WorldWideScience

Sample records for water requirements

  1. Defining reclaimed water potability requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    Water used during previous space missions has been either carried or made aloft. Future human space endeavors will probably have to utilize some form of water reclamation and recycling. There is little applied experience in either the US or foreign space programs with this technology. Water reclamation and recycling constitutes an engineering challenge of the broadest nature and will require an intensive research and development effort if this technology is to mature in time for practical use on the proposed US spacestation. In order for this to happen, reclaimed/recycled water specification will need to be devised to guide engineering development. Perhaps the most strigent specifications will involve water to be consumed. NASA's present Potable Water Specifications are not applicable to reclaimed or recycled potable water. No specifications for reclaimed or recycled potable water presently exist either inside or outside NASA. NASA's past experience with potable water systems is reviewed, limitations of the present Potable Water Specifications are examined, present world expertise with potable water reclamation/recycling systems and system analogs is reviewed, and an approach to developing pertinent Reclaimed/Recycled Potable Water Specifications for spacecraft is presented.

  2. WATER REQUIREMENT OF IRRIGATED GARLIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    A replicated field trial was conducted on the West side of the San Joaquin Valley to determine the crop coefficient and water requirements of irrigated garlic. Irrigation systems used included flood irrigation, subsurface drip irrigation, and surface drip irrigation. Irrigation levels were set at 5...

  3. Water Requirements Of Irrigated Garlic

    Science.gov (United States)

    A replicated field trial was conducted on the West side of the San Joaquin Valley to determine the crop coefficient and water requirements of irrigated garlic. Irrigation systems used included flood irrigation, subsurface drip irrigation, and surface drip irrigation. Irrigation levels were set at 5...

  4. Quality requirements for reclaimed/recycled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, Daniel S.; Sauer, Richard L.; Pierson, Duane L.; Thorstenson, Yvonne R.

    1987-01-01

    Water used during current and previous space missions has been either carried or made aloft. Future human space endeavors will require some form of water reclamation and recycling. There is little experience in the U.S. space program with this technology. Water reclamation and recycling constitute engineering challenges of the broadest nature that will require an intensive research and development effort if this technology is to mature in time for practical use on the proposed U.S. Space Station. In order for this to happen, reclaimed/recycled water specifications will need to be devised to guide engineering development. Present NASA Potable Water Specifications are not applicable to reclaimed or recycled water. Adequate specifications for ensuring the quality of the reclaimed or recycled potable water system is reviewed, limitations of present water specifications are examined, world experience with potable water reclamation/recycling systems and systems analogs is reviewed, and an approach to developing pertinent biomedical water specifications for spacecraft is presented. Space Station water specifications should be designed to ensure the health of all likely spacecraft inhabitants including man, animals, and plants.

  5. Consumptive Use and Water Requirements for Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, A. Leon; Haws, Frank W.; Hughes, Trevor C.; Bagley, Jay M.

    1982-01-01

    Foreword: Studies on the meteorological determinants of evapotranspiration were initiated at least as long ago as the 1920s and by the late 1940s had produced the Blaney-Criddle method for estimating crop consumptive use. The resulting ability to estimate water requirements by both location and crop added a new scientific dimension to water rights administration that was first introduced into the courts of Utah d...

  6. Estimated water requirements : Stillwater Wildlife Management Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An estimated 84,850 acre-feet of water are required annually to maintain 23,231 acres of marsh currently developed on the Stillwater WMA. An additional 34,003...

  7. 30 CFR 71.603 - Drinking water; dispensing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drinking water; dispensing requirements. 71.603... COAL MINES Drinking Water § 71.603 Drinking water; dispensing requirements. (a) Water shall be dispensed through a drinking fountain or from a water storage container with an adequate supply of...

  8. Vitamin and water requirements of dairy sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvia Bovera

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors review the physiological role and the daily requirement of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K, vitamin C  and water in dairy sheep. Regarding the vitamins, classical clinical symptoms and/or non-specific parameters, such as  lowered production and reproduction rates are associated with their deficiencies or excesses. Until the last decade,  these compounds were considered important only for the prevention of such alterations; currently, there is more  emphasis on their function as the vitamins can play a key role in optimising animal health. In this respect, of particu-  lar interest is the action of the antioxidant vitamins (especially vitamin C, vitamin E and beta-carotene in improving  the efficiency of the immune system. 

  9. 9 CFR 108.11 - Water quality requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Water quality requirements. 108.11... LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 108.11 Water quality requirements. A certification from the appropriate water pollution control agency, that the establishment is in compliance with applicable water quality control...

  10. 40 CFR 141.83 - Source water treatment requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Source water treatment requirements... water treatment requirements. Systems shall complete the applicable source water monitoring and... monitoring (§ 141.88(d)). (b) Description of source water treatment requirements—(1) System...

  11. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface water requirements. 258.27... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements. MSWLF... wetlands, that violates any requirements of the Clean Water Act, including, but not limited to,...

  12. 9 CFR 3.139 - Food and water requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Food and water requirements. 3.139..., and Marine Mammals Transportation Standards § 3.139 Food and water requirements. (a) All live animals..., written instructions concerning the food and water requirements of such animal while being so...

  13. Water requirements of the copper industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussey, Orville Durey

    1961-01-01

    The copper industry in 1955 used about 330 million gallons of water per day in the mining and manufacturing of primary copper. This amount is about 0.3 percent of the total estimated withdrawals of industrial water in the United States in 1955. These facts were determined by a survey, in 1956, of the amount and chemical quality of the water used by the copper industry. A large part of this water was used in Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah, where about five-sixths of the domestic copper is mined. Much of the remaining water use was near New York City where most of the electrolytic refineries are located, and the rest of the water was used in widely scattered places. A little more than 100,000 gallons of water per ton of copper was used in the production of copper from domestic ores. Of this amount about 70,000 gallons per ton was used in mining and concentrating the ore, and about 30,000 gallons per ton was used to reduce the concentrate to refined copper. In areas where water was scarce or expensive, the unit water use was a little more than half the average. About 60 mgd (million gallons per day) or 18 percent of the water was used consumptively, and nearly all of the consumptive use occurred in the water-short areas of the West. Of the water used in mining and manufacturing primary copper 75 percent was surface water and 25 percent was ground water, 89 percent of this water was self-supplied by the copper companies and 11 percent came from public supplies. Much of the water used in producing primary copper was of comparatively poor quality; about 46 percent was saline containing 1,000 ppm (parts per million) or more of dissolved solids and 54 percent was fresh. Water that is used for concentration of copper ores by flotation or even any water that comes in contact with the ore at any time before it reaches the flotation plant must be free of petroleum products because they interfere with the flotation process. The water used in mining and ore concentration

  14. On the time required to freeze water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, J. R.; Navarro, C.; Sanz, E.; Valeriani, C.; Vega, C.

    2016-12-01

    By using the seeding technique the nucleation rate for the formation of ice at room pressure will be estimated for the TIP4P/ICE model using longer runs and a smaller grid of temperatures than in the previous work. The growth rate of ice will be determined for TIP4P/ICE and for the mW model of water. Although TIP4P/ICE and mW have a similar melting point and melting enthalpy, they differ significantly in the dynamics of freezing. The nucleation rate of mW is lower than that of TIP4P/ICE due to its higher interfacial free energy. Experimental results for the nucleation rate of ice are between the predictions of these two models when obtained from the seeding technique, although closer to the predictions of TIP4P/ICE. The growth rate of ice for the mW model is four orders of magnitude larger than for TIP4P/ICE. Avrami's expression is used to estimate the crystallization time from the values of the nucleation and growth rates. For mW the minimum in the crystallization time is found at approximately 85 K below the melting point and its value is of about a few ns, in agreement with the results obtained from brute force simulations by Moore and Molinero. For the TIP4P/ICE the minimum is found at about 55 K below the melting point, but its value is about ten microseconds. This value is compatible with the minimum cooling rate required to avoid the formation of ice and obtaining a glass phase. The crossover from the nucleation controlled crystallization to the growth controlled crystallization will be discussed for systems of finite size. This crossover could explain the apparent discrepancy between the values of J obtained by different experimental groups for temperatures below 230 K and should be considered as an alternative hypothesis to the two previously suggested: internal pressure and/or surface freezing effects. A maximum in the compressibility was found for the TIP4P/ICE model in supercooled water. The relaxation time is much smaller than the crystallization time

  15. groundwater contribution to crop water requirement groundwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Keywords: Groundwater, water table, capillary rise, soil type, waterleaf, ... GROUNDWATER CONTRIBUTION TO WATERLEAF (TALINUM TRIANGULARE) IN OXISOLS, I. J. ... Nutritionally, ... information to facilitate increased crop production,.

  16. 30 CFR 75.1101-3 - Water requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water requirements. 75.1101-3 Section 75.1101-3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1101-3 Water requirements. Deluge-type water spray systems shall...

  17. Accounting for environmental flow requirements in global water assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pastor, A.V.; Ludwig, F.; Biemans, H.; Hoff, H.; Kabat, P.

    2014-01-01

    As the water requirement for food production and other human needs grows, quantification of environmental flow requirements (EFRs) is necessary to assess the amount of water needed to sustain freshwater ecosystems. EFRs are the result of the quantification of water necessary to sustain the riverine

  18. Agricultural water requirements for commercial production of cranberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abundant water resources are essential for the commercial production of cranberries, which use irrigated water for frost protection, soil moisture management, and harvest and winter floods. Given water resource demands in southeastern Massachusetts, we sought to quantify the annual water requirement...

  19. Energy requirements for waste water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svardal, K; Kroiss, H

    2011-01-01

    The actual mathematical models describing global climate closely link the detected increase in global temperature to anthropogenic activity. The only energy source we can rely on in a long perspective is solar irradiation which is in the order of 10,000 kW/inhabitant. The actual primary power consumption (mainly based on fossil resources) in the developed countries is in the range of 5 to 10 kW/inhabitant. The total power contained in our nutrition is in the range of 0.11 kW/inhabitant. The organic pollution of domestic waste water corresponds to approximately 0.018 kW/inhabitant. The nutrients contained in the waste water can also be converted into energy equivalents replacing market fertiliser production. This energy equivalent is in the range of 0.009 kW/inhabitant. Hence waste water will never be a relevant source of energy as long as our primary energy consumption is in the range of several kW/inhabitant. The annual mean primary power demand of conventional municipal waste water treatment with nutrient removal is in the range of 0.003-0.015 kW/inhabitant. In principle it is already possible to reduce this value for external energy supply to zero. Such plants should be connected to an electrical grid in order to keep investment costs low. Peak energy demand will be supported from the grid and surplus electric energy from the plant can be is fed to the grid. Zero 'carbon footprint' will not be affected by this solution. Energy minimisation must never negatively affect treatment efficiency because water quality conservation is more important for sustainable development than the possible reduction in energy demand. This argument is strongly supported by economical considerations as the fixed costs for waste water infrastructure are dominant.

  20. 30 CFR 75.1107-7 - Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements. (a) Where water spray devices are... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements. 75.1107-7 Section 75.1107-7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  1. [Hygienic requirements on materials in contact with drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, F-U; Schuster, R; Rapp, T

    2007-03-01

    In Germany the hygienic requirements on materials used to supply drinking water are a part of the technical standards. These regulations have to ensure that legal requirements on drinking water are met at the tap. The hygienic harmlessness is assured by requirements on the composition of materials and by test procedures including parametric limits. Historically, the requirements on different types of materials are a part of different technical standards.

  2. Estimation methods of eco-environmental water requirements: Case study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhifeng; CUI Baoshan; LIU Jingling

    2005-01-01

    Supplying water to the ecological environment with certain quantity and quality is significant for the protection of diversity and the realization of sustainable development. The conception and connotation of eco-environmental water requirements, including the definition of the conception, the composition and characteristics of eco-environmental water requirements, are evaluated in this paper. The classification and estimation methods of eco-environmental water requirements are then proposed. On the basis of the study on the Huang-Huai-Hai Area, the present water use, the minimum and suitable water requirement are estimated and the corresponding water shortage is also calculated. According to the interrelated programs, the eco-environmental water requirements in the coming years (2010, 2030, 2050) are estimated. The result indicates that the minimum and suitable eco-environmental water requirements fluctuate with the differences of function setting and the referential standard of water resources, and so as the water shortage. Moreover, the study indicates that the minimum eco-environmental water requirement of the study area ranges from 2.84×1010m3 to 1.02×1011m3, the suitable water requirement ranges from 6.45×1010m3 to 1.78×1011m3, the water shortage ranges from 9.1×109m3 to 2.16×1010m3 under the minimum water requirement, and it is from 3.07×1010m3 to 7.53×1010m3 under the suitable water requirement. According to the different values of the water shortage, the water priority can be allocated. The ranges of the eco-environmental water requirements in the three coming years (2010, 2030, 2050) are 4.49×1010m3-1.73×1011m3, 5.99×10m3?2.09×1011m3, and 7.44×1010m3-2.52×1011m3, respectively.

  3. The dynamic crossover in water does not require bulk water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, David A; Corsaro, Carmelo; Martin, David F; Mallamace, Francesco; Wynne, Klaas

    2012-06-14

    Many of the anomalous properties of water may be explained by invoking a second critical point that terminates the coexistence line between the low- and high-density amorphous states in the liquid. Direct experimental evidence of this point, and the associated polyamorphic liquid-liquid transition, is elusive as it is necessary for liquid water to be cooled below its homogeneous-nucleation temperature. To avoid crystallization, water in the eutectic LiCl solution has been studied but then it is generally considered that "bulk" water cannot be present. However, recent computational and experimental studies observe cooperative hydration in which case it is possible that sufficient hydrogen-bonded water is present for the essential characteristics of water to be preserved. For femtosecond optical Kerr-effect and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, we observe in each case a fractional Stokes-Einstein relation with evidence of the dynamic crossover appearing near 220 K and 250 K respectively. Spectra obtained in the glass state also confirm the complex nature of the hydrogen-bonding modes reported for neat room-temperature water and support predictions of anomalous diffusion due to "worm-hole" structure.

  4. Land and Water requirements for meat production in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, Wanli

    2010-01-01

    China will face a challenge for meat production with its available land and water. The production of meat requires substantial amounts of livestock feed, which in turn require vast amounts of land and water to produce it. As China has continued to develop

  5. Protection of Urban Water body Infrastructure - Policy Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakantan, T. R.; Ramakrishnan, K.

    2017-07-01

    Water body is an important infrastructure of urban landscape. Water bodies like tanks and ponds are constructed to harvest rainwater for local use. Such water bodies serve many environmental functions including flood and soil erosion control and are useful for irrigation, drinking water supply and groundwater recharge. A large number of water bodies recently have been lost due to anthropogenic activities and the remaining water bodies are under stress due to risk of degradation. There are many phases to solve or control the problem; starting from stopping the abuse, to restoration to monitoring and maintenance. In this situation, the existing urban and peri-urban water bodies are to be preserved and rehabilitated. In this study, policy requirements for the protection (preservation and rehabilitation) of water bodies are analyzed with special reference to Thanjavur city. Thanjavur city has many water bodies and moat around the Big-Temple and the palace, and stands as an evidence for water management in ancient days. These water bodies are to be protected and used properly for sustainable growth of the city. This paper envisages the following three: (a) need for evaluation of hydraulic and hydrologic properties of the water bodies for conserving rainwater and controlling flood water in the existing urban water bodies; (b) need for evaluation of potential of socio-environmental services by the water bodies, and (c) need for developing a relative importance index for protection of water bodies to prioritize the remedial actions.

  6. Estimated water requirements for gold heap-leach operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a perspective on the amount of water necessary for conventional gold heap-leach operations. Water is required for drilling and dust suppression during mining, for agglomeration and as leachate during ore processing, to support the workforce (requires water in potable form and for sanitation), for minesite reclamation, and to compensate for water lost to evaporation and leakage. Maintaining an adequate water balance is especially critical in areas where surface and groundwater are difficult to acquire because of unfavorable climatic conditions [arid conditions and (or) a high evaporation rate]; where there is competition with other uses, such as for agriculture, industry, and use by municipalities; and where compliance with regulatory requirements may restrict water usage. Estimating the water consumption of heap-leach operations requires an understanding of the heap-leach process itself. The task is fairly complex because, although they all share some common features, each gold heap-leach operation is unique. Also, estimating the water consumption requires a synthesis of several fields of science, including chemistry, ecology, geology, hydrology, and meteorology, as well as consideration of economic factors.

  7. Origins for the estimations of water requirements in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanti, A P

    2012-12-01

    Water homeostasis generally occurs without conscious effort; however, estimating requirements can be necessary in settings such as health care. This review investigates the derivation of equations for estimating water requirements. Published literature was reviewed for water estimation equations and original papers sought. Equation origins were difficult to ascertain and original references were often not cited. One equation (% of body weight) was based on just two human subjects and another equation (ml water/kcal) was reported for mammals and not specifically for humans. Other findings include that some equations: for children were subsequently applied to adults; had undergone modifications without explicit explanation; had adjusted for the water from metabolism or food; and had undergone conversion to simplify application. The primary sources for equations are rarely mentioned or, when located, lack details conventionally considered important. The sources of water requirement equations are rarely made explicit and historical studies do not satisfy more rigorous modern scientific method. Equations are often applied without appreciating their derivation, or adjusting for the water from food or metabolism as acknowledged by original authors. Water requirement equations should be used as a guide only while employing additional means (such as monitoring short-term weight changes, physical or biochemical parameters and urine output volumes) to ensure the adequacy of water provision in clinical or health-care settings.

  8. Contribution of drinking water to dietary requirements of essential metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Drinking water can be a source of essential metals, but only one study published thus far has compared the intake of essential metals in drinking water to dietary reference intakes. This assessment compares the ingestion of chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn) from drinking water at the maximum concentrations that should be found in water, or at concentrations that are potentially more likely to be found in Canadian water, to the recommended dietary allowance or adequate intake values established by the Institute of Medicine. At guideline limits, water provides sufficient Cr and Cu to meet nutritional requirements, and Mn and Zn levels are sufficient for some age categories to meet nutritional requirements. At concentrations that are more likely to be found in Canadian water, adequate intakes for Cr and Mn may be met by water alone for bottle-fed infants, and water was estimated to provide 23-66% of daily Cu requirements. Drinking water might become a significant source of some essential metals in individuals whose diets are low in these metals, especially in the case of Cu.

  9. Minimum water requirement for social and economic development

    OpenAIRE

    Chenoweth, JL

    2008-01-01

    There is no common understanding of the minimum per capita fresh water requirement for human health and economic and social development. Existing estimates vary between 20 litres and 4,654 litres per capita per day, however, these estimates are methodologically problematic as they consider only human consumptive and hygiene needs, or they consider economic needs but not the effects of trade. Reconsidering the components of a minimum water requirement estimate for human health and for economic...

  10. Accounting for environmental flow requirements in global water assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pastor, A.V.; Ludwig, F.; Biemans, H.; Hoff, H.; Kabat, P.

    2013-01-01

    With growing water needs for food production, it is necessary to improve the quantification of "Environmental Flow Requirements (EFRs)" to secure enough water for the freshwater ecosystems. In this study, five methods for calculating EFRs were compared to 11 case studies of locally-calculated EFRs.

  11. Forecasting Drinking and Household Water Requirement of the Thrace Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Konukcu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at future forecasting drinking and household water requirements of the Thrace region by the aid of a scientific perspective. To realise this, first future population of the region was predicted and then the water requirements were calculated. As results, water requirements of the city and the countryside for the years 2020, 2030, 2040 and 2050 were computed as 1.45, 1.94, 2.58 and 3.44 km3, respectively. Beside, rapidly increasing drinking and household water requirements due to fast population growth and immense amount of migration into the region, demands by agriculture and intensive industry suggest that the present total water potential of about 4.0 km3 will not be sufficient and a great water crisis may be experienced. Adverse effects of a probable global climate change on water resources make the situation more acute. To overcome this crisis, governmental agencies and civil societies are called work together to produce and implement rational strategies.

  12. Study on vegetation ecological water requirement in Ejina Oasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Ecological Water Requirement (EWR) of desert oasis is the amount of water required to maintain a normal growth of vegetation in the special ecosystems. In this study EWR of the Ejina desert oasis is estimated through the relational equation between normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), productivity and transpiration coefficient, which was established by a combination of the RS, GIS, GPS techniques with the field measurements of productivity. The results show that about 1.53×108 m3 water would be needed to maintain the present state of the Ejina Oasis, and the ecological water requirement would amount to 3.49×108 m3 if the existing vegetation was restored to the highest productivity level at present. Considering the domestic water requirement, river delivery loss, oasis vegetation water con-sumption, farmland water demand, precipitation recharge, etc., the draw-off discharge of the Heihe River (at Longxin Mount) should be 1.93×108―2.23 ×108 m3 to maintain the present state of the Ejina Oasis, and 4.28×108―5.17×108 m3 to make the existing vegetation be restored to the highest productiv-ity level at present.

  13. Estimated water requirements for the conventional flotation of copper ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a perspective on the amount of water used by a conventional copper flotation plant. Water is required for many activities at a mine-mill site, including ore production and beneficiation, dust and fire suppression, drinking and sanitation, and minesite reclamation. The water required to operate a flotation plant may outweigh all of the other uses of water at a mine site, [however,] and the need to maintain a water balance is critical for the plant to operate efficiently. Process water may be irretrievably lost or not immediately available for reuse in the beneficiation plant because it has been used in the production of backfill slurry from tailings to provide underground mine support; because it has been entrapped in the tailings stored in the TSF, evaporated from the TSF, or leaked from pipes and (or) the TSF; and because it has been retained as moisture in the concentrate. Water retained in the interstices of the tailings and the evaporation of water from the surface of the TSF are the two most significant contributors to water loss at a conventional flotation circuit facility.

  14. Water requirements of the rayon- and acetate-fiber industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussey, Orville Durey

    1957-01-01

    Water is required for several purposes in the manufacture of rayon and acetate fiber. These water requirements, as indicated by a survey of the water used by the plants operating in 1953, are both quantitative and qualitative. About 300 mgd (million gallons per day) of water was used in 1953 in the preparation of purified wood cellulose and cotton linters, the basic material from which the rayon and acetate fiber is made. An additional 620 mgd was used in the process of converting the cellulose to rayon and acetate fiber. The total, 920 mgd, is about 1 percent of the total estimated withdrawals of industrial water in the United States in 1953. The rayon- and acetate-fiber plants are scattered through eastern United States and generally are located in small towns or rural areas where there are abundant supplies of clean, soft water. Water use at a typical rayon-fiber plant was about 9 mgd, and at a typical acetate-fiber plant about 38 mgd. About 110 gallons of water was used to produce a pound of rayon fiber, 32 gallons per pound was process water and the remainder was used largely for cooling in connection with power production and air conditioning. For the manufacture of a pound of acetate fiber about 170 gallons of water was used. However, the field survey on which this report is based indicated a wide range in the amount of water used per pound of product. For example, in the manufacture of viscose rayon, the maximum unit water use was 8 times the minimum unit water use. Water use in summer was about 22 percent greater than average annual use. About 8 mgd Of water was consumed by evaporation in the manufacture of rayon and acetate fiber. More than 90 percent of the water used by the rayon and acetate industry was with- drawn from surface-water sources, about 8 percent from ground water, and less than 2 percent from municipal water supplies. All available analyses of the untreated waters used by the rayon and acetate industry were collected and studied. The

  15. Statutory protection for the water requirements of natural ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Uys

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available A project was recently registered with the National Parks Board to investigate the need for legal protection of the water requirements of natural ecosystems and the existing legislation which provides such protection. There is a distinct lack of legal protection, which is identified and discussed in this paper. It is submitted that the current South African water law is outdated and in need of reform so as to accommodate the demands of a wider spectrum of user sectors. Since the amendment of the existing water allocation system (in a country where water is a scarce resource could be politically a disconcerting step, it should be made only after due consideration of the various needs for water, the historical foundation of the existing system, and a study made of effective systems in countries with similar water problems. An in-depth study of the historical development of South African water law has already revealed interesting yet abrogated concepts, which can possibly serve as a means of protecting the natural water requirements.

  16. Active diver thermal protection requirements for cold water diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitt, M W; Nuckols, M L

    1983-07-01

    An analysis of the supplemental heating requirements for military divers, both surface-tended and free-swimming, is presented. Specific categories of diver heat loss, including respiratory losses and suit convective losses, are characterized over a range of water temperatures, depths, and breathing gas mixtures. The need for a 1-kW diver heater is identified to accommodate deep dives where the limitation of a surface-supplied hot water source and a long hot water umbilical pose an unacceptable burden. A 0.5-kW heater is shown to be satisfactory to extend the performance of existing closed circuit-breathing apparatuses for shallow water operations in water temperatures as low as 40 degrees F. Substantial benefits in heat savings are shown through the use of passive regenerative breath heaters and alternative suit inflation gases for drysuit use.

  17. The water footprint of energy consumption: an assessment of water requirements of primary energy carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens-Leenes, P.W.; Hoekstra, A.Y.; Van der Meer, T.H.

    2007-01-01

    Gerbens-Leenes, P.W., Hoekstra, A.Y., Van der Meer, T.H., 2007. The water footprint of energy consumption: an assessment of water requirements of primary energy carriers. In: proceedings ‘First World Water Sustainability-Renewable Energy Congress and Exhibition’. 25-28 November 2007, Maastricht, the

  18. The water footprint of energy consumption: an assessment of water requirements of primary energy carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens-Leenes, P.W.; Hoekstra, A.Y.; Van der Meer, T.H.

    2007-01-01

    Gerbens-Leenes, P.W., Hoekstra, A.Y., Van der Meer, T.H., 2007. The water footprint of energy consumption: an assessment of water requirements of primary energy carriers. In: proceedings ‘First World Water Sustainability-Renewable Energy Congress and Exhibition’. 25-28 November 2007, Maastricht, the

  19. 9 CFR 3.38 - Food and water requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Food and water requirements. 3.38 Section 3.38 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment,...

  20. 9 CFR 3.89 - Food and water requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Food and water requirements. 3.89 Section 3.89 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment,...

  1. 9 CFR 3.16 - Food and water requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Food and water requirements. 3.16 Section 3.16 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment,...

  2. 9 CFR 3.63 - Food and water requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Food and water requirements. 3.63 Section 3.63 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment...

  3. 9 CFR 3.115 - Food and drinking water requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Food and drinking water requirements. 3.115 Section 3.115 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care,...

  4. Estimation of crop water requirements using remote sensing for operational water resources management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliades, Lampros; Spiliotopoulos, Marios; Tzabiras, John; Loukas, Athanasios; Mylopoulos, Nikitas

    2015-06-01

    An integrated modeling system, developed in the framework of "Hydromentor" research project, is applied to evaluate crop water requirements for operational water resources management at Lake Karla watershed, Greece. The framework includes coupled components for operation of hydrotechnical projects (reservoir operation and irrigation works) and estimation of agricultural water demands at several spatial scales using remote sensing. The study area was sub-divided into irrigation zones based on land use maps derived from Landsat 5 TM images for the year 2007. Satellite-based energy balance for mapping evapotranspiration with internalized calibration (METRIC) was used to derive actual evapotranspiration (ET) and crop coefficient (ETrF) values from Landsat TM imagery. Agricultural water needs were estimated using the FAO method for each zone and each control node of the system for a number of water resources management strategies. Two operational strategies of hydro-technical project development (present situation without operation of the reservoir and future situation with the operation of the reservoir) are coupled with three water demand strategies. In total, eight (8) water management strategies are evaluated and compared. The results show that, under the existing operational water resources management strategies, the crop water requirements are quite large. However, the operation of the proposed hydro-technical projects in Lake Karla watershed coupled with water demand management measures, like improvement of existing water distribution systems, change of irrigation methods, and changes of crop cultivation could alleviate the problem and lead to sustainable and ecological use of water resources in the study area.

  5. [Water requirements, water supply and thermoregulation in small ruminants in pasture-based husbandry systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, D; Strobel, H; Axt, H; Voigt, K

    2015-01-01

    Water is an essential source of life and is available to animals as free water, water content of feed, film water (e. g. dew) and metabolic water. The water requirements of small ruminants are influenced by the type of feed, climate, stage of production, type and length of the fleece or hair coat, husbandry factors and the general health of the animal. Differences in water metabolism, drinking behaviour and the efficiency of temperature regulation are further influenced by species, breed, production type, husbandry system, acclimatisation and adaptation. Small ruminants have been, and are still predominantly kept in extensive husbandry systems. They are therefore genetically and phenotypically well adapted to these conditions and possess a range of physiological and behavioural mechanisms to deal with adverse and suboptimal weather conditions. Regarding animal welfare, there is considerable debate in the discussion and assessment of what constitutes a sufficient water supply for small ruminants under different husbandry conditions, often involving differences between theoretical demands and practical experience. This publication reviews and summarises the current literature regarding water requirements, water metabolism and thermoregulatory mechanisms of small ruminants to provide the basis for an informed assessment of extensive husbandry systems in terms of compliance with animal-welfare requirements.

  6. Global net irrigation water requirements from various water supply sources during past and future periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, S.; Cho, J.; Hanasaki, N.; Kanae, S.

    2014-12-01

    Water supply sources for irrigation (e.g. rivers and reservoirs) are critically important for agricultural productivity. The current rapid increase in irrigation water use is considered unsustainable and threatens food production. In this study, we estimated the time-varying dependence of irrigation water requirements from water supply sources, with a particular focus on variations in irrigation area during past (1960-2001) and future (2002-2050) periods using the global water resources model, H08. The H08 model can simulate water requirements on a daily basis at a resolution of 1.0° × 1.0° latitude and longitude. The sources of irrigation water requirements in the past simulations were specified using four categories: rivers (RIV), large reservoirs (LR), medium-size reservoirs (MSR), and non-local non-renewable blue water (NNBW). The simulated results from 1960 to 2001 showed that RIV, MSR and NNBW increased significantly from the 1960s to the early 1990s globally, but LR increased at a relatively low rate. After the early 1990s, the increase in RIV declined as it approached a critical limit, due to the continued expansion of irrigation area. MSR and NNBW increased significantly, during the same time period, following the expansion of the irrigation area and the increased storage capacity of the medium-size reservoirs. We also estimated future irrigation water requirements from the above four water supply sources and an additional water supply source (ADD) in three future simulation designs; irrigation area change, climate change, and changes in both irrigation area and climate. ADD was defined as a future increase in NNBW. After the 2020s, MSR was predicted to approach the critical limit, and ADD would account for 11-23% of the total requirements in the 2040s.

  7. Design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation test bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, J.M.; Valentich, D.J.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes the design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) test bed that will be located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The test bed will process a maximum of 50 gph of waste plus the required volume of cooling water. The test bed will evaluate the performance of a number of SCWO reactor designs. The goal of the project is to select a reactor that can be scaled up for use in a full-size waste treatment facility to process US Department of Energy mixed wastes. EG&G Idaho, Inc. will design and construct the SCWO test bed at the Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF), located in the northern region of the INEL. Private industry partners will develop and provide SCWO reactors to interface with the test bed. A number of reactor designs will be tested, including a transpiring wall, tube, and vessel-type reactor. The initial SCWO reactor evaluated will be a transpiring wall design. This design requirements report identifies parameters needed to proceed with preliminary and final design work for the SCWO test bed. A flow sheet and Process and Instrumentation Diagrams define the overall process and conditions of service and delineate equipment, piping, and instrumentation sizes and configuration Codes and standards that govern the safe engineering and design of systems and guidance that locates and interfaces test bed hardware are provided. Detailed technical requirements are addressed for design of piping, valves, instrumentation and control, vessels, tanks, pumps, electrical systems, and structural steel. The approach for conducting the preliminary and final designs and environmental and quality issues influencing the design are provided.

  8. An Assessment of Global Net Irrigation Water Requirements from Various Water Supply Sources to Sustain Irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Sayaka; Cho, Jail; Yamada, Hannah; Khajuria, Anupam; Hanasaki, Naota; Kanae, Shinjiro

    2014-05-01

    Water supply sources for irrigation, such as rivers, reservoirs, and groundwater, are critically important for agricultural productivity. The current rapid increase in irrigation water use threatens sustainable food production. In this study, we estimated the time-varying dependence of irrigation water requirements from water supply sources, with a particular focus on variations in irrigation area during the period 1960-2050 using the global water resources model, H08. The H08 model simulates water requirements on a daily basis at a resolution of 1.0° × 1.0° . The sources of irrigation water requirements in the past simulations were specified using four categories: rivers (RIV), large reservoirs (LR) with a storage capacity greater than 1.0 km3, medium-size reservoirs (MSR) with storage capacities ranging from 1.0 km3 to 3.0 M m3, and non-local non-renewable blue water (NNBW). We also estimated future irrigation water requirements from the above four water supply sources and an additional water supply source (ADD) in three future simulation designs; irrigation area change, climate change, and changes in both irrigation area and climate. ADD was defined as the difference between NNBW in the 1990s and NNBW in the 2040s, because it was difficult to distinguish the types of future water supply sources except for RIV. The simulated results showed that RIV, MSR, and NNBW increased significantly through the 1960s to the early 1990s globally, but LR increased at a relatively low rate. After the early 1990s, RIV approached a critical limit due to the continued expansion of the irrigation area. Furthermore, MSR and NNBW increased significantly following the expansion of the irrigation area and the increased storage capacity of the medium-size reservoirs. After the 2020s, MSR could be expected to approach the critical limit without the construction of medium-size reservoirs. ADD would account for 11-23% of the total requirements in the 2040s. We found that an expansion of

  9. Defining regulatory requirements for water supply systems in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deryushev Leonid Georgiyevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article the authors offer their suggestions for improving the reliability of the standardization requirements for water supply facilities in Vietnam, as an analog of building regulations of Russia 31.13330.2012. In Russia and other advanced countries the reliability of the designed water supply systems is usual to assess quantitatively. Guidelines on the reliability assessment of water supply systems and facilities have been offered by many researchers, but these proposals are not officially approved. Some methods for assessing the reliability of water supply facilities are informally used in practice when describing their quality. These evaluation methods are simple and useful. However, the given estimations defy common sense and regulatory requirements used by all the organizations, ministries and departments, for example, of Russia, in the process of allowances for restoration and repair of water supply facilities. Inadequacy of the water supply facilities assessment is shown on the example of assessing the reliability of pipeline system. If we take MTBF of specific length of the pipeline as reliability index for a pipeline system, for example, 5 km, a pipeline of the similar gauge, material and working conditions with the length of 5 m, according to the estimation on the basis of non-official approach, must have a value of MTBF 1000 times greater than with the length of 5 km. This conclusion runs counter to common sense, for the reason that all the pipes in the area of 5 km are identical, have the same load and rate of wear (corrosion, fouling, deformation, etc.. It was theoretically and practically proved that products of the same type in the same operating conditions (excluding determined impact of a person, work as an entity, which MTBF is equal to the average lifetime. It is proposed to take the average service life as a reliability indicator of a pipeline. Durability, but not failsafety of the pipe guarantees pipeline functioning

  10. SEBAL Model Using to Estimate Irrigation Water Efficiency & Water Requirement of Alfalfa Crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyliger, Anatoly; Ermolaeva, Olga

    2013-04-01

    The sustainability of irrigation is a complex and comprehensive undertaking, requiring an attention to much more than hydraulics, chemistry, and agronomy. A special combination of human, environmental, and economic factors exists in each irrigated region and must be recognized and evaluated. A way to evaluate the efficiency of irrigation water use for crop production is to consider the so-called crop-water production functions, which express the relation between the yield of a crop and the quantity of water applied to it or consumed by it. The term has been used in a somewhat ambiguous way. Some authors have defined the Crop-Water Production Functions between yield and the total amount of water applied, whereas others have defined it as a relation between yield and seasonal evapotranspiration (ET). In case of high efficiency of irrigation water use the volume of water applied is less than the potential evapotranspiration (PET), then - assuming no significant change of soil moisture storage from beginning of the growing season to its end-the volume of water may be roughly equal to ET. In other case of low efficiency of irrigation water use the volume of water applied exceeds PET, then the excess of volume of water applied over PET must go to either augmenting soil moisture storage (end-of-season moisture being greater than start-of-season soil moisture) or to runoff or/and deep percolation beyond the root zone. In presented contribution some results of a case study of estimation of biomass and leaf area index (LAI) for irrigated alfalfa by SEBAL algorithm will be discussed. The field study was conducted with aim to compare ground biomass of alfalfa at some irrigated fields (provided by agricultural farm) at Saratov and Volgograd Regions of Russia. The study was conducted during vegetation period of 2012 from April till September. All the operations from importing the data to calculation of the output data were carried by eLEAF company and uploaded in Fieldlook web

  11. Requirements for water assessment tools: An automotive industry perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry A. Mueller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Water availability is one of the greatest global sustainability challenges. Water is not available in adequate quantity and quality in many areas and water shortfalls are expected to increase. Businesses are facing water-related challenges due to inadequate water availability and poor resource management. Identifying and quantifying impacts is key to enabling companies to make effective management decisions. Several water assessment tools have been developed to help companies understand the complex nature of water challenges; however, there remain significant gaps in the datasets and inconsistencies in measurement and reporting of geographic water shortfalls. There is a need for more complete datasets containing information on water withdrawal and discharge, freshwater availability and depletion (spatially and temporally, water quality monitoring, reuse and recycling. We discuss four of the available water assessment tools (Global Water Tool, India Water Tool, Water Risk Filter and Aqueduct and highlight those elements most critical to water-related business decisions.

  12. 40 CFR 131.6 - Minimum requirements for water quality standards submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum requirements for water quality... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS General Provisions § 131.6 Minimum requirements for water quality standards submission. The following elements must be included in each State's water...

  13. Developing an operational rangeland water requirement satisfaction index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, G.B.; Verdin, J.P.; Rowland, J.

    2011-01-01

    Developing an operational water requirement satisfaction index (WRSI) for range-land monitoring is an important goal of the famine early warning systems network. An operational WRSI has been developed for crop monitoring, but until recently a comparable WRSI for rangeland was not successful because of the extremely poor performance of the index when based on published crop coefficients (Kc) for rangelands. To improve the rangeland WRSI, we developed a simple calibration technique that adjusts the Kc values for rangeland monitoring using long-term rainfall distribution and reference evapotranspiration data. The premise for adjusting the Kc values is based on the assumption that a viable rangeland should exhibit above-average WRSI (values >80%) during a normal year. The normal year was represented by a median dekadal rainfall distribution (satellite rainfall estimate from 1996 to 2006). Similarly, a long-term average for potential evapotranspiration was used as input to the famine early warning systems network WRSI model in combination with soil-water-holding capacity data. A dekadal rangeland WRSI has been operational for east and west Africa since 2005. User feedback has been encouraging, especially with regard to the end-of-season WRSI anomaly products that compare the index's performance to 'normal' years. Currently, rangeland WRSI products are generated on a dekadal basis and posted for free distribution on the US Geological Survey early warning website at http://earlywarning.usgs.gov/adds/.

  14. Water Requirements for Food Assessed at Different Levels of Scale

    OpenAIRE

    de Ruiter, Henri

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Fresh water scarcity is a major and increasing problem. Increasing water scarcity will have consequences for food security; thus strategies are needed to reduce the appropriation of water. Since agriculture uses 70% of all freshwater withdrawals,

  15. Water Requirements for Food Assessed at Different Levels of Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter de, Henri

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Fresh water scarcity is a major and increasing problem. Increasing water scarcity will have consequences for food security; thus strategies are needed to reduce the appropriation of water. Since agriculture uses 70% of all freshwater withdrawals,

  16. 33 CFR 151.2035 - What are the required ballast water management practices for my vessel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... water management practices for my vessel? 151.2035 Section 151.2035 Navigation and Navigable Waters... SUBSTANCES, GARBAGE, MUNICIPAL OR COMMERCIAL WASTE, AND BALLAST WATER Ballast Water Management for Control of Nonindigenous Species in Waters of the United States § 151.2035 What are the required ballast water...

  17. Integrated Water Resource Management and Energy Requirements for Water Supply in the Copiapó River Basin, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Suárez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Population and industry growth in dry climates are fully tied to significant increase in water and energy demands. Because water affects many economic, social and environmental aspects, an interdisciplinary approach is needed to solve current and future water scarcity problems, and to minimize energy requirements in water production. Such a task requires integrated water modeling tools able to couple surface water and groundwater, which allow for managing complex basins where multiple stakeholders and water users face an intense competition for limited freshwater resources. This work develops an integrated water resource management model to investigate the water-energy nexus in reducing water stress in the Copiapó River basin, an arid, highly vulnerable basin in northern Chile. The model was utilized to characterize groundwater and surface water resources, and water demand and uses. Different management scenarios were evaluated to estimate future resource availability, and compared in terms of energy requirements and costs for desalinating seawater to eliminate the corresponding water deficit. Results show a basin facing a very complex future unless measures are adopted. When a 30% uniform reduction of water consumption is achieved, 70 GWh over the next 30 years are required to provide the energy needed to increase the available water through seawater desalination. In arid basins, this energy could be supplied by solar energy, thus addressing water shortage problems through integrated water resource management combined with new technologies of water production driven by renewable energy sources.

  18. 18 CFR 401.36 - Water supply projects-Conservation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water supply projects-Conservation requirements. 401.36 Section 401.36 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN... Compact § 401.36 Water supply projects—Conservation requirements. Maximum feasible efficiency in the...

  19. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced... my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  20. 21 CFR 1240.80 - General requirements for water for drinking and culinary purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General requirements for water for drinking and... DRUG ADMINISTRATION CONTROL OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.80 General requirements for water for drinking and culinary purposes. Only potable water shall be provided for...

  1. 40 CFR 141.87 - Monitoring requirements for water quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring requirements for water... § 141.87 Monitoring requirements for water quality parameters. All large water systems, and all small... representative of water quality and treatment conditions throughout the system. (d) Monitoring after State...

  2. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment, or... water, sediment, or slurry impoundment which meets the requirements of § 77.216(a) shall adopt a program... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...

  3. 40 CFR 141.86 - Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 141.86 Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in tap water. (a) Sample site location. (1) By the... requirements of § 141.87(e)(2), that it has re-qualified for triennial monitoring. (vii) Any water system... requirements for lead (i.e., a “lead waiver”), the water system must provide certification and...

  4. 40 CFR 141.403 - Treatment technique requirements for ground water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....403 Treatment technique requirements for ground water systems. (a) Ground water systems with significant deficiencies or source water fecal contamination. (1) The treatment technique requirements of this... requirements of this section. (3) When a significant deficiency is identified at a Subpart H public...

  5. Food consumption patterns and their effect on water requirement in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, J.; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2008-01-01

    It is widely recognized that food consumption patterns significantly impact water requirements. The aim of this paper is to quantify how food consumption patterns influence water requirements in China. The findings show that per capita water requirement for food (CWRF) has increased from 255 m3 cap-

  6. Treatment Process Requirements for Waters Containing Hydraulic Fracturing Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfellow, W. T.; Camarillo, M. K.; Domen, J. K.; Sandelin, W.; Varadharajan, C.; Cooley, H.; Jordan, P. D.; Heberger, M. G.; Reagan, M. T.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    A wide variety of chemical additives are used as part of the hydraulic fracturing (HyF) process. There is concern that HyF chemicals will be released into the environment and contaminate drinking water, agricultural water, or other water used for beneficial purposes. There is also interest in using produced water (water extracted from the subsurface during oil and gas production) for irrigation and other beneficial purposes, especially in the arid Southwest US. Reuse of produced water is not speculative: produced water can be low in salts and is being used in California for irrigation after minimal treatment. In this study, we identified chemicals that are used for hydraulic fracturing in California and conducted an analysis to determine if those chemicals would be removed by a variety of technically available treatment processes, including oil/water separation, air stripping, a variety of sorption media, advanced oxidation, biological treatment, and a variety of membrane treatment systems. The approach taken was to establish major physiochemical properties for individual chemicals (log Koc, Henry's constant, biodegradability, etc.), group chemicals by function (e.g corrosion inhibition, biocides), and use those properties to predict the fate of chemical additives in a treatment process. Results from this analysis is interpreted in the context of what is known about existing systems for the treatment of produced water before beneficial reuse, which includes a range of treatment systems from oil/water separators (the most common treatment) to sophisticated treatment trains used for purifying produced water for groundwater recharge. The results show that most HyF chemical additives will not be removed in existing treatment systems, but that more sophisticated treatment trains can be designed to remove additives before beneficial reuse.

  7. DIETARY WATER AND SODIUM REQUIREMENTS FOR ACTIVE ADULTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. Larry Kenney

    2005-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · The 2004 recommendations on water and sodium intake from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences are targeted primarily at sedentary Americans. These guidelines for water and salt intake should not be applied to athletes.

  8. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Digital Architecture Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Kenneth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Digital Architecture effort is a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The LWRS program is performed in close collaboration with industry research and development (R&D) programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants (NPPs). One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. Therefore, a major objective of the LWRS program is the development of a seamless digital environment for plant operations and support by integrating information from plant systems with plant processes for nuclear workers through an array of interconnected technologies. In order to get the most benefits of the advanced technology suggested by the different research activities in the LWRS program, the nuclear utilities need a digital architecture in place to support the technology. A digital architecture can be defined as a collection of information technology (IT) capabilities needed to support and integrate a wide-spectrum of real-time digital capabilities for nuclear power plant performance improvements. It is not hard to imagine that many processes within the plant can be largely improved from both a system and human performance perspective by utilizing a plant wide (or near plant wide) wireless network. For example, a plant wide wireless network allows for real time plant status information to easily be accessed in the control room, field workers’ computer-based procedures can be updated based on the real time plant status, and status on ongoing procedures can be incorporated into smart schedules in the outage command center to allow for more accurate planning of critical tasks. The goal

  9. 76 FR 3646 - Safety Requirements and Manning Exemption Eligibility on Distant Water Tuna Fleet Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Safety Requirements and Manning Exemption Eligibility on Distant Water Tuna Fleet... Requirements and Manning Exemption Eligibility on Distant Water Tuna Fleet Vessels. All comments received will... availability of a draft policy regarding distant water tuna fleet vessels manning exemption eligibility...

  10. 78 FR 18562 - Economic and Environmental Principles and Requirements for Water and Related Land Resources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... QUALITY Economic and Environmental Principles and Requirements for Water and Related Land Resources... Principles and Requirements. SUMMARY: Section 2031 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2007 (Pub. L... Guidelines for Water and Related Land Resources Implementation Studies'' (Principles and Guidelines),...

  11. 40 CFR 258.53 - Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....53 Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements. (a) The ground-water monitoring program must... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements. 258.53 Section 258.53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  12. 76 FR 57740 - Program Requirement Revisions Related to the Public Water System Supervision Programs for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... AGENCY Program Requirement Revisions Related to the Public Water System Supervision Programs for the... the process of revising their respective approved Public Water System Supervision (PWSS) programs to meet the requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). The State of Rhode Island has...

  13. 40 CFR 264.97 - General ground-water monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FACILITIES Releases From Solid Waste Management Units § 264.97 General ground-water monitoring requirements. The owner or operator must comply with the following requirements for any ground-water monitoring... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General ground-water...

  14. 40 CFR 141.26 - Monitoring frequency and compliance requirements for radionuclides in community water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for radionuclides in community water systems. (a) Monitoring and compliance requirements for gross... source of water must begin to conduct initial monitoring for the new source within the first quarter... initial monitoring requirements, a community water system having only one entry point to the distribution...

  15. 15 CFR 923.45 - Air and water pollution control requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air and water pollution control....45 Air and water pollution control requirements. The program must incorporate, by reference or otherwise, all requirements established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (Clean...

  16. WATER TRAPPING ON TIDALLY LOCKED TERRESTRIAL PLANETS REQUIRES SPECIAL CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S. [Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Liu, Yonggang [Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Hu, Yongyun, E-mail: junyang28@uchicago.edu [Laboratory for Climate and Atmosphere-Ocean Studies, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2014-12-01

    Surface liquid water is essential for standard planetary habitability. Calculations of atmospheric circulation on tidally locked planets around M stars suggest that this peculiar orbital configuration lends itself to the trapping of large amounts of water in kilometers-thick ice on the night side, potentially removing all liquid water from the day side where photosynthesis is possible. We study this problem using a global climate model including coupled atmosphere, ocean, land, and sea ice components as well as a continental ice sheet model driven by the climate model output. For a waterworld, we find that surface winds transport sea ice toward the day side and the ocean carries heat toward the night side. As a result, nightside sea ice remains O(10 m) thick and nightside water trapping is insignificant. If a planet has large continents on its night side, they can grow ice sheets O(1000 m) thick if the geothermal heat flux is similar to Earth's or smaller. Planets with a water complement similar to Earth's would therefore experience a large decrease in sea level when plate tectonics drives their continents onto the night side, but would not experience complete dayside dessiccation. Only planets with a geothermal heat flux lower than Earth's, much of their surface covered by continents, and a surface water reservoir O(10%) of Earth's would be susceptible to complete water trapping.

  17. 40 CFR 141.88 - Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in source water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 141.88 Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in source water. (a) Sample location, collection... water samples in accordance with the following requirements regarding sample location, number of samples... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring requirements for lead...

  18. 76 FR 31351 - Safety Requirements and Manning Exemption Eligibility on Distant Water Tuna Fleet Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Safety Requirements and Manning Exemption Eligibility on Distant Water Tuna Fleet... availability of Office of Vessel Activities Policy Letter 11-05 regarding Distant Water Tuna Fleet vessels manning exemption eligibility and safety requirements. This final policy clarifies the requirements...

