolved silver(I). The method, which takes less than 2 min to complete and requires only approximately 1 mL of sample, has been validated through a series of tests, including a comparison with the ICP-MS analysis of a water sample from ISS that contained both silver(I) and colloidal silver. Potential earth-bound applications are also briefly discussed.

  8. Evaluation of water sampling methodologies for amplicon-based characterization of bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J; Wang, Ping; Phillips, Jane; Cotner, James B; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Reduction in costs of next-generation sequencing technologies has allowed unprecedented characterization of bacterial communities from environmental samples including aquatic ecosystems. However, the extent to which extrinsic factors including sampling volume, sample replication, DNA extraction kits, and sequencing target affect the community structure inferred are poorly explored. Here, triplicate 1, 2, and 6L volume water samples from the Upper Mississippi River were processed to determine variation among replicates and sample volumes. Replicate variability significantly influenced differences in the community α-diversity (P=0.046), while volume significantly changed β-diversity (P=0.037). Differences in phylogenetic and taxonomic community structure differed both among triplicate samples and among the volumes filtered. Communities from 2L and 6L water samples showed similar clustering via discriminant analysis. To assess variation due to DNA extraction method, DNA was extracted from triplicate cell pellets from four sites along the Upper Mississippi River using the Epicentre Metagenomic DNA Isolation Kit for Water and MoBio PowerSoil kit. Operational taxonomic units representing ≤14% of sequence reads differed significantly among all sites and extraction kits used, although differences in diversity and community coverage were not significant (P≥0.057). Samples characterized using only the V6 region had significantly higher coverage and lower richness and α-diversity than those characterized using V4-V6 regions (Pwater provides robust representation of community variability, and these results indicate that DNA extraction kit and sequencing target displayed taxonomic biases that did not affect the overall biological conclusions drawn. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pre-concentration of uranium from water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Nemch, Tabandeh Karimi [Zabol Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a simple and rapid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was developed for the determination of uranium in water samples prior to high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) was used as complexing agent. The effect of various parameters on the extraction step including type and volume of extraction and dispersive solvents, pH of solution, concentration of PAN, extraction time, sample volume and ionic strength were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) and preconcentration factor were 0.3 μg L{sup -1} and 194, respectively. Furthermore, the relative standard deviation of the ten replicate was <2.6%. The developed procedure was then applied to the extraction and determination of uranium in the water samples.

  10. Multiplex PCR-based detection of Leptospira in environmental water samples obtained from a slum settlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Magalhães Vital-Brazil

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to apply a molecular protocol to detect leptospiral DNA in environmental water samples. The study was carried out in a peri-urban settlement in Petrópolis, state of Rio de Janeiro. A multiplex PCR method employing the primers LipL32 and 16SrRNA was used. Three out of 100 analysed samples were positive in the multiplex PCR, two were considered to have saprophytic leptospires and one had pathogenic leptospires. The results obtained supported the idea that multiplex PCR can be used to detect Leptospira spp in water samples. This method was also able to differentiate between saprophytic and pathogenic leptospires and was able to do so much more easily than conventional methodologies.

  11. Electrophoretic concentration and sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography analysis of cationic drugs in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuethrich, Alain; Haddad, Paul R; Quirino, Joselito P

    2015-07-03

    Sample preparation by electrophoretic concentration, followed by analysis using sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography, was studied as a green and simple analytical strategy for the trace analysis of cationic drugs in water samples. Electrophoretic concentration was conducted using 50 mmol/L ammonium acetate at pH 5 as acceptor electrolyte. Electrophoretic concentration was performed at 1.0 kV for 50 min and 0.5 kV and 15 min for purified and 10-fold diluted waste water samples, respectively. Sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography was with 100 mmol/L sodium phosphate at pH 2, 100 mmol/L sodium dodecyl sulfate and 27.5%-v/v acetonitrile as separation electrolyte. The separation voltage was -20 kV, UV-detection was at 200 nm, and the acidified concentrate was injected for 36 s at 1 bar (or 72% of the total capillary length, 60 cm). Both purified water and 10-fold diluted waste water exhibited a linear range of two orders of concentration magnitude. The coefficient of determination, and intra- and interday repeatability were 0.991-0.997, 2.5-6.2, and 4.4-9.7%RSD (n=6), respectively, for purified water. The values were 0.991-0.997, 3.4-7.1, and 8.7-9.8%RSD (n=6), correspondingly, for 10-fold diluted waste water. The method detection limit was in the range from 0.04-0.09 to 1.20-6.97 ng/mL for purified and undiluted waste water, respectively.

