WorldWideScience

Sample records for water reducing agent

  1. Research on the Preparation and Performance of Binary Modified Maltodextrin Water-Reducing Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingzhi Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using maltodextrin (MD of different dextrose equivalent (DE values, 1,3-propanesultone, and maleic anhydride as raw materials, a novel binary modified maltodextrin (BMMD was synthesized and further applied as a water-reducing agent. Its structure was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and UV. The rheological behavior of the sample solution and strengths for concrete were also determined and the adsorption was tested by TOC. The influence of the process parameters to degree of substitution (DS and the dosage on the fluidity of cement paste were investigated. The results show that the optimal conditions of sulfonation were the MD of DE 15, m (sulfonated agent/m (MD of 1.4, the catalyst amount of 1% by mass MD, and the reaction time of 12 h; the optimal conditions of esterification were m (esterified agent/m (SMD of 0.6, the reaction temperature of 90°C, and the reaction time of 4 h. The optimal dosages of sulfonated maltodextrin (SMD and BMMD were 0.475% and 0.45%, respectively. In this dosage, the main dispersion capacity of BMMD attributes to two kinds of anchoring groups (SO3-  &  COO- and the appropriate molecular weight of MD.

  2. An overview of advanced reduction processes for bromate removal from drinking water: Reducing agents, activation methods, applications and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qian; Yu, Shuili; Li, Lei; Wang, Ting; Liao, Xinlei; Ye, Yubing

    2017-02-15

    Bromate (BrO 3 - ) is a possible human carcinogen regulated at a strict standard of 10μg/L in drinking water. Various techniques to eliminate BrO 3 - usually fall into three main categories: reducing bromide (Br - ) prior to formation of BrO 3 - , minimizing BrO 3 - formation during the ozonation process, and removing BrO 3 - from post-ozonation waters. However, the first two approaches exhibit low degradation efficiency and high treatment cost. The third workaround has obvious advantages, such as high reduction efficiency, more stable performance and easier combination with UV disinfection, and has therefore been widely implemented in water treatment. Recently, advanced reduction processes (ARPs), the photocatalysis of BrO 3 - , have attracted much attention due to improved performance. To increase the feasibility of photocatalytic systems, the focus of this work concerns new technological developments, followed by a summary of reducing agents, activation methods, operational parameters, and applications. The reaction mechanisms of two typical processes involving UV/sulfite homogeneous photocatalysis and UV/titanium dioxide heterogeneous photocatalysis are further summarized. The future research needs for ARPs to reach full-scale potential in drinking water treatment are suggested accordingly. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Irradiated chitosan nanoparticle as a water-based antioxidant and reducing agent for a green synthesis of gold nanoplatforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasanphan, Wanvimol; Rattanawongwiboon, Thitirat; Choofong, Surakarn; Güven, Olgun; Katti, Kattesh K.

    2015-01-01

    The idea of preparing water-soluble chitosan and observing its nanostructural morphology are proposed using irradiation process. The water-soluble chitosan nanoparticles (WSCS-NPs) properties were assessed for a possible use as an antioxidant and reducing agent for a green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The characteristics of WSCS-NPs were verified using FT-IR, XRD, C H N analyzer and TGA. The nanostructural morphology was investigated using SEM and TEM. The number average molecular weight of WSCS-NPs was as low as 3800 g/mol with narrow polydispersity of 1.26. The average hydrodynamic diameter of WSCS-NPs was 15.40±0.47 nm. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity of WSCS-NPs at 0.1 mg/mL was up to 80%, while the original CS exhibited no antioxidant activity. An effective concentration of WSCS-NPs to reduce DPPH free radicals (150 μM) by 50% is as low as 0.025 mg/mL. The in vitro cytotoxicity test by MTT assay demonstrated that WSCS-NPs are non-toxic with an IC50 of 2000 μg/mL. The WSCS-NPs are efficient reducing and stabilizing agent for producing stable colloidal AuNPs. The achievement of the WSCS-NPs and its ability to create AuNPs would be a part of growing interest of green nanotechnology in biomedicine.

  4. Facile synthesis of water-dispersible Cu2O nanocrystal-reduced graphene oxide hybrid as a promising cancer therapeutic agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chengyi; Quan, Haocheng; Duan, Yourong; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Yaogang

    2013-01-01

    We report a Cu2O nanocrystal-reduced graphene oxide hybrid that is dispersible in water and has anticancer activity under both visible and near-infrared light irradiation. In contrast to the highly efficient killing of both normal and cancer cells initiated by the photothermal effect, the photocatalytic effect of this material results in the selective killing of cancer cells under visible light irradiation. These results have implications for safe and widely applicable cancer therapy agents.We report a Cu2O nanocrystal-reduced graphene oxide hybrid that is dispersible in water and has anticancer activity under both visible and near-infrared light irradiation. In contrast to the highly efficient killing of both normal and cancer cells initiated by the photothermal effect, the photocatalytic effect of this material results in the selective killing of cancer cells under visible light irradiation. These results have implications for safe and widely applicable cancer therapy agents. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization of the over-reduced products and the photocatalytic activity of the CRGO. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32938g

  5. Electron beam induced water-soluble silk fibroin nanoparticles as a natural antioxidant and reducing agent for a green synthesis of gold nanocolloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongkrongsak, Soraya; Tangthong, Theeranan; Pasanphan, Wanvimol

    2016-01-01

    The research proposes a novel water-soluble silk fibroin nanoparticles (WSSF-NPs) created by electron beam irradiation. In this report, we demonstrate the effects of electron beam irradiation doses ranging from 1 to 30 kGy on the molecular weight (MW), nanostructure formation, antioxidant activity and reducing power of the WSSF-NPs. Electron beam-induced degradation of SF causing MW reduction from 250 to 37 kDa. Chemical characteristic functions of SF still remained after exposing to electron beam. The WSSF-NPs with the MW of 37 kDa exhibited spherical morphology with a nanoscaled size of 40 nm. Antioxidant activities and reducing powers were investigated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhryl free radical (DPPH•) scavenging activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays, respectively. The WSSF-NPs showed greater antioxidant activity and reducing power than non-irradiated SF. By increasing their antioxidant and reducing power efficiencies, WSSF-NPs potentially created gold nanocolloid. WSSF-NPs produced by electron beam irradiation would be a great merit for the uses as a natural antioxidant additive and a green reducing agent in biomedical, cosmetic and food applications.

  6. Biomass Pyrolysis Solids as Reducing Agents: Comparison with Commercial Reducing Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrados, Aitziber; De Marco, Isabel; López-Urionabarrenechea, Alexander; Solar, Jon; Caballero, Blanca M.; Gastelu, Naia

    2015-01-01

    Biomass is one of the most suitable options to be used as renewable energy source due to its extensive availability and its contribution to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass under appropriate conditions (slow heating rate and high temperatures) can produce a quality solid product, which could be applicable to several metallurgical processes as reducing agent (biocoke or bioreducer). Two woody biomass samples (olives and eucalyptus) were pyrolyzed to produce biocoke. These biocokes were characterized by means of proximate and ultimate analysis, real density, specific surface area, and porosity and were compared with three commercial reducing agents. Finally, reactivity tests were performed both with the biocokes and with the commercial reducing agents. Bioreducers have lower ash and sulfur contents than commercial reducers, higher surface area and porosity, and consequently, much higher reactivity. Bioreducers are not appropriate to be used as top burden in blast furnaces, but they can be used as fuel and reducing agent either tuyére injected at the lower part of the blast furnace or in non-ferrous metallurgical processes where no mechanical strength is needed as, for example, in rotary kilns. PMID:28787805

  7. Selective Catalytic Reduction Study with Alternative Reducing Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Lourenco, AAD; Martins, CA; Lacava, PT; Ferreira, MA

    2013-01-01

    Diesel engine technology has been driven by increasingly stringent environmental legislation. To comply with these laws, emissions-control systems are being rapidly improved. Within this context, development of exhaust gas after-treatment systems undertakes a significant role. Among the techniques used is selective catalytic reduction (SCR), which converts nitrogen oxides (NOx) into diatomic nitrogen (N-2) and water (H2O). A reducing agent containing ammonia (NH3) is added to the flow and abs...

  8. Development of spraying agent for reducing drying shrinkage of mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hiromi; Maruoka, Masanori; Liu, Lingling

    2017-02-01

    Mortar used to repair is sometimes exposed to drying state in early ages after construction and a few days later water is sprayed frequently on the surface of the mortar in order to prevent cracks. This research studied on shrinkage characteristic of mortar subjected to drying conditions like this. The result showed that the water spraying on the mortar after initial drying did not have any effect to prevent shrinkage, but increased. And it also showed when various chemical agents are mixed and used in watersprayingit had the prevention effect on shrinkage. This report was to understand this kind of phenomenon and clarify the mechanism. In addition, based on the results, the new spraying agent was developed to reduce drying shrinkage.

  9. Why fibers are better turbulent drag reducing agents than polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, Arnout; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2016-11-01

    It is typically found in literature that fibers are not as effective as drag reducing agents as polymers. However, for low concentrations, when adding charged polymers to either distilled or salt water, it is found that polymers showing rod-like behavior are better drag reducing agents than polymers showing coil-like behavior. In this study, using hybrid Direct Numerical Simulation with Langevin dynamics, a comparison is performed between polymer and fiber stress tensors in turbulent flow. The stress tensors are found to be similar, suggesting a common drag reducing mechanism in the onset regime. Since fibers do not have an elastic backbone, this must be a viscous effect. Analysis of the viscosity tensor reveals that all terms are negligible, except the off-diagonal shear viscosity associated with rotation. Based on this analysis, we are able to explain why charged polymers showing rod-like behavior are better drag reducing agents than polymers showing coil-like behavior. Additionally, we identify the rotational orientation time as the unifying time scale setting a new time criterion for drag reduction by both flexible polymers and rigid fibers. This research was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1404940 and AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-14-1-0164.

  10. Multi-agent Water Resources Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelletti, A.; Giuliani, M.

    2011-12-01

    Increasing environmental awareness and emerging trends such as water trading, energy market, deregulation and democratization of water-related services are challenging integrated water resources planning and management worldwide. The traditional approach to water management design based on sector-by-sector optimization has to be reshaped to account for multiple interrelated decision-makers and many stakeholders with increasing decision power. Centralized management, though interesting from a conceptual point of view, is unfeasible in most of the modern social and institutional contexts, and often economically inefficient. Coordinated management, where different actors interact within a full open trust exchange paradigm under some institutional supervision is a promising alternative to the ideal centralized solution and the actual uncoordinated practices. This is a significant issue in most of the Southern Alps regulated lakes, where upstream hydropower reservoirs maximize their benefit independently form downstream users; it becomes even more relevant in the case of transboundary systems, where water management upstream affects water availability downstream (e.g. the River Zambesi flowing through Zambia, Zimbabwe and Mozambique or the Red River flowing from South-Western China through Northern Vietnam. In this study we apply Multi-Agent Systems (MAS) theory to design an optimal management in a decentralized way, considering a set of multiple autonomous agents acting in the same environment and taking into account the pay-off of individual water users, which are inherently distributed along the river and need to coordinate to jointly reach their objectives. In this way each real-world actor, representing the decision-making entity (e.g. the operator of a reservoir or a diversion dam) can be represented one-to-one by a computer agent, defined as a computer system that is situated in some environment and that is capable of autonomous action in this environment in

  11. An Agent Based Model of Household Water Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clinton J. Andrews

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Households consume a significant fraction of total potable water production. Strategies to improve the efficiency of water use tend to emphasize technological interventions to reduce or shift water demand. Behavioral water use reduction strategies can also play an important role, but a flexible framework for exploring the “what-ifs” has not been available. This paper introduces such a framework, presenting an agent-based model of household water-consuming behavior. The model simulates hourly water-using activities of household members within a rich technological and behavioral context, calibrated with appropriate data. Illustrative experiments compare the resulting water usage of U.S. and Dutch households and their associated water-using technologies, different household types (singles, families with children, and retired couples, different water metering regimes, and educational campaigns. All else equal, Dutch and metered households use less water. Retired households use more water because they are more often at home. Water-saving educational campaigns are effective for the part of the population that is receptive. Important interactions among these factors, both technological and behavioral, highlight the value of this framework for integrated analysis of the human-technology-water system.

  12. Biomass Pyrolysis Solids as Reducing Agents: Comparison with Commercial Reducing Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adrados, Aitziber; De Marco, Isabel; López-Urionabarrenechea, Alexander; Solar, Jon; Caballero, Blanca; Gastelu, Naia

    ... to its extensive availability and its contribution to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass under appropriate conditions (slow heating rate and high temperatures)...

  13. In situ generation of silver nanoparticles in poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) polymer membranes in the absence of reducing agent and their effect on pervaporation of a water/acetic acid mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhard, Shvshankar; Kwon, Yong Sung; Moon, MyungJun; Shon, Min Young [Dept. of Industrial Chemistry, Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, You In; Nam, Seung Eun [Center for membranes, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The in situ generation of silver nanoparticles in a poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) (PVA/PAA) polymer matrix in the absence of any additional reducing agent is reported and tends to the membrane fabrication using solution-casting. Its effect on the separation of a water/acetic acid mixture by pervaporation is described. The results of UV spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses showed that the silver nanoparticles were successfully prepared and well dispersed in the polymer matrix. The increased hydrophilicity of the PVA/PAA membrane due to the presence of silver nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements, and membrane absorption studies. Pervaporation data for composite membranes showed a three-fold increase in the flux value, while the initially decreased separation factor subsequently showed a constant value. Overall, the pervaporation data suggested that the presence of silver nanoparticles benefited the dehydration process.

  14. Natural Ferrihydrite as an Agent for Reducing Turbidity Caused by Suspended Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    The turbidity of water can be reduced by the addition of positively charged compounds which coagulate negatively charged clay particles in suspension causing them to flocculate. This research was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the Fe oxide mineral ferrihydrite as a flocculating agent fo...

  15. Water neutral: reducing and ofsetting water footprints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert

    2008-01-01

    During the past few years the concept of the ‘water footprint’ has started to receive recognition within governments, non-governmental organizations, businesses and media as a useful indicator of water use. The increased interest in the water-footprint concept has prompted the question about what

  16. Study of Ascorbic Acid as Iron(III Reducing Agent for Spectrophotometric Iron Speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antesar Elmagirbi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of ascorbic acid as a reducing agent for iron(III has been investigated in order to obtain an alternative carcinogenic reducing agent, hydroxylamine, used in spectrophotometric standard method based on the formation of a red-orange complex of Fe(II-o-phenanthroline. The study was optimised with regards to ascorbic acid concentration as well as pH solution. The results showed that ascorbic acid showed maximum capacity as reducing agent of iron(III under concentration of 4.46.10-4 M and pH solution of 1-4.Under these conditions, ascorbic acid reduced iron(III proportionally and performed similarly to that of hydroxylamine.  The method gave result to linear calibration over the range of 0.2-2 mg/L withhigh accuracy of 97 % and relative standard deviation of less than 2 %. This method was successfully applied to assay iron speciation in water samples.

  17. Cholesterol reducing agents inhibit assembly of type I parainfluenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajimaya, Shringkhala; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Frankl, Tünde; Bryk, Peter; Ward, Brian; Takimoto, Toru

    2017-01-15

    Many enveloped RNA viruses utilize lipid rafts for the assembly of progeny virions, but the role of cholesterol, a major component of rafts, on paramyxovirus budding and virion formation is controversial. In this study, we analyzed the effects of FDA-approved cholesterol-reducing agents, gemfibrozil and lovastatin, on raft formation and assembly of human parainfluenza virus type 1 (hPIV1) and Sendai virus (SeV). Treatment of the human airway epithelial A549 cells with the agents, especially when combined, significantly decreased production of infectious hPIV1 and SeV. Mechanistic analysis indicated that depletion of cellular cholesterol reduced cell surface accumulation of envelope glycoproteins and association of viral matrix and nucleocapsids with raft membrane, which resulted in impaired virus budding and release from the cells. These results indicate that cellular cholesterol is required for assembly and formation of type 1 parainfluenza viruses and suggest that cholesterol could be an attractive target for antiviral agents against hPIV1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of nitrogen containing reducing agents for the corrosion control of materials relevant to nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Padma S. [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, BARC Facilities, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India); Mohan, D. [Department of Chemistry, Anna University, Chennai, Tamilnadu (India); Chandran, Sinu; Rajesh, Puspalata; Rangarajan, S. [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, BARC Facilities, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India); Velmurugan, S., E-mail: svelu@igcar.gov.in [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, BARC Facilities, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India)

    2017-02-01

    Materials undergo enhanced corrosion in the presence of oxidants in aqueous media. Usually, hydrogen gas or water soluble reducing agents are used for inhibiting corrosion. In the present study, the feasibility of using alternate reducing agents such as hydrazine, aqueous ammonia, and hydroxylamine that can stay in the liquid phase was investigated. A comparative study of corrosion behavior of the structural materials of the nuclear reactor viz. carbon steel (CS), stainless steel (SS-304 LN), monel-400 and incoloy-800 in the oxidizing and reducing conditions was also made. In nuclear industry, the presence of radiation field adds to the corrosion problems. The radiolysis products of water such as oxygen and hydrogen peroxide create an oxidizing environment that enhances the corrosion. Electrochemical studies at 90 °C showed that the reducing agents investigated were efficient in controlling corrosion processes in the presence of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. Evaluation of thermal stability of hydrazine and its effect on corrosion potential of SS-304 LN were also investigated in the temperature range of 200–280 °C. The results showed that the thermal decomposition of hydrazine followed a first order kinetics. Besides, a change in electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) was observed from −0.4 V (Vs SHE) to −0.67 V (Vs SHE) on addition of 5 ppm of hydrazine at 240 °C. Investigations were also made to understand the distribution behavior of hydrogen peroxide and hydrazine in water-steam phases and it was found that both the phases showed identical behavior. - Highlights: • Hydrazine was found to be a promising reducing agent for oxidant control. • In presence of hydrazine corrosion potential of SS304 LN was well below −230 mV. • SS304LN could be protected from IGSCC by hydrazine addition. • Thermal and radiation stability of hydrazine at 285 °C was found satisfactory.

  19. Solid-phase reducing agents as alternative for reducing disulfide bonds in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazú, Valeria; Ovsejevi, Karen; Cuadra, Karina; Betancor, Lorena; Manta, Carmen; Batista-Viera, Francisco

    2003-07-01

    Disulfide reduction of Kluyveromyces lactis and Aspergillus oryzae beta-galactosidases and beta-lactoglobulin was assessed. Reduction was performed using one of two thiol-containing agents: dithiothreitol (DTT) or thiopropyl-agarose with a high degree of substitution (1000 micromol of SH groups/g of dried gel). Both reductants allowed an increase of three- (for K. lactis beta-galactosidase) and fourfold (for A. oryzae beta-galactosidase) in the initial content of SH groups in the lactases. Nearly sevenfold fewer micromoles of SH groups per milligram of protein were needed to perform the reduction of K. lactis beta-galactosidase with thiopropyl-agarose than for the same reduction with DTT. However, for A. oryzae beta-galactosidase, nearly twice as many micromoles of SH groups per milligram of protein were needed with thiopropylagarose than with DTT. Disulfide bonds in beta-lactoglobulin were not accessible to thiopropyl-agarose, since this reduction was only possible in the presence of 6 M urea. These results proved that highly substituted thiopropyl-agarose is as good a reducing agent as DTT, for the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins. Moreover, excess reducing agent was very simply separated from the reduced protein by filtration, making it easier to control the reaction and providing reduced protein solutions free of reductant. All these advantages substantially cut down the time required and therefore the cost of the overall process.

  20. A global analysis on water-based fire extinguishing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, Shuai

    2017-04-01

    Due to the superiority of the attribute of water, water-based fire extinguishing agent is considered as one of most effectively fire extinguishing agents. NFPA has developed two standards regarding to water-based fire extinguishing agents. ISO technical committee working group is also preparing for developing a standard about the subject fire extinguishing agent. China also has its own national GB standard about water-based standard. This paper aims at to elaborate standard requirements and methods in different technical documents and standards currently available around the world with a view to summarize the main concern in different standards, and trying to find out valuable information for readers in future research and development.

  1. Decontamination of Water Containing Radiological Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-03-01

    fission, Stagg Stadium, University of Chicago. 16 Jul 45 - Alamagordo, New Mexico TRINITY shot, 19 kt. 5 Aug 45 - "Little Boy" atom bomb, Hliroshima...of New Mexico nuclear age. Nevada Test Site Nuclear 100 ki 4,700 shot Sedan - largest continental shot. Novaya Zemlya (USSR) Nuclear 50 u10 39,000...muultipurpose uInit capalli’ of producilg potable drinking water tromin •%haltev er ra%% water source may lie available. The rev•,rse sismos (1Ito

  2. Effect of reducing agents on wheat gluten and quality characteristics of flour and cookies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen KUMAR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of reducing agents (Lcystine, glutathione and proteases on wheat gluten recovery and quality characteristics of dough and cookies. PBW-343 and RAJ-3765 wheat varieties were analysed for physico-chemical properties which indicated that wheat variety RAJ-3765 had superior quality characteristics in comparison to PBW-343. Wet gluten and dry gluten %yields were reduced with addition of reducing agents. As the concentration of reducing agents increased gluten, yield decreased further. The dough strength (resistance to extension decreased, whereas extension of dough increased significantly with the addition of reducing agents. Upon addition of reducing agents, spread factor increased, whereas hardness decreased. Glutathione was found to be the most effective reducing agent out of the three reducing agents used in this study.

  3. ASSET AND AGENT IN ACHIEVING SUSTAINABLE WATER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    urban water supply as well as tremendous impact on the urban natural environment. Added to this, is the anthropogenitic .... pose threats to ecosystems health and the well-being of urban environments in general. Urban sustainability proponents ... infrastructure in good working condition. Protecting the infrastructure used to ...

  4. Evaluating Water Demand Using Agent-Based Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, T. S.

    2004-12-01

    The supply and demand of water resources are functions of complex, inter-related systems including hydrology, climate, demographics, economics, and policy. To assess the safety and sustainability of water resources, planners often rely on complex numerical models that relate some or all of these systems using mathematical abstractions. The accuracy of these models relies on how well the abstractions capture the true nature of the systems interactions. Typically, these abstractions are based on analyses of observations and/or experiments that account only for the statistical mean behavior of each system. This limits the approach in two important ways: 1) It cannot capture cross-system disruptive events, such as major drought, significant policy change, or terrorist attack, and 2) it cannot resolve sub-system level responses. To overcome these limitations, we are developing an agent-based water resources model that includes the systems of hydrology, climate, demographics, economics, and policy, to examine water demand during normal and extraordinary conditions. Agent-based modeling (ABM) develops functional relationships between systems by modeling the interaction between individuals (agents), who behave according to a probabilistic set of rules. ABM is a "bottom-up" modeling approach in that it defines macro-system behavior by modeling the micro-behavior of individual agents. While each agent's behavior is often simple and predictable, the aggregate behavior of all agents in each system can be complex, unpredictable, and different than behaviors observed in mean-behavior models. Furthermore, the ABM approach creates a virtual laboratory where the effects of policy changes and/or extraordinary events can be simulated. Our model, which is based on the demographics and hydrology of the Middle Rio Grande Basin in the state of New Mexico, includes agent groups of residential, agricultural, and industrial users. Each agent within each group determines its water usage

  5. Green Formation of Spherical and Dendritic Silver Nanostructures under Microwave Irradiation without Reducing Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Noroozi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapid and green formation of spherical and dendritic silver nanostructures based on microwave irradiation time was investigated. Silver nanoparticles were successfully fabricated by reduction of Ag+ in a water medium and using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP as the stabilizing agent and without the use of any other reducing agent, and were compared with those synthesized by conventional heating method. UV–vis absorption spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS and photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS measurements, indicated that increasing the irradiation time enhanced the concentration of silver nanoparticles and slightly increased the particle size. There was a lack of large silver nanoparticles at a high concentration, but interestingly, the formation and growth of silver dendrite nanostructures appeared. Compared to conventional heating methods, the silver nanoparticle suspension produced by irradiated microwaves was more stable over a six-month period in aqueous solution without any signs of precipitation.

  6. Toothpastes containing abrasive and chemical whitening agents: efficacy in reducing extrinsic dental staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Cristina Neves Girao Salgado; Amaral, Flavia Lucisano Botelho do; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Franca, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the efficacy of toothpastes containing abrasive and chemical whitening agents in reducing the extrinsic discoloration of dental enamel. Sixty slabs of dentin from human teeth were sealed so that only the enamel surface was exposed. The enamel surfaces were photographed for initial color assessment. Staining was performed by immersing the dental slabs in 0.2% chlorhexidine solution for 2 minutes and then in black tea for 60 minutes. This process was repeated 15 times. Photographs were taken at the end of the staining process, and the slabs were divided into 5 groups (n = 12), 3 to be brushed with toothpastes containing chemical whitening agents (2 containing phosphate salts and 1 containing phosphate salts plus hydrogen peroxide) and 2 to represent control groups (ordinary/nonwhitening toothpaste and distilled water). The dental slabs were subjected to mechanical toothbrushing with toothpaste slurry or distilled water, according to each group's specifications. After brushing, more photographs were taken for color analysis. The results showed a significant reduction in luminosity after the staining process in addition to an increase in the colors red and yellow (P whitening toothpastes and the changes found in slabs brushed with ordinary toothpaste. The whitening toothpastes did not outperform an ordinary toothpaste in the removal of extrinsic staining.

  7. Have Chinese water pricing reforms reduced urban residential water demand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B.; Fang, K. H.; Baerenklau, K. A.

    2017-06-01

    China continues to deal with severe levels of water scarcity and water pollution. To help address this situation, the Chinese central government initiated urban water pricing reforms in 2002 that emphasized the adoption of increasing block rate (IBR) price structures in place of existing uniform rate structures. By combining urban water use records with microlevel data from the Chinese Urban Household Survey, this research investigates the effectiveness of this national policy reform. Specifically, we compare household water consumption in 28 cities that adopted IBR pricing structures during 2002-2009, with that of 110 cities that had not yet done so. Based on difference-in-differences models, our results show that the policy reform reduced annual residential water demand by 3-4% in the short run and 5% in the longer run. These relatively modest reductions are consistent with the generous nature of the IBR pricing structures that Chinese cities have typically chosen to implement. Our results imply that more efforts are needed to address China's persistent urban water scarcity challenges.

  8. Orange juice substantially reduces the bioavailability of the beta-adrenergic-blocking agent celiprolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Jari J; Juntti-Patinen, Laura; Neuvonen, Pertti J

    2004-03-01

    Grapefruit juice was recently found to decrease plasma concentrations of the beta-adrenergic receptor-blocking agent celiprolol. Our objective was to investigate the effect of orange juice on the pharmacokinetics of celiprolol in healthy subjects. In a randomized crossover study with 2 phases and a washout of 2 weeks, 10 healthy volunteers ingested either 200 mL normal-strength orange juice or water 3 times a day for 2 days. On the morning of day 3, 1 hour after ingestion of 200 mL orange juice or water, each subject ingested 100 mg celiprolol with either 200 mL orange juice or water. In addition, 200 mL orange juice or water was ingested at 4, 10, 22, and 27 hours after celiprolol intake. The concentrations of celiprolol in plasma and its excretion into urine were measured up to 33 hours after its dosing. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures and heart rate were recorded up to 10 hours. Orange juice reduced the mean peak plasma concentration of celiprolol by 89% (P orange juice. Orange juice reduced the urinary excretion of celiprolol by 77% (P Orange juice substantially reduces the bioavailability of celiprolol, but the mechanism of this interaction remains to be resolved. For example, modulation of intestinal pH and of function of transporters implicated in the absorption of celiprolol may be involved. Because of the great extent of the orange juice-celiprolol interaction and a wide use of orange juice, this interaction is likely to have clinical importance in some patients, although hemodynamic consequences were not seen in young healthy subjects.

  9. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases from Myceliophthora thermophila C1 differ in substrate preference and reducing agent specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Frommhagen, Matthias; Koetsier, Martijn J; Westphal, Adrie H.; Visser, Jaap; Hinz, Sandra W A; Vincken, Jean Paul; Berkel, van, T.J.C.; Kabel, Mirjam A.; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Background Lytic polysaccharide monooxgygenases (LPMOs) are known to boost the hydrolytic breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass, especially cellulose, due to their oxidative mechanism. For their activity, LPMOs require an electron donor for reducing the divalent copper cofactor. LPMO activities are mainly investigated with ascorbic acid as a reducing agent, but little is known about the effect of plant-derived reducing agents on LPMOs activity. Results Here, we show that three LPMOs from the f...

  10. Survival of Viral Biowarfare Agents in Disinfected Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Margaret Wade

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Protecting civilian and military water supplies has received more attention since the United States began its war on terror in 2001. Both chlorine and bromine are used by branches of the U.S. military for disinfecting water supplies; however, limited data exists as to the effectiveness of these additives when used against viral biowarfare agents. The present study sought to evaluate the survival of selected viral biothreat agents in disinfected water. Disinfected water samples were spiked with vaccinia virus strain WR and Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE virus strain TC-83 each separately to a final concentration of approximately 1×106 PFU/mL, and survival was assessed by plaque assay. Both viruses were inactivated by 1 mg/L free available chlorine (FAC and 2mg/L total bromine within one hour. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that both chlorine and bromine are effective disinfectants against vaccinia virus and VEE strain TC-83 at the concentrations tested.

  11. Abiotic reductive extraction of arsenic from contaminated soils enhanced by complexation: Arsenic extraction by reducing agents and combination of reducing and chelating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Jung [Department of Bioactive Material Sciences, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Cheol [Department of Environmental Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Kitae, E-mail: kbaek@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bioactive Material Sciences, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Environmental Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Abiotic reductive extraction of As from contaminated soils was studied. • Oxalate/ascorbate were effective in extracting As bound to amorphous iron oxides. • Reducing agents were not effective in extracting As bound to crystalline oxides. • Reductive As extraction was greatly enhanced by complexation. • Combination of dithionite and EDTA could extract about 90% of the total As. - Abstract: Abiotic reductive extraction of arsenic from contaminated soils was studied with various reducing agents and combinations of reducing and chelating agents in order to remediate arsenic-contaminated soils. Oxalate and ascorbic acid were effective to extract arsenic from soil in which arsenic was associated with amorphous iron oxides, but they were not effective to extract arsenic from soils in which arsenic was bound to crystalline oxides or those in which arsenic was mainly present as a scorodite phase. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study showed that iron oxides present in soils were transformed to Fe(II,III) or Fe(II) oxide forms such as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sup II}Fe{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) by reduction with dithionite. Thus, arsenic extraction by dithionite was not effective due to the re-adsorption of arsenic to the newly formed iron oxide phase. Combination of chelating agents with reducing agents greatly improved arsenic extraction from soil samples. About 90% of the total arsenic could be extracted from all soil samples by using a combination of dithionite and EDTA. Chelating agents form strong complexation with iron, which can prevent precipitation of a new iron oxide phase and also enhance iron oxide dissolution via a non-reductive dissolution pathway.

  12. Grafted natural polymer as new drag reducing agent: An experimental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Hayder A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation introduces a new natural drag reducing agent which has the ability to improve the flow in pipelines carrying aqueous or hydrocarbon liquids in turbulent flow. Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus mucilage drag reduction performance was tested in water and hydrocarbon (gas-oil media after grafting. The drag reduction test was conducted in a buildup closed loop liquid circulation system consists of two pipes 0.0127 and 0.0381 m Inside Diameter (ID, four testing sections in each pipe (0.5 to 2.0 m, tank, pump and pressure transmitters. Reynolds number (Re, additive concentration and the transported media type (water and gas-oil, were the major drag reduction variables investigated. The experimental results show that, new additive drag reduction ability is high with maximum percentage of drag reduction (%Dr up to 60% was achieved. The experimental results showed that the drag reduction ability increased by increasing the additive concentration. The %Dr was found to increase by increasing the Re by using the water-soluble additive while it was found to decrease by increasing the Re when using the oil-soluble additive. The %Dr was higher in the 0.0381 m ID pipe. Finally, the grafted and natural mucilage showed high resistance to shear forces when circulated continuously for 200 seconds in the closed-loop system.

  13. Complexing agents in waste waters of Finnish electrolytic and chemical surface treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkanniemi, Kari; Vuorio, Anna-Maria; Vilhunen, Sari; Metsärinne, Sirpa; Sillanpää, Mika

    2008-05-01

    Complexing agents are one of the major environmental concerns in electrolytic and chemical surface treatment (ECST) industry; e.g. the EU reference document on the best available technology (BREF) pays special attention to the usage of EDTA. However, no comprehensive studies are available on usage of EDTA or other complexing agents or their load to the receiving waters from ECST industry. In this study, the concentrations of complexing agents were analyzed to get an overview of their usage and load and also to recognize their relevance in the environmental permitting and compliance monitoring of such facilities. Complexing agent concentrations of treated waste water samples of 23 ECST plants with vat volume exceeding 30 m3 was studied. HPLC and GC-MS were used to analyze and identify complexing agent concentrations, ICP-AES to analyze metals, and TOC to analyse the organic load. The number of the plants in this study equals around 50% of such installations in Finland subject to environmental permit as the IPPC directive provides. EDTA, DTPA, and NTA were found in 11 samples out of 23 mainly in rather small concentrations. Their annual load to the receiving waters may be estimated to be 0.3 tons and the total load from Finnish ECST industry can be extrapolated to be up to 1 ton. Compared to the estimated use of 5-10 tons in the industry this finding is rather low, even though in Finland cast-off treatment baths are typically delivered to the hazardous waste treatment plants. Since the load of complexing agents is rather low, the chemical waste water treatment seems to be either capable of reducing complexing agent concentrations to some extent or their usage is lower than expected. On the other hand, it is possible that not all complexing agents were identified from the samples. The metal concentrations and TOC were well hand in hand with concentrations found in the Finnish environmental database, which proves that the samples were of average quality of the waste

  14. Reduced Iron-Containing Clay Minerals as Antibacterial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Dong, Hailiang; Zeng, Qiang; Xia, Qingyin; Zhang, Limin; Zhou, Ziqi

    2017-07-05

    Previous work documented the general antibacterial mechanism of iron containing clays that involved hydroxyl radical (•OH) production from soluble Fe2+, and attack of cell membrane and intracellular proteins. Here we explore the role of clay structural Fe(II) in •OH production at near neutral pH and identify a lipid involved in the antibacterial process. Structural Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-2 was reduced (rNAu-2) and E. coli, a model bacterium, was exposed to rNAu-2 in oxic suspension. The antibacterial activity of rNAu-2 was dependent on pH and Fe(II) concentration, where E. coli were completely killed at pH 6, but survived at pH 7 and 8. In the presence of a •OH scavenger or in anaerobic atmosphere, E. coli survived better, suggesting that cell death may be caused by •OH generated from oxidation of structural Fe(II) in rNAu-2. In-situ imaging revealed damage of a membrane lipid, cardiolipin, in the polar region of E. coli cells, where reactive oxygen species and redox-active labile Fe were enriched. Our results advance the previous antibacterial model by demonstrating that the structural Fe(II) is the primary source of •OH, which damages cardiolipin, triggers the influx of soluble Fe2+ into the cell, and ultimately leads to cell death.

  15. Ginkgo biloba: a natural reducing agent for the synthesis of cytocompatible graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Park, Jung Hyun; Eppakayala, Vasuki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is a novel two-dimensional planar nanocomposite material consisting of rings of carbon atoms with a hexagonal lattice structure. Graphene exhibits unique physical, chemical, mechanical, electrical, elasticity, and cytocompatible properties that lead to many potential biomedical applications. Nevertheless, the water-insoluble property of graphene restricts its application in various aspects of biomedical fields. Therefore, the objective of this work was to find a novel biological approach for an efficient method to synthesize water-soluble and cytocompatible graphene using Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) as a reducing and stabilizing agent. In addition, we investigated the biocompatibility effects of graphene in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Synthesized graphene oxide (GO) and GbE-reduced GO (Gb-rGO) were characterized using various sequences of techniques: ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Raman spectroscopy. Biocompatibility of GO and Gb-rGO was assessed in human breast cancer cells using a series of assays, including cell viability, apoptosis, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. The successful synthesis of graphene was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy and FTIR. DLS analysis was performed to determine the average size of GO and Gb-rGO. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the crystalline nature of graphene. SEM was used to investigate the surface morphologies of GO and Gb-rGO. AFM was employed to investigate the morphologies of prepared graphene and the height profile of GO and Gb-rGO. The formation of defects in Gb-rGO was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of the prepared GO and Gb-rGO was investigated using a water-soluble tetrazolium 8 assay on human breast cancer cells. GO exhibited a dose-dependent toxicity, whereas Gb-rGO-treated cells showed significant

  16. Ginkgo biloba: a natural reducing agent for the synthesis of cytocompatible graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Park, Jung Hyun; Eppakayala, Vasuki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-01-01

    Background Graphene is a novel two-dimensional planar nanocomposite material consisting of rings of carbon atoms with a hexagonal lattice structure. Graphene exhibits unique physical, chemical, mechanical, electrical, elasticity, and cytocompatible properties that lead to many potential biomedical applications. Nevertheless, the water-insoluble property of graphene restricts its application in various aspects of biomedical fields. Therefore, the objective of this work was to find a novel biological approach for an efficient method to synthesize water-soluble and cytocompatible graphene using Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) as a reducing and stabilizing agent. In addition, we investigated the biocompatibility effects of graphene in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Materials and methods Synthesized graphene oxide (GO) and GbE-reduced GO (Gb-rGO) were characterized using various sequences of techniques: ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Raman spectroscopy. Biocompatibility of GO and Gb-rGO was assessed in human breast cancer cells using a series of assays, including cell viability, apoptosis, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Results The successful synthesis of graphene was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy and FTIR. DLS analysis was performed to determine the average size of GO and Gb-rGO. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the crystalline nature of graphene. SEM was used to investigate the surface morphologies of GO and Gb-rGO. AFM was employed to investigate the morphologies of prepared graphene and the height profile of GO and Gb-rGO. The formation of defects in Gb-rGO was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of the prepared GO and Gb-rGO was investigated using a water-soluble tetrazolium 8 assay on human breast cancer cells. GO exhibited a dose-dependent toxicity, whereas Gb

  17. Subjects for achievement of blast furnace operation with low reducing agent rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ujisawa, Y.; Nakano, K.; Matsukura, Y.; Sunahara, K.; Komatsu, S.; Yamamoto, T. [Sumitomo Metal Industry Ltd., Kashima (Japan). Corp R& amp; D Labs.

    2006-12-15

    The technology which reduces the reducing agent rate by the improvement in the reaction efficiency of blast furnace leads to reduction of hot metal manufacturing cost, but also solution of recent CO{sub 2} emission reduction. The subjects for achievement of the blast furnace operation with low reducing agent rate were described on reduction measures of the carbon consumption and problem of the measures referring to the example of reducing agent rate of the present state blast furnace concerning blast operation and reactive improvement. And, carried out concrete measures were introduced in order to aim at the low reducing agent rate operation. The following results were obtained. 1) Since it has reached the already high reaction efficiency in present state blast furnace, it is not easy to attempt further reduction of the reducing agent rate. 2) The blast furnace use of high reactivity coke or reduced iron is equal level or over it in comparison with the reduction effect by the assumed blast operation in this paper. 3) The promotion of coke reaction load with the gasification is worried, when it aims at the low reducing agent rate operation by the high reactivity coke use. 4) It is estimated that the threshold also exists for the reducibility of competing ore, when it aims at the low reducing agent rate operation using the high reactivity coke. 5) The use of the low SiO{sub 2} sinter is effective for the improvement on the permeability in the blast furnace, when it aims at the low fuel rate operation. However, the new technology of the permeability improvement is desired, since there is a limit for low SiO{sub 2} of the sintered ore, when future raw material supply and demand is considered.

  18. Use of zeolitized pumice waste as a water softening agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, I; Catalfamo, P; Cavallari, L; Di Pasquale, S

    2007-08-17

    Important pumice quarries are located on the island of Lipari (Italy) where an intense activity of extraction, transformation and trade of pumice takes place. Nevertheless, the finest fraction amounting to about 60% of mined pumice is discarded and disposed off in open-sky pits. This implies economic losses for mining industries and environmental problems for neighbouring villages. In order to find a sustainable use of this waste, we resumed and improved an old extractive process with aqueous sodium alkali, where a sodium silicate concentrated solution was produced together with an unextracted residue partially converted into zeolite P in Na+ form and now we are searching for suitable applications of this residue. In this paper, we relate about its use as a low cost water softening agent on the basis of results obtained from several tests both in batch systems and column. They show that, at room temperature, the residue works well with calcium and badly with magnesium, whereas, at 60 degrees C, also the affinity toward Mg ions increases to acceptable levels. Repeated regenerations of the residue with concentrated NaCl solutions do not appreciably compromise the performance. The limits for the possible use as water softening agent are defined.

  19. 49 CFR 40.407 - May a service agent ask to have a PIE reduced or terminated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May a service agent ask to have a PIE reduced or... agent ask to have a PIE reduced or terminated? (a) Yes, as a service agent concerning whom the Department has issued a PIE, you may request that the Director terminate a PIE or reduce its duration and/or...

  20. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases from Myceliophthora thermophila C1 differ in substrate preference and reducing agent specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommhagen, Matthias; Koetsier, Martijn J; Westphal, Adrie H; Visser, Jaap; Hinz, Sandra W A; Vincken, Jean-Paul; van Berkel, Willem J H; Kabel, Mirjam A; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxgygenases (LPMOs) are known to boost the hydrolytic breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass, especially cellulose, due to their oxidative mechanism. For their activity, LPMOs require an electron donor for reducing the divalent copper cofactor. LPMO activities are mainly investigated with ascorbic acid as a reducing agent, but little is known about the effect of plant-derived reducing agents on LPMOs activity. Here, we show that three LPMOs from the fungus Myceliophthora thermophila C1, MtLPMO9A, MtLPMO9B and MtLPMO9C, differ in their substrate preference, C1-/C4-regioselectivity and reducing agent specificity. MtLPMO9A generated C1- and C4-oxidized, MtLPMO9B C1-oxidized and MtLPMO9C C4-oxidized gluco-oligosaccharides from cellulose. The recently published MtLPMO9A oxidized, next to cellulose, xylan, β-(1 → 3, 1 → 4)-glucan and xyloglucan. In addition, MtLPMO9C oxidized, to a minor extent, xyloglucan and β-(1 → 3, 1 → 4)-glucan from oat spelt at the C4 position. In total, 34 reducing agents, mainly plant-derived flavonoids and lignin-building blocks, were studied for their ability to promote LPMO activity. Reducing agents with a 1,2-benzenediol or 1,2,3-benzenetriol moiety gave the highest release of oxidized and non-oxidized gluco-oligosaccharides from cellulose for all three MtLPMOs. Low activities toward cellulose were observed in the presence of monophenols and sulfur-containing compounds. Several of the most powerful LPMO reducing agents of this study serve as lignin building blocks or protective flavonoids in plant biomass. Our findings support the hypothesis that LPMOs do not only vary in their C1-/C4-regioselectivity and substrate specificity, but also in their reducing agent specificity. This work strongly supports the idea that the activity of LPMOs toward lignocellulosic biomass does not only depend on the ability to degrade plant polysaccharides like cellulose, but also on their specificity toward plant

  1. Short communication: Reducing agents attenuate methylglyoxal-based browning in Parmesan cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divine, R D; Rankin, S A

    2013-10-01

    The microbial production of methylglyoxal in cheese has been linked to the formation of brown pigmentation and distinctive volatiles. This study investigated methods for preventing methylglyoxal-induced browning in Parmesan cheese through the addition of reducing agents. Cheeses were treated with the reducing agents sodium bisulfite, glutathione, and erythorbate at 2:1 and 4:1 molar ratios with added methylglyoxal, and then incubated at 10 °C. Colorimetric methods were used to determine degree of browning at 0, 3, and 6 d. Sodium bisulfite and glutathione inhibited the browning reactions of methylglyoxal compared with the control. Erythorbate was much less effective than the other compounds at inhibiting browning, yet was significantly less browned than the control. These reducing agents are thought to act as strong nucleophiles that can form thiohemiketals and thioketals at the carbonyl carbons of methylglyoxal. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment with the Antipsychotic Agent, Risperidone, Reduces Disease Severity in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Sarrabeth; Zareie, Pirooz; Kharkrang, Marie; Fong, Dahna; Connor, Bronwen; La Flamme, Anne Camille

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that atypical antipsychotic agents, which are known to antagonize dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2a receptors, have immunomodulatory properties. Given the potential of these drugs to modulate the immune system both peripherally and within the central nervous system, we investigated the ability of the atypical anti-psychotic agent, risperidone, to modify disease in the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS)4, experimental autoimune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We found that chronic oral administration of risperidone dose-dependently reduced the severity of disease and decreased both the size and number of spinal cord lesions. Furthermore, risperidone treatment substantially reduced antigen-specific interleukin (IL)-17a, IL-2, and IL-4 but not interferon (IFN)-γ production by splenocytes at peak disease and using an in vitro model, we show that treatment of macrophages with risperidone alters their ability to bias naïve T cells. Another atypical antipsychotic agent, clozapine, showed a similar ability to modify macrophages in vitro and to reduce disease in the EAE model but this effect was not due to antagonism of the type 1 or type 2 dopamine receptors alone. Finally, we found that while risperidone treatment had little effect on the in vivo activation of splenic macrophages during EAE, it significantly reduced the activation of microglia and macrophages in the central nervous system. Together these studies indicate that atypical antipsychotic agents like risperidone are effective immunomodulatory agents with the potential to treat immune-mediated diseases such as MS. PMID:25116424

  3. Reduced weight decontamination formulation for neutralization of chemical and biological warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2014-06-03

    A reduced weight DF-200 decontamination formulation that is stable under high temperature storage conditions. The formulation can be pre-packed as an all-dry (i.e., no water) or nearly-dry (i.e., minimal water) three-part kit, with make-up water (the fourth part) being added later in the field at the point of use.

  4. Effects of light energy and reducing agents on C60-mediated photosensitizing reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinones, Michael; Zhang, Yazhou; Riascos, Penelope; Hwang, Huey-Min; Aker, Winfred G; He, Xiaojia; Gao, Ruomei

    2014-01-01

    Many biomolecules contain photoactive reducing agents, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and 6-thioguanine (6-TG) incorporated into DNA through drug metabolism. These reducing agents may produce reactive oxygen species under UVA irradiation or act as electron donors in various media. The interactions of C60 fullerenes with biological reductants and light energy, especially via the Type-I electron-transfer mechanism, are not fully understood although these factors are often involved in toxicity assessments. The two reductants employed in this work were NADH for aqueous solutions and 6-TG for organic solvents. Using steady-state photolysis and electrochemical techniques, we showed that under visible light irradiation, the presence of reducing agents enhanced C60 -mediated Type-I reactions that generate superoxide anion (O2(.-)) at the expense of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) production. The quantum yield of O2(.-) production upon visible light irradiation of C60 is estimated below 0.2 in dipolar aprotic media, indicating that the majority of triplet C60 deactivate via Type-II pathway. Upon UVA irradiation, however, both C60 and NADH undergo photochemical reactions to produce O2(.-), which could lead to a possible synergistic toxicity effects. C60 photosensitization via Type-I pathway is not observed in the absence of reducing agents. © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  5. Development and Performance Assessment of the High-Performance Shrinkage Reducing Agent for Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Sub Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop a high-performance shrinkage reducing agent, this study investigated several shrinkage reducing materials and supplements for those materials. Fluidity and air content were satisfactory for the various shrinkage reducing materials. The decrease in viscosity was the lowest for glycol-based materials. The decrease in drying shrinkage was most prominent for mixtures containing glycol-based materials. In particular, mixtures containing G2 achieved a 40% decrease in the amount of drying shrinkage. Most shrinkage reducing materials had weaker level of compressive strength than that of the plain mixture. When 3% triethanolamine was used for early strength improvement, the strength was enhanced by 158% compared to that of the plain mixture on day 1; enhancement values were 135% on day 7 and 113% on day 28. To assess the performance of the developed high-performance shrinkage reducing agent and to determine the optimal amount, 2.0% shrinkage reducing agent was set as 40% of the value of the plain mixture. While the effect was more prominent at higher amounts, to prevent deterioration of the compressive strength and the other physical properties, the recommended amount is less than 2.0%.

  6. Effects of reducing agents on the synthesis of Ag/rGO nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaya; Song, Qiong; Fan, Bingbing; Zhang, Rui

    2017-01-01

    A facile and rapid microwave-assisted green route has been used for the formation of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) and the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) simultaneously with five different reducing agents, sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), sodium citrate, urea and ascorbic acid. The experimental results show that the structural properties and phase of Ag/reduced graphene oxide (Ag/rGO) nanocomposites are connected with reducing agent. AgNPs can be uniformly and compactly anchored on reduced GO (rGO) surface in the microwave field for 2 min by the assist of NaOH or KOH as reducing agent. The OH- can not only accelerate the ionization of acidic functional groups but also act as the nucleophile for Ag+. By addition of sodium citrate and urea, the GO sample remains its original structure, and Ag+ tends to form Ag2CO3, which then decomposes into Ag2O. While in the urea solution, Ag2O turns into [Ag(NH3)2]+ ions with abundant urea, then [Ag(NH3)2]+ ions are reduced to Ag0 by electrons, which leads to both Ag and Ag2O phase coexisting in the urea treated samples. In addition, it can be found that NaOH shows the best results in terms of the crystallinity and purity of Ag grains anchored on rGO surface.