  19. Offsetting Water Requirements and Stress with Enhanced Water Recovery from CO2 Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Kelsey Anne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-04

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) operations ultimately require injecting and storing CO2 into deep saline aquifers. Reservoir pressure typically rises as CO2 is injected increasing the cost and risk of CCUS and decreasing viable storage within the formation. Active management of the reservoir pressure through the extraction of brine can reduce the pressurization while providing a number of benefits including increased storage capacity for CO2, reduced risks linked to reservoir overpressure, and CO2 plume management. Through enhanced water recovery (EWR), brine within the saline aquifer can be extracted and treated through desalination technologies which could be used to offset the water requirements for thermoelectric power plants or local water needs such as agriculture, or produce a marketable such as lithium through mineral extraction. This paper discusses modeled scenarios of CO2 injection into the Rock Springs Uplift (RSU) formation in Wyoming with EWR. The Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code (FEHM), developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), was used to model CO2 injection with brine extraction and the corresponding pressure tradeoffs. Scenarios were compared in order to analyze how pressure management through the quantity and location of brine extraction wells can increase CO2 storage capacity and brine extraction while reducing risks associated with over pressurization. Future research will couple a cost-benefit analysis to these simulations in order to determine if the benefit of subsurface pressure management and increase CO2 storage capacity can outweigh multiple extraction wells with increased cost of installation and maintenance as well as treatment and/or disposal of the extracted brine.

  20. Water requirements for livestock production: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlink, A C; Nguyen, M L; Viljoen, G J

    2010-12-01

    Water is a vital but poorly studied component of livestock production. It is estimated that livestock industries consume 8% of the global water supply, with most of that water being used for intensive, feed-based production. This study takes a broad perspective of livestock production as a component of the human food chain, and considers the efficiency of its water use. Global models are in the early stages of development and do not distinguish between developing and developed countries, or the production systems within them. However, preliminary indications are that, when protein production is adjusted for biological value in the human diet, no plant protein is significantly more efficient at using water than protein produced from eggs, and only soybean is more water efficient than milk and goat and chicken meat. In some regions, especially developing countries, animals are not used solely for food production but also provide draught power, fibre and fertiliser for crops. In addition, animals make use of crop by-products that would otherwise go to waste. The livestock sector is the fastest-growing agricultural sector, which has led to increasing industrialisation and, in some cases, reduced environmental constraints. In emerging economies, increasing involvement in livestock is related to improving rural wealth and increasing consumption of animal protein. Water usage for livestock production should be considered an integral part of agricultural water resource management, taking into account the type of production system (e.g. grain-fed or mixed crop-livestock) and scale (intensive or extensive), the species and breeds of livestock, and the social and cultural aspects of livestock farming in various countries.

  1. 40 CFR 131.8 - Requirements for Indian Tribes to administer a water quality standards program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... administer a water quality standards program. 131.8 Section 131.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS General Provisions § 131.8 Requirements for Indian Tribes to administer a water quality standards program. (a) The Regional Administrator, as...

  2. Critical water requirements for food, methodology and policy consequences for food security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens-Leenes, P.W.; Nonhebel, S.

    2004-01-01

    Food security and increasing water scarcity have a dominant place on the food policy agenda. Food security requires sufficient water of adequate quality because water is a prerequisite for plant growth. Nowadays, agriculture accounts for 70% of the worldwide human fresh water use. The expected incre

  3. Critical water requirements for food, methodology and policy consequences for food security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens-Leenes, P.W.; Nonhebel, S.

    2004-01-01

    Food security and increasing water scarcity have a dominant place on the food policy agenda. Food security requires sufficient water of adequate quality because water is a prerequisite for plant growth. Nowadays, agriculture accounts for 70% of the worldwide human fresh water use. The expected

  4. Process and utility water requirements for cellulosic ethanol production processes via fermentation pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increasing need of additional water resources for energy production is a growing concern for future economic development. In technology development for ethanol production from cellulosic feedstocks, a detailed assessment of the quantity and quality of water required, and the ...

  5. Process and utility water requirements for cellulosic ethanol production processes via fermentation pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increasing need of additional water resources for energy production is a growing concern for future economic development. In technology development for ethanol production from cellulosic feedstocks, a detailed assessment of the quantity and quality of water required, and the ...

  6. Wind increases "evaporative demand" but reduces plant water requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, S. J.; Or, D.

    2015-12-01

    Transpiration is commonly conceptualised as a fraction of some potential rate, determined by stomatal or canopy resistance. Therefore, so-called "atmospheric evaporative demand" or "potential evaporation" is generally used alongside with precipitation and soil moisture to characterise the environmental conditions that affect plant water use. An increase in potential evaporation (e.g. due to climate change) is generally believed to cause increased transpiration and/or vegetation water stress, aggravating drought effects. In the present study, we investigated the question whether potential evaporation constitutes a meaningful reference for transpiration and compared sensitivity of potential evaporation and leaf transpiration to atmospheric forcing. Based on modelling results and supporting experimental evidence, we conclude that stomatal resistance cannot be parameterised as a factor relating transpiration to potential evaporation, as the ratio between transpiration and potential evaporation not only varies with stomatal resistance, but also with wind speed, air temperature, irradiance and relative humidity. Furthermore, the effect of wind speed in particular implies increase in potential evaporation, which is commonly interpreted as increased "water stress", but at the same time can reduce leaf transpiration, implying a decrease in water demand at the leaf scale. In fact, in a range of field measurements, we found that water use efficiency (WUE, carbon uptake per water transpired) commonly increases with increasing wind speed, enabling plants to conserve water during photosynthesis. We estimate that the observed global decrease in terrestrial near-surface wind speeds could have reduced WUE at a magnitude similar to the increase in WUE attributed to global rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We conclude that trends in wind speed and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have to be considered explicitly for the estimation of drought effects on

  7. Water Trapping on Tidally Locked Terrestrial Planets Requires Special Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jun; Hu, Yongyun; Abbot, Dorian S

    2014-01-01

    Surface liquid water is essential for standard planetary habitability. Calculations of atmospheric circulation on tidally locked planets around M stars suggest that this peculiar orbital configuration lends itself to the trapping of large amounts of water in kilometers-thick ice on the night side, potentially removing all liquid water from the day side where photosynthesis is possible. We study this problem using a global climate model including coupled atmosphere, ocean, land, and sea-ice components as well as a continental ice sheet model driven by the climate model output. For a waterworld we find that surface winds transport sea ice toward the day side and the ocean carries heat toward the night side. As a result, night-side sea ice remains O(10 m) thick and night-side water trapping is insignificant. If a planet has large continents on its night side, they can grow ice sheets O(1000 m) thick if the geothermal heat flux is similar to Earth's or smaller. Planets with a water complement similar to Earth's w...

  8. Climate and ET: Does Plant Water Requirements Increase during Droughts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fipps, G.

    2015-12-01

    Municipalities, engineering consultants and State agencies use reference evapotranspiration (ETo) data (directly and indirectly) for long-term water planning, for designing hydraulic structures, and for establishing regulatory guidance and conservation programs intended to reduce water waste. The use ETo data for agricultural and landscape irrigation scheduling is becoming more common in Texas as ETo-based controllers and automation technologies become more affordable. Until recently, most ETo data has been available as monthly values averaged over many years. Today, automated weather stations and irrigation controllers equipped with specialized instrumentation allow for real-time ETo measurements. With the expected rise in global warming and increased frequency of extreme climate variability in the coming decades, conservation and efficient use of water resources is essential and must make use of the most accurate and representative data available. 2011 marked the driest year on record in the State of Texas. Compounding the lack of rainfall was record heat during the Summer of 2011. An analysis of real time ETo (reference evapotranspiration) data in Texas found that ET was 30 to 50% higher than historic averages during the 2011 Summer. The implications are quite serious, as most current water planning and drought contingency plans do not take into consideration increases in ET during such periods, and irrigation planning and capacity sizing are based on historic averages of consumptive use. This paper examines the relationship between ET and climate during this extreme climatic event. While the solar radiation was near normal levels, temperature and wind was much higher and dew points much lower than norms. The variability and statistical difference between average monthly ETo data and daily, monthly and seasonal ETo measurements (from 2006 to 2014) for selected weather stations of the Texas ET Network. This study will also examine the suitability of using average

  9. A Site-sPecific Agricultural water Requirement and footprint Estimator (SPARE:WATER 1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multsch, S.; Al-Rumaikhani, Y. A.; Frede, H.-G.; Breuer, L.

    2013-07-01

    The agricultural water footprint addresses the quantification of water consumption in agriculture, whereby three types of water to grow crops are considered, namely green water (consumed rainfall), blue water (irrigation from surface or groundwater) and grey water (water needed to dilute pollutants). By considering site-specific properties when calculating the crop water footprint, this methodology can be used to support decision making in the agricultural sector on local to regional scale. We therefore developed the spatial decision support system SPARE:WATER that allows us to quantify green, blue and grey water footprints on regional scale. SPARE:WATER is programmed in VB.NET, with geographic information system functionality implemented by the MapWinGIS library. Water requirements and water footprints are assessed on a grid basis and can then be aggregated for spatial entities such as political boundaries, catchments or irrigation districts. We assume inefficient irrigation methods rather than optimal conditions to account for irrigation methods with efficiencies other than 100%. Furthermore, grey water is defined as the water needed to leach out salt from the rooting zone in order to maintain soil quality, an important management task in irrigation agriculture. Apart from a thorough representation of the modelling concept, we provide a proof of concept where we assess the agricultural water footprint of Saudi Arabia. The entire water footprint is 17.0 km3 yr-1 for 2008, with a blue water dominance of 86%. Using SPARE:WATER we are able to delineate regional hot spots as well as crop types with large water footprints, e.g. sesame or dates. Results differ from previous studies of national-scale resolution, underlining the need for regional estimation of crop water footprints.

  10. A site-specific agricultural water requirement and footprint estimator (SPARE:WATER 1.0) for irrigation agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multsch, S.; Al-Rumaikhani, Y. A.; Frede, H.-G.; Breuer, L.

    2013-01-01

    The water footprint accounting method addresses the quantification of water consumption in agriculture, whereby three types of water to grow crops are considered, namely green water (consumed rainfall), blue water (irrigation from surface or groundwater) and grey water (water needed to dilute pollutants). Most of current water footprint assessments focus on global to continental scale. We therefore developed the spatial decision support system SPARE:WATER that allows to quantify green, blue and grey water footprints on regional scale. SPARE:WATER is programmed in VB.NET, with geographic information system functionality implemented by the MapWinGIS library. Water requirement and water footprints are assessed on a grid-basis and can then be aggregated for spatial entities such as political boundaries, catchments or irrigation districts. We assume in-efficient irrigation methods rather than optimal conditions to account for irrigation methods with efficiencies other than 100%. Furthermore, grey water can be defined as the water to leach out salt from the rooting zone in order to maintain soil quality, an important management task in irrigation agriculture. Apart from a thorough representation of the modelling concept we provide a proof of concept where we assess the agricultural water footprint of Saudi Arabia. The entire water footprint is 17.0 km3 yr-1 for 2008 with a blue water dominance of 86%. Using SPARE:WATER we are able to delineate regional hot spots as well as crop types with large water footprints, e.g. sesame or dates. Results differ from previous studies of national-scale resolution, underlining the need for regional water footprint assessments.

  11. A Site-sPecific Agricultural water Requirement and footprint Estimator (SPARE:WATER 1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Multsch

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural water footprint addresses the quantification of water consumption in agriculture, whereby three types of water to grow crops are considered, namely green water (consumed rainfall, blue water (irrigation from surface or groundwater and grey water (water needed to dilute pollutants. By considering site-specific properties when calculating the crop water footprint, this methodology can be used to support decision making in the agricultural sector on local to regional scale. We therefore developed the spatial decision support system SPARE:WATER that allows us to quantify green, blue and grey water footprints on regional scale. SPARE:WATER is programmed in VB.NET, with geographic information system functionality implemented by the MapWinGIS library. Water requirements and water footprints are assessed on a grid basis and can then be aggregated for spatial entities such as political boundaries, catchments or irrigation districts. We assume inefficient irrigation methods rather than optimal conditions to account for irrigation methods with efficiencies other than 100%. Furthermore, grey water is defined as the water needed to leach out salt from the rooting zone in order to maintain soil quality, an important management task in irrigation agriculture. Apart from a thorough representation of the modelling concept, we provide a proof of concept where we assess the agricultural water footprint of Saudi Arabia. The entire water footprint is 17.0 km3 yr−1 for 2008, with a blue water dominance of 86%. Using SPARE:WATER we are able to delineate regional hot spots as well as crop types with large water footprints, e.g. sesame or dates. Results differ from previous studies of national-scale resolution, underlining the need for regional estimation of crop water footprints.

  12. A site-specific agricultural water requirement and footprint estimator (SPARE:WATER 1.0 for irrigation agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Multsch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The water footprint accounting method addresses the quantification of water consumption in agriculture, whereby three types of water to grow crops are considered, namely green water (consumed rainfall, blue water (irrigation from surface or groundwater and grey water (water needed to dilute pollutants. Most of current water footprint assessments focus on global to continental scale. We therefore developed the spatial decision support system SPARE:WATER that allows to quantify green, blue and grey water footprints on regional scale. SPARE:WATER is programmed in VB.NET, with geographic information system functionality implemented by the MapWinGIS library. Water requirement and water footprints are assessed on a grid-basis and can then be aggregated for spatial entities such as political boundaries, catchments or irrigation districts. We assume in-efficient irrigation methods rather than optimal conditions to account for irrigation methods with efficiencies other than 100%. Furthermore, grey water can be defined as the water to leach out salt from the rooting zone in order to maintain soil quality, an important management task in irrigation agriculture. Apart from a thorough representation of the modelling concept we provide a proof of concept where we assess the agricultural water footprint of Saudi Arabia. The entire water footprint is 17.0 km3 yr−1 for 2008 with a blue water dominance of 86%. Using SPARE:WATER we are able to delineate regional hot spots as well as crop types with large water footprints, e.g. sesame or dates. Results differ from previous studies of national-scale resolution, underlining the need for regional water footprint assessments.

  13. 40 CFR 257.23 - Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and analysis requirements. (a) The ground-water monitoring program must include consistent sampling... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements. 257.23 Section 257.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  14. 30 CFR 77.216-4 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....216-4 Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements; certification. 77.216-4 Section 77.216-4 Mineral...

  15. 77 FR 27097 - LaCrosse Boiling Water Reactor, Exemption From Certain Requirements, Vernon County, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... COMMISSION LaCrosse Boiling Water Reactor, Exemption From Certain Requirements, Vernon County, WI AGENCY...) requesting exemptions from certain security requirements in Title 10 of the Code Federal Regulations (10 CFR) 73.55, for the LaCrosse Boiling Water Reactor (LACBWR). This Environmental Assessment (EA) has...

  16. 46 CFR 11.713 - Requirements for maintaining current knowledge of waters to be navigated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for maintaining current knowledge of waters... § 11.713 Requirements for maintaining current knowledge of waters to be navigated. (a) If a first class... current knowledge of the route. Persons using this method of re-familiarization shall certify,...

  17. 40 CFR 141.714 - Requirements for uncovered finished water storage facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for uncovered finished water storage facilities. 141.714 Section 141.714 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS...

  18. A summary of meteorological requirements for water vapor data and possible space shuttle applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The accuracy of water vapor measurement required by modelers and forecasters at a number of scales of motion is discussed. Direct and indirect methods for operational use in obtaining atmospheric water vapor data are reviewed along with meteorological applications of water vapor data obtained by a space shuttle laboratory lidar system.

  19. Report on the water requirements and water use of the Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge and Management Area Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this study was to review past use and establish the minimum future water requirements for that portion of the Stillwater NWR and Management Area...

  20. Water input requirements of the rapidly shrinking Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Ghazleh, Shahrazad; Hartmann, Jens; Jansen, Nils; Kempe, Stephan

    2009-05-01

    The deepest point on Earth, the Dead Sea level, has been dropping alarmingly since 1978 by 0.7 m/a on average due to the accelerating water consumption in the Jordan catchment and stood in 2008 at 420 m below sea level. In this study, a terrain model of the surface area and water volume of the Dead Sea was developed from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission data using ArcGIS. The model shows that the lake shrinks on average by 4 km(2)/a in area and by 0.47 km(3)/a in volume, amounting to a cumulative loss of 14 km(3) in the last 30 years. The receding level leaves almost annually erosional terraces, recorded here for the first time by Differential Global Positioning System field surveys. The terrace altitudes were correlated among the different profiles and dated to specific years of the lake level regression, illustrating the tight correlation between the morphology of the terrace sequence and the receding lake level. Our volume-level model described here and previous work on groundwater inflow suggest that the projected Dead Sea-Red Sea channel or the Mediterranean-Dead Sea channel must have a carrying capacity of >0.9 km(3)/a in order to slowly re-fill the lake to its former level and to create a sustainable system of electricity generation and freshwater production by desalinization. Moreover, such a channel will maintain tourism and potash industry on both sides of the Dead Sea and reduce the natural hazard caused by the recession.

  1. 46 CFR 153.602 - Special requirements for cargoes reactive with water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special requirements for cargoes reactive with water. 153.602 Section 153.602 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK... and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.602 Special requirements for cargoes reactive with...

  2. Study of Panjin Wetlands Along Bohai Coast (Ⅱ): Ecological Water Requirement of Shuangtaizi Estuarine Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tieliang; ZHOU Linfei; ZHAO Be; YANG Peiqi

    2009-01-01

    Shuangtaizi estuarine wetland along the Bohai Sea coast, the biggest bulrush wetland in the world, has been listed in The Record of Important International Wetland Conservation District'. Taking the year of 2 000 as an example, the minimum, the most suitable and the maximum ecological water requirement of Shuangtaizi estuarine wetland are calculated in this paper based on both ecological theory and Geological Information System technology. In addition, the remote sensing technique is adopted in the data acquisition process. Moreover, the total water requirement and the unit area water requirement for different wetland types are obtained. The result is very important for water resources planning, ecological conservation and regional agriculture structure ad-justment in Shuangtaizi. Meanwhile, this study can serve as a useful example for calculating the ecological water requirement in other similar estuarine wetlands.

  3. Food consumption patterns and their effect on water requirement in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Savenije, H. H. G.

    2008-06-01

    It is widely recognized that food consumption patterns significantly impact water requirements. The aim of this paper is to quantify how food consumption patterns influence water requirements in China. The findings show that per capita water requirement for food (CWRF) has increased from 255 m3 cap-1y-1 in 1961 to 860 m3 cap-1 y-1 in 2003, largely due to an increase in the consumption of animal products in recent decades. Although steadily increasing, the CWRF of China is still much lower than that of many developed countries. The total water requirement for food (TWRF) has been determined as 1127 km3 y-1 in 2003. Three scenarios are proposed to project future TWRF, representing low, medium, and high levels of modernization (S1, S2, and S3, respectively). Analysis of these three scenarios indicates that TWRF will likely continue to increase in the next three decades. An additional amount of water ranging between 407 and 515 km3 y-1 will be required in 2030 compared to the TWRF in 2003. This will undoubtedly put high pressure on China's already scarce water resources. We conclude that the effect of the food consumption patterns on China's water resources is substantial both in the recent past and in the near future. China will need to strengthen "green water" management and to take advantage of "virtual water" import to meet the additional TWRF.

  4. Eco-environmental water requirement for wetlands in Huang-Huai-Hai Area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the related literature and the analysis of the relationship between wetland ecosystem and hydroperiod, the estimating and classifying methods of eco-environmental water requirement for wetlands are established. The data collected from Huang-Huai-Hai Area are from the electronic map (1∶250000) of China National Topographical Database of 1997 and the historical statistics since the 1980s.The results indicate that the minimum eco-environmental water requirement for wetlands is 16.98×109 m3 and the optimal one is 38.38×109 m3 in the studied area. For the five wetland nature reserves covered in the area, the values are 1.47×109 m3 and 3.31×109 m3 respectively. The comparisons of the mentioned minimum water requirement with the status water use, which is 17.05×109 m3 for wetland ecosystem (1997 as the status year), suggest that the water use has not met the minimum eco-environmental water requirement in the Haihe and Huanghe Basins of the studied area. However, the status water use guarantees and exceeds the minimum eco-environmental water requirement in the Shandong Peninsula and the Huaihe Basin. Based on the eco-environmental programming and water resource planning of the studied area, the study establishes the water requirement of the year of 2010, 2030, 2050, when the eco-environmental water requirement for wetlands is 18.30×109 m3, 21.64×109 m3 and 26.76×109 m3, respectively.

  5. Water management requirements for animal and plant maintenance on the Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. C.; Rasmussen, D.; Curran, G.

    1987-01-01

    Long-duration Space Station experiments that use animals and plants as test specimens will require increased automation and advanced technologies for water management in order to free scientist-astronauts from routine but time-consuming housekeeping tasks. The three areas that have been identified as requiring water management and that are discusseed are: (1) drinking water and humidity condensate of the animals, (2) nutrient solution and transpired water of the plants, and (3) habitat cleaning methods. Automation potential, technology assessment, crew time savings, and resupply penalties are also discussed.

  6. Optimizing desalinated sea water blending with other sources to meet magnesium requirements for potable and irrigation waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Noa; Eben-Chaime, Moshe; Oron, Gideon

    2013-05-01

    Sea water desalination provides fresh water that typically lacks minerals essential to human health and to agricultural productivity. Thus the rising proportion of desalinated sea water consumed by both the domestic and agricultural sectors constitutes a public health risk. Research on low-magnesium water irrigation showed that crops developed magnesium deficiency symptoms that could lead to plant death, and tomato yields were reduced by 10-15%. The World Health Organization (WHO) reported on a relationship between sudden cardiac death rates and magnesium intake deficits. An optimization model, developed and tested to provide recommendations for Water Distribution System (WDS) quality control in terms of meeting optimal water quality requirements, was run in computational experiments based on an actual regional WDS. The expected magnesium deficit due to the operation of a large Sea Water Desalination Plant (SWDP) was simulated, and an optimal operation policy, in which remineralization at the SWDP was combined with blending desalinated and natural water to achieve the required quality, was generated. The effects of remineralization costs and WDS physical layout on the optimal policy were examined by sensitivity analysis. As part of the sensitivity blending natural and desalinated water near the treatment plants will be feasible up to 16.2 US cents/m(3), considering all expenses. Additional chemical injection was used to meet quality criteria when blending was not feasible.

  7. 46 CFR 53.05-2 - Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers (modifies HG-400.2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers... requirements for hot water boilers (modifies HG-400.2). (a) The relief valve requirements for hot water boilers... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 53.01-1) except as noted otherwise in this section. (b) Hot water...

  8. [Harmonization of hygienic standards with the foreign requirements for the quality of drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasovskiĭ, G N; Egorova, N A

    2005-01-01

    The concept of and criteria for harmonization of hygienic standards with the foreign requirements for the quality of drinking water were developed. On their basis, more than 100 sanitary standards for water substances were harmonized with the WHO and EC recommendations and the USA and Canadian standards for drinking water quality. Thirty sanitary standards were corrected and 12 ones were newly established without making experimental studies, among them 18 for carcinogenic substances. The paper provides evidence for the reliability and effectiveness of the Russian sanitary standardization system as to most standardized water substances. It also presents the harmonized standard normal values included into the documents of the water sanitary legislation of Russia.

  9. 33 CFR 151.2040 - What are the mandatory ballast water management requirements for vessels equipped with ballast...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... water management requirements for vessels equipped with ballast tanks that operate in the waters of the... Water Management for Control of Nonindigenous Species in Waters of the United States § 151.2040 What are the mandatory ballast water management requirements for vessels equipped with ballast tanks...

  10. Minimum energy requirement of an endoreversible desalination system of sea water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingen Chen, Liwei Shu, Yanlin Ge, Fengrui Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of a typical endoreversible desalination system of sea water is established and the minimum energy requirement for the system is optimized by using finite time thermodynamic theory. The heat exchange between the endoreversible desalination system of sea water and surroundings are delivered by two endoreversible Carnot heat pumps and three endoreversible Carnot heat engines. The minimum energy requirement for the system can be found by subtracting the power outputs from the power inputs. The results show that the minimum energy requirement for the distillation system depends on not only the properties of the input saline water, the output pure water and the brine water, but also the inherent features of the heat pumps and the heat engines, i.e. the total heat conductance of the heat pumps and of the heat engines. The results obtained herein are closer to those of practical system than those obtained based on reversible model.

  11. Concept Paper : Defining wetland water requirements and evaporative rates relative to the Lahontan Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The calculations in this report are to determine average surface water requirements are for planning purposes and are not intended to represent actual Lahontan...

  12. Research on Forecasting Water Requirement of Well Irrigation Rice by Time Series Analysis Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The paper builds up the forecasting model of air temperature according to the data (1994~1998) of Fu Jin area.At the same time,the writer inquires into the relation of water requirement of well irrigation rice (ET) and average air temperature (T).Furthermore,the rice irrigation water requirement (ET) of Fu Jin area has been forecast in 1999.Thus,we can apply the model in irrigation management.

  13. Life cycle water consumption and withdrawal requirements of ethanol from corn grain and residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Gouri Shankar; Yeh, Sonia

    2011-05-15

    We assessed the water requirements of ethanol from corn grain and crop residue. Estimates are explicit in terms of sources-green (GW) and blue (BW) water, consumptive and nonconsumptive requirements across the lifecycle, including evapotranspiration, application and conveyance losses, biorefinery uses, and water use of energy inputs, and displaced requirements or credits due to coproducts. Ethanol consumes 50-146 L/vehicle kilometer traveled (VKT) of BW and 1-60 L/VKT of GW for irrigated corn and 0.6 L/VKT of BW and 70-137 L/VKT of GW for rain-fed corn after coproduct credits. Extending the system boundary to consider application and conveyance losses and the water requirements of embodied energy increases the total BW withdrawal from 23% to 38% and BW + GW consumption from 5% to 16%. We estimate that, in 2009, 15-19% of irrigation water is used to produce the corn required for ethanol in Kansas and Nebraska without coproduct credits and 8-10% after credits. Harvesting and converting the cob to ethanol reduces both the BW and GW intensities by 13%. It is worth noting that the use of GW is not without impacts, and the water quantity and water quality impacts at the local/seasonal scale can be significant for both fossil fuel and biofuel.

  14. Estimating Sugarcane Water Requirements for Biofuel Feedstock Production in Maui, Hawaii Using Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water availability is one of the limiting factors for sustainable production of biofuel crops. A common method for determining crop water requirement is to multiply daily potential evapotranspiration (ETo) calculated from meteorological parameters by a crop coefficient (Kc) to obtain actual crop eva...

  15. Use Of Crop Canopy Size To Estimate Water Requirements Of Vegetable Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planting time, plant density, variety, and cultural practices vary widely for horticultural crops. It is difficult to estimate crop water requirements for crops with these variations. Canopy size, or factional ground cover, as an indicator of intercepted sunlight, is related to crop water use. We...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1101-7 - Installation of water sprinkler systems; requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Installation of water sprinkler systems; requirements. 75.1101-7 Section 75.1101-7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1101-7 Installation of water...

  17. Ecohydrology of street trees: design and irrigation requirements for sustainable water use

    OpenAIRE

    Revelli, Roberto; Porporato, Amilcare

    2014-01-01

    Whereas the beneficial effects of urban vegetation have long been recognized, growing conditions in urban environments, especially for street trees, are typically harsh and limited by low water availability. Supplemental irrigation may be used to preserve aesthetic quality and ability to provide ecosystem services of urban vegetation but requires careful management of available economic and water resources to reduce urban water footprint. To this purpose, decision makers need quantitative too...

  18. REQUIREMENT OF FLUIDITY OF HIGH WATER CONTENT MATERIALS FORTHE GETWAY-SIDE BACKFILLING TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QiTaiyue; MaNianjie

    1996-01-01

    Through analyzing the effects of water consumption, diameter of solid particle, and flow velocity on the fluidity of high water content material slurry, the relationship among the fluidity, the isotropy of the slurry, and the pumping facilities applied in getway-side backfilling has been found. And the requirment of fluidity of high water content material for the design of getway-side backfilling technique is put forward in the paper.

  19. 14 CFR 135.183 - Performance requirements: Land aircraft operated over water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance requirements: Land aircraft operated over water. 135.183 Section 135.183 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING...

  20. 46 CFR 153.1000 - Special operating requirements for cargoes reactive with water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special operating requirements for cargoes reactive with water. 153.1000 Section 153.1000 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1000 Special operating requirements for cargoes...

  1. Food consumption patterns and their effect on water requirement in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that food consumption patterns significantly impact water requirements. The aim of this paper is to quantify how food consumption patterns influence water requirements in China. The findings show that per capita water requirement for food (CWRF has increased from 255 m3 cap-1y−1 in 1961 to 860 m3 cap-1 y−1 in 2003, largely due to an increase in the consumption of animal products in recent decades. Although steadily increasing, the CWRF of China is still much lower than that of many developed countries. The total water requirement for food (TWRF has been determined as 1127 km3 y-1 in 2003. Three scenarios are proposed to project future TWRF, representing low, medium, and high levels of modernization (S1, S2, and S3, respectively. Analysis of these three scenarios indicates that TWRF will likely continue to increase in the next three decades. An additional amount of water ranging between 407 and 515 km3 y-1 will be required in 2030 compared to the TWRF in 2003. This will undoubtedly put high pressure on China's already scarce water resources. We conclude that the effect of the food consumption patterns on China's water resources is substantial both in the recent past and in the near future. China will need to strengthen "green water" management and to take advantage of "virtual water" import to meet the additional TWRF.

  2. Aestivation and diapause syndromes reduce the water balance requirements for pupae of the Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the water balance of aestivating (summer), diapausing (winter), and non-diapausing pupae of Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). Maintaining water requirements during pupal dormancy is particularly important because water cannot be replenished actively by drink...

  3. Water-related environmental control requirements at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J C; Johnson, L D

    1980-09-01

    Water use and waste water production, water pollution control technology requirements, and water-related limitations to their design and commercialization are identified at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion systems. In Part I, a summary of conclusions and recommendations provides concise statements of findings relative to water management and waste water treatment of each of four municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion categories investigated. These include: mass burning, with direct production of steam for use as a supplemental energy source; mechanical processing to produce a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) for co-firing in gas, coal or oil-fired power plants; pyrolysis for production of a burnable oil or gas; and biological conversion of organic wastes to methane. Part II contains a brief description of each waste-to-energy facility visited during the subject survey showing points of water use and wastewater production. One or more facilities of each type were selected for sampling of waste waters and follow-up tests to determine requirements for water-related environmental controls. A comprehensive summary of the results are presented. (MCW)

  4. Analysing changes in water availability to assess environmental water requirements in the Rivirivi River basin, Southern Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimtengo, Mavuto; Ngongondo, Cosmo; Tumbare, Michael; Monjerezi, Maurice

    The headwater catchments of the Rivirivi River basin in Malawi play a vital role in meeting downstream water requirements. In recent years, the Rivirivi River flow regime has experienced changes in its hydrological regime, including an increased number of zero-flow days. This study was aimed at investigating some of the causes of these changes. Water quantity indicators were assessed through flow duration analysis of the river flow regime behavior before and after the introduction of the traditional water allocation practices and dam construction. Further, a desktop reserve model was applied to estimate the environmental water requirements. Anthropogenic land use induced change patterns were investigated by time series analysis of satellite imagery and their potential effect on water resources were inferred. The results indicate that there was a considerable difference in average annual stream flow between two identified main periods (between 1963-1983 and 1984-2004) and zero flows increased from 5% to 12%. In addition, the area experienced a 65% reduction in forest cover from 1992 to 2008 which resulted in increased high flow index by 16%. Furthermore, the ecosystems need approximately the range of 35-40% of the MAR to be maintained at Class A and the range of 9-13% of MAR for class D. The results suggest that anthropogenic activities have negatively affected low flow environmental flows requirements by increasing zero flow days in Rivirivi River catchment. However, total water usage remains below the river's MAR and the river can meet all water needs with proper management of the river flow regime.

  5. Influence of fly ash fineness on water requirement and shrinkage of blended cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissorn Vimonsatit

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the influence of fly ash fineness on water requirement and shrinkage of blended cement mortar was studied. The results indicate that the water requirement and shrinkage characteristic of the blended cement mortar are dependent on fly ash fineness and replacement level. The use of coarse fly ash slightly reduces the water requirement but greatly reduced the drying and the autogenous shrinkage of the blended cement mortars and the reduction is more with an increase in the fly ash replacement level. The finer fly ashes further reduce the water requirement, but increase the drying and the autogenous shrinkages as compared with coarser fly ash. The incorporation of superplasticizer drastically reduces the water requirement, but the effect on the drying and autogenous shrinkages of the normal Portland cement mortar is small. However, for the fly ash mortar, the use of superplasticizer results in a decrease in drying shrinkage and in a substantial increase in the autogenous shrinkage particularly for the fine fly ash at a high replacement level.

  6. Effects of climate change on spring wheat phenophase and water requirement in Heihe River basin, China

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dongmei Han; Denghua Yan; Xinyi Xu; Yu Gao

    2017-02-01

    Climate change has significantly altered the temperature rhythm which is a key factor for the growth and phenophase of the crop. And temperature change further affects crop water requirement and irrigation system. In the north-west of China, one of the most important crop production bases is Heihe River basin where the observed phenological data is scarce. This study thus first adopted accumulated temperature threshold (ATT) method to define the phenological stages of the crop, and analysed the effect of climate change on phenological stages and water requirement of the crop during growing season. The results indicated the ATT was available for the determination of spring wheat phenological stages. The start dates of all phenological stages became earlier and the growing season length (days) was reduced by 7 days under climate change. During the growing season, water requirement without consideration of phenophase change has been increased by 26.1 mm, while that with consideration of phenophase change was featured in the decrease of water requirement by 50 mm. When temperature increased by 1°C on average, the changes were featured in the 2 days early start date of growing season, 2 days decrease of growing season length, and the 1.4 mm increase of water requirement, respectively.

  7. Drinking water public right-to-know requirements in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blette, Veronica

    2008-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency implements a national drinking-water program under the authority of the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. Amendments to the Act in 1996 added new provisions to enhance consumer understanding of drinking-water issues. Notification requirements associated with annual consumer confidence reports, source water assessments and state compliance reports are intended to enhance the public's knowledge of the quality of their drinking water. Water utilities are also subject to public notification requirements to provide more timely information to consumers in response to violations of health standards. These right-to-know requirements are intended to build the public's confidence, but communicating with consumers can be challenging for both utility managers and government leaders. This paper discusses the need for timely communication, the challenge of providing information when there is uncertainty in the science and the importance of preparing to respond to critical incidents. Because surveys have shown that other members of the community may have better access to consumers or are more trusted, it is important for water utilities to establish relationships with the media and the local public health community.

  8. Water in the Mendoza, Argentina, food processing industry: water requirements and reuse potential of industrial effluents in agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Elena Duek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper estimates the volume of water used by the Mendoza food processing industry considering different water efficiency scenarios. The potential for using food processing industry effluents for irrigation is also assessed. The methodology relies upon information collected from interviews with qualified informants from different organizations and food-processing plants in Mendoza selected from a targeted sample. Scenarios were developed using local and international secondary information sources. The results show that food processing plants in Mendoza use 19.65 hm3 of water per year; efficient water management practices would make it possible to reduce water use by 64%, i.e., to 7.11 hm3. At present, 70% of the water is used by the fruit and vegetable processing industry, 16% by wineries, 8% by mineral water bottling plants, and the remaining 6% by olive oil, beer and soft drink plants. The volume of effluents from the food processing plants in Mendoza has been estimated at 16.27 hm3 per year. Despite the seasonal variations of these effluents, and the high sodium concentration and electrical conductivity of some of them, it is possible to use them for irrigation purposes. However, because of these variables and their environmental impact, land treatment is required.

  9. Requiring pollutant discharge permits for pesticide applications that deposit residues in surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centner, Terence; Eberhart, Nicholas

    2014-05-08

    Agricultural producers and public health authorities apply pesticides to control pests that damage crops and carry diseases. Due to the toxic nature of most pesticides, they are regulated by governments. Regulatory provisions require pesticides to be registered and restrictions operate to safeguard human health and the environment. Yet pesticides used near surface waters pose dangers to non-target species and drinking water supplies leading some governments to regulate discharges of pesticides under pollution discharge permits. The dual registration and discharge permitting provisions are burdensome. In the United States, agricultural interest groups are advancing new legislation that would exempt pesticide residues from water permitting requirements. An analysis of the dangers posed by pesticide residues in drinking water leads to a conclusion that both pesticide registration and pollutant discharge permitting provisions are needed to protect human health and aquatic species.

  10. Requiring Pollutant Discharge Permits for Pesticide Applications that Deposit Residues in Surface Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence Centner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural producers and public health authorities apply pesticides to control pests that damage crops and carry diseases. Due to the toxic nature of most pesticides, they are regulated by governments. Regulatory provisions require pesticides to be registered and restrictions operate to safeguard human health and the environment. Yet pesticides used near surface waters pose dangers to non-target species and drinking water supplies leading some governments to regulate discharges of pesticides under pollution discharge permits. The dual registration and discharge permitting provisions are burdensome. In the United States, agricultural interest groups are advancing new legislation that would exempt pesticide residues from water permitting requirements. An analysis of the dangers posed by pesticide residues in drinking water leads to a conclusion that both pesticide registration and pollutant discharge permitting provisions are needed to protect human health and aquatic species.

  11. Requiring Pollutant Discharge Permits for Pesticide Applications that Deposit Residues in Surface Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Terence Centner; Nicholas Eberhart

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural producers and public health authorities apply pesticides to control pests that damage crops and carry diseases. Due to the toxic nature of most pesticides, they are regulated by governments. Regulatory provisions require pesticides to be registered and restrictions operate to safeguard human health and the environment. Yet pesticides used near surface waters pose dangers to non-target species and drinking water supplies leading some governments to regulate discharges of pesticid...

  12. Ecological Water Requirement Estimates for Typical Areas in the Huaihe Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Xin; DU Pengfei; TONG Oingyuan; CHEN Jining

    2008-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems require ecological water allocation to prevent from being damaged by natural disasters and undue exploitation. This paper discusses and estimates the ecological water requirements (EWRs) of typical areas in the Huaihe Basin to determine rational allocations of water resources and pro-mote regional improvements of the ecological environment. The main river course, including Hongze Lake and Nansi Lake, was selected as the study subject. Calculational methods for the river and lake EWRs were based on the reasonableness of the results and data availability. The monthly guarantee rate method was used to calculate monthly, flood period, non-flood period, and annual EWRs for the main river course and the main tributaries at two different guarantee rates. The minimum water level method was used to calculate annual EWRs for Hongze Lake and the upper and lower Nansi Lake of 1.521×109 m3, 0.637×109 m3, and 0.306×109 m3. The results were used to evaluate the rationality of the quantity of water resources allocated to ecological uses in the Huaihe Basin during 1998-2003. The result shows that the present water resource allocations in the Huaihe Basin cannot satisfy the basic ecological requirements for some years, especially years with less precipitation.

  13. Modeling Crop Water Requirement at Regional Scales in the Context of Integrated Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogrul, E. C.; Kadir, T.; Brush, C. F.; Chung, F. I.

    2009-12-01

    In developed watersheds, the stresses on surface and subsurface water resources are generally created by groundwater pumping and stream flow diversions to satisfy agricultural and urban water requirements. The application of pumping and diversion to meet these requirements also affects the surface and subsurface water system through recharge of the aquifer and surface runoff back into the streams. The agricultural crop water requirement is a function of climate, soil and land surface physical properties as well as land use management practices which are spatially distributed and evolve in time. In almost all modeling studies pumping and diversions are specified as predefined stresses and are not included in the simulation as an integral and dynamic component of the hydrologic cycle that depend on other hydrologic components. To address this issue, California Department of Water Resources has been developing a new root zone module that can either be used as a stand-alone modeling tool or can be linked to other stream and aquifer modeling tools. The tool, named Integrated Water Flow Model Demand Calculator (IDC), computes crop water requirements under user-specified climatic, land-use and irrigation management settings at regional scales, and routes the precipitation and irrigation water through the root zone using physically-based methods. In calculating the crop water requirement, IDC uses an irrigation-scheduling type approach where irrigation is triggered when the soil moisture falls below a user-specified level. Water demands for managed wetlands, urban areas, and agricultural crops including rice, can either be computed by IDC or specified by the user depending on the requirements and available data for the modeling project. For areas covered with native vegetation water demand is not computed and only precipitation is routed through the root zone. Many irrigational practices such as irrigation for leaching, re-use of irrigation return flow, flooding and

  14. An ecological hydraulic radius approach to estimate the instream ecological water requirement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Changming; MEN Baohui

    2007-01-01

    This essay defines the concepts of ecological flow velocity as well as ecological hydraulic radius (EHR) and proposes an ecological hydraulic radius approach (EHRA) which considers both the watercourse information (including hydraulic radius, roughness coefficient and hydraulic gradient) and the required stream velocity necessary for maintenance of certain ecological functions all together. The key parameter of EHRA is to fix the watercourse cross-sectional flow area corresponding to EHR, by which the relation between parabola shaped cross-sectional flow area and hydraulic radius is deduced. The EHRA not only meets the requirement of flow velocity for adequate fish spawning migration, but also is applicable to the ecological flows in regard with other ecological issues (such as the calculation of the instream flow requirements for transporting sediment and for pollution self-purification, etc. ). This essay has illuminated the computational process taking the estimation of ecological water requirement of Zhuba Hydrologyical Station watercourse in Niqu branch of the Yalong River as an example. Additionally, we compare EHRA with Tennant approach. The result shows that the Zhuba Hydrological Station ecological water requirement calculated by EHRA lies between the minimum and favorable ecological water requirement calculated by the Tennant approach. This is due to the fact that the ecological flow velocity (such as the fish spawning migration flow velocity) was taken into consideration, producing results applicable to the practical situation.

  15. Requirements on catchment modelling for an optimized reservoir operation in water deficient regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froebrich, J.; Kirkby, M. J.; Reder, C.

    2002-12-01

    To provide long term water security in water deficient regions, the interaction of erosion, pollutant emission, the impact of irrigation areas, the characteristics of ephemeral streams and resulting water quality in reservoirs must be considered in water management plans. In many semiarid regions, reservoirs are the only source of water, the indispensable element required for human existence. By the year 2000 the world had built many small and > 45,000 large dams. In these reservoirs, water quality and quantity are affected both by climate change and catchment land use. Results of past projects indicate that the specific control of reservoirs can lead to a significant improvement of water quality, but reservoirs have already transformed the quantity and quality of surface waters in a remarkable manner. Reservoirs with their distinct behaviour as reactors could therefore be considered as key elements in semiarid and arid catchments, linking and transforming rivers and channels. Effective practical operation schemes require a thorough knowledge of spatial and temporal variation in water quality and quantity, and simulation models can be used to support the identification of most effective management potentials at catchment scale. We discuss here the particular requirements for water quality modelling at catchment scale in semiarid and arid regions. Results of reservoir water quality modelling are presented. The potential of catchment models like the PESERA model is demonstrated. Knowledge gaps, such as the consideration of ephemeral streams in catchment models, are addressed and fresh problem solving strategies are introduced. Erosion models like PESERA can provide important information on sediment transport and hence describing the carrier potentials for organic matter, heavy metals and pesticides from terrestrial areas into the water courses. The new EU-research project tempQsim will improve understanding of how the organic matter is transformed in river beds

  16. Evaluation of Irrigation Methods for Highbush Blueberry. I. Growth and Water Requirements of Young Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted in a new field of northern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. 'Elliott') to determine the effects of different irrigation methods on growth and water requirements of uncropped plants during the first 2 years after planting. The plants were grown on mulched, raised beds...

  17. [Harmonization of microbiologicaland parasitological indices of epidemic safety of drinking water with the international requirements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, L V; Artemova, T Z; Gipp, E K; Zagaĭnova, A V; Maksimkina, T N; Krasniak, A V; Korneĭchuk, S S; Shustova, S S

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of harmonization of microbiological and parasitological indices and benchmarks there was performed the comparative analysis of the requirements for the quality of drinking water in respect of the epidemic safety on the basic regulations of Russia, the Directive Council of the European Union EU, WHO, the United States, Canada, Australia, Finland, Sweden, Brazil, France, Japan and China. As a result, there were revealed the priority bacteriological, virological and parasitological parameters: E. coli--indicator of recent fecal contamination, coliforms, heterotrophic bacteria colony count (Heterotrophic plate count), which is in the water legislation of the Russian Federation is characterized as total bacterial count (TBC), being an integral index of the quality of wastewater treatment technologies and hygienic condition of the water supply systems, coliphages as an indicator of viral contamination. In the Guidelines for drinking-water quality control, WHO and a set of countries there is recommended a more wide range of indicators: enterococci, Clostridium perfringens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, enteroviruses, parasitological indices. With aim of harmonization of the requirements for the quality of drinking water in the Russian Federation with international approaches to the revision of the Sanitary Regulations and Norms (SanPin) 2.1.4.1074 into the project there are introduced priority indicator parameters of bacterial, viral and parasitic contamination of water, evidence-based guidelines.

  18. Addressing Ontario water management plan requirements through the application of spatial technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArdle, S. [4DM Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada); Tonkin, C. [Ontario Power Generation Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation outlined Ontario Power Generation's (OPG) water management plans as they refer to changes to Ontario's electricity market. It included water management planning requirements after the planning process and the OPG's commitment to water management planning in general. The OPG is actively involved in the planning process and advisory committee meetings. It also implemented a decision support software system as an approach for monitoring water management plans in watershed areas in which the OPG operates. A water management review (WMR) was initiated in Ontario in 1995. A review was also undertaken in 2005 and a number of information technology projects that were implemented were discussed. One of the software applications entitled Water View was presented in more detail. The purpose of this software is to address compliance and reporting requirements related to WMR. It represents a starting point for building information along a river system in a spatial context. Last, the presentation identified next steps which include the potential to expand into other OPG watersheds; enhancements to existing functionality; new functionality; and exploring interest with other waterpower producers. 2 figs.

  19. 18 CFR 1304.206 - Requirements for community docks, piers, boathouses, or other water-use facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements for community docks, piers, boathouses, or other water-use facilities. 1304.206 Section 1304.206 Conservation of....206 Requirements for community docks, piers, boathouses, or other water-use facilities. (a)...

  20. Sustainable smallholder intensification through improved water management requires adjusted fertilizer recommendation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedfew, Muluye; Schmitter, Petra; Nakawuka, Prossie; Tilahun, Seifu A.; Steenhuis, Tammo; Langan, Simon

    2017-04-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa small scale irrigation is developing rapidly. Whilst emphasis is mainly placed on water resource availability and access for irrigation, less attention is paid to the interaction of water management on nutrient balances. The quality and quantity of irrigation water delivered to the field not only controls the nutrient flow dynamic system in the soil media but also affects production and uptake. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of different water management methods on partial nutrient balances in irrigated fields of the Ethiopian highlands. The study was conducted during the dry season of 2016 where farmers cultivated consecutively tomato and pepper. Farmers were grouped into three water management treatments: irrigation based on Time Domain reflect meter (TDR), on the standard crop water requirements (CWR) and the traditional farmers practice (FARM). The average water consumption for tomato in the CWR, TDR and FARM groups were 590 mm, 476 mm and 575 mm, respectively. The comparison of the water use at different stages showed that traditional farmer practice used less water at the initial stage and more water at the maturity stage which influenced the crop yield and the nutrient dynamics of NPK. For pepper, the linkage to the supplemental irrigation was slightly different due to the onset of the rainy season. The average tomato yield obtained in the farmer practice plots was 20.8 Mg ha-1 which was significantly lower than those obtained in the TDR (31.67 Mg ha-1) and the CWR (33.2 Mg ha-1) plots. The average partial nitrogen (N) depletion balance obtained for tomato in the TDR, CWR and FARM treatment were -91 kg ha-1, -151 kg ha-1 and 19 kg ha-1 respectively. For phosphorus (P) the calculated depletion balance was -0.6 kg ha-1, -0.5 kg ha-1, and - 0.2 kg ha-1, respectively whereas for potassium (K) the balances were largely negative (i.e. -284 kg ha-1, -270 kg ha-1 and -97 kg ha-1, respectively). Similar observations were

  1. Reduction of water and energy requirement of algae cultivation using an algae biofilm photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Altan; Kinney, Kerry; Katz, Lynn; Berberoglu, Halil

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports the construction and performance of an algae biofilm photobioreactor that offers a significant reduction of the energy and water requirements of cultivation. The green alga Botryococcus braunii was cultivated as a biofilm. The system achieved a direct biomass harvest concentration of 96.4 kg/m(3) with a total lipid content 26.8% by dry weight and a productivity of 0.71 g/m(2) day, representing a light to biomass energy conversion efficiency of 2.02%. Moreover, it reduced the volume of water required to cultivate a kilogram of algal biomass by 45% and reduced the dewatering energy requirement by 99.7% compared to open ponds. Finally, the net energy ratio of the cultivation was 6.00 including dewatering. The current issues of this novel photobioreactor are also identified to further improve the system productivity and scaleup.

  2. A Review on Principles and Methods of Determining the Environmental Water Requirements in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Halajian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In Iran, limitation of water resources is natural due to arid and semi-arid climate, therefore, studies to determine the environmental water requirements have been considered as a necessity in recent years. Environmental flow is one of the most important environmental parameters that should be carefully considered in agricultural water development planning studies. Water resource development projects, especially dam construction and inter-basin transfer of water, are occasionally inevitable due to lack of water and poor spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation. Environmental water demand assessment methods were developed to stabilize environmental flows, the protection of ecosystems or save a particular species (endangered. Methodology approaches in general is divided into two groups: prescription and interactive. Prescriptive approach usually addresses a certain goal and suggests the value of the individual or the individual flow regime. Interactive approach focuses on the relationship between changes in the river (or runoff. Prescriptive approaches include four groups: hydrological index, hydraulic ratio, habitat-simulation, comprehensive approaches. Assessment methods of flow with interactive approach are more complex than prescriptive methods and often include habitat simulation and holistic approaches. The most widely used environmental assessment method is hydrological index (prescriptive. In Iran, due to the lack of complete information regarding the characteristics of aquatic ecosystems and patterns precipitation in any area or the state of underground aquifers, and considering that people in many regions of the country (especially away from the center are dependent on the river for their livelihoods, the assessment should also include socio-economic considerations. So, technical and economic feasibility should be considered for projects that require inter-basin transfer as water rights for future.