  12. Dispersion and toxicity of selected manufactured nanomaterials in natural river water samples: effects of water chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Youn, Sejin; Hovsepyan, Anna; Llaneza, Veronica L; Wang, Yu; Bitton, Gabriel; Bonzongo, Jean-Claude J

    2009-05-01

    Experimental conditions that mimic likely scenarios of manufactured nanomaterials (MNs) introduction to aquatic systems were used to assessthe effect of nanoparticle dispersion/solubility and water chemical composition on MN-toxicity. Aqueous suspensions of fullerenes (C60), nanosilver (nAg), and nanocopper (nCu) were prepared in both deionized water and filtered (0.45 microm) natural river water samples collected from the Suwannee River basin, to emphasize differences in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and solution ionic strengths (I). Two toxicity tests, the Ceriodaphnia dubia and MetPLATE bioassays were used. Results obtained from exposure studies show that water chemistry affects the suspension/solubility of MNs as well as the particle size distribution, resulting in a wide range of biological responses depending on the type of toxicity test used. Under experimental conditions used in this study, C60 exhibited no toxicity even when suspended concentrations exceeded 3 mg L(-1). MetPLATE results showed that the toxicity of aqueous suspensions of nCu tends to increase with increasing DOC concentrations, while increasing I reduces nCu toxicity. The use of the aquatic invertebrate C. dubia on the other hand showed a tendency for decreased mortality with increasing DOC and I. MetPLATE results for nAg showed decreasing trends in toxicity with increasing DOC concentrations and I. However, C. dubia exhibited contrasting biological responses, in that increasing DOC concentrations reduced toxicity, while the latter increased with increasing I. Overall, our results show that laboratory experiments that use DI-water and drastic MN-suspension methods may not be realistic as MN-dispersion and suspension in natural waters vary significantly with water chemistry and the reactivity of MNs.

  13. Recovery data for surface water, groundwater and lab reagent samples analyzed by the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory schedule 2437, water years 2013-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Megan E.; Nowell, Lisa H.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Stone, Wesley W.

    2017-01-01

    Analytical recovery is the concentration of an analyte measured in a water-quality sample expressed as a percentage of the known concentration added to the sample (Mueller and others, 2015). Analytical recovery (hereafter referred to as “recovery”) can be used to understand method bias and variability and to assess the temporal changes in a method over time (Martin and others, 2009). This data set includes two tables: one table of field spike recovery data and one table of lab reagent spike recovery data. The table of field spike recovery data includes results from paired environmental and spike samples collected by the National Water Quality Program, National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Project in surface water and groundwater. These samples were collected as part of the NAWQA Project’s National Water Quality Network: Rivers and Streams assessment, Regional Stream Quality Assessment studies and in multiple groundwater networks following standard practices (Mueller and others, 1997).  This table includes environmental and spike water-quality sample data stored in the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) database (https://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7P55KJN). Concentrations of pesticides in spike samples, while stored in the NWIS database, are not publically available. The calculation of recovery based on these field sample data is outlined in Mueller and others (2015). Lab reagent spikes are pesticide-free reagent water spiked with a known concentration of pesticide. Lab reagent spikes are prepared in the lab and their recovery can be directly measured. The table of lab reagent spike data contains quality control sample information stored in the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) database. Both tables include fields for data-quality indicators that are described in the data processing steps of this metadata file. These tables were developed in order to support a USGS Scientific Investigations Report with the working title

  14. A new ion-selective electrode based on aluminium tungstate for Fe(III) determination in rock sample, pharmaceutical sample and water sample

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mu Naushad

    2008-12-01

    An inorganic cation exchanger, aluminum tungstate (AT), has been synthesized by adding 0.1 M sodium tungstate gradually into 0.1 M aluminium nitrate at pH 1.2 with continuous stirring. The ion exchange capacity for Na+ ion and distribution coefficients of various metal ions was determined on the column of aluminium tungstate. The distribution studies of various metal ions showed the selectivity of Fe(III) ions by this cation exchange material. So, a Fe(III) ion-selective membrane electrode was prepared by using this cation exchange material as an electroactive material. The effect of plasticizers viz. dibutyl phthalate (DBP), dioctylphthalate (DOP), di-(butyl) butyl phosphate (DBBP) and tris-(2-ethylhexylphosphate) (TEHP), has also been studied on the performance of membrane sensor. It was observed that the membrane containing the composition AT: PVC: DBP in the ratio 2 : 20 : 15 displayed a useful analytical response with excellent reproducibility, low detection limit, wide working pH range (1–3.5), quick response time (15 s) and applicability over a wide concentration range of Fe(III) ions from 1 × 10-7 M to 1 × 10-1 M with a slope of 20 ± 1 mV per decade. The selectivity coefficients were determined by the mixed solution method and revealed that the electrode was selective for Fe(III) ions in the presence of interfering ions. The electrode was used for atleast 5 months without any considerable divergence in response characteristics. The constructed sensor was used as indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Fe(III) ions against EDTA and Fe(III) determination in rock sample, pharmaceutical sample and water sample. The results are found to be in good agreement with those obtained by using conventional methods.