  7. PVA stabilized gold nanoparticles by use of unexplored albeit conventional reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, P.K. [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India)]. E-mail: pkk@cmetindia.org; Gokhale, R. [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Subbarao, V.V.V.S. [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Vishwanath, A. Kasi [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Das, B.K. [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Satyanarayana, C.V.V. [National Chemical Laboratory, Pashan Road, Pune 41108 (India)

    2005-07-15

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) stabilized gold nanoparticles have been prepared in aqueous medium using two different reducing viz.; hydrazine hydrate, a stronger reducing agent and sodium formaldehydesulfoxylate (SFS), a slightly weaker reducing agent. SFS is used for first ever time for reduction of gold metal salt. The PVA stabilized gold nanoparticles solutions are wine red to blood red coloured and are stable over a long period of time with no indication of aggregation. The solution shows strong visible light absorptions in the range of 520-540 nm, characteristics of gold nanoparticles. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns of freshly prepared films containing gold nanoparticles indicated particles size to be about 15 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of a more than two-week-old sample revealed well-defined non-agglomerated spherical particles of about 50 nm diameter in solutions.

  8. Effects of Modulus and Modifying Agent on Aging of Water Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Hailan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studied the content of water glass before and after adding modifying agent by TMS-GC method, it was found that different modulus of water glass led to decrease of silicate content at different levels after a period of storage, and the modifying agent could retard the aging of water glass. It has remarkable significance on the theory and practical application of water glass chemistry.

  9. Synthesis and applications of vegetable oil-based fluorocarbon water repellent agents on cotton fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tao; Zheng, Junzhi; Sun, Gang

    2012-06-05

    Vegetable oil-based fluorocarbon water repellent agents were prepared by chemical modifications of different vegetable oils - soybean and linseed oils through several reactions, including saponification, acidification, acylation of vegetable oil and trans-esterification with 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol and 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropanol. The resulted fluorocarbon agents were then copolymerized with styrene. The structures of the vegetable oil based agents were characterized by FT-IR and NMR. By evaluating water contact angle and time of water disappearance on cotton fabrics, as well as whiteness and breaking strength of cotton fabrics that were treated by these agents, optimum fabric finishing conditions were explored. The cotton fabrics finished with the vegetable oil-based fluorocarbon agents showed excellent water repellency, while other properties of the cotton fabrics declined to certain level. The linseed oil-based tetrafluoropropanol water repellent agent displayed the highest water repellency among all modified oils. All the treated fabrics exhibited good durability of water repellency. The linseed oil-based tetrafluoropropanol water repellent agent demonstrated the best durability among all repellent agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Concentration Effect of Reducing Agents on Green Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles: Size, Morphology, and Growth Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-seok; Seo, Yu Seon; Kim, Kyeounghak; Han, Jeong Woo; Park, Youmie; Cho, Seonho

    2016-04-01

    Under various concentration conditions of reducing agents during the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), we obtain the various geometry (morphology and size) of AuNPs that play a crucial role in their catalytic properties. Through both theoretical and experimental approaches, we studied the relationship between the concentration of reducing agent (caffeic acid) and the geometry of AuNPs. As the concentration of caffeic acid increases, the sizes of AuNPs were decreased due to the adsorption and stabilizing effect of oxidized caffeic acids (OXCAs). Thus, it turns out that optimal concentration exists for the desired geometry of AuNPs. Furthermore, we investigated the growth mechanism for the green synthesis of AuNPs. As the caffeic acid is added and adsorbed on the surface of AuNPs, the aggregation mechanism and surface free energy are changed and consequently resulted in the AuNPs of various geometry.

  11. Surface water flood risk and management strategies for London: An Agent-Based Model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Katie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flooding is recognised as one of the most common and costliest natural disasters in England. Flooding in urban areas during heavy rainfall is known as ‘surface water flooding’, considered to be the most likely cause of flood events and one of the greatest short-term climate risks for London. In this paper we present results from a novel Agent-Based Model designed to assess the interplay between different adaptation options, different agents, and the role of flood insurance and the flood insurance pool, Flood Re, in the context of climate change. The model illustrates how investment in adaptation options could reduce London’s surface water flood risk, today and in the future. However, benefits can be outweighed by continued development in high risk areas and the effects of climate change. Flood Re is beneficial in its function to provide affordable insurance, even under climate change. However, it offers no additional benefits in terms of overall risk reduction, and will face increasing pressure due to rising surface water flood risk in the future. The modelling approach and findings are highly relevant for reviewing the proposed Flood Re scheme, as well as for wider discussions on the potential of insurance schemes, and broader multi-sectoral partnerships, to incentivise flood risk management in the UK and internationally.

  12. Role of tin as a reducing agent in iron containing heat absorbing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The role of tin as a reducing agent in a 18Na2O⋅2MgO⋅8CaO⋅72SiO2 glass containing a definite amount of total, ΣFe = [Fe2+] + [Fe3+], was investigated with different concentrations of total tin, ΣSn = [Sn2+] + [Sn4+], by absorption spectra of iron ions in the optical range 300–1200 nm recorded on a JASCO-.

  13. Role of tin as a reducing agent in iron containing heat absorbing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... tin as a reducing agent in a 18Na2O.2MgO.8CaO.72SiO2 glass containing a definite amount of total, Fe = [Fe2+] + [Fe3+], was investigated with different concentrations of total tin, Sn = [Sn2+] + [Sn4+], by absorption spectra of iron ions in the optical range 300–1200 nm recorded on a JASCO-7800 spectrophotometer.

  14. INVESTIGATION OF DIFFERENT REDUCING AGENTS OF AZO DYES FROM TEXTILE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VARZARU Elena

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxicology of textiles is a subject of increasing interest, because of the presence of dangerous compounds in clothes generated from dyeing and finishing processes. In order to protect human health, numerous regulations (Oeko Tex Standard 100, REACH Regulation limit the presence of dangerous chemicals, such as aromatic amines, generated by reductive cleavage of azo dyes, by no more than 30 mg/kg of textile material. The objective of this work was to investigate different methods of azo dyes reduction from colored textile specimens, in order to determine the procedure with the highest selectivity and sensibility. Aromatic amines are generated by chemical degradation achieved by the cleavage of the azo linkage using reducing agents.Different alternatives to sodium dithionite, reducing agent recommended by standard method ISO/FDIS 14362-1 were tested, such as: sodium sulfite and tin chloride. Also, xylene extraction, the common procedure for synthetic fibers was also performed for cotton, dyed with azo dye Direct Blue 6, in order to assess the reliability of common simultaneously extraction and reduction of direct dyes from natural fibres. Sodium ditionite remains the popular choice for reducing agent, since it provides efficient cleavage of azo linkage, generating specifically carcinogenic amines. Both liquid and gas chromatography analytical techniques were used for precise quantitative determination of generated compounds.

  15. [Screening of water retention agent for moisture content regulation in the biocover of municipal landfill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-jing; Mou, Zi-shen; Zhu, Yong; Wang, Hong-tao; Zhao, Chen-xi

    2010-02-01

    Synthetic materials of polyacrylamide (PAM) are known as the flocculating agent as well as water retention agents. In this study, ten types of water-soluble PAM as well as four types of water-insoluble ones were selected and the influences of relative molecular weight, ion types, charge density and particle size on water retention and service life were determined. Based on the results, evaluation method for performance of water retention agent was established and two optimal PAM (water-insoluble JB and water-soluble WSN20) were screened for further study. It showed that JB increased the degree of hydration of testing soil for 32% compared with that of control. Moreover, multiple-step-outflow test using municipal waste showed that addition of JB (0.1%) had significantly effect on its moisture characteristic curve as evidenced by increasing of equilibrium moisture content over 12% under high matrix potential.

  16. Cooperative water network system to reduce carbon footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Park, Jong Moon

    2008-08-15

    Much effort has been made in reducing the carbon footprint to mitigate climate change. However, water network synthesis has been focused on reducing the consumption and cost of freshwater within each industrial plant. The objective of this study is to illustrate the necessity of the cooperation of industrial plants to reduce the total carbon footprint of their water supply systems. A mathematical optimization model to minimize global warming potentials is developed to synthesize (1) a cooperative water network system (WNS) integrated over two plants and (2) an individual WNS consisting of two WNSs separated for each plant. The cooperative WNS is compared to the individual WNS. The cooperation reduces their carbon footprint and is economically feasible and profitable. A strategy for implementing the cooperation is suggested for the fair distribution of costs and benefits. As a consequence, industrial plants should cooperate with their neighbor plants to further reduce the carbon footprint.

  17. Effectiveness of the new water source intervention in reducing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the new water supply system intervention in reducing diarrheal diseases in Ghindae community. Methods: Retrospective study was done base on the records of the Hospital. Results: The incidence of diarrhea decreased by 15% after the introduction of a new water distribution system. The decrease was 44% for giardiasis ...

  18. Reducing Lead in Drinking Water: A Manual for Minnesota's Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, St. Paul.

    This manual was designed to assist Minnesota's schools in minimizing the consumption of lead in drinking water by students and staff. It offers step-by-step instructions for testing and reducing lead in drinking water. The manual answers: Why is lead a health concern? How are children exposed to lead? Why is lead a special concern for schools? How…

  19. Reducing the Forward Operating Base Water Logistics Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-06

    Sensor Catalytic Converter Concept • Combustion of 1 gallon of Fuel produces 1 gallon of water • Capture water from any engine in the battlespace...approach” relying on total treatment efficacy of system rather than what each process was designed for. This philosophy causes reduced...and waterborne parasites in accordance with EPA’s ambient water quality criteria. • Cryptosporidium, Giardi, Ecoli, and Coliform • Senspex is

  20. System and method for regeneration and recirculation of a reducing agent using highly exothermic reactions induced by mixed industrial slags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Jinichiro; Bennett, James P.; Nakano, Anna

    2017-12-12

    Embodiments relate to systems and methods for regenerating and recirculating a CO, H.sub.2 or combinations thereof utilized for metal oxide reduction in a reduction furnace. The reduction furnace receives the reducing agent, reduces the metal oxide, and generates an exhaust of the oxidized product. The oxidized product is transferred to a mixing vessel, where the oxidized product, a calcium oxide, and a vanadium oxide interact to regenerate the reducing agent from the oxidized product. The regenerated reducing agent is transferred back to the reduction furnace for continued metal oxide reductions.

  1. Properties and characterization of agar/CuNP bionanocomposite films prepared with different copper salts and reducing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Shiv; Teng, Xinnan; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2014-12-19

    Various types of agar-based bio-nanocomposite (BNC) films were prepared by blending agar and six different copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) with different shapes and sizes obtained from three different sources of copper salts and two different reducing agents. The BNC films were characterized by UV-visible, FE-SEM, FT-IR, and XRD. The thermogravimetric study showed that the melting point of BNC films was increased when ascorbic acid was used as a reducing agent for CuNPs synthesis. Apparent surface color and transmittance of agar film was greatly influenced by the reinforcement of CuNPs. However, mechanical and water vapor barrier properties did not change significantly (p>0.05) by blending with CuNPs. Tensile modulus and tensile strength decreased slightly for all types of CuNPs reinforced while elongation at break slightly increased when CuNPs produced by ascorbic acid were blended. The agar bio-nanocomposite films showed profound antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative food-borne pathogenic bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Green Synthesis and Characterization of Silver/Chitosan/Polyethylene Glycol Nanocomposites without any Reducing Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Jenn Jye Lim; Mansor Bin Ahmad; Mei Yen Tay; Mohd Zobir Hussein; Kamyar Shameli

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) in aqueous medium. This method was performed by reducing AgNO3 in different stirring times of reaction at a moderate temperature using green agents, chitosan (Cts) and polyethylene glycol (PEG). In this work, silver nitrate (AgNO3) was used as the silver precursor while Cts and PEG were used as the solid support and polymeric stabilizer. The properties of Ag/Cts/PEG nanocomposites (NCs) were studied under different stirr...

  3. [Effects of ground cover and water-retaining agent on winter wheat growth and precipitation utilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ji-Cheng; Guan, Xiu-Juan; Yang, Yong-Hui

    2011-01-01

    An investigation was made at a hilly upland in western Henan Province to understand the effects of water-retaining agent (0, 45, and 60 kg x hm(-2)), straw mulching (3000 and 6000 kg x hm(-2)), and plastic mulching (thickness straw- or plastic mulching was combined with the use of water-retaining agent. Comparing with the control, all the measures increased the soil moisture content at different growth stages by 0.1%-6.5%. Plastic film mulching had the best water-retention effect before jointing stage, whereas water-retaining agent showed its best effect after jointing stage. Soil moisture content was the lowest at flowering and grain-filling stages. Land cover increased the grain yield by 2.6%-20.1%. The yield increment was the greatest (14.2%-20.1%) by the combined use of straw mulching and water-retaining agent, followed by plastic mulching combined with water-retaining agent (11.9% on average). Land cover also improved the precipitation use efficiency (0.4-3.2 kg x mm(-1) x hm(-2)) in a similar trend as the grain yield. This study showed that land cover and water-retaining agent improved soil moisture and nutrition conditions and precipitation utilization, which in turn, promoted the tillering of winter wheat, and increased the grain number per ear and the 1000-grain mass.

  4. Data Gathering Using Mobile Agents for Reducing Traffic in Dense Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Goto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been increasing interest in Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks (MWSNs that are constructed by mobile sensor nodes held by ordinary people, and it has led to a new concept called urban sensing. In such MWSNs, mobile sensor nodes densely exist, and thus, there are basically many sensor nodes that can sense a geographical point in the entire sensing area. To reduce the communication cost for gathering sensor data, it is desirable to gather the sensor data from the minimum number of mobile sensor nodes which are necessary to guarantee the sensing coverage or the quality of services. In this paper, to achieve this, we propose a data gathering method using mobile agents in dense MWSNs. The proposed method guarantees the sensing coverage of the entire area using mobile agents that autonomously perform sensing operations, transmit sensor data, and move between sensor nodes. By gathering only sensor data generated by sensor nodes where mobile agents are running, our proposed method can achieve efficient gathering of sensor data.

  5. Assessment of supercritical water oxidation system testing for the Blue Grass Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Board on Army Science and Technology; Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences; National Research Council

    2013-01-01

    "Assessment of Supercritical Water Oxidation System Testing for the Blue Grass Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant reviews and evaluates the results of the tests conducted on one of the SCWO units...

  6. Evaluation of the effectiveness of five odor reducing agents for sewer system odors using an on-line total reduced sulfur analyzer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choi, Il; Lee, Hyunjoo; Shin, Joungdu; Kim, Hyunook

    2012-01-01

    .... A number of technologies have been proposed to monitor or control odors from sewers. One of the most popular strategies adopted for the control of sewage odor is by applying a commercial odor-reducing agent into the sewer...

  7. Green preparation and spectroscopic characterization of plasmonic silver nanoparticles using fruits as reducing agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyllested, Jes Ærøe; Espina Palanco, Marta; Hagen, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    Chemicals typically available in plants have the capability to reduce silver and gold salts and to create silver and gold nanoparticles. We report the preparation of silver nanoparticles with sizes between 10 and 300 nm from silver nitrate using fruit extract collected from pineapples and oranges...... as reducing agents. The evolvement of a characteristic surface plasmon extinction spectrum in the range of 420 nm to 480 nm indicates the formation of silver nanoparticles after mixing silver nitrate solution and fruit extract. Shifts in plasmon peaks over time indicate the growth of nanoparticles. Electron...... absorption correlates with the decrease of absorption band in the UV. This confirms the evolution of silver nanoparticles from silver clusters. The presence of various silver clusters on the surface of the “green” plasmonic silver nanoparticles is also supported by a strong multi-color luminesce signal...

  8. Thiol-reducing agents prevent sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Cheol; Choi, Boyun; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2017-01-01

    The inhibitory potential of sulforaphane against cancer has been suggested for different types of cancer, including ovarian cancer. We examined whether this effect is mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules related to cell survival and proliferation, in ovarian cancer cells. Sulforaphane at a concentration of 10 μM effectively inhibited the growth of cancer cells. Use of specific inhibitors revealed that activation of MAPK pathways by sulforaphane is unlikely to mediate sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition. Sulforaphane did not generate significant levels of intracellular ROS. Pretreatment with thiol reducers, but not ROS scavengers, prevented sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition. Furthermore, diamide, a thiol-oxidizing agent, enhanced both growth inhibition and cell death induced by sulforaphane, suggesting that the effect of sulforaphane on cell growth may be related to oxidation of protein thiols or change in cellular redox status. Our data indicate that supplementation with thiol-reducing agents should be avoided when sulforaphane is used to treat cancer.

  9. Effect of reducing agents on low-temperature synthesis of nanostructured LiFePO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulka, Andrzej; Walczak, Katarzyna; Zając, Wojciech; Molenda, Janina

    2017-09-01

    Simple co-precipitation synthesis procedure yielding nanometric LiFePO4 with enhanced electrochemical properties without any post-synthesis heat treatment is presented. XRD, SEM and TEM analysis of the obtained powders revealed platelet crystallites and well crystalized bulk structure. Effective way of decreasing amount of Fe3+ containing phases by addition of reducing agents (KI, (NH4)2S2O3, glucose and the atmosphere of 5%H2-95%Ar) during low-temperature (107 °C) synthesis is described. The traditional analytical chemistry methods or the Mӧssbauer spectroscopy methods revealed that utilization of selected reducing agents diminished Fe3+ concentration from 25 to 12 at%. The constructed cells with optimized LiFePO4 as a cathode material showed superior electrochemical performances, including high reversible capacity up to 162 mAh/g at C/10 current discharge rate, flat voltage plateau with a value close to 3.45 V vs. Li0/+.

  10. Rapid fluorescence determination of diquat herbicide in food grains using quantum dots as new reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrillo-Carrion, Carolina; Simonet, Bartolome M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain); Valcarcel, Miguel, E-mail: qa1meobj@uco.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2011-04-29

    CdSe/ZnS QDs have demonstrated capacity to act as reducing agent in organic media such as acetonitrile and ethanol. By using fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy, it has been demonstrated that QDs reduce diquat herbicide to its monocation radical. The reaction is characterized to present a high reaction rate making possible to perform the reaction by simple filtration of the solution containing the herbicide through a QDs modified filter. The monocation radical presents a high fluorescence emission spectrum which was selected as the analytical signal to quantify the diquat herbicide. The method described here for the analysis of diquat herbicide in oat grains is simple and fast allowing the analysis of trace level of herbicide in only 6 min. The excellent sensitivity and reproducibility of the methods indicate that the reaction is favoured from both thermodynamic and kinetic point of view. The results presented open up the possibility to use QDs as redox agent. The sensitivity of the method expressed as detection limit was only of 0.01 mg kg{sup -1}.The lineal range was between 0.05 and 0.5 mg kg{sup -1}. The time of analysis per sample, including extraction, reaction and fluorescent measurement was only of 6 min.

  11. Impact of a Reducing Agent on the Dynamic Surface Properties of Lysozyme Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tihonov, Michael M; Kim, Viktoria V; Noskov, Boris A

    2016-05-01

    Disulfide bond shuffling in the presence of the reducing agents dithiothreitol (DTT) or β-mercaptoethanol (BME) strongly affects the surface properties of lysozyme solutions. The addition of 0.32 mM DTT substantially alters the kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity and surface tension relative to those of pure protein solutions. The significant increase in the dynamic surface elasticity likely relates to the cross-linking between lysozyme molecules and the formation of a dense layer of protein globules stabilized by intermolecular disulfide bonds at the liquid/gas interface. This effect differs from the previously described influence of chaotropic denaturants, such as guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) and urea, on the surface properties of lysozyme solutions. If both chaotropic and reducing agents are added to protein solutions simultaneously, their effects become superimposed. In the case of mixed lysozyme/GuHCl/DTT solutions, the dynamic surface elasticity near equilibrium decreases as the GuHCl concentration increases because of the gradual loosening of the cross-linked layer of protein globules but remains much higher than that of lysozyme/GuHCl solutions.

  12. The influence of reducing agent and 1,10-phenanthroline concentration on DNA cleavage by phenanthroline + copper.

    OpenAIRE

    Veal, J M; Merchant, K; Rill, R L

    1991-01-01

    Copper in the presence of excess 1,10-phenanthroline, a reducing agent, and molecular oxygen causes cleavage of DNA with a preference for T-3',5'-A-steps, particularly in TAT triplets. The active molecular species is commonly thought to be the bis-(1,10-phenanthroline)Cu(I) complex, (Phen)2Cu(I), regardless of the reducing agent type. We have found that (Phen)2Cu(I) is not the predominant copper complex when 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) or 2-mercaptoethanol are used as the reducing agents, ...

  13. Water disinfection agents and disinfection by-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilavský, J.; Barloková, D.; Kapusta, O.; Kunštek, M.

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work is to describe factors of water quality change in the distribution network and legislative requirements in Slovakia for disinfectants and disinfection byproducts (DBPs). In the experimental part, the time dependence of the application of the chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite on the formation of some by-products of disinfection for drinking water from WTP Hriňová is studied. We monitored trihalomethanes, free chlorine, chlorine dioxide and chlorites.

  14. Surface-enhanced Raman as a water monitor for warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Sylvia, James M.; Clauson, Susan L.; Janni, James A.

    2002-02-01

    The threat of chemical warfare agents being released upon civilian and military personnel continues to escalate. One aspect of chemical preparedness is to analyze and protect the portable water supply for the military. Chemical nerve, blister, and choking agents, as well as biological threats must all be analyzed and low limits of detection must be verified. For chemical agents, this generally means detection down to the low ppb levels. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a spectroscopic technique that can detect trace levels of contaminants directly in the aqueous environment. In this paper, results are presented on the use of SERS to detect chemical and biological agent simulants with an end goal of creating a Joint Service Agent Water Monitor. Detection of cyanide, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, phosphonates, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using SERS has been performed and is discussed herein. Aspects of transferring laboratory results to an unattended field instrument are also discussed.

  15. Inactivation of West Nile Virus in Serum with Heat, Ionic Detergent, and Reducing Agent for Proteomic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-14

    Inactivation of West Nile virus in serum with heat, ionic detergent, and reducing agent for proteomic applications Louis A. Altamura1§, Lisa H...Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, MD 21702 3DOD Biotechnology High Performance Computing Software Applications Institute, Telemedicine and Advanced...of West Nile virus in serum with heat, detergent, and reducing agent for proteomic applications Abstract Research involving biosafety level 3

  16. Establishing a Clearinghouse to Reduce Impediments to Water Quality Trading

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hara, Jeffrey K.; Walsh, Michael J.; Marchetti, Paul K.

    2012-01-01

    Pennsylvania adopted a water quality trading program to reduce Chesapeake Bay nutrient pollution. It is the first such program to provide regulated point sources the option of purchasing nutrient reduction credits via arms-length market transactions to achieve mitigation requirements. After the program initially experienced limited trading, the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority designed a nutrient credit clearinghouse to reduce some of the transaction costs and risks that imped...

  17. Integrating the simulation of domestic water demand behaviour to an urban water model using agent based modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutiva, Ifigeneia; Makropoulos, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The urban water system's sustainable evolution requires tools that can analyse and simulate the complete cycle including both physical and cultural environments. One of the main challenges, in this regard, is the design and development of tools that are able to simulate the society's water demand behaviour and the way policy measures affect it. The effects of these policy measures are a function of personal opinions that subsequently lead to the formation of people's attitudes. These attitudes will eventually form behaviours. This work presents the design of an ABM tool for addressing the social dimension of the urban water system. The created tool, called Urban Water Agents' Behaviour (UWAB) model, was implemented, using the NetLogo agent programming language. The main aim of the UWAB model is to capture the effects of policies and environmental pressures to water conservation behaviour of urban households. The model consists of agents representing urban households that are linked to each other creating a social network that influences the water conservation behaviour of its members. Household agents are influenced as well by policies and environmental pressures, such as drought. The UWAB model simulates behaviour resulting in the evolution of water conservation within an urban population. The final outcome of the model is the evolution of the distribution of different conservation levels (no, low, high) to the selected urban population. In addition, UWAB is implemented in combination with an existing urban water management simulation tool, the Urban Water Optioneering Tool (UWOT) in order to create a modelling platform aiming to facilitate an adaptive approach of water resources management. For the purposes of this proposed modelling platform, UWOT is used in a twofold manner: (1) to simulate domestic water demand evolution and (2) to simulate the response of the water system to the domestic water demand evolution. The main advantage of the UWAB - UWOT model

  18. An effective way to reduce water absorption to terahertz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yaxiong; Su, Bo; He, Jingsuo; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Hongfei; Zhang, Shengbo; Zhang, Cunlin

    2018-01-01

    Since many vibrations and rotational levels of biomolecules fall within the THz band, THz spectroscopy can be used to identify biological samples. In addition, most biomolecules need to maintain their biological activity in a liquid environment, but water as polar substance has strong absorption to the THz wave. Thus, it is difficult to detect the sample information in aqueous solution using THz wave. In order to prevent the information of biological samples were masked in the solution, many research methods were used to explore how to reduce the water absorption of terahertz. In this paper, we have developed a real-time chemical methodology through transmission Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system. The material of Zeonor 1020r is used as substrate and cover plate, and PDMS as channel interlayer. The transmission of the empty microfluidic chip is more than 80% in the range of 0.2-2.6 THz by THz-TDS system. Then, experiments were carried out using chips, which were filled with different volumes of 1, 2- propanediol, and it has been proved that the microfluidic chip could reduce the water absorption of terahertz. Finally, in order to further explore the reduction of terahertz to water absorption, we inject different concentrations of electrolyte to the chip. The results show that with the addition of different electrolytes, terahertz transmission line has evident changes. It can be taken into account that the electrolyte has different effects about the hydrogen bonds in the aqueous solution. Some of them can promote water molecules clusters, while others destroy them. Based on the basis of microfluidic chip, the discovery of this phenomenon can provide a way that reduces water absorption of terahertz. This work has laid a solid foundation for the subsequent study in reducing water absorption of terahertz.

  19. ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, Causal Agent of Citrus Huanglongbing, Is Reduced by Treatment with Brassinosteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ingrid; Portieles, Roxana; Rodríguez García, Mayra; López, Yunior; Aranguren, Miguel; Alonso, Eugenio; Delgado, Roger; Luis, Maritza; Batista, Lochy; Paredes, Camilo; Rodríguez, Meilyn; Pujol, Merardo; Ochagavia, María Elena; Falcón, Viviana; Terauchi, Ryohei; Matsumura, Hideo; Ayra-Pardo, Camilo; Llauger, Raixa; Pérez, María del Carmen; Núñez, Mirian; Borrusch, Melissa S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Silva, Yussuan; Pimentel, Eulogio; Borroto, Carlos; Borrás-Hidalgo, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) constitutes the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide, yet no established efficient management measures exist for it. Brassinosteroids, a family of plant steroidal compounds, are essential for plant growth, development and stress tolerance. As a possible control strategy for HLB, epibrassinolide was applied to as a foliar spray to citrus plants infected with the causal agent of HLB, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’. The bacterial titers were reduced after treatment with epibrassinolide under both greenhouse and field conditions but were stronger in the greenhouse. Known defense genes were induced in leaves by epibrassinolide. With the SuperSAGE technology combined with next generation sequencing, induction of genes known to be associated with defense response to bacteria and hormone transduction pathways were identified. The results demonstrate that epibrassinolide may provide a useful tool for the management of HLB. PMID:26731660

  20. Sulfate Reducing Bacteria as Bio-cleaning Agents: Development of New Methodologies and Study Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Balloi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the contribution of different scientific disciplines in the field of restoration and conservation of cultural heritage to finding alternative methods of investigation that are even more effective and fully respect artworks, operators and environment, has greatly increased.An example is the University of Milan patent that provides for the use of some specialized bacteria as cleaning agents. This method, known as biocleaning, is based on the use of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, a sulfate reducing bacterium, for the removal of sulfate alterations from stone surfaces.Recently, the university spin-off Micro4yoU purchased the patent by initiating a series of investments aimed at enhancing the commercial product from prototype. The present work describes: the desulfation mechanism operated by Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the technological shift necessary to obtain a biological formulation usable in situ, with two practical case studies.

  1. 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', Causal Agent of Citrus Huanglongbing, Is Reduced by Treatment with Brassinosteroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Canales

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB constitutes the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide, yet no established efficient management measures exist for it. Brassinosteroids, a family of plant steroidal compounds, are essential for plant growth, development and stress tolerance. As a possible control strategy for HLB, epibrassinolide was applied to as a foliar spray to citrus plants infected with the causal agent of HLB, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'. The bacterial titers were reduced after treatment with epibrassinolide under both greenhouse and field conditions but were stronger in the greenhouse. Known defense genes were induced in leaves by epibrassinolide. With the SuperSAGE technology combined with next generation sequencing, induction of genes known to be associated with defense response to bacteria and hormone transduction pathways were identified. The results demonstrate that epibrassinolide may provide a useful tool for the management of HLB.

  2. Green Synthesis and Characterization of Silver/Chitosan/Polyethylene Glycol Nanocomposites without any Reducing Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenn Jye Lim

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs in aqueous medium. This method was performed by reducing AgNO3 in different stirring times of reaction at a moderate temperature using green agents, chitosan (Cts and polyethylene glycol (PEG. In this work, silver nitrate (AgNO3 was used as the silver precursor while Cts and PEG were used as the solid support and polymeric stabilizer. The properties of Ag/Cts/PEG nanocomposites (NCs were studied under different stirring times of reaction. The developed Ag/Cts/PEG NCs were then characterized by the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy.

  3. Fines stabilizing agent reduces production decline rates in steam injected wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo de Castillo, Milagros; Fernandez Andrades, Jarvi [PDVSA - Petroleos de Venezuela S.A., Caracas (Venezuela); Navarro Cornejo, Willian; Curtis, James [BJ Services do Brasil Ltda., RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The Bachaquero Lago heavy oil field, located in Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela, with an area of 9800 ha, in which more than 1800 wells have been drilled. The Lagunillas formation in this field is a mature, clastic, unconsolidated sandstone of Miocene age with good permeability. Clays are present, in laminated form or dispersed within the productive sandstones. Heavy oil, less than 12 deg API, is produced by cyclic steam injection. Wells are completed with cased-hole gravel packs to prevent sand and fines production. Rapid production decline rates are typically observed after the steam injection cycles, due to fines migration and plugging of the reservoir and gravel pack. This paper describes the methodology used to treat the wells with a fines stabilizing agent during the steam injection cycles in order to successfully reduce the subsequent production decline rate. Results from a multi-well pilot project are presented and analyzed. (author)

  4. Do coxibs reduce prescription of gastroprotective agents? Results of a record linkage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violante Andrea

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxibs are claimed to be cost-effective drugs and reduced prescription of gastroprotective agents is assumed to be one of their major benefits. Real life prescription of these drugs may be substantially different than that considered in pharmacoeconomic analyses or claimed by drug companies, yet. Our objective was to evaluate whether coxibs were associated with reduced prescription of gastro-protective agents (GPAs, specifically proton pump inhibitors, H2 blockers and misoprostol compared to non selective NSAIDs. Methods A record-linkage study was performed using 2001 outpatient prescription data from the province of Modena (about 632,000 inhabitants, in Northern Italy. Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio of GPA prescription for coxib and non-selective NSAID adult users (> 14 years. Three categories of users were further investigated: "acute", "chronic and "incident or new". Main outcome measures were same-day co-prescription and 30 days prescription of GPAs in coxibs and non selective NSAIDs users. To limit selection bias, data were adjusted for age, sex, DDD of coxibs and non selective NSAIDs received during 2001, DDD of GPAs and (for non-incident users DDD of NSAIDs received during the previous 4 years Results Same day co-prescription rates were similar considering the overall population and "acute" users. Chronic coxibs users instead showed higher co-prescription rates than chronic NSAIDs users (OR = 1.2, p Conclusion Assumptions made in pharmacoeconomic analyses on coxibs (lower GPA prescription associated with coxibs use may be overly optimistic. Claims made through cost-effectiveness data should be carefully interpreted, and mechanisms for attributing drug prices revised accordingly.

  5. Evaluating Outdoor Water Use Demand under Changing Climatic and Demographic Conditions: An Agent-based Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanta, L.

    2016-12-01

    Outdoor water use for landscape and irrigation constitutes a significant end use in residential water demand. In periods of water shortages, utilities may reduce garden demands by implementing irrigation system audits, rebate programs, local ordinances, and voluntary or mandatory water use restrictions. Because utilities do not typically record outdoor and indoor water uses separately, the effects of policies for reducing garden demands cannot be readily calculated. The volume of water required to meet garden demands depends on the housing density or lawn size, type of vegetation, climatic conditions, efficiency of garden irrigation systems, and consumer water-use behaviors. Many existing outdoor demand estimation methods are deterministic and do not include consumer responses to conservation campaigns. In addition, mandatory restrictions may have a substantial impact on reducing outdoor demands, but the effectiveness of mandatory restrictions depends on the timing and the frequency of restrictions, in addition to the distribution of housing density and consumer types within a community. This research investigates a garden end-use model by coupling an agent-based modeling approach and a mechanistic-stochastic water demand model to create a methodology for estimating garden demand and evaluating demand reduction policies. The garden demand model is developed for two water utilities, using a diverse data sets, including residential customer billing records, records of outdoor conservation programs, frequency and type of mandatory water use restrictions, lot size distribution, population growth, and climatic data. A set of garden irrigation parameter values, which are based on the efficiency of irrigation systems and irrigation habits of consumers, are determined for a set of conservation ordinances and restrictions. The model parameters are then validated using customer water usage data from the participating water utilities. A sensitivity analysis is conducted for

  6. Polyelectrolytes Ability in Reducing Atrazine Concentration in Water : Surface Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohd Amin, M.F.; Heijman, S.G.J.; Lopes, S.I.C.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the direct ability of two positively charged organic polyelectrolytes (natural-based and synthetic) to reduce the atrazine concentration in water. The adsorption study was set up using multiple glass vessels with different polymer dosing levels followed by ultrafiltration with

  7. Reducing the Risk of Water Pollution in Vulnerable Coastal ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Reducing the Risk of Water Pollution in Vulnerable Coastal Communities of Cartagena, Colombia: Responding to Climate Change. The coastal area of Cartagena, an important tourist destination in Colombia, is home to several poor communities that rely on artisanal fishing (small-scale, traditional fishing techniques) and ...

  8. Reducing the Risk of Water Pollution in Vulnerable Coastal ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Reducing the Risk of Water Pollution in Vulnerable Coastal Communities of Cartagena, Colombia: Responding to Climate Change. The coastal area of ... Amélioration de la capacité d'adaptation sociale et écologique aux changements climatiques dans le bassin versant du fleuve Orotoy, en Colombie. En Colombie, les ...

  9. New approach to reducing water consumption in commercial kitchen hood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmuin, N.; Pairan, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    Water mist sprays are used in wide range of application. However it is depend to the spray characteristic to suit the particular application. The modern commercial kitchen hood ventilation system was adopted with the water mist nozzle technology as an additional tool to increase the filtration efficiency. However, low level of filtration effectiveness and high water consumption were the major problems among the Commercial Kitchen Ventilation expert. Therefore, this study aims to develop a new mist spray technology to replacing the conventional KSJB nozzle (KSJB is a nozzle’s name). At the same time, an appropriate recommended location to install the nozzle in kitchen hood system was suggested. An extensive simulation works were carried out to observe the spray characteristics, ANSYS (FLUENT) was used for simulation wise. In the case of nozzle studies, nozzles were tested at 1 bar pressure of water and air. In comparison with conventional nozzles configuration, this new approach suggested nozzle configuration was reduce up to 50% of water consumption, which by adopted 3 numbers of nozzles instead of 6 numbers of nozzles in the commercial kitchen hood system. Therefore, this nozzle will be used in industry for their benefits of water consumption, filtration efficiency and reduced the safety limitations.

  10. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Five Odor Reducing Agents for Sewer System Odors Using an On-Line Total Reduced Sulfur Analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunook Kim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sewer odors have been a concern to citizens of the Metropolitan Seoul region, which has installed combined sewer systems (CSSs in 86% of its area. Although a variety of odorants are released from sewers, volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs have been recognized as major ones. A number of technologies have been proposed to monitor or control odors from sewers. One of the most popular strategies adopted for the control of sewage odor is by applying a commercial odor-reducing agent into the sewer. In this study, the effectiveness of five different commercial odor-reducing agents (i.e., an odor masking agent, an alkaline solution, two microbial agents, and a chemical oxidant was evaluated by continuously monitoring VSCs released from the sewer with an on-line total reduced sulfur (TRS analyzer before and after each agent was sprayed into CSSs at five different locations of the city. In short, when the effectiveness of odor treatment was tested in the sewer system using five commercial odor reducing treatments, only the chemical oxidant was good enough to reduce the odor in terms of TRS levels measured before and after the application (p < 0.01.

  11. Hydrodynamics and mass transfer deaeration of water on thermal power plants when used natural gas as a desorbing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapov, V. I.; Kudryavtseva, E. V.

    2017-11-01

    The technology of low-temperature deaeration of water in thermal power plants was developed. It is proposed to use natural gas supplied to the furnace as desorbing agent in the deaerator instead steam or superheated water. Natural gas has low, often - negative temperature after reducing installs. At the same time, it contains virtually no corrosive gases, oxygen and carbon dioxide, thereby successfully may be used as a stripping agent in water deaeration. The calculation of the energy efficiency of the technology for a typical unit of CHP has shown that achieved a significant annual saving of fuel equivalent in the transition from the traditional method of deaeration of water in the low temperature deaeration. Hydrodynamic and mass transfer indicators were determined for the deaerator thermal power plants using as stripping medium natural gas supplied to the boiler burners. Theoretically required amount and the real specific consumption of natural gas were estimated for deaeration of water standard quality. The calculation of the hydrodynamic characteristics was presented for jet-bubbling atmospheric deaerator with undescended perforated plate when operating on natural gas. The calculation shows the possibility of using commercially available atmospheric deaerators for the application of the new low-temperature water deaeration technology.

  12. A water market simulator considering pair-wise trades between agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskova, I.; Erfani, T.; Harou, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    In many basins in England no further water abstraction licences are available. Trading water between water rights holders has been recognized as a potentially effective and economically efficient strategy to mitigate increasing scarcity. A screening tool that could assess the potential for trade through realistic simulation of individual water rights holders would help assess the solution's potential contribution to local water management. We propose an optimisation-driven water market simulator that predicts pair-wise trade in a catchment and represents its interaction with natural hydrology and engineered infrastructure. A model is used to emulate licence-holders' willingness to engage in short-term trade transactions. In their simplest form agents are represented using an economic benefit function. The working hypothesis is that trading behaviour can be partially predicted based on differences in marginal values of water over space and time and estimates of transaction costs on pair-wise trades. We discuss the further possibility of embedding rules, norms and preferences of the different water user sectors to more realistically represent the behaviours, motives and constraints of individual licence holders. The potential benefits and limitations of such a social simulation (agent-based) approach is contrasted with our simulator where agents are driven by economic optimization. A case study based on the Dove River Basin (UK) demonstrates model inputs and outputs. The ability of the model to suggest impacts of water rights policy reforms on trading is discussed.

  13. Humans running in place on water at simulated reduced gravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto E Minetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: On Earth only a few legged species, such as water strider insects, some aquatic birds and lizards, can run on water. For most other species, including humans, this is precluded by body size and proportions, lack of appropriate appendages, and limited muscle power. However, if gravity is reduced to less than Earth's gravity, running on water should require less muscle power. Here we use a hydrodynamic model to predict the gravity levels at which humans should be able to run on water. We test these predictions in the laboratory using a reduced gravity simulator. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We adapted a model equation, previously used by Glasheen and McMahon to explain the dynamics of Basilisk lizard, to predict the body mass, stride frequency and gravity necessary for a person to run on water. Progressive body-weight unloading of a person running in place on a wading pool confirmed the theoretical predictions that a person could run on water, at lunar (or lower gravity levels using relatively small rigid fins. Three-dimensional motion capture of reflective markers on major joint centers showed that humans, similarly to the Basilisk Lizard and to the Western Grebe, keep the head-trunk segment at a nearly constant height, despite the high stride frequency and the intensive locomotor effort. Trunk stabilization at a nearly constant height differentiates running on water from other, more usual human gaits. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results showed that a hydrodynamic model of lizards running on water can also be applied to humans, despite the enormous difference in body size and morphology.

  14. [ManNAc, a new therapeutic agent to reduce Angptl4-induced proteinuria in MCD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Lionel; Macé, Camille

    2016-01-01

    Current therapies used in minimal change disease (MCD) were originally designed to cure other diseases. They are only partially efficient, and present inconvenient side effects. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of proteinuria in MCD could lead to new therapeutic strategies. A new experimental transgenic rat model of human MCD was generated. These NPHS2-Angptl4 transgenic rats over-express two different forms of the glycoprotein Angptl4 from the podocyte. The majority of the protein shows a lack of sialylation that is implicated in the pathogenesis of proteinuria. Supplementation of ManNAc, a precursor of sialic acid, significantly reduces albuminuria in those rats by increasing sialylation of the hyposialylated form of Angptl4. After treatment of the first episode of MCD with glucocorticoids in patients, ManNAc could be used as a maintenance drug, especially to reduce the frequency and intensity of relapse. ManNAc is a promising therapeutic agent for patients with MCD. © 2016 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  15. Green preparation and spectroscopic characterization of plasmonic silver nanoparticles using fruits as reducing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jes Ærøe Hyllested

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemicals typically available in plants have the capability to reduce silver and gold salts and to create silver and gold nanoparticles. We report the preparation of silver nanoparticles with sizes between 10 and 300 nm from silver nitrate using fruit extract collected from pineapples and oranges as reducing agents. The evolvement of a characteristic surface plasmon extinction spectrum in the range of 420 nm to 480 nm indicates the formation of silver nanoparticles after mixing silver nitrate solution and fruit extract. Shifts in plasmon peaks over time indicate the growth of nanoparticles. Electron microscopy shows that the shapes of the nanoparticles are different depending on the fruit used for preparation. The green preparation process can result in individual nanoparticles with a very poor tendency to form aggregates with narrow gaps even when aggregation is forced by the addition of NaCl. This explains only modest enhancement factors for near-infrared-excited surface enhanced Raman scattering. In addition to the surface plasmon band, UV–visible absorption spectra show features in the UV range which indicates also the presence of small silver clusters, such as Ag42+. The increase of the plasmon absorption correlates with the decrease of absorption band in the UV. This confirms the evolution of silver nanoparticles from silver clusters. The presence of various silver clusters on the surface of the “green” plasmonic silver nanoparticles is also supported by a strong multicolor luminesce signal emitted by the plasmonic particles during 473 nm excitation.

  16. Use of medium without reducing agent for in vitro fermentation studies by bacteria isolated from pig intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelaert, C; Boudry, C; Portetelle, D; Théwis, A; Bindelle, J

    2012-12-01

    Over the past decade, several in vitro methods have been developed to study intestinal fermentation in pigs and its influence on health. In these methods, samples are fermented by a bacterial inoculum diluted in a mineral buffer solution. Generally, a reducing agent such as Na(2)S or cysteine HCl generates the required anaerobic environment by release of H(2)S inducing an imbalance among bacterial species by the production of toxic metabolites. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to study the impact of reducing agent on fermentation patterns. Protein (soybean protein and/or casein) and carbohydrate (potato starch and/or cellulose) ingredients were fermented in vitro by pig intestinal bacteria from fresh feces obtained from 3 sows fed an antibiotic-free commercial diet in 3 incubation media differing in reducing agent: (i) Na(2)S, (ii) cysteine HCl, or (iii) without reducing agent. Gas fermentation kinetics were monitored over 72 h (pressure was measured every 2 min). Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production after 24 and 72 h were compared among ingredient and reducing agents (n = 2). Gas production was higher (P fermenting carbohydrate than protein ingredients. Except for soybean protein, total SCFA production after 24 and 72 h was similar (P > 0.05) for each ingredient regardless the incubation medium. The SCFA molar ratios did not differ (P > 0.05) between Na(2)S and without reducing agent. In conclusion, saturation of incubation media with CO(2) seems sufficient to generate an anaerobic environment. So incubation media could be simplified by omitting the reducing agent without influencing the fermentation kinetics and SCFA production.

  17. The combination of sodium perborate and water as intracoronal teeth bleaching agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananta Tantri Budi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The color change on post-endodontic treated teeth can be overcome by intracoronal tooth bleaching using walking bleach. Some agents used in walking bleach are combination of sodium peroxide and hydrogen peroxide, and combination of sodium perborate and water. Purpose: The objective of this review is to provide information and consideration of using safe and effective bleaching agents in the field of dentistry. Reviews: On one side, the use of sodium perborate and water combination does not cause the reduction of dentin hardness, enamel decay, and root resorbtion. On the other side, the use of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide combination indicates that it takes longer time in yielding the proper color of teeth. Conclusion: The use of sodium perborate and water combination as bleaching agents is effective and safe.

  18. Effect of different reducing agents on phase formation and transformation behaviour of Ni-Ti shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, H. H. Mohd; Bahrudin, N. A.; Abdullah, J.; Sarifuddin, N.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, NiTi synthesized via solid-state sintering from Ni-TiH2 powders in reducing environments using (i) CaH2 (ii) MgH2 and (iii) CaH2 and MgH2 as in situ reducing agent were investigated. The phase formation was characterized by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), while transformation behavior was analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement. Among these three reducing agents, synthesis in reducing environment using CaH2 as in situ reducing agent resulted in the formation of single phase NiTi with enthalpy change of 25-26 J/g, which is similar to melt-cast NiTi alloys. Specimens sintered in reducing environments using MgH2 and MgH2+CaH2 as in situ reducing agents have lower enthalpy change, ∼16-21 J/g compared to CaH2. This work established the fact that, synthesis in different reducing environment appears to have profound effects on the phase formation and transformation behavior of NiTi.

  19. Decontamination of radiological agents from drinking water infrastructure: a literature review and summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Jeff; Minamyer, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This report summarizes the current state of knowledge on the persistence of radiological agents on drinking water infrastructure (such as pipes) along with information on decontamination should persistence occur. Decontamination options for drinking water infrastructure have been explored for some important radiological agents (cesium, strontium and cobalt), but important data gaps remain. Although some targeted experiments have been published on cesium, strontium and cobalt persistence on drinking water infrastructure, most of the data comes from nuclear clean-up sites. Furthermore, the studies focused on drinking water systems use non-radioactive surrogates. Non-radioactive cobalt was shown to be persistent on iron due to oxidation with free chlorine in drinking water and precipitation on the iron surface. Decontamination with acidification was an effective removal method. Strontium persistence on iron was transient in tap water, but adherence to cement-mortar has been demonstrated and should be further explored. Cesium persistence on iron water infrastructure was observed when flow was stagnant, but not with water flow present. Future research suggestions focus on expanding the available cesium, strontium and cobalt persistence data to other common infrastructure materials, specifically cement-mortar. Further exploration chelating agents and low pH treatment is recommended for future decontamination studies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Homogeneous catalysts for utilization of synthesis gas as a reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, T.; Ramage, R.; Cann, K.; Pettit, R.

    1980-09-10

    The development of a homogeneous catalyst system which, for certain reactions, allows for the direct utilization of synthesis gas as the reducing agent is reported here. Furthermore, the reductions can proceed with each component (CO and H/sub 2/) in proportion to their initial partial pressures, thus allowing for the direct utilization of any composition of synthesis gas. The reactions studied are electron-transfer type reductions typified by the reduction of nitroarenes to aminoarenes, and the catalysts employed are metal carbonyls used in conjunction with a base. In the catalytic cycle, it is presumably the anionic metal hydride (MH/sup -/) which is the principal electron-donating species; with H/sub 2/ alone as the reducing agent, MH/sup -/ is produced by oxidative addition of H/sub 2/ to the metal carbonyl species M followed by removal of a proton with the base, whereas when CO is used, MH/sup -/ is formed by basic attack on the metal carbonyl (M-CO) in the aqueous medium followed by loss of CO/sub 2/. A 1:1 mixture of CO and H/sub 2/ with Ir/sub 4/(CO)/sub 12/ and Rh/sub 6/(CO)/sub 16/ as catalysts utilized both paths simultaneously. Reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline occurred with utilization of both the CO and H/sub 2/ components. The effect of temperature was investigated for these systems and the data are listed. The utilization of the Co and H/sub 2/ are indicated as the selectivity ratio. A selectivity ratio of less than unity indicates a preference for utilization of CO while that of unity indicates utilization of CO and H/sub 2/ at the same ratio as their initial partial pressures. The conclusion is that any composition of synthesis gas could be used for these reductions and that the reduction will proceed, at 137/sup 0/C, such that the H/sub 2/ and CO will be consumed at a constant ratio given by their initial relative concentrations.