  3. Mediterranean agriculture: More efficient irrigation needed to compensate increases in future irrigation water requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, Marianela; Shi, Sinan; von Bloh, Werner; Bondeau, Alberte; Cramer, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Irrigation in the Mediterranean is of vital importance for food security, employment and economic development. Our research shows that, at present, Mediterranean region could save 35% of water by implementing more efficient irrigation and conveyance systems. Some countries like Syria, Egypt and Turkey have higher saving potentials than others. Currently some crops, especially sugar cane and agricultural trees, consume in average more irrigation water per hectare than annual crops (1). Also under climate change, more efficient irrigation is of vital importance for counteracting increases in irrigation water requirements. The Mediterranean area as a whole might face an increase in gross irrigation requirements between 4% and 18% from climate change alone by the end of the century if irrigation systems and conveyance are not improved. Population growth increases these numbers to 22% and 74%, respectively, affecting mainly the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean. However, improved irrigation technologies and conveyance systems have large water saving potentials, especially in the Eastern Mediterranean, and may be able to compensate to some degree the increases due to climate change and population growth. Both subregions would need around 35% more water than today if they could afford some degree of modernization of irrigation and conveyance systems and benefit from the CO2-fertilization effect (1). However, in some scenarios (in this case as combinations of climate change, irrigation technology, influence of population growth and CO2-fertilization effect) water scarcity may constrain the supply of the irrigation water needed in future in Algeria, Libya, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Serbia, Morocco, Tunisia and Spain (1). In this study, vegetation growth, phenology, agricultural production and irrigation water requirements and withdrawal were simulated with the process-based ecohydrological and agro-ecosystem model LPJmL ("Lund-Potsdam-Jena managed Land") after a

  4. Comparison and Cost Analysis of Drinking Water Quality Monitoring Requirements versus Practice in Seven Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonny Crocker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Drinking water quality monitoring programs aim to support provision of safe drinking water by informing water quality management. Little evidence or guidance exists on best monitoring practices for low resource settings. Lack of financial, human, and technological resources reduce a country’s ability to monitor water supply. Monitoring activities were characterized in Cambodia, Colombia, India (three states, Jordan, Peru, South Africa, and Uganda according to water sector responsibilities, monitoring approaches, and marginal cost. The seven study countries were selected to represent a range of low resource settings. The focus was on monitoring of microbiological parameters, such as E. coli, coliforms, and H2S-producing microorganisms. Data collection involved qualitative and quantitative methods. Across seven study countries, few distinct approaches to monitoring were observed, and in all but one country all monitoring relied on fixed laboratories for sample analysis. Compliance with monitoring requirements was highest for operational monitoring of large water supplies in urban areas. Sample transport and labor for sample collection and analysis together constitute approximately 75% of marginal costs, which exclude capital costs. There is potential for substantive optimization of monitoring programs by considering field-based testing and by fundamentally reconsidering monitoring approaches for non-piped supplies. This is the first study to look quantitatively at water quality monitoring practices in multiple developing countries.

  5. A case study of regional catchment water quality modelling to identify pollution control requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, B; Seward, A J; Thompson, L

    2006-01-01

    There are four ecologically important river catchments that contain candidate Special Areas of Conservation (cSACs) under the Habitats Directive in the Lake District National Park located in the North of England. These are the rivers Ehen, Kent, Derwent and Eden. For each cSAC, there are defined ecological criteria that include water quality targets to protect the designated species. Stretches of the riverine cSACs in each catchment are failing to meet these and other water quality targets. The Environment Agency commissioned a study of each catchment to provide the underpinning scientific knowledge to allow it to deliver its statutory obligations under the Habitats Directive. SIMCAT river water quality models were produced and used to predict the water quality impacts resulting from a number of water quality planning scenarios aimed at achieving full compliance with the Habitats Directive and other national and EEC water quality targets. The results indicated that further controls on effluent discharges will allow the majority of targets to be met but other sources of pollution will also need to be controlled. The outcome of the study also recognised that water quality improvements alone will not necessarily produce the required improvement to the ecological interest features in each cSAC.

  6. Estimating Irrigation Water Requirements using MODIS Vegetation Indices and Inverse Biophysical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Bounoua, Lahouari; Harriss, Robert; Harriss, Robert; Wells, Gordon; Glantz, Michael; Dukhovny, Victor A.; Orlovsky, Leah

    2007-01-01

    An inverse process approach using satellite-driven (MODIS) biophysical modeling was used to quantitatively assess water resource demand in semi-arid and arid agricultural lands by comparing the carbon and water flux modeled under both equilibrium (in balance with prevailing climate) and non-equilibrium (irrigated) conditions. Since satellite observations of irrigated areas show higher leaf area indices (LAI) than is supportable by local precipitation, we postulate that the degree to which irrigated lands vary from equilibrium conditions is related to the amount of irrigation water used. For an observation year we used MODIS vegetation indices, local climate data, and the SiB2 photosynthesis-conductance model to examine the relationship between climate and the water stress function for a given grid-cell and observed leaf area. To estimate the minimum amount of supplemental water required for an observed cell, we added enough precipitation to the prevailing climatology at each time step to minimize the water stress function and bring the soil to field capacity. The experiment was conducted on irrigated lands on the U.S. Mexico border and Central Asia and compared to estimates of irrigation water used.

  7. Estimating Irrigation Water Requirements using MODIS Vegetation Indices and Inverse Biophysical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Bounoua, Lahouari; Harriss, Robert; Harriss, Robert; Wells, Gordon; Glantz, Michael; Dukhovny, Victor A.; Orlovsky, Leah

    2007-01-01

    An inverse process approach using satellite-driven (MODIS) biophysical modeling was used to quantitatively assess water resource demand in semi-arid and arid agricultural lands by comparing the carbon and water flux modeled under both equilibrium (in balance with prevailing climate) and non-equilibrium (irrigated) conditions. Since satellite observations of irrigated areas show higher leaf area indices (LAI) than is supportable by local precipitation, we postulate that the degree to which irrigated lands vary from equilibrium conditions is related to the amount of irrigation water used. For an observation year we used MODIS vegetation indices, local climate data, and the SiB2 photosynthesis-conductance model to examine the relationship between climate and the water stress function for a given grid-cell and observed leaf area. To estimate the minimum amount of supplemental water required for an observed cell, we added enough precipitation to the prevailing climatology at each time step to minimize the water stress function and bring the soil to field capacity. The experiment was conducted on irrigated lands on the U.S. Mexico border and Central Asia and compared to estimates of irrigation water used.

  8. Comparison and cost analysis of drinking water quality monitoring requirements versus practice in seven developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Jonny; Bartram, Jamie

    2014-07-18

    Drinking water quality monitoring programs aim to support provision of safe drinking water by informing water quality management. Little evidence or guidance exists on best monitoring practices for low resource settings. Lack of financial, human, and technological resources reduce a country's ability to monitor water supply. Monitoring activities were characterized in Cambodia, Colombia, India (three states), Jordan, Peru, South Africa, and Uganda according to water sector responsibilities, monitoring approaches, and marginal cost. The seven study countries were selected to represent a range of low resource settings. The focus was on monitoring of microbiological parameters, such as E. coli, coliforms, and H2S-producing microorganisms. Data collection involved qualitative and quantitative methods. Across seven study countries, few distinct approaches to monitoring were observed, and in all but one country all monitoring relied on fixed laboratories for sample analysis. Compliance with monitoring requirements was highest for operational monitoring of large water supplies in urban areas. Sample transport and labor for sample collection and analysis together constitute approximately 75% of marginal costs, which exclude capital costs. There is potential for substantive optimization of monitoring programs by considering field-based testing and by fundamentally reconsidering monitoring approaches for non-piped supplies. This is the first study to look quantitatively at water quality monitoring practices in multiple developing countries.

  9. 48 CFR 52.247-52 - Clearance and Documentation Requirements-Shipments to DOD Air or Water Terminal Transshipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Documentation Requirements-Shipments to DOD Air or Water Terminal Transshipment Points. 52.247-52 Section 52.247... and Documentation Requirements—Shipments to DOD Air or Water Terminal Transshipment Points. As... Requirements—Shipments to DOD Air or Water Terminal Transshipment Points (FEB 2006) All shipments to water...

  10. Model of an aquaponic system for minimised water, energy and nitrogen requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Lastiri, D; Slinkert, T; Cappon, H J; Baganz, D; Staaks, G; Keesman, K J

    2016-01-01

    Water and nutrient savings can be established by coupling water streams between interacting processes. Wastewater from production processes contains nutrients like nitrogen (N), which can and should be recycled in order to meet future regulatory discharge demands. Optimisation of interacting water systems is a complex task. An effective way of understanding, analysing and optimising such systems is by applying mathematical models. The present modelling work aims at supporting the design of a nearly emission-free aquaculture and hydroponic system (aquaponics), thus contributing to sustainable production and to food security for the 21st century. Based on the model, a system that couples 40 m(3) fish tanks and a hydroponic system of 1,000 m(2) can produce 5 tons of tilapia and 75 tons of tomato yearly. The system requires energy to condense and recover evaporated water, for lighting and heating, adding up to 1.3 GJ/m(2) every year. In the suggested configuration, the fish can provide about 26% of the N required in a plant cycle. A coupling strategy that sends water from the fish to the plants in amounts proportional to the fish feed input, reduces the standard deviation of the NO3(-) level in the fish cycle by 35%.

  11. Comparison of Land, Water, and Energy Requirements of Lettuce Grown Using Hydroponic vs. Conventional Agricultural Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Guilherme Lages Barbosa; Francisca Daiane Almeida Gadelha; Natalya Kublik; Alan Proctor; Lucas Reichelm; Emily Weissinger; Gregory M. Wohlleb; Halden, Rolf U.

    2015-01-01

    The land, water, and energy requirements of hydroponics were compared to those of conventional agriculture by example of lettuce production in Yuma, Arizona, USA. Data were obtained from crop budgets and governmental agricultural statistics, and contrasted with theoretical data for hydroponic lettuce production derived by using engineering equations populated with literature values. Yields of lettuce per greenhouse unit (815 m2) of 41 ± 6.1 kg/m2/y had water and energy demands of 20 ± 3.8 L/...

  12. Analysis of IECC2003 Chiller Heat Recovery for Service Water Heating Requirement for New York State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winiarski, David W.

    2004-08-15

    The state of New York asked the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the requirement for Heat Recovery for Service Water Heating that exists in the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code to determine whether this requirement should be adopted into the New York State Energy Code. A typical hotel application that would trigger this requirement was examined using whole building simulation software to generate baseline annual chiller and service hot water loads, and a spreadsheet was used to examine the energy savings potential for heat recovery using hourly load files from the simulation. An example application meeting the code requirement was developed, and the energy savings, energy cost savings, and first costs for the heat recovery installation were developed. The calculated payback for this application was 6.3 years using 2002 New York state average energy costs. This payback met the minimum requirements for cost effectiveness established for the state of New York for updating the commercial energy conservation code.

  13. The use of PRA in the development of ALWR (advanced light water reactor) design requirements. [Advanced Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summitt, R.L. (Safety and Reliability Optimization Services, Inc., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Additon, S.L. (TENERA, L.P., Bethesda, MD (USA)); Pasedag, W.F. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The current hiatus in nuclear power plant orders provides an opportunity for the development of advanced light water reactor (ALWR) design concepts and regulatory requirements which incorporate the insights gained from the application of the probabilistic risk assessment. The US Department of Energy is assisting the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in the incorporation of PRA insights into the specification of the utility requirements, and reactor vendors in support of the conceptual design of safety systems, for such advanced plants. This paper reviews the applications of PRA methods in this development of specifications for, and the design of simplified, rugged ALWRs with a significantly improved risk profile. Specific examples of the impact of utilizing published PRA insights, construction and use of functional PRA models, and feedback of PRA experience into the specification of the key assumptions and groundrules for ALWR PRAs are presented. 13 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Water requirements for wheat and maize under climate change in North Nile Delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouda, S.; Noreldin, T; Abd El-Latif, K.

    2015-07-01

    Determination of water requirements for wheat and maize under climate change is important for policy makers in Egypt. The objectives of this paper were to calculate (i) ETo and (ii) water requirements for wheat and maize crops grown in five governorates (Alexandria, Demiatte, Kafr El-Sheik, El-Dakahlia and El-Behira) located in North Nile Delta of Egypt under current climate and climate change. ECHAM5 climate model was used to develop A1B climate change scenario in 2020, 2030 and 2040. Monthly values of evapotranspiration (ETo) under the different scenarios in these governorates were calculated using Hargreaves-Samani equation (H-S). Then, these values were regressed on ETo values previously calculated by Penman-Monteith equation (P-M) and linear regression (prediction equations were developed for each governorate). The predicted ETo values were compared to the values of ETo calculated by P-M equation and the deviations between them were very low (RMSE/obs=0.04-0.06 mm and R2 =0.96-0.99). Water requirements for wheat and maize were calculated using BISm model under current climate and in 2020, 2030 and 2040. The results showed that average annual ETo would increase by low percentage in 2020 and 2030. However, in 2040 the increase would reach 8%. Water requirements are expected to increase by 2-3% for wheat and by 10-15% for maize, which would result in reduction of the cultivated area. Thus, it is very important to revise and fix the production system of wheat and maize, in terms of the used cultivars, fertilizer and irrigation application to overcome the risk of climate change. (Author)

  15. Water consumption footprint and land requirements of large-scale alternative diesel and jet fuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Mark D; Olcay, Hakan; Malina, Robert; Trivedi, Parthsarathi; Pearlson, Matthew N; Strzepek, Kenneth; Paltsev, Sergey V; Wollersheim, Christoph; Barrett, Steven R H

    2013-01-01

    Middle distillate (MD) transportation fuels, including diesel and jet fuel, make up almost 30% of liquid fuel consumption in the United States. Alternative drop-in MD and biodiesel could potentially reduce dependence on crude oil and the greenhouse gas intensity of transportation. However, the water and land resource requirements of these novel fuel production technologies must be better understood. This analysis quantifies the lifecycle green and blue water consumption footprints of producing: MD from conventional crude oil; Fischer-Tropsch MD from natural gas and coal; fermentation and advanced fermentation MD from biomass; and hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids MD and biodiesel from oilseed crops, throughout the contiguous United States. We find that FT MD and alternative MD derived from rainfed biomass have lifecycle blue water consumption footprints of 1.6 to 20.1 Lwater/LMD, comparable to conventional MD, which ranges between 4.1 and 7.4 Lwater/LMD. Alternative MD derived from irrigated biomass has a lifecycle blue water consumption footprint potentially several orders of magnitude larger, between 2.7 and 22 600 Lwater/LMD. Alternative MD derived from biomass has a lifecycle green water consumption footprint between 1.1 and 19 200 Lwater/LMD. Results are disaggregated to characterize the relationship between geo-spatial location and lifecycle water consumption footprint. We also quantify the trade-offs between blue water consumption footprint and areal MD productivity, which ranges from 490 to 4200 LMD/ha, under assumptions of rainfed and irrigated biomass cultivation. Finally, we show that if biomass cultivation for alternative MD is irrigated, the ratio of the increase in areal MD productivity to the increase in blue water consumption footprint is a function of geo-spatial location and feedstock-to-fuel production pathway.

  16. An assessment of global net irrigation water requirements from various water supply sources to sustain irrigation: rivers and reservoirs (1960–2000 and 2050

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khajuria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water supply sources for irrigation, such as rivers, reservoirs, and groundwater, are critically important for agricultural productivity. The current rapid increase in irrigation water use threatens sustainable food production. In this study, we estimated the time-varying dependency of the supply of irrigation water from rivers, large reservoirs with a greater than 1.0 km3 storage capacity, medium-size reservoirs with storage capacities ranging from 1.0 km3 to 3.0 Mm3, and non-local non-renewable blue water (NNBW, particularly taking into account variations in irrigation area during the period 1960–2000. We also estimated the future irrigation water requirements from water supply sources in addition to these four sources, using an irrigation area scenario. The net irrigation water requirements from various supply sources were assessed using the global H08 water resources model. The H08 model simulates water requirements on a daily basis at a resolution of 1.0° × 1.0°. We obtained net irrigation water from rivers and medium-size reservoirs, and determined that the NNBW increased continuously from 1960 to 1985, but the net irrigation water from large reservoirs increased only marginally. After 1985, the net irrigation water from rivers approached a critical limit with the continued expansion of the irrigation area. The irrigation water requirements from medium-size reservoirs and NNBW increased significantly following the expansion of the irrigation area and the increased storage capacity of medium-size reservoirs. Under the irrigation area scenario without climate change, global net irrigation water requirements from additional water supply sources will account for 26% of the total requirements in the year 2050. We found that expansion of irrigation areas due to population growth will generate an enormous demand for irrigation water from additional resources.

  17. An assessment of global net irrigation water requirements from various water supply sources to sustain irrigation: rivers and reservoirs (1960-2000 and 2050)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, S.; Cho, J.; Yamada, H. G.; Hanasaki, N.; Khajuria, A.; Kanae, S.

    2013-01-01

    Water supply sources for irrigation, such as rivers, reservoirs, and groundwater, are critically important for agricultural productivity. The current rapid increase in irrigation water use threatens sustainable food production. In this study, we estimated the time-varying dependency of the supply of irrigation water from rivers, large reservoirs with a greater than 1.0 km3 storage capacity, medium-size reservoirs with storage capacities ranging from 1.0 km3 to 3.0 Mm3, and non-local non-renewable blue water (NNBW), particularly taking into account variations in irrigation area during the period 1960-2000. We also estimated the future irrigation water requirements from water supply sources in addition to these four sources, using an irrigation area scenario. The net irrigation water requirements from various supply sources were assessed using the global H08 water resources model. The H08 model simulates water requirements on a daily basis at a resolution of 1.0° × 1.0°. We obtained net irrigation water from rivers and medium-size reservoirs, and determined that the NNBW increased continuously from 1960 to 1985, but the net irrigation water from large reservoirs increased only marginally. After 1985, the net irrigation water from rivers approached a critical limit with the continued expansion of the irrigation area. The irrigation water requirements from medium-size reservoirs and NNBW increased significantly following the expansion of the irrigation area and the increased storage capacity of medium-size reservoirs. Under the irrigation area scenario without climate change, global net irrigation water requirements from additional water supply sources will account for 26% of the total requirements in the year 2050. We found that expansion of irrigation areas due to population growth will generate an enormous demand for irrigation water from additional resources.

  18. Comparison of Land, Water, and Energy Requirements of Lettuce Grown Using Hydroponic vs. Conventional Agricultural Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Lages Barbosa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The land, water, and energy requirements of hydroponics were compared to those of conventional agriculture by example of lettuce production in Yuma, Arizona, USA. Data were obtained from crop budgets and governmental agricultural statistics, and contrasted with theoretical data for hydroponic lettuce production derived by using engineering equations populated with literature values. Yields of lettuce per greenhouse unit (815 m2 of 41 ± 6.1 kg/m2/y had water and energy demands of 20 ± 3.8 L/kg/y and 90,000 ± 11,000 kJ/kg/y (±standard deviation, respectively. In comparison, conventional production yielded 3.9 ± 0.21 kg/m2/y of produce, with water and energy demands of 250 ± 25 L/kg/y and 1100 ± 75 kJ/kg/y, respectively. Hydroponics offered 11 ± 1.7 times higher yields but required 82 ± 11 times more energy compared to conventionally produced lettuce. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first quantitative comparison of conventional and hydroponic produce production by example of lettuce grown in the southwestern United States. It identified energy availability as a major factor in assessing the sustainability of hydroponics, and it points to water-scarce settings offering an abundance of renewable energy (e.g., from solar, geothermal, or wind power as particularly attractive regions for hydroponic agriculture.

  19. Comparison of Land, Water, and Energy Requirements of Lettuce Grown Using Hydroponic vs. Conventional Agricultural Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Guilherme Lages; Gadelha, Francisca Daiane Almeida; Kublik, Natalya; Proctor, Alan; Reichelm, Lucas; Weissinger, Emily; Wohlleb, Gregory M; Halden, Rolf U

    2015-06-16

    The land, water, and energy requirements of hydroponics were compared to those of conventional agriculture by example of lettuce production in Yuma, Arizona, USA. Data were obtained from crop budgets and governmental agricultural statistics, and contrasted with theoretical data for hydroponic lettuce production derived by using engineering equations populated with literature values. Yields of lettuce per greenhouse unit (815 m2) of 41 ± 6.1 kg/m2/y had water and energy demands of 20 ± 3.8 L/kg/y and 90,000 ± 11,000 kJ/kg/y (±standard deviation), respectively. In comparison, conventional production yielded 3.9 ± 0.21 kg/m2/y of produce, with water and energy demands of 250 ± 25 L/kg/y and 1100 ± 75 kJ/kg/y, respectively. Hydroponics offered 11 ± 1.7 times higher yields but required 82 ± 11 times more energy compared to conventionally produced lettuce. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first quantitative comparison of conventional and hydroponic produce production by example of lettuce grown in the southwestern United States. It identified energy availability as a major factor in assessing the sustainability of hydroponics, and it points to water-scarce settings offering an abundance of renewable energy (e.g., from solar, geothermal, or wind power) as particularly attractive regions for hydroponic agriculture.

  20. A site-specific agricultural water requirement and footprint estimator (SPARE:WATER 1.0) for irrigation agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    S. Multsch; Al-Rumaikhani, Y. A.; H.-G. Frede; L. Breuer

    2013-01-01

    The water footprint accounting method addresses the quantification of water consumption in agriculture, whereby three types of water to grow crops are considered, namely green water (consumed rainfall), blue water (irrigation from surface or groundwater) and grey water (water needed to dilute pollutants). Most of current water footprint assessments focus on global to continental scale. We therefore developed the spatial decision support system SPARE:WATER that allows to quantify green, blu...

  1. A Site-sPecific Agricultural water Requirement and footprint Estimator (SPARE:WATER 1.0)

    OpenAIRE

    S. Multsch; Al-Rumaikhani, Y. A.; Frede, H.-G.; L. Breuer

    2013-01-01

    The agricultural water footprint addresses the quantification of water consumption in agriculture, whereby three types of water to grow crops are considered, namely green water (consumed rainfall), blue water (irrigation from surface or groundwater) and grey water (water needed to dilute pollutants). By considering site-specific properties when calculating the crop water footprint, this methodology can be used to support decision making in the agricultural sector on local to...

  2. Soil water requirements of tissue-cultured Dwarf Cavendish banana ( Musa spp. L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shongwe, V. D.; Tumber, R.; Masarirambi, M. T.; Mutukumira, A. N.

    The banana is one of the most important fruit crops in the world. In terms of consumption, the banana fruit is ranked high yet there has not been much research particularly in relation to water requirements for propagules produced by tissue culture. In recent years, tissue culture banana planting material has become increasingly important due to its vigorous growth and high yields. The objective of this study was to investigate optimum soil water requirements of tissue-cultured banana. Dwarf Cavendish tissue-cultured plantlets grown in pots in a greenhouse were subjected to four irrigation regimes at 100% ETm, 85% ETm, 65% ETm, and 40% ETm. Plant parameters measured were leaf number, plant height, pseudo-stem girth, leaf length, leaf width, leaf area, leaf area index, leaf index, leaf colour, and plant vigour. Soil water potential measurements were also made over a three-month period. Differences between irrigating at 100% ETm and 85% ETm were not significantly ( P plant height, and plant height, compared to 65% and 40% ETm treatments. Pseudo-stem girth was highest from the 100% ETm compared to the other treatments. Economic yields of banana may be obtained with irrigation regimes ranging between 100% ETm and 85% ETm.

  3. Constraints and challenges of meeting the water requirements of livestock in Ethiopia: cases of Lume and Siraro districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenu, Kebede; Markemann, André; Roessler, Regina; Siegmund-Schultze, Marianna; Abebe, Girma; Valle Zárate, Anne

    2013-10-01

    Compared to the total water use in livestock production systems, water for livestock drinking is small in amount but is an important requirement for health and productivity of animals. This study was carried out to assess constraints and challenges of meeting drinking water requirements of livestock in rural mixed smallholder crop-livestock farming districts in the Ethiopian Rift Valley area. Data was collected by individual interviews with randomly selected respondents and farmer group discussions. Farmers ranked feed and water scarcity as the two most important constraints for livestock husbandry, although the ranking order differed between districts and villages. Poor quality water was a concern for the communities in proximity to urban settlements or industrial establishments. Water provision for livestock was challenging during the dry season, since alternative water sources dried up or were polluted. Though rainwater harvesting by dugout constructions was practiced to cope with water scarcity, farmers indicated that mismanagement of the harvested water was posing health risks on both livestock and people. A sustainable water provision for livestock in the area, thus, depends on use of different water sources (intermittent or perennial) that should be properly managed. Industrial establishments should adopt an environment-friendly production to minimize pollution of water resources used for livestock consumption. Technical support to farmers is required in proper design and use of existing rainwater harvesting systems. Further investigations are recommended on effect of poor quality water (perceived by farmers) on performance of livestock.

  4. Water and Energy Dietary Requirements and Endocrinology of Human Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen W.; Feeback, Daniel L.

    2002-01-01

    Fluid and energy metabolism and related endocrine changes have been studied nearly from the beginning of human space flight in association with short- and long-duration flights. Fluid and electrolyte nutrition status is affected by many factors including the microgravity environment, stress, changes in body composition, diet, exercise habits, sleep cycles, and ambient temperature and humidity conditions. Space flight exposes astronauts to all these factors and consequently poses significant challenges to establishing dietary water, sodium, potassium, and energy recommendations. The purpose of this article is to review the results of ground-based and space flight research studies that have led to current water, electrolyte, and energy dietary requirements for humans during space flight and to give an overview of related endocrinologic changes that have been observed in humans during short- and long-duration space flight.

  5. Environmental and ecological water requirement of river system: a case study of Haihe-Luanhe river system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the environmental and ecological problems induced by water resources development and utilization, this paper proposes a concept of environmental and ecological water requirement. It is defined as the minimum water amount to be consumed by the natural water bodies to conserve its environmental and ecological functions. Based on the definition, the methods on calculating the amount of environmental and ecological water requirement are determined. In the case study on Haihe-Luanhe river system, the water requirement is divided into three parts, i.e., the basic in-stream flow, water requirement for sediment transfer and water consumption by evaporation of the lakes or everglades. The results of the calculation show that the environmental and ecological water requirement in the river system is about 124×108 m3, including 57×108 m3 for basic in-stream flow, 63×108m3 for sediment transfer and 4×l08m3 for net evaporation loss of lakes. The total amount of environmental and ecological water requirement accounts for 54% of the amount of runoff (228×108 m3). However, it should be realized that the amount of environmental and ecological water requirement must be more than that we have calculated. According to this result, we consider that the rational utilization rate of the runoff in the river systems must not be more than 40%. Since the current utilization rate of the river system, which is over 80%, has been far beyond the limitation, the problems of environment and ecology are quite serious. It is imperative to control and adjust water development and utilization to eliminate the existing problems and to avoid the potential ecological or environmental crisis.

  6. Water requirements for wheat and maize under climate change in North Nile Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiha Ouda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of water requirements for wheat and maize under climate change is important for policy makers in Egypt. The objectives of this paper were to calculate (i ETo and (ii water requirements for wheat and maize crops grown in five governorates (Alexandria, Demiatte, Kafr El-Sheik, El-Dakahlia and El-Behira located in North Nile Delta of Egypt under current climate and climate change. ECHAM5 climate model was used to develop A1B climate change scenario in 2020, 2030 and 2040. Monthly values of evapotranspiration (ETo under the different scenarios in these governorates were calculated using Hargreaves-Samani equation (H-S. Then, these values were regressed on ETo values previously calculated by Penman-Monteith equation (P-M and linear regression (prediction equations were developed for each governorate. The predicted ETo values were compared to the values of ETo calculated by P-M equation and the deviations between them were very low (RMSE/obs=0.04-0.06 mm and R2 =0.96-0.99. Water requirements for wheat and maize were calculated using BISm model under current climate and in 2020, 2030 and 2040. The results showed that average annual ETo would increase by low percentage in 2020 and 2030. However, in 2040 the increase would reach 8%. Water requirements are expected to increase by 2-3% for wheat and by 10-15% for maize, which would result in reduction of the cultivated area. Thus, it is very important to revise and fix the production system of wheat and maize, in terms of the used cultivars, fertilizer and irrigation application to overcome the risk of climate change. Additional key words: Triticum spp; Zea mays; Penman-Monteith equation; Hargreaves-Samani equation; BISm model; ECHAM5 climate model; A1B climate change scenario. Abbreviations used: BISm (basic irrigation scheduling model; CCAFS (Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security; ETo (evapotranspiration; H-S (Hargreaves & Samani; Kc (crop coefficient; PI (percentage of increase; P

  7. On data requirements for calibration of integrated models for urban water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeveld, Jeroen; Nopens, Ingmar; Schilperoort, Remy; Benedetti, Lorenzo; de Klein, Jeroen; Amerlinck, Youri; Weijers, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of integrated urban water systems (IUWS) has seen a rapid development in recent years. Models and software are available that describe the process dynamics in sewers, wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), receiving water systems as well as at the interfaces between the submodels. Successful applications of integrated modeling are, however, relatively scarce. One of the reasons for this is the lack of high-quality monitoring data with the required spatial and temporal resolution and accuracy to calibrate and validate the integrated models, even though the state of the art of monitoring itself is no longer the limiting factor. This paper discusses the efforts to be able to meet the data requirements associated with integrated modeling and describes the methods applied to validate the monitoring data and to use submodels as software sensor to provide the necessary input for other submodels. The main conclusion of the paper is that state of the art monitoring is in principle sufficient to provide the data necessary to calibrate integrated models, but practical limitations resulting in incomplete data-sets hamper widespread application. In order to overcome these difficulties, redundancy of future monitoring networks should be increased and, at the same time, data handling (including data validation, mining and assimilation) should receive much more attention.

  8. Pumping time required to obtain tube well water samples with aquifer characteristic radon concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricardo, Carla Pereira; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Rocha, Zildete; Palmieri, Helena E.L.; Linhares, Maria G.M.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C., E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br, E-mail: help@cdtn.br, E-mail: mgml@cdtn.br, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Radon is an inert noble gas, which comes from the natural radioactive decay of uranium and thorium in soil, rock and water. Radon isotopes emanated from radium-bearing grains of a rock or soil are released into the pore space. Radon that reaches the pore space is partitioned between the gaseous and aqueous phases. Thus, the groundwater presents a radon signature from the rock that is characteristic of the aquifer. The characteristic radon concentration of an aquifer, which is mainly related to the emanation, is also influenced by the degree of subsurface degassing, especially in the vicinity of a tube well, where the radon concentration is strongly reduced. Looking for the required pumping time to take a tube well water sample that presents the characteristic radon concentration of the aquifer, an experiment was conducted in an 80 m deep tube well. In this experiment, after twenty-four hours without extraction, water samples were collected periodically, about ten minutes intervals, during two hours of pumping time. The radon concentrations of the samples were determined by using the RAD7 Electronic Radon Detector from Durridge Company, a solid state alpha spectrometric detector. It was realized that the necessary time to reach the maximum radon concentration, that means the characteristic radon concentration of the aquifer, is about sixty minutes. (author)

  9. Calculating crop water requirement satisfaction in the West Africa Sahel with remotely sensed soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Amy; Gregory J. Husak,; Molly Brown,; Mark Carroll,; Funk, Christopher C.; Soni Yatheendradas,; Kristi Arsenault,; Christa Peters-Lidard,; Verdin, James

    2015-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will provide soil moisture data with unprecedented accuracy, resolution, and coverage, enabling models to better track agricultural drought and estimate yields. In turn, this information can be used to shape policy related to food and water from commodity markets to humanitarian relief efforts. New data alone, however, do not translate to improvements in drought and yield forecasts. New tools will be needed to transform SMAP data into agriculturally meaningful products. The objective of this study is to evaluate the possibility and efficiency of replacing the rainfall-derived soil moisture component of a crop water stress index with SMAP data. The approach is demonstrated with 0.1°-resolution, ~10-day microwave soil moisture from the European Space Agency and simulated soil moisture from the Famine Early Warning Systems Network Land Data Assimilation System. Over a West Africa domain, the approach is evaluated by comparing the different soil moisture estimates and their resulting Water Requirement Satisfaction Index values from 2000 to 2010. This study highlights how the ensemble of indices performs during wet versus dry years, over different land-cover types, and the correlation with national-level millet yields. The new approach is a feasible and useful way to quantitatively assess how satellite-derived rainfall and soil moisture track agricultural water deficits. Given the importance of soil moisture in many applications, ranging from agriculture to public health to fire, this study should inspire other modeling communities to reformulate existing tools to take advantage of SMAP data.

  10. Monsoon variability, crop water requirement, and crop planning for kharif rice in Sagar Island, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, S.; Choudhury, B. U.; Satpati, L. N.

    2015-12-01

    In the Sagar Island of Bay of Bengal, rainfed lowland rice is the major crop, grown solely depending on erratic distribution of southwest monsoon (SM) rainfall. Lack of information on SM rainfall variability and absence of crop scheduling accordingly results in frequent occurrence of intermittent water stress and occasional crop failure. In the present study, we analyzed long period (1982-2010) SM rainfall behavior (onset, withdrawal, rainfall and wetness indices, dry and wet spells), crop water requirement (CWR, by Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) 56), and probability of weekly rainfall occurrence (by two-parameter gamma distribution) to assess the variability and impact on water availability, CWR, and rice productivity. Finally, crop planning was suggested to overcome monsoon uncertainties on water availability and rice productivity. Study revealed that the normal onset and withdrawal weeks for SM rainfall were 22nd ± 1 and 43rd ± 2 meteorological weeks (MW), respectively. However, effective monsoon rainfall started at 24th MW (rainfall 92.7 mm, p > 56.7 % for 50 mm rainfall) and was terminated by the end of 40th MW (rainfall 90.7 mm, p spell frequency during panicle initiation and heading stage was computed as 40 of which 6 dry spells were >7 days in duration and reflected a significant ( p < 0.05) increasing trend (at 0.22 days year-1) over the years (1982-2010). The present study highlights the adaptive capacity of crop planning including abiotic stress-tolerant cultivars to monsoon rainfall variability for sustaining rainfed rice production vis-à-vis food and livelihood security in vulnerable islands of coastal ecosystem.

  11. Risk assessment of agricultural water requirement based on a multi-model ensemble framework, southwest of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Reza; Akhond-Ali, Ali-Mohammad; Roozbahani, Abbas; Fattahi, Rouhollah

    2017-08-01

    Water shortage and climate change are the most important issues of sustainable agricultural and water resources development. Given the importance of water availability in crop production, the present study focused on risk assessment of climate change impact on agricultural water requirement in southwest of Iran, under two emission scenarios (A2 and B1) for the future period (2025-2054). A multi-model ensemble framework based on mean observed temperature-precipitation (MOTP) method and a combined probabilistic approach Long Ashton Research Station-Weather Generator (LARS-WG) and change factor (CF) have been used for downscaling to manage the uncertainty of outputs of 14 general circulation models (GCMs). The results showed an increasing temperature in all months and irregular changes of precipitation (either increasing or decreasing) in the future period. In addition, the results of the calculated annual net water requirement for all crops affected by climate change indicated an increase between 4 and 10 %. Furthermore, an increasing process is also expected regarding to the required water demand volume. The most and the least expected increase in the water demand volume is about 13 and 5 % for A2 and B1 scenarios, respectively. Considering the results and the limited water resources in the study area, it is crucial to provide water resources planning in order to reduce the negative effects of climate change. Therefore, the adaptation scenarios with the climate change related to crop pattern and water consumption should be taken into account.

  12. Risk assessment of agricultural water requirement based on a multi-model ensemble framework, southwest of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Reza; Akhond-Ali, Ali-Mohammad; Roozbahani, Abbas; Fattahi, Rouhollah

    2016-06-01

    Water shortage and climate change are the most important issues of sustainable agricultural and water resources development. Given the importance of water availability in crop production, the present study focused on risk assessment of climate change impact on agricultural water requirement in southwest of Iran, under two emission scenarios (A2 and B1) for the future period (2025-2054). A multi-model ensemble framework based on mean observed temperature-precipitation (MOTP) method and a combined probabilistic approach Long Ashton Research Station-Weather Generator (LARS-WG) and change factor (CF) have been used for downscaling to manage the uncertainty of outputs of 14 general circulation models (GCMs). The results showed an increasing temperature in all months and irregular changes of precipitation (either increasing or decreasing) in the future period. In addition, the results of the calculated annual net water requirement for all crops affected by climate change indicated an increase between 4 and 10 %. Furthermore, an increasing process is also expected regarding to the required water demand volume. The most and the least expected increase in the water demand volume is about 13 and 5 % for A2 and B1 scenarios, respectively. Considering the results and the limited water resources in the study area, it is crucial to provide water resources planning in order to reduce the negative effects of climate change. Therefore, the adaptation scenarios with the climate change related to crop pattern and water consumption should be taken into account.

  13. Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of grey water for reuse requirements and treatment alternatives: the case of Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu-Ghunmi, L.N.A.H.; Zeeman, G.; Lier, van J.B.; Fayyed, M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the potentials and requirements for grey water reuse in Jordan. The results revealed that urban, rural and dormitory grey water production rate and concentration of TS, BOD5, COD and pathogens varied between 18-66 L cap(-1) d(-1), 848-1,919, 200-1,056, and 560

  14. 30 CFR 77.216-2 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; minimum plan requirements...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; minimum plan requirements; changes or modifications; certification. 77.216-2 Section... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-2 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and...

  15. Utility of multi temporal satellite images for crop water requirements estimation and irrigation management in the Jordan Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identifying the spatial and temporal distribution of crop water requirements is a key for successful management of water resources in the dry areas. Climatic data were obtained from three automated weather stations to estimate reference evapotranspiration (ETO) in the Jordan Valley according to the...

  16. Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of grey water for reuse requirements and treatment alternatives: the case of Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu-Ghunmi, L.N.A.H.; Zeeman, G.; Lier, van J.B.; Fayyed, M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the potentials and requirements for grey water reuse in Jordan. The results revealed that urban, rural and dormitory grey water production rate and concentration of TS, BOD5, COD and pathogens varied between 18-66 L cap(-1) d(-1), 848-1,919, 200-1,056, and

  17. Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of grey water for reuse requirements and treatment alternatives: the case of Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu-Ghunmi, L.N.A.H.; Zeeman, G.; Lier, van J.B.; Fayyed, M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the potentials and requirements for grey water reuse in Jordan. The results revealed that urban, rural and dormitory grey water production rate and concentration of TS, BOD5, COD and pathogens varied between 18-66 L cap(-1) d(-1), 848-1,919, 200-1,056, and 560

  18. The waiting time of the ship on port entrance at required water level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesław GALOR

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety of a ship which manoeuvres within a port area depends to a large extent on the underkeel clearance (UKC. Ports have been built to handle ships of specific maximum parameters. In many cases, however, the existing ports face the need to accept ships larger than those they were designed for. The construction of newharbours is limited by both natural conditions and exceedingly high estimated costs. The main restriction for handling larger ships is the depth of port basins, directly affecting the safety of the manoeuvring ship. The minimum underkeel clearance is most often specified by port regulations as a constant value. However, depending on the prevailingconditions, mainly water level, this required UKC value can be reduced. Thus, ships of larger draft will be allowed to enter. This article / paper present a method of UKC optimization with two restrictions: maximum permitted navigational risk and the time ofwaiting for sufficient water level. An example has been given in reference to ship’s waiting time probability for the port of Świnoujście.

  19. Water requirements of terrestrial and epiphytic orchid seeds and seedlings, and evidence for water uptake by means of mycotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder; Zettler; Stewart

    2000-07-28

    The use of endomycorrhizal fungi as an energy source (=mycotrophy) initiates seedling development and supplements or replaces photosynthesis in all orchids in nature. Fungus-infected and non-infected seeds of the monkey face orchid, Platanthera integrilabia, a US Federally-threatened terrestrial species, had a different set of water relations than seeds of the green fly orchid, Epidendrum conopseum, a subtropical epiphyte. Seeds of the terrestrial species had lower water loss rates, smaller activation energies for water loss and absorbed water from lower relative humidities. Thus, the epiphyte lacks the enhanced water retention capacity associated with the terrestrial species, implying that epiphytic orchids are capable of germinating quickly given an adequately moist substrate. After germination, water content of fungus-infected seeds was higher. These results provide first time fundamental information related to habitat preference by analyzing seed. Germination is considerably enhanced with mycorrhizal fungi that facilitate the absorption of free water by their orchid seed hosts.

  20. Estimation of Barley (Hordeum Vulgare L. Crop Water Requirements Using Cropwat Software in Ksar-Chellala Region, Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Laouisset

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper estimates the reference Evapotranspiration (ET0 and Water requirements of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. in Ksar-Chellala region, Algeria, for one dry year by using CROPWAT software. Determination of Evapotranspiration ( ET is important in application such as irrigation design, irrigation scheduling, water resource management, hydrology and cropping systems modeling. Estimation of crop water requirements of barley ( CWR b respected the methodology adopted by the service of development and management service of FAO, based on the use of software CROPWAT 8.0. The total water requirements for barley depend on a variety of target yields and crops management. The period of climatic data used is 23 years (1990-2012, the average rain in this period is 254 mm. The total rain of the dry year is 190 mm. The results of this study show, during the vegetative cycle of barley which is 6 months, the calculation of ET 0 is 453 mm, the potential water which was used by the crop barley is estimated at 281.4 mm, the efficiency of rainfall is 69 mm and a total water requirements of barley ( CWR b equals to 211 mm, this amount distributed on three months coincided with important stages of development in barley. The supplementary irrigation in these conditions with optimal contents equals water requirements estimated by CROPWAT software that increases significantly grain yield of barely. Consequently, the gross irrigation water requirements ( GIWR of 1250000 ha which project to grow barley in the Algerian steppes regions are estimated at 3.77 billion and this for a dry year and a irrigation efficiency of 70%.

  1. Water requirement and irrigation schedule for tomato in northern guinea savanna zone, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibraheem Alhassan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of water requirement and irrigation schedule for tomato with the support of FAO-CROPWAT simulation model was carried out for Yola, Nigeria with the aim of planning irrigation schedules for tomato and develop recommendations for improve irrigation practices. The climatic data for 2012/2013 and soil properties of the study area were input into the program. Tomato crop properties were updated by the FAO data and three irrigation intervals were tested (7 and 10 days irrigation intervals and irrigation schedule of 10 days interval during initial and development stage and 6 days interval at mid and late season stages of tomato crop. The simulated results analysis for tomato according to the irrigation schedule showed that highest yield reduction of 16.2% was recorded with 10 days irrigation interval treatment and the least of 0.4% with irrigation interval of 10 days at first two growth stages and 6 days at last two stages. FAO-CROPWAT 8.0 can be used in planning proper irrigation schedule for tomato in Yola, Nigeria.

  2. An assessment of global net irrigation water requirements from various water supply sources to sustain irrigation: rivers and reservoirs (1960-2050)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, S.; Cho, J.; Yamada, H. G.; Hanasaki, N.; Kanae, S.

    2014-10-01

    Water supply sources for irrigation (e.g. rivers and reservoirs) are critically important for agricultural productivity. The current rapid increase in irrigation water use is considered unsustainable and threatens food production. In this study, we estimated the time-varying dependence of irrigation water requirements from water supply sources, with a particular focus on variations in irrigation area during past (1960-2001) and future (2002-2050) periods using the global water resources model, H08. The H08 model can simulate water requirements on a daily basis at a resolution of 1.0° × 1.0° latitude and longitude. The sources of irrigation water requirements in the past simulations were specified using four categories: rivers (RIV), large reservoirs (LR) with a storage capacity greater than 1.0 × 109 m3, medium-size reservoirs (MSR) with storage capacities ranging from 1.0 × 109 m3 to 3.0 × 106 m3, and non-local non-renewable blue water (NNBW). The simulated results from 1960 to 2001 showed that RIV, MSR and NNBW increased significantly from the 1960s to the early 1990s globally, but LR increased at a relatively low rate. After the early 1990s, the increase in RIV declined as it approached a critical limit, due to the continued expansion of irrigation area. MSR and NNBW increased significantly, during the same time period, following the expansion of the irrigation area and the increased storage capacity of the medium-size reservoirs. We also estimated future irrigation water requirements from the above four water supply sources and an additional water supply source (ADD) in three future simulation designs; irrigation area change, climate change, and changes in both irrigation area and climate. ADD was defined as a future increase in NNBW. After the 2020s, MSR was predicted to approach the critical limit, and ADD would account for 11-23% of the total requirements in the 2040s.

  3. More crop per drop: Improving our knowledge on crop water requirements for irrigation scheduling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gush, Mark B

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available South Africa is a dry country facing climate change, population expansion and economic growth, resulting in increasing water scarcity and competition for water. The irrigated agriculture and forestry sectors have been allocated approximately two...

  4. Characterizing irrigation water requirements for rice production from the Arkansas Rice Research Verification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated rice irrigation water use in the University of Arkansas Rice Research Verification Program between the years of 2003 and 2011. Irrigation water use averaged 747 mm (29.4 inches) over the nine years. A significant 40% water savings was reported for rice grown under a zero gr...

  5. Use of models to support the monitoring requirements in the water framework directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Højberg, A.L.; Refsgaard, J.C.; Geer, F. van; Jørgensen, L.F.; Zsuffa, I.

    2007-01-01

    Implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) poses many new challenges to European water managers. Monitoring programmes play a key role to assess the status and identify possible trends in the environmental conditions of river basins; to gain new knowledge on water processes and to

  6. Use of models to support the monitoring requirements in the water framework directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Højberg, A.L.; Refsgaard, J.C.; Geer, F. van; Jørgensen, L.F.; Zsuffa, I.

    2007-01-01

    Implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) poses many new challenges to European water managers. Monitoring programmes play a key role to assess the status and identify possible trends in the environmental conditions of river basins; to gain new knowledge on water processes and to asse

  7. More efficient irrigation may compensate for increases in irrigation water requirements due to climate change in the Mediterranean area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, Marianela; Shi, Sinan; von Bloh, Werner; Bondeau, Alberte; Cramer, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Irrigation in the Mediterranean is of vital importance for food security, employment and economic development. We will present a recently published study1 that estimates the current level of water demand for Mediterranean agriculture and simulates the potential impacts of climate change, population growth and transitions to water-saving irrigation and conveyance technologies. The results indicate that, at present, Mediterranean region could save 35% of water by implementing more efficient irrigation and conveyance systems, with large differences in the saving potentials across countries. Under climate change, more efficient irrigation is of vital importance for counteracting increases in irrigation water requirements. The Mediterranean area as a whole might face an increase in gross irrigation requirements between 4% and 18% from climate change alone by the end of the century if irrigation systems and conveyance are not improved. Population growth increases these numbers to 22% and 74%, respectively, affecting mainly the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean. However, improved irrigation technologies and conveyance systems have large water saving potentials, especially in the Eastern Mediterranean. Both the Eastern and the Southern Mediterranean would need around 35% more water than today if they could afford some degree of modernization of irrigation and conveyance systems and benefit from the CO2-fertilization effect. However, in some scenarios water scarcity may constrain the supply of the irrigation water needed in future in Algeria, Libya, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Serbia, Morocco, Tunisia and Spain. In this study, vegetation growth, phenology, agricultural production and irrigation water requirements and withdrawal were simulated with the process-based ecohydrological and agro-ecosystem model LPJmL ("Lund-Potsdam-Jena managed Land") after a large development2 that comprised the improved representation of Mediterranean crops.

  8. Estimation of irrigation requirement for wheat in the southern Spain by using a soil water balance remote sensing driven

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Laura; Bodas, Vicente; Espósito, Gabriel; Campos, Isidro; Aliaga, Jerónimo; Calera, Alfonso

    2013-04-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the use of a remote sensing-driven soil water balance to estimate irrigation water requirements of wheat. The applied methodology is based on the approach of the dual crop coefficient proposed in the FAO-56 manual (Allen et al., 1998), where the basal crop coefficient is derived from a time series of remote sensing multispectral imagery which describes the growing cycle of wheat. This approach allows the estimation of the evapotranspiration (ET) and irrigation water requirements by means of a soil water balance in the root layer. The assimilation of satellite data into the FAO-56 soil water balance is based on the relationship between spectral vegetation indices (VI) and the transpiration coefficient (Campos et al., 2010; Sánchez et al., 2010). Two approaches to plant transpiration estimation were analyzed, the basal crop coefficient methodology and the transpiration coefficient approach described in the FAO-56 (Allen et al., 1998) and FAO-66 (Steduto et al., 2012) manuals respectively. The model is computed at daily time step and the results analyzed in this work are the net irrigation water requirements and water stress estimates. Analysis of results has been done by comparison with irrigation data (irrigation dates and volume applied) provided by farmers in 28 plots of wheat for the period 2004-2012 in the Spanish region of La Mancha, southern Spain, under different meteorological conditions. Total irrigation dose during the growing season varies from 200 mm to 700 mm. In some of plots soil moisture sensors data are available, which allowed the comparison with modeled soil moisture. Net irrigation water requirements estimated by the proposed model shows a good agreement with data, having in account the efficiency of the different irrigation systems. Despite the irrigation doses are generally greater than irrigation water requirements, the crops could suffer water stress periods during the campaign, because real irrigation timing and

  9. Water-requirement Characteristics and Water-saving Irrigation Indices of Dry-raised Rice Seedlings in Paddy Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jian-chang; WANG Wei; WANG Zhi-qin; LIU Li-jun; DING Zhi-jia; ZHU Qing-sen

    2001-01-01

    The dry-raised seedlings (D-RS)of rice had obvious superiority in tillering and growth after transplanting. Especially under the condition of water-saving irrigation or low soil moisture, D-RS had more productive tillers, higher dry matter accumulation, larger grain-filling rate, slower senescence of leaves and stronger root activity during ripening, and higher grain yield, compared with the moist-raised seedlings (MRS). D-RS had smaller yield reduction than M-RS when subject to heavy water stress. The results suggested that D-RS had the ability to adapt to lower soil moisture in paddy field. Basedon the response of D-RS to soil moisture at each growth stage, the water-saving and high-yielding irrigation indices through controlling lowlimit soil water potential were proposed, i.e. soil water potential was - 15 - - 20 kPa from the recovery to the criticalleaf-age of productive tillering, - 20 - - 40 kPa from the critical leaf-age of productive tillering to secondary branch-differentiating stage, - 15 - - 25 kPa from secondary branch-differentiating stage to 20 days after heading and - 25 - - 35 kPa from 21 to 45 days after heading.