  15. Chemcatcher and DGT passive sampling devices for regulatory monitoring of trace metals in surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Ian J; Knutsson, Jesper; Guigues, Nathalie; Mills, Graham A; Fouillac, Anne-Marie; Greenwood, Richard

    2008-07-01

    This work aimed to evaluate whether the performance of passive sampling devices in measuring time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations supports their application in regulatory monitoring of trace metals in surface waters, such as for the European Union's Water Framework Directive (WFD). The ability of the Chemcatcher and the diffusive gradient in thin film (DGT) device sampler to provide comparable TWA concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn was tested through consecutive and overlapping deployments (7-28 days) in the River Meuse (The Netherlands). In order to evaluate the consistency of these TWA labile metal concentrations, these were assessed against total and filtered concentrations measured at relatively high frequencies by two teams using standard monitoring procedures, and metal species predicted by equilibrium speciation modeling using Visual MINTEQ. For Cd and Zn, the concentrations obtained with filtered water samples and the passive sampling devices were generally similar. The samplers consistently underestimated filtered concentrations of Cu and Ni, in agreement with their respective predicted speciation. For Pb, a small labile fraction was mainly responsible for low sampler accumulation and hence high measurement uncertainty. While only the high frequency of spot sampling procedures enabled the observation of higher Cd concentrations during the first 14 days, consecutive DGT deployments were able to detect it and provide a reasonable estimate of ambient concentrations. The range of concentrations measured by spot and passive sampling, for exposures up to 28 days, demonstrated that both modes of monitoring were equally reliable. Passive sampling provides information that cannot be obtained by a realistic spot sampling frequency and this may impact on the ability to detect trends and assess monitoring data against environmental quality standards when concentrations fluctuate.

  16. A sequential injection system for the spectrophotometric determination of calcium, magnesium and alkalinity in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Raquel B R; Rangel, António O S S

    2004-08-01

    A sequential injection methodology for the spectrophotometric determination of calcium, magnesium and alkalinity in water samples is proposed. A single manifold is used for the determination of the three analytes, and the same protocol sequence allows the sequential determination of calcium and magnesium (the sum corresponds to the water hardness). The determination of both metals is based on their reaction with cresolphtalein complexone; mutual interference is minimized by using 8-hydroxyquinoline for the determination of calcium and ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) for the determination of magnesium. Alkalinity determination is based on a reaction with acetic acid, and corresponding color change of Bromcresol Green. Working ranges of 0.5 - 5 mg dm(-3) for Ca, 0.5 - 10 mg dm(-3) for Mg, and 10 - 100 mg HCO3- dm(-3), for alkalinity have been achieved. The results for water samples were comparable to those of the reference methods and to a certified reference water sample. RSDs lower than 5% were obtained, a low reagent consumption and a reduced volume of effluent have been accomplished. The determination rate for calcium and magnesium is 80 h(-1), corresponding to 40 h(-1) per element, while 65 determinations of alkalinity per hour could be carried out.

  17. Lead in drinking water: sampling in primary schools and preschools in south central Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Anne R; Steele, Janet E

    2012-03-01

    Studies in Philadelphia, New York City, Houston, Washington, DC, and Greenville, North Carolina, have revealed high lead levels in drinking water. Unlike urban areas, lead levels in drinking water in suburban and rural areas have not been adequately studied. In the study described in this article, drinking water in primary schools and preschools in five suburban and rural south central Kansas towns was sampled to determine if any exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) guidance level for schools and child care facilities of 20 parts per billion (ppb). The results showed a total of 32.1% of the samples had detectable lead levels and 3.6% exceeded the U.S. EPA guidance level for schools and child care providers of 20 ppb. These results indicate that about one-third of the drinking water consumed by children age six and under in the five suburban and rural south central Kansas towns studied has some lead contamination, exposing these children to both short-term and long-term health risks. The authors suggest a need for increased surveillance of children's drinking water in these facilities.

  18. A water quality monitoring network design methodology for the selection of critical sampling points: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobl, R O; Robillard, P D; Day, R L; Shannon, R D; McDonnell, A J

    2006-11-01

    In order to resolve the spatial component of the design of a water quality monitoring network, a methodology has been developed to identify the critical sampling locations within a watershed. This methodology, called Critical Sampling Points (CSP), focuses on the contaminant total phosphorus (TP), and is applicable to small, predominantly agricultural-forested watersheds. The CSP methodology was translated into a model, called Water Quality Monitoring Station Analysis (WQMSA). It incorporates a geographic information system (GIS) for spatial analysis and data manipulation purposes, a hydrologic/water quality simulation model for estimating TP loads, and an artificial intelligence technology for improved input data representation. The model input data include a number of hydrologic, topographic, soils, vegetative, and land use factors. The model also includes an economic and logistics component. The validity of the CSP methodology was tested on a small experimental Pennsylvanian watershed, for which TP data from a number of single storm events were available for various sampling points within the watershed. A comparison of the ratios of observed to predicted TP loads between sampling points revealed that the model's results were promising.