  1. Improving mine-mill water network design by reducing water and energy requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunson, A.J.; Klein, B.; Veiga, M. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Norman B. Keevil Inst. of Mining Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Mining is an energy-intensive industry, and most processing mills use wet processes to separate minerals from ore. This paper discussed water reduction, reuse and recycling options for a mining and mill operation network. A mine water network design was then proposed in order to identify and reduce water and system energy requirements. This included (1) a description of site water balance, (2) a description of potential water sources, (3) a description of water consumers, (4) the construction of energy requirement matrices, and (5) the use of linear programming to reduce energy requirements. The design was used to determine a site water balance as well as to specify major water consumers during mining and mill processes. Potential water supply combinations, water metering technologies, and recycling options were evaluated in order to identify the most efficient energy and water use combinations. The method was used to highlight potential energy savings from the integration of heating and cooling systems with plant water systems. 43 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  2. An agent-based hydroeconomic model to evaluate water policies in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, J.; Gorelick, S.

    2014-12-01

    Modern water systems can be characterized by a complex network of institutional and private actors that represent competing sectors and interests. Identifying solutions to enhance water security in such systems calls for analysis that can adequately account for this level of complexity and interaction. Our work focuses on the development of a hierarchical, multi-agent, hydroeconomic model that attempts to realistically represent complex interactions between hydrologic and multi-faceted human systems. The model is applied to Jordan, one of the most water-poor countries in the world. In recent years, the water crisis in Jordan has escalated due to an ongoing drought and influx of refugees from regional conflicts. We adopt a modular approach in which biophysical modules simulate natural and engineering phenomena, and human modules represent behavior at multiple scales of decision making. The human modules employ agent-based modeling, in which agents act as autonomous decision makers at the transboundary, state, organizational, and user levels. A systematic nomenclature and conceptual framework is used to characterize model agents and modules. Concepts from the Unified Modeling Language (UML) are adopted to promote clear conceptualization of model classes and process sequencing, establishing a foundation for full deployment of the integrated model in a scalable object-oriented programming environment. Although the framework is applied to the Jordanian water context, it is generalizable to other regional human-natural freshwater supply systems.

  3. Compatibility issues of cement with water reducing admixture in concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Shrivastava

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple brand of cement and water reducing admixtures are available in the market, even though these cements and admixture comply with the respective codal provisions there performance are not same in the concrete for each and every brand of cement and water reducing admixture, even if quality and source of other ingredients of concrete is kept same. This has created a lot of confusion among the user about what type/brand of admixture is used with what type/brand of cement and what should be optimum dose of admixture. Common problem associated with incompatibility issue is flash setting, delayed setting, rapid slump loss, improper strength gain and cracking, these not only effect the strength of the concrete but also the durability of the structure. Hence, in the present study different brand/type of cement and water reducing admixture available in the market is used to find study the compatibility issue and optimum dose of admixture. To achieve this marsh cone test has been performed. Test results indicate that the optimum dose of admixture vary from 0.9 to 1.1% of the weight of cement with different type/brand of cement and type/brand of admixture.

  4. Red tea leaves infusion as a reducing and stabilizing agent in silver nanoparticles synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, K.; Tryba, A. M.; Malina, D.; Sobczak-Kupiec, A.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the unique properties of silver nanoparticles there is growing interest in their applications. Current trends in nanotechnology are focused on developing a new technique to synthesize nanoparticles using biological methods associated with the use of plant extracts, fungi, bacteria or essential oils. These methods are a promising alternative to conventional approaches which can minimize the use of hazardous substances. The silver nanoparticles synthesis using red tea infusion as a reducing and stabilizing agent and their characteristics have been described. Total antioxidant capacity using DPPH radical and total content of phenolic compounds by Folin–Ciocalteau method were measured in tea infusion. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles was carried out using chemical reduction at various temperatures. Furthermore, the effect of tea infusion volume added to reaction mixture on nanoparticles’ properties was investigated. Finally, nanosilver suspensions were characterized by UV–vis spectrophotometer, dynamic light scattering (DLS) scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Moreover, phytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles was determined using Phytotestkit microbiotest.

  5. The Novel Antitubulin Agent TR-764 Strongly Reduces Tumor Vasculature and Inhibits HIF-1α Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcù, Elena; Persano, Luca; Ronca, Roberto; Mitola, Stefania; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Romagnoli, Romeo; Oliva, Paola; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro

    2016-06-13

    Tubulin binding agents (TBAs) are commonly used in cancer therapy as antimitotics. It has been described that TBAs, like combretastatin A-4 (CA-4), present also antivascular activity and among its derivatives we identified TR-764 as a new inhibitor of tubulin polymerization, based on the 2-(alkoxycarbonyl)-3-(3',4',5'-trimethoxyanilino)benzo[b]thiophene molecular skeleton. The antiangiogenic activity of TR-764 (1-10 nM) was tested in vitro on human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs), and in vivo, on the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and two murine tumor models. TR-764 binding to tubulin triggers cytoskeleton rearrangement without affecting cell cycle and viability. It leads to capillary tube disruption, increased cell permeability, and cell motility reduction. Moreover it disrupts adherens junctions and focal adhesions, through mechanisms involving VE-cadherin/β-catenin and FAK/Src. Importantly, TR-764 is active in hypoxic conditions significantly reducing HIF-1α. In vivo TR-764 (1-100 pmol/egg) remarkably blocks the bFGF proangiogenic activity on CAM and shows a stronger reduction of tumor mass and microvascular density both in murine syngeneic and xenograft tumor models, compared to the lead compound CA-4P. Altogether, our results indicate that TR-764 is a novel TBA with strong potential as both antivascular and antitumor molecule that could improve the common anticancer therapies, by overcoming hypoxia-induced resistance mechanisms.

  6. Removal of methyl orange by heterogeneous Fenton catalysts prepared using glycerol as green reducing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotte, Natália S F; Alzamora, M; Sánchez, D R; Carvalho, Nakédia M F

    2017-08-29

    This study aims to prepare environmentally friendly iron catalysts supported on silica, using glycerol as green reducing and stabilizing agent, for application in heterogeneous Fenton degradation of the pollutant dye methyl orange (MO). The catalysts were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analyses, Mössbauer and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies, which revealed the formation of iron(II)/(III) oxalates from the oxidation of glycerol by the iron(III) nitrate precursor. Besides, iron oxihydroxide nanoparticles with superparamagnetic behavior were also formed. Iron catalysts prepared in the presence of nickel(II) or zinc(II) nitrates lead to the formation of the corresponding oxalates. The catalysts were able to degrade MO, efficiently in 180 min of reaction. Fe/SiO 2 furnished higher reaction rates, followed by Zn4Fe2/SiO 2 , which presented higher iron content as well as the smallest nanoparticles. Reaction parameters such as catalyst dosage, hydrogen peroxide concentration, pH and reaction temperature were investigated.

  7. Effect of Desmopressin in Reducing Bleeding after Cardiac Surgery in Patients Receiving Anti-Platelet Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Shadvar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Severe bleeding is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgery using the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB pump. Desmopressin, a synthetic analogue of vasopressin, is used to prevent postoperative bleeding in patients with renal insufficiency. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of desmopressin in reducing blood loss after cardiac surgery in patients receiving antiplatelet drugs. Methods: In this prospective clinical trial, 40 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG surgery with CPB, aged over 18 years, and on antiplatelet therapy for a week before surgery were divided in two groups. Case and control groups received nasal desmopressin spray and nasal normal saline spray, respectively. Patient vital signs, blood loss, administration of blood products, prescription drugs to improve the coagulation status, serum and whole intake and output of patients, need for a second surgery to control the bleeding, remaining sternum open, mortality due to bleeding, duration of intensive care unit (ICU stay and mechanical ventilation were recorded. Results: In the case and control groups there were no differences in duration of operation, mechanical ventilation and length of ICU stay. There was no significant difference in terms of postoperative bleeding and intake of blood products between two groups (P>0.05. Reoperation due to bleeding in the case and control groups was observed in 3 (15%, and 1 (5% patient(s, respectively (P=0.3. Conclusion: Desmopressin has no significant effect on reducing the amount of bleeding after cardiac surgery in patients receiving anti-platelet agents.   Keywords: CABG; cardio pulmonary bypass pump; hemorrhage; desmopressin

  8. Carbohydrate-directed synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles: effect of the structure of carbohydrates and reducing agents on the size and morphology of the composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervani, Zameer; Yamamoto, Yasushi

    2011-04-01

    A monosaccharide (β-D-glucose) and polysaccharide (soluble starch) were used as structure directing and subsequently stabilizing agents for the synthesis of spherical nanoparticles (NPs) and nanowires of silver and gold. Homogeneous monodispersed Ag(0) nanoparticles (Ag NPs) of 15 nm diameter were obtained when 10(-4)M AgNO(3) precursor salt was reduced in starch (1 wt%)-water gel by 1 wt% β-D-glucose. For a second preparation the effect of reducing agents on the synthesis of Au(0) metallic nanoparticles (Au NPs) of 2 × 10(-4)M concentration prepared in a β-D-glucose (0.03 M)-water dispersion was studied first in detail. Different equivalent amounts of NaBH(4) and a number of pH values were evaluated for the reduction of the Au salt HAuCl(4)·3H(2)O to obtain Au NPs. The type and the amount of reducing agent, as well as the pH of the solution was shown to affect the size and morphology of the NPs. NaBH(4) (4 equiv) produced the smallest (5.3 nm (σ 0.7)) metallic particles compared to larger particles (10.0 nm (σ 1.4)) when the salt was reduced by 1 equiv of NaBH(4). Addition of excess NaBH(4) caused the NPs to settle out as a precipitate forming a mesh or wire structure rather than monodispersed particles. Low pH (pH 6) resulted in incomplete reduction, while at pH 8 the salt was completely reduced. When the salt was reduced by NaOH at pH 8, the particles were larger (14.2 nm) and less homogeneous (σ 2.8) compared to those from NaBH(4) reduction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhancement effects of reducing agents on the degradation of tetrachloroethene in the Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed percarbonate system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Zhouwei [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Soil, Water and Environmental Science Department, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Arizona, 429 Shantz Building, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Gu, Xiaogang [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Lu, Shuguang, E-mail: lvshuguang@ecust.edu.cn [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Brusseau, Mark L. [Soil, Water and Environmental Science Department, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Arizona, 429 Shantz Building, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Yan, Ni [Hydrology and Water Resources Department, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona, 429 Shantz Building, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • PCE degradation by reducing-agent modified Fe-catalyzed percarbonate was studied. • The addition of reducing agents significantly increased PCE degradation. • Hydroxylamine hydrochloride showed the best effect on enhancing PCE degradation. • The primary PCE degradation mechanism was oxidation by hydroxyl radical. • O{sub 2}·{sup −} participated in the degradation of PCE in reducing-agent modified system. - Abstract: In this study, the effects of reducing agents on the degradation of tetrachloroethene (PCE) were investigated in the Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed sodium percarbonate (SPC) system. The addition of reducing agents, including hydroxylamine hydrochloride, sodium sulfite, ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate, accelerated the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox cycle, leading to a relatively steady Fe(II) concentration and higher production of free radicals. This, in turn, resulted in enhanced PCE oxidation by SPC, with almost complete PCE removal obtained for appropriate Fe and SPC concentrations. The chemical probe tests, using nitrobenzene and carbon tetrachloride, demonstrated that HO· was the predominant radical in the system and that O{sub 2}·{sup −} played a minor role, which was further confirmed by the results of electron spin resonance measurements. PCE degradation decreased significantly with the addition of isopropanol, a HO· scavenger, supporting the hypothesis that HO· was primarily responsible for PCE degradation. It is noteworthy that Cl{sup −} release was slightly delayed in the first 20 min, indicating that intermediate products were produced. However, these intermediates were further degraded, resulting in the complete conversion of PCE to CO{sub 2}. In conclusion, the use of reducing agents to enhance Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed SPC oxidation appears to be a promising approach for the rapid degradation of organic contaminants in groundwater.

  10. Investigation of the effect of scattering agent and scattering albedo on modulated light propagation in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Linda; Alley, Derek; Cochenour, Brandon

    2011-04-01

    A recent paper described experiments completed to study the effect of scattering on the propagation of modulated light in laboratory tank water [Appl. Opt.48, 2607 (2009)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.48.002607]. Those measurements were limited to a specific scattering agent (Maalox antacid) with a fixed scattering albedo (0.95). The purpose of this paper is to study the effects of different scattering agents and scattering albedos on modulated light propagation in water. The results show that the scattering albedo affects the number of attenuation lengths that the modulated optical signal propagates without distortion, while the type of scattering agent affects the degree to which the modulation is distorted with increasing attenuation length. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  11. Effect of Gum Arabic Karroo as a water-reducing admixture in cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Mbugua

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop Gum Acacia Karroo (GAK as set retarding-water reducing admixture in cement mortars. Retarding admixtures are used to counter effect the accelerated hydration of cement at elevated temperatures by slowing down the retarding process especially during the day when concreting work is done. However most retarding admixtures available in the market are expensive, thereby making them out of reach for small consumers of concrete in Africa are expensive and not readily available. GAK, which contains soluble sugars, was investigated as a set-retarding water reducing-admixture. Setting time was measured in cement pastes with different dosages of GAK and a commercial retarding agent (Tard CE. Compressive strength, bleeding and flow test were investigated on cement mortars with the control being cement mortar without admixture. GAK was found to increase final setting time by 6 h above control. Compressive strength increased when water cement ratio was reduced from 0.5 to 0.4. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed increased dosage of GAK reduced hydration rate.

  12. Caffeic acid: potential applications in nanotechnology as a green reducing agent for sustainable synthesis of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yu Seon; Cha, Song-Hyun; Yoon, Hye-Ran; Kang, Young-Hwa; Park, Youmie

    2015-04-01

    The sustainable synthesis of gold nanoparticles from gold ions was conducted with caffeic acid as a green reducing agent. The formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed by spectroscopic and microscopic methods. Spherical nanoparticles with an average diameter of 29.99 ± 7.43 nm were observed in high- resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. The newly prepared gold nanoparticles exhibited catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride. This system enables the preparation of green catalysts using plant natural products as reducing agents, which fulfills the growing need for sustainability initiatives.

  13. Microfluidic chip with optical sensor for rapid detection of nerve agent Sarin in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hsih Yin; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Loke, Weng Keong; Tan, Yong Teng

    2007-12-01

    The chemical warfare agent Sarin is an organophosphate that is highly toxic to humans as they can act as cholinesterase inhibitors, that disrupts neuromuscular transmission. As these nerve agents are colorless, odorless and highly toxic, they can be introduced into drinking water as a means of terrorist sabotage. Hence, numerous innovative devices and methods have been developed for rapid detection of these organophosphates. Microfluidic technology allows the implementation of fast and sensitive detection of Sarin. In this paper, a micro-total analysis systems (TAS), also known as Lab-on-a-chip, fitted with an optical detection system has been developed to analyze the presence of the nerve agent sarin in water samples. In the present set-up, inhibition of co-introduced cholinesterase and water samples containing trace amounts of nerve agent sarin into the microfluidic device was used as the basis for selective detection of sarin. The device was fabricated using polymeric micromachining with PMMA (poly (methymethacrylate)) as the substrate material. A chromophore was utilized to measure the activity of remnant cholinesterase activity, which is inversely related to the amount of sarin present in the water samples. Comparisons were made between two different optical detection techniques and the findings will be presented in this paper. The presented measurement method is simple, fast and as sensitive as Gas Chromatography.

  14. Decontamination of biological agents from drinking water infrastructure: a literature review and summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Jeff; Minamyer, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This report summarizes the current state of knowledge on the persistence of biological agents on drinking water infrastructure (such as pipes) along with information on decontamination should persistence occur. Decontamination options for drinking water infrastructure have been explored for some biological agents, but data gaps remain. Data on bacterial spore persistence on common water infrastructure materials such as iron and cement-mortar lined iron show that spores can be persistent for weeks after contamination. Decontamination data show that common disinfectants such as free chlorine have limited effectiveness. Decontamination results with germinant and alternate disinfectants such as chlorine dioxide are more promising. Persistence and decontamination data were collected on vegetative bacteria, such as coliforms, Legionella and Salmonella. Vegetative bacteria are less persistent than spores and more susceptible to disinfection, but the surfaces and water quality conditions in many studies were only marginally related to drinking water systems. However, results of real-world case studies on accidental contamination of water systems with E. coli and Salmonella contamination show that flushing and chlorination can help return a water system to service. Some viral persistence data were found, but decontamination data were lacking. Future research suggestions focus on expanding the available biological persistence data to other common infrastructure materials. Further exploration of non-traditional drinking water disinfectants is recommended for future studies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; Daisey, Joan M.

    1999-09-01

    There is growing concern about potential terrorist attacks involving releases of chemical and/or biological (CB) agents, such as sarin or anthrax, in and around buildings. For an external release, the CB agent can enter the building through the air intakes of a building's mechanical ventilation system and by infiltration through the building envelope. For an interior release in a single room, the mechanical ventilation system, which often recirculates some fraction of the air within a building, may distribute the released CB agent throughout the building. For both cases, installing building systems that remove chemical and biological agents may be the most effective way to protect building occupants. Filtration systems installed in the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems of buildings can significantly reduce exposures of building occupants in the event of a release, whether the release is outdoors or indoors. Reduced exposures can reduce the number of deaths from a terrorist attack. The purpose of this report is to provide information and examples of the design of filtration systems to help building engineers retrofit HVAC systems. The report also provides background information on the physical nature of CB agents and brief overviews of the basic principles of particle and vapor filtration.

  16. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aqueous ethanol extract of Curcuma mangga rhizomes as reducing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Foo Yiing; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd

    2015-04-01

    Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) had been developed as an alternative to chemical and physical methods due to its simplicity, cost effectiveness and eco-friendliness. The high biocompatibility and biostability features of AuNPs have found importance in biomedical applications in recent years. In this study, aqueous ethanol extract of Curcuma mangga rhizomes which acts as reducing and stabilizing agent was used to synthesize stable AuNPs by bioreduction of chloroauric acid. The formation of AuNPs was highlighted by the color change of the suspension from light yellow to reddish purple. Time-evolution was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy, while surface plasmon (SP) absorption band of the AuNPs suspension was observed at a maximum absorption of 540 nm. Hydrodynamic radii and size distribution of the AuNPs in the suspension were evaluated using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurement demonstrated negative surface charge. The particle size was calculated in the range of 2-30 nm using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The morphology and elemental composition were further determined by Field Effect Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy meanwhile was used to confirm the presence of AuNPs and functional groups involved in the gold bio-reduction process. Influence of the volume of extract and concentration of gold (III) chloride trihydrate (HAuCl4.3H2O) on the synthesis of AuNPs were also investigated. The results obtained indicate potential optimization and functionalization of AuNPs for future applications in bionanotechnology especially in the field of medicine.

  17. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aqueous ethanol extract of Curcuma mangga rhizomes as reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Foo Yiing; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd [Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Periasamy, Vengadesh [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), Department of Physic, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) had been developed as an alternative to chemical and physical methods due to its simplicity, cost effectiveness and eco-friendliness. The high biocompatibility and biostability features of AuNPs have found importance in biomedical applications in recent years. In this study, aqueous ethanol extract of Curcuma mangga rhizomes which acts as reducing and stabilizing agent was used to synthesize stable AuNPs by bioreduction of chloroauric acid. The formation of AuNPs was highlighted by the color change of the suspension from light yellow to reddish purple. Time-evolution was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy, while surface plasmon (SP) absorption band of the AuNPs suspension was observed at a maximum absorption of 540 nm. Hydrodynamic radii and size distribution of the AuNPs in the suspension were evaluated using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurement demonstrated negative surface charge. The particle size was calculated in the range of 2-30 nm using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The morphology and elemental composition were further determined by Field Effect Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy meanwhile was used to confirm the presence of AuNPs and functional groups involved in the gold bio-reduction process. Influence of the volume of extract and concentration of gold (III) chloride trihydrate (HAuCl{sub 4}.3H{sub 2}O) on the synthesis of AuNPs were also investigated. The results obtained indicate potential optimization and functionalization of AuNPs for future applications in bionanotechnology especially in the field of medicine.

  18. Near- and supercritical water as a diameter manipulation and surface roughening agent in fused silica capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karásek, Pavel; Planeta, Josef; Roth, Michal

    2013-01-02

    The prospects of near- and supercritical water for treatment of the inner surfaces of fused silica capillaries have been tested employing an in-lab-assembled apparatus. Unlike all other agents used for the purpose, water cannot introduce any undesirable heteroatoms to the treated surface. Theoretical background for this work comes from the well-known fact that water near its critical point can solubilize silica. The results show that depending on the temperature, water flow rate, flow mode, and exposure time, high-temperature water has wide-ranging effects on both the surface roughness and the internal diameter profile along the length of the treated capillary. By judicious selection of the operating conditions, tapered capillaries of various profiles for applications in electromigration techniques can be prepared with relatively high reproducibility. The water-treated fused silica capillaries with uniform internal diameter appear to be useful for preparation of monolithic silica capillary columns.

  19. Case series on a diversity of illicit weight-reducing agents: from the well known to the unexpected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Magdalene H Y; Chen, Sammy P L; Ng, Sau W; Chan, Albert Y W; Mak, Tony W L

    2011-01-01

    AIMS To provide an overview of illicit weight-reducing agents found in over-the-counter slimming products ingested by poisoned patients. METHODS The clinical details and analytical findings of slimming products involved in poisoning cases between 2004 and 2009 were reviewed. RESULTS Sixty-six (including one fatal) poisoning cases were encountered. Eighty-one products were analysed and found to contain undeclared prescription weight-loss drugs, drug analogues, banned drugs, drugs used for an inappropriate indication or animal thyroid tissue, with up to six illicit agents within the same product. Many products were readily available from shops or the Internet. CONCLUSIONS A rich diversity of illicit, potentially harmful weight-reducing agents was found in over-the-counter slimming products. PMID:21219406

  20. Preparation of Nano-Scale Biopolymer Extracted from Coconut Residue and Its Performance as Drag Reducing Agent (DRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Muhammad Luqman Bin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Drag or frictional force is defined as force that acts opposite to the object’s relative motion through a fluid which then will cause frictional pressure loss in the pipeline. Drag Reducing Agent (DRA is used to solve this issue and most of the DRAs are synthetic polymers but has some environmental issues. Therefore for this study, biopolymer known as Coconut Residue (CR is selected as the candidate to replace synthetic polymers DRA. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Nano-scale biopolymer DRA on the application of water injection system. Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC is extracted by synthesizing the cellulose extracted from CR under the alkali-catalyzed reaction using monochloroacetic acid. The synthesize process is held in controlled condition whereby the concentration of NaOH is kept at 60%wt, 60 °C temperature and the reaction time is 4 hours. For every 25 g of dried CR used, the mass of synthesized CMC yield is at an average of 23.8 g. The synthesized CMC is then grinded in controlled parameters using the ball milling machine to get the Nano-scale size. The particle size obtained from this is 43.32 Nm which is in range of Nano size. This study proved that Nano-size CMC has higher percentage of drag reduction (%DR and flow increase (%FI if compared to normal-size CMC when tested in high and low flow rate; 44% to 48% increase in %DR and %FI when tested in low flow rate, and 16% to 18% increase in %DR and %FI when tested in high flow rate. The success of this research shows that Nano-scale DRA can be considered to be used to have better performance in reducing drag.

  1. Potato extract as reducing agent and stabiliser in a facile green one-step synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buazar, Foad; Bavi, M.; Kroushawi, Feisal

    2016-01-01

    . Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis indicated that highly pure ZnO nanopowders were obtained at higher temperatures. The use of environmentally benign and renewable material as the respective reducing and protecting agents, starch-rich potato extract, as well as a gentle solvent medium (H2O...

  2. Agricultural pathogen decontamination technology-reducing the threat of infectious agent spread.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betty, Rita G.; Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David

    2005-10-01

    Outbreaks of infectious agricultural diseases, whether natural occurring or introduced intentionally, could have catastrophic impacts on the U.S. economy. Examples of such agricultural pathogens include foot and mouth disease (FMD), avian influenza (AI), citrus canker, wheat and soy rust, etc. Current approaches to mitigate the spread of agricultural pathogens include quarantine, development of vaccines for animal diseases, and development of pathogen resistant crop strains in the case of plant diseases. None of these approaches is rapid, and none address the potential persistence of the pathogen in the environment, which could lead to further spread of the agent and damage after quarantine is lifted. Pathogen spread in agricultural environments commonly occurs via transfer on agricultural equipment (transportation trailers, tractors, trucks, combines, etc.), having components made from a broad range of materials (galvanized and painted steel, rubber tires, glass and Plexiglas shields, etc), and under conditions of heavy organic load (mud, soil, feces, litter, etc). A key element of stemming the spread of an outbreak is to ensure complete inactivation of the pathogens in the agricultural environment and on the equipment used in those environments. Through the combination of enhanced agricultural pathogen decontamination chemistry and a validated inactivation verification methodology, important technologies for incorporation as components of a robust response capability will be enabled. Because of the potentially devastating economic impact that could result from the spread of infectious agricultural diseases, the proposed capability components will promote critical infrastructure protection and greater border and food supply security. We investigated and developed agricultural pathogen decontamination technologies to reduce the threat of infectious-agent spread, and thus enhance agricultural biosecurity. Specifically, enhanced detergency versions of the patented

  3. Bio-corrosion of water pipeline by sulphate-reducing bacteria in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    esiri

    2013-11-13

    Nov 13, 2013 ... This study investigates the presence of SRB in water, in a water pipeline and in ... Key words: Sulphate-reducing bacteria, corrosion, water pipeline, biocide. INTRODUCTION ...... tubercles in distribution pipelines. J. Am. Water ...

  4. Self-Made, Cost-Reducing Hemostatic Agent for Use in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Fernando; Rustagi, Tarush; Iwanaga, Joe; Fisahn, Christian; Oskouian, Rod; Tubbs, R Shane; Dailey, Andrew; Chapman, Jens R

    2017-12-01

    Operative bleeding complications can lead to patient morbidity and mortality as well as longer and increased hospitalization costs. Matrix hemostatic sealants are used commonly to shorten the time to hemostasis, operative times, and the need for blood transfusion. Commercially available hemostatic powders are used in spine surgery because of their ability to conform to wounds and decrease bleeding in difficult-to-access surgical sites. Hospital costs for these agents are variable and are dependent on negotiated institutional contracted prices. We present our technique for mixing and use of our own hemostatic agent that has been used by our senior spine surgeons for more than a decade. It uses supplies that are commonly found in the hospital for a fraction of the cost and at different concentrations of thrombin. We hope that this report serves to assist surgeons working in hospitals with limited resources and enriches their armamentarium of hemostatic agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Insecticidal Effects of Insecticide, Fungicide, Complex Fertilizer and Wetting Agent Combinations Depending on Water Hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavica Vuković

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous occurrence of different harmful species in agricultural practice necessitates that different plant protection chemicals be applied at the same time (tank mix. Mix components differ in purpose, mode of action and/or formulation, while addition of nonpesticide components (complex fertilizers, adjuvants and wetting agents is widely practiced today. However, data concerning the effects of water quality used for preparation of working liquids on the biological effects of pesticides is still scarce. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine insecticidal effects as depending on components used in mixes and water hardness. The effects of mixtures of thiametoxam (Actara 25-WG 0,07kg/ha with azoxystrobin (Quadris 0.75 l/ha, mancozeb (Dithane M-70 2.5 kg/ha, a complex fertilizer (Mortonijc plus 3 kg/ha and a wetting agent (Silwet L-77, depending on the components and water hardness(slightly hard (15.4 d° - tap water from Novi Sad, and very hard (34.7 d° - well water from Adica, a Novi Sad suburb, were determined in a bioassay based on adult mortality rate of the first generation of Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say. The mixtures were applied by a flooding method. The trial was set up to include four replications. Insecticidal effects were determined 24 h and 48 h after exposure. Thiametoxam effectiveness 24 h and 48 h after application in slightly hard water was 100% when the insecticide was applied alone and in double and triple mixes with the fungicides, complex fertilizer and wetting agent, showing no dependency on mix components.The tested adult population of Colorado potato beetle demonstrated high susmceptibility to thiametoxam, while the other components had no impact in slightly hard water. In very hard water, 24 h after application, the insecticidal effect had the same level of significance to thiametoxam in double and triple mixes, with an exception of thiametoxam+mancozeb+Mortonijc plus and

  6. The antiendotoxin agent taurolidine potentially reduces ischemia/reperfusion injury through its metabolite taurine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doddakula, Kishore K

    2010-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass results in ischemia\\/reperfusion (I\\/R)-induced endotoxemia. We conducted a prospective randomized trial to investigate the effect of taurolidine, an antiendotoxin agent with antioxidant and membrane-stabilizing properties, on patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).

  7. Oxidation of the antibacterial agent norfloxacin during sodium hypochlorite disinfection of marine culture water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Rong, Chuan; Song, Yanqun; Wang, Yinghui; Pei, Jiying; Tang, Xinying; Zhang, Ruijie; Yu, Kefu

    2017-09-01

    Chlorination disinfection and antibiotic addition are two universal processes of marine culture. The generation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) is unavoidable. Antibiotic residue not only pollutes water but also acts as a precursor to the production of new DBPs. The fate of antibiotic norfloxacin (NOR) in chlorination disinfection was investigated. It was observed that NOR could be oxidized by disinfection agent sodium hypochlorite, but the oxidation rate varied considerably with the type of disinfected water. For fresh water, marine culture water and sea water, the reaction rate constant was 0.066 min(-1), 0.466 min(-1) and 1.241 min(-1), respectively. The difference was primarily attributed to the promotion role of bromide ions in seawater and marine culture water. Moreover, the bromide ions could result in the generation of brominated DBPs (Br-DBPs). The kinetics, products, reaction centers and mechanisms were investigated. The active site of NOR was found to be the N4 atom on piperazinyl in fresh water. During marine culture water and sea water disinfection, the carboxyl on NOR was oxidized and two Br-DBPs were formed. This was attributed to the lowering of the reaction's required activation energy when performed in the presence of bromide ions. The Br-DBPs were also confirmed in real shrimp pond brackish water. Quantitative structure activity relationships and the total organic halogen analysis showed that the DBPs in marine culture water possessed stronger toxicological properties than the DBPs in fresh water. The toxicity increase was attributed to the production of Br-DBPs in the disinfection process of marine culture water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reduced weight decontamination formulation utilizing a solid peracid compound for neutralization of chemical and biological warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-09-20

    A reduced weight decontamination formulation that utilizes a solid peracid compound (sodium borate peracetate) and a cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride) that can be packaged with all water removed. This reduces the packaged weight of the decontamination formulation by .about.80% (as compared to the "all-liquid" DF-200 formulation) and significantly lowers the logistics burden on the warfighter. Water (freshwater or saltwater) is added to the new decontamination formulation at the time of use from a local source.

  9. Water Balance Estimation in Patients with Acute Poisonings due to Psychotropic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Ilyashenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to develop a procedure for an integrated assessment of changes in body hydration, by using the polyseg-mental bioimpedance analysis (PBIA of the body’s water sectors. Subjects and methods. The volumes of cellular and extracellular fluids in various body regions were estimated in 85 patients with acute poisonings by psychotropic agents, by employing the PBIA over time within three days and when the impact of various treatment options on them was evaluated. An ABC-01 MEDASS device with ABC043 software was applied. Results. The study ascertained that the changes in the volumes of extracellular and cellular fluids in the upper trunk, namely progressive extracellular fluid accumulation, are the most informative parameters for disease prognosis. On this basis, the authors proposed a formula to calculate the integral hydration index (IHI and showed its informative value when used in patients with acute poisonings due to psychotropic agents during remedial measures. Conclusion. The IHI developed on the basis of estimation of abnormal cellular and extracellular fluid volumes in patients with poisonings by psychotropic agents is sensitive and striking in the evaluation of water imbalance in patients under resuscitation and allows the detected disorders to be efficiently corrected. Key words: acute poisonings, water balance, extracellular and cellular fluid, index, hydration index.

  10. The role of reducing agents in the nucleation and growth of Al metalloid clusters: Ab initio molecular dynamic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnemrat, Sufian

    2017-06-01

    Ab initio simulations are used to study the growth of metalloid aluminum clusters from their monohalide (AlCl) precursors. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is used to study the role of reducing agents in the growth process of Al metalloid clusters. Car-Parrinello MD simulations of AlCl liquid and Lithium-Aluminum Hydride reducing agent (LiAlH4) show spontaneous metalloid cluster growth. The growth process is initiated by transferring a proton to a nearby Al atom that helps forming trivalent impurities (AlCl3) in the solution. Growth towards larger metalloid clusters then proceeds via repeated insertion of AlCl into Al-Cl bonds as well as elimination of AlCl3 species. The transferred proton plays a significant role in reducing additional monohalide species from the solution. The energy barrier associated with the Al-Cl bond is dropped from 7.8 eV to 4 eV via proton-hopping between Al centers. However, this process is completely prohibited in the case of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) reducing agent due to strong Coulomb interactions between Na and B centers. Repeated insertion of additional AlCl monomers towards larger clusters was not observed within the same time scale of the previous simulations.

  11. Reducing Retrieval Time in Automated Storage and Retrieval System with a Gravitational Conveyor Based on Multi-Agent Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imén Kouloughli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to reduce the retrieval time of a list of products by choosing the best combination of storage and retrieval rules at any time. This is why we start by implementing some storage rules in an Automated Storage/Retrieval System (Automated Storage and Retrieval System: AS/RS fitted with a gravity conveyor while some of these rules are dedicated to storage and others to retrieval. The system is seen as a Multi-Agent System (MAS where the produced agents are reactive agents that can interact to achieve a behavior (organizing the store. Our MAS is characterized by a decentralized control, which means that there is no preset plan. The produced agents exchange information such as their color, their distance from the output station, etc. Each product merely applies a set of behavioral rules. The aim is to choose the best product to be retrieved in the shortest possible time. The product-type agents have no cognitive ability, but still perform complex tasks.

  12. A new reducing agent to prepare single-layer, high-quality reduced graphene oxide for device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shun; Yu, Kehan; Cui, Shumao; Bo, Zheng; Lu, Ganhua; Chen, Junhong

    2011-07-01

    We report on a novel, efficient, and one-step approach to prepare single-layer reduced graphene oxide (RGO) suspensions and films using hydroxylamine hydrochloride. The effective chemical reduction of GO was evidenced by a significant increase in the C/O ratio and five orders of magnitude decrease in the GO resistance. Field-effect transistor gas sensors were fabricated using as-produced RGO sheets and the resulting sensor exhibited a fast response and a high sensitivity to low-concentration target gases at room temperature.

  13. Evaluation of policy measures and methods to reduce diffuse water pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Ute; Doehler, Helmut; Eurich-Menden, Brigitte; Goemann, Horst; Jaeger, Peter; Kreins, Peter; Moeller, Christine; Prigge, Achim; Ristenpart, Erik; Schultheiss, Ute

    2006-11-15

    After considerable improvements of wastewater treatment, the loads of nutrients and plant protection agents, deriving from agriculture and heavy metals from urban drainages effluents as well as from erosion of agricultural soils are the main sources of nutrients and harmful substances in the loads of water bodies. The targets of the project were on the one hand the analysis of the political and legislative framework of both policy fields and on the other hand the evaluation of several, selected water protection measures with regard to their contribution to reduce water pollution, their economical effects as well as their political enforceability. The focus was laid on diffuse water pollution caused by agriculture. As main reasons for the diffuse water pollution stagnating at high level, the analysis of the political framework identified a lack of implementation discipline of water law, followed by the fragmented and insufficient water protection legislation itself and the previous design of the common agricultural policy slanted towards increasing productivity. For the future co-operation of agricultural and water authorities in implementation of their reforms and better definition of 'Good Farming Practice' are recommended. The second investigation level focuses on the analysis and assessment of selected measures to reduce the input of nutrients and plant protection agents. This part was done with help of calculation models focussing on the specific cost/benefit ratios for water protection. In detail the following measures have been analysed: decoupling of direct payments, coupling of livestock farming to areas, tax on mineral nitrogen, pesticide levy, buffer stripes alongside of watercourses, all season crop cover on arable land, soil cultivation procedures, changing the use of arable land, optimisation of animal nutrition, optimisation of manure storage and application, co-operative agreements, education and training. Co-operations and water protection

  14. Polyelectrolytes Ability in Reducing Atrazine Concentration in Water: Surface Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Faiz Mohd Amin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the direct ability of two positively charged organic polyelectrolytes (natural-based and synthetic to reduce the atrazine concentration in water. The adsorption study was set up using multiple glass vessels with different polymer dosing levels followed by ultrafiltration with a 1 kDa membrane. The addition of polymers exhibited a capability in reducing the atrazine concentration up to a maximum of 60% in surface-to-volume ratio experiments. In the beginning, the theoretical L-type of the isotherm of Giles’ classification was expected with an increase in the dosage of the polymer. However, in this study, the conventional type of isotherm was not observed. It was found that the adsorption of the cationic polymer on the negatively charged glass surface was necessary and influential for the removal of atrazine. Surface-to-volume ratio adsorption experiments were performed to elucidate the mechanisms and the polymer configuration. The glass surface area was determined to be a limiting parameter in the adsorption mechanism.

  15. Influence of reducing agents and surfactants on size and shape of silver fine powder particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevan P. Dimitrijević

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Silver fine powder with different shapes and sizes were prepared by chemical reduction and characterized by scanning electron microscope. In this paper was presented the method for the preparation of the fine Ag powder with particles size smaller than 2.5 µm with suitability for the mass-production scale. Reduction was performed from nitrate solution directly by vigorous stirring at room temperature by three different reduction agents, with and without presence of two dispersants. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the preferred size of the particles obtained in all experiments with aim of the protecting agent. Larger particles and wider size distribution were obtained without surfactants although with average size of about 1 µm and small quantity of larger clusters of primary particles that is out of the fine powder classification. High purity, 99.999%, of silver was obtained in every experiment.

  16. Influence of the concentration of reducing agent on gold nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and its ammonia sensing performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalingam, Muthu Mariappan; Balasubramanian, Karthikeyan

    2017-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide were synthesized with various concentrations of ascorbic acid. Phase structure and the variation in particle size were analysed by XRD studies and SEM image, respectively. The extent of reduction in graphene oxide was analysed by different techniques. Then the sensor was fabricated by simple drop casting method on a glass and the electrical contacts were provided by silver electrodes. The electrical conductivity of the films was measured by I-V measurements. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was employed to monitor the charge transfer at the interface of electrode and the sample. Finally the ammonia sensing of the fabricated films was studied by chemiresisitive method and the results are compared.

  17. Potato extract as reducing agent and stabiliser in a facile green one-step synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buazar, Foad; Bavi, M.; Kroushawi, Feisal

    2016-01-01

    A facile green recipe was developed to synthesise highly pure, safe and durable zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO Nps) using homemade starch-rich potato extract. The ZnO Nps were synthesised using zinc nitrate and potato extract, and the whole reaction is carried out for 30 min at 80 °C....... In the synthesis, starch-rich potato extract acted as the reducing agent and as a stabilising layer on freshly formed ZnO Nps. Hexagonal (wurtzite) shaped ZnO Nps with size about 20 ± 1.2 nm were synthesised and characterised using X-ray diffraction, transition electron microscope and scanning microscopy analyses....... Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis indicated that highly pure ZnO nanopowders were obtained at higher temperatures. The use of environmentally benign and renewable material as the respective reducing and protecting agents, starch-rich potato extract, as well as a gentle solvent medium (H2O...

  18. Reducing Moose-Vehicle Collisions through Salt Pool Removal and Displacement: an Agent-Based Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Grosman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Between 1990 and 2002, more than 200 moose-vehicle collisions occurred each year in Quebec, including about 50/yr in the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve. One cause is the presence of roadside salt pools that attract moose near roads in the spring and summer. Using the computer simulation technique of agent-based modeling, this study investigated whether salt pool removal and displacement, i.e., a compensatory salt pool set up 100 to 1500 m away from the road shoulder, would reduce the number of moose-vehicle collisions. Moose road crossings were used as a proxy measure. A GPS telemetry data set consisting of approximately 200,000 locations of 47 moose over 2 yr in the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve was used as an empirical basis for the model. Twelve moose were selected from this data set and programmed in the model to forage and travel in the study area. Five parameters with an additional application of stochasticity were used to determine moose movement between forest polygons. These included food quality; cover quality, i.e., protection from predators and thermal stress; proximity to salt pools; proximity to water; and slope. There was a significant reduction in road crossings when either all or two thirds of the roadside salt pools were removed, with and/or without salt pool displacement. With 100% salt pool removal, the reduction was greater (49% without compensatory salt pools than with them (18%. When two thirds of the salt pools were removed, the reduction was the same with and without compensatory salt pools (16%. Although moose-vehicle collisions are not a significant mortality factor for the moose population in the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve, in areas with higher road densities, hunting pressure, and/or predator densities it could mean the difference between a stable and a declining population, and salt pool removal could be part of a good mitigation plan to halt population declines. This model can be used, with improvements such as

  19. Toward an Agent-Based Model of Socially Optimal Water Rights Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlen, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    There has been considerable interest lately in using public markets for buying and selling the rights to local water usage. Such water rights markets, if designed correctly, should be socially optimal, that is, should sell rights at prices that reflect the true value of water in the region, taking into account that water rights buyers and sellers represent a disparate group of private industry, public authorities, and private users, each having different water needs and different priority to local government. Good market design, however, is hard. As was experienced in California short-run electric power markets, a market design that on paper looks reasonable but in practice is mal-constructed can have devastating effects: firms can learn to manipulate prices by `playing' both sides of the market, and sellers can under-provide so as to create exorbitant prices which buyers have no choice but to pay. Economic theory provides several frameworks for developing a good water rights market design; for example, the structure-conduct-performance paradigm (SCPP) suggests that, among other things, the number and types of buyers and sellers (structure), and transaction clearing rules and government policies (conduct) affect in very particular ways the prices and quantities (performance) in the market. In slow-moving or static markets, SCPP has been a useful predictor of market performance; in faster markets the market dynamics that endogenously develop over time are often too complex to predict with SCPP or other existing modeling techniques. New, more sophisticated combinations of modeling and simulation are needed. Toward developing a good (i.e., socially optimal) water rights market design that can take into account the dynamics inherent in the water sector, we are developing an agent-based model of water rights markets. The model serves two purposes: first, it provides an SCPP-based framework of water rights markets that takes into account the particular structure of

  20. Comparison of sodium dithionite and glucose as a reducing agent for natural indigo dyeing on cotton fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikhao Laksanawadee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A traditional reducing agent in an indigo dyeing process with cotton fabrics is sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4 which is environmentally unfavorable because the resulting by-products cause various problems to the disposal wastewaters. In this research, glucose was used as a possible replacement of Na2S2O4 in indigo dyeing. The comparison of reduction power of Na2S2O4 and glucose for natural indigo dyeing on cotton fabrics based on reduction potential was analyzed. The optimum reduction temperature for natural indigo dye of both reducing agents was at 70°C. The reduction time did not have a significant effect on the reduction potential under the condition studied. Na2S2O4 could give higher color strength than glucose. However, wash fastness of the fabric samples from a glucose reduction was slightly better than Na2S2O4 ones. Hence, glucose virtually has a potential to be used as a green reducing agent in natural indigo dyeing.

  1. Seed-mediated synthesis of gold nanorods: control of the aspect ratio by variation of the reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeppl, Susanne; Ghielmetti, Nico [ETH Zurich, Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials (Switzerland); Caseri, Walter, E-mail: wcaseri@mat.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Polymer Technology, Department of Materials (Switzerland); Spolenak, Ralph [ETH Zurich, Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials (Switzerland)

    2013-03-15

    Seed-mediated growth methods involving reduction of tetrachloroaurate(III) with ascorbic acid are common for the synthesis of gold nanorods. This study shows, however, that simply by appropriate choice of the reducing agent a drastic influence on the aspect ratio can be attained. Weaker reducing agents, such as dihydroxybenzene isomers (hydroquinone, catechol or resorcinol) or glucose can increase the aspect ratio of the nanorods by an order of magnitude, up to values as high as 100 (nanowires). The increase in aspect ratio is mainly a consequence of an increase in length of the particles (up to 1-3 {mu}m). This effect is probably associated with a decrease in the reduction rate of gold(III) species by dihydroxybenzenes or glucose compared to ascorbic acid. The reduction potential of the reducing agents strongly depends on the pH value, and related effects on the dimensions of the nanoparticles are also reflected in this study. The nanorods exhibited penta-twinned nature without noteworthy defects (e.g. stacking faults and dislocations).

  2. Effect of reducing agents in tuning the third-order optical nonlinearity and optical limiting behavior of reduced graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandi, G.; Saravanan, M.; Vinitha, G.; Jessie Raj, M. B.; Sabari Girisun, T. C.

    2017-05-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was prepared by reduction method using various reductants like hydrazine, sodium borohydride and ascorbic acid. XRD and Raman analysis confirmed the effective removal of functional groups in GO. SEM revealed that rGO consists of thin crumpled and disordered sheets closely associated with each other. Blue shift in UV-absorption maxima was due to weak interlayer coupling between the layers of rGO. Third order NLO properties of dispersed rGO were measured by Z-scan technique (532 nm, 50 mW). Both GO and rGO possess self defocusing, saturable absorption and optical limiting behavior. The nonlinear component of refractive index, absorption coefficient and optical susceptibility were found to be 10-8 cm2/W, 10-3 cm/W and 10-6 esu respectively. Tunability of NLO coefficients with altering functional groups upon rGO was achieved. rGO prepared using hydrazine with high NLO coefficient and excellent durability, signify the scope of utilizing them as optical limiters.

  3. The efficacy of targeted health agents education to reduce the duration of untreated psychosis in a rural population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Eduardo; Molina, Juan; Kamis, Danielle; Calvo, Maria; Stratton, Lee; Strejilevich, Sergio; Aleman, Gabriela Gonzalez; Guerrero, Gonzalo; Bourdieu, Mercedes; Conesa, Horacio A; Escobar, Javier I; de Erausquin, Gabriel A

    2015-02-01

    The duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is a key determinant in the severity of symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. DUP is a modifiable factor that if reduced can improve patient outcome and treatment response. We sought to decrease DUP in rural Argentina by instituting annual training of local health agents to better identify signs of mental illness and offer earlier intervention. DUP was estimated using Schedules of Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN). Ongoing training was correlated with a reduction in DUP. Reducing DUP through better screening can decrease the psychosocial burden of disease and improve the trajectory of psychosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Isolation of active coagulant protein from the seeds of Strychnos potatorum- a potential water treatment agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunkumar, P; Sadish Kumar, V; Saran, S; Bindun, Harsha; Devipriya, Suja P

    2018-01-19

    The application of natural coagulants for decentralized water treatment is gaining importance as a part of global sustainable initiative. This study focuses on the isolation of active coagulation components responsible for water clarification with respect to Strychnos potatorum seeds. The active coagulant components, protein and polysaccharide were successfully isolated, dialysed and subjected to gel permeation chromatography. The polysaccharide was isolated with the saline extraction method and characterized using FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. Protein was precipitated with 80% Ammonium sulphate solution combined with dialysis and gel permeation chromatography using Sephadex G-50. SDS-PAGE revealed that the isolated protein has a molecular weight of 12 kDa. The small scale coagulation assay suggests that the protein fraction has superior coagulation activity, than the isolated polysaccharide residue. The active coagulant fractions reported in this study would be helpful in deploying cheaper and simple methods in scaling up the coagulant fraction from these seeds acting as a potential water treatment agent.

  5. Carbon quantum dots prepared with polyethyleneimine as both reducing agent and stabilizer for synthesis of Ag/CQDs composite for Hg{sup 2+} ions detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ting; Dong, Jiang Xue; Liu, Shi Gang; Li, Na; Lin, Shu Min; Fan, Yu Zhu [Key Laboratory of Eco-environments in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (Ministry of Education), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, No.2 Tiansheng Road, BeiBei District, Chongqing 400715 (China); Lei, Jing Lie [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Luo, Hong Qun, E-mail: luohq@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Eco-environments in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (Ministry of Education), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, No.2 Tiansheng Road, BeiBei District, Chongqing 400715 (China); Li, Nian Bing, E-mail: linb@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Eco-environments in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (Ministry of Education), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, No.2 Tiansheng Road, BeiBei District, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The carbon quantum dots (CQDs) synthesized with PEI showed an extraordinary reducibility. • The Ag/CQDs composite was prepared by using CQDs as reducing and stabilizing agent. • A simple Ag/CQDs composite-based dual-signal probe was provided for Hg{sup 2+} detection. • The proposed strategy shows a potential for detecting Hg{sup 2+} in real water samples. - Abstract: A stable silver nanoparticles/carbon quantum dots (Ag/CQDs) composite was prepared by using CQDs as reducing and stabilizing agent. The CQDs synthesized with polyethyleneimine (PEI) showed an extraordinary reducibility. When Hg{sup 2+} was presented in the Ag/CQDs composite solution, a color change from yellow to colorless was observed, accompanied by a shift of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band and decrease in absorbance of the Ag/CQDs composite. On the basis of the further studies on TEM, XPS and XRD analysis, the possible mechanism is attributed to the formation of a silver-mercury amalgam. Hence, a two dimensional sensing platform for Hg{sup 2+} detection was constructed upon the Ag/CQDs composite. Based on the change of absorbance, a good linear relationship was obtained from 0.5 to 50 μM for Hg{sup 2+}. And the limit of detection for Hg{sup 2+} was as low as 85 nM, representing high sensitivity to Hg{sup 2+}. More importantly, the proposed method also exhibits a good selectivity toward Hg{sup 2+} over other metal ions. Besides, this strategy demonstrates practicability for the detection of Hg{sup 2+} in real water samples with satisfactory results.