  10. Does the bathing water classification depend on sampling strategy? A bootstrap approach for bathing water quality assessment, according to Directive 2006/7/EC requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Iago; Alvarez, César; Gil, José L; Revilla, José A

    2012-11-30

    Data on the 95th and 90th percentiles of bacteriological quality indicators are used to classify bathing waters in Europe, according to the requirements of Directive 2006/7/EC. However, percentile values and consequently, classification of bathing waters depend both on sampling effort and sample-size, which may undermine an appropriate assessment of bathing water classification. To analyse the influence of sampling effort and sample size on water classification, a bootstrap approach was applied to 55 bacteriological quality datasets of several beaches in the Balearic Islands (Spain). Our results show that the probability of failing the regulatory standards of the Directive is high when sample size is low, due to a higher variability in percentile values. In this way, 49% of the bathing waters reaching an "Excellent" classification (95th percentile of Escherichia coli under 250 cfu/100 ml) can fail the "Excellent" regulatory standard due to sampling strategy, when 23 samples per season are considered. This percentage increases to 81% when 4 samples per season are considered. "Good" regulatory standards can also be failed in bathing waters with an "Excellent" classification as a result of these sampling strategies. The variability in percentile values may affect bathing water classification and is critical for the appropriate design and implementation of bathing water Quality Monitoring and Assessment Programs. Hence, variability of percentile values should be taken into account by authorities if an adequate management of these areas is to be achieved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Simulation of temporal and spatial distribution of required irrigation water by crop models and the pan evaporation coefficient method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-min; Yang, Yonghui; Han, Shu-min; Hu, Yu-kun

    2009-07-01

    Hebei Plain is the most important agricultural belt in North China. Intensive irrigation, low and uneven precipitation have led to severe water shortage on the plain. This study is an attempt to resolve this crucial issue of water shortage for sustainable agricultural production and water resources management. The paper models distributed regional irrigation requirement for a range of cultivated crops on the plain. Classic crop models like DSSAT- wheat/maize and COTTON2K are used in combination with pan-evaporation coefficient method to estimate water requirements for wheat, corn, cotton, fruit-trees and vegetables. The approach is more accurate than the static approach adopted in previous studies. This is because the combination use of crop models and pan-evaporation coefficient method dynamically accounts for irrigation requirement at different growth stages of crops, agronomic practices, and field and climatic conditions. The simulation results show increasing Required Irrigation Amount (RIA) with time. RIA ranges from 5.08×109 m3 to 14.42×109 m3 for the period 1986~2006, with an annual average of 10.6×109 m3. Percent average water use by wheat, fruit trees, vegetable, corn and cotton is 41%, 12%, 12%, 11%, 7% and 17% respectively. RIA for April and May (the period with the highest irrigation water use) is 1.78×109 m3 and 2.41×109 m3 respectively. The counties in the piedmont regions of Mount Taihang have high RIA while the central and eastern regions/counties have low irrigation requirement.

  12. Water requirements and drinking rates of homing pigeons: A consideration for exposure risk of migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Cristina R; Moye, John K; Pritsos, Chris A

    2017-02-13

    Access to water along a bird's migratory flyway is essential during the vital process of migration. Because of the scarcity of water in some environments, there is potential for migratory birds to encounter and drink from contaminated bodies of water. Ingestion of contaminated water may cause injury and compromise flying ability, leading to a disruption of migration. To determine injury to birds from potential exposure, it is essential to not only know the concentration of a given contaminant in the water but also the quantity and rate of water consumption by the birds. Homing pigeons (Columba livia) were used in a series of experiments to determine differences in drinking behavior after various flights and after periods of resting. Results from this study demonstrate that homing pigeons' water consumption is dramatically different when assessed according to activity, flight distance, and time elapsed after flight. This suggests that the drinking rates of birds during migration are extremely important and much greater than estimated using traditional exposure assessment procedures. Thus, exposure to contaminants via drinking water may be greatly underestimated and the rate of water consumption should be considered when estimating potential exposure risk to avian species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. China’s Grain Production and Its Requirement for Water Resources Allocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing; ZHAO

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural water is directly related with grain production security. This article analyzes how to allocate the water resources in terms of grain production. Firstly,for the whole country,we established the VAR mathematical model with the data of 1983 to 2008 to test the relationships between the total amount of water and the agriculture production and forecast the water consumption in 2020. Then focusing on the major grain producing areas,we examine the main index and the pressure index,from which we find that the amount of agricultural water in major areas fail to satisfy the demand of production,and that unbalanced development exists between different areas with several areas especially serious. At last,we point out that,to ensure the security of agriculture production and the sustainable utilization of water resources,the government should take measures not only to prevent water pollution and reduce water consumption,but also to improve inter-basin water transfer planning.

  14. Microbiological water quality requirements for salad irrigation in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrrel, S F; Knox, J W; Weatherhead, E K

    2006-08-01

    The growth in United Kingdom salad production is dependent on irrigation to maintain product quality. There are concerns that irrigation with poor-quality water could pose a disease risk. This article examines the key issues in the emerging debate on the microbiological quality of water used for salad irrigation in the United Kingdom. The links between irrigation water quality and foodborne disease, and the current international guidance on irrigation water quality, are firstly reviewed. The findings indicate that a number of recent food-poisoning outbreaks have been linked to the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables and that unhygienic product handling is implicated as the principal source of contamination. There is also credible evidence that salads contaminated in the field, including by irrigation water, can pose a small disease risk at the point of sale. Although irrigation water-quality standards exist in various forms internationally, there is no nationally agreed on standard used in the United Kingdom. This paper then describes the results of a survey conducted in 2003 of United Kingdom irrigation practices that might influence the microbiological quality of salads. The survey showed that surface water is the principal irrigation water source, that overhead irrigation predominates, that the gap between the last irrigation and harvest may be < 24 h in many cases, and that current water-quality monitoring practices are generally very limited in scope. This paper concludes with a discussion of the issues emerging from the review and survey, including the need for improved water-quality monitoring, and the problems associated with establishing water-quality standards that could be either too strict or too lax.

  15. Water footprint components required to address the water-energy-food nexus, with the recent Urban Water Atlas for Europe as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanham, Davy

    2017-04-01

    The first part of this presentation analyses which water footprint (WF) components are necessary in WF accounting to provide relevant information to address the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG's) water security (SDG 6), food security (SDG 2) and energy security (SDG 7) in a nexus setting. It is strongly based on the publication Vanham (2016) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoser.2015.08.003. First, the nexus links between (1) the planetary boundary freshwater resources (green and blue water resources) and (2) food, energy and blue water security are discussed. Second, it is shown which water uses are mostly represented in WF accounting. General water management and WF studies only account for the water uses agriculture, industry and domestic water. Important water uses are however mostly not identified as separate entities or even included, i.e. green and blue water resources for aquaculture, wild foods, biofuels, hydroelectric cooling, hydropower, recreation/tourism, forestry (for energy and other biomass uses) and navigation. Third, therefore a list of essential separate components to be included within WF accounting is presented. The latter would be more coherent with the water-food-energy-ecosystem nexus. The second part of the presentation gives a brief overview of the recently published Urban Water Atlas for Europe. It shows for a selected city which WF components are represented and which not. As such, it also identifies research gaps.

  16. Physically-based Methods for the Estimation of Crop Water Requirements from E.O. Optical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) represent the basic information for the evaluation of crop water requirements. A widely used method to compute ET is based on the so-called "crop coefficient" (Kc), defined as the ratio of total evapotranspiration by reference evapotranspiration ET0. The val...

  17. Getting Out of Orbit: Water Recycling Requirements and Technology Needs for Long Duration Missions Away from Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Deep-space crewed missions will not have regular access to the Earth's resources or the ability to rapidly return to Earth if a system fails. As crewed missions extend farther from Earth for longer periods, habitation systems must become more self-sufficient and reliable for safe, healthy, and sustainable human exploration. For human missions to Mars, Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) must be able operate for up to 1,100 days with minimal spares and consumables. These missions will require capabilities to more fully recycle atmospheric gases and wastewater to substantially reduce mission costs. Even with relatively austere requirements for use, water represents one of the largest consumables by mass. Systems must be available to extract and recycle water from all sources of waste. And given that there will be no opportunity to send samples back to Earth for analysis, analytical measurements will be limited to monitoring hardware brought on board the spacecraft. The Earth Reliant phase of NASA's exploration strategy includes leveraging the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate advanced capabilities for a robust and reliable ECLSS. The ISS Water Recovery System (WRS) includes a Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) for distillation and recovery of water from urine and a Water Processor Assembly (WPA) to process humidity condensate and urine distillate into potable water. Possible enhancements to more fully "close the water loop" include recovery of water from waste brines and solid wastes. A possible game changer is the recovery of water from local planetary resources through use of In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) technologies. As part of the development and demonstration sequence, NASA intends to utilize cis-Lunar space as a Proving Ground to verify systems for deep space habitation by conducting extended duration missions to validate our readiness for Mars.

  18. Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of grey water for reuse requirements and treatment alternatives: the case of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghunmi, Lina Abu; Zeeman, Grietje; van Lier, Jules; Fayyed, Manar

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the potentials and requirements for grey water reuse in Jordan. The results revealed that urban, rural and dormitory grey water production rate and concentration of TS, BOD(5), COD and pathogens varied between 18-66 L cap(-1)d(-1), 848-1,919, 200-1,056, and 560-2,568 mg L(-1) and 6.9E2-2.7E5 CFU mL(-1), respectively. The grey water compromises 64 to 85% of the total water flow in the rural and urban areas. Storing grey water is inevitable to meet reuse requirements in terms of volume and timing. All the studied grey waters need treatment, in terms of solids, BOD(5), COD and pathogens, before storage and reuse. Storage and physical treatment, as a pretreatment step should be avoided, since it produces unstable effluents and non-stabilized sludge. However, extensive biological treatment can combine storage and physical treatments. Furthermore, a batch-fed biological treatment system combining anaerobic and aerobic processes copes with the fluctuations in the hydrographs and pollutographs as well as the present nutrients. The inorganic content of grey water in Jordan is about drinking water quality and does not need treatment. Moreover, the grey water SAR values were 3-7, revealing that the concentrations of monovalent and divalent cations comply with agricultural demand in Jordan. The observed patterns in the hydrographs and pollutographs showed that the hydraulic load could be used for the design of both physical and biological treatment units for dormitories and hotels. For family houses the hydraulic load was identified as the key design parameter for physical treatment units and the organic load is the key design parameter for biological treatment units.

  19. Minimizing instrumentation requirement for estimating crop water stress index and transpiration of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research was conducted in northern Colorado in 2011 to estimate the Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) and actual water transpiration (Ta) of maize under a range of irrigation regimes. The main goal was to obtain these parameters with minimum instrumentation and measurements. The results confirmed that ...

  20. Radionuclides in drinking water: the recent legislative requirements of the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Sveva; Risica, Serena

    2015-03-01

    In November 2013, a new EURATOM Directive was issued on the protection of public health from the radionuclide content in drinking water. After introducing the contents of the Directive, the paper analyses the hypotheses about drinking water ingestion adopted in documents of international and national organizations and the data obtained from national/regional surveys. Starting from the Directive's parametric value for the Indicative Dose, some examples of derived activity concentrations of radionuclides in drinking water are reported for some age classes and three exposure situations, namely, (i) artificial radionuclides due to routine water release from nuclear power facilities, (ii) artificial radionuclides from nuclear medicine procedures, and (iii) naturally occurring radionuclides in drinking water or resulting from existing or past NORM industrial activities.

  1. Mediterranean irrigation under climate change: more efficient irrigation needed to compensate for increases in irrigation water requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, M.; Shi, S.; von Bloh, W.; Bondeau, A.; Cramer, W.

    2016-03-01

    Irrigation in the Mediterranean is of vital importance for food security, employment and economic development. This study systematically assesses how climate change and increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations may affect irrigation requirements in the Mediterranean region by 2080-2090. Future demographic change and technological improvements in irrigation systems are taken into account, as is the spread of climate forcing, warming levels and potential realization of the CO2-fertilization effect. Vegetation growth, phenology, agricultural production and irrigation water requirements and withdrawal were simulated with the process-based ecohydrological and agro-ecosystem model LPJmL (Lund-Potsdam-Jena managed Land) after an extensive development that comprised the improved representation of Mediterranean crops. At present the Mediterranean region could save 35 % of water by implementing more efficient irrigation and conveyance systems. Some countries such as Syria, Egypt and Turkey have a higher savings potential than others. Currently some crops, especially sugar cane and agricultural trees, consume on average more irrigation water per hectare than annual crops. Different crops show different magnitudes of changes in net irrigation requirements due to climate change, the increases being most pronounced in agricultural trees. The Mediterranean area as a whole may face an increase in gross irrigation requirements between 4 and 18 % from climate change alone if irrigation systems and conveyance are not improved (4 and 18 % with 2 °C global warming combined with the full CO2-fertilization effect and 5 °C global warming combined with no CO2-fertilization effect, respectively). Population growth increases these numbers to 22 and 74 %, respectively, affecting mainly the southern and eastern Mediterranean. However, improved irrigation technologies and conveyance systems have a large water saving potential, especially in the eastern Mediterranean, and may be able to

  2. A conceptual review of water extraction requirements associated with shale gas activities in New Brunswick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shea, K.J. [Dillon Consulting Limited (Canada)], email: koshea@dillon.ca

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of conventional energy resources and the rising energy demand, the shale gas industry is growing. In North America, the percentage of this resource in the energy production mix is becoming significant, thanks to newly developed techniques which have created more economically viable opportunities. However, the public is expressing some concern over the water needs of the shale gas industry. The aim of this paper is to explain why the public is concerned with shale gas activity water usage and how the industry can address this concern. It is shown that shale gas developments are occurring in areas where no relationship exists between oil and gas industries and local communities and the public is therefore turning towards other, less scientifically rigorous, sources of information. This paper recommends that the industry benchmark its water usage against other activities so that the public can better understand the real impact of the shale gas industry on the water resources.

  3. Groundwater Storage vs. Surface Water Storage - Why Sustainability Requires a Different Management Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, S.; Davids, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Storing water in times of excess for use in times of shortage is an essential water-management tool, especially in climates typified by precipitation in one season and demand in another. The three primary water storage mechanisms in the Western US, and much of the world in fact, are: seasonal snow pack, surface water reservoirs, and groundwater aquifers. In California, nearly every major river has one or more large dam and reservoir and current focus has shifted toward off-stream storage. In addition to California's surface reservoirs, groundwater aquifers provide huge volumes of water storage that are heavily utilized during times of drought. With California's new Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) substantial attention is presently focused on developing strategies for using groundwater storage more effectively in conjunction with surface-storage reservoirs. However, compared to surface water storage, we need to think differently and develop new frameworks if we want to manage groundwater storage sustainably. Despite its immense capacity, groundwater storage is harder to manage because there are physical constraints to how fast water can be put into and withdrawn from aquifers, its boundaries are not as well defined as those of a surface reservoir, and it is part of a dynamic, porous media flow system where the Theis concepts of capture govern. Therefore, groundwater does not behave as a level pool like surface water reservoirs, which has several implications for effective management: 1) extraction/injection locations can have substantial impacts on the system, 2) interactions with the surface water systems can be nonlinear and complex and 3) hydraulic effects can continue long after pumping/injection has stopped. These nonlinear spatial and temporal responses, coupled with long time scales, makes management of groundwater storage much different than surface water storage. Furthermore, failure to fully understand these issues can lead to mismanagement

  4. 沼泽湿地生态储水量及生态需水量计算方法%Method for calculating ecological water storage and ecological water requirement of marsh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽娟; 李九一; 粱丽乔; 柳玉梅

    2009-01-01

    As one of the most typical wetlands, marsh plays an important role in hydrological and economic aspects, especially in keeping biological diversity. In this study, the definition and connotation of the ecological water storage of marsh is discussed for the first time, and its distinction and relationship with ecological water requirement are also analyzed. Furthermore, the gist and method of calculating ecological water storage and ecological water requirement have been provided, and Momoge wetland has been given as an example of calculation of the two variables. Ecological water use of marsh can be ascertained according to ecological water storage and ecological water requirement. For reasonably spatial and temporal varia-tion of water storage and rational water resources planning, the suitable quantity of water supply to marsh can be calculated according to the hydrological conditions, ecological de-mand and actual water resources.

  5. Kinetic Requirements for the Measurement of Mesospheric Water Vapor at 6.8 (microns) under Non-LTE Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Russell, James M., III

    1999-01-01

    We present accuracy requirements for specific kinetic parameters used to calculate the populations and vibrational temperatures of the H2O(010) and H2O(020) states in the terrestrial mesosphere. The requirements are based on rigorous simulations of the retrieval of mesospheric water vapor profiles from measurements of water vapor infrared emission made by limb scanning instruments on orbiting satellites. Major improvements in the rate constants that describe vibration-to- vibration exchange between the H2O(010) and 02(1) states are required in addition to improved specification of the rate of quenching Of O2(1) by atomic oxygen (0). It is also necessary to more accurately determine the yield of vibrationally excited O2(l) resulting from ozone photolysis. A contemporary measurement of the rate of quenching of H2O(010) by N2 and O2 is also desirable. These rates are either highly uncertain or have never before been measured at atmospheric temperatures. The suggested improvements are necessary for the interpretation of water vapor emission measurements at 6.8 microns to be made from a new spaceflight experiment in less than 2 years. The approach to retrieving water vapor under non-LTE conditions is also presented.

  6. Radioactivity of drinking water in Finland - basis for quality requirements; Talousveden radioaktiivisuus - perusteita laatuvaatimuksille

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelaeinen, I.; Huikuri, P.; Salonen, L.; Markkanen, M.; Arvela, H

    2001-07-01

    Several natural radioactive substances occur in drinking water in Finland, among which radon-222 is the most harmful from radiation protection viewpoint. Also long-lived alpha-active substances like uranium-238, uranium-234, polonium-210 and radium-226, as well as beta-active lead-210 and radium-228 occur in drinking water. Elevated concentrations are found only in ground water, those originating from bedrock being clearly higher than those from soil. Assessments based on dosimetry indicate that radioactivity in drinking water causes annually 20 fatal cancers. About 40% of cases is due to inhaled waterborn radon, 40% is due to ingested radon and 20% is due to other natural radioactive substances than radon. This report gives motivation for a proposition to restrict and monitor the radiation exposure from radioactive substances in drinking water, delivered by STUK to the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health in March 1999. The proposition introduces an action level of 300 Bq/l for radon concerning the waterworks. For other radionuclides except radon the action level proposed is 0.1 millisieverts per year (mSv/a), collectively. This new proposition does not bring in notable changes in the monitoring practice, although the calculated doses will change slightly. The proposed guideline for radon in private wells is 1000 Bq/l. According to the present monitoring data, less than 200 Finns served by waterworks use drinking water with radon concentration exceeding 300 Bq/l. Approximately 1000 waterworks consumers receive an annual dose that exceeds 0.1 mSv from other radionuclides than radon. About 20 000 Finns served by private wells use drinking water with radon concentration exceeding the STUK guideline 1 000 Bq/l. Radon can be removed from drinking water using aeration or granular activated carbon filtration (GAC), whereas uranium and radium can be effectively removed by ion exchange resins and lead and polonium using reverse osmosis. There are two methods to determine

  7. Radioactivity of drinking water in Finland - basis for quality requirements; Talousveden radioaktiivisuus - perusteita laatuvaatimuksille

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelaeinen, I.; Huikuri, P.; Salonen, L.; Markkanen, M.; Arvela, H

    2001-07-01

    Several natural radioactive substances occur in drinking water in Finland, among which radon-222 is the most harmful from radiation protection viewpoint. Also long-lived alpha-active substances like uranium-238, uranium-234, polonium-210 and radium-226, as well as beta-active lead-210 and radium-228 occur in drinking water. Elevated concentrations are found only in ground water, those originating from bedrock being clearly higher than those from soil. Assessments based on dosimetry indicate that radioactivity in drinking water causes annually 20 fatal cancers. About 40% of cases is due to inhaled waterborn radon, 40% is due to ingested radon and 20% is due to other natural radioactive substances than radon. This report gives motivation for a proposition to restrict and monitor the radiation exposure from radioactive substances in drinking water, delivered by STUK to the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health in March 1999. The proposition introduces an action level of 300 Bq/l for radon concerning the waterworks. For other radionuclides except radon the action level proposed is 0.1 millisieverts per year (mSv/a), collectively. This new proposition does not bring in notable changes in the monitoring practice, although the calculated doses will change slightly. The proposed guideline for radon in private wells is 1000 Bq/l. According to the present monitoring data, less than 200 Finns served by waterworks use drinking water with radon concentration exceeding 300 Bq/l. Approximately 1000 waterworks consumers receive an annual dose that exceeds 0.1 mSv from other radionuclides than radon. About 20 000 Finns served by private wells use drinking water with radon concentration exceeding the STUK guideline 1 000 Bq/l. Radon can be removed from drinking water using aeration or granular activated carbon filtration (GAC), whereas uranium and radium can be effectively removed by ion exchange resins and lead and polonium using reverse osmosis. There are two methods to determine

  8. Estimation of water requirement per unit carbon fixed by Eucalyptus camaldulensis in semi-arid land of Western Australia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Kojima; Y. Tanaka; S. Katoh; K. Tahara; N. Takahashi; K, Yamada

    2002-01-01

    Afforestation in arid land is a promising method for carbon fixation, but the effective utili-zation of water is highly important and required. Thus, the evaluation of the amount of water perunit carbon fixed with the tree growth is required to minimize the amount of water supplied to theplants. In this research, a tree is regarded as a carbon fixation reactor with inflows of water andnutrients from roots, and CO2 as the carbon source from leaves with outflow of water vapor fromleaves and accumulation in the tree itself. In the process of photosynthesis and respiration nutri-tional elements are dissolved in water flow in trees. They do not flow out by these reactions, butare accumulated in trees. Thus, we have treated the behaviour of nutrients as a marker to evaluatethe water/carbon ratio. Assuming that nutrient concentration is constant in sap, and the differences in the ratios ofnutrient to carbon in living trees and dead (i.e. litter fall, etc.) are negiected, the ratio of the usedwater to fixed carbon is given as the ratio of nutrient to carbon in the tree body divided by the ratioof nutrient to water in sap. However, some nutrients are translocated and concentrated within thetree and some may be discarded through litter fall. Thus it is important to examine which nutrientelement is the most suitable as the tracer. In this paper, the results of the above method applied to Eucalyptus camaldulensis in semi-arid land of Western Australia are shown. The value of water requirement per unit carbon fixationdetermined from potassium balance is between 421 kg-H2O/kg-C for mature trees and 285kg-H2O/k9-C for young trees, while the values from calcium balance are much larger than these.The cause of the discrepancy between these values is discussed based on the measured elementconcentrations in sap and trees and the plant physiology. Finally, the actual average value throughthe life of a tree is suggested to fall between the two values.

  9. Superficial Water Resource at Tempisque River Watershed, Costa Rica: Availability and Requirement Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Guzmán-Arias

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the status of water resources availability and demand in the upper and middle Tempisque watershed projected up to 2030 and the proposed actions to start a planning process. The resource availability scenarios incorporate the modifications inwater flows due to land use and cli­mate changes; these combined effects increases the problems of water shortages during the dry season. The resource demand scenarios include projections provided by the major users in the watershed, of which very few can envision growth expectations in terms of water consumption. The proposed resource planning process integrates the analysis conducted in this thesis and tries to identify the basic steps to be followed for the pro­per management of the resource in the future.

  10. A functional cutin matrix is required for plant protection against water loss

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Guoxiong; Komatsuda, Takao; Ma, Jian Feng; Li, Chao; Yamaji, Naoki; Nevo, Eviatar

    2011-01-01

    The plant cuticle, a cutin matrix embedded with and covered by wax, seals the aerial organ's surface to protect the plant against uncontrolled water loss. The cutin matrix is essential for the cuticle to function as a barrier to water loss. Recently, we identified from wild barley a drought supersensitive mutant, eibi1, which is caused by a defective cutin matrix as the result of the loss of function of HvABCG31, an ABCG full transporter. Here, we report that eibi1 epidermal cells contain lip...

  11. Ground Water Monitoring Requirements for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The groundwater monitoring requirements for hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities (TSDFs) are just one aspect of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste management strategy for protecting human health and the

  12. Ecological hydraulic radius model to calculate instream flow requirements for transporting sediment in the western water transfer region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Transporting sediment is a natural function of the river. To maintain the normal evolution of the river certain amount of water flow is required, which is called the instream flow requirements for transporting sediment (IFRTS). We defined the permitting flow velocity by the conception of IFRTS, and also put forward the ecological hydraulic radius model (EHRM) to estimate IFRTS. The calculating process of EHRM is explained by the example of Daofu Hydrological Station on Xianshui branch of Yalong River in the west line first-stage construction of South-North Water Transfer Project. The result shows that the IFRTS occupied 29.7%―59.5% of annual mean discharge in flood season, the average of IFRTS was about 100.2 m3/s during 1966―1987, it is close to the IFRTS 90 m3/s calculated by IFRTS conception. Hence, it is feasible to use EHRM to calculate IFRTS.

  13. Sea snakes (Laticauda spp.) require fresh drinking water: implication for the distribution and persistence of populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Babonis, Leslie S; Sheehy, Coleman M; Tu, Ming-Chung

    2008-01-01

    Dehydration and procurement of water are key problems for vertebrates that have secondarily invaded marine environments. Sea snakes and other marine reptiles are thought to remain in water balance without consuming freshwater, owing to the ability of extrarenal salt glands to excrete excess salts obtained either from prey or from drinking seawater directly. Contrary to this long-standing dogma, we report that three species of sea snake actually dehydrate in marine environments. We investigated dehydration and drinking behaviors in three species of amphibious sea kraits (Laticauda spp.) representing a range of habits from semiterrestrial to very highly marine. Snakes that we dehydrated either in air or in seawater refused to drink seawater but drank freshwater or very dilute brackish water (10%-30% seawater) to remain in water balance. We further show that Laticauda spp. can dehydrate severely in the wild and are far more abundant at sites where there are sources of freshwater. A more global examination of all sea snakes demonstrates that species richness correlates positively with mean annual precipitation within the Indo-West Pacific tropical region. The dependence of Laticauda spp. on freshwater might explain the characteristically patchy distributions of these reptiles and is relevant to understanding patterns of extinctions and possible future responses to changes in precipitation related to global warming. In particular, metapopulation dynamics of the Laticauda group of sea snakes are expected to change in relation to projected reductions of tropical dry-season precipitation.

  14. Impacts of Water Scarcity on Coast Guard Mission Requirements and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    due to decreased flow; increased sedimentation and/or s,our of stream bed and banks; and increased fish kills due to supersaturation of waters with...recycling by both industry, agriculture and aquaculture 8-2 Lax i * Offshore desalination (conventional and solar- powered) * Onshore solar energy production

  15. Discharge of surplus phloem water may be required for normal grape ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Keller, Markus

    2017-01-01

    At the onset of ripening, some fleshy fruits shift the dominant water import pathway from the xylem to the phloem, but the cause for the decline in xylem inflow remains obscure. This study found that xylem-mobile dye movement into grape berries decreased despite transient increases in berry growth and transpiration during early ripening, whereas outward dye movement continued unless the roots were pressurized. Modeling berry vascular flows using measurements of pedicel phloem sap sugar concentration, berry growth, solute accumulation, and transpiration showed that a fraction of phloem-derived water was used for berry growth and transpiration; the surplus was recirculated via the xylem. Changing phloem sap sugar concentration to a much higher published value led to model simulations predicting xylem inflow or backflow depending on the developmental stage and genotype. Mathematically preventing net xylem flow resulted in large variations in phloem sap sugar concentration in pedicels serving neighboring berries on the same fruit cluster. Moreover, restricting water discharge via the xylem and/or across the skin impaired berry solute accumulation and color change. Collectively, these results indicate that discharge of surplus phloem water via berry transpiration and/or xylem backflow may be necessary to facilitate normal grape ripening. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. A Simple Scheme for Modeling Irrigation Water Requirements at the Regional Scale Applied to an Alpine River Catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascalle C. Smith

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple approach for estimating the spatial and temporal variability of seasonal net irrigation water requirement (IWR at the catchment scale, based on gridded land use, soil and daily weather data at 500 × 500 m resolution. In this approach, IWR is expressed as a bounded, linear function of the atmospheric water budget, whereby the latter is defined as the difference between seasonal precipitation and reference evapotranspiration. To account for the effects of soil and crop properties on the soil water balance, the coefficients of the linear relation are expressed as a function of the soil water holding capacity and the so-called crop coefficient. The 12 parameters defining the relation were estimated with good coefficients of determination from a systematic analysis of simulations performed at daily time step with a FAO-type point-scale model for five climatically contrasted sites around the River Rhone and for combinations of six crop and ten soil types. The simple scheme was found to reproduce well results obtained with the daily model at six additional verification sites. We applied the simple scheme to the assessment of irrigation requirements in the whole Swiss Rhone catchment. The results suggest seasonal requirements of 32 × 106 m3 per year on average over 1981–2009, half of which at altitudes above 1500 m. They also disclose a positive trend in the intensity of extreme events over the study period, with an estimated total IWR of 55 × 106 m3 in 2009, and indicate a 45% increase in water demand of grasslands during the 2003 European heat wave in the driest area of the studied catchment. In view of its simplicity, the approach can be extended to other applications, including assessments of the impacts of climate and land-use change.

  17. Determination of the Water Requirements of Garlic (Alium Sativum L. and Its Relationship With the Crop's Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Eduardo Castro Franco

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of garlic (Allium sativum L., there is not enough information available about the water requirements for garlic crop in the country. The present study is to identify the crop water requirements for each phenological stage and set a watering schedule according to environmental conditions offered in Tunja-Boyacá. This research was conducted during the first half of 2013, on the farm called “La Maria", which is located in the Pedagogical and Technological University of Colombia. The assessment of the phenological stages in garlic was developed through a stratified sampling design and a destructive sampling design, which were carried out every 7 days after transplant. The value of Kc was determined through the FAO-56 methodology, in which the method was used to find the crop evapotranspiration. In order to establish crop water use, two lysimeters of 1 m3 of capacity were installed. The result of ETo was obtained through the weather station data, these data were analyzed with the Penman-Monteith equation, using the Cropwat software. Three phenological stages for growing garlic (Allium sativum L. were established, from the transplant to the harvest. These stages were: vegetative Growth and development, Bulb initiation and Maturation. Kc values for each phenological stage were 0.95, 0.97 and 0.68 respectively.

  18. An integrated PMP model to assess the development of agro-energy crops and the effect on water requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Donati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an integrated model for the economic and environmental assessment of the use of natural resources when new activities (i.e. biomass crops for energy production are introduced into the farm production plan. The methodology is based on the integration of positive mathematical programming (PMP with the AquaCrop model developed by FAO. PMP represents farmer decision processes and evaluates how farms react to the biomass-sorghum activity option at different price levels. AquaCrop evaluates the relationship between water needs and biomass production and assesses the effect of the land allocation on water requirements at regional level. The integration of these two models assists global policy evaluation at regional level as it makes it possible to identify the economic threshold for biomass crops, the change in land allocation and total water requirement. The model can help policy makers to evaluate the impacts of variations in crop profitability and market innovations on farm profitability, land use and water consumption and the sustainability of the market scenario.

  19. Environmental water requirements of groundwater dependent ecosystems: conflict between nature and man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witczak, S.; Kania, J.; Rozanski, K.; Wachniew, P.; Zurek, A.; Dulinski, M.

    2012-04-01

    The presented study was aimed at investigating possible interactions between the porous sandy aquifer intensively exploited for drinking water purposes and the groundwater dependent ecosystem (GDE) consisting of a valuable forest stand. The investigated aquifer (Bogucice Sands) and the associated GDE (Niepolomice Forest) are located in the south of Poland. The aquifer covers the area of ca. 200 km2 and belongs to the category of medium groundwater basins in Poland. The Niepolomice Forest is a lowland forest covering around 110 km2. This relic of once vast forests is protected as a Natura 2000 Special Protection Area "Puszcza Niepolomicka" (PLB120002) that supports bird populations of European importance. Additionally, a fen in the western part of the Niepolomice Forest comprises a separate Natura 2000 area "Torfowisko Wielkie Bloto" (PLH120080), a significant habitat of endangered butterfly species associated with wet meadows. The Niepolomice Forest contains also several nature reserves and the European bison breeding centre and has an important recreational value as the largest forest complex in the vicinity of Krakow. Due to spatially variable lithologies and groundwater levels, the Niepolomice Forest is a mosaic of various forest and non-forest habitats, including wetlands, marsh forests, humid forests and fresh forests. Dependence of the Niepolomice Forest stands on groundwater is enhanced by low available water capacity and low capillary rise of soils in the area. Groundwater conditions in the Niepolomice Forest, including Wielkie Bloto fen have been affected by meliorations carried out mostly in the period 1900-1930 and after the Second World War and by forest management. Due to artesian conditions in the area and relatively thin clay layer separating Tertiary aquifer layers from shallow Quaternary aquifer, the upward leaching of deeper groundwater may contribute in a significant way to the water balance of the investigated GDE. In September 2009 a cluster of

  20. Review of photochemical reaction constants of organic micropollutants required for UV advanced oxidation processes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wols, B A; Hofman-Caris, C H M

    2012-06-01

    Emerging organic contaminants (pharmaceutical compounds, personal care products, pesticides, hormones, surfactants, fire retardants, fuel additives etc.) are increasingly found in water sources and therefore need to be controlled by water treatment technology. UV advanced oxidation technologies are often used as an effective barrier against organic contaminants. The combined operation of direct photolysis and reaction with hydroxyl radicals ensures good results for a wide range of contaminants. In this review, an overview is provided of the photochemical reaction parameters (quantum yield, molar absorption, OH radical reaction rate constant) of more than 100 organic micropollutants. These parameters allow for a prediction of organic contaminant removal by UV advanced oxidation systems. An example of contaminant degradation is elaborated for a simplified UV/H(2)O(2) system.

  1. Cautions required for the boiling test of a silver-water nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareshahi, Hassan; Emami-Meibodi, Majid; Behjat, Abbas

    2016-12-01

    Various experimental works have been reported on boiling of nanofluids, and some contradictory data are reported in this case in the literature. Systematic errors in experiments may be one of the factors causing a significant gap in the data. In this paper, boiling of Ag-water nanofluid is studied empirically. A NiCr wire is used for the experiments. According to UV-Vis absorption spectra data, Ag-water nanofluid changes during the tests. Since the electrical resistance-temperature relationship for the NiCr test section changes during the experiments, the wire temperature cannot be determined by this method. This can be accounted for by the presence of a porous nanoparticle layer created through particle deposition during nucleate boiling.

  2. Determining treatment requirements for turbid river water to avoid clogging of aquifer storage and recovery wells in siliceous alluvium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Declan; Vanderzalm, Joanne; Miotliński, Konrad; Barry, Karen; Dillon, Peter; Lawrie, Ken; Brodie, Ross S

    2014-12-01

    The success of Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) schemes relies on defining appropriate design and operational parameters in order to maintain high rates of recharge over the long term. The main contribution of this study was to define the water quality criteria and hence minimum pre-treatment requirements to allow sustained recharge at an acceptable rate in a medium-coarse sand aquifer. The source water was turbid, natural water from the River Darling, Australia. Three treatments were evaluated: bank filtration; coagulation and chlorine disinfection; and coagulation plus granular activated carbon and chlorine disinfection (GAC). Raw source water and the three treated waters were used in laboratory columns packed with aquifer material in replicate experiments in saturated conditions at constant temperature (19 °C) with light excluded for 37 days. Declines in hydraulic conductivity from a mean of 2.17 m/d occurred over the 37 days of the experiment. The GAC-treated water gave an 8% decline in hydraulic conductivity over the 16 cm length of columns, which was significantly different from the other three source waters, which had mean declines of 26-29%. Within the first 3 cm of column length, where most clogging occurred in each column, the mean hydraulic conductivity declined by 10% for GAC-treated water compared with 40-50% for the other source waters. There was very little difference between the columns until day 21, despite high turbidity (78 NTU) in the source water. Reducing turbidity by treatment was not sufficient to offset the reductions in hydraulic conductivity. Biological clogging was found to be most important as revealed by the accumulation of polysaccharides and bacterial numbers in columns when they were dissected and analysed at the end of the experiment. Further chemical clogging through precipitation of minerals was found not to occur within the laboratory columns, and dispersion of clay was also found to be negligible. Due to the low

  3. Discharge of surplus phloem water may be required for normal grape ripening

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yun; Keller, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Abstract At the onset of ripening, some fleshy fruits shift the dominant water import pathway from the xylem to the phloem, but the cause for the decline in xylem inflow remains obscure. This study found that xylem-mobile dye movement into grape berries decreased despite transient increases in berry growth and transpiration during early ripening, whereas outward dye movement continued unless the roots were pressurized. Modeling berry vascular flows using measurements of pedicel phloem sap sug...

  4. Germination requirements and seedling responses to water availability and soil type in four eucalypt species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Wolfgang; Milberg, Per; Lamont, Byron B.

    2002-03-01

    We conducted experiments on seed germination, seedling survival and seedling growth of four Eucalyptus species to identify factors that might explain why they are restricted to the two major soil types in southwestern Australia, deep sands ( E. macrocarpa, E. tetragona) and lateritic loam ( E. loxophleba, E. wandoo). At high temperatures (28 °C), germination in darkness was lower for the two 'loam species' than for the 'sand species', while there were no differences in light or at low temperatures (10 °C). Germination commenced earlier, and was faster in the sand species than in the loam species, but was almost inhibited in all species by -1.0 MPa. E. tetragona proved the most drought-tolerant in terms of germination level and seedling survival. Seedlings of the sand species had much longer roots two weeks after germination in the absence of water stress, and the roots of more seedlings continued to elongate under moderate water stress (-1.0 MPa), than the two loam species. Roots were longer in all species, except E. macrocarpa, at -0.5 MPa than at -0.1 MPa, despite seedlings having a smaller mass and hypocotyl length. As water availability declined, there was a tendency for the sand species to survive longer on sand than on loam while soil type had no effect on the loam species. Pattern and duration of seedling survival of the loam species was similar to that of the sand species despite their smaller seeds. We conclude that seedlings from the large-seeded sand species are able to penetrate the soil profile faster and deeper, but that they are not less prone to drying soils than seedlings from the small-seeded loam species. Instead, seed size and germination speed are important prerequisites to cope successfully with unstable soil surfaces and to exploit the rapidly descending water in deep sands.

  5. A new approach to incorporating environmental flow requirements in water allocation modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, K.S.; Krogt, W.N.M.; Beek, van E.

    2012-01-01

    The condition of river, wetland and estuarine ecosystems is largely determined by the prevailing flow regime. The flow regime can be described by the magnitude, frequency, timing, duration and rate of change of both intra-annual and inter-annual events. The required flow regime, necessary to maintai

  6. Functional requirements of computer systems for the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, 1988-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, R.M.; McNellis, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Investigating the occurrence, quantity, quality, distribution, and movement of the Nation 's water resources is the principal mission of the U.S. Geological Survey 's Water Resources Division. Reports of these investigations are published and available to the public. To accomplish this mission, the Division requires substantial computer technology to process, store, and analyze data from more than 57,000 hydrologic sites. The Division 's computer resources are organized through the Distributed Information System Program Office that manages the nationwide network of computers. The contract that provides the major computer components for the Water Resources Division 's Distributed information System expires in 1991. Five work groups were organized to collect the information needed to procure a new generation of computer systems for the U. S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division. Each group was assigned a major Division activity and asked to describe its functional requirements of computer systems for the next decade. The work groups and major activities are: (1) hydrologic information; (2) hydrologic applications; (3) geographic information systems; (4) reports and electronic publishing; and (5) administrative. The work groups identified 42 functions and described their functional requirements for 1988, 1992, and 1997. A few new functions such as Decision Support Systems and Executive Information Systems, were identified, but most are the same as performed today. Although the number of functions will remain about the same, steady growth in the size, complexity, and frequency of many functions is predicted for the next decade. No compensating increase in the Division 's staff is anticipated during this period. To handle the increased workload and perform these functions, new approaches will be developed that use advanced computer technology. The advanced technology is required in a unified, tightly coupled system that will support all functions simultaneously

  7. Required water quality for the use of high-performance membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoike, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    The clinical benefits of high-performance membrane (HPM) dialyzers have often been reported since the advent of the synthetic polyacrylonitrile dialysis membrane. HPMs, which have high water permeability, eliminate a wide spectrum of uremic toxins, and offer excellent biocompatibility, are now essential for hemodialysis, hemofiltration, and hemodiafiltration. For HPMs whose mean pore size is enlarged to secure better dialysis membrane performance, however, the dialyzing fluid must be highly purified to prevent contamination. Blood purification therapies using highly purified dialyzing fluid and HPM are expected to improve the prognosis of future patients undergoing dialysis. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Requirements for competence modelling in professional learning: experience from the water sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éva Rátky

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Competence Models are proved as critical instruments for human resources management and development, and of determined for both the labour market (employers for the selection of the employees and training providers for the enhancement of the vocational training opportunities. The concept of competence modeling is still under development and considerable efforts are focused on the creation of new Competence Models and their application to a broad range of professional learning sectors. The scope of this inquiry is to contribute to this research field by setting the basis for the design and development of a Competence Model for the Water Sector.

  9. A functional cutin matrix is required for plant protection against water loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoxiong; Komatsuda, Takao; Ma, Jian Feng; Li, Chao; Yamaji, Naoki; Nevo, Eviatar

    2011-09-01

    The plant cuticle, a cutin matrix embedded with and covered by wax, seals the aerial organ's surface to protect the plant against uncontrolled water loss. The cutin matrix is essential for the cuticle to function as a barrier to water loss. Recently, we identified from wild barley a drought supersensitive mutant, eibi1, which is caused by a defective cutin matrix as the result of the loss of function of HvABCG31, an ABCG full transporter. Here, we report that eibi1 epidermal cells contain lipid-like droplets, which are supposed to consist of cutin monomers that have not been transported out of the cells. The eibi1 cuticle is fragile due to a defective cutin matrix. The rice ortholog of the EIBI1 gene has a similar pattern of expression, young shoot but not flag leaf blade, as the barley gene. The model of the function of Eibi1 is discussed. The HvABCG31 full transporter functions in the export of cutin components and contributed to land plant colonization, hence also to terrestrial life evolution.

  10. Temperature regulation and water requirements of the monk parakeet, Myiopsitta monachus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, Wesley W; Caccamise, Donald F

    1975-12-01

    Monk parakeets have been introduced into North America within the past 15 years and are apparently becoming established in several geographical regions. Several physiological responses of monk parakeets related to climatic tolerance were examined, and it is concluded that the species is equipped physiologically to occupy most climatic situations with the exception of arctic and subarctic regions and waterless deserts. The standard metabolic rate, determined during the winter, was 44% lower at night (1.17 ml O2 g(-1) hr(-1)) than during the day (1.68 ml O2 g(-1) hr(-1)). Monk parakeets are relatively tolerant of low air temperature (Ta) and showed no signs of hypothermia at Ta's as low as-8°C. The birds were unable to maintain body weight on a diet of air-dried seeds without supplemental water. Monk parakeets possess excellent capabilities for increasing evaporative water loss at high Ta's, being able to dissipate up to 153% of their metabolic heat production at 44°C. This species responds to high Ta's with open-mouthed panting. During panting the thick, moist tongue is raised and lowered in synchrony with the thorax. Thus, monk parakeets may employ lingual flutter to augment evaporative cooling; a mechanism analogous to the gular flutter of other nonpasserine birds.

  11. COMPARISON OF SPATIAL INTERPOLATION METHODS FOR WHEAT WATER REQUIREMENT AND ITS TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION IN HAMEDAN PROVINCE (IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Nazarifar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water is the main constraint for production of agricultural crops. The temporal and spatial variations in water requirement for agriculture products are limiting factors in the study of optimum use of water resources in regional planning and management. However, due to unfavorable distribution and density of meteorological stations, it is not possible to monitor the regional variations precisely. Therefore, there is a need to estimate the evapotranspiration of crops at places where meteorological data are not available and then extend the findings from points of measurements to regional scale. Geostatistical methods are among those methods that can be used for estimation of evapotranspiration at regional scale. The present study attempts to investigate different geostatistical methods for temporal and spatial estimation of water requirements for wheat crop in different periods. The study employs the data provided by 16 synoptic and climatology meteorological stations in Hamadan province in Iran. Evapotranspiration for each month and for the growth period were determined using Penman-Mantis and Torrent-White methods for different water periods based on Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI. Among the available geostatistical methods, three methods: Kriging Method, Cokriging Method, and inverse weighted distance were selected, and analyzed, using GS+ software. Analysis and selection of the suitable geostatistical method were performed based on two measures, namely Mean Absolute Error (MAE and Mean Bias Error (MBE. The findings suggest that, in general, during the drought period, Kriging method is the proper one for estimating water requirements for the six months: January, February, April, May, August, and December. However, weighted moving average is a better estimation method for the months March, June, September, and October. In addition, Kriging is the best method for July. In normal conditions, Kriging is suitable for April, August, December

  12. Evaporative demand and water requirements of the principal crops of the Guadalentin valley (SE Spain) in drought periods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Toribio, M. I.; Garcia-Marin, R.; Conesa-Garcia, C.; Lopez-Bermudez, F.

    2010-07-01

    The drought periods that affect the province of Murcia, especially the Guadalentin Valley, are aggravated by an increase in evaporative demand. The aim of the present study was to characterize the increased water demand of woody and herbaceous crops during drought periods in the Guadalentin Valley, an agricultural zone with an excellent climate for specialty crops, which is of great economic importance for Murcia. After defining the drought periods of the last three decades in time and space by means of the standard index of rainfall drought (IESP), several methods were used to determine the reference evapotranspiration (ETo): the Penman-Monteith model (ASCE and FAO models for grass), the Hargreaves method (ETo-ASCE for alfalfa), and ETo using the FAO Radiation method. Finally, the crop water requirements for each to crop type and area of cultivation were estimated using monthly crop coefficients (K{sub c}) and the mean monthly evaporative demand values were obtained by the best fitting method. The increase in the evaporative demand reflected the increased water deficits that occur in the drought years, both in summer and winter (1.23 hm{sup 3} yr{sup -}1). Drought periods are also responsible for reducing the areas dedicated to horticultural crops, because of their high water demands and the additional costs involved, resulting an aggravated socioeconomic position and increased unemployment. (Author) 25 refs.

  13. Impact of water fluoride concentration on the fluoride content of infant foods and drinks requiring preparation with liquids before feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohoori, Fatemeh V; Moynihan, Paula J; Omid, Narges; Abuhaloob, Lamis; Maguire, Anne

    2012-10-01

    To measure the fluoride (F) content of infant foods and drinks requiring reconstitution with liquids prior to consumption and to determine the impact of water F concentration on their F content, as consumed, by measuring F content before and after preparation. In total, 58 infant powdered formula milks, dry foods and concentrated drinks were prepared with deionized water (pasta and rice', 'breakfast cereals', 'savoury meals' and 'powdered infant formula milks' were 0.38, 0.26, 0.18, 0.16 and 0.15 μg/g, respectively. The corresponding mean F concentrations were 0.97, 1.21, 0.86, 0.74 and 0.91 μg/g, respectively, when the same samples were prepared with fluoridated water. Although some nonreconstituted infant foods/drinks showed a high F concentration in their dry or concentrated forms, the concentration of F in prepared foods/drinks primarily reflected the F concentration of liquid used for their preparation. Some infant foods/drinks, when reconstituted with fluoridated water, may result in a F intake in infants above the suggested optimum range (0.05-0.07 mg F/kg body weight) and therefore may put infants at risk of developing dental fluorosis. Further research is necessary to determine the actual F intake of infants living in fluoridated and nonfluoridated communities using reconstituted infant foods and drinks. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2013-09-30

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data all add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects, as well as expert opinion of marine environmental research professionals. Cost estimates have been developed at the pilot and commercial scale. The reference model described in this document is an oscillating water column device deployed in Northern California at approximately 50 meters water depth.

  15. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hanna, Luke A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data all add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects, as well as expert opinion of marine environmental research professionals. Cost estimates have been developed at the pilot and commercial scale. The reference model described in this document is an oscillating water column device deployed in Northern California at approximately 50 meters water depth.