  19. Polypyrrole/silica/magnetite nanoparticles as a sorbent for the extraction of sulfonamides from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukchuay, Thanyaporn; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Wannapob, Rodtichoti; Thavarungkul, Panote; Bunkoed, Opas

    2015-09-08

    A magnetic solid-phase extraction sorbent of polypyrrole/silica/magnetite nanoparticles was successfully synthesized and applied for the extraction and preconcentration of sulfonamides in water samples. The magnetite nanoparticles provided a simple and fast separation method for the analytes in water samples. The silica coating increased the surface area that helped to increase the polypyrrole layer. The polypyrrole-coated silica provided a high extraction efficiency due to the π-π and hydrophobic interactions between the polypyrrole and sulfonamides. Several parameters that affected the extraction efficiencies, i.e. the amount of sorbent, pH of the sample, extraction time, extraction temperature, ionic strength, and desorption conditions were investigated. Under the optimal conditions, the method was linear over the range of 0.30-200 μg/L for sulfadiazine and sulfamerazine, and 1.0-200 μg/L for sulfamethazine and sulfamonomethoxine. The limit of detection was 0.30 μg/L for sulfadiazine and sulfamerazine and 1.0 μg/L for sulfamethazine and sulfamonomethoxine. This simple and rapid method was successfully applied to efficiently extract sulfonamides from water samples. It showed a high extraction efficiency for all tested sulfonamides, and the recoveries were in the range of 86.7-99.7% with relative standard deviations of < 6%. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Application of environmental DNA analysis for the detection of Opisthorchis viverrini DNA in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Hiroki; Sato, Megumi; Sato, Marcello Otake; Ikeda, Sumire; Yoonuan, Tippayarat; Sanguankiat, Surapol; Pongvongsa, Tiengkham; Moji, Kazuhiko; Minamoto, Toshifumi

    2017-05-01

    Opisthorchiasis, which can lead to cholangiocarcinoma in cases of chronic infection, is a major public health problem in Southeast Asian countries. The trematode, Opisthorchis viverrini, is the causative agent of the disease. Accurate and rapid monitoring of O. viverrini is crucial for disease prevention and containment. Therefore, in this study we sought to develop a novel species-specific real-time PCR assay for detecting O. viverrini using environmental DNA (eDNA). The diagnostic sensitivity of the newly developed real-time PCR assay was similar to that of the traditional PCR assay for 50 fecal samples collected in Lao PDR (21 and 19 samples were positive by real-time PCR and traditional PCR, respectively). The efficacy of eDNA analysis and its applicability in the field were tested using a total of 94 environmental water samples collected from 44 sites in Savannakhet, Lao PDR during May and October 2015 and February 2016. O. viverrini eDNA was detected in five samples by real-time PCR, indicating the presence of the fluke in the area and the risk of infection for individuals consuming fish from these water sources. The application of eDNA analysis would facilitate the identification of O. viverrini endemic hotspots and contribute to the ecological control of opisthorchiasis, and this strategy can be applied to other eukaryotic water pathogens.

  1. Presence of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in sludge samples from several Spanish water treatment plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, M.; Penalver, A.; Aguilar, C. [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Consorci d' Aigues de Tarragona (CAT), Ctra. Nacional 340 Km. 1094, Ap. correus n.7, 43895 L' Ampolla, Tarragona (Spain); Borrull, F., E-mail: francesc.borrull@urv.cat [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Consorci d' Aigues de Tarragona (CAT), Ctra. Nacional 340 Km. 1094, Ap. correus n.7, 43895 L' Ampolla, Tarragona (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    Sludge samples from eleven potable water treatment plants (PWTP), three waste water treatment plants (WWTP) and an industrial water treatment plant (IWTP), located in different areas of Spain, mainly in Catalonia, were analyzed for their radiological content in order to determine whether they could be considered as industries affected by naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). In general, samples from the PWTPs showed higher activity values for the alpha and gamma emitting isotopes than the WWTPs and the IWTP. For example, samples from the area located in the north of Catalonia show values of {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U in the range of 84.4-792.1 Bq/kg, 3.3-26.8 Bq/kg and 63.8-585.9 Bq/kg, respectively. In general, for PWTP, the values obtained for the gamma emitter and alpha emitter isotopes showed that both the geology and the industrial activities correlate with the values measured. The magnitude of these results demonstrates the need to measure the radionuclide content of these samples before reaching a decision about their final disposal.