  6. Effects of Electron Acceptors, Reducing Agents, and Toxic Metabolites on Anaerobic Degradation of Heterocyclic Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Dorthe; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Arvin, Erik

    1996-01-01

    Degradation of four heterocyclic compounds was examined under nitrate-reducing, sulphate-reducing and methanogenic conditions. Soil samples from a creosote-polluted site in Denmark were used as inoculum. Indole and quinoline were degraded under all redox conditions with the highest degradation...

  7. Assessing surface water flood risk and management strategies under future climate change: Insights from an Agent-Based Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, K; Surminski, S; Hall, J; Crick, F

    2017-10-01

    Climate change and increasing urbanization are projected to result in an increase in surface water flooding and consequential damages in the future. In this paper, we present insights from a novel Agent Based Model (ABM), applied to a London case study of surface water flood risk, designed to assess the interplay between different adaptation options; how risk reduction could be achieved by homeowners and government; and the role of flood insurance and the new flood insurance pool, Flood Re, in the context of climate change. The analysis highlights that while combined investment in property-level flood protection and sustainable urban drainage systems reduce surface water flood risk, the benefits can be outweighed by continued development in high risk areas and the effects of climate change. In our simulations, Flood Re is beneficial in its function to provide affordable insurance, even under climate change. However, the scheme does face increasing financial pressure due to rising surface water flood damages. If the intended transition to risk-based pricing is to take place then a determined and coordinated strategy will be needed to manage flood risk, which utilises insurance incentives, limits new development, and supports resilience measures. Our modelling approach and findings are highly relevant for the ongoing regulatory and political approval process for Flood Re as well as for wider discussions on the potential of insurance schemes to incentivise flood risk management and climate adaptation in the UK and internationally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Catalytic degradation of the nerve agent VX by water-swelled polystyrene-supported ammonium fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, Daniele; Goldvaser, Michael; Columbus, Ishay; Zafrani, Yossi

    2011-10-21

    The catalytic degradation of the nerve agent VX (O-ethyl S-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methylphosphonothioate) by water-swelled polymer-supported ammonium fluorides is described. VX (0.06-0.53 mol/mol F(-)) is rapidly degraded (t(1/2) ∼ 10-30 min) to form the "G-analogue" (O-ethyl methylphosphonofluoridate), which hydrolyzes (t(1/2) ∼ 1-1.5 h) to the nontoxic EMPA (ethyl methylphosphonic acid). The toxic desethyl-VX is not formed. The catalytic effect of fluoride is maintained even when 6 equiv of VX are loaded. GB (O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) and desethyl-VX agents are also degraded under these conditions.

  9. Electrochemically Reduced Water Protects Neural Cells from Oxidative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi Kashiwagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging-related neurodegenerative disorders are closely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stresses and their incidence tends to increase with aging. Brain is the most vulnerable to reactive species generated by a higher rate of oxygen consumption and glucose utilization compared to other organs. Electrochemically reduced water (ERW was demonstrated to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS in several cell types. In the present study, the protective effect of ERW against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO was investigated in several rodent neuronal cell lines and primary cells. ERW was found to significantly suppress H2O2 (50–200 μM induced PC12 and SFME cell deaths. ERW scavenged intracellular ROS and exhibited a protective effect against neuronal network damage caused by 200 μM H2O2 in N1E-115 cells. ERW significantly suppressed NO-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells despite the fact that it did not have the ability to scavenge intracellular NO. ERW significantly suppressed both glutamate induced Ca2+ influx and the resulting cytotoxicity in primary cells. These results collectively demonstrated for the first time that ERW protects several types of neuronal cells by scavenging ROS because of the presence of hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles dissolved in ERW.

  10. Reducing nitrate loss in tile drainage water with cover crops and water-table management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, C F; Tan, C S; Welacky, T W; Reynolds, W D; Zhang, T Q; Oloya, T O; McLaughlin, N B; Gaynor, J D

    2014-03-01

    Nitrate lost from agricultural soils is an economic cost to producers, an environmental concern when it enters rivers and lakes, and a health risk when it enters wells and aquifers used for drinking water. Planting a winter wheat cover crop (CC) and/or use of controlled tile drainage-subirrigation (CDS) may reduce losses of nitrate (NO) relative to no cover crop (NCC) and/or traditional unrestricted tile drainage (UTD). A 6-yr (1999-2005) corn-soybean study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of CC+CDS, CC+UTD, NCC+CDS, and NCC+UTD treatments for reducing NO loss. Flow volume and NO concentration in surface runoff and tile drainage were measured continuously, and CC reduced the 5-yr flow-weighted mean (FWM) NO concentration in tile drainage water by 21 to 38% and cumulative NO loss by 14 to 16% relative to NCC. Controlled tile drainage-subirrigation reduced FWM NO concentration by 15 to 33% and cumulative NO loss by 38 to 39% relative to UTD. When CC and CDS were combined, 5-yr cumulative FWM NO concentrations and loss in tile drainage were decreased by 47% (from 9.45 to 4.99 mg N L and from 102 to 53.6 kg N ha) relative to NCC+UTD. The reductions in runoff and concomitant increases in tile drainage under CC occurred primarily because of increases in near-surface soil hydraulic conductivity. Cover crops increased corn grain yields by 4 to 7% in 2004 increased 3-yr average soybean yields by 8 to 15%, whereas CDS did not affect corn or soybean yields over the 6 yr. The combined use of a cover crop and water-table management system was highly effective for reducing NO loss from cool, humid agricultural soils. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  11. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang [The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Department of Radiology, Zhengzhou, Henan Province (China)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80) each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. (orig.)

  12. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases from Myceliophthora thermophila C1 differ in substrate preference and reducing agent specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frommhagen, Matthias; Koetsier, Martijn J.; Westphal, Adrie H.; Visser, Jaap; Hinz, Sandra W.A.; Vincken, Jean Paul; Berkel, Van Willem J.H.; Kabel, Mirjam A.; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lytic polysaccharide monooxgygenases (LPMOs) are known to boost the hydrolytic breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass, especially cellulose, due to their oxidative mechanism. For their activity, LPMOs require an electron donor for reducing the divalent copper cofactor. LPMO activities

  13. Investigating the role of water in the Diffusion of Cholera using Agent-Based simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustijn, Ellen-Wien; Doldersum, Tom; Augustijn, Denie

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, cholera was considered to be a waterborne disease. Currently we know that many other factors can contribute to the spread of this disease including human mobility and human behavior. However, the hydrological component in cholera diffusion is significant. The interplay between cholera and water includes bacteria (V. cholera) that survive in the aquatic environment, the possibility that run-off water from dumpsites carries the bacteria to surface water (rivers and lakes), and when the bacteria reach streams they can be carried downstream to infect new locations. Modelling is a very important tool to build theory on the interplay between different types of transmission mechanisms that together are responsible for the spread of Cholera. Agent-based simulation models are very suitable to incorporate behavior at individual level and to reproduce emergence. However, it is more difficult to incorporate the hydrological components in this type of model. In this research we present the hydrological component of an Agent-Based Cholera model developed to study a Cholera epidemic in Kumasi (Ghana) in 2005. The model was calibrated on the relative contribution of each community to the distributed pattern of cholera rather than the absolute number of incidences. Analysis of the results shows that water plays an important role in the diffusion of cholera: 75% of the cholera cases were infected via river water that was contaminated by runoff from the dumpsites. To initiate infections upstream, the probability of environment-to-human transmission seemed to be overestimated compared to what may be expected from literature. Scenario analyses show that there is a strong relation between the epidemic curve and the rainfall. Removing dumpsites that are situated close to the river resulted in a strong decrease in the number of cholera cases. Results are sensitive to the scheduling of the daily activities and the survival time of the cholera bacteria.

  14. Do corticosteroids have a role in preventing or reducing acute toxic lung injury caused by inhalation of chemical agents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Dylan W; Meulenbelt, Jan

    2011-02-01

    To assess the evidence that treatment with corticosteroids improves the outcome in those exposed to lung-damaging agents. We searched Pubmed, Toxnet, Cochrane database, Google Scholar, and Embase from 1966 to January 2010 using the search terms "steroid", "corticosteroid", "lung injury", "lung damage", and "inhalation". These searches identified 287 papers of which 118 contained information on animal studies. However, most were reviews or case reports and only a few were controlled animal experiments of which 13 were considered relevant. ROLE OF CORTICOSTEROIDS: Corticosteroids have no beneficial effect at the alveolar level on acute lung injury, which is caused by inhalation of poorly water-soluble compounds (e.g. nitrogen dioxide, ozone, phosgene) or following severe exposure to water-soluble compounds (e.g. chlorine, ammonia). In the recovery phase, corticosteroids may even be harmful, because corticosteroids hamper the division of type II alveolar cells and hamper the differentiation from type II into type I alveolar cells. The latter is important for the re-epithelialization of the alveolus and removal of excess of water in the alveolus. Furthermore, the quality of animal studies does not always allow extrapolation to human exposures. Differences between humans and animals in anatomy, pulmonary defense systems, breathing physiology, as well as the way the animals have been exposed, and the timing and route of corticosteroids in animal studies make predictions difficult. ROLE OF CORTICOSTEROIDS: An abundance of uncontrolled case reports and a few human crossover studies have evaluated the outcome of human volunteers exposed to various lung-damaging agents. Only a few reports contained systematic information on corticosteroid treatment. Data on the efficacy of corticosteroids after human exposure to lung-damaging agents are inconclusive. Often the number of patients involved is small or the severity of exposure is unclear or not well determined. These reports

  15. The clinical nurse specialist as change agent: reducing employee injury and related costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlak, Carol A; Doheny, Margaret O; Jones, Susan L; Lavelle, Colleen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was, first, to examine the role of the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) as it relates to the implementation of a CNS-initiated Safe Movement Program and, second, to report findings from a CNS-initiated safe movement program (SMP) in reducing healthcare workers' injuries and related costs. A longitudinal preimplementation and postimplementation study design was used. Healthcare workers in a 156-bed, extended-care facility (nursing home) participated in the study. Participants at the onset of the study included 52 healthcare workers who participated in the study preimplementation and postimplementation of the SMP. Attrition resulted in a final sample of 46. Data were collected on healthcare workers' perceptions of injuries as well as existing incident reports and workers' compensation records preimplementation and postimplementation of the study. Outcomes included major reduction in healthcare worker injuries and related workers' compensation cost savings. The number of healthcare workers who thought an injury occurred as a result of lifting or transferring a resident was reduced by 75%, and perceptions of lifting and transfer injuries resulting in a back strain were reduced by 80%. The number of times in a month healthcare workers felt lifting or transferring a resident was "too much" for them was reduced by 73%. Workers' compensation insurance was reduced by 93%. A CNS-initiated SMP reduces injuries and costs and may recoup the cost of the program in 5 years. Job-related musculoskeletal injuries are a critical problem. As the healthcare workforce continues to age, a comprehensive SMP needs to be implemented to ensure safety of employees in the clinical practice setting. The program may pay for itself in 5 years.

  16. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-05-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method.

  17. Phosphated cyclodextrins as water-soluble chiral NMR solvating agents for cationic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cira Mollings Puentes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The utility of phosphated α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrins as water-soluble chiral NMR solvating agents for cationic substrates is described. Two sets of phosphated cyclodextrins, one with degrees of substitution in the 2–6 range, the other with degrees of substitution in the 6–10 range, are examined. Results with 33 water-soluble cationic substrates are reported. We also explored the possibility that the addition of paramagnetic lanthanide ions such as praseodymium(III and ytterbium(III further enhances the enantiomeric differentiation in the NMR spectra. The chiral differentiation with the phosphated cyclodextrins is compared to prior results obtained with anionic carboxymethylated cyclodextrins. There are a number of examples where a larger differentiation is observed with the phosphated cyclodextrins.

  18. Sodium hypochlorite: A promising agent for reducing Botrytis cinerea infection on rose flowers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macnish, A.J.; Morris, K.L.; Theije, de A.; Mensink, M.G.J.; Boerrigter, H.A.M.; Reid, M.S.; Jiang, C.Z.; Woltering, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a fungal pathogen that greatly reduces the postharvest quality of rose flowers. A postharvest dip in 200 µL L-1 sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for 10 s at 20 °C provided the greatest control of B. cinerea on ‘Akito’ and ‘Gold Strike’ flowers. NaOCl derived from Clorox® Ultra

  19. Reducing Preconception Risks Among African American Women with Conversational Agent Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Brian; Bickmore, Timothy; Hempstead, Megan; Yinusa-Nyahkoon, Leanne; Sadikova, Ekaterina; Mitchell, Suzanne; Gardiner, Paula; Adigun, Fatima; Penti, Brian; Schulman, Daniel; Damus, Karla

    2015-01-01

    Systems and tools are needed to identify and mitigate preconception health (PCH) risks, particularly for African American (AA) women, given persistent health disparities. We developed and tested "Gabby," an online preconception conversational agent system. One hundred nongravid AA women 18-34 years of age were screened for over 100 PCH risks and randomized to the Gabby or control group. The Gabby group interacted with the system for up to six months; the control group received a letter indicating their health risks with a recommendation to talk with their clinician. The numbers, proportions, and types of risks were compared between groups. There were 23.7 (SD 5.9) risks identified per participant. Eighty-five percent (77 of 91) provided 6 month follow up data. The Gabby group had greater reductions in the number (8.3 vs. 5.5 risks, P risks compared to controls. The Gabby group averaged 63.7 minutes of interaction time. Seventy-eight percent reported that it "was easy to talk to Gabby" and 64% used information from Gabby to improve their health. Gabby was significantly associated with preconception risk reduction. More research is needed to determine if Gabby can benefit higher risk populations and if risk reduction is clinically significant. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  20. Synthesis of a fluorine-free polymeric water-repellent agent for creation of superhydrophobic fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Keke; Yu, Miao; Li, Qianqian; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Xiting; Quan, Miao; Liu, Zhengtang; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2017-12-01

    A non-fluorinated polymeric alkylsilane, poly(isobutyl methacrylate-co-3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane) (PIT), is designed and synthesized to replace the commercial long-chain perfluoroalkylsilane (FAS) water-repellent agent. The superhydrophobic polyester fabrics are prepared by anchoring sol-gel derived silica nanoparticles onto alkali-treated polyester fabric surfaces and subsequently hydrophobilizing with PIT, using FAS as control. The surface chemical composition, surface morphology, wetting behavior and durability of the modified polyester fabrics are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS) and video-based contact angle goniometer, respectively. The results show that a porous silica layer could be successfully fabricated onto the surface of polyester fabric through base-catalyzed sol-gel process with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as precursor, incorporating additional nanostructured roughness essential for superhydrophobicity. At the same time, such a silica primer layer could provide both secondary reactive moieties (-Si - OH) for the subsequent surface hydrophobization and acceptable adhesion at the silica-polyester fabric interface. When silica modified polyester fabric (SiO2@ fabric) is hydrophobized by PIT solution (10 mg/mL), excellent water-repellency could be obtained. The water contact angle is up to 154° and the sliding angle is about 5°. Compared with small molecule water-repellent agent FAS, PIT modified SiO2@ fabric exhibits greatly improved solvent resistance under ultra-sonication, abrasion and simulated laundering durability. The anti-stain property of PIT-modified SiO2@ fabric is also evaluated by using different aqueous colored solutions.

  1. Environmental exposure and risk assessment of fluoroquinolone antibacterial agents in wastewater and river water of the Glatt Valley Watershed, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golet, Eva M; Alder, Alfredo C; Giger, Walter

    2002-09-01

    The mass flows of fluoroquinolone antibacterial agents (FQs) were investigated in the aqueous compartments of the Glatt Valley Watershed, a densely populated region in Switzerland. The major human-use FQs consumed in Switzerland, ciprofloxacin (CIP) and norfloxacin (NOR), were determined in municipal wastewater effluents and in the receiving surface water, the Glatt River. Individual concentrations in raw sewage and in final wastewater effluents ranged from 255 to 568 ng/L and from 36 to 106 ng/L, respectively. In the Glatt River, the FQs were present at concentrations below 19 ng/L. The removal of FQs from the water stream during wastewater treatment was between 79 and 87%. During the studied summer period, FQs in the dissolved fraction were significantly reduced downstream in the Glatt River (15-20 h residence time) (66% for CIP and 48% for NOR). Thus, after wastewater treatment, transport in rivers causes an additional decrease of residual levels of FQs in the aquatic environment. Refined predicted environmental concentrations for the study area compare favorably with the measured environmental concentrations (MEC) obtained in the monitoring study. Total measured FQ concentrations occurring in the examined aquatic compartments of the Glatt Valley Watershed were related to acute ecotoxicity data from the literature. The risk quotients obtained (MEC/PNEC < 1) following the recommendations of the European guidelines or draft documents suggest a low probability for adverse effects of the occurring FQs, either on microbial activity in WWTPs or on algae, daphnia, and fish in surface waters.

  2. Raspberry Extract as Both a Stabilizer and a Reducing Agent in Environmentally Friendly Process of Receiving Colloidal Silver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Pulit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An ecofriendly method of nanosilver obtaining has been studied. The process involves the chemical reduction method carried out in aqueous environment. Silver nitrate (V was applied as a silver ions source. Raspberry extract was used as a natural source of both reducing and stabilizing agents. The total amount of phenolic compounds was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Obtained nanoparticles were analyzed by the dynamic light scattering technique so as to determine the particles size and suspension stability which was characterized by an electrokinetic potential. The results confirmed that the size of some nanoparticles was under 100 nm.

  3. Effect of reducing agents in the conversion of Cu2O nanocolloid to Cu nanocolloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Andal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Current work reports the conversion of copper (I oxide, nano-colloid to stable copper nanocolloid. Different reduction conditions were attempted to control the stability and size of the Cu nanoparticles. Hydrazine hydrate, ascorbic acid and glucose are found to be good reductants. In our work stable copper nanoparticles are obtained by reducing Cu2O without any special protections like inert gas atmosphere etc. Ascorbic acid, a natural vitamin C not only reduces cuprous oxide but protects the new born copper due to its antioxidant properties. A red shift is observed when Cu2O nanospheres get converted to Cu. UV, XRD, FTIR and TEM were used to characterize the prepared Cu nanoparticles. The mechanism for the growth process of Cu nanomaterials are discussed.

  4. Reducing water use for animal production through aquaculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdegem, M.C.J.; Bosma, R.H.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2006-01-01

    Animals fed formulated diets indirectly consume large quantities of water. Globally, about 1.2 m3 of water is needed to produce 1 kg of grain used in animal feeds. Cattle in feedlots consume about 7 kg of feed concentrate to gain 1 kg in weight. For pigs this is close to 4 kg and for poultry

  5. Non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus as potential biocontrol agents to reduce aflatoxin contamination in peanuts harvested in Northern Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaniz Zanon, María Silvina; Barros, Germán Gustavo; Chulze, Sofía Noemí

    2016-08-16

    Biological control is one of the most promising strategies for preventing aflatoxin contamination in peanuts at field stage. A population of 46 native Aspergillus flavus nonaflatoxin producers were analysed based on phenotypic, physiological and genetic characteristics. Thirty-three isolates were characterized as L strain morphotype, 3 isolates as S strain morphotype, and 10 isolates did not produce sclerotia. Only 11 of 46 non-aflatoxigenic isolates did not produce cyclopiazonic acid. The vegetative compatibility group (VCG) diversity index for the population was 0.37. For field trials we selected the non-aflatoxigenic A. flavus AR27, AR100G and AFCHG2 strains. The efficacy of single and mixed inocula as potential biocontrol agents in Northern Argentina was evaluated through a 2-year study (2014-2015). During the 2014 peanut growing season, most of the treatments reduced the incidence of aflatoxigenic strains in both soil and peanut kernel samples, and no aflatoxin was detected in kernels. During the 2015 growing season, there was a reduction of aflatoxigenic strains in kernel samples from the plots treated with the potential biocontrol agents. Reductions of aflatoxin contamination between 78.36% and 89.55% were observed in treated plots in comparison with the un-inoculated control plots. This study provides the first data on aflatoxin biocontrol based on competitive exclusion in the peanut growing region of Northern Argentina, and proposes bioproducts with potential use as biocontrol agents. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Oxygen nano-bubble water reduces calcium oxalate deposits and tubular cell injury in ethylene glycol-treated rat kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Yasuhiko; Yasui, Takahiro; Taguchi, Kazumi; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Niimi, Kazuhiro; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Okada, Atsushi; Kubota, Yasue; Kawai, Noriyasu; Itoh, Yasunori; Tozawa, Keiichi; Sasaki, Shoichi; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2013-08-01

    Renal tubular cell injury induced by oxalate plays an important role in kidney stone formation. Water containing oxygen nano-bubbles (nanometer-sized bubbles generated from oxygen micro-bubbles; ONB) has anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ONB water on kidney stone formation in ethylene glycol (EG)-treated rats. We divided 60 rats, aged 4 weeks, into 5 groups: control, the water-fed group; 100 % ONB, the 100 % ONB water-fed group; EG, the EG treated water-fed group; EG + 50 % ONB and EG + 100 % ONB, water containing EG and 50 % or 100 % ONB, respectively. Renal calcium oxalate (CaOx) deposition, urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), and renal expression of inflammation-related proteins, oxidative stress biomarkers, and the crystal-binding molecule hyaluronic acid were compared among the 5 groups. In the control and 100 % ONB groups, no renal CaOx deposits were detected. In the EG + 50 % ONB and EG + 100 % ONB groups, ONB water significantly decreased renal CaOx deposits, urinary NAG excretion, and renal monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, osteopontin, and hyaluronic acid expression and increased renal superoxide dismutase-1 expression compared with the EG group. ONB water substantially affected kidney stone formation in the rat kidney by reducing renal tubular cell injury. ONB water is a potential prophylactic agent for kidney stones.

  7. Solar UV reduces Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst infectivity in environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, B J; Hoefel, D; Daminato, D P; Fanok, S; Monis, P T

    2008-05-01

    To determine the effect of solar radiation on Cryptosporidium parvum in tap and environmental waters. Outdoor tank experiments and a cell culture infectivity assay were used to measure solar inactivation of C. parvum oocysts in different waters. Experiments conducted on days with different levels of solar insolation identified rapid inactivation of oocysts in tap water (up to 90% inactivation within the first hour). Increased dissolved organic carbon content in environmental waters decreased solar inactivation. The role of solar ultraviolet (UV) in inactivation was confirmed by long-pass filter experiments, where UV-B was identified as the most germicidal wavelength. Reductions in oocyst infectivity following solar radiation were not related to a loss of excystation capacity. Solar UV can rapidly inactivate C. parvum in environmental waters. This is the first study to assess natural sunlight inactivation of C. parvum oocysts in surface waters and drinking water using an infectivity measure and determines the wavelengths of light responsible for the inactivation. The findings presented here provide valuable information for determining the relative risks associated with Cryptosporidium oocysts in aquatic environments and identify solar radiation as a critical process affecting the oocyst survival in the environment.

  8. Reducing phosphorus loading of surface water using iron-coated sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenenberg, J.E.; Chardon, W.J.; Koopmans, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus losses from agricultural soils is an important source of P in surface waters leading to surface water quality impairment. In addition to reducing P inputs, mitigation measures are needed to reduce P enrichment of surface waters. Because drainage of agricultural land by pipe drainage is an

  9. Agarwood Waste as A New Fluid Loss Control Agent in Water-based Drilling Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azlinda Azizi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Agarwood has been used widely in various ways, including traditional medicine and art. The usage of agarwood has grown broader in modern times include in therapeutic medicines and perfumery. In this paper the agarwood waste has been explored to be used as a fluid loss control agent to control fluid loss without affecting the drilling fluid rheological properties which are density, pH, viscosity, yield point and gel strength. Agarwood waste was used as an additive in the drilling fluid system due to its unique characteristic. Rheological and filtration measurements were performed on the formulated water-based drilling fluid. Formulations of a base solution of fresh water, sodium hydroxide, bentonite, barite, and xanthan gum were presented. The performance of the agarwood waste as the fluid loss control agent was compared with based fluid formulation and water-based drilling fluid with treating with conventional fluid loss control agent (starch. The filtrate volume of drilling fluid with agarwood waste was about 13 ml while for drilling fluid with conventional fluid loss control agent, starch gave 12 ml of filtrate volume after undergoing filtration test by using LPLT filter press. The performance of drilling fluid with agarwood was efficient as drilling fluid with starch. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso

  10. 3Ts for Reducing Lead in Drinking Water: Telling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead in drinking water in schools or childcare facilities programs should include communicating with parents, teachers, and the public. Transparency and a communication strategy are a key piece to developing a lead testing program.

  11. 3Ts for Reducing Lead in Drinking Water: Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is important to train school officials to raise awareness of the potential occurrences, causes, and health effects of lead in drinking water; assist school officials in identifying potential areas where elevated lead may occur.

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Agent Indomethacin Reduces Invasion and Alters Metabolism in a Human Breast Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Ackerstaff

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Hostile physiological environments such as hypoxia and acidic extracellular pH, which exist in solid tumors, may promote invasion and metastasis through inflammatory responses and formation of eicosanoids. Here, we have investigated the effects of the antiinflammatory agent indomethacin on the invasion and metabolism of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-435 in Dulbecco's Modified Eagles (DME-based or Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI-based cell medium, using a magnetic resonance-compatible invasion assay. Indomethacin treatment significantly reduced the invasion of MDA-MB-435 cells independent of the culture and perfusion conditions examined. Significant changes were detected in levels of intracellular choline phospholipid metabolites and in triglyceride (TG concentrations of these cells, depending on indomethacin treatment and basal cell medium used. Additionally, genetic profiling of breast cancer cells, grown and treated with low-dose indomethacin in cell culture using an RPMI-based medium, revealed the upregulation of several genes implicating cyclooxygenaseindependent targets of indomethacin. These data confirm the ability of an anti-inflammatory agent to reduce breast cancer invasion and demonstrate, depending on cell culture and perfusion conditions, that the indomethacin-induced decrease in invasion is associated with changes in choline phospholipid metabolism, TG metabolism, and gene expression.

  13. Reducing agent-free synthesis of curcumin-loaded albumin nanoparticles by self-assembly at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Maryam Sadat; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Yang, Hye Gyeong; Kim, Yejin; Park, Eun Ji; Lee, Kang Choon; Na, Dong Hee

    2017-08-30

    The purpose of this study was to prepare curcumin-loaded bovine serum albumin nanoparticles (CCM-BSA-NPs) by reducing agent-free self-assembly at room temperature. A 2(4) factorial design approach was used to investigate the CCM-BSA-NP preparation process at different pH values, temperatures, dithiothreitol amounts, and CCM/BSA mass ratios. Increasing the ionic strength enabled preparation of CCM-BSA-NPs at 25°C without reducing agent. CCM-BSA-NPs prepared under the optimized conditions at 25°C showed a particle size of 110±6nm, yield of 88.5%, and drug loading of 7.1%. The CCM-BSA-NPs showed strong antioxidant activity and neuroprotective effects in glutamate-induced mouse hippocampal neuronal HT22 cells. This study suggests that ionic strength can be a key parameter affecting the preparation of albumin-based NPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A simplified method for the cultivation of extreme anaerobic Archaea based on the use of sodium sulfite as reducing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, O; Thomm, M

    2000-08-01

    The extreme sensitivity of many Archaea to oxygen is a major obstacle for their cultivation in the laboratory and the development of archaeal genetic exchange systems. The technique of Balch and Wolfe (1976) is suitable for the cultivation of anaerobic Archaea but involves time-consuming procedures such as the use of air locks and glove boxes. We describe here a procedure for the cultivation of anaerobic Archaea that is more convenient and faster and allows the preparation of liquid media without the use of an anaerobic chamber. When the reducing agent sodium sulfide (Na2S) was replaced by sodium sulfite (Na2SO3), anaerobic media could be prepared without protection from oxygen outside an anaerobic chamber. Exchange of the headspace of serum bottles by appropriate gases was sufficient to maintain anaerobic conditions in the culture media. Organisms that were unable to utilize sulfite as a source for cellular sulfur were supplemented with hydrogen sulfide. H2S was simply added to the headspace of serum bottles by a syringe. The use of H2S as a source for sulfur minimized the precipitation of cations by sulfide. Representatives of 12 genera of anaerobic Archaea studied here were able to grow in media prepared by this procedure. For the extremely oxygen-sensitive organism Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus, we show that plates could be prepared outside an anaerobic chamber when sulfite was used as reducing agent. The application of this method may faciliate the cultivation and handling of extreme anaerobic Archaea considerably.

  15. Landfill disposal of unused medicines reduces surface water releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Lial; Buzby, Mary; Finan, Douglas S; Cunningham, Virginia L

    2013-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is conducting research to evaluate the pathways and fate of active pharmaceutical ingredients from the consumer to surface waters. One potential pathway identified by the researchers is the disposal of unused pharmaceutical products that are discarded by consumers in household trash and disposed of in municipal solid waste landfills. This study was designed to evaluate relative amounts of surface water exposures through the landfill disposal pathway compared to patient use and flushing of unused medicine pathways. The estimated releases to surface water of 24 example active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in landfill leachate were calculated for 3 assumed disposal scenarios: 5%, 10%, and 15% of the total annual quantity of API sold is discarded and unused. The estimated releases from landfills to surface waters, after treatment of the leachate, were compared to the total amount of each example API that would be released to surface waters from publicly owned treatment works, generated by patient use and excretion. This study indicates that the disposal of unused medications in municipal solid waste landfills effectively eliminates the unused medicine contribution of APIs to surface waters; greater than 99.9% of APIs disposed of in a landfill are permanently retained. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  16. Innovative Water Management Technology to Reduce Environment Impacts of Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castle, James W. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Rodgers, John H. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Alley, Bethany [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Beebe, Alex [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Coffey, Ruthanne [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Jurinko, Kristen [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Pardue, Michael [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Ritter, Tina [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Spacil, Michael M. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2013-08-08

    -reverse osmosis produced water was designed to promote oxidizing conditions within the first wetland cell for nitrification of ammonia, and the subsequent three cells were designed to promote reducing conditions for denitrification of nitrate. By incorporating multiple wetland cells in a CWTS, the conditions within each cell can be modified for removal of specific COCs. In addition, a CWTS designed with multiple cells allows for convenient sample collection points so that biogeochemical conditions of individual cells can be monitored and performance evaluated. Removal rate coefficients determined from the pilot-scale CWTS experiments and confirmed by the demonstration system can be used to calculate HRTs required to treat COCs in full-scale CWTSs. The calculated HRTs can then be used to determine the surface area or footprint of a full-size CWTS for a given inflow rate of produced water.

  17. Innovative Water Management Technology to Reduce Environment Impacts of Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castle, James; Rodgers, John; Alley, Bethany; Coffey, Ruthanne; Jurinko, Kristen; Pardue, Michael; Ritter, Tina; Spacil, Michael

    2013-05-15

    -reverse osmosis produced water was designed to promote oxidizing conditions within the first wetland cell for nitrification of ammonia, and the subsequent three cells were designed to promote reducing conditions for denitrification of nitrate. By incorporating multiple wetland cells in a CWTS, the conditions within each cell can be modified for removal of specific COCs. In addition, a CWTS designed with multiple cells allows for convenient sample collection points so that biogeochemical conditions of individual cells can be monitored and performance evaluated. Removal rate coefficients determined from the pilot-scale CWTS experiments and confirmed by the demonstration system can be used to calculate HRTs required to treat COCs in full-scale CWTSs. The calculated HRTs can then be used to determine the surface area or footprint of a full-size CWTS for a given inflow rate of produced water.

  18. Innovative Water Management Technology to Reduce Environmental Impacts of Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castle, James; Rodgers, John; Alley, Bethany; Beebe, Alex; Coffey, Ruthanne; Jurinko, Kristen; Pardue, Michael; Ritter, Tina; Spacil, Michael

    2013-05-15

    -reverse osmosis produced water was designed to promote oxidizing conditions within the first wetland cell for nitrification of ammonia, and the subsequent three cells were designed to promote reducing conditions for denitrification of nitrate. By incorporating multiple wetland cells in a CWTS, the conditions within each cell can be modified for removal of specific COCs. In addition, a CWTS designed with multiple cells allows for convenient sample collection points so that biogeochemical conditions of individual cells can be monitored and performance evaluated. Removal rate coefficients determined from the pilot-scale CWTS experiments and confirmed by the demonstration system can be used to calculate HRTs required to treat COCs in full-scale CWTSs. The calculated HRTs can then be used to determine the surface area or ?footprint? of a full-size CWTS for a given inflow rate of produced water.

  19. Release of reduced inorganic selenium species into waters by the green fresh water algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Denina Bobbie Dawn; Wallschläger, Dirk

    2011-03-15

    The common green fresh water algae Chlorella vulgaris was exposed to starting concentrations of 10 μg/L selenium in the form of selenate, selenite, or selenocyanate (SeCN(-)) for nine days in 10% Bold's basal medium. Uptake of selenate was more pronounced than that of selenite, and there was very little uptake of selenocyanate. Upon uptake of selenate, significant quantities of selenite and selenocyanate were produced by the algae and released back into the growth medium; no selenocyanate was released after selenite uptake. Release of the reduced metabolites after selenate exposure appeared to coincide with increasing esterase activity in solution, indicating that cell death (lysis) was the primary emission pathway. This is the first observation of biotic formation of selenocyanate and its release into waters from a nonindustrial source. The potential environmental implications of this laboratory observation are discussed with respect to the fate of selenium in impacted aquatic systems, the ecotoxicology of selenium bioaccumulation, and the interpretation of environmental selenium speciation data generated, using methods incapable of positively identifying reduced inorganic selenium species, such as selenocyanate.

  20. Evolution of the Raman properties of nitrogen-doped graphene sheets with reducing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xiufeng; Meng, Xiuqing; Wu, Fengmin

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) with different nitrogen levels was synthesized by using a simple hydrothermal method. Graphite oxide (GO), prepared by the modified Hummers method, served as the raw material, and urea served as both the reducing reagent and dopant. The variation in structures and morphologies indicates the successful incorporation of nitrogen in graphene. Urea can accelerate the reduction in GO. The optical properties also vary with the doping level, as verified by Raman analysis, and the intensity ratio (ID/IG) of the D to G Raman modes changes with increasing nitrogen doping level because of defects induced by doping. The relationship between the qualities of urea and the crystallite size of the as-produced NG was also studied in detail.

  1. Improving performance of HVAC systems to reduce exposure to aerosolized infectious agents in buildings; recommendations to reduce risks posed by biological attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Penny J; Mair, Michael; Inglesby, Thomas V; Gross, Jonathan; Henderson, D A; O'Toole, Tara; Ahern-Seronde, Joa; Bahnfleth, William P; Brennan, Terry; Burroughs, H E Barney; Davidson, Cliff; Delp, William; Ensor, David S; Gomory, Ralph; Olsiewski, Paula; Samet, Jonathan M; Smith, William M; Streifel, Andrew J; White, Ronald H; Woods, James E

    2006-01-01

    The prospect of biological attacks is a growing strategic threat. Covert aerosol attacks inside a building are of particular concern. In the summer of 2005, the Center for Biosecurity of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center convened a Working Group to determine what steps could be taken to reduce the risk of exposure of building occupants after an aerosol release of a biological weapon. The Working Group was composed of subject matter experts in air filtration, building ventilation and pressurization, air conditioning and air distribution, biosecurity, building design and operation, building decontamination and restoration, economics, medicine, public health, and public policy. The group focused on functions of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems in commercial or public buildings that could reduce the risk of exposure to deleterious aerosols following biological attacks. The Working Group's recommendations for building owners are based on the use of currently available, off-the-shelf technologies. These recommendations are modest in expense and could be implemented immediately. It is also the Working Group's judgment that the commitment and stewardship of a lead government agency is essential to secure the necessary financial and human resources and to plan and build a comprehensive, effective program to reduce exposure to aerosolized infectious agents in buildings.

  2. Benchmarking Water Quality from Wastewater to Drinking Waters Using Reduced Transcriptome of Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Pu; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Hanxin; Wang, Pingping; Tian, Mingming; Yu, Hongxia

    2017-08-15

    One of the major challenges in environmental science is monitoring and assessing the risk of complex environmental mixtures. In vitro bioassays with limited key toxicological end points have been shown to be suitable to evaluate mixtures of organic pollutants in wastewater and recycled water. Omics approaches such as transcriptomics can monitor biological effects at the genome scale. However, few studies have applied omics approach in the assessment of mixtures of organic micropollutants. Here, an omics approach was developed for profiling bioactivity of 10 water samples ranging from wastewater to drinking water in human cells by a reduced human transcriptome (RHT) approach and dose-response modeling. Transcriptional expression of 1200 selected genes were measured by an Ampliseq technology in two cell lines, HepG2 and MCF7, that were exposed to eight serial dilutions of each sample. Concentration-effect models were used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and to calculate effect concentrations (ECs) of DEGs, which could be ranked to investigate low dose response. Furthermore, molecular pathways disrupted by different samples were evaluated by Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis. The ability of RHT for representing bioactivity utilizing both HepG2 and MCF7 was shown to be comparable to the results of previous in vitro bioassays. Finally, the relative potencies of the mixtures indicated by RHT analysis were consistent with the chemical profiles of the samples. RHT analysis with human cells provides an efficient and cost-effective approach to benchmarking mixture of micropollutants and may offer novel insight into the assessment of mixture toxicity in water.

  3. Bioleached sludge composting drastically reducing ammonia volatilization as well as decreasing bulking agent dosage and improving compost quality: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weitong; Zheng, Guanyu; Fang, Di; Cui, Chunhong; Liang, Jianru; Zhou, Lixiang

    2015-10-01

    Sludge bioleaching technology with Acidithiobacillus species has been commercially adopted for improving advanced dewatering of sludge in China since 2010. However, up to now, little information on bioleached dewatered sludge (BS) composting is available. Here, we report the changes of physicochemical and biological properties in BS composting and evaluate compost product quality compared to conventional dewatered sludge (CS) composting in an engineering scale composting facility. The results showed that the amount of bulking agents required in BS composting was only about 10% of CS composting to obtain optimum moisture content, reducing about 700 kg bulking agents per ton fresh sludge. pH of BS composting mixture was slightly lower consistently by about 0.2-0.3 pH units than that in CS mixture in the first 30 days. Organic matter biodegradation in BS system mainly occurred in the first 9 days of composting. In spite of higher content of NH4(+)-N was found in BS mixture in related to CS mixture; unexpectedly the cumulative ammonia volatilization in the former was only 51% of the latter, indicating that BS composting drastically reduced nitrogen loss. Compared to CS composting system, the relative lower pH, the higher intensity of microbial assimilation, and the presence of water soluble Fe in BS system might jointly reduce ammonia volatilization. Consequently, BS compost product exhibited higher fertilizer values (N+P2O5+K2O=8.38%) as well as lower heavy metal levels due to the solubilization of sludge-borne heavy metals during bioleaching process. Therefore, composting of BS possesses more advantages over the CS composting process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Geo-inspired model: Agents vectors naturals inspired by the environmental management (AVNG of water tributaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Eduardo Millán Rojas

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Management to care for the environment and the Earth (geo can be source of inspiration for developing models that allow addressing complexity issues; the objective of this research was to develop an additional aspect of the inspired models. The geoinspired model has two features, the first covering aspects related to environmental management and the behavior of natural resources, and the second has a component of spatial location associated with existing objects on the Earth's surface. Method: The approach developed in the research is descriptive and its main objective is the representation or characterization of a case study within a particular context. Results: The result was the design of a model to emulate the natural behavior of the water tributaries of the Amazon foothills, in order to extend the application of the inspired models and allow the use of elements such as geo-referencing and environmental management. The proposed geoinspired model is called “natural vectors agents inspired in environmental management”. Conclusions: The agents vectors naturals inspired by the environmental are polyform elements that can assume the behavior of environmental entities, which makes it possible to achieve progress in other fields of environmental management (use of soil, climate, flora, fauna, and link environmental issues with the structure of the proposed model.

  5. Effectiveness of the new water source intervention in reducing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Diarrheal diseases are the major cause of morbidity and mortality among children in many developing countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa 1. One of the contributory factors predisposing children to diarrhea is the water and sanitation contamination vicious cycle2. In Eritrea, diarrhoeal disease is one of ...

  6. Dietary strategies for reduced phosphorus excretion and improved water quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maguire, R.O.; Dou, Z.; Sims, J.T.; Brake, J.; Joern, B.C.

    2005-01-01

    Received for publication October 29, 2004. Cost effective feeding strategies are essential to deal with P surpluses associated with intensive animal agriculture and the consequent impact on water quality. Reduction of P overfeeding, use of feed additives to enhance dietary P utilization, and

  7. Riparian shrub buffers reduce surface water pollutant loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. A. Geyer; C. Barden; K. Mankin; D. Devlin

    2003-01-01

    Surface water resources in Kansas often contain concentrations of pesticides, nutrients, and sediments that are of concern to local citizens. The United States Geological Survey reported in 1999 that 97 percent of streams and 82 percent of lakes in Kansas would not fully support all uses as designated by state statutes (U.S. Geological Survey 1999). Bacteria and...

  8. Analytical control of reducing agents on uranium/plutonium partitioning at purex process; Controle analitico dos agentes redutores na particao uranio/plutonio no processo purex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Izilda da Cruz de

    1995-07-01

    Spectrophotometric methods for uranium (IV), hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and its decomposition product hydrazoic acid(HN{sub 3}), and hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2} OH) determinations were developed aiming their applications for the process control of CELESTE I installation at IPEN/CNEN-SP. These compounds are normally present in the U/Pu partitioning phase of the spent nuclear treatment via PUREX process. The direct spectrophotometry was used for uranium (IV) analysis in nitric acid-hydrazine solutions based on the absorption measurement at 648 nm. The azomethine compound formed by reaction of hydrazine and p-dimethylamine benzaldehyde with maximum absorption at 457 nm was the basis for the specific analytical method for hydrazine determination. The hydrazoic acid analysis was performed indirectly by its conversion into ferric azide complex with maximum absorption at 465 nm. The hydroxylamine detection was accomplished based on its selective oxidation to nitrous acid which is easily analyzed by the reaction with Griess reagent. The resulted azocompound gas a maximum absorption at 520 nm. The sensibility of 1,4x10{sup -6}M for U(IV) with 0,8% of precision, 1,6x10{sup -6}M for hydrazine with 0,8% of precision, 2,3x10{sup -6}M hydrazoic acid with 0,9% of precision and 2,5x10{sup -6}M for hydroxylamine with 0,8% of precision were achieved. The interference studies have shown that each reducing agent can be determined in the presence of each other without any interference. Uranium(VI) and plutonium have also shown no interference in these analysis. The established methods were adapted to run inside glove-boxes by using an optical fiber colorimetry and applied to process control of the CELESTE I installation. The results pointed out that the methods are reliable and safety in order to provide just-in-time information about process conditions. (author)

  9. Reducing Agricultural Water Footprints at the Farm Scale: A Case Study in the Beijing Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Beijing is one of the most water-stressed regions in the world. Reducing agricultural water use has long been the basis of local policy for sustainable water use. In this article, the potential to reduce the life cycle (cradle to gate water footprints of wheat and maize that contribute to 94% of the local cereal production was assessed. Following ISO 14046, consumptive and degradative water use for the wheat-maize rotation system was modeled under different irrigation and nitrogen (N application options. Reducing irrigation water volume by 33.3% compared to current practice did not cause a significant yield decline, but the water scarcity footprint and water eutrophication footprint were decreased by 27.5% and 23.9%, respectively. Similarly, reducing the N application rate by 33.3% from current practice did not cause a significant yield decline, but led to a 52.3% reduction in water eutrophication footprint while maintaining a similar water scarcity footprint. These results demonstrate that improving water and fertilizer management has great potential for reducing the crop water footprints at the farm scale. This situation in Beijing is likely to be representative of the challenge facing many of the water-stressed regions in China, where a sustainable means of agricultural production must be found.

  10. Preliminary assessment of the interaction of introduced biological agents with biofilms in water distribution systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Caldwell, Sara; Jones, Howland D. T.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Souza, Caroline Ann; McGrath, Lucas K.

    2005-12-01

    Basic research is needed to better understand the potential risk of dangerous biological agents that are unintentionally or intentionally introduced into a water distribution system. We report on our capabilities to conduct such studies and our preliminary investigations. In 2004, the Biofilms Laboratory was initiated for the purpose of conducting applied research related to biofilms with a focus on application, application testing and system-scale research. Capabilities within the laboratory are the ability to grow biofilms formed from known bacteria or biofilms from drinking water. Biofilms can be grown quickly in drip-flow reactors or under conditions more analogous to drinking-water distribution systems in annular reactors. Biofilms can be assessed through standard microbiological techniques (i .e, aerobic plate counts) or with various visualization techniques including epifluorescent and confocal laser scanning microscopy and confocal fluorescence hyperspectral imaging with multivariate analysis. We have demonstrated the ability to grow reproducible Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms in the annular reactor with plate counts on the order of 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6} CFU/cm{sup 2}. Stationary phase growth is typically reached 5 to 10 days after inoculation. We have also conducted a series of pathogen-introduction experiments, where we have observed that both polystyrene microspheres and Bacillus cereus (as a surrogate for B. anthracis) stay incorporated in the biofilms for the duration of our experiments, which lasted as long as 36 days. These results indicated that biofilms may act as a safe harbor for bio-pathogens in drinking water systems, making it difficult to decontaminate the systems.

  11. The reducing agent Dithiothreitol (DTT) increases expression of c-myc and c- fos protooncogenes in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skouv, J.; Sørensen, Ilona Kryspin; Frandsen, H.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the possible tumour promoting activity of the food mutagen 2-hydroxyamino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (N-OH-PhIP), by studying its influence on the expression of three genes considered to be of relevance in the tumour promotion step....... However, when cells were treated with DTT alone, the expression of c-fos and c-myc was also transiently induced. We therefore conclude that DTT, and not N-OH-PhIP, induced oncogene expression. Induction of both c-fos and c-mye expression by a reducing agent, DTT, which is frequently used in in vitro...

  12. Reducing Traffic Congestions by Introducing CACC-Vehicles on a Multi-Lane Highway Using Agent-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaout, Georges M.; Bowling, Shannon R.

    2011-01-01

    Traffic congestion is an ongoing problem of great interest to researchers from different areas in academia. With the emerging technology for inter-vehicle communication, vehicles have the ability to exchange information with predecessors by wireless communication. In this paper, we present an agent-based model of traffic congestion and examine the impact of having CACC (Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control) embedded vehicle(s) on a highway system consisting of 4 traffic lanes without overtaking. In our model, CACC vehicles adapt their acceleration/deceleration according to vehicle-to-vehicle inter-communication. We analyze the average speed of the cars, the shockwaves, and the evolution of traffic congestion throughout the lifecycle of the model. The study identifies how CACC vehicles affect the dynamics of traffic flow on a complex network and reduce the oscillatory behavior (stop and go) resulting from the acceleration/deceleration of the vehicles.

  13. Q69, an E. faecalis-infecting bacteriophage, as a biocontrol agent for reducing tyramine in dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor eLadero

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines (BAs are low molecular weight nitrogenous compounds with biological activity, formed from amino acids by decarboxylation. BAs are naturally present in all living organisms playing essential roles. However, their accumulation in food through the metabolic activity of certain microorganisms constitutes a toxicological hazard. Among foods, cheeses accumulate some of the highest concentrations of BAs since they provide an ideal environment for their accumulation. Most of the methods proposed for reducing BAs in cheese, such as milk pasteurisation, have not only failed to completely solve the problem, they also affect non-BA producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB, i.e., the bacteria that participate in the development of the organoleptic characteristics of cheese. Novel technologies specifically targeted against BA producers are therefore needed to control BA accumulation. Bacteriophages have been proposed as agents for specifically controlling the presence of foodborne pathogens in food. Due to its specificity, they could be used as a biotechnological tool targeted to reduce the population of BA-producing bacteria. The present work reports the isolation, from cheese, and the characterisation of bacteriophage Q69, which infects specifically Enterococcus faecalis, the species mainly responsible of the accumulation of the BA tyramine in foods. Furthermore, its capacity to reduce the accumulation of tyramine in different conditions –including a model cheese- was proven. The obtained results open up the possibility of use bacteriophages to prevent BA accumulation in fermented foods.