  16. Water requirements and crop coefficients of tropical forest seedlings in different shading conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanoeli B. Monteiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective was to determine the crop evapotranspiration (ETc and crop coefficients (Kc of tropical forest seedlings over a 135-day cycle, in the climatic conditions of the Cerrado-Amazon transitional region (11º 51’ 08 “S; 55º 30’ 56” W; altitude of 371 m. Five native species (Tabebuia impetiginosa, Tabebuia roseoalba, Handroanthus chrysotrichus, Parkia pendula and Parkia platycephala and one exotic species (Adenanthera pavonina were evaluated in seven shading conditions: 35, 50 and 80% black nets (Polyolefin; green Frontinet®, red ChromatiNet® and blue ChromatiNet® of 50% shading; and full sun. Reference evapotranspiration (ETo was obtained by the Penman-Monteith FAO-56 method and the crop evapotranspiration of the seedlings (ETc was given by daily weighing. The Kc values were obtained by dividing ETo by ETc. At 135 DAT, destructive analysis was performed to determine the leaf area. In full sun conditions, ETc varied from 3.9 (P. pendula to 5.0 mm d-1 (T. roseoalba. The increase in the shading percentage promotes reduction in leaf area, ETc and Kc. Colored nets with 50% shading generate similar water demands.

  17. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  18. Designing for surface water runoff control: end-user requirements in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bruen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Since 1975, flood estimation in Ireland has generally followed methods as outlined in the Flood Studies Report (Natural Environment Research Council, 1975. An update of this for conditions in the Republic of Ireland commenced in 2005 and included research in Urban Catchment Flood Analysis. To inform this work, a scoping study of issues relating to flooding caused by urban runoff was undertaken by a team from the Centre for Water Resources Research at University College Dublin and some of the findings are described in this paper. It focussed on quantitative and qualitative research methods (self-completion questionnaires and Focus Groups to review the methods of flood estimation for urbanised catchments currently in use in Ireland. It assessed the nature of deficiencies associated with urban-runoff control and identified achievable and realistic objectives for further research. A questionnaire was developed around a number of key themes pertaining to flooding caused by urban runoff and circulated to 291 stakeholders in target sectors that ranged from Engineering Consultancies to Academic Institutions. A total of 100 questionnaires were returned giving a 34% response rate. The study found; (i a proliferation of methods are used in practice resulting in significant differences between the estimates; (ii some methods are sometimes being used for inappropriate spatial scales; (iii there is a lack of clear guidance on the use of the methods and/or associated software packages; (iv there is little appreciation of the uncertainties associated with the methods and (v there are significant deficiencies in some of the basic information available.

    A list of recommendations was produced, to guide the commissioning of future research to improve the methods available to designers.

  19. Considering the Influence of Multi-weather-factors to Forecasting the Water Requirement of Well Irrigation Rice Based on ANN Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Qiang; FU Hong; LIANG Chuan

    2004-01-01

    The author considered the influences of several weather factors, such as air temperature, sunlight, saturation deficiency, wind speed and so on to forecasting the water requirement of well irrigation rice based on Artificial Neutron Network. Through dealing with the time series of water requirement and its influence factors, the author applied the multi-dimension data correlation analysis to ensure the net structure. Thus, the ANN model to forecast the water requirement of well irrigation rice has been built. By means of the ANN model, uncertainty relation between water requirement and many influence factors among the interior and exterior can be discovered. The results of ANN model is good, and can provide some references for establishing the water saving irrigation system.

  20. Effects of climate change on water requirements and phenological period of major crops in Heihe River basin, China - Based on the accumulated temperature threshold method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongmei; Xu, Xinyi; Yan, Denghua

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, global climate change has significantly caused a serious crisis of water resources throughout the world. However, mainly through variations in temperature, climate change will affect water requirements of crop. It is obvious that the rise of temperature affects growing period and phenological period of crop directly, then changes the water demand quota of crop. Methods including accumulated temperature threshold and climatic tendency rate were adopted, which made up for the weakness of phenological observations, to reveal the response of crop phenological change during the growing period. Then using Penman-Menteith model and crop coefficients from the United Nations Food& Agriculture Organization (FAO), the paper firstly explored crop water requirements in different growth periods, and further forecasted quantitatively crop water requirements in Heihe River Basin, China under different climate change scenarios. Results indicate that: (i) The results of crop phenological change established in the method of accumulated temperature threshold were in agreement with measured results, and (ii) there were many differences in impacts of climate warming on water requirement of different crops. The growth periods of wheat and corn had tendency of shortening as well as the length of growth periods. (ii)Results of crop water requirements under different climate change scenarios showed: when temperature increased by 1°C, the start time of wheat growth period changed, 2 days earlier than before, and the length of total growth period shortened 2 days. Wheat water requirements increased by 1.4mm. However, corn water requirements decreased by almost 0.9mm due to the increasing temperature of 1°C. And the start time of corn growth period become 3 days ahead, and the length of total growth period shortened 4 days. Therefore, the contradiction between water supply and water demands are more obvious under the future climate warming in Heihe River Basin, China.

  1. Crop Monitoring Based on SPOT-5 Take-5 and Sentinel-1A Data for the Estimation of Crop Water Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Navarro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical and microwave images have been combined for land cover monitoring in different agriculture scenarios, providing useful information on qualitative and quantitative land cover changes. This study aims to assess the complementarity and interoperability of optical (SPOT-5 Take-5 and synthetic aperture radar (SAR (Sentinel-1A data for crop parameter (basal crop coefficient (Kcb values and the length of the crop’s development stages retrieval and crop type classification, with a focus on crop water requirements, for an irrigation perimeter in Angola. SPOT-5 Take-5 images are used as a proxy of Sentinel-2 data to evaluate the potential of their enhanced temporal resolution for agricultural applications. In situ data are also used to complement the Earth O=observation (EO data. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and dual (VV + VH polarization backscattering time series are used to compute the Kcb curve for four crop types (maize, soybean, bean and pasture and to estimate the length of each phenological growth stage. The Kcb values are then used to compute the crop’s evapotranspiration and to subsequently estimate the crop irrigation requirements based on a soil water balance model. A significant R2 correlation between NDVI and backscatter time series was observed for all crops, demonstrating that optical data can be replaced by microwave data in the presence of cloud cover. However, it was not possible to properly identify each stage of the crop cycle due to the lack of EO data for the complete growing season.

  2. Surface water mineralization of isopyrazam according to OECD 309: observations on implementation of the new data requirement within agrochemical regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Laurence H; Moreland, Harriet J

    2014-03-01

    A surface water mineralization study (according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD] guideline OECD 309) is a new requirement in European Union agrochemical regulations; therefore, industry has little experience with this test. The guideline allows for a number of options within the test design, notably the options to conduct the study under diffuse light and to include an inoculum of suspended sediment. The present study was designed to investigate the potential impact of these options on the degradation rate of a representative compound. The fungicide, isopyrazam, was chosen as it was previously shown to be susceptible to metabolism by phototrophic organisms under a fluorescent light-dark cycle. The impact of diffuse light was investigated at light intensities representative of those at depth in large, open water bodies (test compound [DT50] < 50 d), whereas degradation in continuous darkness was negligible. Furthermore, investigation at 2 different light intensities resulted in similar degradation rates, indicating that this transformation mechanism was not proportional to light intensity, provided that there was sufficient light for photosynthesis to occur. Inclusion of suspended sediment did not have a significant impact on the degradation rate of isopyrazam, except at extremely high sediment concentrations, which were not considered representative of conditions in large, open water bodies.

  3. Some Specific CASL Requirements for Advanced Multiphase Flow Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Berry

    2010-11-01

    Because of the diversity of physical phenomena occuring in boiling, flashing, and bubble collapse, and of the length and time scales of LWR systems, it is imperative that the models have the following features: • Both vapor and liquid phases (and noncondensible phases, if present) must be treated as compressible. • Models must be mathematically and numerically well-posed. • The models methodology must be multi-scale. A fundamental derivation of the multiphase governing equation system, that should be used as a basis for advanced multiphase modeling in LWR coolant systems, is given in the Appendix using the ensemble averaging method. The remainder of this work focuses specifically on the compressible, well-posed, and multi-scale requirements of advanced simulation methods for these LWR coolant systems, because without these are the most fundamental aspects, without which widespread advancement cannot be claimed. Because of the expense of developing multiple special-purpose codes and the inherent inability to couple information from the multiple, separate length- and time-scales, efforts within CASL should be focused toward development of a multi-scale approaches to solve those multiphase flow problems relevant to LWR design and safety analysis. Efforts should be aimed at developing well-designed unified physical/mathematical and high-resolution numerical models for compressible, all-speed multiphase flows spanning: (1) Well-posed general mixture level (true multiphase) models for fast transient situations and safety analysis, (2) DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation)-like models to resolve interface level phenmena like flashing and boiling flows, and critical heat flux determination (necessarily including conjugate heat transfer), and (3) Multi-scale methods to resolve both (1) and (2) automatically, depending upon specified mesh resolution, and to couple different flow models (single-phase, multiphase with several velocities and pressures, multiphase with single

  4. LeFRK2 is required for phloem and xylem differentiation and the transport of both sugar and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damari-Weissler, Hila; Rachamilevitch, Shimon; Aloni, Roni; German, Marcelo A; Cohen, Shabtai; Zwieniecki, Maciej A; Michele Holbrook, N; Granot, David

    2009-09-01

    It has been suggested that LeFRK2, the major fructose-phosphorylating enzyme in tomato plants, may be required for stem xylem development. Yet, we do not know if this enzyme affects the development of individual vessels, whether it affects water conductance, or whether it affects phloem development and sugar transport. Here, we show that suppression of LeFRK2 results in a significant reduction in the size of vascular cells and slows fiber maturation. The vessels in stems of LeFRK2-antisense plants are narrower than in WT plants and have thinner secondary cell walls. Although the cambium produces rounded secondary vessels, these vessels become deformed during the early stages of xylem maturation. Water conductance is then reduced in stems, roots, and leaves, suggesting that LeFRK2 influences xylem development throughout the entire vascular system. Interestingly, the build-up of positive xylem pressure under static (no-flow) conditions was also decreased. Suppression of LeFRK2 reduced the length and width of the sieve elements, as well as callose deposition. To examine the effect of LeFRK2 suppression on phloem transport, we created triple-grafted plants in which a portion of the wild-type stem was replaced with an antisense interstcok, and compared the contents of the transported sugar, sucrose, in the different portions of these stems. Sucrose contents above and within the LeFRK2-antisense interstock were significantly higher than those below the graft. These results show that the antisense interstock restricted the downward movement of sucrose, suggesting that LeFRK2 is required for both phloem and xylem development.

  5. A stochastic ensemble-based model to predict crop water requirements from numerical weather forecasts and VIS-NIR high resolution satellite images in Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Anna; Falanga Bolognesi, Salvatore; De Michele, Carlo; Medina Gonzalez, Hanoi; Villani, Paolo; D'Urso, Guido; Battista Chirico, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    Irrigation agriculture is one the biggest consumer of water in Europe, especially in southern regions, where it accounts for up to 70% of the total water consumption. The EU Common Agricultural Policy, combined with the Water Framework Directive, imposes to farmers and irrigation managers a substantial increase of the efficiency in the use of water in agriculture for the next decade. Ensemble numerical weather predictions can be valuable data for developing operational advisory irrigation services. We propose a stochastic ensemble-based model providing spatial and temporal estimates of crop water requirements, implemented within an advisory service offering detailed maps of irrigation water requirements and crop water consumption estimates, to be used by water irrigation managers and farmers. The stochastic model combines estimates of crop potential evapotranspiration retrieved from ensemble numerical weather forecasts (COSMO-LEPS, 16 members, 7 km resolution) and canopy parameters (LAI, albedo, fractional vegetation cover) derived from high resolution satellite images in the visible and near infrared wavelengths. The service provides users with daily estimates of crop water requirements for lead times up to five days. The temporal evolution of the crop potential evapotranspiration is simulated with autoregressive models. An ensemble Kalman filter is employed for updating model states by assimilating both ground based meteorological variables (where available) and numerical weather forecasts. The model has been applied in Campania region (Southern Italy), where a satellite assisted irrigation advisory service has been operating since 2006. This work presents the results of the system performance for one year of experimental service. The results suggest that the proposed model can be an effective support for a sustainable use and management of irrigation water, under conditions of water scarcity and drought. Since the evapotranspiration term represents a staple

  6. The Case for Universal Screening of Private Well Water Quality in the U.S. and Testing Requirements to Achieve It: Evidence from Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan; Flanagan, Sara V

    2017-08-03

    The 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) regulates >170,000 public water systems to protect health, but not >13 million private wells. State and local government requirements for private well water testing are rare and inconsistent; the responsibility to ensure water safety remains with individual households. Over the last two decades, geogenic arsenic has emerged as a significant public health concern due to high prevalence in many rural American communities. We build the case for universal screening of private well water quality around arsenic, the most toxic and widespread of common private water contaminants. We argue that achieving universal screening will require policy intervention, and that testing should be made easy, accessible, and in many cases free to all private well households in the United States, considering the invisible, tasteless, odorless, and thus silent nature of arsenic. Our research has identified behavioral, situational and financial barriers to households managing their own well water safety, resulting in far from universal screening despite traditional public health outreach efforts. We observe significant socioeconomic disparities in arsenic testing and treatment when private water is unregulated. Testing requirements can be a partial answer to these challenges. Universal screening, achieved through local testing requirements complemented by greater community engagement targeting biologically and socioeconomically vulnerable groups, would reduce population arsenic exposure greater than any promotional efforts to date. Universal screening of private well water will identify the dangers hidden in America's drinking water supply and redirect attention to ensure safe water among affected households. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP629.

  7. Response Of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Crop And Broad-Leaved Weeds To Different Water Requirements And Weed Management In Sandy Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Metwally Ibrahim M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity is a major cause of crops yield reduction in many parts of the world. So, a more rational use of irrigation water should be adapted and deficit irrigation principles should be accepted with a certain level of reduction in yield level. To study the efficiency of four water requirements (100% whole season, 75% whole season, 50% whole season and 100% whole season while 50% at grain-filling stage and five weed-control treatments (three postemergence herbicides i.e., metosulam, tribenuron-methyl, and bromoxynil, hand weeding and unweeded check, and their interactive effects, two field experiments on wheat crop were conducted in two successive seasons at the agricultural experimental station of the National Research Centre, Nubaria, Egypt. Bromoxynil, tribenuron-methyl came in the first order for controlling total broad-leaved weeds. Application of 100% water requirement recorded the highest values compared to all other irrigation water treatments in term of flag-leaf area, chlorophyll content, plant height, number of spike/m2, spike weight, grains number/spike, weight of 1,000 grains, yield and yield attributes of wheat. Metosulam followed by bromoxynil, tribenuron-methyl and hand-weeding treatments gave higher values of grain yield/ha. The highest grain yield, protein and carbohydrates percentages of wheat grains were obtained from addition of 100% water requirement with metosulam treatment was used followed by 75% of water requirement combined with metosulam treatment without significant difference among these treatments.

  8. Water-quality requirements, tolerances, and preferences of pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) in the lower Missouri River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Dale W.

    2011-01-01

    Although numerous studies have been completed on pallid sturgeon populations and behavior, few have addressed the potential for water-quality characteristics to limit recruitment and population success of pallid sturgeon. Literature on sturgeon and water-quality data indicates recruitment of pallid sturgeon may be limited by several water-quality characteristics of the lower Missouri River including: High summer water temperatures in excess of 30 degrees Celsius, which likely are stressful to pallid sturgeon,

  9. A comparison of the cost associated with pollution prevention measures to that required to treat polluted water resources

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oelofse, Suzanna HH

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pollution of water resources is largely as a result of human activity and therefore could be prevented to a large degree. The quality of our water resources is deteriorating and downstream water users have to deal with the pollution impacts caused...

  10. Study Water Availability of Malino River to Meet the Need of Water Requirement in District Ongka Malino, Central Sulawesi of Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Sutapa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change is marked by changes in weather patterns and climate patterns result in increased or reduced rainfall in some areas. Decreased rainfall as input variables watershed due to irregularities global climate will affect the flow of the river, both annual river flow and seasonal dynamics. One of the basic human needs are affected by global warming is the water. The importance of adequate water supply for the community public hearings mandated by the declaration of the United Nations in 2000 which set the year 2015 as the horizon for achieving the Millennium Development Goal's (MDG’s. This is confirmed again at the Earth Summit in Johannesburg in September 2002 on the preparation of programs and strategies in 2015 for water supply and sanitation. In this study, the availability of water is analyzed by the FJ. Mock model and water needs were analyzed based on the guidelines for water needs. The analysis showed that there is excess water in January and May to August and the lack of water in the Month of February and the month of September to December. To overcome the shortage of water is necessary to change the cropping pattern and prioritize water for the needs of the population and livestock.

  11. Water Collection Purification System: Identifying CF Capabilities and Requirements, and Assessing off-the-Shelf Purification Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    media Ohio Pure Water Co Sand and silica dioxide of different grain sizes Birm media filter Ohio Pure Water Co Specific resin for iron when water does...Terminator filters Ohio Pure Water Co Same than Birm filter but with air injection system to add oxygen in the mixture Nitrate filter Ohio Pure Water Co...media 1,000-4,000 Birm media filter 1,000-2,000 Manganese greensand filter 1,000-2,700 Terminator filters 800-1,000 Nitrate filter

  12. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Baldwin, Helene L.

    1962-01-01

    What do you use water for?If someone asked you this question you would probably think right away of water for drinking. Then you would think of water for bathing, brushing teeth, flushing the toilet. Your list would get longer as you thought of water for cooking, washing the dishes, running the garbage grinder. Water for lawn watering, for play pools, for swimming pools, for washing the car and the dog. Water for washing machines and for air conditioning. You can hardly do without water for fun and pleasure—water for swimming, boating, fishing, water-skiing, and skin diving. In school or the public library, you need water to wash your hands, or to have a drink. If your home or school bursts into flames, quantities of water are needed to put it out.In fact, life to Americans is unthinkable without large supplies of fresh, clean water. If you give the matter a little thought, you will realize that people in many countries, even in our own, may suffer from disease and dirt simply because their homes are not equipped with running water. Imagine your own town if for some reason - an explosion, perhaps - water service were cut off for a week or several weeks. You would have to drive or walk to a neighboring town and bring water back in pails. Certainly if people had to carry water themselves they might not be inclined to bathe very often; washing clothes would be a real chore.Nothing can live without water. The earth is covered by water over three-fourths of its surface - water as a liquid in rivers, lakes and oceans, and water as ice and snow on the tops of high mountains and in the polar regions. Only one-quarter of our bodies is bone and muscle; the other three-fourths is made of water. We need water to live, and so do plants and animals. People and animals can live a long time without food, but without water they die in a few days. Without water, everything would die, and the world would turn into a huge desert.

  13. Simulating the Effect of Alternative Climate Change Scenarios on Pollutant Loading Reduction Requirements for Meeting Water Quality Standards Under USEPA's Total Maximum Daily Load Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronewold, A. D.; Alameddine, I.; Anderson, R.; Wolpert, R.; Reckhow, K.

    2008-12-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) total maximum daily load (TMDL) program requires that individual states assess the condition of surface waters and identify those which fail to meet ambient water quality standards. Waters failing to meet those standards must have a TMDL assessment conducted to determine the maximum allowable pollutant load which can enter the water without violating water quality standards. While most of the nearly 30,000 TMDL assessments completed since 1995 use mechanistic or empirical water quality models to forecast water quality conditions under alternative pollutant loading reduction scenarios, few, if any, also simulate water quality conditions under alternative climate change scenarios. As a result, model-based loading reduction requirements (which serve as the cornerstone for implementing water resource management plans, and initiating environmental management infrastructure projects), believed to improve water quality in impaired waters and reinstate their designated use, may misrepresent the actual required reduction when future climate change scenarios are considered. For example, recent research indicates a potential long term future increase in both the number of days between, and the intensity of, individual precipitation events. In coastal terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, such climate conditions could lead to an increased accumulation of pollutants on the landscape between precipitation events, followed by a washoff event with a relatively high pollutant load. On the other hand, anticipated increases in average temperature and evaporation rate might not only reduce effective rainfall rates (resulting in less energy for transporting pollutants from the landscape) but also reduce the tidal exchange ratio in shallow estuaries (many of which are valuable recreational, commercial, and aesthetic natural resources). Here, we develop and apply a comprehensive watershed-scale model for simulating water quality in

  14. 40 CFR 122.34 - As an operator of a regulated small MS4, what will my NPDES MS4 storm water permit require?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sanctions to ensure compliance include non-monetary penalties, fines, bonding requirements and/or permit... process that identifies the municipality's program goals (e.g., minimize water quality impacts resulting...., adopt a combination of structural and/or non-structural BMPs), operation and maintenance policies...

  15. Effect of near-infrared-radiation reflective screen materials on ventilation requirement, crop transpiration and water use efficiency of a greenhouse rose crop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanghellini, C.; Jianfeng, D.; Kempkes, F.L.K.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of Near Infrared (NIR)-reflective screen material on ventilation requirement, crop transpiration and water use efficiency of a greenhouse rose crop was investigated in an experiment whereby identical climate was ensured in greenhouse compartments installed with either NIR-reflective or

  16. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  17. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  18. User Requirements for the Application of Remote Sensing in the Planning and Management of Water Resource Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgy, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Data relating to hydrologic and water resource systems and subsystems management are reported. Systems models, user application, and remote sensing technology are covered. Parameters governing water resources include evaportranspiration, vegetation, precipitation, streams and estuaries, reservoirs and lakes, and unsaturate and saturated soil zones.

  19. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lead Poisoning Prevention Training Center (HHLPPTC) Training Tracks Water Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir For information about lead in water in Flint, MI, please visit http://www.phe. ...

  20. Tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide water-in-oil microemulsions: dependence of the minimum amount of alkanol required to produce a microemulsion with the alkanol and organic solvent topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuin, E; Lissi, E; Olivares, K

    2004-08-01

    The amount of alcohol required to produce a microemulsion in a quaternary water-in-oil system was evaluated for a series of alcohols and hydrocarbon solvents of different size or topology. It was observed that the amount of n-hexanol and n-decanol required was similar in all the solvents considered. On the other hand, considerably higher concentrations of the branched alcohols (2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanol and 3-ethyl-3-pentanol) were required to produce the microemulsion, irrespective of the solvent topology (n-hexane or 2,2,4-trimethylpentane). From an analysis of the change in the analytical alcohol concentration with the surfactant concentration the amounts of alcohol present at the microaggregates' surface at the point of microemulsion formation were obtained. It is concluded that the high amounts of branched alcohols required are due to both less efficient incorporation at the interface and the larger number of alcohol molecules per surfactant required to stabilize the microemulsion.

  1. Quantifying water requirements of riparian river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia: Implications for the management of environmental flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Tanya M.; Colloff, Matthew J.; Davies, Micah; Koul, Vijay; Benyon, Richard G.; Nagler, Pamela L.

    2015-01-01

    Water resource development and drought have altered river flow regimes, increasing average flood return intervals across floodplains in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia, causing health declines in riparian river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) forests and woodlands. Environmental flow allocations helped to alleviate water stress during the recent Millennium Drought (1997–2010), however, quantification of the flood frequency required to support healthy E. camaldulensis communities is still needed. We quantified water requirements of E. camaldulensis for two years across a flood gradient (trees inundated at frequencies of 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10 years) at Yanga National Park, New South Wales to help inform management decision-making and design of environmental flows. Sap flow, evaporative losses and soil moisture measurements were used to determine transpiration, evapotranspiration and plant-available soil water before and after flooding. A formula was developed using plant-available soil water post-flooding and average annual rainfall, to estimate maintenance time of soil water reserves in each flood frequency zone. Results indicated that soil water reserves could sustain 1:2 and 1:5 trees for 15 months and six years, respectively. Trees regulated their transpiration rates, allowing them to persist within their flood frequency zone, and showed reduction in active sapwood area and transpiration rates when flood frequencies exceeded 1:2 years. A leaf area index of 0.5 was identified as a potential threshold indicator of severe drought stress. Our results suggest environmental water managers may have greater flexibility to adaptively manage floodplains in order to sustain E. camaldulensis forests and woodlands than has been appreciated hitherto.

  2. Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

    2013-12-31

    The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

  3. Water quality requirements for sustaining aquifer storage and recovery operations in a low permeability fractured rock aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Declan; Miotliński, Konrad; Dillon, Peter; Taylor, Russel; Wakelin, Steve; Levett, Kerry; Barry, Karen; Pavelic, Paul

    2011-10-01

    A changing climate and increasing urbanisation has driven interest in the use of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) schemes as an environmental management tool to supplement conventional water resources. This study focuses on ASR with stormwater in a low permeability fractured rock aquifer and the selection of water treatment methods to prevent well clogging. In this study two different injection and recovery phases were trialed. In the first phase ~1380 m(3) of potable water was injected and recovered over four cycles. In the second phase ~3300 m(3) of treated stormwater was injected and ~2410 m(3) were subsequently recovered over three cycles. Due to the success of the potable water injection cycles, its water quality was used to set pre-treatment targets for harvested urban stormwater of ≤ 0.6 NTU turbidity, ≤ 1.7 mg/L dissolved organic carbon and ≤ 0.2 mg/L biodegradable dissolved organic carbon. A range of potential ASR pre-treatment options were subsequently evaluated resulting in the adoption of an ultrafiltration/granular activated carbon system to remove suspended solids and nutrients which cause physical and biological clogging. ASR cycle testing with potable water and treated stormwater demonstrated that urban stormwater containing variable turbidity (mean 5.5 NTU) and organic carbon (mean 8.3 mg/L) concentrations before treatment could be injected into a low transmissivity fractured rock aquifer and recovered for irrigation supplies. A small decline in permeability of the formation in the vicinity of the injection well was apparent even with high quality water that met turbidity and DOC but could not consistently achieve the BDOC criteria.

  4. Remote sensing in precision farming: real-time monitoring of water and fertilizer requirements of agricultural crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, Arkadi; Ben Asher, Jiftah; Kopeika, Norman S.

    2016-10-01

    The advancements in remote sensing in combination with sensor technology (both passive and active) enable growers to analyze an entire crop field as well as its local features. In particular, changes of actual evapo-transpiration (ET) as a function of water availability can be measured remotely with infrared radiometers. Detection of crop water stress and ET and combining it with the soil water flow model enable rational irrigation timing and application amounts. Nutrient deficiency, and in particular nitrogen deficiency, causes substantial crop losses. This deficiency needs to be identified immediately. A faster the detection and correction, a lesser the damage to the crop yield. In the present work, to retrieve ET a novel deterministic approach was used which is based on the remote sensing data. The algorithm can automatically provide timely valuable information on plant and soil water status, which can improve the management of irrigated crops. The solution is capable of bridging between Penman-Monteith ET model and Richards soil water flow model. This bridging can serve as a preliminary tool for expert irrigation system. To support decisions regarding fertilizers the greenness of plant canopies is assessed and quantified by using the spectral reflectance sensors and digital color imaging. Fertilization management can be provided on the basis of sampling and monitoring of crop nitrogen conditions using RS technique and translating measured N concentration in crop to kg/ha N application in the field.

  5. The future of evapotranspiration: Global requirements for ecosystem functioning, carbon and climate feedbacks, agricultural management, and water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Joshua B.; Melton, Forrest; Middleton, Elizabeth; Hain, Christopher; Anderson, Martha; Allen, Richard; McCabe, Matthew F.; Hook, Simon; Baldocchi, Dennis; Townsend, Philip A.; Kilic, Ayse; Tu, Kevin; Miralles, Diego D.; Perret, Johan; Lagouarde, Jean-Pierre; Waliser, Duane; Purdy, Adam J.; French, Andrew; Schimel, David; Famiglietti, James S.; Stephens, Graeme; Wood, Eric F.

    2017-04-01

    The fate of the terrestrial biosphere is highly uncertain given recent and projected changes in climate. This is especially acute for impacts associated with changes in drought frequency and intensity on the distribution and timing of water availability. The development of effective adaptation strategies for these emerging threats to food and water security are compromised by limitations in our understanding of how natural and managed ecosystems are responding to changing hydrological and climatological regimes. This information gap is exacerbated by insufficient monitoring capabilities from local to global scales. Here, we describe how evapotranspiration (ET) represents the key variable in linking ecosystem functioning, carbon and climate feedbacks, agricultural management, and water resources, and highlight both the outstanding science and applications questions and the actions, especially from a space-based perspective, necessary to advance them.

  6. The Future of Evapotranspiration: Global requirements for ecosystem functioning, carbon and climate feedbacks, agricultural management, and water resources

    KAUST Repository

    Fisher, Joshua B.

    2017-03-11

    The fate of the terrestrial biosphere is highly uncertain given recent and projected changes in climate. This is especially acute for impacts associated with changes in drought frequency and intensity on the distribution and timing of water availability. The development of effective adaptation strategies for these emerging threats to food and water security are compromised by limitations in our understanding of how natural and managed ecosystems are responding to changing hydrological and climatological regimes. This information gap is exacerbated by insufficient monitoring capabilities from local to global scales. Here, we describe how evapotranspiration (ET) represents the key variable in linking ecosystem functioning, carbon and climate feedbacks, agricultural management, and water resources, and highlight both the outstanding science and applications questions and the actions, especially from a space-based perspective, necessary to advance them. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. The Future of Evapotranspiration: Global Requirements for Ecosystem Functioning, Carbon and Climate Feedbacks, Agricultural Management, and Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Joshua B.; Melton, Forrest; Middleton, Elizabeth; Hain, Christopher; Anderson, Martha; Allen, Richard; McCabe, Matthew F.; Hook, Simon; Baldocchi, Dennis; Townsend, Philip A.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The fate of the terrestrial biosphere is highly uncertain given recent and projected changes in climate. This is especially acute for impacts associated with changes in drought frequency and intensity on the distribution and timing of water availability. The development of effective adaptation strategies for these emerging threats to food and water security are compromised by limitations in our understanding of how natural and managed ecosystems are responding to changing hydrological and climatological regimes. This information gap is exacerbated by insufficient monitoring capabilities from local to global scales. Here, we describe how evapotranspiration (ET) represents the key variable in linking ecosystem functioning, carbon and climate feedbacks, agricultural management, and water resources, and highlight both the outstanding science and applications questions and the actions, especially from a space-based perspective, necessary to advance them.

  8. Leaf Abscission Induced by Ethylene in Water-Stressed Intact Seedlings of Cleopatra Mandarin Requires Previous Abscisic Acid Accumulation in Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Cadenas, A.; Tadeo, F. R.; Talon, M.; Primo-Millo, E.

    1996-09-01

    The involvement of abscisic acid (ABA) in the process of leaf abscission induced by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) transported from roots to shoots in Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reshni Hort. ex Tan.) seedlings grown under water stress was studied using norflurazon (NF). Water stress induced both ABA (24-fold) and ACC (16-fold) accumulation in roots and arrested xylem flow. Leaf bulk ABA also increased (8-fold), although leaf abscission did not occur. Shortly after rehydration, root ABA and ACC returned to their prestress levels, whereas sharp and transitory increases of ACC (17-fold) and ethylene (10-fold) in leaves and high percentages of abscission (up to 47%) were observed. NF suppressed the ABA and ACC accumulation induced by water stress in roots and the sharp increases of ACC and ethylene observed after rewatering in leaves. NF also reduced leaf abscission (7-10%). These results indicate that water stress induces root ABA accumulation and that this is required for the process of leaf abscission to occur. It was also shown that exogenous ABA increases ACC levels in roots but not in leaves. Collectively, the data suggest that ABA, the primary sensitive signal to water stress, modulates the levels of ethylene, which is the hormonal activator of leaf abscission. This assumption implies that root ACC levels are correlated with root ABA amounts in a dependent way, which eventually links water status to an adequate, protective response such as leaf abscission.

  9. Water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity is without a doubt on of the greatest threats to the human species and has all the potential to destabilise world peace. Falling water tables are a new phenomenon. Up until the development of steam and electric motors, deep groudwater...

  10. A Preliminary Appraisal of Offstream Reservoir Sites for Meeting Water Storage Requirements in the Upper Snake River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    Barranco (1978) gives net returns of $90.48 and $59.55 per acre. This would indicate a net value added per acre-foot of $34.66 and $22.73, respectively...Project B-039-IDA, Idaho Department of Water Resources, Uni- versity of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, 288 pp. Barranco , G.S., 1978, "The Feasibility of

  11. Effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on water and acid requirements of soybeans grown in a recirculating hydroponic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowiak, C. L.; Wheeler, R. M.; Lowery, W.; Sager, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    Establishing mass budgets of various crop needs, i.e. water and nutrients, in different environments is essential for the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). The effects of CO2 (500 and 1000 umol mol (exp -1)) on water and acid use (for pH control) by soybeans in a recirculating hydroponic system were examined. Plants of cvs. McCall and Pixie were grown for 90 days using the nutrient film technique (NFT) and a nitrate based nutrient solution. System acid use for both CO2 levels peaked near 4 weeks during a phase of rapid vegetative growth, but acid use decreased more rapidly under 500 compared to 1000 umol mol (exp GR) CO2. Total system water use by 500 and 1000 umol mol (exp -1) plants was similar, leaving off at 5 weeks and declining as plants senesced (ca. 9 weeks). However, single leaf transpiration rates were consistently lower at 1000 umol mol (exp -1). The data suggest that high CO2 concentrations increase system acid (and nutrient) use because of increased vegetative growth, which in turn negates the benefit of reduced water use (lower transpiration rates) per unit leaf area.

  12. Validation and Determination of Ice Water Content - Radar Reflectivity Relationships during CRYSTAL-FACE: Flight Requirements for Future Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayres, D. S.; Smith, J. B.; Pittman, J. V.; Weinstock, E. M.; Anderson, J. G.; Heymsfield, G.; Fridland, A. M.; Ackerman, A. S.

    2007-01-01

    In order for clouds to be more accurately represented in global circulation models (GCM), there is need for improved understanding of the properties of ice such as the total water in ice clouds, called ice water content (IWC), ice particle sizes and their shapes. Improved representation of clouds in models will enable GCMs to better predict for example, how changes in emissions of pollutants affect cloud formation and evolution, upper tropospheric water vapor, and the radiative budget of the atmosphere that is crucial for climate change studies. An extensive cloud measurement campaign called CRYSTAL-FACE was conducted during Summer 2002 using instrumented aircraft and a variety of instruments to measure properties of ice clouds. This paper deals with the measurement of IWC using the Harvard water vapor and total water instruments on the NASA WB-57 high-altitude aircraft. The IWC is measured directly by these instruments at the altitude of the WB-57, and it is compared with remote measurements from the Goddard Cloud Radar System (CRS) on the NASA ER-2. CRS measures vertical profiles of radar reflectivity from which IWC can be estimated at the WB-57 altitude. The IWC measurements obtained from the Harvard instruments and CRS were found to be within 20-30% of each other. Part of this difference was attributed to errors associated with comparing two measurements that are not collocated in time an space since both aircraft were not in identical locations. This study provides some credibility to the Harvard and CRS-derived IWC measurements that are in general difficult to validate except through consistency checks using different measurement approaches.

  13. 基于二元水循环的河流生态需水水量与水质综合评价方法——以辽河流域为例%Water quantity-quality combined evaluation method for rivers' water requirements of the instream environment in dualistic water cycle: A case study of Liaohe River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王西琴; 张远; 刘昌明

    2007-01-01

    In this article the meaning of the quantity and quality of environmental flows of river in dualistic water cycle is discussed, and compared with the meaning of unitary water cycle. Based on the analysis of the relationship between environmental flows of river requirements, the efficiency of water resource usage, the consumption coefficient, and the concentration of waste water elimination, the water quantity and water quality calculation method of the environmental flows of river requirements in dualistic water cycle is developed, and the criteria for environmental flows of river requirements are established, and therefore the water quantity-quality combined evaluation of natural river flows requirements are realized. Taking the Liaohe River as a model, the environmental flows of river requirements for Xiliao River, Dongliao River, mainstream Liaohe River, Huntai River and northeast rivers along the coasts of the Yellow and Bohai seas in unitary water cycle are calculated, each taking up 39.3%, 63.0%, 43.9%, 43.3% and 43.5% of runoff respectively. Evaluated according to Tennant recommended flow, the results show that: except Xiliao River is "median", the rest are all upon "good", the Dongliao River is even "very good". The corresponding results in dualistic water cycle are that, the proportion of natural flows for each river is 57.5%, 74.1%, 60.8%, 60.3% and 60.4%; while the combined evaluation results show that: considering "quantity", except Xiliao River, the rest rivers can all achieve the "quantity" criteria of the environmental flows of river requirements, but if considering the aspect of "quality", only Dongliao River can reach the "quality" standard. By water quantity-quality combined evaluation method, only Dongliao River can achieve the criteria. So the water quality is the main factor that determines whether the environmental flows can meet the river ecosystem demands.

  14. Determination of 210Pb, 210Po, 226Ra, 228Ra and uranium isotopes in drinking water in order to comply with the requirements of the EU ‘Drinking Water Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, M; Loots, H; Jacobs, K; Verheyen, L; Sneyers, L; Verrezen, F; Bruggeman, M

    2016-03-01

    The European Union published in 2013 a new Drinking Water Directive with stricter requirements for measuring natural radioactivity. In order to adhere to this, a method for sequential separation of 210Pb, 210Po, 238U and 234U in drinking water was applied using UTEVA® and Sr resins. Polonium-210, 238U and 234U were quantified using alpha-particle spectrometry and 210Pb using liquid scintillation counting. Radium-226 and 228Ra were determined using 3M Empore Radium RAD Disks, and their quantification was done using a Quantulus™ 1220 liquid scintillation counter.

  15. Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sanmuga Priya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation through aquatic macrophytes treatment system (AMATS for the removal of pollutants and contaminants from various natural sources is a well established environmental protection technique. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes, a worst invasive aquatic weed has been utilised for various research activities over the last few decades. The biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in minimising various contaminants present in the industrial wastewater is well studied. The present review quotes the literatures related to the biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in reducing the concentration of dyestuffs, heavy metals and minimising certain other physiochemical parameters like TSS (total suspended solids, TDS (total dissolved solids, COD (chemical oxygen demand and BOD (biological oxygen demand in textile wastewater. Sorption kinetics through various models, factors influencing the biosorption capacity, and role of physical and chemical modifications in the water hyacinth are also discussed.

  16. Simulated effects of dam removal on water temperatures along the Klamath River, Oregon and California, using 2010 Biological Opinion flow requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risley, John C.; Brewer, Scott J.; Perry, Russell W.

    2012-01-01

    Computer model simulations were run to determine the effects of dam removal on water temperatures along the Klamath River, located in south-central Oregon and northern California, using flow requirements defined in the 2010 Biological Opinion of the National Marine Fisheries Service. A one-dimensional, daily averaged water temperature model (River Basin Model-10) developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 10, Seattle, Washington, was used in the analysis. This model had earlier been configured and calibrated for the Klamath River by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Klamath Secretarial Determination to simulate the effects of dam removal on water temperatures for current (2011) and future climate change scenarios. The analysis for this report was performed outside of the scope of the Klamath Secretarial Determination process at the request of the Bureau of Reclamation Technical Services Office, Denver, Colorado.For this analysis, two dam scenarios were simulated: “dams in” and “dams out.” In the “dams in” scenario, existing dams in the Klamath River were kept in place. In the “dams out” scenario, the river was modeled as a natural stream, without the J.C. Boyle, Copco1, Copco2, and Iron Gate Dams, for the entire simulation period. Output from the two dam scenario simulations included daily water temperatures simulated at 29 locations for a 50-year period along the Klamath River between river mile 253 (downstream of Link River Dam) and the Pacific Ocean. Both simulations used identical flow requirements, formulated in the 2010 Biological Opinion, and identical climate conditions based on the period 1961–2009.Simulated water temperatures from January through June at almost all locations between J.C. Boyle Reservoir and the Pacific Ocean were higher for the “dams out” scenario than for the “dams in” scenario. The simulated mean monthly water temperature increase was highest [1.7–2

  17. WATER REQUIREMENT ESTIMATE FOR THE REPRODUCTIVE PERIOD OF MANGO ORCHADS IN THE NORTHEAST OF THE STATE OF PARÁ, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO JORGE DE OLIVEIRA PONTE DE SOUZA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to estimate the water consumption in mango orchard during its phenological stages in the northeastern of the State of Pará, Brazil. For this purpose, it was installed and instrumented a micrometeorological tower in a mango orchard, cv. Tommy Atkins, of 22 years old, with data collected during the crops of 2010/2011 and of 2011/2012. The actual crop evapotranspiration was estimated from the energy balance using the Bowen ratio technique. The crops were subjected to different weather conditions, consequently, some differences in the Bowen ration values were observed. The evapotranspiration suffered influences of meteorological conditions during the period. The actual crop evapotranspiration during its reproductive period ranged between 402.9 and 420 mm with a mean daily water consumption of 3.8 mm at flowering, of 4.25 mm at fruit fall, of 3.56 mm at fruit formation, of 3.0 mm at fruit maturation and of 3.73 mm for the whole period.

  18. User requirements and user acceptance of current and next-generation satellite mission and sensor complement, oriented toward the monitoring of water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castruccio, P. A.; Loats, H. L., Jr.; Fowler, T. R.; Robinson, P.

    1975-01-01

    Principal water resources users were surveyed to determine the applicability of remotely sensed data to their present and future requirements. Analysis of responses was used to assess the levels of adequacy of LANDSAT 1 and 2 in fulfilling hydrological functions, and to derive systems specifications for future water resources-oriented remote sensing satellite systems. The analysis indicates that water resources applications for all but the very large users require: (1) resolutions on the order of 15 meters, (2) a number of radiometric levels of the same order as currently used in LANDSAT 1 (64), (3) a number of spectral bands not in excess of those used in LANDSAT 1, and (4) a repetition frequency on the order of 2 weeks. The users had little feel for the value of new sensors (thermal IR, passive and active microwaves). What is needed in this area is to achieve specific demonstrations of the utility of these sensors and submit the results to the users to evince their judgement.

  19. ABA is required for the accumulation of APX1 and MBF1c during a combination of water deficit and heat stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandalinas, Sara I.; Balfagón, Damián; Arbona, Vicent; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Inupakutika, Madhuri A.; Mittler, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in plant acclimation to abiotic stress. Although recent studies suggested that ABA could also be important for plant acclimation to a combination of abiotic stresses, its role in this response is currently unknown. Here we studied the response of mutants impaired in ABA signalling (abi1-1) and biosynthesis (aba1-1) to a combination of water deficit and heat stress. Both mutants displayed reduced growth, biomass, and survival when subjected to stress combination. Focusing on abi1-1, we found that although its stomata had an impaired response to water deficit, remaining significantly more open than wild type, its stomatal aperture was surprisingly reduced when subjected to the stress combination. Stomatal closure during stress combination in abi1-1 was accompanied by higher levels of H2O2 in leaves, suggesting that H2O2 might play a role in this response. In contrast to the almost wild-type stomatal closure phenotype of abi1-1 during stress combination, the accumulation of ascorbate peroxidase 1 and multiprotein bridging factor 1c proteins, required for acclimation to a combination of water deficit and heat stress, was significantly reduced in abi1-1. Our findings reveal a key function for ABA in regulating the accumulation of essential proteins during a combination of water deficit and heat stress. PMID:27497287

  20. Study of ecological water requirement of Shule River Basin%疏勒河流域生态需水量研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛夏; 王启优

    2016-01-01

    The ecological base flows of Shule River Basin are calculated by Tennant method, the driest month runoff measured in recent 10-years, 90% assurance rate method, the monthly and annual assurance rate method. The sensitive ecological water requirements of wetlands, lakes and important aquatic organisms are calculated for the typical areas in the basin. The ecological water requirement of Shule River Basin is the sum of its ecological base flow and sensitive ecological water requirement. By com-parison and analysis of the above methods, it is concluded that the 90% assurance rate method is suitable for the calculation of the ecological base flow in the basin. The results showed that the ecological base flow is 23% of the average flow in the driest month of 90% assurance rate. The ecological water requirement of wetlands, lakes and important aquatic organisms are 6. 40 × 108 , 0. 14 × 108 m3 and 0. 23 × 108 m3 respectively, so the ecological water requirement of the basin is 6. 77 × 108 m3 . Based on the results, the water ecological warning line and ecological characteristic flow are determined, providing the reference for the most stringent water resources management.%采用Tennant法、近10 a最枯月实测径流量法、90%保证率法、月年保证率法分别计算了疏勒河流域的生态基流;对敏感生态需水(包括河流湿地生态需水、湖泊生态需水、重要水生生物生态需水),采用流域典型区进行计算。疏勒河流域生态需水即为其生态基流与敏感生态需水之和。在对上述方法进行比较、分析的基础上,得出的90%的保证率法即为疏勒河流域生态基流比较合适的计算方法。计算结果表明:该河流域生态基流的所需水量为河流90%保证率下的最枯月平均流量的23%,河流的湿地生态需水量为6.40亿m3,湖泊生态需水量为0.14亿m3,重要水生生物的生态需水量为0.23亿m3。在此基础上,通过计算得出疏勒河

  1. Optimising conventional treatment of domestic waste water: quality, required surface area, solid waste minimisation and biogas production for medium and small-scale applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Szewczuk, S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available .kashan.co.za] Optimising conventional treatment of domestic waste water: quality, required surface area, solid waste minimisation and biogas production for medium and small-scale applications S SZEWCZUK, SP ROUX, M LINDEQUE, J GERMANIS CSIR, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001...) and the methane-rich gas yield is used for heating the Ad reactor itself. Increased efficiency due to technological progress can increase the gas yield, reduce the reactor dependency on biogas for heating and allow more efficient use of the biogas...

  2. The assessment of the required groundwater quantity for the conservation of ecosystems and the achievement of a good ecological status of surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja Janža

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the available quantity of groundwater is of essential importance for its sustainable use. Modern approaches for estimation of groundwater availability take into account all potential impacts of abstractions, including impacts on groundwater dependent ecosystems and impacts on surface waters ecological status. Groundwater body is in good quantitative status if groundwater abstractions do not cause signifiant damages to groundwater dependent ecosystems and signifiant diminution in the ecological status of surface water bodies. The methodology presented in this paper was developed as an integral part of the assessment of the quantitative status of groundwater bodies in Slovenia and is tailored to the characteristics of the groundwater dependent ecosystems as well as hydrological and hydrogeological conditions in the Slovenian territory. Two different approaches were implemented; for forest habitats on alluvial aquifers, and habitats of amphibians and molluscs in karst areas. Estimates of the required quantity of groundwater for groundwater dependent ecosystems conservation were performed at the level of groundwater bodies and annual averages of temporal variables of the water balance, calculated with the regional water balance model GROWA-SI. In the areas of groundwater bodies with groundwater dependent ecosystems estimated quantity present 0.1 % - 12.4 % of the groundwater recharge. The estimated share of annual renewable quantity of groundwater to maintain the ecological status of surface waters for the entire territory of Slovenia is 23.2 %. The largest share, 30 % is in north-eastern Slovenia and the lowest in the north-west part of Slovenia with a 16.6 % average annual renewable quantity.

  3. Thermoregulation of water foraging honeybees—Balancing of endothermic activity with radiative heat gain and functional requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Helmut; Stabentheiner, Anton; Schmaranzer, Sigurd

    2010-01-01

    Foraging honeybees are subjected to considerable variations of microclimatic conditions challenging their thermoregulatory ability. Solar heat is a gain in the cold but may be a burden in the heat. We investigated the balancing of endothermic activity with radiative heat gain and physiological functions of water foraging Apis mellifera carnica honeybees in the whole range of ambient temperatures (Ta) and solar radiation they are likely to be exposed in their natural environment in Middle Europe. The mean thorax temperature (Tth) during foraging stays was regulated at a constantly high level (37.0–38.5 °C) in a broad range of Ta (3–30 °C). At warmer conditions (Ta = 30–39 °C) Tth increased to a maximal level of 45.3 °C. The endothermic temperature excess (difference of Tbody − Ta of living and dead bees) was used to assess the endogenously generated temperature elevation as a correlate of energy turnover. Up to a Ta of ∼30 °C bees used solar heat gain for a double purpose: to reduce energetic expenditure and to increase Tth by about 1–3 °C to improve force production of flight muscles. At higher Ta they exhibited cooling efforts to get rid of excess heat. A high Tth also allowed regulation of the head temperature high enough to guarantee proper function of the bees’ suction pump even at low Ta. This shortened the foraging stays and this way reduced energetic costs. With decreasing Ta bees also reduced arrival body weight and crop loading to do both minimize costs and optimize flight performance. PMID:20705071

  4. 旱地作物需水量预报决策辅助系统%Decision Support System of Water Requirement Forecast for Dryland Crop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    上官周平; 邵明安; 薛增召

    2001-01-01

    The decision support system of water requirement forecast for dryland crop is a systematic integrated intelligent computer software established by combining existing agronomy knowledge, model and expert experience with the artificial intelligent technology, on the foundation of Penman formula. This decision support system is a subsystem as "Expert system of water-saving agricultural of Northwestern area". It can give decision consulting for irrigation scheme for the management of winter wheat and summer corn in Middle of Shaanxi areas. And can led the water-saving farming to more scientific and more reasonable in this areas.%旱地作物需水量预报决策辅助系统是利用人工智能技术,在Penman公式的基础上结合现有西北旱区的农学知识、模型以及经验进行系统集成而建立的智能化计算机软件系统,该系统是西北地区节水农业专家系统的一个子系统。在生产实践中可为陕西关中地区的冬小麦、夏玉米的栽培作出灌溉方案的决策咨询。

  5. Estimation of water requirements and Kc values of 'Thompson Seedless' table grapes grown in the overhead trellis system, using the Eddy covariance method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Villagra

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Crop evapotranspiration (ETc is essential for irrigation scheduling. The amount of water consumed can be estimated by multiplying the reference evapotranspiration (ET0 by a crop coefficient (Kc; the value of Kc is usually obtained from FAO Paper nr 56. In table grapes (Vitis vinifera L., Kc are obtained from experiments in vines trained on trellis systems; however in Chile, the most used is the overhead trellis system (parronal. Therefore, the objective was to determine water requirements and Kc values of a table grape orchard cv. Thompson Seedless trained on an overhead trellis system in Calle Larga (32°52'40" S, 70°37'45" W, 795 m a.s.l., Aconcagua Valley, Chile, using the Eddy covariance method. During the 2008/2009 and 2009/2010 seasons, the instruments required for ET0 and ETc measurement were installed on a 4 m tower above the soil (2 m above vine canopy. The ET0 was estimated according to the FAO Penman-Monteith equation and ETc by the Eddy covariance method. The Kc was obtained by ratio between ETc and ET0. The maximum ETc was 7 mm d-1 and total water consumption was 810 mm. The season maximum Kc value of 1.2 was obtained near harvest during the first season, and 20 d before veraison in the second season. The Kc increased linearly with the percentage of intercepted solar radiation (IRS by the vine canopy at noon, suggesting that an equation to convert the IRS to Kc is more useful than Kc tabulated according to phenology. The equation obtained in this experiment was Kc = 0.012 IRS - 0.1029, R² = 0.85.