  2. Optimizing stream water mercury sampling for calculation of fish bioaccumulation factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva-Murray, Karen; Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste A.; Brigham, Mark E.; Scudder Eikenberry, Barbara C.; Knightes, Christopher; Button, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for game fishes are widely employed for monitoring, assessment, and regulatory purposes. Mercury BAFs are calculated as the fish Hg concentration (Hgfish) divided by the water Hg concentration (Hgwater) and, consequently, are sensitive to sampling and analysis artifacts for fish and water. We evaluated the influence of water sample timing, filtration, and mercury species on the modeled relation between game fish and water mercury concentrations across 11 streams and rivers in five states in order to identify optimum Hgwater sampling approaches. Each model included fish trophic position, to account for a wide range of species collected among sites, and flow-weighted Hgwater estimates. Models were evaluated for parsimony, using Akaike’s Information Criterion. Better models included filtered water methylmercury (FMeHg) or unfiltered water methylmercury (UMeHg), whereas filtered total mercury did not meet parsimony requirements. Models including mean annual FMeHg were superior to those with mean FMeHg calculated over shorter time periods throughout the year. FMeHg models including metrics of high concentrations (80th percentile and above) observed during the year performed better, in general. These higher concentrations occurred most often during the growing season at all sites. Streamflow was significantly related to the probability of achieving higher concentrations during the growing season at six sites, but the direction of influence varied among sites. These findings indicate that streamwater Hg collection can be optimized by evaluating site-specific FMeHg - UMeHg relations, intra-annual temporal variation in their concentrations, and streamflow-Hg dynamics.

  3. Ionizing radiation effect on teas of Camellia sinensis plant irradiated with different water activities; Efeito da radiacao ionizante em chas da planta Camellia sinensis irradiados com diferentes atividades de agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanaro, Gustavo Bernardes

    2013-07-01

    Tea is the most consumed beverage in the world. Teas from Camellia sinensis plant have high levels of antioxidants, which mean that they may have several beneficial effects on health preservation. For centuries, mankind looks for ways to conserve better and for a longer time the food that they eat. The food irradiation process is a largely technique used worldwide, and is recommended by many health agencies and authorities of several countries. The radiation interacts with the material causing two kinds of effects, the direct and the indirect effect. In the direct effect the radiation interacts with the DNA molecule, breaking it, and then inactivates the cell. In the indirect effect, which represents 70% of the interaction, the radiation breaks the water molecule in a process denominated radiolysis, creating a number of free radicals that will interact with the cellular components, leading to the cell death. Therefore, the aim of this work is to study the effects of gamma radiation on two kinds of tea from Camellia sinensis plant irradiated with different water activities. The green tea and black tea samples had their Aw adjusted to three values (high Aw, medium Aw, and low Aw). The samples were irradiated in {sup 60}Co source at doses of 0, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 kGy. The analyses used were: microbiology by plate count, total phenolic compounds quantification, antioxidant activity by ORAC assay, and identification and quantification of main antioxidants in these beverages. It was noted that the greater the quantity of free water present in the medium, the lower was the dose to achieve microbiological control. The green tea showed to be a little more susceptible to irradiation by high Aw once there was more variation in the amount of flavonoids and phenolics than the black tea, decreasing the amount of these compounds in some doses, but increasing the amount in other ones. However in both teas, these changes can be considered insignificant, since

  4. Major Surface-Water Sampling Sites in the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program: 1991 and 1994 Study-Unit Starts - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set shows the 1991 and 1994 National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) study units' major surface-water sampling sites. These sites are in NAWQA's fixed...

  5. HEAVY METAL ANALYSIS IN WASTE WATER SAMPLES FROM VALEA ŞESEI TAILING POND

    OpenAIRE

    I. L. MELENTI; Magyar, E.; T RUSU

    2011-01-01

    Heavy metal analysis in waste water samples from Valea Şesei tailing pond. The mining of ore deposits and the processing and smelting of copper at Roşia Poieni have resulted in an increase of the toxic elements concentration within all components of the environment in the area. Valea Şesei tailing pond is a waste deposit for the Roşia Poieni open-pit and is the biggest tailing pond in Romania. In October 2009, we determined 8 heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn) in 10 waste water ...

  6. Increased formation of halomethanes during chlorination of chloramphenicol in drinking water by UV irradiation, persulfate oxidation, and combined UV/persulfate pre-treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenhai, Chu; Tengfei, Chu; Erdeng, Du; Deng, Yang; Yingqing, Guo; Naiyun, Gao

    2016-02-01

    Ultraviolet/persulfate (UV/PS) has been widely used to generate sulfate radicals for degradation of water organic pollutants in previous studies. However, its impacts on disinfection byproduct formation during post-chlorination of degraded compounds is unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impacts of UV irradiation, PS oxidation, and the combined UV/PS advanced oxidation process (AOP) pre-treatments on halomethane formation during the following chlorination of chloramphenicol (CAP), a model antibiotic commonly found in wastewater-impacted water. Results showed that CAP could be transformed to more trichloromethane (TCM) than monochloromethane (MCM) and dichloromethane (DCM) in the presence of excess chlorine. UV photolysis, PS oxidation and UV/PS AOP all directly decomposed CAP to produce halomethanes (HMs) before post-chlorination. Moreover, UV and UV/PS pre-treatments both enhanced the formation of all the HMs in the subsequent chlorination. PS pre-oxidation decreased the TCM formation during post-chlorination, but increased the yields of MCM, DCM and total HMs. UV pre-irradiation significantly increased the bromide utilization of HMs, whereas UV/PS pre-oxidation decreased the bromine incorporation and utilization of HMs from the chlorination of CAP in a low-bromide water. UV irradiation, PS oxidation, and UV/PS AOP can inactivate pathogens and degrade organic pollutants, but this benefit should be weighed against a potential risk of the increased halomethane formation from degraded organic pollutants with and without post-chlorination.