  14. Efficacy of zero-valent copper (Cu(0)) nanoparticles and reducing agents for dechlorination of mono chloroaromatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Sandesh S; Kamble, Sanjay P; Kulkarni, Prashant S

    2016-09-01

    The zero-valent copper (Cu(0)) nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction method. The morphology of nanoparticles was investigated by using X ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X ray, UV-visible spectrophotometer and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analyser. The Cu(0) nanoparticles along with reducing agents, NaBH4/5% acidified alcohol were used for the dechlorination of chloroaromatics at room temperature. Chlorobenzene (Cl-B), chlorotoluene (Cl-T), chloropyridine (Cl-Py) and chlorobiphenyl (Cl-BPh) were selected as the contaminants. The effect of various operating parameters such as pH, concentration of the catalyst and reducing agent (NaBH4), and recycling of the catalyst on dechlorination were studied. Nearly complete dechlorination of all the chloroaromatics were achieved in the presence of Cu(0) nanoparticles (2.5 g L(-1)) and NaBH4 (1.0 g L(-1)) within 12 h. On the contrary, approximately 70% of dechlorination was observed in the presence of 5% acidified alcohol at similar experimental conditions. The dechlorination mechanism highlighted the importance of Cu(0) nanoparticles as a surface mediator. The kinetics of the dechlorination of chloroaromatics was investigated and compared with chloroaliphatics. The dechlorination rate differed from 0.23 h(-1) (Cl-B) to 0.15 h(-1) (Cl-BPh) in the presence of Cu(0) nanoparticles and NaBH4. The effectiveness of Cu(0) nanoparticles with NaBH4 (1 g L(-1)) and 5% acidified alcohol as electron donors were studied by oxidation-reduction potential and observed to be -1016 mV and -670 mV, respectively. Final products of the dechlorination were benzene, toluene, pyridine and biphenyl, as identified by gas chromatograph mass spectrometer and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cellulose nanocomposite films with in situ generated silver nanoparticles using Cassia alata leaf extract as a reducing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaranjana, P; Nagarajan, E R; Rajini, N; Jawaid, M; Rajulu, A Varada

    2017-06-01

    Cotton linters were dissolved in aq. (8% LiOH+15% urea) that was pre-cooled to -12.5°C. Using this solution cellulose gel films were prepared by regeneration method with ethyl alcohol as a coagulant. These wet films were diffused with 10wt% Cassia alata leaf extract that acted as a reducing agent. The leaf extract diffused cellulose wet films were used as the matrix. The wet matrix films were dipped individually in lower concentrated 1-5mM aq.AgNO3 source solutions in the presence of sunlight and allowed the solutions to react with the diffused leaf extract reducing agent which in situ generated the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) inside the films as well as in the source solution. The AgNPs formed in the source solution were observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) while those formed in situ the films were observed by SEM and the particle size distribution was determined. The cellulose/AgNP composite films showed good antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli bacteria. These nanocomposite films were also characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile tests. At temperatures below 300°C, the thermal stability of the nanocomposite films was lower than that of the matrix due to the catalytic effect of AgNPs. The nanocomposite films also possessed good tensile properties. The ecofriendly cellulose/AgNP composite films with good antibacterial activity and tensile properties can be considered for medical applications like dressing materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of using aluminum sulfate and water-soluble Moringa oleifera seed lectin to reduce turbidity and toxicity of polluted stream water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, José Henrique Edmilson Souza; de Santana, Keissy Vanderley; do Nascimento, Ana Cláudia Claudina; de Paiva, Sérgio Carvalho; de Moura, Maiara Celine; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; de Oliveira, Maria Betânia Melo; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; do Nascimento, Aline Elesbão; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique

    2016-11-01

    Aluminum salts are used as coagulants in water treatment; however, the exposure to residual aluminum has been associated with human brain lesions. The water-soluble Moringa oleifera lectin (WSMoL), which is extracted with distilled water and isolated by chitin chromatography, has coagulant activity and is able to reduce the concentration of metal ions in aqueous solutions. This study evaluated the potential of using aluminum sulfate and WSMoL to reduce the turbidity and toxicity of water from the Cavouco stream located in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. The water sample used (called P1) was collected from the stream source, which was found to be strongly polluted based on physicochemical and water quality analyses, as well as ecotoxicity assays with Artemia salina and seeds of Eruca sativa and Lactuca sativa. The assays combining WSMoL and aluminum sulfate were more efficient than those that used these agents separately. Furthermore, the greatest reduction in turbidity (96.8%) was obtained with the treatment using aluminum sulfate followed by WSMoL, compared to when they were applied simultaneously (91.3%). In addition, aluminum sulfate followed by WSMoL treatment resulted in residual aluminum concentration (0.3 mg/L) that was much lower than that recorded after the treatment using only the salt (35.5 mg/L). The ecotoxicity of P1 was also strongly reduced after the treatments. In summary, the combined use of aluminum sulfate and WSMoL was efficient in promoting a strong reduction of turbidity and ecotoxicity of a polluted water sample, without resulting in a high residual aluminum concentration at the conclusion of the treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hollow fiber-mediated liquid-phase microextraction of chemical warfare agents from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, D K; Pardasani, Deepak; Gupta, A K; Palit, Meehir; Kanaujia, Pankaj K; Tak, Vijay

    2006-02-24

    Unambiguous detection and identification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and related compounds are of paramount importance from verification point of view of Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). It requires development of fast, reliable, simple and reproducible sample preparation of CWAs from water which is likely to be contaminated during deliberate or inadvertent spread of CWAs. This work describes development of hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) method for efficient extraction of CWAs (such as sarin, sulfur mustard and their analogues) from water followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis. Extraction parameters, such as organic solvent, agitation, extraction time, and salt concentration were optimized. Best recoveries of target analytes were achieved using 1 microL trichloroethylene as extracting solvent, 1000 rpm stirring rate, 15 min extraction time, and 30% NaCl. Excellent precision was observed with less than 7.6% RSD. The limit of detection by HF-LPME was achieved up to 0.1 microg/L at 30% salt concentration.

  18. Water Injection on Commercial Aircraft to Reduce Airport Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daggett, David L.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Fucke, Lars; Eames, David J. H.

    2010-01-01

    The potential nitrogen oxide (NO(x) reductions, cost savings, and performance enhancements identified in these initial studies of waterinjection technology strongly suggest that it be further pursued. The potential for engine maintenance cost savings from this system should make it very attractive to airline operators and assure its implementation. Further system tradeoff studies and engine tests are needed to answer the optimal system design question. Namely, would a low-risk combustor injection system with 70- to 90-percent NO(x) reduction be preferable, or would a low-pressure compressor (LPC) misting system with only 50-percent NO(x) reduction but larger turbine inlet temperature reductions be preferable? The low-pressure compressor injection design and operability issues identified in the report need to be addressed because they might prevent implementation of the LPC type of water-misting system. If water-injection technology challenges are overcome, any of the systems studied would offer dramatic engine NO(x) reductions at the airport. Coupling this technology with future emissions-reduction technologies, such as fuel-cell auxiliary power units will allow the aviation sector to address the serious challenges of environmental stewardship, and NO(x) emissions will no longer be an issue at airports.

  19. Emergency response planning to reduce the impact of contaminated drinking water during natural disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Craig L.; Adams, Jeffrey Q.

    2011-12-01

    Natural disasters can be devastating to local water supplies affecting millions of people. Disaster recovery plans and water industry collaboration during emergencies protect consumers from contaminated drinking water supplies and help facilitate the repair of public water systems. Prior to an event, utilities and municipalities can use "What if"? scenarios to develop emergency operation, response, and recovery plans designed to reduce the severity of damage and destruction. Government agencies including the EPA are planning ahead to provide temporary supplies of potable water and small drinking water treatment technologies to communities as an integral part of emergency response activities that will ensure clean and safe drinking water.

  20. Multi-agent modelling framework for water, energy and other resource networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, S.; Selby, P. D.; Meier, P.; Harou, J. J.; Yoon, J.; Lachaut, T.; Klassert, C. J. A.; Avisse, N.; Mohamed, K.; Tomlinson, J.; Khadem, M.; Tilmant, A.; Gorelick, S.

    2015-12-01

    Bespoke modelling tools are often needed when planning future engineered interventions in the context of various climate, socio-economic and geopolitical futures. Such tools can help improve system operating policies or assess infrastructure upgrades and their risks. A frequently used approach is to simulate and/or optimise the impact of interventions in engineered systems. Modelling complex infrastructure systems can involve incorporating multiple aspects into a single model, for example physical, economic and political. This presents the challenge of combining research from diverse areas into a single system effectively. We present the Pynsim 'Python Network Simulator' framework, a library for building simulation models capable of representing, the physical, institutional and economic aspects of an engineered resources system. Pynsim is an open source, object oriented code aiming to promote integration of different modelling processes through a single code library. We present two case studies that demonstrate important features of Pynsim's design. The first is a large interdisciplinary project of a national water system in the Middle East with modellers from fields including water resources, economics, hydrology and geography each considering different facets of a multi agent system. It includes: modelling water supply and demand for households and farms; a water tanker market with transfer of water between farms and households, and policy decisions made by government institutions at district, national and international level. This study demonstrates that a well-structured library of code can provide a hub for development and act as a catalyst for integrating models. The second focuses on optimising the location of new run-of-river hydropower plants. Using a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, this study analyses different network configurations to identify the optimal placement of new power plants within a river network. This demonstrates that Pynsim can be

  1. Synthesis of Pt/rGO catalysts with two different reducing agents and their methanol electrooxidation activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Thu Ha Thi, E-mail: ptntd2004@yahoo.fr [Key Laboratory for Petrochemical and Refinery Technologies, 2 Pham Ngu Lao street, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Tran, Thanh Thuy Thi, E-mail: tranthithanhthuygl@gmail.com [Key Laboratory for Petrochemical and Refinery Technologies, 2 Pham Ngu Lao street, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Le, Hong Ngan Thi; Tran, Lien Thi; Nguyen, Phuong Hoa Thi; Nguyen, Minh Dang [Key Laboratory for Petrochemical and Refinery Technologies, 2 Pham Ngu Lao street, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Quynh, Bui Ngoc [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon, UMR5256, 2 avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Pt/rGO catalysts were successfully synthesized using either NaBH{sub 4} or ethylene glycol. • Synthesis using NaBH{sub 4} could improve electrocatalytic towards methanol oxidation of Pt/rGO catalyst. • 40%Pt/rGO synthesized using NaBH{sub 4} showed the best electrocatalytic performance. - Abstract: The synthesis processes of Platinum (Pt) on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) catalysts from graphene oxide (GO) using two reducing agents including sodium borohydride and ethylene glycol is reported. Structure and morphology of Pt/rGO catalysts are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electrocatalytic methanol oxidation properties of these catalysts are evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The results show that catalyst synthesized using sodium borohydride has a higher metallic Pt content and an improved catalytic performance in comparison to catalyst synthesized using ethylene glycol. Moreover, effect of Pt loading amount on electrocatalytic methanol oxidation performance of catalysts synthesized using sodium borohydride is systematically investigated. The optimal Pt loading amount on graphene is determined to be 40%.

  2. Design of a multi-agent hydroeconomic model to simulate a complex human-water system: Early insights from the Jordan Water Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, J.; Klassert, C. J. A.; Lachaut, T.; Selby, P. D.; Knox, S.; Gorelick, S.; Rajsekhar, D.; Tilmant, A.; Avisse, N.; Harou, J. J.; Gawel, E.; Klauer, B.; Mustafa, D.; Talozi, S.; Sigel, K.

    2015-12-01

    Our work focuses on development of a multi-agent, hydroeconomic model for purposes of water policy evaluation in Jordan. The model adopts a modular approach, integrating biophysical modules that simulate natural and engineered phenomena with human modules that represent behavior at multiple levels of decision making. The hydrologic modules are developed using spatially-distributed groundwater and surface water models, which are translated into compact simulators for efficient integration into the multi-agent model. For the groundwater model, we adopt a response matrix method approach in which a 3-dimensional MODFLOW model of a complex regional groundwater system is converted into a linear simulator of groundwater response by pre-processing drawdown results from several hundred numerical simulation runs. Surface water models for each major surface water basin in the country are developed in SWAT and similarly translated into simple rainfall-runoff functions for integration with the multi-agent model. The approach balances physically-based, spatially-explicit representation of hydrologic systems with the efficiency required for integration into a complex multi-agent model that is computationally amenable to robust scenario analysis. For the multi-agent model, we explicitly represent human agency at multiple levels of decision making, with agents representing riparian, management, supplier, and water user groups. The agents' decision making models incorporate both rule-based heuristics as well as economic optimization. The model is programmed in Python using Pynsim, a generalizable, open-source object-oriented code framework for modeling network-based water resource systems. The Jordan model is one of the first applications of Pynsim to a real-world water management case study. Preliminary results from a tanker market scenario run through year 2050 are presented in which several salient features of the water system are investigated: competition between urban and

  3. Reducing water leakage into underground coal mines by aquifer dewatering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Based on stratigraphic, structural, hydrogeologic, and mining data collected during a study in central Pennsylvania, a two-dimensional, finite-difference computer model was used to simulate groundwater flow in a sandstone unit (0.3 to 11 m thick) overlying an underground mine, and to evaluate the responses of the flow system and leakage rate into the mine when hypothetical dewatering wells are introduced into the system. Simulation of well dewatering, using 25 wells, showed that negligible reduction in leakage would occur if sandstone permeability was less than 0.30 m/day. When sandstone permeability equalled 3.0 m/day, 25 wells reduced leakage by 2.4 percent.

  4. Implementing the Water Framework Directive: Contract Design and the Cost of Measures to Reduce Nitrogen Pollution from Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Fabio; Gallerani, Vittorio; Raggi, Meri; Viaggi, Davide

    2007-10-01

    The performance of different policy design strategies is a key issue in evaluating programmes for water quality improvement under the Water Framework Directive (60/2000). This issue is emphasised by information asymmetries between regulator and agents. Using an economic model under asymmetric information, the aim of this paper is to compare the cost-effectiveness of selected methods of designing payments to farmers in order to reduce nitrogen pollution in agriculture. A principal-agent model is used, based on profit functions generated through farm-level linear programming. This allows a comparison of flat rate payments and a menu of contracts developed through mechanism design. The model is tested in an area of Emilia Romagna (Italy) in two policy contexts: Agenda 2000 and the 2003 Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) reform. The results show that different policy design options lead to differences in policy costs as great as 200-400%, with clear advantages for the menu of contracts. However, different policy scenarios may strongly affect such differences. Hence, the paper calls for greater attention to the interplay between CAP scenarios and water quality measures.

  5. Implementing the water framework directive: contract design and the cost of measures to reduce nitrogen pollution from agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Fabio; Gallerani, Vittorio; Raggi, Meri; Viaggi, Davide

    2007-10-01

    The performance of different policy design strategies is a key issue in evaluating programmes for water quality improvement under the Water Framework Directive (60/2000). This issue is emphasised by information asymmetries between regulator and agents. Using an economic model under asymmetric information, the aim of this paper is to compare the cost-effectiveness of selected methods of designing payments to farmers in order to reduce nitrogen pollution in agriculture. A principal-agent model is used, based on profit functions generated through farm-level linear programming. This allows a comparison of flat rate payments and a menu of contracts developed through mechanism design. The model is tested in an area of Emilia Romagna (Italy) in two policy contexts: Agenda 2000 and the 2003 Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) reform. The results show that different policy design options lead to differences in policy costs as great as 200-400%, with clear advantages for the menu of contracts. However, different policy scenarios may strongly affect such differences. Hence, the paper calls for greater attention to the interplay between CAP scenarios and water quality measures.

  6. Mesothelium regeneration on acellular bovine pericardia loaded with an angiogenic agent (ginsenoside Rg1) successfully reduces postsurgical pericardial adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yen; Lai, Po-Hong; Wang, Chung-Chi; Chen, Sung-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chun; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2006-10-01

    Our objective was to reduce postsurgical pericardial adhesions with porous acellular bovine pericardia loaded with ginsenoside Rg1, an angiogenic agent isolated from Panax ginseng (the Acellular/Rg1 patch). The acellular/Rg1 patch was used as a substitute to repair a defect created in the pericardium of a rabbit model. A commercially available expanded polytetrafluoroethylene patch, the cellular pericardium (the cellular patch), and the acellular pericardium without loading Rg1 (the acellular patch) were used as controls. The implanted samples were retrieved at 1 and 3 months after surgery (n = 5 per group at each time point). It was found that each side of the implanted patch could be remesothelialized provided that regeneration of neo-tissue fibrils occurred initially on its surfaces. Because remesothelialization did not take place on the surfaces of the expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and cellular patches, moderate to severe adhesions to the lung and epicardium were clearly observed. As compared with the cellular patch, the acellular patch significantly reduced postsurgical pericardial adhesions, especially on its lung side, as a result of remesothelialization. In the presence of Rg1, a faster remesothelialization was observed on each side of the acellular/Rg1 patch. Therefore, the acellular/Rg1 patch was free of any adhesions to the lung; however, there was still a filmy adhesion to the epicardium observed in 3 of the 5 studied animals at 3 months after surgery, due to incomplete remesothelialization. The acellular/Rg1 patch effectively repaired pericardial defects in rabbits and successfully reduced the formation of pericardial adhesions.

  7. Preparation of fluidized catalytic cracking slurry oil-in-water emulsion as anti-collapse agent for drilling fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqiang Xiong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized catalytic cracking slurry oil-in-water emulsion (FCCSE was prepared by using interfacial complexes generation method that was simple and versatile. The critical factors influencing the sample preparation process were optimized, for instance, the optimum value of the mixed hydrophile-lipophile balance of compound emulsifier was 11.36, the content of compound emulsifier was 4 wt%, the emulsification temperature was 75 °C, the agitation speed was 200 rpm, and the emulsification time was 30–45 min. The performance as a drilling fluid additive was also investigated with respect to rheological properties, filtration loss and inhibition of FCCSE. Experimental results showed that FCCSE was favorable to inhibiting clay expansion and dispersion and reducing fluid loss. Furthermore, it had good compatibility with other additives and did not affect the rheological properties of drilling fluids. FCCSE exhibited better performance than the available emulsified asphalt. It has a promising application as anti-collapse agent in petroleum and natural gas drilling.

  8. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan

    2001-12-01

    We propose a process that uses sulfur dioxide from coal combustion as a raw material to synthesize polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a water treatment agent. The process uses sodium chlorate as an oxidant and ferrous sulfate as an absorbent. The major chemical mechanisms in this reaction system include oxidation, hydrolysis, and polymerization. Oxidation determines sulfur conversion efficiency while hydrolysis and polymerization control the quality of product. Many factors, including SO{sub 2} inlet concentration, flow rate of simulated flue gas, reaction temperature, addition rate of oxidant and stirring rate, may affect the efficiencies of SO{sub 2} removal. Currently, the effects of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration, the flow rate of simulated flue gas and addition rate of flue gas on removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, are being investigated. Experiments shown in this report have demonstrated that the conversion efficiencies of sulfur dioxide with ferrous sulfate as an absorbent are in the range of 60-80% under the adopted process conditions. However, the conversion efficiency of sulfur dioxide may be improved by optimizing reaction conditions to be investigated. Partial quality indices of the synthesized products, including Fe{sup 2+} concentration and total iron concentration, have been evaluated.

  9. New reducing agents for the low-NO{sub x} SCR technology; Neue Reduktionsmittel fuer die Low NO{sub x}-SCR-Technik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroecher, O.; Elsener, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Jacob, E. [Emissionskonzepte, Krailling (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Ammonium formate (Denoxium), methanamide (AdAmide) and guanidinium formate (GuFo) were investigated in model gas experiments as alternatives for urea (AdBlue {sup registered}) in the SCR process. Similar to AdBlue {sup registered} these compounds generate ammonia over catalysts in the exhaust gas system, which reacts as actual reducing agent with the nitrogen oxides. The main advantage of the alternative reducing agents is their much lower melting point, which makes a heating system unnecessary. Another advantage of AdAmide and GuFo is their better stability at high temperatures compared to AdBlue {sup registered}. The decomposition proceeds for ammonium formate and probably also for guanidinium formate via formic acid as intermediate. When methanamide is used as reducing agent, it can emit undecomposed at low temperatures or also form HCN as sideproduct. TiO{sub 2} proved to be the best decomposition catalyst for all three reducing agents, whereby the formation of side-products was avoided by low space velocities and high reaction temperatures. Therefore, the ideal reactor for the alternative reducing agents is a separate ammonia generator, which is filled with a TiO{sub 2} catalyst and operated at 250-300 C at low space velocities in a side-flow. (orig.)

  10. Reduced aggregation and cytotoxicity of amyloid peptides by graphene oxide/gold nanocomposites prepared by pulsed laser ablation in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingying; Han, Qiusen; Wang, Xinhuan; Yu, Ning; Yang, Lin; Yang, Rong; Wang, Chen

    2014-11-12

    A novel and convenient method to synthesize the nanocomposites combining graphene oxides (GO) with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is reported and their applications to modulate amyloid peptide aggregation are demonstrated. The nanocomposites produced by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in water show good biocompatibility and solubility. The reduced aggregation of amyloid peptides by the nanocomposites is confirmed by Thioflavin T fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. The cell viability experiments reveals that the presence of the nanocomposites can significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of the amyloid peptides. Furthermore, the depolymerization of peptide fibrils and inhibition of their cellular cytotoxicity by GO/AuNPs is also observed. These observations suggest that the nanocomposites combining GO and AuNPs have a great potential for designing new therapeutic agents and are promising for future treatment of amyloid-related diseases. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Reducing and verifying haloacetic acids in treated drinking water using a biological filter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jie C; Chan, Hung Y; Yang, Chih Y; Tseng, Wei B; Han, Jia Y

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on reducing the haloacetic acid (HAA) concentrations in treated drinking water. HAA has been thought to be one possible nutrient supporting heterotrophic bacteria regrowth in drinking water. In this study, experiments were conducted using a pilot-scale system to evaluate the efficiency of biological filters (BF) for reducing excess HAA concentrations in water. The BF system reduced the total HAA concentration and the concentrations of five HAA species in the water. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were the three main HAA5 species that were present in the treated drinking water in this investigation. Combined, these three species represent approximately 77% of the HAA5 in the finished water after BF. The verification of the empirical HAA equation for the outlet in the BF system indicated linear relationships with high correlation coefficients. The empirical equation for the HAA5 concentrations in the finished water was established by examining other nutrients (e.g., dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm wavelength (UV254), and ammonia nitrogen) that can reduce pathogenic contamination. These findings may be useful for designing advanced processes for conventional water treatment plants or for managing water treatment and distribution systems for providing high-quality drinking water.

  12. Open Software Tools Applied to Jordan's National Multi-Agent Water Management Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Stephen; Meier, Philipp; Harou, Julien; Yoon, Jim; Selby, Philip; Lachaut, Thibaut; Klassert, Christian; Avisse, Nicolas; Khadem, Majed; Tilmant, Amaury; Gorelick, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Jordan is the fourth most water scarce country in the world, where demand exceeds supply in a politically and demographically unstable context. The Jordan Water Project (JWP) aims to perform policy evaluation by modelling the hydrology, economics, and governance of Jordan's water resource system. The multidisciplinary nature of the project requires a modelling software system capable of integrating submodels from multiple disciplines into a single decision making process and communicating results to stakeholders. This requires a tool for building an integrated model and a system where diverse data sets can be managed and visualised. The integrated Jordan model is built using Pynsim, an open-source multi-agent simulation framework implemented in Python. Pynsim operates on network structures of nodes and links and supports institutional hierarchies, where an institution represents a grouping of nodes, links or other institutions. At each time step, code within each node, link and institution can executed independently, allowing for their fully autonomous behaviour. Additionally, engines (sub-models) perform actions over the entire network or on a subset of the network, such as taking a decision on a set of nodes. Pynsim is modular in design, allowing distinct modules to be modified easily without affecting others. Data management and visualisation is performed using Hydra (www.hydraplatform.org), an open software platform allowing users to manage network structure and data. The Hydra data manager connects to Pynsim, providing necessary input parameters for the integrated model. By providing a high-level portal to the model, Hydra removes a barrier between the users of the model (researchers, stakeholders, planners etc) and the model itself, allowing them to manage data, run the model and visualise results all through a single user interface. Pynsim's ability to represent institutional hierarchies, inter-network communication and the separation of node, link and

  13. The Effect of Luteinizing Hormone Reducing Agent on Anxiety and Novel Object Recognition Memory in Gonadectomized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfa-Fatollahkhani, Paria; Nahavandi, Arezo; Abtahi, Hossein; Anjidani, Shabnam; Borhani, Sahar; Jameie, Seyed Behnam; Shabani, Mohammad; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Shahbazi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Mood disorders such as anxiety and depression are common following menopause and andropause. Lack of sex steroid hormones is suggested as the primary cause of these disturbances. The level of luteinizing hormone (LH) would also rise 3-4 times than normal in these people. The potential effects of LH on mood and cognitive symptoms following menopause and andropause are still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of increased LH on novel object discrimination (NOD) memory and anxiety like behavior in gonadectomized rats. Four-month-old male and female Wistar rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups (in each sex): control rats (Cont), gonadectomized without treatment (GnX), gonadectomized treated with triptorelin, a GnRH agonist which reduces LH release eventually, (GnX+Tr), gonadectomized treated with triptorelin plus sex steroid hormone, estradiol in female and testosterone in male rats (GnX+Tr+S/T). After 4 weeks treatment, anxiety score (elevated plus maze) and NOD were measured. Data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA, and P-values less than 0.05 were considered as significant. Gonadectomy increased anxiety like behaviors (decrease of presence time in the open arms) in female rats (P=0.012), but not in male ones (P=0.662). Additionally, triptorelin alone reduced the increased anxiety score in gonadectomized female rats, compared to group treated with both triptorelin and estradiol. Furthermore, it was shown that gonadectomy and or treatment with triptorelin and sex steroids had no significant effect on novel object recognition memory in both female (P=0.472) and male rats (P=0.798). Findings of this study revealed that increased level of LH following menopause or andropause should be considered as a possible cause for increased anxiety. Also, this study showed that LH reducing agents would reduce anxiety like behavior in gonadectomized female rats. The effect of increased LH on cognitive functions such as novel object recognition memory was not

  14. [First results on the use of chloramines to reduce disinfection byproducts in drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azara, Antonio; Muresu, Elena; Dettori, Marco; Ciappeddu, Pierluigi; Deidda, Antonio; Maida, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    The presence of disinfection byproducts (DBP) in drinking water raises concerns about the safety of chlorination and is one of the problems inherent the use of surface water as a source of drinking water. In order to reduce the presence of DBP (in particular of chlorites), we evaluated the combined use of chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection and monochloramine for residual disinfection in a water purification plant and distribution system in Sardinia (Italy). The results are very encouraging. Disinfection byproducts were reduced and other parameters were found to be within the recommended standards, indicating further improvements of the purification process.

  15. Pyrolysis Gas as a Renewable Reducing Agent for the Recycling of Zinc- and Lead-Bearing Residues: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, C.; Antrekowitsch, J.

    2017-04-01

    The topic "Zero Waste" has been in existence for several years in the industry, and the metallurgical industry has also made efforts to reduce the amounts of residues occurring and have started several investigations to cut down on metallurgical by-products which have to be landfilled. Especially, the additional costs for CO2 emissions in different metallurgical steps have led to investigations into alternative carbon carriers. Charcoal has been identified to serve as an ideal substitute due its CO2-neutrality. For the applications of this renewable carbon carrier in metallurgical processes, charcoal production by means of a carbonization process needs to be optimized. As a by-product during the heating of agricultural wastes or wood by excluding air, pyrolysis gas occurs. Due to the existence of combustible compounds in this gas, an application as a reduction agent instead of fossil carbon carriers in metallurgy is possible. Based on the prevention of dumping metallurgical by-products, an investigation has been developed to treat zinc- and lead-containing materials. To realize this, a dedicated process concept has been designed and developed. As the main focuses, the usage of the pyrolysis gas from charcoal production for the Waelz kiln process and the recycling of zinc- and lead-containing Waelz slag, resulting from the processing of steel mill dust in a vertical retort, have to be mentioned. Within this research, the process concept was executed from laboratory-scale up to pilot-scale testing, described in this article.

  16. Novel ELISA for the detection of raw and processed egg using extraction buffer containing a surfactant and a reducing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yumiko; Aburatani, Kenichi; Mizumura, Tasuku; Sakai, Masatoshi; Muraoka, Shiroo; Mamegosi, Shinichi; Honjoh, Tsutomu

    2005-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been considered extremely useful for the detection of markers of allergenic substances in food, because it is simple, offers a suitable sensitivity, and is useful in providing quantitative results. Allergenic protein present in processed food can be denatured or altered, hindering therefore their possibility to be extracted and detected. This paper reports the development of an ELISA method that can be used for the determination of allergenic proteins in buffer solutions containing SDS, a surfactant, and 2-mercaptoethanol, a reducing agent. Measurement by ELISA in solutions containing 1% SDS and 7% 2-mercaptoethanol has been made possible by using an antibody prepared through immunization with an antigen denatured with SDS and 2-mercaptoethanol. This ELISA technique can be used to measure proteins in food that have been denatured by various manufacturing processes. An example is egg white albumin, which is susceptible to heat denaturation and has been difficult to recover from food in the past. Its recovery was improved 10- to 100-fold by the new ELISA method as compared with previous methods. This means that allergenic substances in food can now be detected quantitatively. This method can be very useful in allergy prevention and control strategies.

  17. Structural, optical and electronic characteristics of N-doped graphene nanosheets synthesized using urea as reducing agent and nitrogen precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoli, Pankaj; Das, Malay K.; Kar, Kamal K.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, nitrogen (N)-doped graphene nanosheets (NGns) have been synthesized by solvothermal method using urea both as the green precursor of N and as the reducing agent for graphene oxide (GO). As synthesized NGns have been characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS). The Raman D to G band intensity ratio (I D /I G ), being a measure of defects in the honeycomb lattice, is used as an indicator for the formation of NGns. For GO:urea weight ratio of 1:5, high C to O atomic ratio (C/O) of ~8.75 with an N-content as high as ~8.3 at.% and high I D /I G ratio of 1.55 have been observed, which confirm the removal of oxygen functionalities from GO to form NGns. Further, transparent conducting films (TCFs) of the synthesized NGns have been fabricated by spray coating. Thermal graphitization of the TCFs has been performed to enhance their optical and electrical properties. When annealed at 900 °C for 1 h in vacuum, the film shows a best performance in terms of sheet resistance and transmittance values of ~1.63 kΩ □-1 and ~68.21%, respectively.

  18. Atomic layer deposition of cobalt carbide films and their magnetic properties using propanol as a reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarr, Mouhamadou, E-mail: sarrtapha44@yahoo.fr [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Bahlawane, Naoufal; Arl, Didier [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Dossot, Manuel [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Microbiology for the Environment, UMR 7564 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, 54601 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); McRae, Edward [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198CNRS-Université de Lorraine, FST, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Lenoble, Damien, E-mail: damien.lenoble@list.lu [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Conformal carbon-Co-carbide thin films. • Chemically growth carbone-Co-carbide composite. • Tuneable magnetic properties. - Abstract: The investigation of highly conformal thin films using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is driven by a variety of applications in modern technologies. In particular, the emergence of 3D memory device architectures requires conformal materials with tuneable magnetic properties. Here, nanocomposites of carbon, cobalt and cobalt carbide are deposited by ALD using cobalt acetylacetonate with propanol as a reducing agent. Films were grown by varying the ALD deposition parameters including deposition temperature and propanol exposure time. The morphology, the chemical composition and the crystalline structure of the cobalt carbide film were investigated. Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements revealed magnetic hysteresis loops with a coercivity reaching 500 Oe and a maximal saturation magnetization of 0.9 T with a grain size less than 15 nm. Magnetic properties are shown to be tuneable by adjusting the deposition parameters that significantly affect the microstructure and the composition of the deposited films.

  19. Synthesis of Pt3Y and Other Early-Late Intermetallic Nanoparticles by Way of a Molten Reducing Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanady, Jacob S; Leidinger, Peter; Haas, Andreas; Titlbach, Sven; Schunk, Stephan; Schierle-Arndt, Kerstin; Crumlin, Ethan J; Wu, Cheng Hao; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2017-04-26

    Early-late intermetallic phases have garnered increased attention recently for their catalytic properties. To achieve the high surface areas needed for industrially relevant applications, these phases must be synthesized as nanoparticles in a scalable fashion. Herein, Pt3Y-targeted as a prototypical example of an early-late intermetallic-has been synthesized as nanoparticles approximately 5-20 nm in diameter via a solution process and characterized by XRD, TEM, EDS, and XPS. The key development is the use of a molten borohydride (MEt3BH, M = Na, K) as both the reducing agent and reaction medium. Readily available halide precursors of the two metals are used. Accordingly, no organic ligands are necessary, as the resulting halide salt byproduct prevents sintering, which further permits dispersion of the nanoscale intermetallic onto a support. The versatility of this approach was validated by the synthesis of other intermetallic phases such as Pt3Sc, Pt3Lu, Pt2Na, and Au2Y.

  20. Estimated general population control limits for unitary agents in drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, A.P.; Adams, J.D.; Cerar, R.J.; Hess, T.L.; Kistner, S.L.; Leffingwell, S.S.; MacIntosh, R.G.; Ward, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of chemical agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the potential exists for contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. Persistent agents such as VX or sulfur mustard pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. This White Paper has been prepared to provide technical bases for these decisions by developing working estimates of agent control limits in selected environmental media considered principal sources of potential human exposure. To date, control limits for public exposure to unitary agents have been established for atmospheric concentrations only. The current analysis builds on previous work to calculate working estimates of control limits for ingestion and dermal exposure to potentially contaminated drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items such as garden produce. Information characterizing agent desorption from, and detection on or in, contaminated porous media are presently too developed to permit reasonable estimation of dermal exposure from this source. Thus, dermal contact with potentially contaminated porous surfaces is not considered in this document.

  1. Spatial analysis of private tanker water markets in Jordan: Using a hydroeconomic multi-agent model to simulate non-observed water transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassert, Christian; Yoon, Jim; Gawel, Erik; Sigel, Katja; Klauer, Bernd; Talozi, Samer; Lachaut, Thibaut; Selby, Philip; Knox, Stephen; Gorelick, Steven; Tilmant, Amaury; Harou, Julien; Mustafa, Daanish; Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Rajsekhar, Deepthi; Avisse, Nicolas; Zhang, Hua

    2017-04-01

    The country of Jordan is characterized by severe water scarcity and deficient public water supply networks. To address these issues, Jordan's water sector authorities have adopted a water rationing scheme implemented by interrupting piped water supply for several days per week. As in many arid countries around the world, this has led to the emergence of private markets of small-scale providers, delivering water via tanker trucks. On the one hand, these markets play a crucial role in meeting residential and commercial water demands by balancing the shortcomings of the public supply system. On the other hand, providers partially rely on illegal abstractions from rural ground and surface water sources, thereby circumventing regulatory efforts to conserve these resources. Private tanker water markets, therefore, provide a substantial contribution to consumer welfare while jeopardizing freshwater resource sustainability. Thus, a better understanding of these markets is of great importance for the formulation of policy interventions pursuing freshwater sustainability in a socially acceptable manner. Direct assessments of the size of these markets or their responses to policy interventions are, however, impeded by their partially illegal nature and the resulting lack of available information. To overcome this data collection challenge, we use a hydroeconomic multi-agent model developed in the Jordan Water Project to indirectly simulate country-wide tanker water market activities on the basis of demand and supply estimates. The demand for tanker water is conceptualized as a residual demand, remaining after a water user has depleted all available cheap and qualitatively reliable piped water. It is derived from residential and commercial demand functions on the basis of survey data. Tanker water supply is determined by farm simulation models calculating the groundwater pumping cost and the agricultural opportunity cost of tanker water. Finally, a spatial market algorithm

  2. Evaluation of water security in Jordan using a multi-agent, hydroeconomic model: Initial model results from the Jordan Water Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, J.; Klassert, C. J. A.; Lachaut, T.; Selby, P. D.; Knox, S.; Gorelick, S.; Rajsekhar, D.; Tilmant, A.; Avisse, N.; Harou, J. J.; Medellin-Azuara, J.; Gawel, E.; Klauer, B.; Mustafa, D.; Talozi, S.; Sigel, K.; Zhang, H.

    2016-12-01

    Our work focuses on development of a multi-agent, hydroeconomic model for water policy evaluation in Jordan. Jordan ranks among the most water-scarce countries in the world, a situation exacerbated due to a recent influx of refugees escaping the ongoing civil war in neighboring Syria. The modular, multi-agent model is used to evaluate interventions for enhancing Jordan's water security, integrating biophysical modules that simulate natural and engineered phenomena with human modules that represent behavior at multiple levels of decision making. The hydrologic modules are developed using spatially-distributed groundwater and surface water models, which are translated into compact simulators for efficient integration into the multi-agent model. For the multi-agent model, we explicitly account for human agency at multiple levels of decision making, with agents representing riparian, management, supplier, and water user groups. Human agents are implemented as autonomous entities in the model that make decisions in relation to one another and in response to hydrologic and socioeconomic conditions. The integrated model is programmed in Python using Pynsim, a generalizable, open-source object-oriented software framework for modeling network-based water resource systems. The modeling time periods include historical (2006-2014) and future (present-2050) time spans. For the historical runs, the model performance is validated against historical data for several observations that reflect the interacting dynamics of both the hydrologic and human components of the system. A historical counterfactual scenario is also constructed to isolate and identify the impacts of the recent Syrian civil war and refugee crisis on Jordan's water system. For the future period, model runs are conducted to evaluate potential supply, demand, and institutional interventions over a wide range of plausible climate and socioeconomic scenarios. In addition, model sensitivity analysis is conducted

  3. A monomeric water-soluble NIR-absorbing porphyrin derivative as in vivo photoacoustic tomography contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Luciano, Michael; Zhou, Feifei; Brückner, Christian; Zhu, Quing

    2017-03-01

    A PEGylated quinoline-annulated porphyrin derivative was synthesized as in vivo photoacoustic tomography contrast agent. It possesses high solubility and stability in water and phosphate-buffered saline. No toxicity sign was observed in BALB/c mice. The dye demonstrates a 4-fold higher photoacoustic signal generation efficiency compared to fresh rat blood. Injection of the dye results in a significant enhancement of in vivo PAT images of murine tumors. Analysis of the mouse urine after injection revealed an unaltered renal filtration of the contrast agent.

  4. Monitoring of water supply connections as an element to reduce apparent losses of water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwoździej-Mazur, Joanna

    2017-11-01

    Measuring instruments are designed to measure a given physical value, to process the obtained information and forward it to the observer. They are designed to perform specific tasks in specific working conditions and meeting the envisaged requirements. The most important requirement to be met by measuring instruments, is to preserve the established metrological characteristics. The basic and most common instrument for measuring the volume of flowing water is the water meter. Selecting the right water meter in the operating conditions is not an easy issue. The problem has been further intensified by decrease of water consumption which began in the 90s of the twentieth century and continuing to the present day. As a result, there has changed the structure of water consumption in both the residential and industrial applications. In this situation, a right selection of the optimal water meter it is an important case. The article presents the results of research in the field of characteristic flows in the water supply connections in multi-family housing using modern monitoring systems. It has been presented the calculated inequality ratio of water consumption, which can be helpful when designing a plumbing systems. In addition, the structure of water consumption due to the typical flow ranges was determined.

  5. Effects of electrolyzed oxidizing water on reducing Listeria monocytogenes contamination on seafood processing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengchu; Duan, Jingyun; Su, Yi-Cheng

    2006-02-15

    The effects of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water on reducing Listeria monocytogenes contamination on seafood processing surfaces were studied. Chips (5 x 5 cm(2)) of stainless steel sheet (SS), ceramic tile (CT), and floor tile (FT) with and without crabmeat residue on the surface were inoculated with L. monocytogenes and soaked in tap or EO water for 5 min. Viable cells of L. monocytogenes were detected on all chip surfaces with or without crabmeat residue after being held at room temperature for 1 h. Soaking contaminated chips in tap water resulted in small-degree reductions of the organism (0.40-0.66 log cfu/chip on clean surfaces and 0.78-1.33 log cfu/chip on dirty surfaces). Treatments of EO water significantly (peffectiveness of EO water on inactivating Listeria cells. However, treatments of EO water also resulted in significant reductions of L. monocytogenes on dirty surfaces (2.33 log on SS and CT and 1.52 log on FT) when compared with tap water treatments. The antimicrobial activity of EO water was positively correlated with its chlorine content. High oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of EO water also contributed significantly to its antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes. EO water was more effective than chlorine water on inactivating L. monocytogenes on surfaces and could be used as a chlorine alternative for sanitation purpose. Application of EO water following a thorough cleaning process could greatly reduce L. monocytogenes contamination in seafood processing environments.

  6. The Effect of Luteinizing Hormone Reducing Agent on Anxiety and Novel Object Recognition Memory in Gonadectomized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paria Arfa-Fatollahkhani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mood disorders such as anxiety and depression are common following menopause and andropause. The lack of sex steroid hormones is suggested as the primary cause of these disturbances. The level of luteinizing hormone (LH would also rise 3-4 times than normal in these people. The potential effects of LH on mood and cognitive symptoms following menopause and andropause are not clear yet. This study aimed to investigate the effect of increased LH on novel object discrimination (NOD memory and anxiety like behavior in gonadectomized rats. Methods: Four-month-old male and female Wistar rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups (in each sex: Control rats (Cont, gonadectomized without treatment (GnX, gonadectomized treated with triptorelin (a GnRH agonist which decreases LH release (GnX+Tr, gonadectomized treated with triptorelin plus sex steroid hormone, estradiol in female and testosterone in male rats (GnX+Tr+S/T. After 4 weeks treatment, anxiety score (elevated plus maze and NOD were measured. Data were analyzed using 1- way ANOVA, and P values less than 0.05 were considered as significant. Results: Gonadectomy increased anxiety like behaviors (decrease of presence time in the open arms in female rats (P=0.012, but not in male ones (P = 0.662. Additionally, triptorelin alone reduced the increased anxiety score in gonadectomized female rats, compared to group treated with both triptorelin and estradiol. Furthermore, it was shown that gonadectomy and or treatment with triptorelin and sex steroids had no significant effect on the new object recognition memory in both female (P = 0.472 and male rats (P = 0.798. Conclusion: On the whole, this study revealed that increased level of LH following menopause or andropause should be considered as a possible cause for increased anxiety. Also, this study showed that LH reducing agents would reduce anxiety behavior in gonadectomized female rats. The effect of increased LH on cognitive functions such

  7. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-09-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  8. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez, N.

    2016-09-06

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  9. Bio-based coatings for reducing water sorption in natural fibre reinforced composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mokhothu, Thabang H

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, bio-based coatings were used for reducing water sorption of composites containing flame retardant treated natural fibres and phenolic resin. Two types of coatings; polyfurfuryl alcohol resin (PFA) and polyurethane (PU) were used...

  10. Kinetic analyses of plant water relocation using deuterium as tracer - reduced water flux of Arabidopsis pip2 aquaporin knockout mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Ines, O; Graf, W; Franck, K I; Albert, A; Winkler, J B; Scherb, H; Stichler, W; Schäffner, A R

    2010-09-01

    Due to reduced evaporation and diffusion of water molecules containing heavier isotopes, leaf water possesses an elevated (18)O or (2)H steady-state content. This enrichment has been exploited in plant physiology and ecology to assess transpiration and leaf water relations. In contrast to these studies, in this work the (2)H content of the medium of hydroponically grown Arabidopsis thaliana was artificially raised, and the kinetics of (2)H increase in the aerial parts recorded during a short phase of 6-8 h, until a new equilibrium at a higher level was reached. A basic version of the enrichment models was modified to establish an equation that could be fitted to measured leaf (2)H content during uptake kinetics. The fitting parameters allowed estimation of the relative water flux q(leaf) into the Arabidopsis rosette. This approach is quasi-non-invasive, since plants are not manipulated during the uptake process, and therefore, offers a new tool for integrated analysis of plant water relations. The deuterium tracer method was employed to assess water relocation in Arabidopsis pip2;1 and pip2;2 aquaporin knockout plants. In both cases, q(leaf) was significantly reduced by about 20%. The organ and cellular expression patterns of both genes imply that changes in root hydraulic conductivity, as previously demonstrated for pip2;2 mutants, and leaf water uptake and distribution contributed in an integrated fashion to this reduced flux in intact plants.

  11. Nitrogenous Derivatives of Phosphorus and the Origins of Life: Plausible Prebiotic Phosphorylating Agents in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Megha; Gibard, Clémentine; Bhowmik, Subhendu; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan

    2017-07-29

    Phosphorylation under plausible prebiotic conditions continues to be one of the defining issues for the role of phosphorus in the origins of life processes. In this review, we cover the reactions of alternative forms of phosphate, specifically the nitrogenous versions of phosphate (and other forms of reduced phosphorus species) from a prebiotic, synthetic organic and biochemistry perspective. The ease with which such amidophosphates or phosphoramidate derivatives phosphorylate a wide variety of substrates suggests that alternative forms of phosphate could have played a role in overcoming the "phosphorylation in water problem". We submit that serious consideration should be given to the search for primordial sources of nitrogenous versions of phosphate and other versions of phosphorus.

  12. Reducing nitrogen leaching from fertilizers to surface waters: catchment specific indicators of economic benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Skou; Levin, Gregor; Odgaard, Mette Vestergaard

    2018-01-01

    Monetization of benefits related to improving water quality is expected for a proportionality test under Article 4 of the EU’s Water Framework Directive (relating to benefits and costs of measures). Our pilot study explores with impact pathway methodology some basic economic benefits of reducing ...

  13. the performance of cassava flour as a water-reducing admixture for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHINYERE

    ABSTRACT. The performance of cassava flour as a water reducing admixture in concrete was investigated. Four concrete mixes of widely differing water/cement ratios were made and each of the mixes contained three different dosage levels of cassava flour as admixture. The properties tested include workability of the fresh ...

  14. An Empirical Agent-Based Model to Simulate the Adoption of Water Reuse Using the Social Amplification of Risk Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiah, Venu; Binder, Andrew R; Berglund, Emily Z

    2017-10-01

    Water reuse can serve as a sustainable alternative water source for urban areas. However, the successful implementation of large-scale water reuse projects depends on community acceptance. Because of the negative perceptions that are traditionally associated with reclaimed water, water reuse is often not considered in the development of urban water management plans. This study develops a simulation model for understanding community opinion dynamics surrounding the issue of water reuse, and how individual perceptions evolve within that context, which can help in the planning and decision-making process. Based on the social amplification of risk framework, our agent-based model simulates consumer perceptions, discussion patterns, and their adoption or rejection of water reuse. The model is based on the "risk publics" model, an empirical approach that uses the concept of belief clusters to explain the adoption of new technology. Each household is represented as an agent, and parameters that define their behavior and attributes are defined from survey data. Community-level parameters-including social groups, relationships, and communication variables, also from survey data-are encoded to simulate the social processes that influence community opinion. The model demonstrates its capabilities to simulate opinion dynamics and consumer adoption of water reuse. In addition, based on empirical data, the model is applied to investigate water reuse behavior in different regions of the United States. Importantly, our results reveal that public opinion dynamics emerge differently based on membership in opinion clusters, frequency of discussion, and the structure of social networks. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  15. The Role of Demand Response in Reducing Water-Related Power Plant Vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macknick, J.; Brinkman, G.; Zhou, E.; O'Connell, M.; Newmark, R. L.; Miara, A.; Cohen, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The electric sector depends on readily available water supplies for reliable and efficient operation. Elevated water temperatures or low water levels can trigger regulatory or plant-level decisions to curtail power generation, which can affect system cost and reliability. In the past decade, dozens of power plants in the U.S. have curtailed generation due to water temperatures and water shortages. Curtailments occur during the summer, when temperatures are highest and there is greatest demand for electricity. Climate change could alter the availability and temperature of water resources, exacerbating these issues. Constructing alternative cooling systems to address vulnerabilities can be capital intensive and can also affect power plant efficiencies. Demand response programs are being implemented by electric system planners and operators to reduce and shift electricity demands from peak usage periods to other times of the day. Demand response programs can also play a role in reducing water-related power sector vulnerabilities during summer months. Traditionally, production cost modeling and demand response analyses do not include water resources. In this effort, we integrate an electricity production cost modeling framework with water-related impacts on power plants in a test system to evaluate the impacts of demand response measures on power system costs and reliability. Specifically, we i) quantify the cost and reliability implications of incorporating water resources into production cost modeling, ii) evaluate the impacts of demand response measures on reducing system costs and vulnerabilities, and iii) consider sensitivity analyses with cooling systems to highlight a range of potential benefits of demand response measures. Impacts from climate change on power plant performance and water resources are discussed. Results provide key insights to policymakers and practitioners for reducing water-related power plant vulnerabilities via lower cost methods.