  6. Necessidade hídrica do meloeiro irrigado com água de diferentes salinidades e cultivado com ou sem cobertura do solo Water requirements of melon irrigated with different water salinities, cultivated with and without mulching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A. S. B. de Medeiros

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A necessidade hídrica das culturas pode ser estimada a partir da evapotranspiração de referência (ETo e do coeficiente de cultura (kc. Com o objetivo de se estimar a necessidade hídrica de duas cultivares de melão (Gold mine e Trusty cultivadas com e sem cobertura do solo com filme de polietileno e irrigadas por gotejamento com água de diferentes salinidades (1,2, 2,5 e 4,4 dS m-1 instalou-se um experimento no município de Mossoró, RN, em um Argissolo Vermelho Amarelo. Para se obter a necessidade hídrica da cultura, realizou-se o balanço hídrico nas parcelas, obtendo-se os coeficientes de cultura. Para medir a variação de armazenamento de água no perfil do solo e o fluxo subterrâneo, foram instaladas baterias com três tensiômetros em cada parcela de dois blocos experimentais. A lâmina de irrigação foi estimada pela metodologia FAO e ajustada de acordo com o monitoramento da umidade do solo. A água de maior salinidade diminuiu a evapotranspiração do meloeiro em 14%, a cobertura de solo reduziu em 18% e a cultivar Trusty evapotranspirou 11% a menos que a Gold mine. O balanço hídrico permitiu que se estimassem os coeficientes de cultura do meloeiro para diferentes salinidades, cobertura de solo e cultivares.The water requirement of the crops can be estimated from the reference evapotranspiration (ETo and crop coefficients (kc. Aiming to estimate the water requirement of two cultivars of melon (Gold mine and Trusty cultivated with and without soil covering with polyethylene film and irrigated by trickle irrigation with water of different salinities (1.2, 2.5 and 4.4 dS m-1, an experiment was installed in the municipal district of Mossoró, RN, in an Alfissol. To obtain the water requirement of the crop the water balance was accomplished in the plots, obtaining the crop coefficients. To obtain the variation in water storage in the soil profile and the subsurface flow three tensiometers were installed in each plot of two

  7. Water-requirement characteristics of two cassava varieties%两个木薯品种需水特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王泽平; 刘海斌; 罗兴录

    2012-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to discuss the water-requirement characteristics of cassava varieties SC 205 and Xinxuan 048 and to provide scientific basis for cassava cultivation and drought resistance breeding. [Method]Cassava varieties SC 205 (main variety grown in Guangxi) and Xinxuan 048 (bred by Guangxi University) were taken as test materials; four treatments, viz., (A) normal water supply (CK) , (B) mild drought, (C) moderate drought, and (D) severe drought, were set. The net photosynthetic rate, leaf water potential, leaf membrane permeability, chlorophyll a+b, MDA , PRO , and biomass were measured during the cassava root tube formation period (from May to July) and expanding period (from July to September), and maturity (Sep. to Dec). [ Result ]The water-stress time of SC 205 was earlier than that of Xinxuan 048. The influence of water-stress on cassava was more obvious in the late growth period. The photosynthesis efficiency of cassava leaves was affected by water stress under drought condition. However, the compensation effect of water stress on the photosynthesis efficiency was likely to appear under the mild and moderate drought conditions. [Conclusion]The order of cassava physiology responses to drought stress was as follows: photosynthetic rate> transpiration>stomatal conductance>leaf water potential. The appropriate water stress was beneficial to cassava yield formation and starch accumulation. Cassava variety Xinxuan 048 showed stronger drought resistance than that of SC 205 under this experimental condition.%[目的]探讨木薯品种华南205和新选048的需水特性,为木薯大田栽培及抗旱育种提供科学依据.[方法]以广西木薯主栽品种华南205和广西大学自育品种新选048为材料,试验设置正常供水(A)、轻度干旱(B)、中度干旱(C)和重度干旱(D)共4个土壤水分处理,在木薯块根形成期(5~7月)、膨大期(7~9月)和成熟期(9~12月)测定木薯净光合速率、叶片水势、叶片

  8. Comparison of Water Requirement and Water Use Efficiency of Main Crops in Shihezi Cultivated Area, Xinjiang%新疆石河子垦区主要作物需水特征及水效益比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉义; 逄焕成; 张凤华; 陈阜

    2009-01-01

    The trend of water requirement and deficiency of major crops in Shihezi cultivated area, Xinjiang was analyzed based on 50 years meteorological data. Water use efficiency (WUE) and economical water use efficiency (EWUE) of major crops was also compared. The result showed that water requirements of spring wheat, winter wheat, spring soybean, spring millet and alfalfa showed an increasing trend in the past 50 years, and the highest increasing range occurred in spring wheat, which increased by 6. 6 mm for every 5 years. But the water requirement of spring corn, rice and cotton decreased. Water deficiency among main crops in this region varied significantly. The order from high to low for grain crops was rice> winter wheat > spring corn> spring soybean > spring millet > spring wheat>potatoes. The order for cash crops was sugar crops>process tomato>alfalfa>cotton>melon crops>hemp crops>oil crops. Moreover, we found that the WUE and EWUE of major crops varied significantly under different irrigation methods. The WUE of grain crops such as spring wheat and spring corn was higher than other crops. But the highest EWUE occurred in fruit vegetable crops such as grape, flat peach and capsicum.%根据新疆石河子垦区50年气象数据资料,计算分析了主要作物需水量变化及自然降水条件下农田水分平衡状况,并对主要作物水分生产效率效益进行了比较.结果表明:春小麦、冬小麦、春大豆、春谷子、苜蓿需水量均呈上升趋势,其中春小麦增加幅度最大,每5 a平均增加6.6 mm,而春玉米、水稻、棉花需水量呈下降趋势.粮食作物中以水稻亏水量最高,冬小麦、春玉米次之,而春大豆、春谷子、春小麦、薯类作物相对较小,经济作物中以糖类作物亏水量最高,其次为加工番茄、苜蓿、棉花,而瓜类、麻类、油料作物相对较小.不同灌溉方式下作物水分利用效率效益差异较大,粮食类作物如春小麦、春玉米水分利用效率

  9. Techniques and equipment required for precise stream gaging in tide-affected fresh-water reaches of the Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Winchell

    1971-01-01

    Current-meter measurements of high accuracy will be required for calibration of an acoustic flow-metering system proposed for installation in the Sacramento River at Chipps Island in California. This report presents an analysis of the problem of making continuous accurate current-meter measurements in this channel where the flow regime is changing constantly in response to tidal action. Gaging-system requirements are delineated, and a brief description is given of the several applicable techniques that have been developed by others. None of these techniques provides the accuracies required for the flowmeter calibration. A new system is described--one which has been assembled and tested in prototype and which will provide the matrix of data needed for accurate continuous current-meter measurements. Analysis of a large quantity of data on the velocity distribution in the channel of the Sacramento River at Chipps Island shows that adequate definition of the velocity can be made during the dominant flow periods--that is, at times other than slack-water periods--by use of current meters suspended at elevations 0.2 and 0.8 of the depth below the water surface. However, additional velocity surveys will be necessary to determine whether or not small systematic corrections need be applied during periods of rapidly changing flow. In the proposed system all gaged parameters, including velocities, depths, position in the stream, and related times, are monitored continuously as a boat moves across the river on the selected cross section. Data are recorded photographically and transferred later onto punchcards for computer processing. Computer programs have been written to permit computation of instantaneous discharges at any selected time interval throughout the period of the current meter measurement program. It is anticipated that current-meter traverses will be made at intervals of about one-half hour over periods of several days. Capability of performance for protracted

  10. Final report on CCQM-K70: Determination of Hg in natural water at a concentration level required by the European environmental quality standard (EQS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiel, Detlef; Rienitz, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    This comparison 'Hg in natural water' was a follow-up to the pilot studies CCQM-P100.1 and CCQM-P100.2. The aim of this comparison was to demonstrate the capability of national metrology institutes to measure the Hg mass concentration in a natural water sample at the very low concentration level of γ(Hg) ≈ 70 ng/L as required by the EQS. In this way it served to help implement the European Water Framework Directive (WFD). This comparison was an activity of the Inorganic Analysis Working Group (IAWG) of CCQM and was piloted by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) with the help of the co-organizers Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM, Berlin, Germany), Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais (LNE, Paris, France), and the Joint Research Centre-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (EC-JRC-IRMM, Geel, Belgium). The following laboratories participated in this key comparison (in alphabetical order): BAM (Germany) EC-JRC-IRMM (European Union) KRISS (Republic of Korea) LGC (United Kingdom) LNE (France) NIST (United States of America) NMIA (Australia) NRC (Canada) PTB (Germany) SP (Sweden) The majority of participants applied isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) using sector field or quadrupole inductively coupled plasma MS (ICP-MS) in combination with cold vapour (CV) generation as the analytical technique. NRC reported a combined result of ID-CV-ICP-MS and CV atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). SP applied a standard addition method on a sector field ICP-MS, while BAM made use of an external 5-point calibration on a CV atomic fluorescence spectrometer (AFS). The key comparison reference value (KCRV) was agreed upon during the IAWG meeting in April 2010 at BIPM as the sum of the added Hg content calculated from the gravimetric sample preparation and the Hg matrix content of the water used for sample preparation (determined and validated on two independent pathways). Accordingly the degrees

  11. 西辽河流域地表地下复合生态需水研究%Study on ecological water requirement in Xiliao River basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王高旭; 陈敏建; 丰华丽; 王立群; 黄昌硕

    2014-01-01

    针对西辽河流域水资源开发利用强度大、地下水超采、平原河流断流等严重的生态问题,将河道生态流量与地下水位作为整体来考虑,系统地确定复合型生态需水。首先以河道为对象,计算了最小生态流量、适宜生态流量;其次,以河岸为对象,以地下水与河流补排关系和避免盐碱化为依据,以河道生态流量为边界条件,确定了支撑河道生态需水的生态地下水位。西辽河流域的地表地下复合生态需水指标由河道最小生态流量和适宜生态流量以及地下生态水位构成,可为流域水资源规划和管理、生态系统保护和恢复提供科学依据。%Aimed at the severe ecological problems such as large scale development of water resources , over-exploiting groundwater and cutting off of plain rivers in the Xiliao river basin , the paper consideredthe ecological flow and groundwater level of river as a whole , and systematically determined the compositeecological water requirement.Firs,t it calculated the minimum river flow and appropriate ecological flow ;secondly, taking bank of river as objective and ecological flow as confine condition ,according to the relationbetween replenishment and discharge and avoiding salinization , the paper determined the ecologicalgroundwater level that can support the ecological flow of rivers .The composite indexex of ecological waterrequirement are composed of minimum river flow, appropriate ecological flow and ecological level ofgroundwater,which can provide scientific reference for the plan and management of water resources , protectionand recovery of water ecosystem in that region .

  12. Ecological water requirements in the lower reaches of Luanhe Basin%滦河下游河道生态需水量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 杨晓华; 王银堂

    2009-01-01

    Based on the methods of the ecological water requirements (EWRs) at home and abroad, this paper takes the area from Panjiakou reservoir to Luanhe estuary of Luanhe Basin as the typical area to determine the water allocations of the river ecological restoration in reservoirs' downstream. EWRs are calculated with the month-by-month frequency method and eco-hydraulics method. The methods can describe EWRs according to seasons and grades, meanwhile emphasize the relationship between hydrology and ecology. Through the analysis of the ecological, hydrological and hydraulic data from the studied area from 1956 to 2000, the results indicate that: (1) The month-by-month frequency method and eco-hydraulics method are both reasonable in calculating EWRs in the Lower reaches of Luanhe Basin; (2) The minimum, medium and ideal level of annual EWRs are 4.29×108,8.93×108 and 16.29×108m3, about 10.18%, 21.21% and 38.68% of the natural river discharge respectively; And (3) the ratio of the monthly ecological flows should be 33.5% in the flood period (August) and 11.5% in the biological propagation period in spring (April-June).%为量化水库下游河道生态修复所需水量,以滦河下游潘家口水库-滦河口为研究样区,采用逐月频率法和生态水力学法估算河道生态需水量,既具有水文学方法的简便,又考虑生物学特性,强调了水文-生态的联系.通过对研究区河道1956~2000年生态、水文及水力资料的分析计算,结果表明:①逐月频率法和生态水力学法在计算滦河下游河道生态需水中均合理;②最小、适宜、理想等级年生态需水量分别为4.29亿,8.93亿和16.29亿m3,分别占河道天然径流量的10.18%、21.21%和38.68%;③年内汛期8月份及生物繁殖期(4~6月)需水量分别达到年度总量的33.5%和11.5%.

  13. Bottled Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bottled water and fluoride. Does bottled water contain fluoride? Bottled water products may contain fluoride, depending on ... How can I find out the level of fluoride in bottled water? The FDA does not require ...

  14. Lead and tap water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water contaminated with lead ... The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitors drinking water in the United States. It requires water suppliers to produce annual water quality reports. These reports include information about lead amounts, and they ...

  15. Water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic animals are healthiest and grow best when environmental conditions are within certain ranges that define, for a particular species, “good” water quality. From the outset, successful aquaculture requires a high-quality water supply. Water quality in aquaculture systems also deteriorates as an...

  16. Water Districts, Part of Service Delivery Strategy that DCA requires, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Board Of Commissioners.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Water Districts dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2010. It is described...

  17. Increasing CO[sub 2] from glacial to present concentrations alters nitrogen and water requirements of C[sub 3] plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne, P.H.; Johnson, H.B.; Mayeux, H.S. (USDA-ARS, Temple, TX (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Nitrogen and water use efficiencies were measured for three C[sub 3] species, annual grasses Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) and Triticum aestivum (wheat; two cultivars) and a woody perennial Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite), grown at daytime CO[sub 2] concentrations that spanned glacial to present atmospheric levels. Changes in nitrogen and water use efficiencies were used to investigate effects of increasing [CO[sub 2

  18. Analysis of Temporal and Spatial Characteristics of the Water Requirements of Potato( Solanum tuberosum )in Ningxia%宁夏马铃薯需水量的时空特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李剑萍; 耿秀华; 韩颖娟; 孟丹; 王连喜; 袁海燕

    2011-01-01

    [目的]探讨宁夏马铃薯(Solanum tuberosum)需水量的时空特征.[方法]采用联合国粮农组织(FAO)推荐的Penman-Monteith公式,计算宁夏1981 ~2007年21个站点参考作物蒸散量,进而得到西吉、同心等典型站点的马铃薯全生育期内的需水量,统计分析其时空变化特征和生育期需水量的变化规律.最后,分析了气候变化背景下宁夏马铃薯需水量变化状况.[结果]马铃薯需水量高值区对应宁夏的中部干旱地区;宁夏马铃薯需水量在近27年内呈现上升的趋势,并且南部山区上升趋势明显大于中部地区;从播种-分枝期,马铃薯日需水量逐渐增大,花序-盛花期这一作物生长旺盛阶段为需水高峰期,块茎成熟-收获期日需水量迅速下降.此外,分析表明,缺水幅度将进一步加大,未来马铃薯生长将要面临更加严峻的水分问题.[结论]该研究可以为宁夏的实际灌溉、水资源合理利用和农田水利工程规划等农业生产工作提供科学依据.%[Objective] The research aimed to discuss the temporal and spatial characteristics of the water requirements of potato in Ningxia. [ Method] Penman - Monteith formulae,recommended by the FAO of the United Nation,were adopted to calculate the reference crop evapotrans piration of 21 weather stations in Ningxia from 1981 to 2007 in order to getting the water requirements of potato throughout the whole growth period in typically stations as Xiji. Then the temporal and spatial changes and the change regulations of the potato water requirements throughout the whole growth period were statistically analyzed. Finally, the change of potato water requirements in Ningxia under the climate change background were analyzed. [ Result] The results showed that the area with high water requirements values matched with the central arid regions of Ningxia. The water requirements of potato in Ningxia had the trend to ascend in the last 27 years and the upward tendency

  19. Hydrologic requirements of and consumptive ground-water use by riparian vegetation along the San Pedro River, Arizona. Chapters A-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, James M.; Stromberg, Juliet C.; Scott, Russell L.; authors include Leenhouts, James M.; Lite, Sharon J.; Dixon, Mark; Rychener, Tyler; Makings, Elizabeth; Williams, David G.; Goodrich, David C.; Cable, William L.; Levick, Lainie R.; McGuire, Roberta; Gazal, Rico M.; Yepez, Enrico A.; Ellsworth, Patrick; Huxman, Travis E.

    2006-01-01

    This study is a coordinated effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (USDA ARS), and Arizona State University, with assistance from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the University of Wyoming, and the University of Arizona. The specific objectives of the study were: to determine the water needs of riparian vegetation through the riparian growing season and throughout the SPRNCA to ensure its long-term ecological integrity; to quantify the total water use of riparian vegetation within the SPRNCA; and to determine the source of water used by key riparian plant species within the SPRNCA. To meet these objectives, the study was divided into three elements: (1) a characterization of the status and variability of hydrologic factors within the riparian system (USGS), (2) a riparian biohydrology study to relate spatial and temporal aspects of riparian changes and condition to the hydrologic variables (Arizona State University), and (3) a water-use evapotranspiration (ET) study to quantify annual consumptive ground-water use by riparian transpiration and direct evaporation from the stream channel (USDA ARS) in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the University of Wyoming, and the University of Arizona. Twenty-six sites within the SPRNCA were selected for collection of vegetation data from three primary streamflow regimes (perennial, intermittent-wet, intermittent-dry), which include the principal vegetation communities. Detailed hydrologic-condition data were collected at a subset of 16 of these sites, called the SPRNCA biohydrology sites. Water-use and water-source data were collected at a subset of 5 of the 16 biohydrology sites. Vegetation data also were collected at supplemental sites within the SPRNCA boundary in the Upper San Pedro Basin and in the Lower San Pedro Basin. In addition to information about vegetation and geomorphic conditions, hydrologic data collected at the 16

  20. Study on Spatial Variation of Shanxi Wheat Crop Water Requirement%山西省小麦需水量空间变化规律分析研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩娜娜; 王仰仁; 周青云; 金建华; 叶澜涛; 郑志伟

    2016-01-01

    Based on the test data of wheat water requirement in Shanxi Province and the nearly 50 years of meteorological data near the weather station,this paper analyzed the spatial variation of Shanxi wheat crop water requirement and the influences of meteoro-logical factors on them.The results showed that:Shanxi Changzhi the winter wheat crop water requirement in the region of Changhzi was largest.The other regions were very similar.From the analysis of the stage of the crop water requirement,especially the joint-ing stage to harvest,the winter wheat water requirement gradually decreased from north to south.In addition,the number of days of wheat grown from north to south is also showing a decreasing trend.The relationship between wheat period average daily water de-mand and the average wind speed is more closely.%结合山西省10个小麦试验站多年需水量的试验数据及邻近气象站近50年的气象资料,分析了山西省小麦需水量在空间上的变化特点及其对气象因子变化的响应。结果表明:从全生育期小麦需水量来看,以山西长治地区为最大,其他地区较为接近;从阶段作物需水量来看,尤其是拔节到收获的阶段,小麦的需水量呈现出自北向南逐渐递减的变化规律。另外,小麦的生长天数也呈现出自北向南逐渐减少的趋势。小麦生育期内日平均需水量与日平均参考作物蒸发蒸腾量关系非常密切。

  1. Water requirements and management of maize under drip and sprinkler irrigation. 2000 annual report for Agricultural Technology Utilization and Transfer (ATUT) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research at Ismailia, Egypt, focused on irrigation management of maize, fava bean, wheat, and alfalfa. In 1998, the two weighing lysimeters at Ismailia were recalibrated successfully with precision of 0.01 mm; and a state-of-the-art time domain reflectometry (TDR) system for soil water balance measu...

  2. 1961-2010年四川盆地玉米有效降水和需水量的变化特征%Variation characteristics of maize effective precipitation and water requirement in Sichuan basin during 1961-2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞艳梅; 陈超; 潘学标

    2015-01-01

    作物有效降水量和需水量是科学确定灌溉时期与灌溉量的重要依据。该研究基于1961-2010年四川盆地104个气象台站的地面气象资料和1981-2010年17个农业气象观测站的玉米生育期资料,采用联合国粮食及农业组织(FAO)推荐的参考作物蒸散量和降水量的比率法计算了研究区域内玉米全生育期及不同生育阶段的有效降水量,采用参考作物蒸散量法结合单作物系数法计算了相应时段的需水量,并探讨了玉米不同生育阶段缺水量和水分盈亏指数的变化。结果表明:近50年来,除乳熟到成熟期外,玉米全生育期及播种到乳熟期的有效降水量总体呈下降趋势;全生育期和各生育阶段的需水量均呈减少趋势;除播种到拔节期外,全生育期和拔节到成熟期的缺水量以下降趋势为主。比较各区域典型地区玉米水分盈亏状况,盆地北部玉米水分亏缺程度最严重,而盆地西部最轻;比较玉米各个生育阶段的水分满足情况,播种到拔节阶段水分亏缺程度最严重。研究可为四川盆地玉米种植区的农业用水以及合理灌溉提供科学依据。%Crop effective precipitation and water requirement are the basis for farmland water management and irrigation. Based on the observation data from 104 meteorology stations during 1961-2010 and phenology data of maize from 17 agrometeorology stations during 1981-2010 over the maize growing regions of Sichuan basin, the effective precipitation of maize of the whole growing period and different growth stages during 1961-2010 in Sichuan basin were estimated by using the reference crop evapotranspiration and precipitation ratio method recommended by Food and Agriculture Organization, and the water requirement of maize also were estimated by using FAO Penman-Monteith equation and crop coefficient method. Further, the water deficit and water budget index in each growth stage of maize

  3. Method for the use of epiphytic diatoms in lakes following the requirements of the Water Framework Directive; Metodo de muestreo de diatomeas epifitas en lagunas para la aplicacion de la Directiva Marco del Agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco Lanza, S.; Becares Mantecon, E.

    2006-07-01

    We propose a sampling method for the use of epiphytic diatoms as water quality indicators in lakes. This methodology will help in the assessment of ecological status in these aquatic systems following the requirements of the Water Framework Directive. The method is based on the use of Kornijow's samplers for the collection of epiphyton growing on helophytes. Preliminary results show the efficacy of this method for the evaluation of water quality. The application of this simple methodology will allow the use of epiphytic diatoms as biological indicators in a wide range of lacustrine environments, creating reproducible results in the long time and based on a common protocol easily applicable. (Author) 47 refs.

  4. Mandatory requirements in relation to air, soil, or water protection. Analysis of need and feasibility. Final Report (Tasks 3 and 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Chavez, R.; Kunen, E.; Walden, D.; Fingerman, K.; Arya, L; Chalmers, J. [Winrock International, Little Rock (United States); Kretschmer, B.; Polakova, J.; Farmer, A.; Bowyer, C.; Menadue, H. [Institute for European Environmental Policy IEEP, London (United Kingdom); Alberici, S.; Toop, G. [Ecofys, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15

    This study focusses on the environmental impacts, both within and outside Europe, associated with the agricultural management of biofuel feedstocks consumed within the European Union (EU). This study has focussed on an examination of the environmental effects associated with crops that: Represent the prevailing cropping type in a country/region and are already produced in intensive agricultural systems and in zones with vulnerable soil/water conditions; and have become the prevailing feedstocks to supply the EU biofuel markets. The report starts with an overview of key biofuel crops and focus countries within and outside the EU (Section 2). Section 3 provides an overview of soils risks from biofuels consumed in the EU. It sets out the type of risks arising from the cultivation of biofuel feedstocks within Europe and in non-EU countries, provides information from case studies on actual risks arising in the selected countries, as well as considering the scope and effectiveness of existing provisions for soil protection. A synthesis of the estimated risks per region for different types of risks concludes the section. Section 4 sets out water risks associated with the identified biofuel crops in the selected EU and non-EU focus areas. Similarly to the soil section, the assessment of existing provisions for water protection addresses their scope and effectiveness in containing the pressures from biofuel feedstock production and concludes with a synthesis estimating the actual risks. Section 5 provides a corresponding analysis of air quality risks. Section 6 discussed the feasibility of introducing additional sustainability criteria in the RED to mitigate identified risks to soil, water and air and overall concludes the study.

  5. Impact of climate change on water requirement of main crops in Nanjing%气候变化对南京主要作物需水量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝树荣; 俞方易; 张展羽; 金玉洁; 花剑岚

    2015-01-01

    By Combining the variation of meteorological factors, it is analyzed the impact of climate change on water requirement of main crops in Nanjing, China and it is presented some measures to address the impacts of climate change. For achieving this goal, water requirement of crops in Nanjing from 1951 to 2005 is calculated with the method of Mann-Kendall. Combining the variation of meteorological factors, the paper analyzes the impact of climate change on water requirement of main crops in Nanjing and put forward some measures to address climate change. The data show that the decrease of water requirement of summer crops, such as rice, cotton and corn, is related with the insignificant increase of summer temperature, increase of rainfall, drop of sunshine hours, and slowdown of wind speed. While the increase of water requirement of winter wheat and canola is mainly related to the highest growth rate of winter and spring temperatures, the effect of drop in sunshine hours and slowdown in wind speed is not enough to offset that of the increase in temperature and the reduction in humidity. The cropping system is affected by temperature, which may bring the increase of total crop water requirement. Thus, water-saving irrigation, especially water impoundment for controlling irrigation is necessary to reduce irrigation and drainage quota, weaken greenhouse effect and reduce the impact of climate change on the rice production.%采用Mann-Kendall方法计算南京1951—2005年的作物需水量,结合气象因素的变化趋势,分析气候变化对南京主要作物需水量的影响,提出应对气候变化的措施。结果表明:夏作水稻、棉花和玉米的需水量减少,主要与夏季增温不明显以及降雨增加、日照时数减少和风速显著降低有关;冬小麦和油菜需水量呈增加趋势,主要因为冬春季增温趋势率最大,日照时数减少和风速的下降不足以抵消气温升高和湿度降低的影响。认为温

  6. Energy and water use by invasive goats (Capra hircus) in an Australian rangeland, and a caution against using broad-scale allometry to predict species-specific requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, A J; Cooper, C E; Russell, B; Dawson, T J; McLeod, S R; Maloney, S K

    2012-02-01

    Feral goats (Capra hircus) are ubiquitous across much of Australia's arid and semi-arid rangelands, where they compete with domestic stock, contribute to grazing pressure on fragile ecosystems, and have been implicated in the decline of several native marsupial herbivores. Understanding the success of feral goats in Australia may provide insights into management strategies for this and other invasive herbivores. It has been suggested that frugal use of energy and water contributes to the success of feral goats in Australia, but data on the energy and water use of free-ranging animals are lacking. We measured the field metabolic rate and water turnover rate of pregnant and non-pregnant feral goats in an Australian rangeland during late summer (dry season). Field metabolic rate of pregnant goats (601 ± 37 kJ kg(-0.73)d(-1)) was 1.3 times that of non-pregnant goats (456 ± 24 kJ kg(-0.73)d(-1)). The water turnover rate of pregnant goats (228 ± 18 mL kg(-0.79)d(-1)) was also 1.3 times that of non-pregnant goats (173 ± 18 kg(-0.79)d(-1)), but the difference was not significant (P=0.07). There was no significant difference in estimated dry matter digestibility between pregnant and non-pregnant goats (mean ca. 58%), blood or urine osmolality, or urine electrolyte concentrations, indicating they were probably eating similar diets and were able to maintain osmohomeostasis. Overall, the metabolic and hygric physiology of non-pregnant goats conformed statistically to the predictions for non-marine, non-reproductive placental mammals according to both conventional and phylogenetically independent analyses. That was despite the field metabolic rate and estimated dry matter intake of non-pregnant goats being only 60% of the predicted level. We suggest that general allometric analyses predict the range of adaptive possibilities for mammals, but that specific adaptations, as present in goats, result in ecologically significant departures from the average allometric curve. In

  7. The influence of Savannah River discharge and changing SRS cooling water requirements on the potential entrainment of ichthyoplankton at the SRS Savannah River intakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paller, M.H.

    1992-08-01

    Entrainment (i.e., withdrawal of fish larvae and eggs in cooling water) at the SRS Savannah River intakes is greatest when periods of high river water usage coincide with low river dischargeduring the spawning season. American shad and striped bass are the two species of greatest concern because of their recreational and/or commercial importance and because they produce drifting eggs and larvae vulnerable to entrainment. In the mid-reaches of the Savannah River, American shad and striped bass spawn primarily during April and May. An analysis of Savannah River discharge during April and May 1973--1989 indicated the potential for entrainment of 4--18% of the American shad and striped bass larvae and eggs that drifted past the SRS. This analysis assumed the concurrent operation of L-, K-, and P-Reactors. Additional scenarios investigated were: (1) shutting down L- and P-Reactors, and operating K-Reactor with a recycle cooling tower; and (2) shutting down L- and P-Reactors, eliminating minimum flows to Steel Creek, and operating K-Reactor with a recycle cooling tower. The former scenario reduced potential entrainment to 0.7--3.3%, and the latter scenario reduced potential entrainment to 0.20.8%. Thus, the currently favored scenario of operating K-Reactor with a cooling tower and not operating L- and P-Reactors represents a significant lessening of the impact of SRS operations.

  8. Software requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegers, Karl E

    2003-01-01

    Without formal, verifiable software requirements-and an effective system for managing them-the programs that developers think they've agreed to build often will not be the same products their customers are expecting. In SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS, Second Edition, requirements engineering authority Karl Wiegers amplifies the best practices presented in his original award-winning text?now a mainstay for anyone participating in the software development process. In this book, you'll discover effective techniques for managing the requirements engineering process all the way through the development cy

  9. Energy requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, Christian V.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.

    2007-01-01

    The determination of the appropriate energy and nutritional requirements of a newborn infant requires a clear goal of the energy and other compounds to be administered, valid methods to measure energy balance and body composition, and knowledge of the neonatal metabolic capacities. Providing an appr

  10. Energy requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, Christian V.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.

    The determination of the appropriate energy and nutritional requirements of a newborn infant requires a clear goal of the energy and other compounds to be administered, valid methods to measure energy balance and body composition, and knowledge of the neonatal metabolic capacities. Providing an

  11. Data Requirements For The Water Directive - Role of Remote Sensing Using The Hrsc-ax Camera Illustrated By The Blue City Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J.; O'Kane, J. P.

    A completely digital, aerial survey of Cork City and the Lee Catchment, flown in May 2001 at an altitude of 3000m, covered an area of 325sqkm. The campaign used the German Aerospace Centres HRSC-AX system. The SAXT (Airborne, Extended- & cedil;Generation) version of the HRSC (High Resolution Stereo Camera), in commercial operation since late 2000, produces very high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and multi-spectral ortho-rectified images. The system contains nine CCD line sensors, mounted in parallel behind one single optic. Operating on a push-broom principle, these acquire nine superimposed image tracks simultaneously (along-track). Five of the nine CCD lines are panchromatic sensors arranged at specific viewing an- gles to provide the multiple-stereo and photogrammetric capabilities of the instrument. The other four are covered with colour filters (red, green, blue near infrared) to ac- quire multi-spectral images. The fully automatic photogrammetric and cartographic processing system, developed at the DLR Institute of Space Sensor Technology and Planetary Exploration (in co-operation with the Technical University of Berlin) yields mean absolute accuracies of s15-20cm in both the horizontal and vertical directions ´ for all products. For the Blue City Project, the system yielded a DEM with a resolu- tion of 100cm, a nadir (panchromatic) ortho-mosaic with a 15cm resolution, and true colour (R, G, B and nIR) ortho-mosaics with a 30cm resolution. Joining the colour bands yielded true-colour (RGB) and false-colour (nIR,G,B) ortho-image mosaics of the full area. The combination of these high resolution products allows detailed to- pographic and multi-spectral analysis of the study area. This data set will provide the foundation for a multi-purpose geographic information system, linked to hydro- dynamic, hydraulic and hydrologic computer models of surface and subsurface flow, including water quality, throughout the catchment of the Lee and the City of

  12. Entericidin is required for a probiotic treatment (Enterobacter sp. strain C6-6) to protect trout from cold-water disease challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubiger, Carla B; Orfe, Lisa H; Sudheesh, Ponnerassery S; Cain, Kenneth D; Shah, Devendra H; Call, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum causes bacterial cold-water disease in multiple fish species, including salmonids. An autochthonous Enterobacter strain (C6-6) inhibits the in vitro growth of F. psychrophilum, and when ingested as a putative probiotic, it provides protection against injection challenge with F. psychrophilum in rainbow trout. In this study, low-molecular-mass (≤3 kDa) fractions from both Enterobacter C6-6 and Escherichia coli K-12 culture supernatants inhibited the growth of F. psychrophilum. The ≤3-kDa fraction from Enterobacter C6-6 was analyzed by SDS-PAGE, and subsequent tandem mass spectroscopy identified EcnB, which is a small membrane lipoprotein that is a putative pore-forming toxin. Agar plate diffusion assays demonstrated that ecnAB knockout strains of both Enterobacter C6-6 and E. coli K-12 no longer inhibited F. psychrophilum (P ) and the wild-type strain (C6-6) were added to the fish diet every day for 38 days. On day 11, the fish were challenged by injection with a virulent strain of F. psychrophilum (CSF 259-93). Fish that were fed C6-6 had significantly longer survival than fish fed the ecnAB knockout strain (P Enterobacter C6-6, and it may present new opportunities for therapeutic and prophylactic treatments against similarly susceptible pathogens.

  13. 油橄榄水分的研究进展%A research progress review on water requirement in Olea europaea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩华柏; 罗洪平; 廖明安; 吴佐英

    2011-01-01

    The research results on Olea europaea photosynthesis, leaf nutrient absorption, fruit growth and yield and so on were summarized through collecting the published literatures of Olea europaea.A more systematic introduction and evaluation for Olea europaea field irrigation was given in the hope of achieving the purpose of high-yielding cultivation under the conservation of water resources, and according to China's situation, some suggestions of irrigation were put forward.%通过收集相关文献,从光合生理、叶面营养吸收、果实生长状况和产量等方面的影响综述了国外对油橄榄水分的研究成果,对油橄榄的灌溉研究作一个比较系统的介绍和评价,以期为在节约水资源条件下实现对油橄榄的丰产栽培提供参考.

  14. Requirements dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. Knowing ‘what’ to build is an integral part of an Information System Development, and it is generally understood that this, which is known as Requirements, is achievable through a process of understanding, communication and management. It is currently maintained by the Requirements theorists that successful system design clarifies the interrelations between information and its representations...

  15. Transthoracic ultrasound assessment of B-lines for identifying the increment of extravascular lung water in shock patients requiring fluid resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongdhep Theerawit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several studies have shown that the number of B-lines was related to the amount of extravascular lung water (EVLW. In our study, we aimed to demonstrate the magnitude of the incremental B-lines in shock patients with positive net fluid balance and the association with gas exchange impairment. Materials and Methods: We performed trans-thoracic ultrasound at admission (T 0 and at follow-up period (T FL to demonstrate the change of B lines ( B-lines after fluid therapy. We compared the total B-line score (TBS at T 0 and T FL and calculated the Pearson′s correlation coefficient between the B-lines and PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio. Results: A total of 20 patients were analyzed. All patients had septic shock. Net fluid balance was + 2228.05 ± 1982.15 ml. The TBS at T 0 and T FL were 36.6 ± 23.73 and 63.80 ± 29.25 (P < 0.01. The B-lines along anterior axillary line (AAL correlated to the TBS (r = 0.90, P < 0.01. The B-lines along AAL had inverse correlation to PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio (r = −0.704, P < 0.05. The increase of B-lines ≥ 10 was related to the decrease of PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio. The inter-observer reliability between two ultrasound readers was high (r = 0.92, P < 0.01. Discussion : The number of B-lines increased in shock patients with positive net fluid balance and correlated to impaired oxygenation. These data supported the benefit of ultrasound for assessing the EVLW.

  16. Water requirement and irrigation systems of winter wheat:CROPWAT-DSSAT model solution in Guanzhong District%基于CROPWAT-DSSAT关中地区冬小麦需水规律及灌溉制度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文佳; 冯浩

    2012-01-01

    Definitive regulation of winter wheat water requirement is critical for developing theoretical bases for rational irrigation systems with high agricultural water use efficiency in Guanzhong District. To develop time-variant optimal irrigation schemes, a simulation of seasonal characteristics of a range of variables (e.g., effective rainfall, crop water requirement, etc.) was conducted for the winter wheat growth seasons in the last 30 years in Guanzhong District. An integrated CROPWAT-DSSAT model was used to simultaneously simulate the changes in crop production and water stress under different irrigation schemes in different precipitation years. The optimal irrigation schemes were determined according to effects of irrigation on crop yield and economic benefits. Based on the results, the amount of effective rainfall was less than 50% of water requirement during winter wheat season. Seasonal characteristics were different across different precipitation years; which phenomenon induced severe water shortages during wintering, greening and jointing stages of winter wheat. Among the four investigated irrigation stages, which were wintering, greening, jointing stage and grain-filling stages, water for greening was most critical for winter wheat growth. This was followed by water for jointing,while grain-filling irrigation was least critical for winter wheat production. Abundance analysis suggested that optimal total irrigations in wet years, normal years and dry years were 75 mm, 125 mm and 150 mm, respectively. For detail, irrigation scheme suggested that water for wintering was the critical in wet years. For maximum yield and economic benefit of winter wheat, water for winter, greening and jointing were all noted to be no less than 25 mm in wet years. For normal years, waters for wintering, greening and jointing were 50 mm, 50 mm and 25 mm respectively. These water quotas gave the highest yields of winter wheat. However, halving the amount of water for wintering

  17. Knowing requires data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Ramon C.

    2017-01-01

    Groundwater-flow models are often calibrated using a limited number of observations relative to the unknown inputs required for the model. This is especially true for models that simulate groundwater surface-water interactions. In this case, subsurface temperature sensors can be an efficient means for collecting long-term data that capture the transient nature of physical processes such as seepage losses. Continuous and spatially dense network of diverse observation data can be used to improve knowledge of important physical drivers, conceptualize and calibrate variably saturated groundwater flow models. An example is presented for which the results of such analysis were used to help guide irrigation districts and water management decisions on costly upgrades to conveyance systems to improve water usage, farm productivity and restoration efforts to improve downstream water quality and ecosystems.

  18. Virtual water trade and world water resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, T; Kanae, S

    2004-01-01

    Global virtual water trade was quantitatively estimated and evaluated. The basic idea of how to estimate unit requirement of water resources to produce each commodity is introduced and values for major agricultural and stock products are presented. The concept of virtual water and the quantitative estimates can help in assessing a more realistic water scarcity index in each country, projecting future water demand for food supply, increasing public awareness on water, and identifying the processes wasting water in the production. Really required water in exporting countries is generally smaller than virtually required water in importing countries, reflecting the comparative advantage of water use efficiency, and it is estimated to be 680 km3/y for 2000. On the contrary the virtually required water for the same year is estimated to be 1,130 km3/y, and the difference of 450 km3/y is virtually saved by global trade. However, solely virtual water should not be used for any decision making since the idea of virtual water implies only the usage and influence of water and no concerns on social, cultural, and environmental implications. Virtual water trade also does not consider other limiting factors than water.

  19. 实施跨界水环境补偿的探讨--对《水污染防治行动计划》中“实施跨界水环境补偿”的解读%Discussion of the Interprovincial Compensation for Water Environment-- An Interpretation of “Implementation of Interprovincial Compensation of Water Environment”Required in the Water Pollution Control Action Plan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵越; 杨文杰; 王东; 马乐宽

    2015-01-01

    针对《水污染防治行动计划》提出“实施跨界水环境补偿”的要求,文章总结分析了国内外已开展的水环境补偿实践情况,表明实施水环境补偿对跨界水质改善具有较好作用;从宏观层面分析了在我国推广跨界水环境补偿面临的主要困境与问题,并从政策、资金等方面提出了相关建议,为下阶段我国推广实施跨界水环境补偿提供参考。%With regard to the implementation of interprovincial compensation of water environment required in the Water Pollution Control Action Plan, the practices in water environmental compensation conducted home and aboard were reviewed and analyzed, indicating that water environmental compensation was an efficient measure of quality improvement of interprovincial water environment. Main difficulties confronted with in promotion of interprovincial water environmental compensation in China was analyzed from the macro perspective. Relevant suggestions from the aspects of policies and funds were put forward, providing reference for extension of implementing the interprovincial compensation of water environment in the next stage.

  20. Water as the future clash for civilizations: a fresh conceptual approach for a Global Trinity? Water Scarcity and Future Conflict- consideration of water scarcity as a primary cause of conflict in the future requiring an adjustment to the Western approach to threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    the-future-of-africas-water-security/. Figure 2 - African Continent Water Availability C6te d’lvoire Niger Benin Sudan Senegal Mauritania...quality by human influence. Water distribution. The percentages of volumes of fresh and saline water, both on and under the surface of the Earth

  1. The assessment of the habitat and water quality requirements of the stone crayfish (Austropotamobius torrentium and noble crayfish (Astacus astacus species in the rivers from the Anina Mountains (SW Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pârvulescu L.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The species Austropotamobius torrentium and Astacus astacus are two species known in the EU directives to require deeper understanding of their autecologic requirements before any sustainable conservation effort could be successfully applied. Therefore, the paper aims to analyze the occurrence of these two species of crayfish in the Anina Mountains (Romania in relation to several physical-chemical indicators measured on site. The results suggest that the anthropogenic impacts registered in some of the sampling sites (e.g. organic pollution and river bed modification might have triggered the disappearance of both species from the areas of the water sheds situated downstream villages and towns, deforestation sites and sewage treatment plants. The analysis suggest that both species might have similar ecologic requirements, with a BMWP score of 8 (out of a possible 10, therefore good indicators of pristine aquatic environments and with a possible toleration to pollution but only up to a moderate level. Nevertheless, the lack of cohabitation of the populations of both species at a local scale was discussed along with two possible explaining hypotheses: behavioral exclusion or different times and/or modalities of dispersal history.

  2. 40 CFR 141.80 - General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... exceeding the lead or copper action level shall implement all applicable source water treatment requirements...) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Control of Lead and Copper § 141.80 General requirements. (a... drinking water regulations for lead and copper. Unless otherwise indicated, each of the provisions of...

  3. 18 CFR 430.15 - Conservation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conservation requirements. 430.15 Section 430.15 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION SPECIAL REGULATIONS GROUND WATER PROTECTION AREA: PENNSYLVANIA § 430.15 Conservation requirements....

  4. 中国与印度“大火规”水处理系统的设计要求对比%Comparison Chinese with India Design Requirement of Water Treatment System in Power Plant Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐淑姣

    2015-01-01

    国内电力设计行业涉足印度发电工程日益增多。本文对比了中印电力标准中水处理系统的设计要求,对两国工程设计标准的异同进行了总结,为国内后续开展的印度发电工程水处理系统设计提供参考和借鉴。%More and more Indian power plant projects are designed by Chinese electric power design institute. This paper coMPared the design requirement of water treatment system in power plant code between China and India, and it summarized the differences and similarities in design code of the two countries. It is hoped that the coMParison will provide reference for Chinese to design water treatment system of Indian power plant in the future.

  5. Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Vision Catalyst Purifier employs the basic technology developed by NASA to purify water aboard the Apollo spacecraft. However, it also uses an "erosion" technique. The purifier kills bacteria, viruses, and algae by "catalytic corrosion." A cartridge contains a silver-impregnated alumina bed with a large surface area. The catalyst bed converts oxygen in a pool of water to its most oxidative state, killing over 99 percent of the bacteria within five seconds. The cartridge also releases into the pool low levels of ionic silver and copper through a controlled process of erosion. Because the water becomes electrochemically active, no electricity is required.

  6. 40 CFR 141.806 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 141.806 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Aircraft Drinking Water Rule § 141.806 Reporting... developed the aircraft water system operations and maintenance plan required by § 141.804, and report the...

  7. 40 CFR 141.807 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 141.807 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Aircraft Drinking Water Rule § 141.807 Recordkeeping... maintain aircraft water system operations and maintenance plans in accordance with FAA requirements, and...

  8. Estimation of yield and water requirements of maize crops combining high spatial and temporal resolution images with a simple crop model, in the perspective of the Sentinel-2 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battude, Marjorie; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Brut, Aurore; Cros, Jérôme; Dejoux, Jean-François; Huc, Mireille; Marais Sicre, Claire; Tallec, Tiphaine; Demarez, Valérie

    2016-04-01

    Water resources are under increasing pressure as a result of global change and of a raising competition among the different users (agriculture, industry, urban). It is therefore important to develop tools able to estimate accurately crop water requirements in order to optimize irrigation while maintaining acceptable production. In this context, remote sensing is a valuable tool to monitor vegetation development and water demand. This work aims at developing a robust and generic methodology mainly based on high resolution remote sensing data to provide accurate estimates of maize yield and water needs at the watershed scale. Evapotranspiration (ETR) and dry aboveground biomass (DAM) of maize crops were modeled using time series of GAI images used to drive a simple agro-meteorological crop model (SAFYE, Duchemin et al., 2005). This model is based on a leaf partitioning function (Maas, 1993) for the simulation of crop biomass and on the FAO-56 methodology for the ETR simulation. The model also contains a module to simulate irrigation. This study takes advantage of the SPOT4 and SPOT5 Take5 experiments initiated by CNES (http://www.cesbio.ups-tlse.fr/multitemp/). They provide optical images over the watershed from February to May 2013 and from April to August 2015 respectively, with a temporal and spatial resolution similar to future images from the Sentinel-2 and VENμS missions. This dataset was completed with LandSat8 and Deimos1 images in order to cover the whole growing season while reducing the gaps in remote sensing time series. Radiometric, geometric and atmospheric corrections were achieved by the THEIA land data center, and the KALIDEOS processing chain. The temporal dynamics of the green area index (GAI) plays a key role in soil-plant-atmosphere interactions and in biomass accumulation process. Consistent seasonal dynamics of the remotely sensed GAI was estimated by applying a radiative transfer model based on artificial neural networks (BVNET, Baret

  9. Urban water recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, T

    2005-01-01

    Increasing urbanization has resulted in an uneven distribution of population, industries, and water in urban areas; thus, imposing unprecedented pressures on water supplies and water pollution control. These pressures are exacerbated during the periods of drought and climatic uncertainties. The purpose of this paper is to summarize emergence of water reclamation, recycling and reuse as a vital component of sustainable water resources in the context of integrated water resources management in urban and rural areas. Water quality requirements and health and public acceptance issues related to water reuse are also discussed. Reclaimed water is a locally controllable water resource that exists right at the doorstep of the urban environment, where water is needed the most and priced the highest. Closing the water cycle loop not only is technically feasible in agriculture, industries, and municipalities but also makes economic sense. Society no longer has the luxury of using water only once.