  7. Detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in water samples with a Becton Dickinson FACSort flow cytometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schets FM; Medema GJ; Boschman GD; LWL; Becton Dickinson Europe, Aalst, Belgie

    1995-01-01

    Current detection techniques for Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in water samples combine filtration of large volumes of water, concentration by centrifugation and flotation and immunofluorescense microscopy. The techniques are extremely labour-intensive and inefficient. The various steps

  8. Evaluation of viability of Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxins degradation in irradiated samples of maize Avaliação da viabilidade de Aspergillus flavus e degradação de aflatoxinas em amostras de milho irradiadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Aquino

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the currently most important fungi in stored grains is Aspergillus flavus, which produce aflatoxins. This fungus can grow on diverse substrates and represents a serious public health and animal nutritional problem. Therefore, the study of techniques that can be applied to the control of aflatoxins is of great importance. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of gamma radiation on the growth of Aspergillus flavus Link and on degradation of aflatoxin B1 and B2 (AFB1 and AFB2 at a relative humidity of 97 99% and a water activity (Aw of 0.88-0.94. Samples of corn grains were irradiated using a cobalt 60 source emitting gamma rays at doses of 2, 5 and 10 kGy. Irradiation was found to be effective in reducing the number colony-forming units of A. flavus, per gram, in the corn samples analyzed. In addition, the fluorescent viability test (fluorescein diacetate and ethidium bromide revealed a decrease in the number of viable cells with increasing irradiation doses and three different fluorescence patterns. Furthermore, irradiation induced a partial reduction in AFB1 and AFB2 levels at the doses of 2 and 5 kGy, whereas complete degradation of aflatoxins was observed in the assay employing 10 kGy.Um dos fungos mais importantes atualmente em grãos armazenados é o Aspergillus flavus, o qual produz aflatoxinas. Este fungo pode crescer em diversos substratos e representa uma séria preocupação em saúde pública e nutrição animal. Portanto, o estudo de técnicas que possam ser aplicadas no controle das aflatoxinas é de grande importância. Assim sendo, o objetivo do presente trabalho foi estudar os efeitos da radiação gama no crescimento de Aspergillus flavus Link e na degradação das aflatoxinas B1 e B2, (AFB1 e AFB2 em umidade relativa (UR de 97-99% e atividade de água (Aa de 0,88-0,94. Amostras de grãos de milho foram irradiadas, utilizando-se uma fonte de Cobalto 60, emissora de raios gama, com as doses de 2; 5

  9. Measurement of drinking water contaminants by solid phase microextraction initially quantified in source water samples by the USGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Robert; Yang, Ill; Lippincott, Robert Lee; Murphy, Eileen; Buckley, Brian

    2008-04-15

    Two adsorbent solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers, 70 microm Carbowax divinylbenzene (CW/DVB) and 65 microm polydimethylsiloxane divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB), were selected for the analysis of several target analytes (phenols, phosphates, phthalates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and chlorinated pesticides) identified by the USGS in surface waters. Detection limits for standards ranged from 0.1 to 1 ng/mL for the CW/ DVB fiber and 0.1 to 2 ng/mL for the PDMS/DVB fiber for 20 of the analytes. The remaining analytes were not extracted because their polarity precluded their partition to the solid phase of the SPMEfiber. Groundwater and treated water samples collected from wells in northern New Jersey were then sampled for the USGS analytes by the SPME method as well as a modified version of EPA 525.5 using C-18 bonded solid phase extraction columns. Nine of the USGS analytes-bisphenol A, bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, butylated hydroxytoluene, butlyated hydroxyanisole, diethyltoulamide, diethyl phthalate, bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and triphenyl phosphate-were detected in groundwater samples using the CW/ DVB fiber.

  10. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  11. Determination of atrazine in surface waters by combination of POCIS passive sampling and ELISA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernoch, Ivo; Fránek, Milan; Diblíková, Iva; Hilscherová, Klára; Randák, Tomáš; Ocelka, Tomáš; Bláha, Luděk

    2011-09-01

    Polar organic compound integrative samplers (POCIS) in combination with instrumental techniques such as LC-MS-MS were previously used to monitor environmental pollutants but the performance of alternative immunochemical methods such as ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) has been explored less. In the present study, POCIS technology was applied to surface water sampling in the Czech Republic, and ELISA was used as a detection technique for the herbicide atrazine. In the first study, 28 samples from streams around small municipal waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) were collected using two different devices (POCISpest and POCISpharm) over the course of 21 days. Elevated atrazine concentrations (up to 25 ng per POCIS) were found in samples down-stream of WWTPs. This observation was also confirmed in another two year study (4 sampling periods) investigating 7 river sites around a major city of Brno as well as the inlet and outlet of the city's WWTP. High atrazine levels were systematically determined at the outlet from the WWTPs (120-605 ng per POCIS). A decreasing trend in the atrazine concentrations in rivers around the city of Brno has been observed, with the highest levels observed within the first sampling period in spring 2007 (100-600 ng per POCIS, with an extreme value of 2760 ng per POCIS). Results of the atrazine ELISA were closely correlated with LC-MS/MS, which confirmed good applicability of ELISA as a cost-effective screening tool.