  16. Can a New Antiseptic Agent Reduce the Bacterial Colonization Rate of Central Venous Lines in Post- Cardiac Surgery Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Yousefshahi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Central venous (CV catheters play an essential role in the management of critically ill patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. CV lines are, however, allied to catheter-associated blood stream infections. Bacterial colonization of CV lines is deemed the main cause of catheter-associated infection. The purpose of our study was to compare bacterial colony counts in the catheter site before CV line insertion in two groups of post-cardiac surgery patients: a group receiving Sanosil (an antiseptic agent composed of H2 O2 and silver and a control group.Methods: This interventional prospective double-blinded clinical trial recruited the patients in three post-cardiac surgeryICUs of a heart center. The participants were divided into interventional (113 patients and control (136 patients groups. Sanosil was added to the routine preparation procedure (Chlorhexidine bath one day before and scrub with Povidone-Iodine just before the CV line insertion. After the removal of the CV lines, the catheters tips were sent for culture and evaluation of colony counts.Results: Catheter colonization occurred in 55 (22.1% patients: 26 (23% patients in the Sanosil group and 29 (21.3% in the control group; there was no significant statistical difference between the two groups (p value = 0.75, RR = 1.05, 95%CI:0.76-1.45. The most common organism having colonized in the cultures of the catheter tips was staphylococcus epidermis:20 cases in the control group and 16 cases in the intervention group.Conclusion: Catheter colonization frequently occurs in post-cardiac surgery patients. However, our results did not indicate the effectiveness of adding Sanosil to the routine preparation procedure with respect to reducing catheter bacterial colonization.

  17. Comparison of Binding Affinities of Water-Soluble Calixarenes with the Organophosphorus Nerve Agent Soman (GD and Commonly-Used Nerve Agent Simulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne A. Ede

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of inclusion complexes of the water-soluble p-sulfonatocalix[n]arenes, where n = 4 or 6, with the Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA GD, or Soman, and commonly used dialkyl methylphosphonate simulants has been studied by experimental solution NMR methods and by Molecular Mechanics (MMFF and semi-empirical (PM6 calculations. Complex formation in non-buffered and buffered solutions is driven by the hydrophobic effect, and complex stoichiometry determined as 1:1 for all host:guest pairs. Low affinity complexes (Kassoc < 100 M−1 are observed for all guests, attributed to poor host–guest complementarity and the role of buffer cation species accounts for the low affinity of the complexes. Comparison of CWA and simulant behavior adds to understanding of CWA–simulant correlations and the challenges of simulant selection.

  18. Morphological plasticity of root growth under mild water stress increases water use efficiency without reducing yield in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Cai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A large yield gap exists in rain-fed maize (Zea mays L. production in semi-arid regions, mainly caused by frequent droughts halfway through the crop-growing period due to uneven distribution of rainfall. It is questionable whether irrigation systems are economically required in such a region since the total amount of rainfall does generally meet crop requirements. This study aimed to quantitatively determine the effects of water stress from jointing to grain filling on root and shoot growth and the consequences for maize grain yield, above- and below-ground dry matter, water uptake (WU and water use efficiency (WUE. Pot experiments were conducted in 2014 and 2015 with a mobile rain shelter to achieve conditions of no, mild or severe water stress. Maize yield was not affected by mild water stress over 2 years, while severe stress reduced yield by 56 %. Both water stress levels decreased root biomass slightly but shoot biomass substantially. Mild water stress decreased root length but increased root diameter, resulting in no effect on root surface area. Due to the morphological plasticity in root growth and the increase in root ∕ shoot ratio, WU under water stress was decreased, and overall WUE for both above-ground dry matter and grain yield increased. Our results demonstrate that an irrigation system might be not economically and ecologically necessary because the frequently occurring mild water stress did not reduce crop yield much. The study helps us to understand crop responses to water stress during a critical water-sensitive period (middle of the crop-growing season and to mitigate drought risk in dry-land agriculture.

  19. Morphological plasticity of root growth under mild water stress increases water use efficiency without reducing yield in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qian; Zhang, Yulong; Sun, Zhanxiang; Zheng, Jiaming; Bai, Wei; Zhang, Yue; Liu, Yang; Feng, Liangshan; Feng, Chen; Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Ning; Evers, Jochem B.; Zhang, Lizhen

    2017-08-01

    A large yield gap exists in rain-fed maize (Zea mays L.) production in semi-arid regions, mainly caused by frequent droughts halfway through the crop-growing period due to uneven distribution of rainfall. It is questionable whether irrigation systems are economically required in such a region since the total amount of rainfall does generally meet crop requirements. This study aimed to quantitatively determine the effects of water stress from jointing to grain filling on root and shoot growth and the consequences for maize grain yield, above- and below-ground dry matter, water uptake (WU) and water use efficiency (WUE). Pot experiments were conducted in 2014 and 2015 with a mobile rain shelter to achieve conditions of no, mild or severe water stress. Maize yield was not affected by mild water stress over 2 years, while severe stress reduced yield by 56 %. Both water stress levels decreased root biomass slightly but shoot biomass substantially. Mild water stress decreased root length but increased root diameter, resulting in no effect on root surface area. Due to the morphological plasticity in root growth and the increase in root / shoot ratio, WU under water stress was decreased, and overall WUE for both above-ground dry matter and grain yield increased. Our results demonstrate that an irrigation system might be not economically and ecologically necessary because the frequently occurring mild water stress did not reduce crop yield much. The study helps us to understand crop responses to water stress during a critical water-sensitive period (middle of the crop-growing season) and to mitigate drought risk in dry-land agriculture.

  20. Ongoing Research on Herding Agents for In Situ Burning in Arctic Waters: Studies on Fate and Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Gustavson, Kim; Wegeberg, Susse

    surface, and only small concentrations of herders were found in the water column (0.2-22.8 mg/L). The inherent properties of herders in relation to toxicity and bioaccumulation on the high Arctic copepods (Calanus hyperboreus), as well as the biodegradability of herders were studied under arctic......Research on the fate and effects of herding agents used to contain and thicken oil slicks for in situ burning in Arctic waters continues under the auspices of the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers Arctic Oil Spill Response Technology – Joint Industry Program (JIP). In 2014....../2015 laboratory studies were conducted on the fate and effects of herders. The purpose of the studies was to improve the knowledge base used to evaluate the environmental risk of using herders in connection with in situ burning for oil spill response in Arctic seas. Two herding agents were studied (OP 40...

  1. Assessing the value of cooperation and information exchange in large water resources systems by agent-based optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, M.; Castelletti, A.

    2013-07-01

    Many large-scale water resources systems, especially in transboundary contexts, are characterized by the presence of several and conflicting interests and managed by multiple, institutionally independent decision makers. These systems are often studied adopting a centralized approach based on the assumption of full cooperation and information exchange among the involved parties. Such a perspective is conceptually interesting to quantify the best achievable performance but might have little practical impact given the real political and institutional setting. In this work, we propose a novel decision-analytic framework based on multiagent systems to model and analyze different levels of cooperation and information exchange among multiple decision makers. The Zambezi River basin is used as a case study. According to the proposed agent-based optimization approach, each agent represents a decision maker, whose decisions are defined by an explicit optimization problem considering only the agent's local interests. The economic value of information exchange is estimated comparing a noncooperative setting, where agents act independently, with the first basic level of cooperation, i.e., coordination, characterized by full information exchange. The economic value of cooperation is also estimated by comparison with the ideal, fully cooperative management of the system. Results show that coordination, obtained with complete information exchange, allows the downstream agents to better adapt to the upstream behaviors. The impact of information exchange depends on the objective considered, and we show coordination to be particularly beneficial to environmental interests.

  2. Efficacy of reducing agent and surfactant contacting pattern on the performance characteristics of nickel electroless plating baths coupled with and without ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amrita; Pujari, Murali; Uppaluri, Ramgopal; Verma, Anil

    2014-07-01

    This article addresses furthering the role of sonication for the optimal fabrication of nickel ceramic composite membranes using electroless plating. Deliberating upon process modifications for surfactant induced electroless plating (SIEP) and combined surfactant and sonication induced electroless plating (SSOEP), this article highlights a novel method of contacting of the reducing agent and surfactant to the conventional electroless nickel plating baths. Rigorous experimental investigations indicated that the combination of ultrasound (in degas mode), surfactant and reducing agent pattern had a profound influence in altering the combinatorial plating characteristics. For comparison purpose, purely surfactant induced nickel ELP baths have also been investigated. These novel insights consolidate newer research horizons for the role of ultrasound to achieve dense metal ceramic composite membranes in a shorter span of total plating time. Surface and physical characterizations were carried out using BET, FTIR, XRD, FESEM and nitrogen permeation experiments. It has been analyzed that the SSOEP baths provided maximum ratio of percent pore densification per unit metal film thickness (PPDδ) and hold the key for further fine tuning of the associated degrees of freedom. On the other hand SIEP baths provided lower (PPDδ) ratio but higher PPD. For SSOEP baths with dropwise reducing agent and bulk surfactant, the PPD and metal film thickness values were 73.4% and 8.4 μm which varied to 66.9% and 13.3 μm for dropwise reducing agent and drop surfactant case. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of reducing agents on the electronic, magnetic and electrocatalytic properties of thiol-capped Pt/Co and Pt/Ni nanoparticles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathe, NR

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The electronic, magnetic and electrocatalytic properties of bimetallic thiol-capped Pt/Co and Pt/Ni nanoparticles were synthesised using two reducing agents, NaBH(sub4) and N(sub2)H(sub4). X-ray diffraction analysis of the nanoparticles showed Pt...

  4. Formation and growth of palladium nanoparticles inside porous poly(4-vinyl-pyridine) monitored by operando techniques : The role of different reducing agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazzarini, Andrea; Groppo, Elena; Agostini, Giovanni; Borfecchia, Elisa; Giannici, Francesco; Portale, Giuseppe; Longo, Alessandro; Pellegrini, Riccardo; Lamberti, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    In this work we followed the formation of palladium nanoparticles, starting from palladium (II) acetate precursor, inside a poly(4-vinylpyridine-co-divinylbenzene) polymer in presence of different reducing agents. The formation and growth of palladium nanoparticles in presence of H-2 was followed as

  5. Blue Planet dialysis: novel water-sparing strategies for reducing dialysate flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molano-Triviño, Alejandra; Wancjer, Benjamin; Neri, Mauro M; Karopadi, Akash N; Rosner, Mitchell; Ronco, Claudio

    2017-11-08

    Hemodialysis (HD) is an expensive therapy in economic and in ecological terms, owing to a high carbon footprint and significant consumption of natural sources, especially water. Our aim was to review strategies to diminish waste of water in maintenance dialysis, exploring previously described water reuse trends and less known strategies for reducing the dialysate flow. We conducted a systematic review of water-sparing strategies, including the reuse of reverse osmosis rejected water and the reduction of dialysate flux. We performed a search in Medline, Pubmed, Scielo, OVID and Biblioteca Redentor, using key words: Dialysate flow rate, Dialysate flux, and decrease; excluding: online, peritoneal, continuous, blood access, needle, hemodiafiltration, acute, pharmacokinetics, increase. We limited our search to adult humans or in vitro trials in English, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese, between January 1980 and June 2017. We found 816 trials. 37 articles were retrieved for review, and 11 articles were analyzed. Conservation of water in chronic HD should be considered an important responsibility of healthcare practitioners all over the world. We present a wider usage of dialysate flow rates, considering that it would lead to significant water conservation without much compromise on dialysis efficacy in small patients. We believe that further investigation into the utility of reduced dialysate flux in different populations is needed to broaden our understanding of how we can use these techniques in order to significantly reduce water consumption during chronic HD while still ensuring optimum efficacy and efficiency of the therapy.

  6. An upper-bound assessment of the benefits of reducing perchlorate in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, Randall

    2014-10-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency plans to issue new federal regulations to limit drinking water concentrations of perchlorate, which occurs naturally and results from the combustion of rocket fuel. This article presents an upper-bound estimate of the potential benefits of alternative maximum contaminant levels for perchlorate in drinking water. The results suggest that the economic benefits of reducing perchlorate concentrations in drinking water are likely to be low, i.e., under $2.9 million per year nationally, for several reasons. First, the prevalence of detectable perchlorate in public drinking water systems is low. Second, the population especially sensitive to effects of perchlorate, pregnant women who are moderately iodide deficient, represents a minority of all pregnant women. Third, and perhaps most importantly, reducing exposure to perchlorate in drinking water is a relatively ineffective way of increasing iodide uptake, a crucial step linking perchlorate to health effects of concern. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  7. Photostability and phytotoxicity of selected sunscreen agents and their degradation mixtures in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodil, Rosario; Moeder, Monika; Altenburger, Rolf; Schmitt-Jansen, Mechthild

    2009-11-01

    confirmed that sunlight can account noticeably for decontamination and detoxification of contaminated water. However, due to its potential accumulation in combination with a specific mode of action, BP-3 may imply probable environmental risks at least to algae. This study emphasizes the need of a combined chemical and toxicological evaluation for a reliable risk assessment concerning degradation processes exemplified here for UV-protecting agents.

  8. Impact of the Microstructure of Polymer Drag Reducer on Slick-Water Fracturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yu Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have focused on the drag reduction performance of slick-water, but the microdrag reduction mechanism remains unclear since the microstructure of the drag reducer and its effect on this mechanism have not been well studied. In this study, the microstructure of the drag reducer in slick-water was effectively characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The viscoelasticity and drag reduction performance of the drag reducer with different microstructures were then investigated. Further, the effects of the microstructure of the drag reducer on the viscoelasticity and drag reduction performance of slick-water were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the viscoelasticity of slick-water is governed by the microstructure of the drag reducer, which exhibits a network structure. In addition, the drag reduction performance is related to the viscoelasticity. At low flow rates, the drag reduction performance is dominantly influenced by viscosity, whereas, at high flow rates, it is governed mainly by elasticity. Furthermore, the drag reducer with a uniformly distributed network structure exhibits the most stable drag reduction performance. This drag reducer was used in a field test and the obtained results were consistent with those of a laboratory experiment.

  9. Can Mobile-Enabled Payment Methods Reduce Petty Corruption in Urban Water Provision?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Krolikowski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Corruption in the urban water sector constrains economic growth and human development in low-income countries. This paper empirically evaluates the ability of novel mobile-enabled payment methods to reduce information asymmetries and mitigate petty corruption in the urban water sector’s billing and payment processes. Overcoming these barriers may promote improved governance and water service delivery. The case of Dar es Salaam is used to explore the role of mobile-enabled payment instruments through the use of a stratified random sample of 1097 water utility customers and 42 interviews with representatives from the water sector, the telecommunications industry, civil society, and banking institutions. Results show that mobile-enabled payment methods can reduce information asymmetries and the incidence of petty corruption to promote improved financial management by making payment data more transparent and limiting the availability of economic rents in the billing and payment process. Implications for African urban water services include wider availability and more effective use of human and financial resources. These can be used to enhance water service delivery and citizen participation in the production of urban water supplies. The use of mobile-enabled payment methods in the urban water sector represents an application of mobile communication technologies in a low-income country with proven potential for scalability that simultaneously supports the achievement of development objectives.

  10. Research on removing reservoir core water sensitivity using the method of ultrasound-chemical agent for enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenjun; Huang, Jiehao

    2018-04-01

    The phenomenon of water sensitivity often occurs in the oil reservoir core during the process of crude oil production, which seriously affects the efficiency of oil extraction. In recent years, near-well ultrasonic processing technology attaches more attention due to its safety and energy efficient. In this paper, the comparison of removing core water sensitivity by ultrasonic wave, chemical injection and ultrasound-chemical combination technique are investigated through experiments. Results show that: lower ultrasonic frequency and higher power can improve the efficiency of core water sensitivity removal; the effects of removing core water sensitivity under ultrasonic treatment get better with increase of core initial permeability; the effect of removing core water sensitivity using ultrasonic treatment won't get better over time. Ultrasonic treatment time should be controlled in a reasonable range; the effect of removing core water sensitivity using chemical agent alone is slightly better than that using ultrasonic treatment, however, chemical injection could be replaced by ultrasonic treatment for removing core water sensitivity from the viewpoint of oil reservoir protection and the sustainable development of oil field; ultrasound-chemical combination technique has the best effect for water sensitivity removal than using ultrasonic treatment or chemical injection alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic water stress reduces tree growth and the carbon sink of deciduous hardwood forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, Edward R; Dragoni, Danilo; Schmid, Hans Peter; Rahman, Abdullah F; Sims, Daniel; Wayson, Craig A; Johnson, Daniel J; Phillips, Richard P

    2014-08-01

    Predicted decreases in water availability across the temperate forest biome have the potential to offset gains in carbon (C) uptake from phenology trends, rising atmospheric CO2 , and nitrogen deposition. While it is well established that severe droughts reduce the C sink of forests by inducing tree mortality, the impacts of mild but chronic water stress on forest phenology and physiology are largely unknown. We quantified the C consequences of chronic water stress using a 13-year record of tree growth (n = 200 trees), soil moisture, and ecosystem C balance at the Morgan-Monroe State Forest (MMSF) in Indiana, and a regional 11-year record of tree growth (n > 300 000 trees) and water availability for the 20 most dominant deciduous broadleaf tree species across the eastern and midwestern USA. We show that despite ~26 more days of C assimilation by trees at the MMSF, increasing water stress decreased the number of days of wood production by ~42 days over the same period, reducing the annual accrual of C in woody biomass by 41%. Across the deciduous forest region, water stress induced similar declines in tree growth, particularly for water-demanding 'mesophytic' tree species. Given the current replacement of water-stress adapted 'xerophytic' tree species by mesophytic tree species, we estimate that chronic water stress has the potential to decrease the C sink of deciduous forests by up to 17% (0.04 Pg C yr(-1) ) in the coming decades. This reduction in the C sink due to mesophication and chronic water stress is equivalent to an additional 1-3 days of global C emissions from fossil fuel burning each year. Collectively, our results indicate that regional declines in water availability may offset the growth-enhancing effects of other global changes and reduce the extent to which forests ameliorate climate warming. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Agent Building Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    AgentBuilder is a software component developed under an SBIR contract between Reticular Systems, Inc., and Goddard Space Flight Center. AgentBuilder allows software developers without experience in intelligent agent technologies to easily build software applications using intelligent agents. Agents are components of software that will perform tasks automatically, with no intervention or command from a user. AgentBuilder reduces the time and cost of developing agent systems and provides a simple mechanism for implementing high-performance agent systems.

  13. Effect of reduced water activity and reduced matric potential on the germination of xerophilic and non-xerophilic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yang; Begum, Mariam; Chapman, Belinda; Hocking, Ailsa D

    2010-05-30

    Reduction in water activity (a(w)) is used as a microbiological hurdle to prevent food spoilage. To minimize the levels of salt and sugar, which are commonly used to reduce a(w), the potential of food structure as a microbiological hurdle needs to be assessed. The concept of matric potential (Psi(m)) is used to measure the effect of food structure on water movement. This study reports the effect of reduced a(w) and reduced Psi(m) on the germination of xerophilic fungi (represented by Eurotium herbariorum) and non-xerophilic fungi (represented by Aspergillus niger) on model glycerol agar media. Germination curves were plotted with the percentage of germinated spores against time. The germination time (t(G)), which is defined as the time at which 50% of the total viable spores have germinated, was estimated using the Gompertz model. Total viable spores was defined as those spores that were able to germinate under the optimum a(w) and Psi(m) conditions for each species, i.e. 0.95 a(w) and 2.5% agar for E. herbariorum and 0.98 a(w) and 2.5% agar for A. niger. As a(w) decreased from 0.90 to 0.85 a(w), t(G) increased significantly for both the xerophilic fungi and non-xerophilic species at equivalent matric potential values. When matric potential was reduced from -12 kPa (2.5% agar) to -38 kPa (12.5% agar), t(G) of A. niger was significantly extended at 0.90 a(w); however, t(G) remained the same for A. niger at 0.85 a(w), and for E. herbariorum at 0.80, 0.85 and 0.90 a(w). This study demonstrated that the germination time for non-xerophilic and xerophilic fungi was extended by reduced a(w), however the effect of reduced Psi(m) was limited. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of anti-caking agent on the water sorption isotherm and flow-ability properties of vacuum dried honey powder

    OpenAIRE

    Nurhadi, Bambang; Roos, Yrjö H.

    2017-01-01

    Honey powder is a hygroscopic powder due to its composition and structure. The addition of anti-caking agent was aimed to increase the stability of honey powder. The present study aimed to study the influence of anti-caking agent on the water sorption isotherm and flow-ability properties of vacuum dried honey powder. Anti-caking agents, calcium silicate and calcium stearate, were added in honey powder. The addition of anti-caking agent influenced water sorption and flow-ability properties of ...

  15. Green mediated synthesis and characterization of ZnO nanoparticles using Euphorbia Jatropa latex as reducing agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Geetha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Presently the progress of green chemistry in the synthesis of nanoparticles with the use of plants has engrossed a great attention. This study reports the synthesis of ZnO using latex of Euphorbia Jatropa as reducing agent. As prepared product was characterized by powder X-ray diffractometer (PXRD, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy–energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM–EDS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS, Rietveld refinement, UV–Visible spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL. The concentration of plant latex plays an important role in controlling the size of the particle and its morphology. PXRD graphs showed the well crystallisation of the particles. The average particle size was calculated using Scherrer equation and advanced Williamson Hall (WH plots. The average particle size was around 15 nm. This result was also supported by SEM and TEM analyses. FTIR shows the characteristic peak of ZnO at 435 cm−1. SEM and TEM micrographs show that the particles were almost hexagonal in nature. EDS of SEM analysis confirmed that the elements are only Zn and O. EDS confirmed purity of ZnO. Atomic states were confirmed by XPS results. Crystal parameters were determined using Rietveld refinement. From UV–Visible spectra average energy gap was calculated which is ∼3.63 eV. PL studies showed UV emission peak at 392 nm and broad band visible emission centred in the range 500–600 nm. The Commission International de I'Eclairage and colour correlated temperature coordinates were estimated for ZnO prepared using 2 ml, 4 ml and 6 ml Jatropa latex. The results indicate that the phosphor may be suitable for white light emitting diode (WLED. The study fruitfully reveals simple, fast, economical and eco friendly method of synthesis of multifunctional ZnO nanoparticles (Nps.

  16. [Drinking water regulations in Ukraine and infectious morbidity rate with water pathway of transmission of causative agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmasheva, E V; Korchak, G I; Mikhienkova, A I; Nikonova, N A; Rosada, M A

    2013-01-01

    These are presented drinking water regulations in Ukraine on microbiological indices in the new state document "Hygienic Drinking water regulations intended for human consumption" (State sanitary regulations and standards (GsanPiN) 2.2.4-171-10). There is reported an analysis of both the open waterbodies water quality and water for centralized water supply in 2007-2011 and 1992-1996 also on sanitary-bacteriological indices for performance of comparative retrospective analysis. There has been shown water quality degradation for open waterbodies, the main sources of water supply for population. Against this background, a marked improvement of drinking water quality has been noted, the number of non-standard samples decreased to 3.6 % compared with 8.8% in the preceding 15 years. This index correlates with a decrease in the number of outbreaks of infections transmitted by water. There was noted unsatisfactory registration of viral infections with water pathway of transmission and the increase in morbidity rate of gastroenterocolitides of unknown etiology that may include acute viral intestinal infections. Expediency to keep "fermentation of glucose" test in bacteriological examination of water in the identification scheme of general coliforms has been substantiated.

  17. Water-soluble organo-building blocks of aminoclay as a soil-flushing agent for heavy metal contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Chul [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (BK21 program), KAIST, 335 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Jung [Advanced Biomass R and D Center, KAIST, 291 Daehakno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Dong Ah [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (BK21 program), KAIST, 335 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Ji-Won, E-mail: jiwonyang@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (BK21 program), KAIST, 335 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Biomass R and D Center, KAIST, 291 Daehakno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aminoclays have synthesized using centered metals with aminopropyl silane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developed aminoclay has unique nano-sized and water-soluble properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aminoclay showed high heavy metal capacity with metal ions and its less toxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aminoclay could be used to remediate heavy metals from soils an alternative soil-flushing agent. - Abstract: We demonstrated that water-soluble aminopropyl magnesium functionalized phyllosilicate could be used as a soil-flushing agent for heavy metal contaminated soils. Soil flushing has been an attractive means to remediate heavy metal contamination because it is less disruptive to the soil environment after the treatment was performed. However, development of efficient and non-toxic soil-flushing agents is still required. We have synthesized aminoclays with three different central metal ions such as magnesium, aluminum, and ferric ions and investigated applicability of aminoclays as soil flushing agents. Among them, magnesium (Mg)-centered aminoclay showed the smallest size distribution and superior water solubility, up to 100 mg/mL. Mg aminoclay exhibited cadmium and lead binding capacity of 26.50 and 91.31 mg/g of Mg clay, respectively, at near neutral pH, but it showed negligible binding affinity to metals in acidic conditions. For soil flushing with Mg clay at neutral pH showed cadmium and lead were efficiently extracted from soils by Mg clay, suggesting strong binding ability of Mg clay with cadmium and lead. As the organic matter and clay compositions increased in the soil, the removal efficiency by Mg clay decreased and the operation time increased.

  18. Heavy Water Reduces GFP Expression in Prokaryotic Cell-Free Assays at the Translation Level While Stimulating Its Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa S. Hohlefelder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro proliferation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells is remarkably hampered in the presence of heavy water (D2O. Impairment of gene expression at the transcription or translation level can be the base for this effect. However, insights into the underlying mechanisms are lacking. Here, we employ a cell-free expression system for the quantitative analysis of the effect of increasing percentages of D2O on the kinetics of in-vitro GFP expression. Experiments are designed to discriminate the rates of transcription, translation, and protein folding using pDNA and mRNA vectors, respectively. We find that D2O significantly stimulates GFP expression at the transcription level but acts as a suppressor at translation and maturation (folding in a linear dose-dependent manner. At a D2O concentration of 60%, the GFP expression rate was reduced to 40% of an undisturbed sample. We observed a similar inhibition of GFP expression by D2O in a recombinant Escherichia coli strain, although the inhibitory effect is less pronounced. These results demonstrate the suitability of cell-free systems for quantifying the impact of heavy water on gene expression and establish a platform to further assess the potential therapeutic use of heavy water as antiproliferative agent.

  19. The effect of disinfectant agents in eliminating the contamination of dental unit water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Kulak, Y; Kazazoglu, E

    High concentrations of water-borne organisms cause multiple public health problems. Contamination of water exiting the dental unit water lines could be inhibited with the use of some disinfectants. The purpose of this investigation was to establish the effect of two disinfectants and to test their

  20. Removal of sulphates from waste waters by sulphate-reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luptáková Alena

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available are present in almost all types of water, usually as a simple anion SO42-. The sulphates together with hydrogencarbonates and chlorides are principal anions in natural waters. In typical underground and surface waters, the concentration of sulphates is in the range from ten to hundreds milligrams per litre.Nowadays, the importance of the control of sulphate concentration in waste waters increases. According to the Slovak legislation the limit concentration of sulphates in surface and drinking waters is 250 mg.l-1 . In rivers the contents of sulphates increases mainly by the discharge of waste waters, which are coming mainly from chemical, textile, metallurgical, pharmaceutical, paper and mining industry. The concentration of sulphates in these waters is in the order of grams per litre.Many technologies for the sulphates removal from waste waters exist, including biologico-chemical processes. The principle of one of these methods is the reduction of sulphates by sulphate-reducing bacteria to hydrogen-sulphide.The objective of this work was to study the effect of initial sulphates concentration on the activity of anaerobic sulphate reducers as well as the kinetics of the anaerobic sulphate reduction. The batch reactor was used at temperature of 30°C and pH 7,5. Lactate was used as the carbon source.

  1. Investigation of water washes suitable for very small meat plants to reduce pathogens on beef surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Sally Flowers; Henning, William R; Mills, Edward W; Doores, Stephanie; Ostiguy, Nancy; Cutter, Catherine N

    2010-05-01

    Water washing with a handheld hose was performed on beef surfaces to ascertain the most effective combination of methods needed to remove potentially harmful microorganisms. For these experiments, beef brisket surfaces were experimentally inoculated with a fecal slurry containing Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Campylobacter coli, and Campylobacter jejuni. In a pilot study, surfaces were washed with cold water (15 degrees C) at various water pressures, spray distances, application times, and drip times, and remaining bacterial populations were determined following the enumeration and isolation of pathogens and naturally occurring hygiene indicators (mesophilic aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and E. coli). The most efficacious combinations of these washing conditions were applied subsequently to artificially contaminated beef brisket surfaces in conjunction with hot (77 degrees C), warm (54 degrees C), and additional cold (15 degrees C) water washes. In the cold water washing pilot study, combinations of physical washing conditions significantly reduced all bacterial populations (P water washing; E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium were reduced by 3.8 and 4.1 log CFU/cm(2), respectively. Overall, higher water temperature, longer application times, and shorter spray distances more effectively removed pathogens from inoculated beef surfaces. These findings will be used to formulate water washing recommendations for very small meat processing establishments.

  2. Increased water intake to reduce headache: Learning from a critical appraisal

    OpenAIRE

    Price, A.; Burls, A

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Bottom Line\\ud Water intake is a cost effective, non-invasive and low-risk intervention to reduce or prevent headache pain. Rationale: Chronic mild dehydration may trigger headache. Increased water intake could help. A small trial shows modest benefit; however, a larger methodologically sound randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm efficacy.\\ud \\ud Critically Appraised Paper\\ud Spigt, M., Weerkamp, N., Troost, J., van Schayck, C. P., & Knottnerus, J. A. (2012). ‘A randomized...

  3. Interest (mis)alignments in representative negotiations: Do pro-social agents fuel or reduce inter-group conflict?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaldering, H.; Greer, L.L.; van Kleef, G.A.; de Dreu, C.K.W.

    2013-01-01

    In representative negotiations, interests of the representative and the represented constituency are not always aligned. We investigated how interest (mis)alignment and representative’s social value orientation influence representative negotiations. Past theory and research on the principal-agent

  4. Comparison of mine water neutralisation efficiencies of different alkaline generating agents

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available generating agents for acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment. To fulfil the goals of this study, a comparative study was undertaken using limestone, lime, hydrated lime, magnesite, periclase, brucite, soda ash and caustic soda. Bench scale laboratory studies were...

  5. The tick biocontrol agent Metarhizium brunneum (= M. anisopliae (strain F52 does not reduce non-target arthropods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya R Fischhoff

    Full Text Available Previous studies have found that Met52®, which contains the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium brunneum, is effective in reducing the abundance of Ixodes scapularis, the tick vector for the bacterium causing Lyme disease and for other tick-borne pathogens. Given widespread interest in effective, safe methods for controlling ticks, Met52 has the potential to be used at increasing scales. The non-target impacts of Met52, as applied for tick control, have not yet been assessed. A Before-After-Control-Impact experiment was conducted to assess the effects of Met52 on non-target arthropods in lawn and forest habitats typical of residential yards. Ground-dwelling arthropods were collected using bulk sampling of soil and litter, and pitfall sampling. Arthropods were sampled once before and twice after treatment of plots with either Met52 or water (control. Multivariate general linear models were used to jointly model the abundance of arthropod orders. For each sampling method and post-spray sampling occasion, Akaike Information Criterion values were used to compare the fits of two alternative models: one that included effects of period (before vs. after spray, habitat (lawn vs. forest, and treatment (Met52 vs. control, versus a nested null model that included effects of period, and habitat, but no treatment effect. The null model was consistently better supported by the data. Significant effects were found of period and habitat but not treatment. Retrospective power analysis indicated the study had 80% power to detect a 50% reduction in arthropod abundance, as measured by bulk samples taken before versus one week after treatment. The deployment of Met52 in suburban settings is unlikely to cause meaningful reductions in the abundance of non-target arthropods.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Study of Water Entry Supercavity Influenced by Turbulent Drag-Reducing Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Xing Jiang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The configurational and dynamic characteristics of water entry supercavities influenced by turbulent drag-reducing additives were studied through supercavitating projectile approach, experimentally and numerically. The projectile was projected vertically into water and aqueous solution of CTAC with weight concentrations of 100, 500, and 1000 ppm, respectively, using a pneumatic nail gun. The trajectories of the projectile and the supercavity configuration were recorded by a high-speed CCD camera. Besides, water entry supercavities in water and CTAC solution were numerically simulated based on unsteady RANS scheme, together with application of VOF multiphase model. The Cross viscosity model was adopted to represent the fluid property of CTAC solution. It was obtained that the numerical simulation results are in consistence with experimental data. Numerical and experimental results all show that the length and diameter of supercavity in drag-reducing solution are larger than those in water, and the drag coefficient is smaller than that in water; the maintaining time of supercavity is longer in solution as well. The surface tension plays an important role in maintaining the cavity. Turbulent drag-reducing additives have the potential in enhancement of supercavitation and drag reduction.

  7. The Effect of Hydrogen Sulfide Concentration on Gel as Water Shutoff Agent Effet de la concentration en sulfure d'hydrogène sur un gel utilisé en tant qu'agent de traitement des venues d'eaux

    OpenAIRE

    You Q.; Mu L.; Wang Y.; Zhao F.

    2011-01-01

    For drilling and water shutoff of oil and gas reservoirs containing hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the effects of H2S on widely used gel as water shutoff agents are studied. The gels include Na2Cr2O7/Na2SO3/HPAM gel, Na2Cr2O7/(NH2)2CS/HPAM gel, Cr(III)-acetate & Cr(III)-lactate/HPAM gel and phenol formaldehyde resin/HPAM gel. The results show that: for Na2Cr2O7/Na2SO3/HPAM gel and Na2Cr2O7/(NH2)2CS/HPAM gel, the H2S as reducing agent (the reducibility is more efficient than that of Na2SO3a...

  8. Evidence for a specific interaction of vitronectin with arginine: effects of reducing agents on the expression of functional domains and immunoepitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, D; Wagner, N V

    1997-04-01

    Vitronectin (Vn) circulates in plasma primarily in the native, monomeric form, whereas platelet-associated Vn in conformationally altered and multimeric. Here, we report that denatured Vn specifically binds to L-Arg, whereas the L-Arg binding site is cryptic in the native form of Vn. In addition, combined treatment of disulfide-linked Vn multimers with L-Arg, urea, and reducing agent results in the formation of disperse oligomers with reduced expression of denaturation-sensitive epitopes. These results suggest that L-Arg modulates the partitioning between monomeric and multimeric Vn species and that L-Arg affinity chromatography can be employed to test for exposure of conformationally sensitive binding sites in Vn. The effects of denaturation on the exposure of conformationally sensitive epitopes in the N-terminus of Vn is controversial. Treatment of Vn with reducing agents abolished type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor and antibody binding to the highly disulfide-linked N-terminal somatomedin B domain (amino acids 1 to 51), whereas epitopes located in the connecting region/first hemopexin-like repeat (amino acids 52 to 239) and the glycosaminoglycan binding domain (amino acids 343-379) were not affected. These observations indicate that appropriate disulfide-linkage of the N-terminal somatomedin B domain is required for ligand binding and that published differences on the effects of denaturation on the expression of binding sites are probably due to the use of reducing agents in the denaturation process.

  9. Impact of Acid-Reducing Agents on the Pharmacokinetics of Palbociclib, a Weak Base With pH-Dependent Solubility, With Different Food Intake Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wan; Klamerus, Karen J; Yuhas, Lisa M; Pawlak, Sylvester; Plotka, Anna; O'Gorman, Melissa; Kirkovsky, Leonid; Kosa, Maha; Wang, Diane

    2017-11-01

    Palbociclib free base capsule is a weak base drug with highly pH-dependent solubility. In vitro and in vivo studies evaluated the impact of acid-reducing agents on exposure of palbociclib and determined whether the impact, if any, can be mitigated by food. A drug-drug interaction study (study 1) was conducted first under fasted conditions and showed that coadministration of multiple doses of the proton-pump inhibitor rabeprazole substantially reduced palbociclib mean area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity and maximum observed plasma concentration by 62% and 80%, respectively. In vitro assessment suggested that the presence of bile salt mixed micelles to mimic the fed state can significantly enhance the solubility of palbociclib. Subsequently, study 2 was conducted under fed conditions and demonstrated that coadministration of rabeprazole decreased palbociclib maximum observed plasma concentration by 41% but had limited impact on area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to infinity (13% decrease). This study also showed that the histamine-2 receptor antagonist famotidine and local antacid with staggered dosing had no impact on palbociclib exposure under fed conditions. Food intake effectively mitigated the impact of acid-reducing agents on palbociclib exposure. Palbociclib free base capsule should be taken with food, and acid-reducing agent use does not need to be avoided. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  10. Agricultural implications of reduced water supplies in the Green and Upper Yellowstone River Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansford, R. R.; Roach, F.; Gollehon, N. R.; Creel, B. J.

    1982-02-01

    The growth of the energy sector in the energy-rich but water-restricted Western US has presented a potential conflict with the irrigated agricultural sector. This study measures the direct impacts on farm income and employment resulting from the transfer of water from agriculture to energy in two specific geographical areas - the Green and Upper Yellowstone River Basins. We used a linear programming model to evaluate the impacts of reduced water supplies. Through the use of regional multipliers, we expanded our analysis to include regional impacts. Volume I provides the major analysis of these impacts. Volume II provides further technical data.

  11. Reducing SCADA System Nuisance Alarms in the Water Industry in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Nigel; Phillips, Debra H; Nicell, Ciaran

    2015-08-01

    The advancement of telemetry control for the water industry has increased the difficulty of managing large volumes of nuisance alarms (i.e., alarms that do not require a response). The aim of this study was to identify and reduce the number of nuisance alarms that occur for Northern Ireland (NI) Water by carrying out alarm duration analysis to determine the appropriate length of persistence (an advanced alarm management tool) that could be applied. All data were extracted from TelemWeb (NI Water's telemetry monitoring system) and analyzed in Excel. Over a 6-week period, an average of 40 000 alarms occurred per week. The alarm duration analysis, which has never been implemented before by NI Water, found that an average of 57% of NI Water alarms had a duration of <5 minutes. Applying 5-minute persistence, therefore, could prevent an average 26 816 nuisance alarms per week. Most of these alarms were from wastewater assets.

  12. Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-05-09

    Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and

  13. Reducing exposure to high fluoride drinking water in Estonia-a countrywide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indermitte, Ene; Saava, Astrid; Karro, Enn

    2014-03-14

    Fluoride is a naturally occurring contaminant in groundwater in Estonia. There are several regions in Estonia with fluoride contents in public water supplies as high as 7 mg/L. Long-term exposure to high-fluoride drinking water may have several adverse health effects, primarily dental fluorosis. The opportunities for exposure reduction rely highly on water treatment technologies. Since 2004 public water suppliers in Estonia have made efforts to diminish fluoride content in drinking water systems. A follow-up study on a country level was carried out in 2004-2012 to analyze the changes in population exposure to excessive (over 1.5 mg/L) fluoride in drinking water and to get information about the reduction methods applied by public water supplies (PWS) to optimize the fluoride levels in public water system. The results showed that bigger PWS have been more effective in fluoride reduction measures than small PWS. The main methods used to lower the fluoride content were reverse osmosis technology and replacement of water sources with new ones (new drilled wells). As a result of all the measures taken the overall high-fluoride exposure has been reduced substantially (82%).

  14. Reducing Exposure to High Fluoride Drinking Water in Estonia—A Countrywide Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indermitte, Ene; Saava, Astrid; Karro, Enn

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride is a naturally occurring contaminant in groundwater in Estonia. There are several regions in Estonia with fluoride contents in public water supplies as high as 7 mg/L. Long-term exposure to high-fluoride drinking water may have several adverse health effects, primarily dental fluorosis. The opportunities for exposure reduction rely highly on water treatment technologies. Since 2004 public water suppliers in Estonia have made efforts to diminish fluoride content in drinking water systems. A follow-up study on a country level was carried out in 2004–2012 to analyze the changes in population exposure to excessive (over 1.5 mg/L) fluoride in drinking water and to get information about the reduction methods applied by public water supplies (PWS) to optimize the fluoride levels in public water system. The results showed that bigger PWS have been more effective in fluoride reduction measures than small PWS. The main methods used to lower the fluoride content were reverse osmosis technology and replacement of water sources with new ones (new drilled wells). As a result of all the measures taken the overall high-fluoride exposure has been reduced substantially (82%). PMID:24637908

  15. Environmental response nanosilica for reducing the pressure of water injection in ultra-low permeability reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peisong; Niu, Liyong; Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhijun

    2017-12-01

    The super-hydrophobic silica nanoparticles are applied to alter the wettability of rock surface from water-wet to oil-wet. The aim of this is to reduce injection pressure so as to enhance water injection efficiency in low permeability reservoirs. Therefore, a new type of environmentally responsive nanosilica (denote as ERS) is modified with organic compound containing hydrophobic groups and "pinning" groups by covalent bond and then covered with a layer of hydrophilic organic compound by chemical adsorption to achieve excellent water dispersibility. Resultant ERS is homogeneously dispersed in water with a size of about 4-8 nm like a micro-emulsion system and can be easily injected into the macro or nano channels of ultra-low permeability reservoirs. The hydrophobic nanosilica core can be released from the aqueous delivery system owing to its strong dependence on the environmental variation from normal condition to injection wells (such as pH and salinity). Then the exposed silica nanoparticles form a thin layer on the surface of narrow pore throat, leading to the wettability from water-wet to oil-wet. More importantly, the two rock cores with different permeability were surface treated with ERS dispersion with a concentration of 2 g/L, exhibit great reduce of water injection pressure by 57.4 and 39.6%, respectively, which shows great potential for exploitation of crude oil from ultra-low permeability reservoirs during water flooding. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Studies on guinea-pig macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). II. Purification of MIF after treatment with reducing and denaturing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotkes, P; Pick, E

    1979-09-01

    Treatment of guinea-pig macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) containing culture supernatants with the denaturing agents guanidine hydrochloride (Gu HCl) or urea, in the presence or absence of the reducing agent 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME), or with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), does not destroy biological activity. Alkylation of reduced MIF preparations results in a considerable decrease or total loss of MIF activity. Treatment of supernatants with the combinations, Gu HCl and 2-ME or urea and 2-ME results in the recovery of MIF activity in association with molecules less than 30,000 in molecular weight (mol. wt). After removal of the agents by dialysis, MIF activity is found associated with molecules larger than 30,000. The reduction in mol. wt is dependent on the presence of 2-ME. When MIF-containing supernatants are treated with urea and SDS and fractionated by preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) in the presence of the same agents, MIF activity is recovered in the mol. wt range of 42,000--80,000. When supernatants are treated with 2-me, in addition to urea and SDS, and preparative PAGE is performed in their presence, MIF activity is found associated with material having a mol. wt of 15,000--18,000. Analytical SDS-PAGE of this fraction reveals two or three closely grouped bands corresponding to the above mol. wt range.

  17. Effectiveness Of Different House-Hold Hand Washing Agents On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hand hygiene is a very important procedure in infection control. Washing agents commonly in use were investigated for their effectiveness in reducing hand floral and cotton towel was used as drying agent. Agents studied include; water alone, carex soap, dettol, and imperial leather. The hands were inoculated (deliberate ...

  18. Summary of the 3rd workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Nakatsuka, Tohru; Iwamura, Takamichi [eds.

    2000-06-01

    The research activities of a Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) are being performed for a development of the next generation water-cooled reactor. A workshop on the RMWR was held on March 3rd 2000 aiming to exchange information between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. This report summarizes the contents of lectures and discussions on the workshop. The 1st workshop was held on March 1998 focusing on the review of the research activities and future research plan. The succeeding 2nd workshop was held on March 1999 focusing on the topics of the plutonium utilization in water-cooled reactors. The 3rd workshop was held on March 3rd 2000, which was attended by 77 participants. The workshop began with a lecture titled 'Recent Situation Related to Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR)', followed by 'Program on MOX Fuel Utilization in Light Water Reactors' which is the mainstream scenario of plutonium utilization by utilities, and 'Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). Also, following lectures were given as the recent research activities in JAERI: 'Progress in Design Study on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors', 'Long-Term Scenarios of Power Reactors and Fuel Cycle Development and the Role of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors', 'Experimental and Analytical Study on Thermal Hydraulics' and Reactor Physics Experiment Plan using TCA'. At the end of the workshop, a general discussion was performed about the research and development of the RMWR. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture and general discussion, as well as presentation viewgraphs, program and participant list as appendixes. The 7 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. Soundless Chemical Demolition Agents

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    The traditional approach to demolishing concrete structures or reducing the size of large rocks or boulders has typically included the use of explosives. The resulting explosions are associated with the obvious risks posed by shock waves and fly rock. Soundless chemical demolition agents (SCDAs) have proven to be viable substitutes for the use of explosives. SCDAs are powdery materials that will expand considerably when mixed with water.

  20. Determination of Chemical Warfare Agents in Water Samples by Solid Phase Microextraction and GC-FID

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Fatima

    2007-01-01

    The Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) is presently developing a mobile laboratory for the identification of chemical warfare agents (CWA) and related compounds. The laboratory will be used in the field, and it is therefore advantageous that the analytical methods give a high priority to low solvent consumption and minimal need for sample preparation. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) meets these requirements, since the technique is based on automatic extraction and concentration...

  1. Fate of water borne therapeutic agents and associated effects on nitrifying biofilters in recirculating aquaculture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    of these agents on biofilter nitrification performance. All experiments were conducted through addition of chemical additives to closed pilot scale recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) with fixed media submerged biofilters under controlled operating conditions with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss......) in a factorial design with true replicates. Biofilter nitrification performances were evaluated by changes in chemical processes, and nitrifying populations were identified by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis. FA was degraded at a constant rate immediately after addition, and found...

  2. Flotation of agent for breach of emulsion oil/water aiming treatment of water produced for the industry petroleum; Agente de flotacao (Tanfloc) para quebra de emulsao oleo/agua visando tratamento de aguas produzidas pela industria do petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, A.C. de; Andrade, J.M. de; Melo, M.A.A.; Melo, D.M.A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work was studied the action of an agent of flotation TanFloc broken emulsion in oil / water when its concentration varies and salinity. This material is used by Petroleum brazilian for removal of turbidity in the water from the petroleum industry. For the test set up a bench in the laboratory of the Environmental Technology UFRN for simulation of tests made on the field. To do so, was studied the concentration of TanFloc and it was found that the best concentration for removal of turbidity was 11ppm such material. It was found that the level of salinity affects particularly the results of turbidity therefore this was also one of the parameters studied. (author)

  3. Multi-agent agro-economic simulation of irrigation water demand with climate services for climate change adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Balbi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Farmers’ irrigation practices play a crucial role in the sustainability of crop production and water consumption, and in the way they deal with the current and future effects of climate change. In this study, a system dynamic multi-agent model adopting the soil water balance provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO Irrigation and Drainage Paper 56 was developed to explore how farmers’ decision making may affect future water needs and use with a focus on the role of climate services, i.e. forecasts and insurance. A climatic projection record representing the down-scaled A1B market scenario (a balance across all sources of the assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC is used to produce future daily data about relative humidity, precipitation, temperature and wind speed. Two types of meteorological services are made available: i a bi-weekly bulletin; and ii seasonal forecasts. The precision of these services was altered to represent different conditions, from perfect knowledge to poor forecasts. Using the available forecasts, farming agents take adaptation decisions concerning crop allocation and irrigation management on the basis of their own risk attitudes. Farmers’ attitudes are characterized by fuzzy classifications depending on age, relative income and crop profitability. Farming agents’ adaptation decisions directly affect the crop and irrigation parameters, which in turn affect future water needs on a territorial level. By incorporating available and future meteorological services, the model allows the farmer’s decision making-process to be explored together with the consequent future irrigation water demand for the period 2015 to 2030. The model prototype is applied to a data set of the Venice Lagoon Watershed, an area of 2038 km2 in north-east Italy, for a preliminary test of its performance and to design future development objectives.

  4. Modelling mitigation options to reduce diffuse nitrogen water pollution from agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouraoui, Fayçal; Grizzetti, Bruna

    2014-01-15

    Agriculture is responsible for large scale water quality degradation and is estimated to contribute around 55% of the nitrogen entering the European Seas. The key policy instrument for protecting inland, transitional and coastal water resources is the Water Framework Directive (WFD). Reducing nutrient losses from agriculture is crucial to the successful implementation of the WFD. There are several mitigation measures that can be implemented to reduce nitrogen losses from agricultural areas to surface and ground waters. For the selection of appropriate measures, models are useful for quantifying the expected impacts and the associated costs. In this article we review some of the models used in Europe to assess the effectiveness of nitrogen mitigation measures, ranging from fertilizer management to the construction of riparian areas and wetlands. We highlight how the complexity of models is correlated with the type of scenarios that can be tested, with conceptual models mostly used to evaluate the impact of reduced fertilizer application, and the physically-based models used to evaluate the timing and location of mitigation options and the response times. We underline the importance of considering the lag time between the implementation of measures and effects on water quality. Models can be effective tools for targeting mitigation measures (identifying critical areas and timing), for evaluating their cost effectiveness, for taking into consideration pollution swapping and considering potential trade-offs in contrasting environmental objectives. Models are also useful for involving stakeholders during the development of catchments mitigation plans, increasing their acceptability. © 2013.