  10. Requerimento hídrico e coeficiente de cultura da cana-de-açúcar irrigada no semiárido brasileiro Water requirement and crop coefficient of irrigated sugarcane in a semi-arid region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thieres G. F. da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar o requerimento hídrico e o coeficiente de cultura (Kc da cana-de-açúcar irrigada durante o ciclo de soca, variedade RB 92-579, na região semiárida do Submédio do Vale do São Francisco. O experimento foi conduzido em área de cultivo comercial de cana-de-açúcar situada no município de Juazeiro, BA. Obteve-se o requerimento hídrico da cultura por meio do método do Balanço de Energia Razão de Bowen. Foram monitoradas também a biomassa acumulada e a fração da radiação fotossinteticamente ativa interceptada pela cultura (fRFA. Com os resultados constatou-se que a evapotranspiração da cana-de-açúcar atingiu uma taxa média diária de 4,7 mm, em resposta ao acúmulo de biomassa e, mas a fRFA apresentou, entretanto, influência do tombamento da cultura durante a fase de crescimento máximo. O requerimento hídrico total da cana-de-açúcar foi de 1710 mm, e o Kc atingiu o valor médio de 1,10 na fase de crescimento máximo. As equações de estimativa do Kc mensal, tendo graus dias acumulados e dias após o corte como variáveis independentes apresentaram ótimos ajustes (R2 ~ 0,95 e 0,98 e consideram a redução nos valores de Kc devida ao tombamento da cultura.The objective of this study was to determine the water requirement and crop coefficient of the irrigated sugarcane, variety RB 92-579, in the semi-arid region of the lower middle of São Francisco Valley. The experiment was carried out in a commercial area of sugarcane located in the municipality of Juazeiro in the State of Bahia. The crop water requirement was estimated with the Bowen Ratio Energy Balance method. The accumulated biomass and the photosynthetic active radiation intercepted (fPAR by the crop were monitored. The sugarcane evapotranspiration reached a mean value of 4.7 mm d-1 in response to fPAR and accumulated biomass; however presented influence of the crop lodging during the maximum growth phase. The total water

  11. Spatial-temporal analysis of water requirements of coffee crop in Minas Gerais State, Brazil Análise espaço-temporal da demanda hídrica do cafeeiro, no Estado de Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis C. de A. Lemos Filho

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Scientific investigations about crop water requirements are of fundamental importance to the irrigation process. The main objective of this paper is to analyze and to map water requirements of coffee crop in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Potential evapotranspiration values (ET0 were estimated by the Penman-Monteith-FAO method, using daily data sets available for 42 National Meteorology Institute (INMET stations for a period of 17 years. The crop coefficient values (kc considered were extracted from literature. The results were analyzed by means of geostatistical tools. The theoretical semi-variograms were fitted by the Maximum Likelihood method, considering spherical, exponential and Gaussian models. The maps were created using the ordinary kriging method. In a general way, the results have showed that the coffee crop evapotranspiration (ETc presents high variability in Minas Gerais State. The largest variations, both spatial and temporal, have been observed in the northern part of the State. January and June, respectively, presented the highest and the smallest water requirements of coffee crop. Based on this, we can conclude that due to the coffee crop evapotranspiration (ETc data distinction in different regions of Minas Gerais, a good estimate of the ETc values for each locality will bring many benefits to the coffee growers regarding irrigation scheduling.O conhecimento de informações que expressam a demanda hídrica das plantas, é fundamental para a irrigação. O objetivo principal desta pesquisa foi analisar a demanda hídrica para o cafeeiro em Minas Gerais. Os valores de ET0, estimados pelo método de Penman-Monteith-FAO a partir de dados diários originados de registros de 42 estações climatológicas do INMET, se referem a um período de 17 anos. Os valores de coeficiente de cultura (kc adotado no estudo, são os citados por Allen et al. (1998 e Doorenbos & Pruitt (1997. As análises dos resultados são feitas através da geoestat

  12. 贵州开阳烟区烤烟需水特征与烟田土壤水分变化研究%Flue-Cured Tobacco Water Requirement Characteristics and Soil Moisture Change in Kaiyang Tobacco Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冷璐; 陆引罡

    2014-01-01

    Flue-cured tobacco water requirement characteristics and soil moisture condition have very significant effect on tobacco growth, physiological and biochemical process, the quality of tobacco and fertilizer use in tobacco fields. T his research through the field trials providedtechnicalsupportforthetobaccoplantingandwaterusingproject.Theresultsshowedthatithasobviousstagesondomesticdemand of water:it’s less consumption in root stretch period, significantly higher in vigorous growing period, gradually declined in mature period, flue-curedtobaccowaterrequirementcharacteristicsconsistentwiththegrowthtrendoftobacco.Thesoilmoisturecontentisgreaterthanthe tobaccowaterrequirementinrootstretchandleafmatureperiod,thusneedtopayattentiontodrainage;thesoilmoisturecontentlessthanthe waterrequirementsin vigorousgrowing period due to periodic drought,thistime should be timely to supplementalirrigation.%烤烟需水特征与烟田土壤水分变化状况对烤烟生长发育、生理生化过程、烟叶的品质特征和产量都有显著的影响。通过田间试验,研究优质烤烟需水特征和各生育期土壤水分的动态变化,结果表明,烤烟生长季内需水量具有明显的阶段性:伸根期消耗少,旺长期明显升高,成熟期逐步下降,烤烟需水特征与烟株的生长趋势相一致。烤烟伸根期、成熟期土壤含水量大于烤烟的需水量,需要注意排水,而旺长后期和成熟前期由于阶段性干旱,土壤含水量小于烤烟的需水量,这一时段应及时进行补灌。

  13. Water flow requirements related to oxygen consumption in juveniles of Oplegnathus insignis Requerimientos de flujo de agua en función del consumo de oxígeno en juveniles de Oplegnathus insignis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio Segovia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study the oxygen consumption rate in four groups of Oplegnathus insignis was examined under three different water temperatures 13, 18 and 23°C. Average weight of each group of fish was 9.5, 198, 333 and 525 g respectively. Oxygen consumption was measured in a respirometer of 18.8 L capacity and results show that at the same water temperature occurs an inverse relationship between body weight and oxygen consumption whereas for same body weight (W in kg the respiration rate varies proportionally with temperature rise (T in °C. The generalized equation of oxygen consumption (Ro in routine metabolism was determined as: Ro (mg O2 kg-1 h-1 = [85.229 + (10.03 T]-(221.344 W. The information it is analized with regard to establishing quantitative relationships that allow a more precise specification of the water flow requirements and renewal rates in open flow systems without oxygenation, considering aspects such as body weight, respiratory rate, temperature and stocking density.Se determinó la tasa de consumo de oxígeno de Oplegnathus insignis en cuatro grupos de peces bajo tres temperaturas diferentes: 13, 18 y 23°C. El peso promedio de cada grupo de peces fue de 9,5, 198, 333 y 523 g respectivamente. El consumo de oxígeno se determinó en un respirómetro de 18,8 L de capacidad y los resultados muestran que a una misma temperatura ocurre una relación inversa entre el peso corporal (W en kg y el consumo de oxígeno, mientras que para un mismo peso corporal la tasa respiratoria varía proporcionalmente con el ascenso de temperatura (T en °C. La ecuación generalizada que representa el consumo de oxígeno (Ro en metabolismo de rutina se determinó como: Ro (mg O2 kg-1 h-1 = [85.229 + (10.03 T]-(221.344 W. Se analizó la información en relación a establecer las relaciones cuantitativas que permitan una especificación más exacta de los requerimientos de flujo de agua y tasas de renovación en sistemas de flujo abierto y sin oxigenaci

  14. Water consumption in the energy sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Andreas Dahl; Drews, Martin; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    Energy, water, and food systems are closely interlinked in the Energy-Water-Food Nexus. Water is of paramount importance for the energy sector. Fossil fuels require water for extraction, trans-port and processing. Thermal power plants require water for cooling, whether they use nuclear, fossil......-users. The waste water is often returned to the environment after energy requiring waste water management....... or biofuels. Hydropower is based on water in rivers or reservoirs. Feedstock production for biofuels may depend on water for irrigation. On the other hand, energy is necessary for pumping of ground- and surface water, for water treatment as well as for transport and distribution of water to end...

  15. Artificial Ground Water Recharge with Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heviánková, Silvie; Marschalko, Marian; Chromíková, Jitka; Kyncl, Miroslav; Korabík, Michal

    2016-10-01

    With regard to the adverse manifestations of the recent climatic conditions, Europe as well as the world have been facing the problem of dry periods that reduce the possibility of drawing drinking water from the underground sources. The paper aims to describe artificial ground water recharge (infiltration) that may be used to restock underground sources with surface water from natural streams. Among many conditions, it aims to specify the boundary and operational conditions of the individual aspects of the artificial ground water recharge technology. The principle of artificial infiltration lies in the design of a technical system, by means of which it is possible to conduct surplus water from one place (in this case a natural stream) into another place (an infiltration basin in this case). This way, the water begins to infiltrate into the underground resources of drinking water, while the mixed water composition corresponds to the water parameters required for drinking water.

  16. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - main report. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1996-07-01

    The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2), which is a boiling water reactor (BWR), located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low- level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

  17. Next Generation Microbiology Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. M.; Oubre, C. M.; Elliott, T. F.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    As humans continue to explore deep into space, microorganisms will travel with them. The primary means to mitigate the risk of infectious disease are a combination of prudent spacecraft design and rigorous operational controls. The effectiveness of these methods are evaluated by microbiological monitoring of spacecraft, food, water, and the crew that is performed preflight, in-flight, and post-flight. Current NASA requirements associated with microbiological monitoring are based on culture-based methodology where microorganisms are grown on a semi-solid growth medium and enumerated. Subsequent identification of the organisms requires specialized labor and large equipment, which historically has been performed on Earth. Requirements that rely strictly on culture-based units limit the use of non-culture based monitoring technology. Specifically, the culture-based "measurement criteria" are Colony Forming Units (CFU, representing the growth of one microorganism at a single location on the agar medium) per a given volume, area, or sample size. As the CFU unit by definition is culture-based, these requirements limit alternative technologies for spaceflight applications. As spaceflight missions such as those to Mars extend further into space, culture-based technology will become difficult to implement due to the (a) limited shelf life of the culture media, (b) mass/volume necessary to carry these consumables, and (c) problems associated with the production of biohazardous material in the habitable volume of the spacecraft. In addition, an extensive amount of new knowledge has been obtained during the Space Shuttle, NASA-Mir, and International Space Station Programs, which gave direction for new or modified microbial control requirements for vehicle design and mission operations. The goal of this task is to develop and recommend a new set of requirements for vehicle design and mission operations, including microbiological monitoring, based upon "lessons learned" and new

  18. Water Quality of Hills Water, Supply Water and RO Water Machine at Ulu Yam Selangor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngadiman, N.; ‘I Bahari, N.; Kaamin, M.; Hamid, N. B.; Mokhtar, M.; Sahat, S.

    2016-07-01

    The rapid development resulted in the deterioration of the quality of drinking water in Malaysia. Recognizing the importance of water quality, new alternatives for drinking water such as mineral water processing from reverse osmosis (RO) machine become more popular. Hence, the demand for mineral water, natural spring water or water from the hills or mountains rose lately. More consumers believed the quality of these spring water better than other source of drinking water. However, the quality of all the drinking water sources is to meet the required quality standard. Therefore, this paper aims to measure the quality of the waters from hills, from RO machine and the water supply in Ulu Yam, Selangor Batang Kali, Malaysia. The water quality was determined based on following parameters: ammoniacal nitrogen (NH3), iron (Fe), turbidity (NTU) and pH. The results show that the water from hills has better quality compared to water supply and water from RO machine. The value of NH3 ranged from 0.03 mg/L- 0.67 mg/L; Fe was from 0.03mg/L - 0.12 mg/L, turbidity at 0.42 NTU - 0.88 NTU and pH is at 6.60 - 0.71. Based on the studied parameters, all three types of water are fit for drinking and have met the required national drinking water quality standard.

  19. Groundwater Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Llamas

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The groundwaters released through springs constituted a basic element for the survival and progressive development of human beings. Man came to learn how to take better advantage of these waters by digging wells, irrigation channels, and galleries. Nevertheless, these activities do not require cooperation nor the collective agreement of relatively large groups of people, as in the case of creating the necessary structures to take advantage of the resources of surfacewaters. The construction and operation of these structures was a powerful factor in the birth of an urban or civil society – the designated water civilizations. The difference between people taking advantage of groundwater, quasi-individually, and those of surface water, where people work in a group, has continued to the present day. Whereas earlier, this difference did not bring about any special problems, the technological advances of this century, especially theturbine pump, have led to a spectacular increase in the use of roundwater. This advance has significantly contributed to reducing hunger in the world and has provided potable water in developing countries. However, the almost generalized lack of planning and control in the exploitation of these groundwaters reflects that they are little or badly understood by the managers of water policy in almost every country. As such, problems have occurred which have often become exaggerated, giving rise to water-myths. These problems, though, should be addressed if the aim is the sustainable usage of surface water as well as groundwater. To counter any misconceptions and to seek solutions to the problems, distinct plans of action can be highlighted: educating the public; fomenting a system of participative management and decisive support for the communities of users of subterranean waters; integrating a sufficient number of experts in hydrology in the various water management organizations;and assuring transparency of the data on

  20. Water, Water Everywhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Rusty

    2009-01-01

    Everybody knows that children love water and how great water play is for children. The author discusses ways to add water to one's playscape that fully comply with health and safety regulations and are still fun for children. He stresses the importance of creating water play that provides children with the opportunity to interact with water.

  1. Water, Water Everywhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Rusty

    2009-01-01

    Everybody knows that children love water and how great water play is for children. The author discusses ways to add water to one's playscape that fully comply with health and safety regulations and are still fun for children. He stresses the importance of creating water play that provides children with the opportunity to interact with water.

  2. 《山水长安》在高中地理必修一中的应用%On the Application of "Waters and Mountains of Chang'an" to Senior Geography (Required Course One

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立肖; 白冬冬

    2016-01-01

    "Waters and Mountains of Chang'an" is a six-epi-sode documentary launched by CCTV at the end of 2011, mainly analyzing the natural and geographical characteristics and geo-graphical advantages of Qinling Mountains within the boundary of Xi'an. Exemplified by the senior geography textbook (Required Course One) published by Hu'nan Education Press, this paper specifies how to apply the effective elements of the documentary to the classroom teaching of the second chapter of the textbook, so as to provide some beneficial references for senior geography teaching.%《山水长安》是央视2011年岁末推出的六集纪录片。其主要分析了西安段秦岭的自然地理特点和地理优势。本文以湘教版高中地理教材必修一为例,具体阐述如何将该纪录片中的有效元素应用于第二章的地理课堂教学之中,从而为高中地理教学提供有价值的借鉴。

  3. Quantifying Water Stress Using Total Water Volumes and GRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, A. S.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Druffel-Rodriguez, R.

    2011-12-01

    Water will follow oil as the next critical resource leading to unrest and uprisings globally. To better manage this threat, an improved understanding of the distribution of water stress is required today. This study builds upon previous efforts to characterize water stress by improving both the quantification of human water use and the definition of water availability. Current statistics on human water use are often outdated or inaccurately reported nationally, especially for groundwater. This study improves these estimates by defining human water use in two ways. First, we use NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to isolate the anthropogenic signal in water storage anomalies, which we equate to water use. Second, we quantify an ideal water demand by using average water requirements for the domestic, industrial, and agricultural water use sectors. Water availability has traditionally been limited to "renewable" water, which ignores large, stored water sources that humans use. We compare water stress estimates derived using either renewable water or the total volume of water globally. We use the best-available data to quantify total aquifer and surface water volumes, as compared to groundwater recharge and surface water runoff from land-surface models. The work presented here should provide a more realistic image of water stress by explicitly quantifying groundwater, defining water availability as total water supply, and using GRACE to more accurately quantify water use.

  4. Water management strategy overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducette, B. [Suncor Energy Inc. Oil Sands, Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Suncor's oil sands operations produce 225,000 bbl/day of crude oil products from Alberta's Fort McMurray area. Water is a key resource used for enhanced recovery methods to produce crude oil products from oil sands. A water management strategy is required to monitor and control the amount of water used in the bitumen liberation process, cooling, the steam assisted gravity drainage process, steam for cogeneration, an energy transfer medium, a transportation medium, feedstock, and potable water. The water management strategy is designed to manage both short and long term water issues and develop sustainable water management strategies in an integrated manner. The strategy also encourages open communication on water to optimize synergy between operators, energy producers, and governments. The opportunities and challenges of a water management strategy were outlined with reference to recycling opportunities, managing water chemistry, and improving the ability to measure water use.

  5. Basic Information about Lead in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control treatment to prevent lead and copper from contaminating drinking water. Corrosion control treatment means utilities must ... Page How EPA Requires States and Public Water Systems to Protect Drinking Water The Safe Drinking Water ...

  6. 基于鱼类栖息地盐度需求的汛期河口生态需水研究%Estuarine Ecological Water Requirement for Flood Season Based on the Salinity Demand of Fishes Habitat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭涛; 陈晓宏; 王高旭; 陈志和; 杜建

    2012-01-01

    海河流域枯水期中下游河道基本干涸,汛期来水基本上是河口全年生态维持水量的惟一来源。根据汛期河口水生态系统的特点,选择鱼类为河口水生态系统的关键种群,以盐度作为关键生态因子,构建基于生态学和水动力学的汛期河口生态需水计算模型。以海河流域漳卫新河河口为例,采用改进熵值法进行河口及邻近海域鱼类优先保护次序评价,确定蓝点马鲛(Scomberomorus niphonius)和半滑舌鳎(Cynoglossus semilaevis)作为优先保护对象。在此基础上,运用1维水流和盐度数学模型模拟河口盐度与流量相关关系,以优先保护鱼类产卵和育幼的适宜盐度为控制条件,计算得到汛期漳卫新河河口最小和适宜生态流量分别为10.1、57.5 m3/s,揭示水动力特性变化导致鱼类栖息地盐度及其生态需水的变化规律。%Based on ecology and hydrodynamics,a model for evaluating the estuarine ecological water requirement for flood season was established.Fishes was chosen as estuarine aquatic ecosystems key populations,and salinity was determined as the key ecological factor based on characteristics of estuarine aquatic ecosystems.The model was tested on the data from the Zhangweixin River Estuary(ZRE) in Haihe basin.The improved entropy method was used to evaluate the priority conservation order of fishes,and Scomberomorus niphonius and Cynoglossus semilaevis was identified as the priority conservation target in the ZRE and its adjacent sea area.On this basis,the relationship between estuarine salinity and discharge was simulated by using one-dimensional flow and salinity mathematical model.Under the condition of suitable salinity of target species spawning and nursery,minimum and medium ecological flow for flood season was 10.1 and 57.5 m3/s,respectively in the ZRE.The result revealed the change law of fish habitat salinity and estuarine ecological water requirement caused by hydrodynamic

  7. Sustainability and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Virender A.

    2009-07-01

    World's population numbered 6.1 billion in 2000 and is currently increasing at a rate of about 77 million per year. By 2025, the estimated total world population will be of the order of 7.9 billion. Water plays a central role in any systematic appraisal of life sustaining requirements. Water also strongly influences economic activity (both production and consumption) and social roles. Fresh water is distributed unevenly, with nearly 500 million people suffering water stress or serious water scarcity. Two-thirds of the world's population may be subjected to moderate to high water stress in 2025. It is estimated that by 2025, the total water use will increase by to 40%. The resources of water supply and recreation may also come under stress due to changes in climate such as water balance for Lake Balaton (Hungary). Conventional urban water systems such as water supply, wastewater, and storm water management are also currently going through stress and require major rethinking. To maintain urban water systems efficiently in the future, a flexibility approach will allow incorporation of new technologies and adaptation to external changes (for example society or climate change). Because water is an essential resource for sustaining health, both the quantity and quality of available water supplies must be improved. The impact of water quality on human health is severe, with millions of deaths each year from water-borne diseases, while water pollution and aquatic ecosystem destruction continue to rise. Additionally, emerging contaminants such as endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), pharmaceuticals, and toxins in the water body are also of a great concern. An innovative ferrate(VI) technology is highly effective in removing these contaminants in water. This technology is green, which addresses problems associated with chlorination and ozonation for treating pollutants present in water and wastewater. Examples are presented to demonstrate the applications of ferrate

  8. Irrigation water quality assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing demands on fresh water supplies by municipal and industrial users means decreased fresh water availability for irrigated agriculture in semi arid and arid regions. There is potential for agricultural use of treated wastewaters and low quality waters for irrigation but this will require co...

  9. Water footprint of Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrah, E. R.; Odai, S. N.; Annor, F. O.; Adjei, K. A.; van der Zaag, P.

    2009-04-01

    Water is used in almost all human endeavour. Unlike oil, water does not have a substitute. There are many factors that affect the water consumption pattern of people. These include climatic condition, income level and agricultural practices among others. The water footprint concept has been developed in order to have an indicator of water use in relation to its consumption by people. The water footprint of a country is defined as the volume of water needed for the production of the goods and services consumed by the inhabitants of the country (Chapagain and Hoekstra, 2008). Due to the bulky nature of water, it is not in its raw state a tradable commodity though it could be traded through the exchange of goods and services from one point to the other. Closely linked to the water footprint concept is the virtual water concept. Virtual water can be defined as the volume of water required to produce a commodity or service (Chapagain and Hoekstra, 2008 and Allan, 1999). The international trade of these commodities implies flows of virtual water over large distances. The water footprint of a nation can therefore be assessed by quantifying the use of domestic water resources, taking out the virtual water flow that leaves the country and adding the virtual water flow that enters the country to it. This research focuses on the assessment and analysis of the water footprints of Ghana considering only the consumptive component of the water footprint. In addition to livestock, 13 crops were considered, 4 of which were cash crops. Data was analysed for the year 2001 to 2005 The most recent framework for the analysis of water footprint is offered by Chapagain and Hoekstra. This was adopted for the study. The water footprint calculations show that the water footprint of Ghana is about 20011 Gm³/yr. Base on this the average water footprint of a Ghanaian is 823 m³/cap/yr. Not only agricultural crops but also other products require water for their manufacture, aluminium being a

  10. Purified water quality study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinka, H.; Jackowski, P.

    2000-04-03

    Argonne National Laboratory (HEP) is examining the use of purified water for the detection medium in cosmic ray sensors. These sensors are to be deployed in a remote location in Argentina. The purpose of this study is to provide information and preliminary analysis of available water treatment options and associated costs. This information, along with the technical requirements of the sensors, will allow the project team to determine the required water quality to meet the overall project goals.

  11. Global monthly water stress: 2. Water demand and severity of water stress

    OpenAIRE

    Wada, Yoshihide; Van Beek, L. P. H.; Viviroli, Daniel; Dürr, Hans H.; Weingartner, Rolf; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper assesses global water stress at a finer temporal scale compared to conventional assessments. To calculate time series of global water stress at a monthly time scale, global water availability, as obtained from simulations of monthly river discharge from the companion paper, is confronted with global monthly water demand. Water demand is defined here as the volume of water required by users to satisfy their needs. Water demand is calculated for the benchmark year of 2000 and contras...

  12. Global monthly water stress: 2. Water demand and severity of water stress

    OpenAIRE

    Wada, Yoshihide; Beek, L. P. H.; Viviroli, Daniel; Dürr, Hans H; Weingartner, Rolf; Bierkens, Marc F.P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper assesses global water stress at a finer temporal scale compared to conventional assessments. To calculate time series of global water stress at a monthly time scale, global water availability, as obtained from simulations of monthly river discharge from the companion paper, is confronted with global monthly water demand. Water demand is defined here as the volume of water required by users to satisfy their needs. Water demand is calculated for the benchmark year of 2000 and contras...

  13. Faulty assumptions for repository requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutcliffe, W G

    1999-06-03

    Long term performance requirements for a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste are based on assumptions concerning water use and subsequent deaths from cancer due to ingesting water contaminated with radio isotopes ten thousand years in the future. This paper argues that the assumptions underlying these requirements are faulty for a number of reasons. First, in light of the inevitable technological progress, including efficient desalination of water, over the next ten thousand years, it is inconceivable that a future society would drill for water near a repository. Second, even today we would not use water without testing its purity. Third, today many types of cancer are curable, and with the rapid progress in medical technology in general, and the prevention and treatment of cancer in particular, it is improbable that cancer caused by ingesting contaminated water will be a sign&ant killer in the far future. This paper reviews the performance requirements for geological repositories and comments on the difficulties in proving compliance in the face of inherent uncertainties. The already tiny long-term risk posed by a geologic repository is presented and contrasted with contemporary every day risks. A number of examples of technological progress, including cancer treatments, are advanced. The real and significant costs resulting from the overly conservative requirements are then assessed. Examples are given of how money (and political capital) could be put to much better use to save lives today and in the future. It is concluded that although a repository represents essentially no long-term risk, monitored retrievable dry storage (above or below ground) is the current best alternative for spent fuel and high-level nuclear waste.

  14. Lisímetro de pesagem de grande porte. parte II: consumo hídrico do coqueiro anão verde irrigado Large-scale weighing lysimeter. part II: water requirements of the irrigated dwarf-green coconut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inajá F. Sousa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho, como segunda parte de uma pesquisa realizada no Estado de Sergipe, objetiva determinar a evapotranspiração e o coeficiente de cultura na fase de crescimento do coqueiro anão-verde (Cocos nucifera L., com base em medições lisimétricas e no modelo do balanço de energia, segundo a razão de Bowen. Obteve-se a evapotranspiração de referência pelo método de Penman-Monteith, na escala diária em todo o período experimental. O sistema de aquisição de dados foi programado para a automação da coleta de todos os sensores necessários à obtenção dos componentes do balanço de energia. O consumo hídrico do coqueiro durante a fase de crescimento é de 1.263,30 mm, com média diária de 3,90 mm d-1. O coeficiente de cultura nessa fase fenológica da palmeira varia entre 0,50 e 1,80, com média de 0,96.This paper, as Part II of a research carried out in Sergipe state, aims to determine evapotranspiration and crop coefficient of dwarf-green coconut (Cocos nucifera L. based on lysimeter measurements and Bowen ratio-energy balance method. The reference evapotranspiration was obtained by the Penman-Monteith approach on daily-scale during the experimental period. The data acquisition system was used to obtain all data from the sensors necessary to determine the energy balance components. The water requirements of coconut palm during the phenological growth stage is 1263.30 mm, with daily average of 3.90 mm d-1. The crop coefficient during this phenological growth stage varies between 0.50 and 1.80, with daily mean of 0.96.

  15. Repository seals requirements study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-03

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. This report presents the results of a repository sealing requirements study. Sealing is defined as the permanent closure of the shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes. Sealing includes those components that would reduce potential inflows above the repository, or that would divert flow near the repository horizon to allow vertical infiltration to below the repository. Sealing of such features as emplacement drifts was not done in this study because the current capability to calculate fracture flow into the drifts is not sufficiently mature. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

  16. Water resources and sustainable development: planning requirements and shared management between Spain and Portugal; Recursos hidricos y desarrollo sostenible: requisitos para la planificacion y gestion compartida entre Espana y Portugal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Lopez, A.

    2011-07-01

    The Earth has a constant quantity of water, but suffers hydric stress and forecast of future is not optimistic. Thus, the UN in the Millennium Development Goals for 2015 establishes special reference to the issues of water. This paper highlights the indicators of sustainability for the hydric resources and proposes an ecosistemic model of eco-social efficiency for the sharing planning and management between Spain and Portugal. (Author)

  17. Groupware requirements evolution patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pumareja, Dulce Trinidad

    2013-01-01

    Requirements evolution is a generally known problem in software development. Requirements are known to change all throughout a system's lifecycle. Nevertheless, requirements evolution is a poorly understood phenomenon. Most studies on requirements evolution focus on changes to written specifications

  18. Water Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statistics Training & Education Policy & Recommendations Fast Facts Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ... type=”submit” value=”Submit” /> Healthy Water Home Water Contamination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ...

  19. Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the safest water supplies in the world, but drinking water quality can vary from place to place. It ... water supplier must give you annual reports on drinking water. The reports include where your water came from ...

  20. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B.

  1. Interactions between poly(ethylene glycol) and protein in dichloromethane/water emulsions. 2. Conditions required to obtain spontaneous emulsification allowing the formation of bioresorbable poly(D,L lactic acid) microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malzert-Fréon, Aurélie; Schönhammer, Karin; Benoît, Jean-Pierre; Boury, Frank

    2009-09-01

    From microscopic observations, it was established that an oil-in-water emulsion with droplets of a size in the micrometer range can spontaneously form at room temperature without additional external stirring as soon as a solvent that is only partly miscible to water-like dichloromethane (DCM) is put in contact with an aqueous mixture of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a protein. Experimental results show that emulsification only occurs if the system simultaneously includes PEG with middle chain, an organic solvent partly miscible to water and for which PEG affinity is sufficiently high, and a protein. From adsorption kinetics, it appears that this spontaneous emulsification process is related to the rapid diffusion of DCM towards water through the formation of interfacial turbulences, once the accumulation of PEG close to the DCM/water interface occurs. The oil droplets formed would be then stabilized by adsorbed protein molecules. Since the presence of polylactic acid in the organic phase did not prevent the emulsion formation, we studied the feasibility of formulating microparticles using this polymer. From results, it appears that microcapsules with a polymeric shell, with a homogeneous size of about 50 microm and able to encapsulate a model hydrophobic drug, such as amiodarone, can be obtained by using this spontaneous emulsification method.

  2. Towards standardising building rural clinics: energy requirements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Szewczuk, S

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available (brick and mortar) and Innovative Building Technologies (IBTs) and alternative off-grid services technologies (energy, water, and sanitation). The paper discusses the energy requirements of a conceptual design for a generic, basic rural clinic....

  3. Schools--and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelson, Gunnard

    1970-01-01

    This report on water receptacles argues that, in building planning, drinking fountains and classroom sinks should not be afterthoughts. Choices must meet aesthetic demands while fulfillling maintenance requirements. (JF)

  4. 7 CFR 1466.21 - Contract requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... resources in or near the project area (e.g., impaired water bodies, at-risk species, drinking water supplies... practices to be implemented, the timing of practice installation, the operation and maintenance requirements... agrees to assume all obligations, including operation and maintenance of the EQIP contract's conservation...

  5. 18 CFR 3b.3 - Notice requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice requirements. 3b.3 Section 3b.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES COLLECTION, MAINTENANCE, USE, AND DISSEMINATION OF RECORDS OF...

  6. 18 CFR 3a.41 - Access requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Access requirements. 3a.41 Section 3a.41 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Access to Classified Materials §...

  7. 18 CFR 153.21 - Conformity with requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conformity with requirements. 153.21 Section 153.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... Requirements § 153.21 Conformity with requirements. (a) General Rule. Applications under subparts B and C...

  8. ENERGY STAR Certified Water Coolers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Water Coolers that are effective as of February...

  9. ENERGY STAR Certified Water Heaters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Water Heaters that are effective April 16, 2015....

  10. Water footprint as a tool for integrated water resources management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaya, Maite; Hoekstra, Arjen

    2010-05-01

    together with the water footprint concept could thus provide an appropriate framework to support more optimal water management practices by informing production and trade decisions and the development and adoption of water efficient technology. In order to move towards better water governance however a further integration of water-related concerns into water-related sectoral policies is paramount. This will require a concerted effort by all stakeholders, the willingness to adopt a total resource view where water is seen as a key, cross-sectoral input for development and growth, a mix of technical approaches, and the courage to undertake and fund water sector reforms. We are convinced that the water footprint analysis can provide a sufficiently robust fact base for meaningful stakeholder dialogue and action towards solutions.

  11. 46 CFR 61.35-3 - Required tests and checks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... activated. (10) Feed water flow controls. The feed water flow limit device (found on steam boilers and water... INSPECTIONS Design Verification and Periodic Testing for Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 61.35-3 Required tests... level controls must be tested by slowly lowering the water level in the boiler. Each operating...

  12. Low water FGD technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-15

    Conventional flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) systems require large supplies of water. Technologies which reduce water usage are becoming more important with the large number of FGD systems being installed in response to ever tightening emission regulations. Reducing water loss is particularly important in arid regions of the world. This report reviews commercial and near commercial low water FGD processes for coal-fired power plants, including dry, semi-dry and multi-pollutant technologies. Wet scrubbers, the most widely deployed FGD technology, account for around 10–15% of the water losses in power plants with water cooling systems. This figure is considerably higher when dry/air cooling systems are employed. The evaporative water losses can be reduced by some 40–50% when the flue gas is cooled before it enters the wet scrubber, a common practice in Europe and Japan. Technologies are under development to capture over 20% of the water in the flue gas exiting the wet scrubber, enabling the power plant to become a water supplier instead of a consumer. The semi-dry spray dry scrubbers and circulating dry scrubbers consume some 60% less water than conventional wet scrubbers. The commercial dry sorbent injection processes have the lowest water consumption, consuming no water, or a minimal amount if the sorbent needs hydrating or the flue gas is humidified to improve performance. Commercial multi-pollutant systems are available that consume no water.

  13. 气候变化下长江中下游水稻灌溉需水量时空变化特征%Spatiotemporal variations of rice irrigation water requirements in the mid-lower reaches of Yangtze River under changing climate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王卫光; 彭世彰; 孙风朝; 邢万秋; 罗玉峰; 徐俊增

    2012-01-01

    选择长江中下游单季中稻为研究对象,结合45个气象站1961~2010年逐日气象资料,基于统计降尺度模型(SDSM),生成HadCM3气候模式A2和B2两种情景下各站点参考作物腾发量和降水数据.基于联合国粮食及农业组织(FAO)推荐的作物系数法,并考虑有效性降雨和不同地区深层渗漏量,分析历史和未来的水稻灌溉需水时空变化特征.结果表明:过去50年,除了太湖流域以外的长江中下游大部分区域的参考作物腾发量和水稻需水量都呈显著下降趋势,而显著下降的水稻灌溉需水量主要位于鄱阳湖流域;未来两种情景下,参考作物腾发量、水稻需水量和水稻灌溉需水量均值都呈下降趋势,但水稻灌溉需水量降幅最小;水稻需水量和水稻灌溉需水量在长江中下游地区的变化趋势具有明显的空间异质性,水稻需水量大幅减少的区域由太湖流域向汉江和洞庭湖流域扩展.未来水稻灌溉需水量减少的区域主要分布在太湖流域、汉江流域东部和洞庭湖流域北部,并随时间推移呈扩大趋势.%Projections of rice irrigation water requirements under future climate conditions can be beneficial in developing adaptation strategies for reducing the negative impact of climate change on rice productions and to ensuring the food security from the perspective of the sustainable use of water resources. Using a statistical downscaling model (SDSM) , the projected daily reference evapotranspiration and precipitation of HadCM3 under A2 and B2 scenarios were downscaled to 45 local meteorological stations in the Mid-Lower Reaches of Yangtze River. Spatiotemporal variations of irrigation water requirements during the middle-season rice growing period for the past five decades (1961 -2010) and future dates (2011 -2099) were analyzed. The FAO (Food and Agricultural Organization) crop coefficient method and a water balance model considering the effective precipitation and

  14. 40 CFR 256.50 - Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Requirements. Section 4003(1) requires the State solid waste managment plan to idenifty means for coordinating... supply, waste water treatment, pesticides, ocean protection, toxic substances control, noise control, and..., including Soil Conservation Service (land spreading solid waste on food chain croplands); (5)...

  15. 40 CFR 141.130 - General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment technique requirements for disinfection byproduct precursors in § 141.135. (2) The regulations in... established MCLs for TTHM and HAA5 and treatment technique requirements for disinfection byproduct precursors..., distribution line breaks, storm run-off events, source water contamination events, or cross-connection events....

  16. Water: Source of Future Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    domestic purposes.6 In addition, another two-thirds of the world population could be under conditions of water stress . Water stress is defined as the...by engaging in better water management practices. For example, growing tomatoes with traditional irrigation systems requires far more water than...growing tomatoes that use drip systems. This example suggests that even our daily diet has an effect on our overall water needs.21 Growing a pound of

  17. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  18. DTU International Energy Report 2016: The Energy-Water-Food Nexus - from local to global aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Energy, water, and food systems are closely interlinked in the Energy-Water-Food Nexus. Water is of paramount importance for the energy sector. Fossil fuels require water for extraction, trans-port and processing. Thermal power plants require water for cooling, whether they use nuclear, fossil......-users. The waste water is often returned to the environment after energy requiring waste water management....

  19. Urban water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, M. O.; Hinkelmann, R.; Nützmann, G.; Jekel, M.; Singer, G.; Lewandowski, J.; Nehls, T.; Barjenbruch, M.

    2014-06-01

    Urban water systems consist of large-scale technical systems and both natural and man-made water bodies. The technical systems are essential components of urban infrastructure for water collection, treatment, storage and distribution, as well as for wastewater and runoff collection and subsequent treatment. Urban aquatic ecosystems are typically subject to strong human influences, which impair the quality of surface and ground waters, often with far-reaching impacts on downstream aquatic ecosystems and water users. The various surface and subsurface water bodies in urban environments can be viewed as interconnected compartments that are also extensively intertwined with a range of technical compartments of the urban water system. As a result, urban water systems are characterized by fluxes of water, solutes, gases and energy between contrasting compartments of a technical, natural or hybrid nature. Referred to as urban water interfaces, boundaries between and within these compartments are often specific to urban water systems. Urban water interfaces are generally characterized by steep physical and biogeochemical gradients, which promote high reaction rates. We hypothesize that they act as key sites of processes and fluxes with notable effects on overall system behaviour. By their very nature, urban water interfaces are heterogeneous and dynamic. Therefore, they increase spatial heterogeneity in urban areas and are also expected to contribute notably to the temporal dynamics of urban water systems, which often involve non-linear interactions and feedback mechanisms. Processes at and fluxes across urban water interfaces are complex and less well understood than within well-defined, homogeneous compartments, requiring both empirical investigations and new modelling approaches at both the process and system level. We advocate an integrative conceptual framework of the urban water system that considers interfaces as a key component to improve our fundamental

  20. Preliminary results of calculations for heavy-water nuclear-power-plant reactors employing 235U, 233U, and 232Th as a fuel and meeting requirements of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioffe, B. L.; Kochurov, B. P.

    2012-02-01

    A physical design is developed for a gas-cooled heavy-water nuclear reactor intended for a project of a nuclear power plant. As a fuel, the reactor would employ thorium with a small admixture of enriched uranium that contains not more than 20% of 235U. It operates in the open-cycle mode involving 233U production from thorium and its subsequent burnup. The reactor meets the conditions of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons: the content of fissionable isotopes in uranium at all stages of the process, including the final one, is below the threshold for constructing an atomic bomb, the amount of product plutonium being extremely small.

  1. Discovering system requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahill, A.T.; Bentz, B. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirements process. This report provides a high-level overview of the system requirements process, explaining types, sources, and characteristics of good requirements. System requirements, however, are seldom stated by the customer. Therefore, this report shows ways to help you work with your customer to discover the system requirements. It also explains terminology commonly used in the requirements development field, such as verification, validation, technical performance measures, and the various design reviews.

  2. Ontology Requirements Specification

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez-Figueroa, Mari Carmen; Gómez-Pérez, A.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the ontology requirements specification activity is to state why the ontology is being built, what its intended uses are, who the end users are, and which requirements the ontology should fulfill. This chapter presents detailed methodological guidelines for specifying ontology requirements efficiently. These guidelines will help ontology engineers to capture ontology requirements and produce the ontology requirements specification document (ORSD). The ORSD will play a key role dur...

  3. Virginia Household Water Quality Program: Heavy Metals in Household Water

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, Erin; Benham, Brian Leslie, 1960-; Forrester, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Federal law requires public water utilities to provide biologically safe water. However, the safety of privately owned, individual water supplies such as wells, springs, and cisterns is the sole responsibility of the owner. This publication discusses the sources, testing, and treatment of heavy metals.

  4. Variability of Rain Water Quality due to Roof Characteristics | Utsev ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variability of Rain Water Quality due to Roof Characteristics. ... is receiving increased attention worldwide as an alternative source of drinking water. ... as grey water for domestic purposes but requires treatment to be used as drinking water.

  5. Piloting a method to evaluate the implementation of integrated water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-05

    Oct 5, 2015 ... water resource management in the Inkomati River Basin. Melanie J ..... Water Act of 1967 (Zaikowski, 2007) to establish a new system of water rights. ..... are required to support water decision making, evaluation and review of ...

  6. Addressing the world water crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The world is facing an impinging crisis on water as population growth continues, energy use increases, and affluence (standard of living) increases all requiring more water. Agriculture must find ways to use water more productively while improving the impact of agriculture on the environment. Agri...

  7. Assessing Requirements Quality through Requirements Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Ajitha; Heimdahl, Mats; Woodham, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    In model-based development, the development effort is centered around a formal description of the proposed software system the model. This model is derived from some high-level requirements describing the expected behavior of the software. For validation and verification purposes, this model can then be subjected to various types of analysis, for example, completeness and consistency analysis [6], model checking [3], theorem proving [1], and test-case generation [4, 7]. This development paradigm is making rapid inroads in certain industries, e.g., automotive, avionics, space applications, and medical technology. This shift towards model-based development naturally leads to changes in the verification and validation (V&V) process. The model validation problem determining that the model accurately captures the customer's high-level requirements has received little attention and the sufficiency of the validation activities has been largely determined through ad-hoc methods. Since the model serves as the central artifact, its correctness with respect to the users needs is absolutely crucial. In our investigation, we attempt to answer the following two questions with respect to validation (1) Are the requirements sufficiently defined for the system? and (2) How well does the model implement the behaviors specified by the requirements? The second question can be addressed using formal verification. Nevertheless, the size and complexity of many industrial systems make formal verification infeasible even if we have a formal model and formalized requirements. Thus, presently, there is no objective way of answering these two questions. To this end, we propose an approach based on testing that, when given a set of formal requirements, explores the relationship between requirements-based structural test-adequacy coverage and model-based structural test-adequacy coverage. The proposed technique uses requirements coverage metrics defined in [9] on formal high-level software

  8. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  9. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure, Volume 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the {prime}978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  10. Apparent equilibration time required for surfactant-oil-water systems to emulsify into the morphology imposed by the formulation. Part 2: Effect of sec-butanol concentration and initial location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Gabriela; Antón, Raquel; Marfisi, Shirley; Márquez, Laura; Salager, Jean-Louis

    2004-06-22

    Winsor type I equilibrated surfactant-oil-water (SOW) systems produce o/w emulsions upon stirring. However, if the surfactant is initially dissolved in the oil phase, the attained type after inmediate emulsification is usually w/o. If the SOW system is partially equilibrated, it could result in a normal o/w emulsion, as if it were fully equilibrated. The minimum contact time for that to happen, the so-called apparent equilibration time tAPE, was previously shown (Langmuir 2002, 18, 607) to strongly depend on formulation, surfactant molecular weight, and oil viscosity. The present report shows that it depends on alcohol concentration and location in the unequilibrated system.

  11. Water citizenship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paerregaard, Karsten; Stensrud, Astrid Bredholt; Andersen, Astrid Oberborbeck

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the implementation of Peru’s new water law and discusses how it produces new forms of water citizenship. Inspired by the global paradigm of “integrated water resources management,” the law aims to include all citizens in the management of the country’s water resources...... by embracing a “new water culture.” We ask what forms of water citizenship emerge from the new water law and how they engage with local water practices and affect existing relations of inequality. We answer these questions ethnographically by comparing previous water legislation and how the new law currently...... is negotiated and contested in three localities in Peru’s southern highlands. We argue that the law creates a new water culture that views water as a substance that is measurable, quantifiable, and taxable, but that it neglects other ways of valuing water. We conclude that water citizenship emerges from...

  12. Water, Water Everywhere, But...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Cliff

    Materials for teaching a unit on water pollution are provided in this teaching package. These materials include: (1) a student reading booklet; (2) a reference booklet listing a variety of popular chemical, biological, and physical tests which can be performed on a local waterway and providing information about the environmental effects and toxic…

  13. Water, Water Everywhere, But...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Cliff

    Materials for teaching a unit on water pollution are provided in this teaching package. These materials include: (1) a student reading booklet; (2) a reference booklet listing a variety of popular chemical, biological, and physical tests which can be performed on a local waterway and providing information about the environmental effects and toxic…

  14. Postmarket Requirements and Commitments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provides information to the public on postmarket requirements and commitments. The phrase postmarket requirements and commitments refers to studies and clinical...

  15. Requirements for existing buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012.......This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012....

  16. Replacing reserve requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Edward J. Stevens

    1993-01-01

    An examination of the fading significance of the Federal Reserve System's reserve requirements and the recent flowering of required clearing balances, a rapidly growing feature of Reserve Bank operations.

  17. Requirements for existing buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012.......This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012....

  18. Replacing reserve requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Edward J. Stevens

    1993-01-01

    An examination of the fading significance of the Federal Reserve System's reserve requirements and the recent flowering of required clearing balances, a rapidly growing feature of Reserve Bank operations.

  19. Exigências hídricas da videira na Região do Submédio São Francisco Table grape water requirements in the Submedium São Francisco Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAQUELINE ÁVILA NETTO

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho objetivou a estimativa das necessidades hídricas da videira (Vitis vinifera L., cv. Itália, sob as condições edafoclimáticas da Região do Submédio São Francisco. A parte experimental foi conduzida no campo experimental de Bebedouro da Embrapa-Centro de Pesquisa Agropecuária do Trópico Semi-Árido, no município de Petrolina, PE, durante o período de maio a agosto de 1996. A evapotranspiração da cultura foi determinada pelo método do balanço hídrico no solo, e a evapotranspiração de referência foi estimada pelo método de Penman, visando avaliar o comportamento do coeficiente de cultura (Kc ao longo do ciclo da cultura. O parreiral, com cinco anos de idade, foi conduzido em sistema de latada a 2 m acima da superfície do solo, num espaçamento de 4 m x 2 m e irrigado diariamente por gotejamento. O consumo hídrico diário máximo da cultura foi de 4,33 mm dia-1, totalizando 333,6 mm no período de observações. Os valores de Kc variaram de 0,50 a 0,74. Determinou-se uma curva característica de Kc para o ciclo vegetativo da videira, a qual permite obter o Kc diário em função dos dias após a poda.This study used data of a field experiment conducted at the Bebedouro experimental base of the Embrapa-Centro de Pesquisa Agropecuária do Trópico Semi-Árido in Petrolina, PE, Brazil, from May to August, 1996, during the growing period of a five-year-old table grape (Vitis vinifera L., Italy cultivar. The plants were conducted in a two-meter above soil surface trellis system, four meters between rows by two meters between plants, and daily irrigated by trickling system. The crop evapotranspiration was determined by the soil water balance method, and the reference evapotranspiration was estimated by the method of Penman, used to analyse the behaviour of the crop coefficient (Kc throughout the crop growing period. The maximum crop daily water use was 4.33 mm d-1 and the total water consumption was 333.6 mm for the whole

  20. Accounting for Water Insecurity in Modeling Domestic Water Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaitsis, S. E.; Huber-lee, A. T.; Vogel, R. M.; Naumova, E.

    2013-12-01

    Water demand management uses price elasticity estimates to predict consumer demand in relation to water pricing changes, but studies have shown that many additional factors effect water consumption. Development scholars document the need for water security, however, much of the water security literature focuses on broad policies which can influence water demand. Previous domestic water demand studies have not considered how water security can affect a population's consumption behavior. This study is the first to model the influence of water insecurity on water demand. A subjective indicator scale measuring water insecurity among consumers in the Palestinian West Bank is developed and included as a variable to explore how perceptions of control, or lack thereof, impact consumption behavior and resulting estimates of price elasticity. A multivariate regression model demonstrates the significance of a water insecurity variable for data sets encompassing disparate water access. When accounting for insecurity, the R-squaed value improves and the marginal price a household is willing to pay becomes a significant predictor for the household quantity consumption. The model denotes that, with all other variables held equal, a household will buy more water when the users are more water insecure. Though the reasons behind this trend require further study, the findings suggest broad policy implications by demonstrating that water distribution practices in scarcity conditions can promote consumer welfare and efficient water use.

  1. Future Home Network Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbonnier, Benoit; Wessing, Henrik; Lannoo, Bart;

    This paper presents the requirements for future Home Area Networks (HAN). Firstly, we discuss the applications and services as well as their requirements. Then, usage scenarios are devised to establish a first specification for the HAN. The main requirements are an increased bandwidth (towards 1...

  2. Future Home Network Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbonnier, Benoit; Wessing, Henrik; Lannoo, Bart

    This paper presents the requirements for future Home Area Networks (HAN). Firstly, we discuss the applications and services as well as their requirements. Then, usage scenarios are devised to establish a first specification for the HAN. The main requirements are an increased bandwidth (towards 1...

  3. PIT Coating Requirements Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MINTEER, D.J.

    2000-10-20

    This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

  4. Healthy Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Newsroom, Features, & Announcements CDC at Work: Healthy Water Fast Facts WASH-related Observances Top Causes of Drinking ... Features, & Announcements Training & Education CDC at Work: Healthy Water Policy & Recommendations Fast Facts Index of Water-Related Topics By A- ...

  5. Parasites: Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Water Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Parasites can live in natural water sources. When outdoors, treat your water before drinking ...

  6. Water Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Water Safety KidsHealth > For Parents > Water Safety Print A ... best measure of protection. previous continue Making Kids Water Wise It's important to teach your kids proper ...

  7. Water pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Institute, Marine

    2013-01-01

    Students will learn about what causes water pollution and how to be environmentally aware. *Note: Students should understand the concept of the water cycle before moving onto water pollution (see Lesson Plan “Oceans all Around Us”).

  8. NASA Water Resources Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, David L.

    2011-01-01

    With increasing population pressure and water usage coupled with climate variability and change, water issues are being reported by numerous groups as the most critical environmental problems facing us in the 21st century. Competitive uses and the prevalence of river basins and aquifers that extend across boundaries engender political tensions between communities, stakeholders and countries. In addition to the numerous water availability issues, water quality related problems are seriously affecting human health and our environment. The potential crises and conflicts especially arise when water is competed among multiple uses. For example, urban areas, environmental and recreational uses, agriculture, and energy production compete for scarce resources, not only in the Western U.S. but throughout much of the U.S. and also in numerous parts of the world. Mitigating these conflicts and meeting water demands and needs requires using existing water resources more efficiently. The NASA Water Resources Program Element works to use NASA products and technology to address these critical water issues. The primary goal of the Water Resources is to facilitate application of NASA Earth science products as a routine use in integrated water resources management for the sustainable use of water. This also includes the extreme events of drought and floods and the adaptation to the impacts from climate change. NASA satellite and Earth system observations of water and related data provide a huge volume of valuable data in both near-real-time and extended back nearly 50 years about the Earth's land surface conditions such as precipitation, snow, soil moisture, water levels, land cover type, vegetation type, and health. NASA Water Resources Program works closely to use NASA and Earth science data with other U.S. government agencies, universities, and non-profit and private sector organizations both domestically and internationally. The NASA Water Resources Program organizes its

  9. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1996-07-01

    The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

  10. Water conservation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available of their water needs from rainwater harvesting. • Water quality: The quality of water is matched with use. For instance, the best quality water may be used for drinking and cooking and poorer quality water, such as grey water, used for flushing toilets... and irrigation. • Onsite retention: In natural environments vegetation and soil absorb and retain a large proportion of rain water that falls on to it. Green buildings aim to emulate this by ensuring that buildings and sites absorb and retain rain water...