  12. Modeling sampling strategies for determination of zooplankton abundance in ballast water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Marco R; Johansson, Mattias L; Xiao, Yanyu; Lewis, Mark A; MacIsaac, Hugh J

    2017-02-15

    Ballast water has been a major source of non-indigenous species introductions. The International Maritime Organization has proposed performance standard that will establish an upper limit for viable organisms in discharged ballast. Here we test different sampling efforts for zooplankton in ballast water on a commercial vessel. We fit different probability density functions to find the most representative and evaluated sampling efforts necessary to achieve error rates (α, β) of sample volumes. To estimate error rates, we performed simulations which drew from 1 to 30 replicates of each volume (0.10-3.00m(3)) for mean densities ranging between 1 and 20 organisms m(-3). Fieldwork and simulations suggested that >0.5m(3) samples had the best accuracy and precision, and that the Poisson distribution fit these communities best. This study provides the first field test of a sampling strategy to assess compliance with the future IMO standard for large vessels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Determination of rhodamine B in soft drink, waste water and lipstick samples after solid phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylak, Mustafa; Unsal, Yunus Emre; Yilmaz, Erkan; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2011-08-01

    A new solid phase extraction method is described for sensitive and selective determination of trace levels of rhodamine B in soft drink, food and industrial waste water samples. The method is based on the adsorption of rhodamine B on the Sepabeads SP 70 resin and its elution with 5 mL of acetonitrile in a mini chromatographic column. Rhodamine B was determined by using UV visible spectrophotometry at 556 nm. The effects of different parameters such as pH, amount of rhodamine B, flow rates of sample and eluent solutions, resin amount, and sample volume were investigated. The influences of some alkali, alkali earth and transition metals on the recoveries of rhodamine B were investigated. The preconcentration factor was found 40. The detection limit based on three times the standard deviation of the reagent blank for rhodamine B was 3.14 μg L⁻¹. The relative standard deviations of the procedure were found as 5% in 1×10⁻⁵ mol L⁻¹ rhodamine B. The presented procedure was successfully applied to real samples including soft drink, food and industrial waste water and lipstick samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. TRITIUM UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS FOR SURFACE WATER SAMPLES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, R.

    2012-07-31

    Radiochemical analyses of surface water samples, in the framework of Environmental Monitoring, have associated uncertainties for the radioisotopic results reported. These uncertainty analyses pertain to the tritium results from surface water samples collected at five locations on the Savannah River near the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). Uncertainties can result from the field-sampling routine, can be incurred during transport due to the physical properties of the sample, from equipment limitations, and from the measurement instrumentation used. The uncertainty reported by the SRS in their Annual Site Environmental Report currently considers only the counting uncertainty in the measurements, which is the standard reporting protocol for radioanalytical chemistry results. The focus of this work is to provide an overview of all uncertainty components associated with SRS tritium measurements, estimate the total uncertainty according to ISO 17025, and to propose additional experiments to verify some of the estimated uncertainties. The main uncertainty components discovered and investigated in this paper are tritium absorption or desorption in the sample container, HTO/H{sub 2}O isotopic effect during distillation, pipette volume, and tritium standard uncertainty. The goal is to quantify these uncertainties and to establish a combined uncertainty in order to increase the scientific depth of the SRS Annual Site Environmental Report.

  15. Removal of Pb ion from water samples using red mud (bauxite ore processing waste)

    OpenAIRE

    Ghorbani A.; Nazarfakhari M.; Pourasad Y.; Mesgari Abbasi S.

    2014-01-01

    This work presented the use of red mud (bauxite ore processing waste) in removal of lead ions in water samples. For this 0.1 g of red mud has been used as adsorbent which suspended in 10 ml of lead solution with the concentration of 50 mg l-1 for about 1 h. After that the lead concentration in the samples taken from the red mud treated lead solution measured with atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The effect of some parameter which is important in adsorption of lead on red mud such as suit...

  16. First Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence round-robin test of water samples: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgese, Laura; Bilo, Fabjola; Tsuji, Kouichi; Fernández-Ruiz, Ramón; Margui, Eva; Streli, Christina; Pepponi, Giancarlo; Stosnach, Hagen; Yamada, Takashi; Vandenabeele, Peter; Maina, David M.; Gatari, Michael; Shepherd, Keith D.; Towett, Erick K.; Bennun, Leonardo; Custo, Graciela; Vasquez, Cristina; Depero, Laura E.