  5. Soak Feet Warm Water Therapy Effective To Reduce Blood Pressure In The Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yessi harnani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a heart and blood vessels disease that is manifested by rising blood pressure. Untreated hypertension will lead to complication such as stroke and heart failure. Soak feet warm water is one of the complementary therapy that can reduce blood pressure. The purpose of this research is to find out the effecveness of soak feet warm water therapy to reduce blood pressure in the elderly. This research was a quantave by using the pre-experimental design and pretest and posest approach. The Sample were elderly with hypertension in working area of Puskesmas Simpang Tiga Pekanbaru. The sampling technique was used purposive sampling. The data collection techniques were used observation and measuring blood pressure by using sphignomanometer. The data analyzed was used Wilcoxon test. The Results showed that generally elderly with hypertension were on stage II. Stasc result showed that mean blood pressure post soak feet warm water therapy was 74,00 and standard deviaon was 5, 026, with the sistolic P value was 0.000 (<0.05 and diastolic P value was 0.000 (<0.05. So, it could be stated that soak feet warm water therapy effecve to reduce blood pressure in elderly. It is recommended to elderly with hypertension to always controlling their blood pressure, if there is a rising of blood pressure they could using soak feet warm water therapy to treat hypertension as a complementary therapy, cheap and easy to do indenpendently.

  6. Effectiveness of unfertilized buffer strips for reducing nitrogen loads from agricultural lowland to surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noij, I.G.A.M.; Heinen, M.; Heesmans, H.I.M.; Thissen, J.T.N.M.; Groenendijk, P.

    2012-01-01

    Unfertilized buffer strips (BS) are widely accepted to reduce nitrogen (N) loads from agricultural land to surface water. However, the relative reduction of N load or concentration (BS effectiveness, BSE), varies with management and local conditions, especially hydrogeology. We present novel

  7. Longevity and effectiveness of aluminum addition to reduce sediment phosphorus release and restore lake water quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huser, Brian J; Egemose, Sara; Harper, Harvey

    2016-01-01

    114 lakes treated with aluminum (Al) salts to reduce internal phosphorus (P) loading were analyzed to identify factors driving longevity of post-treatment water quality improvements. Lakes varied greatly in morphology, applied Al dose, and other factors that may have affected overall treatment ef...

  8. the performance of cassava flour as a water-reducing admixture for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHINYERE

    to remove any chaff present in the flour. The processed flour was then stored in plastic bags. Chemical analysis of the cassava flour used in this study can be found ..... Straw Pulp Waste Liquor As A Water-. Reducing Admixture, Magazine of. Concrete Research, Vol. 47, No. 171,. 1995, pp. 113-118. 5. Chia, K. S. and Zhang, ...

  9. Options in European legislation to reduce water pollution in the Netherlands: cadmium as case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos JH; Poorter LRM de; SEC

    2007-01-01

    The RIVM has performed a study on European legislation useful for reducing cadmium pollution in Dutch surface waters. The Integrated Pollution Prevention Control Directive (IPPC) is an instrument that can impose restraints on one of the main sources of pollution, the industrial sector. However, for

  10. Effect of water hyacinth on distribution of sulphate-reducing bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms-Laub, on the distribution of populations of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sediments from various stations on the shores of Lake Victoria around Mwanza Municipality, Tanzania, was studied. Lactate-utilising SRB were observed to be the dominant ...

  11. Nitrate and sulfate reducers-retrievable number of bacteria and their activities in Indian waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    determined. NRB and SRB were observed throughout these depths and did not relate to HB numbers. HB and NRB were recorded at 3 orders per ml and SRB at 2. High numbers of reducers were encountered in shallow depths as frequently as in deeper waters and did...

  12. Mechanisms and Effectivity of Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors Using a Chitinous Substrate in Treating Mining Influenced Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mining-influenced water (MIW) is the main environmental challenges associated with the mining industry. Passive MIW remediation can be achieved through microbial activity in sulfate-reducing bioreactors (SRBRs), but their actual removal rates depend on different factors, one of w...

  13. Denitrifying Bioreactors – An Approach for Reducing Nitrate Loads to Receiving Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-cost and simple technologies are needed to reduce watershed export of excess nitrogen to sensitive aquatic ecosystems. Denitrifying bioreactors are an approach where solid carbon substrates are added into the flow path of contaminated water. These carbon substrates (often fragmented wood-product...

  14. Reduced CSF Water Influx in Alzheimer's Disease Supporting the β-Amyloid Clearance Hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Suzuki

    Full Text Available To investigate whether water influx into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF space is reduced in Alzheimer's patients as previously shown in the transgenic mouse model for Alzheimer's disease.Ten normal young volunteers (young control, 21-30 years old, ten normal senior volunteers (senior control, 60-78 years old, MMSE ≥ 29, and ten Alzheimer's disease (AD patients (study group, 59-84 years old, MMSE: 13-19 participated in this study. All AD patients were diagnosed by neurologists specializing in dementia based on DSM-IV criteria. CSF dynamics were analyzed using positron emission tomography (PET following an intravenous injection of 1,000 MBq [15O]H2O synthesized on-line.Water influx into CSF space in AD patients, expressed as influx ratio, (0.755 ± 0.089 was significantly reduced compared to young controls (1.357 ± 0.185; p < 0.001 and also compared to normal senior controls (0.981 ± 0.253, p < 0.05. Influx ratio in normal senior controls was significantly reduced compared to young controls (p < 0.01.Water influx into the CSF is significantly reduced in AD patients. β-amyloid clearance has been shown to be dependent on interstitial flow and CSF production. The current study indicates that reduction in water influx into the CSF may disturb the clearance rate of β-amyloid, and therefore be linked to the pathogenesis of AD.UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000011939.

  15. Competition-Induced Reductions in Soil Water Availability Reduced Pine Root Extension Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.H. Ludovici; L.A. Morris

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between soil water availability, root extension, and shoot growth of loblolly pine seedlings (Pinus taeda L.) was evaluated in a rhizotron sand mixture in the absence and presence of crabgrass (Digitaria spp.) competition. Heights and diameters of seedlings grown with crabgrass were reduced 33 and SO%, respectively, compared with...

  16. Reduced cover of drifting macroalgae following nutrient reduction in Danish coastald waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jonas Ribergaard; Dromph, Karsten Mikael; Göke, Cordula

    2015-01-01

    and eelgrass cover showed no significant trend, reflecting that eelgrass cover had not increased despite the reduced levels of nutrients and drifting algae. This ratio also showed no consistent relationship to water quality probably because different regulation mechanisms govern drifting algae and eelgrass......Based on a large dataset from the national Danish monitoring programme, we analysed the temporal variability of drifting algae cover in shallow (1–2 m) water during a period of reduced nutrient loadings. Algal cover was analysed both in absolute terms and relative to eelgrass, Zostera marina, cover...... to test the hypotheses that (1) the cover of drifting algae and the relative dominance of algae versus eelgrass in shallow waters have declined in parallel to reductions in nutrient levels during the last decades, and (2) spatio-temporal differences in algal cover can be related to differences in nutrient...

  17. Characterization of bromate-reducing bacterial isolates and their potential for drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Andrew N; Chee-Sanford, Joanne; Lai, Hoi Yi Mandy; Ho, Chi-hua; Klenzendorf, J Brandon; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2011-11-15

    The objective of the current study was to isolate and characterize several bromate-reducing bacteria and to examine their potential for bioaugmentation to a drinking water treatment process. Fifteen bromate-reducing bacteria were isolated from three sources. According to 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the bromate-reducing bacteria are phylogenetically diverse, representing the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria. The broad diversity of bromate-reducing bacteria suggests the widespread capability for microbial bromate reduction. While the cometabolism of bromate via nitrate reductase and (per)chlorate reductase has been postulated, five of our bromate-reducing isolates were unable to reduce nitrate or perchlorate. This suggests that a bromate-specific reduction pathway might exist in some microorganisms. Bioaugmentation of activated carbon filters with eight of the bromate-reducing isolates did not significantly decrease start-up time or increase bromate removal as compared to control filters. To optimize bromate reduction in a biological drinking water treatment process, the predominant mechanism of bromate reduction (i.e., cometabolic or respiratory) needs to be assessed so that appropriate measures can be taken to improve bromate removal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Trophic State of a Shallow Lake with Reduced Inflow of Surface Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejankowski Wojciech

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the general classification of shallow eutrophic lakes, two alternative types are distinguished: phytoplankton-dominated and macrophyte-dominated lakes. The latter type is rare and currently endangered by human activity. In order to determine the effect of reduced inflow of surface water by an earth dyke on the lake trophic state, certain biological and physico-chemical parameters were evaluated. This work focuses on two lakes of similar morphometric characteristics situated in the agricultural landscape. The effect of the earth dyke on the trophic state was positively verified. The lake situated in the catchment basin, in which the inflow of surface water was reduced, was defined as meso-eutrophic, with a small amount of phytoplankton and high water transparency. The reference lake was highly eutrophic, with low water transparency and a large amount of phytoplankton. The water body surrounded by the earth dyke was macrophytes dominated (65% of the lake area, whereas the reference lake was a phytoplankton-macrophyte type (42% of the lake area. The trophic evaluation of a lake can be underestimated because of a significant amount of biogenic compounds accumulated in plant tissues. Thus, the values of Carlson’s indices in macrophyte-dominated lakes may not account for the total amount of nutrients in the water body.

  19. Nitric oxide reduces oxidative damage induced by water stress in sunflower plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Cechin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the main environmental constraints that can reduce plant yield. Nitric oxide (NO is a signal molecule involved in plant responses to several environmental stresses. The objective of this study was to investigate the cytoprotective effect of a single foliar application of 0, 1, 10 or 100 µM of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP in sunflower plants under water stress. Water stressed plants treated with 1μM SNP showed an increase in the relative water content compared with 0 μM SNP. Drought reduced the shoot dry weight but SNP applications did not result in alleviation of drought effects. Neither drought nor water stress plus SNP applications altered the content of photosynthetic pigments. Stomatal conductance was reduced by drought and this reduction was accompanied by a significant reduction in intercellular CO2 concentration and photosynthesis. Treatment with SNP did not reverse the effect of drought on the gas exchange characteristics. Drought increased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA and proline and reduced pirogalol peroxidase (PG-POD activity, but did not affect the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD. When the water stressed plants were treated with 10 μM SNP, the activity of PG-POD and the content of proline were increased and the level of MDA was decreased. The results show that the adverse effects of water stress on sunflower plants are dependent on the external NO concentration. The action of NO may be explained by its ability to increase the levels of antioxidant compounds and the activity of ROS-scavenging enzymes.

  20. Summary of the 4th workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsuka, Toru; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Iwamura, Takamichi (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-09-01

    The research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs) has been performed in JAERI for the development of future innovative reactors. The workshop on the RMWRs has been held every year since fiscal 1997 aimed at information exchange between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. The 4th workshop was held on March 2, 2001 under the joint auspices of JAERI and North Kanto branch of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The workshop began with three lectures on recent research activities in JAERI entitled 'Recent Situation of Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor', 'Analysis on Electricity Generation Costs of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors' and 'Reprocessing Technology for Spent Mixed-Oxides Fuel from LWR'. Then five lectures followed: 'Micro Reactor Physics of MOX Fueled LWR' which shows the recent results of reactor physics, Fast Reactor Cooled by Supercritical Light Water' which is another type of reduced-moderation reactor, 'Phase 1 of Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), 'Integral Type Small PWR with Stand-alone Safety' which is intended to suit for the future consumers' needs, and Utilization of Plutonium in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors' which dictates benefits of plutonium utilization with RMWRs. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture, as well as presentation handouts, program and participant list as appendixes. The 8 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  1. Plasma membrane ordering agent pluronic F-68 (PF-68) reduces neurotransmitter uptake and release and produces learning and memory deficits in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, M. S.; Prendergast, M. A.; Terry, A. V. Jr

    1999-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence indicates that aged-related changes in the fluidity and lipid composition of the plasma membrane contribute to cellular dysfunction in humans and other mammalian species. In the CNS, reductions in neuronal plasma membrane order (PMO) (i.e., increased plasma membrane fluidity) have been attributed to age as well as the presence of the beta-amyloid peptide-25-35, known to play an important role in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). These PMO increases may influence neurotransmitter synthesis, receptor binding, and second messenger systems as well as signal transduction pathways. The effects of neuronal PMO on learning and memory processes have not been adequately investigated, however. Based on the hypothesis that an increase in PMO may alter a number of aspects of synaptic transmission, we investigated several neurochemical and behavioral effects of the membrane ordering agent, PF-68. In cell culture, PF-68 (nmoles/mg SDS extractable protein) reduced [3H]norepinephrine (NE) uptake into differentiated PC-12 cells as well as reduced nicotine stimulated [3H]NE release. The compound (800-2400 microg/kg, i.p., resulting in nmoles/mg SDS extractable protein in the brain) decreased step-through latencies and increased the frequencies of crossing into the unsafe side of the chamber in inhibitory avoidance training. In the Morris water maze, PF-68 increased the latencies and swim distances required to locate a hidden platform and reduced the time spent and distance swam in the previous target quadrant during transfer (probe) trials. PF-68 did not impair performance of a well-learned working memory task, the rat delayed stimulus discrimination task (DSDT), however. Studies with 14C-labeled PF-68 indicated that significant (pmoles/mg wet tissue) levels of the compound entered the brain from peripheral (i.p.) injection. No PF-68 related changes were observed in swim speeds or in visual acuity tests in water maze experiments, rotorod

  2. The synthesis of a water-soluble derivative of rutin as an antiradical agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedriali, Carla Aparecida; Fernandes, Adjaci Uchoa [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Bioquimica]. E-mail: capedriali@hotmail.com; Bernusso, Leandra de Cassia; Polakiewicz, Bronislaw [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Tecnologia Bioquimico-Farmaceutica

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize a water-soluble derivative of rutin (compound 2) by introducing carboxylate groups on rutin's sugar moiety. The rutin derivative showed an almost 100-fold solubility increase in water. The antiradical capacity of compound 2 was evaluated using the luminol/AAPH system, and the derivative's activity was 1.5 times greater than that of Trolox. Despite the derivative's high solubility in water (log P = -1.13), lipid peroxidation of brain homogenate membranes was very efficiently inhibited (inhibition values were only 19% lower than the inhibition values of rutin). (author)

  3. Debris Flows and Water Tracks in Continental Antarctica: Water as a geomorphic agent in a hyperarid polar desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauber, E.; Sassenroth, C.; De Vera, J.-P.; Schmitz, N.; Reiss, D.; Hiesinger, H.; Johnsson, A.

    2017-09-01

    Most studies using Antarctica as a Mars analogue have focused on the McMurdo Dry Valleys, which are among the coldest and driest places on Earth. However, other ice-free areas in continental Antarctica also display landforms that can inform the study of the possible geomorphic impact of water in a polar desert. Here we present a new analogue site in the interior of the Transantarctic Mountains in Northern Victoria Land. Gullies show unambiguous evidence for debris flows, and water tracks act as shallow subsurface pathways of water on top of the permafrost tale. Both processes are driven by meltwater from glacier ice and snow in an environ-ment which never experiences rainfall and in which the air temperatures probably never exceed 0°C.

  4. Permanent water swelling effect in low temperature thermally reduced graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamatthaiou, S.; Argyropoulos, D.-P.; Masurkar, A.; Cavallari, M. R.; Farmakis, F.; Kymissis, I.; Georgoulas, N.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate permanent water trapping in reduced graphene oxide after high relative humidity exposure. For this purpose, we grew graphene oxide films via spin-coating on glass substrates followed by thermal reduction. The electrical resistance of the planar device was then measured. We observed that resistance is significantly increased after water vapor exposure and remains stable even after 250 days in ambient conditions. Various techniques were applied to desorb the water and decrease (recover) the material's resistance, but it was achieved only with low temperature thermal annealing (180 °C) under forming gas (H2/N2 mixture). The permanent effect of water absorption was also detected by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  5. Cold Water and Pauses in Illumination Reduces Pain During Photodynamic Therapy: A Randomized Clinical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S.R.; Haedersdal, M.; Wulf, H.C.

    2009-01-01

    Pain is the main acute adverse event during photodynamic therapy of skin lesions. The objective of this randomized study was to evaluate the pain-relieving effect of pauses and cooling during illumination. Twenty-four patients with actinic keratoses were treated with photodynamic therapy in two...... symmetrical areas and cooled with either cold-water-spray or cold-water-pack (Coo]Pack). Treatment areas were cooled during either the first or second period of illumination, which were separated by a 3-min pause in illumination. Pain intensity was scored from 0 to 10. Water-spray reduced the mean pain score...... by 1.2 points (p=0.030) and CoolPack by 1.3 points (p=0.007) during the first half of the illumination. Pain intensity decreased during the pause by 3.7 points in water-spray patients (p

  6. Isolation of the etiological agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis from artificially heated waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, A.R.; Tyndall, R.L.; Coutant, C.C.; Willaert, E.

    1977-12-01

    To determine whether artificial heating of water by power plant discharges facilitates proliferation of the pathogenic free-living amoebae that cause primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, water samples (250 ml) were taken from discharges within 3,000 feet (ca. 914.4 m) of power plants and were processed for amoeba culture. Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri grew out of water samples from two of five lakes and rivers in Florida and from one of eight man-made lakes in Texas. Pathogenic N. fowleri did not grow from water samples taken from cooling towers and control lakes, the latter of which had no associated power plants. The identification of N. fowleri was confirmed by pathogenicity in mice and by indirect immunofluorescence analyses, by using a specific antiserum.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF POLYMER GEL SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE VOLUMETRIC SWEEP AND REDUCE PRODUCING WATER/OIL RATIOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Rajeev Jain; Tuan Nguyen

    2003-11-01

    Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of the first year of a three-year research program that is aimed at the understanding of the chemistry of gelation and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work has focused on a widely-applied system in field applications, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. The initial reaction between chromium acetate and one polymer is referred to as the uptake reaction. The uptake reaction was studied as functions of chromium and polymer concentrations and pH values. Experimental data were regressed to determine a rate equation that describes the uptake reaction of chromium by polyacrylamide. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as the reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A statistical model that describes the growth of pre-gel aggregates was developed using the theory of branching processes. The model gives molecular weight averages that are expressed as functions of the conversion of the reactive sites on chromium acetate or on the polymer molecule. Results of the application of the model correlate well with experimental data of viscosity and weight-average molecular weight and gives insights into the gelation process. A third study addresses the flow of water and oil in rock material after a gel treatment. Previous works have shown that gel treatments usually reduce the permeability to water to a greater extent than the permeability to oil is reduced. This phenomenon is referred to as disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR). Flow experiments were conducted to determine the effect of polymer and chromium concentrations on

  8. Who wants to be an agent? A framework to analyse water politics and governance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meissner, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available - ally penetrate civil society and to implement logistically politi- cal decisions throughout the realm’ (Mann, 1988 p. 5; Mann, 1993a: 55 cited in Hobson, 2000). Infrastructural power can alternatively also be defined as power through or with, rather... of such actors in water politics and governance. The framework has five components: description of the geographic area or issue; the actors involved in water politics and governance; the (hydropolitical) history of the issue; the actors’ power to enable change...

  9. Optimizing withdrawal from drinking water reservoirs to reduce downstream temperature pollution and reservoir hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M; Rinke, K; Hipsey, M R; Boehrer, B

    2017-07-15

    Sustainable management of drinking water reservoirs requires balancing the demands of water supply whilst minimizing environmental impact. This study numerically simulates the effect of an improved withdrawal scheme designed to alleviate the temperature pollution downstream of a reservoir. The aim was to identify an optimal withdrawal strategy such that water of a desirable discharge temperature can be supplied downstream without leading to unacceptably low oxygen concentrations within the reservoir. First, we calibrated a one-dimensional numerical model for hydrodynamics and oxygen dynamics (GLM-AED2), verifying that the model reproduced water temperatures and hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen concentrations accurately over a 5 year period. Second, the model was extended to include an adaptive withdrawal functionality, allowing for a prescribed withdrawal temperature to be found, with the potential constraint of hypolimnetic oxygen concentration. Scenario simulations on epi-/metalimnetic withdrawal demonstrate that the model is able to autonomously determine the best withdrawal height depending on the thermal structure and the hypolimnetic oxygen concentration thereby optimizing the ability to supply a desirable discharge temperature to the downstream river during summer. This new withdrawal strategy also increased the hypolimnetic raw water volume to be used for drinking water supply, but reduced the dissolved oxygen concentrations in the deep and cold water layers (hypolimnion). Implications of the results for reservoir management are discussed and the numerical model is provided for operators as a simple and efficient tool for optimizing the withdrawal strategy within different reservoir contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ecohydrology of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) in the western United States and implications of water balance following a biocontrol agent introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, P. L.; Glenn, E. P.

    2012-12-01

    With increased demand on water sources for human use and likely diminished supplies due to climate change, it is important to understand the variation in evapotranspiration (ET) and vegetation water use by transpiration (T) in arid and semi-arid zone riparian areas in the western U.S. Understanding riparian plant water use is critical for accuracy of climate models, predictions used in water resources management, and assessment of land use change impacts on the water balance of ecosystems. Moore and Heilman (2011) suggested the following three principles for predicting when vegetation changes will impact the local or regional water budget: (i) variation will result if energy balance partitioning has been altered, (ii) if deeper or shallower active rooting depth has changed the amount of soil moisture accessible to plants, or (iii) if temporary changes in water use add up over longer time scales. They note that large changes in vegetation types do not necessarily result in changes in water discharge. We will use these principles to consider the case of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) on western U.S. rivers. Once considered a high-water-use plant that out-competed native trees, research over the past two decades has shown that saltcedar water use is low to moderate, and less than native trees. Consequently, the prospects of salvaging water for human use by replacing saltcedar with native trees, once thought to be bright, now appear questionable. Furthermore, saltcedar has come to occupy ecohydrological niches on altered river systems that are no longer available to native plants. However, with the widespread introduction and spread of saltcedar leaf beetles (Diorhabda carinulata) on western rivers, introduced in part to reduce riparian water use through reduction of saltcedar abundance, saltcedar ecology has now entered a new phase. The talk will present a synthesis of the recent literature on saltcedar water use and provide an overview of saltcedar ecohydrology in terms of

  11. Novel Water Soluble, Substituted Pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidines: Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation as Antitubulin Antitumor Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangjee, Aleem; Pavana, Roheeth K; Li, Wei; Hamel, Ernest; Westbrook, Cara; Mooberry, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To study the effects of a regioisomeric change on the biological activities of previously reported water soluble, colchicine site binding, microtubule depolymerizing agents. Methods Nine pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidines were designed and synthesized. The importance of various substituents was evaluated. Their abilities to cause cellular microtubule depolymerization, inhibit proliferation of MDA-MB-435 tumor cells and displace colchicine binding to tubulin were studied. One of the compounds was also evaluated in the National Cancer Institute preclinical 60 cell line panel. Results Pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine analogs were more potent than their pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine regioisomers. We identified compounds with submicromolar potency against cellular proliferation. The structure-activity relationship study gave insight into substituents that were crucial for activity and those that improved activity. The compound that was tested in the NCI 60 cell line is a 2-digit nanomolar (GI50) inhibitor of 8 tumor cell lines. Conclusion We have identified substituted pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidines that are water-soluble colchicine site microtubule depolymerizing agents. These compounds serve as leads for further optimization. PMID:22814902

  12. Transport behavior of surrogate biological warfare agents in a simulated landfill: Effect of leachate recirculation and water infiltration

    KAUST Repository

    Saikaly, Pascal

    2010-11-15

    An understanding of the transport behavior of biological warfare (BW) agents in landfills is required to evaluate the suitability of landfills for the disposal of building decontamination residue (BDR) following a bioterrorist attack on a building. Surrogate BW agents, Bacillus atrophaeus spores and Serratia marcescens, were spiked into simulated landfill reactors that were filled with synthetic building debris (SBD) and operated for 4 months with leachate recirculation or water infiltration. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) was used to monitor surrogate transport. In the leachate recirculation reactors, <10% of spiked surrogates were eluted in leachate over 4 months. In contrast, 45% and 31% of spiked S. marcescens and B. atrophaeus spores were eluted in leachate in the water infiltration reactors. At the termination of the experiment, the number of retained cells and spores in SBD was measured over the depth of the reactor. Less than 3% of the total spiked S. marcescens cells and no B. atrophaeus spores were detected in SBD. These results suggest that significant fractions of the spiked surrogates were strongly attached to SBD. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  13. Newly Synthesized Water Soluble Cholinium-Purpurin Photosensitizers and Their Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles as Promising Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Key Shim

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available For possible future use in Photodynamic Therapy (PDT and/or Photothermal Therapy (PTT of cancer and screening of cancer cells a new type of ionic liquid photosensitizer –Cholinium-Purpurin-18 (Chol-Pu-18 – was synthesized and small gold (Au nanoparticles, stabilized by this photosensitizer were prepared without adding any particular reducing agents and CTAB. UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM were used for characterization of the nanoparticles and FAB-MS and NMR of the ionic liquid choline hydroxide, purpurin carboxylate and their ionic liquid type of photosensitizer were obtained.

  14. The potential for energy savings when reducing the water consumption in a kraft pulp mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wising, Ulrika; Berntsson, Thore [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Science; Stuart, Paul [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2004-05-01

    In this paper an existing pulp and paper mill has been studied in a systematic way regarding the reduction of water consumption, and the resulting increased potential for energy integration. It has been found that when the mill's hot water consumption is decreased, the live steam demand for the mill also decreases. Also when decreasing the hot water consumption, the quantity and temperature of available excess heat increases. This excess heat can be used for evaporation, thereby reducing the live steam demand further by up to 1.5 GJ/t. A pinch analysis was performed at an existing mill and it was found that if pinch violations are removed, the hot water consumption is not an important factor any more. Removing all the pinch violations and using the remaining excess heat for evaporation yields a significantly larger energy savings for the mill (4.0 GJ/t). From an economic optimum perspective it is probably most profitable to do a combination of reducing water consumption, removing pinch violations, and use the remaining excess heat for evaporation.

  15. Solar light irradiation significantly reduced cytotoxicity and disinfection byproducts in chlorinated reclaimed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiao-Tong; Zhang, Xue; Du, Ye; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Lu, Yun; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2017-11-15

    Chlorinated reclaimed water is widely used for landscaping and recreational purposes, resulting in human exposure to toxic disinfection byproducts. Although the quality of chlorinated reclaimed water might be affected by sunlight during storage, the effects of solar light irradiation on the toxicity remain unknown. This study investigated the changes in cytotoxicity and total organic halogen (TOX) of chlorinated reclaimed water exposed to solar light. Irradiation with solar light for 12 h was found to significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of chlorinated reclaimed water by about 75%, with ultraviolet light being responsible for the majority of this reduction. Chlorine residual in reclaimed water tended to increase the cytotoxicity, and the synergy between solar light and free chlorine could not enhance the reduction of cytotoxicity. Adding hydroxyl radical scavengers revealed that the contribution of hydroxyl radical to cytotoxicity reduction was limited. Solar light irradiation concurrently reduced TOX. The low molecular weight (1 kDa) fraction was probably caused by photoconversion from high toxic TOX to low toxic TOX. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of the microbial community structure and nitrosamine-reducing isolates in drinking water biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanfeng; Guo, Yanling; Yang, Qingxiang; Huang, Yao; Zhu, Chunyou; Fan, Jing; Pan, Feng

    2015-07-15

    Two biofilters were constructed using biological activated carbon (BAC) and nitrosamine-containing water from two drinking water treatment plants. The microbiome of each biofilter was characterized by 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing, and one nitrosamine-reducing bacterium was isolated. The results showed that nitrosamines changed the relative abundance at both the phylum and class levels, and the new genera were observed in the microbial communities of the two BAC filters after cultivation. As such, the genus Rhodococcus, which includes many nitrosamine-reducing strains reported in previous studies, was only detected in the BAC2 filter after cultivation. These findings indicate that nitrosamines can significantly affect the genus level in the microbial communities. Furthermore, the isolated bacterial culture Rhodococcus cercidiphylli A41 AS-1 exhibited the ability to reduce five nitrosamines (N-nitrosodimethylamine, N-nitrosodiethylamine, N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine, N-nitrosopyrrolidine, and N-nitrosodi-n-butylamine) with removal ratios that ranged from 38.1% to 85.4%. The isolate exhibited a better biodegradation ability with nitrosamine as the carbon source when compared with nitrosamine as the nitrogen source. This study increases our understanding of the microbial community in drinking water biofilters with trace quantities of nitrosamines, and provides information on the metabolism of nitrosamine-reducing bacteria. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Using microbial desalination cells to reduce water salinity prior to reverse osmosis

    KAUST Repository

    Mehanna, Maha

    2010-01-01

    A microbial desalination cell (MDC) is a new method to reduce the salinity of one solution while generating electrical power from organic matter and bacteria in another (anode) solution. Substantial reductions in the salinity can require much larger volumes of the anode solution than the saline water, but any reduction of salinity will benefit the energy efficiency of a downstream reverse osmosis (RO) desalination system. We investigated here the use of an MDC as an RO pre-treatment method using a new type of air-cathode MDC containing three equally sized chambers. A single cycle of operation using a 1 g L -1 acetate solution reduced the conductivity of salt water (5 g L-1 NaCl) by 43 ± 6%, and produced a maximum power density of 480 mW m-2 with a coulombic efficiency of 68 ± 11%. A higher concentration of acetate (2 g L-1) reduced solution conductivity by 60 ± 7%, and a higher salt concentration (20 g L-1 NaCl) reduced solution conductivity by 50 ± 7%. The use of membranes with increased ion exchange capacities further decreased the solution conductivity by 63 ± 2% (20 g L-1 NaCl). These results demonstrate substantial (43-67%) desalination of water is possible using equal volumes of anode solution and salt water. These results show that MDC treatment could be used to substantially reduce salt concentrations and thus energy demands for downstream RO processing, while at the same time producing electrical power. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. The effects of endodontic substances and naturally reducing agents on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based sealer to root dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchin, Doglas; Farina, Ana Paula; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine (CHX), and two naturally derived reducing agents on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based sealer to root dentin. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 single-rooted human teeth were prepared using ProTaper (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Johnson City, TN, USA) and an irrigation protocol including 5% NaOCl or 2% CHX gel, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), for smear layer removal. The following subgroups (n = 10) were also assessed according to the naturally derived reducing agent used: no agent (control group); grape seed extract (GSE); and green tea. Root canals were filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany). Bond strength was measured using the push-out test, and statistical analyses were performed using ANOVA; failure patterns (modes) were classified as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. The types of failure modes were evaluated using the Chi-squared test at α =0.05. Results: The irrigation protocols demonstrated similar bond strength values (P > 0.05). However, the Chi-squared test revealed significant differences in failure mode among the groups (P sealer to dentin; however, improvement was evident in the adhesion quality of AH Plus to NaOCl-treated root dentin, due to the prevalence of cohesive failure. PMID:29386775

  19. The Role of Windbreaks in Reducing Water Resources Use in Irrigated Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, T. A.; de Vries, T. T.

    2014-12-01

    Windbreaks are common features in flat agricultural landscapes around the world. The reduction in wind speed afforded by windbreaks is dictated by their porosity, location, height, and distance from the windbreak. The reduction in wind speeds not only reduces potential wind erosion; it also reduces crop evapotranspiration (ET) and provides shelter for livestock and crops. In the Canterbury plains of New Zealand there are over 300,000 km of windbreaks which were first implemented as a soil conservation strategy to reduce wind erosion of prime agricultural land. Agriculture in the region has since changed to irrigated pasture cultivation for dairy production and windbreaks are being cut down or reduced to heights of 2 m to allow for large scale centre-pivot irrigation schemes. Although soil erosion is no longer a major concern due to permanent pasture cover, irrigation water is sourced from limited supplies of ground and surface water and thus the effects of wind on irrigation losses due to spray drift and increased ET are of significant concern. The impact of reducing windbreaks needs to be understood in terms of water resources use. Experimental and theoretical work was conducted to quantify the reduction in wind speeds by windbreaks and in spray evaporation losses. A temporal and spatial model was also developed and validated to quantify the impact of single and multiple windbreaks on irrigation water losses. Initial modelling results show that for hot windy dry conditions in Canterbury, ET can increase by up to 1.4 mm/day when windbreaks are reduced to 2 m in height and on average wind days ET can increase by up to 0.5 mm/day. ET can be reduced by up to 30% in the windbreak leeward zone relative to ET in areas not protected by windbreaks. Wind speed, air temperature and relative humidity all had a considerable impact on spray evaporation losses, but the extent is determined by the droplet size. Estimated losses range from only 0.07% to 67% for 5 and 0.2 mm

  20. Consideration of the Role of Plasma in a Plasma-Coupled Selective Catalytic Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides with a Hydrocarbon Reducing Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong Ju Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explain how plasma improves the performance of selective catalytic reduction (SCR of nitrogen oxides (NOx with a hydrocarbon reducing agent. In the plasma-coupled SCR process, NOx reduction was performed with n-heptane as a reducing agent over Ag/γ-Al2O3 as a catalyst. We found that the plasma decomposes n-heptane into several oxygen-containing products such as acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde and butyraldehyde, which are more reactive than the parent molecule n-heptane in the SCR process. Separate sets of experiments using acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde and butyraldehyde, one by one, as a reductant in the absence of plasma, have clearly shown that the presence of these partially oxidized compounds greatly enhanced the NOx conversion. The higher the discharge voltage, the more the amounts of such partially oxidized products. The oxidative species produced by the plasma easily converted NO into NO2, but the increase of the NO2 fraction was found to decrease the NOx conversion. Consequently, it can be concluded that the main role of plasma in the SCR process is to produce partially oxidized compounds (aldehydes, having better reducing power. The catalyst-alone NOx removal efficiency with n-heptane at 250 °C was measured to be less than 8%, but it increased to 99% in the presence of acetaldehyde at the same temperature. The NOx removal efficiency with the aldehyde reducing agent was higher as the number of carbons in the aldehyde was more; for example, the NOx removal efficiencies at 200 °C with butyraldehyde, propionaldehyde and acetaldehyde were measured to be 83.5%, 58.0% and 61.5%, respectively, which were far above the value (3% obtained with n-heptane.

  1. In Vitro Dissolution of Fluconazole and Dipyridamole in Gastrointestinal Simulator (GIS), Predicting in Vivo Dissolution and Drug-Drug Interaction Caused by Acid-Reducing Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Kazuki; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gregory E; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-07-06

    Weakly basic drugs typically exhibit pH-dependent solubility in the physiological pH range, displaying supersaturation or precipitation along the gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, their oral bioavailabilities may be affected by coadministration of acid-reducing agents that elevate gastric pH. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of a multicompartmental in vitro dissolution apparatus, Gastrointestinal Simulator (GIS), in predicting in vivo dissolution of certain oral medications. In vitro dissolution studies of fluconazole, a BCS class I, and dipyridamole, a BCS class II weak bases (class IIb), were performed in the GIS as well as United States Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus II and compared with the results of clinical drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies. In both USP apparatus II and GIS, fluconazole completely dissolved within 60 min regardless of pH, reflecting no DDI between fluconazole and acid-reducing agents in a clinical study. On the other hand, seven-fold and 15-fold higher concentrations of dipyridamole than saturation solubility were observed in the intestinal compartments in GIS with gastric pH 2.0. Precipitation of dipyridamole was also observed in the GIS, and the percentage of dipyridamole in solution was 45.2 ± 7.0%. In GIS with gastric pH 6.0, mimicking the coadministration of acid-reducing agents, the concentration of dipyridamole was equal to its saturation solubility, and the percentage of drug in solution was 9.3 ± 2.7%. These results are consistent with the clinical DDI study of dipyridamole with famotidine, which significantly reduced the Cmax and area under the curve. An In situ mouse infusion study combined with GIS revealed that high concentration of dipyridamole in the GIS enhanced oral drug absorption, which confirmed the supersaturation of dipyridamole. In conclusion, GIS was shown to be a useful apparatus to predict in vivo dissolution for BCS class IIb drugs.

  2. One-pot high-yield synthesis of single-crystalline gold nanorods using glycerol as a low-cost and eco-friendly reducing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Rashida; Gomes, Janaina F.; Ullah, Sajjad; Acuña, José J. S.; Tremiliosi-Filho, Germano

    2015-10-01

    The formation of gold nanorods (AuNRs) has recently attracted great attention due to their shape-dependent optical properties that are important for many applications. The development of simpler and safer methods for the high-yield synthesis of AuNRs employing low-cost and easily handled reagents is thus of great importance. Here, we introduce, for the first time, a one-pot seedless method for the preparation of single-crystalline AuNRs in almost 100 % yield based on the use of glycerol in alkaline medium as an eco-friendly, low-cost and pH-tunable reducing agent. The synthesized AuNRs were characterized by UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy, FEG-SEM and HRTEM. The effect of the presence of capping agent (CTAB) and the concentration of reactants (glycerol, NaOH and AgNO3) on the yield and aspect ratio (AR) of AuNRs is discussed. The AR and yield of AuNRs showed a clear dependence on the pH and temperature of the reaction mixture as well as on the concentration of AgNO3 added as an auxiliary reagent. The longitudinal plasmon resonance band of the resulting AuNRs can be tuned between 620 and 1200 nm by varying the reaction conditions. AuNRs with an aspect ratio (AR) of around 4 were obtained in almost 100 % yield at room temperature and under mild reducing environment. The formation of AuNRs is faster at higher pH (>11) and higher temperature (>30 °C), but the AuNR yield is smaller (tunable reducing agent with a pH-dependent reducing power, can provide a more general strategy for the preparation of a wide range of metallic nanoparticles.

  3. The effect of reduced rates of crop protection agents and adjuvants on productivity, weed infestation and health of spring barley (Hordeum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezary A. Kwiatkowski

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment on the cultivation of spring barley was carried out in the period 2009–2011 at the Experimental Farm in Czesławice (central Lublin region on grey-brown podzolic soil derived from loess (soil quality class II. The study included 3 rates of herbicides, growth retardant and fungicides (100%, 75% and 50% as well as different types of adjuvant (oil, surface-active, mineral. Plots without adjuvant were the control treatment. A hypothesis was made that the reduction in rates of crop protection agents by 25–50%, with the simultaneous addition of adjuvants, would allow spring barley productivity to be maintained at a level similar to that obtained under the conditions when recommended rates are applied without adjuvant. It was also assumed that particular types of adjuvant would show different interactions with specific groups of crop protection agents. It has been proved that a rational reduction in rates of crop protection agents is up to a limit of 25%, especially when an adjuvant is added to such reduced rates. This allows spring barley productivity to be maintained at the level obtained after the application of full rates (without adjuvant. But a further reduction in rates of crop protection agents by 50%, in spite of the interaction of adjuvants, results in a significant deterioration of all spring barley yield components, since such conditions lead to increased occurrence of agricultural pests (weeds, fungal diseases as well as increased crop lodging. Among the group of adjuvants tested in the present experiment, the oil adjuvant Atpolan 80 EC showed the best interaction with crop protection agents used.

  4. Transient turbid water mass reduces temperature-induced coral bleaching and mortality in Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxenford, Hazel A; Vallès, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is seen as one of the greatest threats to the world's coral reefs and, with the continued rise in sea surface temperature predicted into the future, there is a great need for further understanding of how to prevent and address the damaging impacts. This is particularly so for countries whose economies depend heavily on healthy reefs, such as those of the eastern Caribbean. Here, we compare the severity of bleaching and mortality for five dominant coral species at six representative reef sites in Barbados during the two most significant warm-water events ever recorded in the eastern Caribbean, i.e., 2005 and 2010, and describe prevailing island-scale sea water conditions during both events. In so doing, we demonstrate that coral bleaching and subsequent mortality were considerably lower in 2010 than in 2005 for all species, irrespective of site, even though the anomalously warm water temperature profiles were very similar between years. We also show that during the 2010 event, Barbados was engulfed by a transient dark green turbid water mass of riverine origin coming from South America. We suggest that reduced exposure to high solar radiation associated with this transient water mass was the primary contributing factor to the lower bleaching and mortality observed in all corals. We conclude that monitoring these episodic mesoscale oceanographic features might improve risk assessments of southeastern Caribbean reefs to warm-water events in the future.

  5. Reduced Efficiency of Chlorine Disinfection of Naegleria fowleri in a Drinking Water Distribution Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Haylea C; Wylie, Jason; Dejean, Guillaume; Kaksonen, Anna H; Sutton, David; Braun, Kalan; Puzon, Geoffrey J

    2015-09-15

    Naegleria fowleri associated with biofilm and biological demand water (organic matter suspended in water that consumes disinfectants) sourced from operational drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) had significantly increased resistance to chlorine disinfection. N. fowleri survived intermittent chlorine dosing of 0.6 mg/L for 7 days in a mixed biofilm from field and laboratory-cultured Escherichia coli strains. However, N. fowleri associated with an attached drinking water distribution biofilm survived more than 30 times (20 mg/L for 3 h) the recommended concentration of chlorine for drinking water. N. fowleri showed considerably more resistance to chlorine when associated with a real field biofilm compared to the mixed laboratory biofilm. This increased resistance is likely due to not only the consumption of disinfectants by the biofilm and the reduced disinfectant penetration into the biofilm but also the composition and microbial community of the biofilm itself. The increased diversity of the field biofilm community likely increased N. fowleri's resistance to chlorine disinfection compared to that of the laboratory-cultured biofilm. Previous research has been conducted in only laboratory scale models of DWDSs and laboratory-cultured biofilms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating how N. fowleri can persist in a field drinking water distribution biofilm despite chlorination.

  6. EFFECT OF THE DECHLORINATING AGENT, ASCORBIC ACID, ON THE MUTAGENICITY OF CHLORINATED WATER SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    XAD resin adsorption has been widely used to concentrate the organic compounds present in chlorinated drinking waters prior to mutagenicity testing. Previous work has shown that mutagenic artifcats can arise due to the reaction of residual chlorine with the resins. Althrough the ...

  7. A novel MR contrast agent for angiography and perfusion: Hyperpolarized water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipsø, Hans Kasper Wigh

    , hyperpolarized water is applied for angiographic imaging and perfusion measurements in a pig model. Renal angiography of 0.55 mm in-plane isotropic resolution is demonstrated and perfusion measurements provides values comparable to conventional Gd-T1-DCE analysis. Finally, it is demonstrated that the method can...

  8. Who wants to be an agent? A framework to analyse water politics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce a framework to analyse water politics and governance. The framework has been constructed from a social constructivist perspective. This theory places attention on the role of normative aspects like ideology, values, interests and culture in politics. This means that a theory of ...

  9. Sn powder as reducing agents and SnO2 precursors for the synthesis of SnO2-reduced graphene oxide hybrid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingxi; Zhang, Congcong; Li, Lingzhi; Liu, Yu; Li, Xichuan; Xu, Xiaoyang; Xia, Fengling; Wang, Wei; Gao, Jianping

    2013-12-26

    A facile approach to prepare SnO2/rGO (reduced graphene oxide) hybrid nanoparticles by a direct redox reaction between graphene oxide (GO) and tin powder was developed. Since no acid was used, it is an environmentally friendly green method. The SnO2/rGO hybrid nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The microstructure of the SnO2/rGO was observed with scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The tin powder efficiently reduced GO to rGO, and the Sn was transformed to SnO2 nanoparticles (∼45 nm) that were evenly distributed on the rGO sheets. The SnO2/rGO hybrid nanoparticles were then coated on an interdigital electrode to fabricate a humidity sensor, which have an especially good linear impedance response from 11% to 85% relative humidity.

  10. Application of multi-agent simulation to evaluate the influence of reservoir operation strategies on the distribution of water availability in the semi-arid Jaguaribe basin, Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oel, P.R.; Krol, Martinus S.; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert

    2012-01-01

    Studying the processes responsible for the distribution of water resources in a river basin over space and time is of great importance for spatial planning. In this study a multi-agent simulation approach is applied for exploring the influence of alternative reservoir operation strategies on water

  11. Embedded ICT technology on sprayers in order to reduce water pollution; the Aware project

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Various routes exist to reduce water pollution due to pesticide spray drift: decision aid systems for spraying when necessary, a better tuning of sprayers and more precise spraying combinations involving a sprayer and its nozzles, an active matter and an adjuvant. In the European project Aware, supported by a LIFE Environment program, the interest of ICT technologies is demonstrated at the different stages of the spraying process: before, during and after spraying. The...

  12. [Acupuncture Intervention Reduced Weight Gain Induced by Hypoglycemic Agents through Food Intake-related Targets in Central Nervous System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xin-yue; Ou, Chen; Lu, Sheng-feng; Zhu, Bing-mei

    2015-12-01

    Clinical practice shows that thiazolidinediones (TZDs) induce weight gain in patients with type-II diabetes mellitus during treatment, which restrains its application and generalization clinically. It has been demonstrated that acupuncture therapy is useful in easing obesity in clinical trials. In the present paper, we summarize the underlying mechanism of weight gain induced by TZDs through food intake-related targets in the central nervous system and analyze the possible effects of acupuncture therapy. Acupuncture therapy is expected to reduce weight gain side effect of TZDs through 1) lowering permeability of blood brain barrier to reduce TZDs concentration in the brain, 2) upregulating the expression of hypothalamic leptin and inhibiting hypothalamic neuropiptide Y expression, and 3) down-regulating activities of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor to reduce energy intake and fat syntheses.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Reduced Graphene Oxide Sheets via Water-Based Exfoliation and Reduction Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorrada Loryuenyong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research studied the synthesis of graphene oxide and graphene via a low-cost manufacturing method. The process started with the chemical oxidation of commercial graphite powder into graphite oxide by modified Hummer’s method, followed by the exfoliation of graphite oxide in distilled water using the ultrasound frequency from a laboratory ultrasonic bath. Finally, the oxygen functional groups on exfoliated graphite oxide or graphene oxide were eliminated by stirring in hot distilled water at 95°C, as a replacement for highly toxic and dangerously unstable hydrazine. The results assured that stirring in hot distilled water could give the product of graphene or reduced graphene oxide. The samples were characterized by FTIR, XRD, TGA, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, and TEM methods.

  14. Manganese-oxidizing and -reducing microorganisms isolated from biofilms in chlorinated drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrato, José M; Falkinham, Joseph O; Dietrich, Andrea M; Knocke, William R; McKinney, Chad W; Pruden, Amy

    2010-07-01

    The interaction of chemical, physical and biological factors that affect the fate, transport and redox cycling of manganese in engineered drinking water systems is not clearly understood. This research investigated the presence of Mn-oxidizing and -reducing bacteria in conventional water treatment plants exposed to different levels of chlorine. Mn(II)-oxidizing and Mn(IV)-reducing bacteria, principally Bacillus spp., were isolated from biofilm samples recovered from four separate drinking water systems. Rates of Mn-oxidation and -reduction for selected individual isolates were represented by pseudo-first-order kinetics. Pseudo-first-order rate constants were obtained for Mn-oxidation (range: 0.106-0.659 days(-1)), aerobic Mn-reduction (range: 0.036-0.152 days(-1)), and anaerobic Mn-reduction (range: 0.024-0.052 days(-1)). The results indicate that microbial-catalyzed Mn-oxidation and -reduction (aerobic and anaerobic) can take place simultaneously in aqueous environments exposed to considerable oxygen and chlorine levels and thus affect Mn-release and -deposition in drinking water systems. This has important implications for Mn-management strategies, which typically assume Mn-reduction is not possible in the presence of chlorine and oxidizing conditions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Control Strategies to Reduce the Energy Consumption of Central Domestic Hot Water Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dentz, Jordan [The Levy Partnership, Inc., New York, NY (United States). Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions; Ansanelli, Eric [The Levy Partnership, Inc., New York, NY (United States). Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions; Henderson, Hugh [The Levy Partnership, Inc., New York, NY (United States). Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions; Varshney, Kapil [The Levy Partnership, Inc., New York, NY (United States). Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions

    2016-06-23

    Domestic hot water (DHW) heating is the second largest energy end use in U.S. buildings, exceeded only by space conditioning. Recirculation systems consisting of a pump and piping loop(s) are commonly used in multifamily buildings to reduce wait time for hot water at faucets; however, constant pumping increases energy consumption by exposing supply and return line piping to continuous heat loss, even during periods when there is no demand for hot water. In this study, ARIES installed and tested two types of recirculation controls in a pair of buildings in order to evaluate their energy savings potential. Demand control, temperature modulation controls, and the simultaneous operation of both were compared to the baseline case of constant recirculation. Additionally, interactive effects between DHW control fuel reductions and space conditioning (heating and cooling) were estimated in order to make more realistic predictions of the payback and financial viability of retrofitting DHW systems with these controls. Results showed that DHW fuel consumption reduced by 7% after implementing the demand control technique, 2% after implementing temperature modulation, and 15% after implementing demand control and temperature modulation techniques simultaneously; recirculation pump runtime was reduced to 14 minutes or less per day. With space heating and cooling interactions included, the estimated annual cost savings were 8%, 1%, and 14% for the respective control techniques. Possible complications in the installation, commissioning and operation of the controls were identified and solutions offered.