  11. Transportation System Requirements Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

  12. Water Recycling in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Young

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth and, more importantly, experiences the most variable rainfall of all the continents on our planet. The vast majority of Australians live in large cities on the coast. Because wastewater treatments plants were all located near the coast, it was thought that large scale recycling would be problematic given the cost of infrastructure and pumping required to establish recycled water schemes. This all changed when Australia experienced a decade of record low rainfall and water utilities were given aggressive targets to increase the volume of water recycled. This resulted in recycled water being accepted as a legitimate source of water for non-drinking purposes in a diversified portfolio of water sources to mitigate climate risk. To ensure community support for recycled water, Australia lead the world in developing national guidelines for the various uses of recycled water to ensure the protection of public health and the environment. Australia now provides a great case study of the developments in maximizing water recycling opportunities from policy, regulatory and technological perspectives. This paper explores the evolution in thinking and how approaches to wastewater reuse has changed over the past 40 years from an effluent disposal issue to one of recognizing wastewater as a legitimate and valuable resource. Despite recycled water being a popular choice and being broadly embraced, the concept of indirect potable reuse schemes have lacked community and political support across Australia to date.

  13. 40 CFR 141.625 - Conditions requiring increased monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conditions requiring increased monitoring. 141.625 Section 141.625 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Requirements § 141.625 Conditions...

  14. 33 CFR 136.105 - General requirements for a claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements for a claim. 136.105 Section 136.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT General Procedure § 136.105 General requirements for...

  15. Water uptake and water supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    The water uptake and the water supply do not directly affect the mineral absorption of plants. However, many connections exist between the management of minerals and water. The most evident of those connections are following

  16. Water: the stuff of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenmark, M

    1995-11-01

    This article discusses the relationship between human settlements and the water cycle. Water is a finite resource that supports daily human life, is required for food production, and is necessary for waste removal. Water quality has declined under the strains of increasing population and pollution. Human survival depends upon reducing risks and safeguarding water supplies that are crucial to survival. Contaminated water supplies lead to sickness and death. Maintaining urban water quality means maintaining the water supply system. High internal pipe pressure means leakage to the outside. When water systems are partially full, the internal pipe pressure lowers and creates susceptibility to in-leakage. If cracked sewage pipes lie in contaminated areas, the risk of waterborne diseases is increased. Groundwater is the main source of water in many dry climates. Demand for water can outstrip the supply of groundwater. Poor soil management and mismanagement of irrigation systems may result in waterlogging and salinization. The global water cycle replenishes the supply in the ground. Water is lost through evaporation and in biomass production and is returned through rainfall. Surplus water collects in aquifers and rivers. Sustainable development requires thinking about what can be changed including types of governments, technical solutions, citizen education, lifestyles, and expectations. Flexibility and cooperation between sectors is important for successful management of water resources. Many communities are developing Local Government Action Plans, as called for in the 1992 Rio Earth Summit's Local Agenda 21, Chapter 28.

  17. Laser inactivation of pathogenic viruses in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishkanich, Alexander; Zhevlakov, Alexander; Kascheev, Sergey; Sidorov, Igor; Ruzankina, Julia; Yakovlev, Alexey; Mak, Andrey

    2016-03-01

    Currently there is a situation that makes it difficult to provide the population with quality drinking water for the sanitary-hygienic requirements. One of the urgent problems is the need for water disinfection. Since the emergence of microorganisms that are pathogens transmitted through water such as typhoid, cholera, etc. requires constant cleansing of waters against pathogenic bacteria. In the water treatment process is destroyed up to 98% of germs, but among the remaining can be pathogenic viruses, the destruction of which requires special handling. As a result, the conducted research the following methods have been proposed for combating harmful microorganisms: sterilization of water by laser radiation and using a UV lamp.

  18. 40 CFR 141.624 - Additional requirements for consecutive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Stage 2 Disinfection... system that does not add a disinfectant but delivers water that has been treated with a primary or... requirements for chlorine and chloramines in § 141.131 (c) and § 141.132(c)(1) and the compliance...

  19. Stochastic water demand modelling for a better understanding of hydraulics in water distribution networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokker, E.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the water distribution network water quality process take place influenced by de flow velocity and residence time of the water in the network. In order to understand how the water quality changes in the water distribution network, a good understanding of hydraulics is required. Specifically in

  20. Evaluation of irrigation and drainage water cation composition and salt leaching requirement in Hetao Irrigation District%内蒙古河套灌区灌排水离子组成及淋洗盐分用水量评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘霞; 王丽萍; 张圣微; 张义强

    2011-01-01

    以河套灌区"盐分去向"为研究背景,通过调查灌区土壤及各级灌排渠系水阳离子含量变化及室内模拟灌溉水淋洗土柱试验,分析灌溉水经过土壤到排水阳离子组成的变化规律,探讨用Na+浓度评价淋盐排灌水量比的可行性.结果表明,与灌溉水相比,各级排水干渠排水所含盐分中Na+所占比例明显增加,平均约为87%;Ca2+所占比例减少,平均约为7%.排水的全盐浓度(EC)和Na+浓度有显著相关关系,说明Na+浓度对排水的全盐浓度有显著影响.灌溉水的2/3 Ca2+以非水溶性钙盐积聚在土壤,排出量较少,但灌区全年的Na+收支基本平衡.淋盐排灌水量比评价分析结果表明,用Na+浓度评价淋盐排灌水量比要优于用全盐浓度(EC);要维持灌区Na+收支平衡,排灌水量比应保持在0.12~0.15,针对现有灌区年引水量50亿t,年排水量要达到6~7亿t.%To determine where the salts go, variations in cation compositions of soil, irrigation water and drainage water in Hetao Irrigation District were analyzed. Field investigations and simulations of soil column leaching experiments were conducted to determine the changes in cation concentrations in irrigation water, drainage water and in soil profile. The study also discussed the use of water soluble Na+ concentration to determine irrigation/drainage ratio for salt leaching (LR). The results showed that the average ratio of Na+ to total salts in different drainage canal waters was about 87%, which was higher than that in irrigation water. The average ratio of Ca2+ was about 7%, which was lower than that in irrigation water. A significant correlation was noted between EC and Na+ concentration. This indicated that Na+ significantly influenced total salt concentration in drainage water. There existed an annual balance in Na+ input-output in irrigated areas. However, about 2/3 of irrigation water Ca2+ accumulated in soils with less water insoluble cation discharge. LR

  1. Software Requirements Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Altalbe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Requirements are defined as the desired set of characteristics of a product or a service. In the world of software development, it is estimated that more than half of the failures are attributed towards poor requirements management. This means that although the software functions correctly, it is not what the client requested. Modern software requirements management methodologies are available to reduce the occur-rence of such incidents. This paper performs a review on the available literature in the area while tabulating possible methods of managing requirements. It also highlights the benefits of following a proper guideline for the requirements management task. With the introduction of specific software tools for the requirements management task, better software products are now been developed with lesser resources.

  2. Turning Desirements into Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    budgets, assessment teams must wonder when to consider the cost of a particular solution. The DoD management systems wisely separate requirements gen...analysis so the The warfighter—the man or woman who goes into harm’s way— has every imperative to expect much of us as requirements managers, program...the man or woman who goes into harm’s way—has every imperative to expect much of us as requirements managers, program managers, and resource

  3. Anthropometric Requirements for Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulu, Sudhakar; Margerum, Sarah; Dory, Jonathan; Rochlis, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the requirement from an Anthropometric standpoint for the development of the Constellation's programs hardware, specifically the Orion crew exploration vehicle. The NASA JSC Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) provides anthropometry, strength, mobility, and mass properties requirements; gathers, interprets, manages and maintains the flight crew anthropometry database; and participates and provides input during crew selection. This is used to assist in requirements for vehicle and space suit design and for crew selection.

  4. Testing agile requirements models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BOTASCHANJAN Jewgenij; PISTER Markus; RUMPE Bernhard

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses a model-based approach to validate software requirements in agile development processes by simulation and in particular automated testing. The use of models as central development artifact needs to be added to the portfolio of software engineering techniques, to further increase efficiency and flexibility of the development beginning already early in the requirements definition phase. Testing requirements are some of the most important techniques to give feedback and to increase the quality of the result. Therefore testing of artifacts should be introduced as early as possible, even in the requirements definition phase.

  5. Environmental Requirements Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusack, Laura J.; Bramson, Jeffrey E.; Archuleta, Jose A.; Frey, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor responsible for the environmental cleanup of the Hanford Site Central Plateau. As part of this responsibility, the CH2M HILL is faced with the task of complying with thousands of environmental requirements which originate from over 200 federal, state, and local laws and regulations, DOE Orders, waste management and effluent discharge permits, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) response and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action documents, and official regulatory agency correspondence. The challenge is to manage this vast number of requirements to ensure they are appropriately and effectively integrated into CH2M HILL operations. Ensuring compliance with a large number of environmental requirements relies on an organization’s ability to identify, evaluate, communicate, and verify those requirements. To ensure that compliance is maintained, all changes need to be tracked. The CH2M HILL identified that the existing system used to manage environmental requirements was difficult to maintain and that improvements should be made to increase functionality. CH2M HILL established an environmental requirements management procedure and tools to assure that all environmental requirements are effectively and efficiently managed. Having a complete and accurate set of environmental requirements applicable to CH2M HILL operations will promote a more efficient approach to: • Communicating requirements • Planning work • Maintaining work controls • Maintaining compliance

  6. Water, mineral waters and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraccia, Luisa; Liberati, Giovanna; Masciullo, Stefano Giuseppe; Grassi, Marcello; Fraioli, Antonio

    2006-06-01

    The authors focus on water resources and the use of mineral waters in human nutrition, especially in the different stages of life, in physical activity and in the presence of some morbid conditions. Mineral water is characterized by its purity at source, its content in minerals, trace elements and other constituents, its conservation and its healing properties recognized by the Ministry of Health after clinical and pharmacological trials. Based on total salt content in grams after evaporation of 1l mineral water dried at 180 degrees C (dry residues), mineral waters can be classified as: waters with a very low mineral content, waters low in mineral content, waters with a medium mineral content, and strongly mineralized waters. Based on ion composition mineral waters can be classified as: bicarbonate waters, sulfate waters, sodium chloride or saltwater, sulfuric waters. Based on biological activity mineral waters can be classified as: diuretic waters, cathartic waters, waters with antiphlogistic properties. Instructions for use, doses, and current regulations are included.

  7. Federal Agency Satellite Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    detect sizable areas of standing water, and to recognize drought conditions and their onset. In the Sahel , for example, observations from about 50...Regional Environmental Problems d AID believes that far more can be done to estimate agricultural production in threatened regional areas such as the Sahel ...management activities. Remotely sensed data show only the land surface, and the information on the occurrence and salinity of ground water must be

  8. Jumping on water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-11-01

    Water striders can jump on water as high as they can jump on land. Quick jumps allow them to avoid sudden dangers such as predators' attacks, and therefore understanding how they make such a dramatic motion for survival can shed light on the ultimate level of semi-aquatic motility achievable through evolution. However, the mechanism of their vertical jumping from a water surface has eluded hydrodynamic explanations so far. By observing movements of water strider legs and theoretically analyzing their dynamic interactions with deforming liquid-air interface, we have recently found that different species of jumping striders always tune their leg rotation speed with a force just below that required to break the water surface to reach the maximum take-off velocity. Here, we start with discussing the fundamental theories of dynamics of floating and sinking of small objects. The theories then enable us to analyze forces acting on a water strider while it presses down the water surface to fully exploit the capillary force. We further introduce a 68-milligram at-scale robotic insect capable of jumping on water without splash, strikingly similar to the real strider, by utilizing the water surface just as a trampoline.

  9. Writing testable software requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knirk, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This tutorial identifies common problems in analyzing requirements in the problem and constructing a written specification of what the software is to do. It deals with two main problem areas: identifying and describing problem requirements, and analyzing and describing behavior specifications.

  10. Ecodesign requirements for televisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huulgaard, Rikke Dorothea; Dalgaard, Randi; Merciai, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This paper concerns the Ecodesign Directive (2009/125/EC) and the implementing measures (IM) in which ecodesign requirements are set up for energy-using and energy-related products. Previous studies have found that the requirements have a unilateral focus on energy consumption and the use...

  11. Getting the Requirements Right

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    27 Defense AT&L: July–August 2015 Getting the Requirements Right Sean J. Stackley, USN Stackley is Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research...getting the requirements right . The author can be contacted through brian.a.metcalf@navy.mil. We’re Looking for a Few Good Authors Got opinions to

  12. Evaluation of the Water Requirements for a Greenhouse Tomato Crop using the Priestley-Taylor Method Evaluación del Consumo de Agua de un Cultivo de Tomate en Invernadero Usando el Método de Priestley-Taylor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Valdés-Gómez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The Priestley-Taylor (PT model was evaluated for estimating the real evapotranspiration (ETreal of a drip-irrigated greenhouse tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. crop. The net radiation incorporated in the PT model was estimated using meteorological variables. For this experiment, an automatic weather station (AWS was installed inside the greenhouse to measure solar radiation (Rgi, net radiation (Rn, air temperature (Ta and relative humidity (RH. Another AWS was installed over a grass cover to measure atmospheric conditions outside the greenhouse. The experiment was carried out at the Panguilemo experimental station (35°23' S, 71°40' W, 110 m.a.s.l. from August to December 2000. The PT model was evaluated using the ETreal obtained from the water balance (WB method. In this case, values of ETreal by PT model were calculated using: a Rgi and soil heat flux (G = 0; b Rgi and G ≠ 0; c solar radiation measured outside the greenhouse (Rge and G = 0; and d Rge and G ≠ 0. For these cases, results indicated that PT model was able to compute ETreal with errors less than 5%. Also, Rn was calculated with a relative absolute error and a mean deviation lower than 6% and 0.07 mm d-1, respectively, using Rgi or Rge. Daily soil heat flux values equal to zero did not affect the calculation of ETreal values. Thus, the PT model evaluated in this study could be used for scheduling irrigation for a greenhouse tomato crop, using internal measurements of air temperature and relative humidity, and external measurements of solar radiation. In this case, PT model predicted the ETreal with an error of 6.1%.Se evaluó el comportamiento del modelo de Priestley-Taylor (PT para la estimación de la evapotranspiración real (ETreal de un cultivo de tomates (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. en condiciones de invernadero. La radiación neta incorporada en el modelo de PT fue calculada usando variables meteorológicas clásicas. Para este experimento, una estación meteorol

  13. Water and waste water reclamation in a 21st century space colony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebens, H. J.; Johnson, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents the results of research on closed-life support systems initiated during a system design study on space colonization and concentrates on the water and waste water components. Metabolic requirements for the 10,000 inhabitants were supplied by an assumed earth-like diet from an intensive agriculture system. Condensed atmospheric moisture provided a source of potable water and a portion of the irrigation water. Waste water was reclaimed by wet oxidation. The dual-water supply required the condensation of 175 kg/person-day of atmospheric water and the processing of 250 kg/person-day of waste water.

  14. Water and waste water reclamation in a 21st century space colony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebens, H. J.; Johnson, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents the results of research on closed-life support systems initiated during a system design study on space colonization and concentrates on the water and waste water components. Metabolic requirements for the 10,000 inhabitants were supplied by an assumed earth-like diet from an intensive agriculture system. Condensed atmospheric moisture provided a source of potable water and a portion of the irrigation water. Waste water was reclaimed by wet oxidation. The dual-water supply required the condensation of 175 kg/person-day of atmospheric water and the processing of 250 kg/person-day of waste water.

  15. Water Reuse: Using Reclaimed Water For Irrigation

    OpenAIRE

    Haering, Kathryn C.; Evanylo, Gregory K.; Benham, Brian Leslie, 1960-; Goatley, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Describes water reuse and reclaimed water, explains how reclaimed water is produced, options for water reuse, water reuse regulations, and agronomic concerns with water reuse, and provides several case studies of water reuse.

  16. 46 CFR 119.320 - Water heaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water heaters. 119.320 Section 119.320 Shipping COAST... Machinery § 119.320 Water heaters. (a) A water heater must meet the requirements of Parts 53 and 63 in... electric water heater is also acceptable if it: (1) Has a capacity of not more than 454 liters (120...

  17. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  18. 21 CFR 165.110 - Bottled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bottled water. 165.110 Section 165.110 Food and... CONSUMPTION BEVERAGES Requirements for Specific Standardized Beverages § 165.110 Bottled water. (a) Identity—(1) Description. Bottled water is water that is intended for human consumption and that is sealed...

  19. Water security assessment using blue and green water footprint concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veettil, Anoop Valiya; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2016-11-01

    The quantitative assessment of water security using the concept of blue and green water footprints can improve water resources management at local to regional scale. We developed an integrated modeling framework by considering both climatic and anthropogenic factors to investigate spatio-temporal variability of blue and green water availability and to quantify the water security in a river basin. The proposed modeling framework can be useful for providing an overview of the water security within the watershed and to identify water stress (hot spots) regions within the river basin. We applied Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to quantify the availability of fresh water (blue water and green water) in Savannah River Basin (SRB), USA. The anthropogenic factors (e.g., water demand) and Environmental Flow Requirement (EFR) information are incorporated to quantify the water security in terms of scarcity and vulnerability indices. A higher amount of blue water was observed for counties located in the upper part of SRB and higher green water flow was observed for counties that has the presence of intensive agriculture and large water bodies (e.g., reservoir). A time lag exists between the maximum rainfall during June-September and the maximum blue water observed in December-March. The study also analyzed the monthly variation of blue and green water flow for counties located in SRB. We expect that the water security assessment can provide useful information for understanding the emerging hot spots within a river basin (eco-system) due to the abstraction of water for human activities, such as irrigation, industrial use, energy production and domestic use.

  20. Protecting environmental flows through enhanced water licensing and water markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Erfani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To enable economically efficient future adaptation to water scarcity some countries are revising water management institutions such as water rights or licensing systems to more effectively protect ecosystems and their services. Allocating more flow to the environment though can mean less abstraction for economic production, or the inability to accommodate new entrants (diverters. Modern licensing arrangements should simultaneously enhance environmental flows and protect water abstractors who depend on water. Making new licensing regimes compatible with tradable water rights is an important component of water allocation reform. Regulated water markets can help decrease the societal cost of water scarcity whilst enforcing environmental and/or social protections. In this article we simulate water markets under a regime of fixed volumetric water abstraction licenses with fixed minimum flows or under a scalable water license regime (using water "shares" with dynamic environmental minimum flows. Shares allow adapting allocations to available water and dynamic environmental minimum flows can vary as a function of ecological requirements. We investigate how a short-term spot market manifests within each licensing regime. We use a river-basin-scale hydro-economic agent model that represents individual abstractors and can simulate a spot market under both licensing regimes. We apply this model to the Great Ouse river basin in Eastern England with public water supply, agricultural, energy and industrial water using agents. Results show the proposed shares with dynamic environmental flow licensing system protects river flows more effectively than the current static minimum flow requirements during a dry historical year, but that the total opportunity cost to water abstractors of the environmental gains is a 10 to 15% loss in economic benefits.

  1. 33 CFR 151.15 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... BALLAST WATER Implementation of MARPOL 73/78 and the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty as it Pertains to Pollution from Ships Oil Pollution § 151.15 Reporting requirements. (a) The... instantaneous rate permitted in §§ 151.10 or 151.13 of this chapter, or NLS in bulk, in 46 CFR 153.1126 or...

  2. 7 CFR 1779.9 - Environmental requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... or online at http://www.usda.gov/rus/water/ees/index.htm), the environmental review requirements... development methods to mitigate any adverse environmental effects. Facility planning and design must not only... or minimize adverse environmental impacts. The lender must assist the Agency in ensuring that...

  3. 24 CFR 966.4 - Lease requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... water and reasonable amounts of heat at appropriate times of the year (according to local custom and... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lease requirements. 966.4 Section 966.4 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  4. 75 FR 32237 - Information Collection Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... INFORMATION: The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA), Public Law 104-13, Section 2, 109 Stat. 163 (1995... public comment. 44 U.S.C. 3507(b); 5 CFR 1320.12(d). Federal law requires OMB to approve or disapprove... water. FRA has added 49 CFR part 214 to establish minimum workplace safety standards for railroad...

  5. Requirements in engineering projects

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, João M

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on various topics related to engineering and management of requirements, in particular elicitation, negotiation, prioritisation, and documentation (whether with natural languages or with graphical models). The book provides methods and techniques that help to characterise, in a systematic manner, the requirements of the intended engineering system.  It was written with the goal of being adopted as the main text for courses on requirements engineering, or as a strong reference to the topics of requirements in courses with a broader scope. It can also be used in vocational courses, for professionals interested in the software and information systems domain.   Readers who have finished this book will be able to: - establish and plan a requirements engineering process within the development of complex engineering systems; - define and identify the types of relevant requirements in engineering projects; - choose and apply the most appropriate techniques to elicit the requirements of a giv...

  6. Water availability study for California wetlands [ Modoc

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Conclusions to evaluation: Water supply appears to be adequate for present and future water requirements. The legality of South Fork Pit River diversions and the...

  7. Electrolytic silver ion cell sterilizes water supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, C. F.; Gillerman, J. B.

    1968-01-01

    Electrolytic water sterilizer controls microbial contamination in manned spacecraft. Individual sterilizer cells are self-contained and require no external power or control. The sterilizer generates silver ions which do not impart an unpleasant taste to water.

  8. Water treatment processes for oilfield steam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, A.; Pauley, J.C. [Chevron Canada Ltd., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Various water treatment processes are used within the oilfield industry. Processes tend to be common within one region of the world, but different between regions due to untreated water characteristics and treated water quality requirements. This paper summarized Chevron's view of water treatment requirements and processes for oilfield steam injection. It identified water treatment systems that have been used at thermal projects, where they are most commonly utilized, their purpose, and the limits of each process. The advantages and disadvantages of different water treatment systems were also reviewed. The paper focused on the treatment of fresh waters, low-TDS produced waters, high-hardness waters, and high-silica produced waters. Challenges and opportunities were also identified. It was concluded that the challenges created by high-silica, or by high-hardness produced waters lead to more costly processes. 25 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs.

  9. Energy implications of bottled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleick, P. H.; Cooley, H. S.

    2009-01-01

    As bottled water use continues to expand around the world, there is growing interest in the environmental, economical, and social implications of that use, including concerns about waste generation, proper use of groundwater, hydrologic effects on local surface and groundwater, economic costs, and more. A key concern is how much energy is required to produce and use bottled water. This paper estimates the energy footprint required for various phases of bottled water production, transportation, and use. We do not develop a single comprehensive life-cycle energy estimate because of differences among water sources, bottling processes, transportation costs, and other factors, but we quantify key energy inputs necessary for site-specific assessments. We also apply these inputs to three site-specific examples of the energy required from production to the point of use: local bottled water produced and used in Los Angeles, water bottled in the South Pacific and shipped by cargo ship to Los Angeles, and water bottled in France and shipped in various ways to Los Angeles. For water transported short distances, the energy requirements of bottled water are dominated by the energy used to produce the plastic bottles. Long-distance transport, however, can lead to energy costs comparable to, or even larger than, those of producing the bottle. All other energy costs—for processing, bottling, sealing, labeling, and refrigeration—are far smaller than those for the production of the bottle and transportation. These data can be used to generate specific estimates for different sources, treatments, and delivery options.

  10. Ground water in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, A.R.

    1960-01-01

    One of the first requisites for the intelligent planning of utilization and control of water and for the administration of laws relating to its use is data on the quantity, quality, and mode of occurrence of the available supplies. The collection, evaluation and interpretation, and publication of such data are among the primary functions of the U.S. Geological Survey. Since 1895 the Congress has made appropriations to the Survey for investigation of the water resources of the Nation. In 1929 the Congress adopted the policy of dollar-for-dollar cooperation with the States and local governmental agencies in water-resources investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey. In 1937 a program of ground-water investigations was started in cooperation with the Oklahoma Geological Survey, and in 1949 this program was expanded to include cooperation with the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board. In 1957 the State Legislature created the Oklahoma Water Resources Board as the principal State water agency and it became the principal local cooperator. The Ground Water Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey collects, analyzes, and evaluates basic information on ground-water resources and prepares interpretive reports based on those data. Cooperative ground-water work was first concentrated in the Panhandle counties. During World War II most work was related to problems of water supply for defense requirements. Since 1945 detailed investigations of ground-water availability have been made in 11 areas, chiefly in the western and central parts of the State. In addition, water levels in more than 300 wells are measured periodically, principally in the western half of the State. In Oklahoma current studies are directed toward determining the source, occurrence, and availability of ground water and toward estimating the quantity of water and rate of replenishment to specific areas and water-bearing formations. Ground water plays an important role in the economy of the State. It is

  11. Creativity in Requirement Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Olesen, Henning

    Traditional requirements engineering focuses mainly on analysis and elicitation. However, current trends in new system, device and software are towards involving all stakeholders in the early stages of the engineering process to define the user requirements. Creativity is here seen as a major...... keystone in this process in order to open up stakeholder's mind to new technologies, which do not yet exist. This paper dis-cusses the application of creativity in the requirements process and illustrate through cases from the MAGNET and MAGNET Beyond projects....

  12. Wasted waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemczynowicz, J

    1996-11-01

    This article presents the increasing mismanagement of water as a result of increasing delivery of water volume, water pollution, and water wasting. One example of water mismanagement is irrigation, through which 67% of water is withdrawn from the hydrological cycle. In addition, reports from European communities reveal that pesticides from agriculture worsen the existing underground pollution. Furthermore, a 25% drop in land productivity was observed in Africa due to erosion, salinization, water logging, and desertification. Also, 23% of withdrawn water goes to industries, which are the major polluters. Since 1900 about 250,000 tons of cadmium have been produced worldwide, which eventually enter and harm the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Moreover, high mercury levels were observed in Malaysia's Kelang River in the late 1980s, and river pollution in Thailand and Malaysia is recorded to be 30-100 times higher than accepted levels. Aside from that, the human race must also understand that there is a connection between water scarcity and water quality. When there is water pollution, it is expected that many people will suffer diarrheal diseases and intestinal parasite infections, which will further increase the mortality rate to 3.3 million per year. Realizing the severity of the problem, it is suggested that the human race must learn to recycle water like stormwater to prevent scarcity with drinking water.

  13. Branding water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolnicar, Sara; Hurlimann, Anna; Grün, Bettina

    2014-06-15

    Branding is a key strategy widely used in commercial marketing to make products more attractive to consumers. With the exception of bottled water, branding has largely not been adopted in the water context although public acceptance is critical to the implementation of water augmentation projects. Based on responses from 6247 study participants collected between 2009 and 2012, this study shows that (1) different kinds of water - specifically recycled water, desalinated water, tap water and rainwater from personal rainwater tanks - are each perceived very differently by the public, (2) external events out of the control of water managers, such as serious droughts or floods, had a minimal effect on people's perceptions of water, (3) perceptions of water were stable over time, and (4) certain water attributes are anticipated to be more effective to use in public communication campaigns aiming at increasing public acceptance for drinking purposes. The results from this study can be used by a diverse range of water stakeholders to increase public acceptance and adoption of water from alternative sources. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. 7 CFR 1780.11 - Service area requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., maintenance, debt service, and reserve requirements. Such guarantees from developers will meet the... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Service area requirements. 1780.11 Section 1780.11... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE LOANS AND GRANTS General Policies and Requirements § 1780.11 Service...

  15. 33 CFR 175.110 - Visual distress signals required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visual distress signals required... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.110 Visual distress signals... signals selected from the list in § 175.130 or the alternatives in § 175.135, in the number required, are...

  16. Towards sustainable water governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Wietske; Adamowski, Jan; Orr, Christopher J.; Wals, Arjen; Milot, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on multi-loop social learning processes required to move towards more sustainable water governance. Multi-loop social learning is recognized as a crucial element to decision-making involving a process of managing change where the central methodological concern is with

  17. Water Pollution Control Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1974

    1974-01-01

    A special report on the state of the water pollution control industry reveals that due to forthcoming federal requirements, sales and the backlogs should increase; problems may ensue because of shortages of materials and inflation. Included are reports from various individual companies. (MLB)

  18. Water Pollution Control Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1974

    1974-01-01

    A special report on the state of the water pollution control industry reveals that due to forthcoming federal requirements, sales and the backlogs should increase; problems may ensue because of shortages of materials and inflation. Included are reports from various individual companies. (MLB)

  19. Water Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, H. J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Deals with water pollution in the following categories: a global view, self purification, local pollution, difficulties in chemical analysis, and remedies for water pollution. Emphasizes the extent to which man's activities have modified the cycles of certain elements. (GS)

  20. Water Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, H. J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Deals with water pollution in the following categories: a global view, self purification, local pollution, difficulties in chemical analysis, and remedies for water pollution. Emphasizes the extent to which man's activities have modified the cycles of certain elements. (GS)

  1. Irrigation Requirement Estimation Using Vegetation Indices and Inverse Biophysical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounoua, Lahouari; Imhoff, Marc L.; Franks, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    We explore an inverse biophysical modeling process forced by satellite and climatological data to quantify irrigation requirements in semi-arid agricultural areas. We constrain the carbon and water cycles modeled under both equilibrium, balance between vegetation and climate, and non-equilibrium, water added through irrigation. We postulate that the degree to which irrigated dry lands vary from equilibrium climate conditions is related to the amount of irrigation. The amount of water required over and above precipitation is considered as an irrigation requirement. For July, results show that spray irrigation resulted in an additional amount of water of 1.3 mm per occurrence with a frequency of 24.6 hours. In contrast, the drip irrigation required only 0.6 mm every 45.6 hours or 46% of that simulated by the spray irrigation. The modeled estimates account for 87% of the total reported irrigation water use, when soil salinity is not important and 66% in saline lands.

  2. Science in Requirements Engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suhaimi Jaafar

    2014-01-01

    Based on a review of the articles about methodological principles, and some research classifications, in this work an overview of the nature and status of science in Requirements Engineering is done...

  3. Ecodesign requirements for televisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huulgaard, Rikke Dorothea; Dalgaard, Randi; Merciai, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    to analyse if other environmental hotspots and life cycle phases should be included in the requirements in the IM of the Ecodesign Directive besides energy consumption in the use phase analysis. Methods The consequential approach is used. The data for the LCA have been gathered from two manufacturers of TVs......Purpose This paper concerns the Ecodesign Directive (2009/125/EC) and the implementing measures (IM) in which ecodesign requirements are set up for energy-using and energy-related products. Previous studies have found that the requirements have a unilateral focus on energy consumption and the use...... phase. This is not in line with the scientific understanding of ecodesign, where attention should be put on all life cycle phases and all relevant environmental impact categories. This study focuses on the requirements for televisions (TV). A life cycle assessment (LCA) is carried out on two TVs...

  4. Innovations for Requirements Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    for the Evolution of Requirements Models Allyson Hoss, Doris Carver 129 Text Classification and Machine Learning Support for Requirements...Hoss and Doris L. Carver Department of Computer Science Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA ahoss1@lsu.edu, dcarver@lsu.edu...Algunas reflexiones en el 40° aniversario de los Sistemas de Gerencia de Bases de Datos, ARTech, 2003 www.genexus.com/whitepapers 13. Humphrey

  5. BRD usability requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Alina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-12

    This document describes the usability requirements for the Biosurveillance resource directory (BRD); that is, who will be using the tool and what tasks they will be using it for. It does not include information on technical implementation (e.g., whether specific information is contained in the database or pulled on demand from other sources). It also avoids specific design ideas (such as widget descriptions) unless they are necessary to illustrate a requirement.

  6. Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Uniform requirements are instructions to authors on how to prepare manuscripts.If authors prepare their manuscripts in the style specified in these requirements, editors of the participating journals will not return the manuscripts for changes in style before considering them for publication.In the publishing process, however, the journals may alter accepted manuscripts to conform with details of their publication styles.

  7. CLIC Detector Power Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, A

    2013-01-01

    An estimate for the CLIC detector power requirements is outlined starting from the available data on power consumptions of the four LHC experiments and considering the differences between a typical LHC Detector (CMS) and the CLIC baseline detector concept. In particular the impact of the power pulsing scheme for the CLIC Detector electronics on the overall detector consumption is considered. The document will be updated with the requirements of the sub-detector electronics once they are more defined.

  8. Issues in Requirements Elicitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    oriented domain analysis ( FODA ) continues that the re- quirements analyst uses the products of domain analysis when implementing a new system [Kang 90, p...5]. Therefore, FODA does have applicability to requirements elicitation, and will be overviewed in this section. All requirements originate with the...information. For example, with FODA both an entity relationship model and features model are created. The entity relationship model is particularly useful

  9. Utility requirements for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondrasek, R.J.

    1982-02-01

    This report describes work done and results obtained during performance of Task 1 of a study of Utility Requirements and Criteria for Fusion Options. The work consisted of developing a list of utility requirements for fusion optics containing definition of the requirements and showing their relative importance to the utility industry. The project team members developed a preliminary list which was refined by discussions and literature searches. The refined list was recast as a questionnaire which was sent to a substantial portion of the utility industry in this country. Forty-three questionnaire recipients responded including thirty-two utilities. A workshop was held to develop a revised requirements list using the survey responses as a major input. The list prepared by the workshop was further refined by a panel consisting of vice presidents of the three project team firms. The results of the study indicate that in addition to considering the cost of energy for a power plant, utilities consider twenty-three other requirements. Four of the requirements were judged to be vital to plant acceptability: Plant Capital Cost, Financial Liability, Plant Safety and Licensability.

  10. A sub-tank water-saving drinking water station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting

    2017-05-01

    "Thousands of boiling water" problem has been affecting people's quality of life and good health, and now most of the drinking fountains cannot effectively solve this problem, at the same time, ordinary drinking water also has high energy consumption, there are problems such as yin and yang water. Our newly designed dispenser uses a two-tank heating system. Hot water after heating, into the insulation tank for insulation, when the water tank in the water tank below a certain water level, the cold water and then enter the heating tank heating. Through the water flow, tank volume and other data to calculate the time required for each out of water, so as to determine the best position of the water level control, summed up the optimal program, so that water can be continuously uninterrupted supply. Two cans are placed up and down the way, in the same capacity on the basis of the capacity of the container, the appropriate to reduce its size, and increase the bottom radius, reduce the height of its single tank to ensure that the overall height of two cans compared with the traditional single change. Double anti-dry design, to ensure the safety of the use of drinking water. Heating tank heating circuit on and off by the tank of the float switch control, so that the water heating time from the tank water level control, to avoid the "thousands of boiling water" generation. The entry of cold water is controlled by two solenoid valves in the inlet pipe, and the opening and closing of the solenoid valve is controlled by the float switch in the two tanks. That is, the entry of cold water is determined by the water level of the two tanks. By designing the control scheme cleverly, Yin and yang water generation. Our design completely put an end to the "thousands of boiling water", yin and yang water, greatly improving the drinking water quality, for people's drinking water safety provides a guarantee, in line with the concept of green and healthy development. And in the small

  11. DRIFT-ARID: Application of a method for environmental water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DRIFT-ARID: Application of a method for environmental water requirements ... of water required (EWR) to sustain ecosystem services in non-perennial rivers need ... river types, especially episodic rivers where data are scarce or non-existent.

  12. Water Ways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahrling, Peter

    2007-01-01

    In many communities, schools are among the largest facilities and house the highest concentrations of daytime population. They create a huge demand for water. Even in regions with abundant water supplies, an increase in demand stresses local capacity, and water becomes more expensive. However, with the help of innovative products that reduce water…

  13. Water SA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 43, No 2 (2017) ... WaterSA publishes refereed, original work in all branches of water science, technology and engineering. ... Water SA is the WRC's accredited scientific journal which contains original research articles ... via linearized calibration method in the upstream of Huaihe River Basin, China ...

  14. Burning water: The water footprint of biofuel-based transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens-Leenes, Winnie; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert

    2010-01-01

    The trend towards substitution of conventional transport fuels by biofuels requires additional water. The EU aims to replace 10 percent of total transport fuels by biofuels by 2020. This study calculates the water footprint (WF) of different transport modes using bio-ethanol, biodiesel or

  15. Comparing Russian and Finnish standards of water purification

    OpenAIRE

    Maria, Pupkova

    2012-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is water purification. The first aim of this thesis is to consider different ways of water purification. The second aim is to compare Finnish and Russian standards of water purification. The third one is to show water purification methods on the pattern of Mikkeli water purification plan. Water purification methods of water intended for human consumption will be described.Combined tables will be done according to the quality requirement of drinking water of both,...

  16. Water Availability--The Connection Between Water Use and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Robert M.; Hamilton, Pixie A.; Miller, Timothy L.; Myers, Donna N.

    2008-01-01

    Water availability has become a high priority in the United States, in large part because competition for water is becoming more intense across the Nation. Population growth in many areas competes with demands for water to support irrigation and power production. Cities, farms, and power plants compete for water needed by aquatic ecosystems to support their minimum flow requirements. At the same time, naturally occurring and human-related contaminants from chemical use, land use, and wastewater and industrial discharge are introduced into our waters and diminish its quality. The fact that degraded quality limits the availability and suitability of water for critical uses is a well-known reality in many communities. What may be less understood, but equally true, is that our everyday use of water can significantly affect water quality, and thus its availability. Landscape features (such as geology, soils, and vegetation) along with water-use practices (such as ground-water withdrawals and irrigation) govern water availability because, together, they affect the movement of chemical compounds over the land and in the subsurface. Understanding the interactions of human activities with natural sources and the landscape is critical to effectively managing water and sustaining water availability in the future.

  17. Water/Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator Qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water and Sewage Works, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This article summarizes in tabular form the U.S. and Canadian programs for classification of water and wastewater treatment plant personnel. Included are main characteristics of the programs, educational and experience requirements, and indications of requirement substitutions. (CS)

  18. Water Governance in Central Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djanibekov, Nodir; Assche, Van Kristof; Valentinov, Vladislav

    2016-01-01

    We develop a social systems theory perspective on Central Asian post-Socialist transition, placing particular emphasis on the coordination problems in transboundary water governance. The extensive Soviet water-energy infrastructure around the Amudarya and Syrdarya rivers required coordination, bu

  19. Water and nitrogen requirements of subsurface drip irrigated pomegranate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface drip irrigation is a well-developed practice for both annual and perennial crops. The use of subsurface drip is a well-established practice in many annual row crops, e.g. tomatoes, strawberries, lettuce. However, the use of subsurface drip on perennial crops has been slow to develop. With th...

  20. Water-Quality Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Water Quality? [1.7MB PDF] Past featured science... Water Quality Data Today's Water Conditions Get continuous real- ... list of USGS water-quality data resources . USGS Water Science Areas Water Resources Groundwater Surface Water Water ...

  1. NP Science Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dart, Eli [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rotman, Lauren [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tierney, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-08-26

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. To support SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In August 2011, ESnet and the Office of Nuclear Physics (NP), of the DOE SC, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by NP. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  2. User requirements for satellite snow data service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolberg, S.; Standley, A.; Hiltbrunner, D.; Hallikainen, M.

    1997-12-31

    This report discusses the answers given by ten users or potential users of remotely sensed snow data when asked about their data needs and present measurements, their requirements for remote sensing data and potential of using such, and the models or other analysis tools in which the information is used. The answers show both consensus and differences among the respondents` use of snow data and requirements for remote sensing snow products. For water resources planning and management, the most important variable is snow water equivalent, with acceptable errors around 10%. Acceptable spatial error is typically in the range of 200 m to 1 km. For flood forecasting and short-term runoff simulation, snow covered area is more important, with a classification of 5 to 8 steps being generally sufficient. Meteorologists tend to focus on albedo and snow coverage data, with 5% steps desired for albedo. Geometric resolution and accuracy is less important, temporal resolution and delivery time is more important than in water resource management. For avalanche use, most snow variables except water equivalent are important, several in depth profiles. Spatial and temporal requirements are high. In all user groups there is a desire for models which can use measured values quantitatively. Today, measured snow information is largely interpreted manually and subjectively and lead to actions based on experience and judgement. The organizing of measurements, simulations and calibrated sub-models with varying uncertainty levels is partly a conceptual problem, partly a software problem. 1 ref.

  3. 40 CFR 141.706 - Reporting source water monitoring results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting source water monitoring... Cryptosporidium Source Water Monitoring Requirements § 141.706 Reporting source water monitoring results. (a) Systems must report results from the source water monitoring required under § 141.701 no later than 10...

  4. Assessment of requirements for dry towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, D E; Sonnichsen, J C

    1976-09-01

    The regional limitations of surface water supplies in the U.S. were assessed with respect to the consumptive use requirements of wet cooling towers. The study simulated unit consumptive use factors by region, assessed regional water supplies, and examined electric load projections through 2000 A.D. to ascertain where and when water limitations may occur and, therefore, where dry cooling may be required. It was concluded that the cooling water supply situation in the United States through the year 2000 is adequate in most areas, but is uncertain over much of the Southwest. The uncertainty is related to increasing competition for the available supplies and to potential Federal and/or State policy decisions that may have a significant effect on power plant cooling. Limitations on coastal siting, seismic zone constraints, and state constraints on the purchase and transfer of water rights from other uses to cooling supply have the potential of bringing wet/dry or dry cooling into relatively common use in the 1990's. (LCL)

  5. Improved Marine Waters Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazov, Atanas; Yakushev, Evgeniy; Milkova, Tanya; Slabakova, Violeta; Hristova, Ognyana

    2017-04-01

    IMAMO - Improved Marine Waters Monitoring is a project under the Programme BG02: Improved monitoring of marine waters, managed by Bulgarian Ministry of environment and waters and co-financed by the Financial Mechanism of the European Economic Area (EEA FM) 2009 - 2014. Project Beneficiary is the Institute of oceanology - Bulgarian Academy of Sciences with two partners: Norwegian Institute for Water Research and Bulgarian Black Sea Basin Directorate. The Project aims to improve the monitoring capacity and expertise of the organizations responsible for marine waters monitoring in Bulgaria to meet the requirements of EU and national legislation. The main outcomes are to fill the gaps in information from the Initial assessment of the marine environment and to collect data to assess the current ecological status of marine waters including information as a base for revision of ecological targets established by the monitoring programme prepared in 2014 under Art. 11 of MSFD. Project activities are targeted to ensure data for Descriptors 5, 8 and 9. IMAMO aims to increase the institutional capacity of the Bulgarian partners related to the monitoring and assessment of the Black Sea environment. The main outputs are: establishment of real time monitoring and set up of accredited laboratory facilities for marine waters and sediments chemical analysis to ensure the ability of Bulgarian partners to monitor progress of subsequent measures undertaken.

  6. Bottled Water Mania: Americas Misguided Infatuation with Bottled Water over Tap Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    to remove pathogens. There are no requirements for filtration of bottled water. Tap water must be tested for cryptosporidium, giardia, and viruses ...Plastic bottles in landfills can take hundreds of years to decompose, causing a profound environmental impact. The oceans are another victim of

  7. Ensuring water supply for all towns and villages in the Eastern Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    water requirement reconciliation strategies for all towns and villages in South Africa .... components or changing weather pattern results in water short- ages that could ..... of the Directorate: Reserve Requirements, Department of Water. Affairs ...

  8. Army Sociocultural Performance Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    L., Crafts, J. L., & Brooks, J. E. (July 1995). Intercultural communication requirements for Special Forces teams. (Study Report 1683). Arlington... Communication Uses alternative, sometimes novel, methods to communicate when verbal language is not shared; conveys information about mood, intent...status, and demeanor via gestures, tone of voice, and facial expressions; improvises communication techniques as necessary. WI Works with Interpreters

  9. Requirements for Xenon International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  10. Requirements for Xenon International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Harper, Warren W.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Humble, Paul H.; Madison, Jill C.; Morris, Scott J.; Panisko, Mark E.; Ripplinger, Mike D.; Stewart, Timothy L.

    2015-12-30

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  11. Lunar base construction requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Steve; Helleckson, Brent

    1990-01-01

    The following viewgraph presentation is a review of the Lunar Base Constructibility Study carried out in the spring and summer of 1990. The objective of the study was to develop a method for evaluating the constructibility of Phase A proposals to build facilities on orbit or on extraterrestrial surfaces. Space construction was broadly defined as all forms of assembly, disassembly, connection, disconnection, deployment, stowage, excavation, emplacement, activation, test, transportation, etc., required to create facilities in orbit and on the surfaces of other celestial bodies. It was discovered that decisions made in the face of stated and unstated assumptions early in the design process (commonly called Phase A) can lock in non-optimal construction methods. Often, in order to construct the design, alterations must be made to the design during much later phases of the project. Such 'fixes' can be very difficult, expensive, or perhaps impossible. Assessing constructibility should thus be a part of the iterative design process, starting with the Phase A studies and continuing through production. This study assumes that there exists a minimum set of key construction requirements (i.e., questions whose answers form the set of discriminators) that must be implied or specified in order to assess the constructibility of the design. This set of construction requirements constitutes a 'constructibility filter' which then becomes part of the iterative design process. Five inherently different, dichotomous design reference missions were used in the extraction of these requirements to assure the depth and breath of the list.

  12. INDECT Advanced Security Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Uruena, Manuel; Martinez, Maria; Niemiec, Marcin; Stoianov, Nikolai

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the requirements for the security mechanisms that are currently being developed in the framework of the European research project INDECT. An overview of features for integrated technologies such as Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), Cryptographic Algorithms, Quantum Cryptography, Federated ID Management and Secure Mobile Ad-hoc networking are described together with their expected use in INDECT.

  13. Protein Requirements during Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda Courtney-Martin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein recommendations for elderly, both men and women, are based on nitrogen balance studies. They are set at 0.66 and 0.8 g/kg/day as the estimated average requirement (EAR and recommended dietary allowance (RDA, respectively, similar to young adults. This recommendation is based on single linear regression of available nitrogen balance data obtained at test protein intakes close to or below zero balance. Using the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO method, we estimated the protein requirement in young adults and in both elderly men and women to be 0.9 and 1.2 g/kg/day as the EAR and RDA, respectively. This suggests that there is no difference in requirement on a gender basis or on a per kg body weight basis between younger and older adults. The requirement estimates however are ~40% higher than the current protein recommendations on a body weight basis. They are also 40% higher than our estimates in young men when calculated on the basis of fat free mass. Thus, current recommendations may need to be re-assessed. Potential rationale for this difference includes a decreased sensitivity to dietary amino acids and increased insulin resistance in the elderly compared with younger individuals.

  14. Data Crosscutting Requirements Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shoshani, Arie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Plata, Charity [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    In April 2013, a diverse group of researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) scientific community assembled to assess data requirements associated with DOE-sponsored scientific facilities and large-scale experiments. Participants in the review included facilities staff, program managers, and scientific experts from the offices of Basic Energy Sciences, Biological and Environmental Research, High Energy Physics, and Advanced Scientific Computing Research. As part of the meeting, review participants discussed key issues associated with three distinct aspects of the data challenge: 1) processing, 2) management, and 3) analysis. These discussions identified commonalities and differences among the needs of varied scientific communities. They also helped to articulate gaps between current approaches and future needs, as well as the research advances that will be required to close these gaps. Moreover, the review provided a rare opportunity for experts from across the Office of Science to learn about their collective expertise, challenges, and opportunities. The "Data Crosscutting Requirements Review" generated specific findings and recommendations for addressing large-scale data crosscutting requirements.

  15. User Requirements for Wireless

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    technologies or software has been developed. A variety of user requirements are provided illustrating the effect of changing the targeted user group with respect to age,; to the context and the different technologies or software as well as to the difference in viewpoint on ways of involving users...

  16. Integration of hydrogeology and soil science for sustainable water resources-focus on water quantity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased biofuel production has heightened awareness of the strong linkages between crop water use and depletion of water resources. Irrigated agriculture consumed 90% of global fresh water resources during the past century. Addressing crop water use and depletion of groundwater resources requires ...

  17. Fast Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Beijing’s Water Cube tailor made for swimming success The water in the Water Cube pool is tranquil now. The predatory power of American Michael Phelps churning his way to an unprecedented eighth gold medal in the men’s 4x100 meters medley relay, took swimming to new heights. And there is no doubt that Beijing’s bubbleshaped aquatics center helped in the process of the 21 new world swimming records.

  18. Supercritical water

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Yizhak

    2012-01-01

    Discover the many new and emerging applications of supercritical water as a green solvent Drawing from thousands of original research articles, this book reviews and summarizes what is currently known about the properties and uses of supercritical water. In particular, it focuses on new and emerging applications of supercritical water as a green solvent, including the catalytic conversion of biomass into fuels and the oxidation of hazardous materials. Supercritical Water begins with an introduction that defines supercritical fluids in general. It then defines supercritical wa

  19. European attitudes to water pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Kejser

    2016-01-01

    Efficient use of the water resource requires internalization of all costs in the price of water, including environmental and resource costs. However, water resource management tends to be highly political and increasing water prices are a sensitive and complicated policy matter. Hence......, there is a need for increased understanding of the implementation process and the attitudes towards implementation among the general public. This paper explores the spatial heterogeneity in the public attitude towards internalizing environmental and resource costs in the price of water across the EU regions....... Within an extensive spatial dataset constructed for the purpose, we estimate the effect of individual information levels and affordability concerns on the attitude towards environmental water pricing. Information about water problems is found to have a significant and positive effect on attitudes...

  20. Food and water supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, I. G.

    1975-01-01

    Supplying astronauts with adequate food and water on short and long-term space flights is discussed based on experiences gained in space flight. Food consumption, energy requirements, and suitability of the foodstuffs for space flight are among the factors considered. Physicochemical and biological methods of food production and regeneration of water from astronaut metabolic wastes, as well as wastes produced in a closed ecological system, or as a result of technical processes taking place in various spacecraft systems are suggested for long-term space flights.