    2014-11-01

    Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) is a mature technique to evaluate quantitatively the elemental composition of liquid samples deposited on clean and well polished reflectors. In this paper the results of the first worldwide TXRF round-robin test of water samples, involving 18 laboratories in 10 countries are presented and discussed. The test was performed within the framework of the VAMAS project, interlaboratory comparison of TXRF spectroscopy for environmental analysis, whose aim is to develop guidelines and a standard methodology for biological and environmental analysis by means of the TXRF analytical technique.

  17. Sampling tritiated water vapor from the atmosphere by an active system using silica gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, E.T.S.I. de Bilbao, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo, s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Alegria, N., E-mail: natalia.alegria@ehu.es [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, E.T.S.I. de Bilbao, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo, s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Idoeta, R.; Legarda, F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, E.T.S.I. de Bilbao, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo, s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Among the different methods used to collect the tritiated water vapor (HTO) contained in the atmosphere, one of the most worldwide used is its collection using an air pump, which forces the air to pass through a dry silica gel trap. The silica gel is then distilled to remove the water collected, which is measured in a liquid scintillation counting system. In this paper, an analysis of the water collection efficiency of the silica gel has been done as a function of the temperatures involved, the dimensions of the pipe driving the air into the silica gel traps, the air volume passing through the trap and the flow rates used. Among the obtained conclusions, it can be pointed out that placing the traps inside a cooled container, the amount of silica gel needed to collect all the water contained in the air passing through these traps can be estimated using a weather forecast and a psychometric chart. To do this, and as thermal equilibrium between incoming and open air should be established, a suitable design of the sampling system is proposed. - Highlights: > To recollect the atmosphere air tritiated water vapor, an active system was used. > The system is an air pump and three traps with silica gel connected by a rubber pipe. > The silica gel retention depends on the meteorological conditions and the flow rate. > The amount of water collected and the mass of silica gel need were calculated, F.

  18. Stable isotope analysis of saline water samples on a cavity ring-down spectroscopy instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Ford, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition of water using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instruments utilizing infrared absorption spectroscopy have been comprehensively tested. However, potential limitations of infrared spectroscopy for the analysis of highly saline water have not yet been evaluated. In this study, we assessed uncertainty arising from elevated salt concentrations in water analyzed on a CRDS instrument and the necessity of a correction procedure. We prepared various solutions of mixed salts and separate solutions with individual salts (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2) using deionized water with a known stable isotope composition. Most of the individual salt and salt mixture solutions (some up to 340 g L(-1)) had δ-values within the range usual for CRDS analytical uncertainty (0.1‰ for δ (18)O and 1.0‰ for δ (2)H). Results were not compromised even when the total load of salt in the vaporizer reached ∼38.5 mg (equivalent to build up after running ∼100 ocean water samples). Therefore, highly saline mixtures can be successfully analyzed using CRDS, except highly concentrated MgCl2 solutions, without the need for an additional correction if the vaporizer is frequently cleaned and MgCl2 concentration in water is relatively low.

  19. Influence of water activity and temperature on growth and mycotoxin production by Alternaria alternata on irradiated soya beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo, Maria Silvina; Ramirez, Maria Laura; Barros, Germán Gustavo; Chulze, Sofia Noemi

    2011-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of water activity (a(w)) (0.99-0.90), temperature (15, 25 and 30°C) and their interactions on growth and alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) production by Alternaria alternata on irradiated soya beans. Maximum growth rates were obtained at 0.980 a(w) and 25°C. Minimum a(w) level for growth was dependent on temperature. Both strains were able to grow at the lowest a(w) assayed (0.90). Maximum amount of AOH was produced at 0.98 a(w) but at different temperatures, 15 and 25°C, for the strains RC 21 and RC 39 respectively. Maximum AME production was obtained at 0.98 a(w) and 30°C for both strains. The concentration range of both toxins varied considerably depending on a(w) and temperature interactions. The two metabolites were produced over the temperature range 15 to 30°C and a(w) range 0.99 to 0.96. The limiting a(w) for detectable mycotoxin production is slightly greater than that for growth. Two-dimensional profiles of a(w)× temperature were developed from these data to identify areas where conditions indicate a significant risk from AOH and AME accumulation on soya bean. Knowledge of AOH and AME production under marginal or sub-optimal temperature and a(w) conditions for growth can be important since improper storage conditions accompanied by elevated temperature and moisture content in the grain can favour further mycotoxin production and lead to reduction in grain quality. This could present a hazard if the grain is used for human consumption or animal feedstuff. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of an MSFIA-MPFS pre-treatment method for radium determination in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Y; Gómez, E; Garcias, F; Cerdà, V; Casas, M

    2007-02-28

    A new automatic method for preconcentration and separation of radium in water samples has been developed. Such method combines both multisyringe (MSFIA) and multi-pumping (MPFS) flow analysis techniques allowing to analyze larger sample volumes with a higher throughput than other previous methodologies. Ra adsorbed on MnO(