  16. Control Strategies to Reduce the Energy Consumption of Central Domestic Hot Water Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dentz, Jordan; Ansanelli, Eric; Henderson, Hugh; Varshney, Kapil

    2016-06-03

    Domestic hot water (DHW) heating is the second largest energy end use in U.S. buildings, exceeded only by space conditioning. Recirculation systems consisting of a pump and piping loop(s) are commonly used in multifamily buildings to reduce wait time for hot water at faucets; however, constant pumping increases energy consumption by exposing supply and return line piping to continuous heat loss, even during periods when there is no demand for hot water. In this study, ARIES installed and tested two types of recirculation controls in a pair of buildings in order to evaluate their energy savings potential. Demand control, temperature modulation controls, and the simultaneous operation of both were compared to the baseline case of constant recirculation. Additionally, interactive effects between DHW control fuel reductions and space conditioning (heating and cooling) were estimated in order to make more realistic predictions of the payback and financial viability of retrofitting DHW systems with these controls. Results showed that DHW fuel consumption reduced by 7% after implementing the demand control technique, 2% after implementing temperature modulation, and 15% after implementing demand control and temperature modulation techniques simultaneously; recirculation pump runtime was reduced to 14 minutes or less per day. With space heating and cooling interactions included, the estimated annual cost savings were 8%, 1%, and 14% for the respective control techniques. Possible complications in the installation, commissioning and operation of the controls were identified and solutions offered.

  17. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Hugo Caram

    2006-03-01

    U.S. low rank coals contain relatively large amounts of moisture, with the moisture content of subbituminous coals typically ranging from 15 to 30 percent and that for lignites from 25 and 40 percent. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit, for it can result in fuel handling problems and it affects heat rate, stack emissions and maintenance costs. Theoretical analyses and coal test burns performed at a lignite fired power plant show that by reducing the fuel moisture, it is possible to improve boiler performance and unit heat rate, reduce emissions and reduce water consumption by the evaporative cooling tower. The economic viability of the approach and the actual impact of the drying system on water consumption, unit heat rate and stack emissions will depend critically on the design and operating conditions of the drying system. The present project evaluated the low temperature drying of high moisture coals using power plant waste heat to provide the energy required for drying. Coal drying studies were performed in a laboratory scale fluidized bed dryer to gather data and develop models on drying kinetics. In addition, analyses were carried out to determine the relative costs and performance impacts (in terms of heat rate, cooling tower water consumption and emissions) of drying along with the development of optimized drying system designs and recommended operating conditions.

  18. Exchanges across land-water-scape boundaries in urban systems: strategies for reducing nitrate pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenasso, M L; Pickett, S T A; Groffman, P M; Band, L E; Brush, G S; Galvin, M F; Grove, J M; Hagar, G; Marshall, V; McGrath, B P; O'Neil-Dunne, J P M; Stack, W P; Troy, A R

    2008-01-01

    Conservation in urban areas typically focuses on biodiversity and large green spaces. However, opportunities exist throughout urban areas to enhance ecological functions. An important function of urban landscapes is retaining nitrogen thereby reducing nitrate pollution to streams and coastal waters. Control of nonpoint nitrate pollution in urban areas was originally based on the documented importance of riparian zones in agricultural and forested ecosystems. The watershed and boundary frameworks have been used to guide stream research and a riparian conservation strategy to reduce nitrate pollution in urban streams. But is stream restoration and riparian-zone conservation enough? Data from the Baltimore Ecosystem Study and other urban stream research indicate that urban riparian zones do not necessarily prevent nitrate from entering, nor remove nitrate from, streams. Based on this insight, policy makers in Baltimore extended the conservation strategy throughout larger watersheds, attempting to restore functions that no longer took place in riparian boundaries. Two urban revitalization projects are presented as examples aimed at reducing nitrate pollution to stormwater, streams, and the Chesapeake Bay. An adaptive cycle of ecological urban design synthesizes the insights from the watershed and boundary frameworks, from new data, and from the conservation concerns of agencies and local communities. This urban example of conservation based on ameliorating nitrate water pollution extends the initial watershed-boundary approach along three dimensions: 1) from riparian to urban land-water-scapes; 2) from discrete engineering solutions to ecological design approaches; and 3) from structural solutions to inclusion of individual, household, and institutional behavior.

  19. Inactivation of West Nile Virus in Serum with Heat, Ionic Detergent, and Reducing Agent for Proteomic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-07

    until analyzed by LC MS/MS. 2.8 LC-MS/MS tandem mass tag analysis. Sample digests were suspended in 240 µl of 0.1% [vol/vol] formic acid in HPLC ...using a flow rate of 10 µl/minute. The loading solvent was 0.1 % [vol/vol] formic acid in HPLC grade water. The pre-column eluent was directed to

  20. Measures to reduce the impact of anti-icing agents on the environment and on the work of wastewater treatment facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronov Yuriy Viktorovich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the impact of the excess of chemical agents in the snow on the environment and on the working waste water treatment facilities. The article presents some suggestions for improvement of regulatory requirements concerning design engineering of snow melting facilities in the water disposal system. This suggestion was substantiated to assess snow as waste disposed from road surface, and to register snow mass delivered to snow melting facilities in equivalent units. It is assumed that snow melting stations are facilities designed for waste treatment, and this is why the project documentation for construction of these facilities has to undergo a state expertise for Environmental Impact Assessment. Completed studies provide estimates of the receipted snow, its pollution, etc. But at the same time these studies serve as the basis for approving the necessity of developing a unified system for monitoring the city's snow-melting plants to ensure the reliability.

  1. Biomolecule conjugation strategy using novel water-soluble phosphine-based chelating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Gali, Hariprasad; Volkert, Wynn A.

    2004-08-24

    This invention describes a novel strategy to produce phosphine-functionalized biomolecules (e.g. peptides or proteins) for potential use in the design and development of site-specific radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis or therapy of specific cancers. Hydrophilic alkyl phosphines, in general, tend to be oxidatively unstable. Therefore, incorporation of such phosphine functionalities on peptide (and other biomolecule) backbones, without oxidizing the P.sup.III centers, is difficult. In this context this discovery reports on a new technology by which phosphines, in the form of bifunctional chelating agents, can be directly incorporated on biomolecular backbones using manual synthetic or solid phase peptide synthesis methodologies. The superior ligating abilities of phosphine ligands, with various diagnostically (e.g. TC-99m) or therapeutically (e.g. Re186/188, Rh-105, Au-199) useful radiometals, coupled with the findings that the resulting complexes demonstrate high in vivo stability makes this approach useful in the development of radiolabeled biomolecules for applications in the design of tumor-specific radiopharmaceuticals.

  2. Fabrication and optical properties of water soluble CdSeS nanocrystals using glycerin as stabilizing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fengrui; Tan, Guolong

    2013-01-01

    Herein we present an unusual phosphine-free method to fabricate water soluble CdSeS nanocrystals in cubic structure. In this method, glycerin was used as a stabilizing agent replacing tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO). Water solution of Na2SeO3 in polyethylene glycol was utilized as Se source. 3-Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) provides S source. The phosphine-free Se and S sources were found to be highly reactive and suitable for the synthesis of CdSeS nanocrystals. XRD and HRTEM images confirm the formation of CdSeS nanocrystals in zinc blende structure. The absorption peaks on UV-vis spectra of as-prepared CdSeS nanocrystals are tunable from 330 nm to 440 nm, which blue shifts to shorter wavelength side in comparison with that of pure CdSe nanocrystals. The cubic CdSeS nanocrystals demonstrate narrow PL emissions spectra between 464 and 615 nm. Transmission electron microscopy images show the uniformity for the size distribution of the ternary QDs. Series water soluble CdSe(1-x)S(x) (x = 0:1) nanocrystals have also been synthesized using Na2SeO3 and Na2S solution as the Se-S co-sources. Tunable band gap energies of CdSe(1-x)S(x) (x = 0:1) nanocrystals upon chemical composition x have been achieved, the gap ranges from 290 nm to 558 nm.

  3. Reduced Graphene Oxide Membranes: Applications in Fog Collection and Water Purification

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Bo

    2017-05-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has attracted considerable interest recently as the low cost and chemical stable derivative of pristine graphene with application in many applications such as energy storage, water purification and electronic devices. This dissertation thoroughly investigated stacked rGO membrane fabrication process by vacuum-driven filtration, discovered asymmetry of the two surfaces of the rGO membrane, explored application perspectives of the asymmetric rGO membrane in fog collection and microstructure patterning, and disclosed membrane compaction issue during water filtration and species rejection. In more details, this dissertation revealed that, with suitable pore size, the filtration membrane substrate would leave its physical imprint on the bottom surface of the rGO membrane in the form of surface microstructures, which result in asymmetric dynamic water wettability properties of the two surfaces of the rGO membrane. The asymmetric wettability of the rGO membrane would lead to contrasting fog harvesting behavior of its two surfaces. The physical imprint mechanism was further extended to engineering pre-designed patterns selectively on the bottom surface of the rGO membrane. This dissertation, for the first time, reported the water flux and rejection kinetics, which was related to the compaction of the rGO membrane under pressure in the process of water filtration.

  4. Increased food production and reduced water use through optimized crop distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kyle Frankel; Rulli, Maria Cristina; Seveso, Antonio; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2017-12-01

    Growing demand for agricultural commodities for food, fuel and other uses is expected to be met through an intensification of production on lands that are currently under cultivation. Intensification typically entails investments in modern technology — such as irrigation or fertilizers — and increases in cropping frequency in regions suitable for multiple growing seasons. Here we combine a process-based crop water model with maps of spatially interpolated yields for 14 major food crops to identify potential differences in food production and water use between current and optimized crop distributions. We find that the current distribution of crops around the world neither attains maximum production nor minimum water use. We identify possible alternative configurations of the agricultural landscape that, by reshaping the global distribution of crops within current rainfed and irrigated croplands based on total water consumption, would feed an additional 825 million people while reducing the consumptive use of rainwater and irrigation water by 14% and 12%, respectively. Such an optimization process does not entail a loss of crop diversity, cropland expansion or impacts on nutrient and feed availability. It also does not necessarily invoke massive investments in modern technology that in many regions would require a switch from smallholder farming to large-scale commercial agriculture with important impacts on rural livelihoods.

  5. Lake Recovery Through Reduced Sulfate Deposition: A New Paradigm for Drinking Water Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lindsay E; Krkošek, Wendy H; Stoddart, Amina K; Trueman, Benjamin F; Gagnon, Graham A

    2017-02-07

    This study examined sulfate deposition in Nova Scotia from 1999 to 2015, and its association with increased pH and organic matter in two protected surface water supplies (Pockwock Lake and Lake Major) located in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The study also examined the effect of lake water chemistry on drinking water treatment processes. Sulfate deposition in the region decreased by 68%, whereas pH increased by 0.1-0.4 units over the 16-year period. Average monthly color concentrations in Pockwock Lake and Lake Major increased by 1.7 and 3.8×, respectively. Accordingly, the coagulant demand increased by 1.5 and 3.8× for the water treatment plants supplied by Pockwock Lake and Lake Major. Not only was this coagulant increase costly for the utility, it also resulted in compromised filter performance, particularly for the direct-biofiltration plant supplied by Pockwock Lake that was found to already be operating at the upper limit of the recommended direct filtration thresholds for color, total organic carbon and coagulant dose. Additionally, in 2012-2013 geosmin occurred in Pockwock Lake, which could have been attributed to reduced sulfate deposition as increases in pH favor more diverse cyanobacteria populations. Overall, this study demonstrated the impact that ambient air quality can have on drinking water supplies.

  6. Reduced risk estimations after remediation of lead (Pb) in drinking water at two US school districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllidou, Simoni; Le, Trung; Gallagher, Daniel; Edwards, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The risk of students to develop elevated blood lead from drinking water consumption at schools was assessed, which is a different approach from predictions of geometric mean blood lead levels. Measured water lead levels (WLLs) from 63 elementary schools in Seattle and 601 elementary schools in Los Angeles were acquired before and after voluntary remediation of water lead contamination problems. Combined exposures to measured school WLLs (first-draw and flushed, 50% of water consumption) and home WLLs (50% of water consumption) were used as inputs to the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model for each school. In Seattle an average 11.2% of students were predicted to exceed a blood lead threshold of 5 μg/dL across 63 schools pre-remediation, but predicted risks at individual schools varied (7% risk of exceedance at a "low exposure school", 11% risk at a "typical exposure school", and 31% risk at a "high exposure school"). Addition of water filters and removal of lead plumbing lowered school WLL inputs to the model, and reduced the predicted risk output to 4.8% on average for Seattle elementary students across all 63 schools. The remnant post-remediation risk was attributable to other assumed background lead sources in the model (air, soil, dust, diet and home WLLs), with school WLLs practically eliminated as a health threat. Los Angeles schools instead instituted a flushing program which was assumed to eliminate first-draw WLLs as inputs to the model. With assumed benefits of remedial flushing, the predicted average risk of students to exceed a BLL threshold of 5 μg/dL dropped from 8.6% to 6.0% across 601 schools. In an era with increasingly stringent public health goals (e.g., reduction of blood lead safety threshold from 10 to 5 μg/dL), quantifiable health benefits to students were predicted after water lead remediation at two large US school systems. © 2013.

  7. Water soluble heterometallic potassium-dioxidovanadium(V) complexes as potential antiproliferative agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Manas; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Silva, Joana; Mahmudov, Kamran T; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2016-02-01

    Two water soluble heterometallic potassium–dioxidovanadium polymers, [KVO2(L1)]n (1) and [KVO2(L2)(H2O)]n (2) [H2L1= (2,3-dihydroxybenzylidene)-2-hydroxybenzohydrazide and H2L2=(2,3-dihydroxybenzylidene)benzohydrazide], have been synthesized and characterized by IR, NMR, elemental analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The antiproliferative potentials of 1 and 2 were examined towards human colorectal carcinoma (HCT116), and lung (A549) and breast (MCF7) adenocarcinoma cell lines. 1 exhibits a high cytotoxic activity against colorectal carcinoma cells (HCT116), with IC50 lower than those for cisplatin.

  8. Isolation and selection of Bacillus spp. as potential biological agents for enhancement of water quality in culture of ornamental fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, R; Ramchuran, S; Ramduth, D; Görgens, J; Gardiner, N

    2007-11-01

    To isolate, select and evaluate Bacillus spp. as potential biological agents for enhancement of water quality in culture of ornamental fish. Natural isolates obtained from mud sediment and Cyprinus carpio were purified and assessed in vitro for efficacy based on the inhibition of growth of pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila and the decrease in concentrations of ammonium, nitrite, nitrate and phosphate ions. Based on suitability to predefined characteristics, the isolates B001, B002 and B003 were selected and evaluated in vitro in the presence of Aer. hydrophila and in a preliminary in vivo trial with C. carpio. The inhibitory effect on pathogen growth and the decrease in concentrations of waste ions was demonstrated. Based on 16S RNA sequence homology, the isolates were identified as Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus licheniformis, respectively. Isolate B002 did not contain the anthrax virulence plasmids pOX1, pOX2 or the B. cereus enterotoxin. Selected isolates effected synergistic reduction in pathogen load and the concentrations of waste ions in vitro and in vivo and are safe for use in ornamental aquaculture. A new approach for assessment of biological agents was demonstrated and has yielded putative isolates for development into aquaculture products.

  9. Hydrothermally derived water-dispersible mixed valence copper-chitosan nanocomposite as exceptionally potent antimicrobial agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basumallick, Srijita; Rajasekaran, Parthiban; Tetard, Laurene; Santra, Swadeshmukul

    2014-10-01

    We report, for the first time, a one-step hydrothermal (HT) process to design and synthesize water-dispersible chitosan nanoparticles loaded with mixed valence copper. Interestingly, this HT copper-chitosan biocompatible composite exhibits exceptionally high antimicrobial properties. A comprehensive characterization of the composite indicates that the hydrothermal process results in the formation of monodispersed nanoparticles with average size of 40 ± 10 nm. FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic studies unveiled that the hydrolysis of the glycoside bonds as the origin of the depolymerization of chitosan. Furthermore, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy measurements confirmed the presence of mixed valence copper states in the composite, while UV-Vis and FT-IR studies revealed the chemical interaction of copper with the chitosan matrix. Hence, the extensive spectroscopic data provide strong evidence that the chitosan structure was rearranged to capture copper oxide nanoparticles. Finally, HT copper-chitosan composite showed a complete killing effect when tested against both Gram negative ( E. coli) and Gram positive ( S. aureus) bacteria at metallic copper concentration of 100 μg/ml (1.57 mM). At the same concentration, neither pure chitosan nor copper elicited such antimicrobial efficacy. Thus, we show that HT process significantly enhances the synergistic antimicrobial effect of chitosan and copper in addition to increasing the water dispersibility.

  10. Synthesis of metallocomplexes of water soluble bisquinolinylporhyrins as potential antimicrobial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Ishkov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available At present, extensive research is being carried out on the phenomenon of resistance of microbes to antibiotics, including the newest of them. Among the most promising drug candidates for treatment such superbugs is derivatives of 5,15-disubstituted water-soluble porphyrins developed and patented by Destiny Pharma, UK. Here, we continued of our investigation of quinolinylporphyrins and report about synthesis of 5,15-di(n-propyl-10,20-di(3-quinolinylporphyrine and its isomer - 5,10-di(n-propyl-15,20-di(3-quinolinylporphyrine and their complexes with Fe and Mn. The porphyrins was obtained by mixed aldehydes condensation of mixture quinoline-3-carbaldehyde and n-butyraldehyde with pyrrole in propionic acid with small amount propionic anhydride. Above mentioned porphyrins was separated and purified by column chromatography on silica gel and their Fe and Mn complexes was synthesized in refluxing DMF by treatment respectively FeCl3 and Mn(CH3CO22. Water-soluble form of the metalloporphyrines was obtained by quaternization of nitrogen atom of quinolinyl substituents by methyl-paratoluenesulfonate for further investigation their antimicrobial properties.

  11. Pistachio hull water-soluble polysaccharides as a novel prebiotic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari-Alavijeh, Safoura; Soleimanian-Zad, Sabihe; Sheikh-Zeinoddin, Mahmoud; Hashmi, Sarwar

    2018-02-01

    We isolated and characterized pistachio hull polysaccharides (PHP). The PHP was a heteropolysaccharide mainly contained 75.50% (w/w) total sugar and 9.51% (w/w) uronic acid. As determined by GPC analysis, the polysaccharide with a molecular weight of 3.71×10 6 D (83.2%) was the most dominant fraction. Moreover, HPLC analysis indicated that PHP was predominantly composed of xylose, glucose, arabinose, and fructose with a molar ratio of 1.00:2.50:19.67:28.81. FT-IR and NMR analysis also confirmed the results obtained by HPLC and characterized preliminary structure features of the PHP. Functional properties of the PHP including water holding capacity (WHC: 2.44±0.05g water/g DM), and oil holding capacity (OHC: 11.53±0.04g oil/g DM) were significant compared to inulin used as reference prebiotic (pPHP remained 94.37% undigested in the simulated digestion process and stimulated the growth of L. plantarum PTCC 1896 and L. rhamnosus GG and increased the acetate, propionate and butyrate production over inulin in vitro. Totally, the PHP showed a considerable prebiotic capability and high WHC, OHC suggesting that the PHP is a potent pharmaceutical with good technological properties which can be used in food and drug industries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan; Adrienne Cooper

    2004-11-01

    Absorption of sulfur dioxide from a simulated flue gas was investigated for the production of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a highly effective coagulant useful in treatment of drinking water and wastewater. The reaction for PFS synthesis took place near atmospheric pressure and at temperatures of 30-80 C. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved, with ferrous iron concentrations in the product less than 0.1%. A factorial analysis of the effect of temperature, oxidant dosage, SO{sub 2} concentration, and gas flow rate on SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was carried out, and statistical analyses are conducted. The solid PFS was also characterized with different methods. Characterization results have shown that PFS possesses both crystalline and non-crystalline structure. The kinetics of reactions among FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O, NaHSO{sub 3} and NaClO{sub 3} was investigated. Characterizations of dry PFS synthesized from SO{sub 2} show the PFS possesses amorphous structure, which is desired for it to be a good coagulant in water and wastewater treatment. A series of lab-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of PFS synthesized from waste sulfur dioxide, ferrous sulfate and sodium chlorate. The performance assessments were based on the comparison of PFS and other conventional and new coagulants for the removal of turbidity and arsenic under different laboratory coagulant conditions. Pilot plant studies were conducted at Des Moines Water Works in Iowa and at the City of Savannah Industrial and Domestic (I&D) Water Treatment Plant in Port Wentworth, Georgia. PFS performances were compared with those of conventional coagulants. The tests in both water treatment plants have shown that PFS is, in general, comparable or better than other coagulants in removal of turbidity and organic substances. The corrosion behavior of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS) prepared from SO{sub 2} and ferric chloride (FC) were compared. Results

  13. Limited Effects of Water Absorption on Reducing the Accuracy of Leaf Nitrogen Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blowman J. Wang

    2017-03-01

    finally calculated. The results showed that chlorophyll, carotenoid, and water contents could be estimated with R2 of 0.75, 0.59, and 0.69, respectively, which were acceptable for fresh leaves. The dry matter was retrieved with a relatively lower accuracy because of the fixed absorption coefficients adopted by PROSPECT5. The performances of species-specific optimal indices using water-free spectra were comparable to or worse than the corresponding indices derived with measured or simulated spectra. Compared with measured spectra, ETP did not change much after the effects of water were removed, and the R2 between cross-species optimal spectral indices and area-based LNC for Sawtooth Oak and Sweetgum decreased while it remained almost the same for Maize, suggesting that the water-removed cross-species optimal indices were inferior to the corresponding optimal indices found without water removal. ETP was larger than 30% for all spectra, demonstrating the non-existence of common optimal NDSI or RSI for the three species. After water removal, the accuracy of PLSR for Sawtooth Oak and Sweetgum decreased and increased negligibly for Maize. The results suggest that water absorption has limited effects on reducing the accuracy of leaf nitrogen estimation. On the contrary, the accuracy may decrease due to the loss of spectral information caused by the removal of water-sensitive spectral regions.

  14. Effect of Gum Arabic karroo as a Water-Reducing Admixture in Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbugua, Rose; Salim, Ramadhan; Ndambuki, Julius

    2016-01-28

    Concrete is one of the most popular construction materials in the world. Chemical admixtures are ingredients added to concrete to enhance its properties. However, most chemical admixtures on the market today are expensive, thereby making them out of reach for small consumers of concrete. In Africa, use of chemical admixtures is rare despite the harsh weather conditions. In the current study, Gum from Acacia karroo (GAK) was used as a water-reducing admixture in concrete. A slump test, density and compressive strength were studied using different dosages of GAK while neat concrete was the control. Results showed that slump increased by 200% at a 2% dosage of GAK. This enabled reduction of water-to-binder (w/b) ratio from 0.61 to 0.48 for samples with a 3% dosage. Reduction in w/b resulted in increased compressive strength of 37.03% above the control after 180 days of curing for a 3% dosage. XRD studies also showed a decreased rate of hydration in the presence of GAK in concrete. It was concluded that GAK can be used in concrete as a water-reducing admixture, which is environmentally-friendly, thus producing sustainable and greener concrete.

  15. Effect of Gum Arabic karroo as a Water-Reducing Admixture in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Mbugua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is one of the most popular construction materials in the world. Chemical admixtures are ingredients added to concrete to enhance its properties. However, most chemical admixtures on the market today are expensive, thereby making them out of reach for small consumers of concrete. In Africa, use of chemical admixtures is rare despite the harsh weather conditions. In the current study, Gum from Acacia karroo (GAK was used as a water-reducing admixture in concrete. A slump test, density and compressive strength were studied using different dosages of GAK while neat concrete was the control. Results showed that slump increased by 200% at a 2% dosage of GAK. This enabled reduction of water-to-binder (w/b ratio from 0.61 to 0.48 for samples with a 3% dosage. Reduction in w/b resulted in increased compressive strength of 37.03% above the control after 180 days of curing for a 3% dosage. XRD studies also showed a decreased rate of hydration in the presence of GAK in concrete. It was concluded that GAK can be used in concrete as a water-reducing admixture, which is environmentally-friendly, thus producing sustainable and greener concrete.

  16. Water cycle and its management for plant habitats at reduced pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and mathematical models were developed for describing and testing temperature and humidity parameters for plant production in bioregenerative life support systems. A factor was included for analyzing systems operating at low (10-101.3 kPa) pressure to reduce gas leakage and structural mass (e.g., inflatable greenhouses for space application). The expected close relationship between temperature and relative humidity was observed, along with the importance of heat exchanger coil temperature and air circulation rate. The presence of plants in closed habitats results in increased water flux through the system. Changes in pressure affect gas diffusion rates and surface boundary layers, and change convective transfer capabilities and water evaporation rates. A consistent observation from studies with plants at reduced pressures is increased evapotranspiration rates, even at constant vapor pressure deficits. This suggests that plant water status is a critical factor for managing low-pressure production systems. The approach suggested should help space mission planners design artificial environments in closed habitats.

  17. REMOVAL OF ORGANIC DYES FROM CONTAMINATED WATER USING COFE2O4 /REDUCED GRAPHENE OXIDE NANOCOMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sakhaei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Up to now, lots of materials such as active carbon, iron, manganese, zirconium, and metal oxides have been widely used for removal of dyes from contaminated water. Among these, ferrite nanoparticle is an interesting magnetic material due to its moderate saturation magnetization, excellent chemical stability and mechanical hardness. Graphene, a new class of 2D carbonaceous material with atom thick layer features, has attracted much attention recently due to its high specific surface area. Reduced graphene oxide (rGO has also been of great interest because of its unique properties, which are similar to those of graphene, such as specific surface area, making it an ideal candidate for dye removal. Thus far, few works have been carried out on the preparation of CoFe2O4-rGO composite and its applications in removal of contaminants from water. In this paper, CoFe2O4 reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite was fabricated using hydrothermal process. During the hydrothermal process, the reduction of graphene oxide and growth of CoFe2O4 simultaneously occurred on the carbon basal planes under the conditions generated in the hydrothermal system. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy contaminant and UV-Vis spectroscopy as the analytical method. The experimental results suggest that this material has great potential for treating Congo red contaminated water.

  18. A novel biocoagulant agent from mushroom chitosan as water and wastewater therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Oday; Abidin, Zurina Z; Idris, Azni; Kamarudin, Suryani; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq

    2017-08-01

    A new commercial cationic polyelectrolyte chitosan (CM), obtained from the waste of mushroom production, was examined using models of water and wastewater namely kaolin and palm oil mill effluent (pome). As it is biocompatible, widely available, and economically feasible, chitosan mushroom has high potential to be a suitable replacement for alum. Also, it can be a promising alternative to chitosan obtained traditionally from Crustaceans due to its higher zeta potential and homogeneity based on the raw material required for its production. A wide range of coagulant dose (5-60 mg l -1 ) and wastewater pH (2-12) were taken into account to find the optimal conditions of coagulation. The optimal doses are 10 and 20 mg l -1 at best pH (11 and 3) when treated with kaolin and palm oil mill effluent, respectively, while 1200 mg l -1 of alum was not enough to reach the efficiency of chitosan mushroom. On the other hand, the optimum dose of chitosan mushroom (20 mg l -1 ) at pH 3 of pome produced (75, 73, and 98%) removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), and total suspended solids (TSS), respectively. The significant potential of chitosan mushroom was proved by zeta potential measurement. Indeed, it possesses the highest zeta potential (+70 mV) as compared to the traditional chitosan produced from crustaceans. In short, chitosan mushroom as a biocoagulant is eco-friendly and it enhances water quality that meets the requirements of environmental conservatives.

  19. Fast and low-temperature sintering of silver complex using oximes as a potential reducing agent for solution-processible, highly conductive electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Han, Dae Sang; Park, Su Bin; Chae, Jangwoo; Kim, Ji Man; Kwak, Jeonghun

    2014-11-01

    Highly conductive, solution-processed silver thin-films were obtained at a low sintering temperature of 100 °C in a short sintering time of 10 min by introducing oximes as a potential reductant for silver complex. The thermal properties and reducibility of three kinds of oximes, acetone oxime, 2-butanone oxime, and one dimethylglyoxime, were investigated as a reducing agent, and we found that the thermal decomposition product of oximes (ketones) accelerated the conversion of silver complex into highly conductive silver at low sintering temperature in a short time. Using the acetone oxime, the silver thin-film exhibited the lowest surface resistance (0.91 Ω sq-1) compared to those sing other oximes. The silver thin-film also showed a high reflectance of 97.8%, which is comparable to evaporated silver films. We also demonstrated inkjet printed silver patterns with the oxime-added silver complex inks.

  20. New insights into the formation mechanism of Ag, Au and AgAu nanoparticles in aqueous alkaline media: alkoxides from alcohols, aldehydes and ketones as universal reducing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Janaina F; Garcia, Amanda C; Ferreira, Eduardo B; Pires, Cleiton; Oliveira, Vanessa L; Tremiliosi-Filho, Germano; Gasparotto, Luiz H S

    2015-09-07

    In this report we present new insights into the formation mechanism of Ag, Au and AgAu nanoparticles with alcohols, aldehydes and ketones in alkaline medium at room temperature. We selected methanol, ethanol, glycerol, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetone to demonstrate their capability of reducing gold and silver ions under the above-mentioned conditions. We showed that the particles are also formed with potassium tert-butoxide in the absence of hydroxides. Our results strongly suggest that alkoxides, formed from any molecule containing a hydroxyl or a functional group capable of generating them in alkaline medium, are the actual and universal reducing agent of silver and gold ions, in opposition to the currently accepted mechanisms. The universality of the reaction mechanism proposed in this work may impact on the production of noble nanoparticles with simple chemicals normally found in standard laboratories.

  1. Fast and low-temperature sintering of silver complex using oximes as a potential reducing agent for solution-processible, highly conductive electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Han, Dae Sang; Park, Su Bin; Chae, Jangwoo; Kim, Ji Man; Kwak, Jeonghun

    2014-11-21

    Highly conductive, solution-processed silver thin-films were obtained at a low sintering temperature of 100 °C in a short sintering time of 10 min by introducing oximes as a potential reductant for silver complex. The thermal properties and reducibility of three kinds of oximes, acetone oxime, 2-butanone oxime, and one dimethylglyoxime, were investigated as a reducing agent, and we found that the thermal decomposition product of oximes (ketones) accelerated the conversion of silver complex into highly conductive silver at low sintering temperature in a short time. Using the acetone oxime, the silver thin-film exhibited the lowest surface resistance (0.91 Ω sq(-1)) compared to those sing other oximes. The silver thin-film also showed a high reflectance of 97.8%, which is comparable to evaporated silver films. We also demonstrated inkjet printed silver patterns with the oxime-added silver complex inks.

  2. Removal heavy metals and sulphate from waste waters by sulphate-reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kušnierová Mária

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the process of bacterial sulphate reduction, which is used to removal of heavy metals and sulphate ions from waste waters.The life of animals and plants depends on the existence of microscopic organisms – microorganisms (MO, which play an important role in cycle changes of biogenic elements on the earth. The sulphur cycle in the nature is considered as one of the oldest and most significant biological systems (Fig. 1. The sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB miss the assimilatory part of the cycle and produce sulphides. The microbial population of this dissimilatory part is called “sulfuretum”. The SRB can be found in anaerobic mud and sediments of freshwater, thermal or non-thermal sulphur springs, mining waters from sulphide deposits, oil deposits, sea and ocean beds, and in the gastrointestinal tract of man and animals. The SRB represent a group of chemoorganotrophic, strictly anaerobic and gramnegative bacteria, which exhibit a great morphological and physiological diversity. Despite of their considerable morphological variety, they have one property in common, which is the ability to utilise preferentially sulphates (occasionally sulphites, thiosulphates, tetrathionates as electron acceptors, which are reduced to sulphides, during anaerobic respiration. The electron donors in these processes are simple organic compounds as lactate, malate, etc.,(heterotrophically reduction or gaseous hydrogen (autotrophically reduction. SRB can produce a considerable amount of hydrogen sulphide, which reacts easily in aqueous solution with the cations of heavy metals, forming metal sulphides that have low solubility. The bacterial sulphate reduction can be used for the treatment of acid mine drainage waters, which is considered to be the major problem associated with mining activities.In order to remove heavy metals from waste waters, e.g., from galvanizing plants, mine waters (Smolnik, Šobov locality and metallurgic plants (works

  3. DNA interaction, anti-proliferative effect of copper oxide nanocolloids prepared from metallosurfactant based microemulsions acting as precursor, template and reducing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Dogra, Varsha; Kumar, Rajeev; Kumar, Sandeep; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Singhal, Nitin Kumar

    2018-01-15

    In the present study, we have synthesized mixed cuprous/copper oxide nanosuspensions by metallosurfactant based microemulsion technique. Three metallosurfactants were synthesized which includes two non-ionic double chained metallosurfactants with C 12 , C 16 chains with coordinated copper i.e. Cudda and Cuhexa, respectively. Another cationic double chained metallosurfactant with loosely bound metal (Cuctac) was also prepared. The prepared metallocomplexes were characterized using FTIR, elemental analysis, and NMR. The effect of the position of metallosurfactant in microemulsion on the fabrication and properties of nanosuspensions was elucidated. In this method, no external reducing agent and capping agent were added and tween 80 acted both as reducing and stabilizing agent for the nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized and it was observed that mixed copper and cuprous oxide particles are present in colloidal suspension for all the three studied metallosurfactants. The kinetics of formation of mixed copper/cuprous oxide nanosuspensions (Ns) and their stability was estimated using Uv-visible spectroscopy. Further, the binding and interactions of copper nanosuspensions with calf Thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were assessed using Uv-vis spectroscopy, circular dichroism and gel electrophoresis. Additionally, the antioxidant activity of the Cu Ns was checked using DPPH assay. The role of positive charge on nanoparticles as evaluated from Zeta potential was responsible for DNA affinity. The DNA conformational changes in the presence of nanosuspensions and relevant scavengers were investigated. Further, the anti-proliferative activity of copper Ns was assessed using HeLa cells and Cuhexa derived Ns were proved to be active with highest activity at a low concentration and were nontoxic towards normal cell lines. In summary, this work demonstrates a softer approach for the synthesis of copper nanosuspensions with a size range of 2-5 nm and evaluated the role

  4. TTFields alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic agents effectively reduce the viability of MDR cell sub-lines that over-express ABC transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirson Eilon D

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents may result in reduced sensitivity to structurally unrelated agents, a phenomenon known as multidrug resistance, MDR. The purpose of this study is to investigate cell growth inhibition of wild type and the corresponding MDR cells by Tumor Treating Fields - TTFields, a new cancer treatment modality that is free of systemic toxicity. The TTFields were applied alone and in combination with paclitaxel and doxorubicin. Methods Three pairs of wild type/MDR cell lines, having resistivity resulting from over-expression of ABC transporters, were studied: a clonal derivative (C11 of parental Chinese hamster ovary AA8 cells and their emetine-resistant sub-line EmtR1; human breast cancer cells MCF-7 and their mitoxantrone-resistant sub lines MCF-7/Mx and human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and their doxorubicin resistant MDA-MB-231/Dox cells. TTFields were applied for 72 hours with and without the chemotherapeutic agents. The numbers of viable cells in the treated cultures and the untreated control groups were determined using the XTT assay. Student t-test was applied to asses the significance of the differences between results obtained for each of the three cell pairs. Results TTFields caused a similar reduction in the number of viable cells of wild type and MDR cells. Treatments by TTFields/drug combinations resulted in a similar increased reduction in cell survival of wild type and MDR cells. TTFields had no effect on intracellular doxorubicin accumulation in both wild type and MDR cells. Conclusions The results indicate that TTFields alone and in combination with paclitaxel and doxorubicin effectively reduce the viability of both wild type and MDR cell sub-lines and thus can potentially be used as an effective treatment of drug resistant tumors.

  5. Reducing surface water total and methyl mercury concentrations and bioavailability using a coagulation-wetland system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, T. E.; Fleck, J.; Henneberry, Y. K.; Stumpner, E. B.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Bachand, P.; Randall, P.

    2013-12-01

    With the recent passage of laws regulating concentrations and loads of mercury (Hg) in surface waters, there is a need to develop management practices that will reduce the export of Hg from both point and non-point sources. Coagulation with metal based salts to remove particles and dissolved organic matter (DOM) from solution is a practice commonly employed by drinking water utilities. Because dissolved Hg is associated with particles and DOM, it follows that Hg should also be removed during the coagulation process and end up associated with the organo-metal precipitate, termed flocculate (floc). The effectiveness of iron- and aluminum-based coagulants for removing both inorganic and methyl mercury (IHg and MeHg, respectively) from solution was demonstrated in laboratory studies conducted on agricultural drainage waters of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: dissolved concentrations of MeHg decreased by 80% while IHg decreased by 97% following coagulation. To test the field application of this technology, samples were collected from the inflows and outflows of wetland treatment cells constructed in the central Delta of California. This replicated field experiment includes three replicates each of three inflow waters treatments: (1) iron sulfate addition, (2) polyaluminum chloride addition, and (3) untreated controls. Water entering and exiting the nine treatment cells was sampled approximately monthly over a 1-year period for total Hg and MeHg in both the dissolved and particulate aqueous phases. Initial results confirm that coagulant addition is removing Hg (total and methyl, particulate and dissolved) from solution and sequestering it in the floc. Seasonal effects on DOM concentration and other factors appear to effect whether passage through the wetland cells alters surface water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and Hg concentrations. Related studies will examine whether the presence of the floc affects the production and fate of MeHg within the wetland cells. If

  6. Fullerene-reduced graphene oxide composites obtained by ultrashort laser ablation of fullerite in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bonis, A., E-mail: angela.debonis@unibas.it [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10-85100, Potenza (Italy); Curcio, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10-85100, Potenza (Italy); Santagata, A. [CNR-ISM, U.O.S. Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, 85050, Tito Scalo (PZ) (Italy); Rau, J.V. [CNR-ISM, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100-00133, Rome (Italy); Galasso, A.; Teghil, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10-85100, Potenza (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Laser ablation of a fullerite target in water performed by an ultra-short laser source has been reported. • The formation of reduced graphene oxide has been described considering the laser ablation in liquid mechanism. • Fullerene-reduced graphene oxide composite, in the form of self assembled microtubes, has been described. - Abstract: The laser ablation in liquid of carbon-based solid targets is of particular interest thanks to the possibility of obtaining different carbon allotropes by varying the experimental parameters employed. The ablation of a fullerite target in water using a frequency-doubled Nd:glass laser source with a pulse duration of 250 fs and a frequency repetition rate of 10 Hz is presented. The obtained products have been characterized by transmission electron and atomic force microscopies and by X-ray photoelectron and micro-Raman spectroscopies. During the femtosecond laser ablation, the collapse of fullerene cages has been considered with the consequent formation of graphene oxide (GO) and its successive hydrogenation. The process of self-assembling in microtube structures of the formed reduced graphene oxide-fullerene composites has then been reported.

  7. In situ green synthesis of silver–graphene oxide nanocomposites by using tryptophan as a reducing and stabilizing agent and their application in SERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Biwen; Liu, Zhiming; Guo, Zhouyi; Zhang, Wen; Wan, Mingming; Qin, Xiaochu; Zhong, Huiqing, E-mail: zhonghq@scnu.edu.cn

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Tryptophan (Trp) as a reducing and stabilizing agent was a green one-pot method. • The role of pH has been explored to obtain optimum reaction conditions during the growth process. • The synthesized Ag–GO nanocomposites exhibited excellent SERS activity. - Abstract: Silver–graphene oxide (Ag–GO) nanocomposites were in situ fabricated rapidly through a green one-pot method by using tryptophan (Trp) as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The morphologies of synthesized Ag–GO nanocomposites were characterized by UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and micro-Raman system. The results indicated silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) with spherical size were well dispersed on the surface of graphene oxide (GO). The role of pH has been explored to obtain optimum reaction conditions during the growth process. Raman signals of GO were greatly enhanced after Ag NPs loaded on its surface. More importantly, the synthesized Ag–GO nanocomposites exhibited excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity as SERS substrates to detect crystal violet (CV) in aqueous solution, and the enhancement factor (EF) from the intensity of the vibrational mode at 1621 cm{sup −1} was calculated to be 1.6 × 10{sup 5}.

  8. Integrating modeling, monitoring, and management to reduce critical uncertainties in water resource decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, James T; Freeman, Mary C

    2016-12-01

    Stream ecosystems provide multiple, valued services to society, including water supply, waste assimilation, recreation, and habitat for diverse and productive biological communities. Managers striving to sustain these services in the face of changing climate, land uses, and water demands need tools to assess the potential effectiveness of alternative management actions, and often, the resulting tradeoffs between competing objectives. Integrating predictive modeling with monitoring data in an adaptive management framework provides a process by which managers can reduce model uncertainties and thus improve the scientific bases for subsequent decisions. We demonstrate an integration of monitoring data with a dynamic, metapopulation model developed to assess effects of streamflow alteration on fish occupancy in a southeastern US stream system. Although not extensive (collected over three years at nine sites), the monitoring data allowed us to assess and update support for alternative population dynamic models using model probabilities and Bayes rule. We then use the updated model weights to estimate the effects of water withdrawal on stream fish communities and demonstrate how feedback in the form of monitoring data can be used to improve water resource decision making. We conclude that investment in more strategic monitoring, guided by a priori model predictions under alternative hypotheses and an adaptive sampling design, could substantially improve the information available to guide decision-making and management for ecosystem services from lotic systems. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Improving rice production sustainability by reducing water demand and greenhouse gas emissions with biodegradable films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhisheng; Zheng, Xunhua; Liu, Chunyan; Lin, Shan; Zuo, Qiang; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    In China, rice production is facing unprecedented challenges, including the increasing demand, looming water crisis and on-going climate change. Thus, producing more rice at lower environmental cost is required for future development, i.e., the use of less water and the production of fewer greenhouse gas (GHG) per unit of rice. Ground cover rice production systems (GCRPSs) could potentially address these concerns, although no studies have systematically and simultaneously evaluated the benefits of GCRPS regarding yields and considering water use and GHG emissions. This study reports the results of a 2-year study comparing conventional paddy and various GCRPS practices. Relative to conventional paddy, GCRPSs had greater rice yields and nitrogen use efficiencies (8.5% and 70%, respectively), required less irrigation (-64%) and resulted in less total CH4 and N2O emissions (-54%). On average, annual emission factors of N2O were 1.67% and 2.00% for conventional paddy and GCRPS, respectively. A cost-benefit analysis considering yields, GHG emissions, water demand and labor and mulching costs indicated GCRPSs are an environmentally and economically profitable technology. Furthermore, substituting the polyethylene film with a biodegradable film resulted in comparable benefits of yield and climate. Overall, GCRPSs, particularly with biodegradable films, provide a promising solution for farmers to secure or even increase yields while reducing the environmental footprint.

  10. Preparation of Silica/Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanosheet Composites for Removal of Organic Contaminants from Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Liu, Wei; Wang, Haifei; Lu, Wensheng

    2016-06-01

    Graphene-based composites open up new opportunities as effective adsorbents for the removal of organic contaminants from water. In this article, we report a novel and facile process to synthesize well-dispersed silica/reduced graphene oxide (SiO2/RGO) nanosheet composites. The SiO2/RGO nanosheet composites are prepared through a modified sol-gel process with in situ hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) on graphene oxide (GO) nanosheet, followed by reduction of GO to graphene. In comparison with the RGO nanosheets, the as-prepared SiO2/RGO nanosheet composites have a larger surface area and good aqueous disperse ability. In addition, the application of SiO2/RGO nanosheet composites was demonstrated on removing organic dyes from water. The SiO2/RGO nanosheet composites show rapid and stable adsorption performance on removal of Methylene Blue (MB) and thionine (TH) from water. It is indicated that the resulting SiO2/RGO composites can be utilized as efficient adsorbents for the removal of organic contaminants from water.

  11. DEFICIT IRRIGATION TECHNIQUE FOR REDUCING WATER USE OF TOMATO UNDER POLYTUNNEL CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladjana SAVIC

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of paper was to asses the use of regulated deficit irrigation (RDI for production of two tomato cultivars (Cedrico and Abellus in polytunnels in Serbia. RDI plants received 60% of the water that was applied to FI plants and significant saving of water for irrigation and increased in irrigation water use efficiency (IWUE were achieved. Yield data for Cedrico cultivar showed no differences between RDI and FI, while due to the bigger sensitivity to drought, yield of Abellus was reduced under RDI. In general, fruit quality (soluble solids, titrable acidity was sustained or improved in both cultivars under RDI. Economic analyses showed that due to the current low prices of water and electricity in Serbia, the profit increase of Cedrico, similarly to the previously trialed cultivar Amati, was not high under RDI comparing to FI. Reduction of yield and consequent profit for Abellus, indicated that for future commercial growing of tomato under RDI should be used drought resistant cultivars.

  12. Harmful filamentous cyanobacteria favoured by reduced water turnover with lake warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, Thomas; Köster, Oliver; Salcher, Michaela M.; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2012-11-01

    Anthropogenic-induced changes in nutrient ratios have increased the susceptibility of large temperate lakes to several effects of rising air temperatures and the resulting heating of water bodies. First, warming leads to stronger thermal stratification, thus impeding natural complete water turnover (holomixis), which compensates for oxygen deficits in the deep zones. Second, increased water temperatures and nutrient concentrations can directly favour the growth of harmful algae. Thus, lake-restoration programmes have focused on reducing nutrients to limit toxic algal blooms. Here we present evidence that the ubiquitous harmful cyanobacterium Planktothrix rubescens has become the dominant species in a large lake during the past four decades, although the phosphorus content of the ecosystem decreased fivefold. However, the nitrogen input was not diminished concomitantly, favouring this non-N2-fixing cyanobacterium owing to increased N:P ratios. P. rubescens contains gas vesicles that allow for buoyancy to accumulate within the depth of optimal irradiance. As the toxic cyanobacterium has low consumption by predators, water turnover represents the main mechanism of seasonal population control. Thus, unidirectional lake-restoration measures in parallel with recurrent absence of holomixis owing to lake warming may lead to similar undesired effects that have formerly emerged from fertilization.

  13. Collecting a better water-quality sample: Reducing vertical stratification bias in open and closed channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, William R.

    2017-01-01

    Collection of water-quality samples that accurately characterize average particle concentrations and distributions in channels can be complicated by large sources of variability. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a fully automated Depth-Integrated Sample Arm (DISA) as a way to reduce bias and improve accuracy in water-quality concentration data. The DISA was designed to integrate with existing autosampler configurations commonly used for the collection of water-quality samples in vertical profile thereby providing a better representation of average suspended sediment and sediment-associated pollutant concentrations and distributions than traditional fixed-point samplers. In controlled laboratory experiments, known concentrations of suspended sediment ranging from 596 to 1,189 mg/L were injected into a 3 foot diameter closed channel (circular pipe) with regulated flows ranging from 1.4 to 27.8 ft3 /s. Median suspended sediment concentrations in water-quality samples collected using the DISA were within 7 percent of the known, injected value compared to 96 percent for traditional fixed-point samplers. Field evaluation of this technology in open channel fluvial systems showed median differences between paired DISA and fixed-point samples to be within 3 percent. The range of particle size measured in the open channel was generally that of clay and silt. Differences between the concentration and distribution measured between the two sampler configurations could potentially be much larger in open channels that transport larger particles, such as sand.

  14. Music therapy as a stress reducing agent and anxiety in adolescents. Development of a musicoterapeutical process within the educational center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Mora

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Music therapy is a very powerful therapeutic intervention technique that connects very quickly with the emotional content of the individual. In Spain, the facts of education and emotional development have been relegated to a second position in detriment of performance and academic achievement. Under this situation many adolescents in our society suffer daily problems of anxiety and stress, associated or not to other possible pathologies. The following study aims to shed little specks of light about the effects of music therapy on individual development of adolescents from a public school. We treat these students in their entire whole, including cognitive, emotional, social, musical and intrapersonal aspects within each session. It is intended primarily to reduce levels of anxiety and stress that many of them are subjected to daily, victims of their own risk or social exclusion, added or not to different pathologies diagnosed.

  15. The role of aqueous leaf extract of Tinospora crispa as reducing and capping agents for synthesis of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apriandanu, D. O. B.; Yulizar, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Environmentally friendly method for green synthesis of Au nanoparticles (AuNP) using aqueous leaf extract of Tinospora crispa (TLE) was reported. TLE has the ability for reducing and capping AuNP. Identification of active compounds in aqueous leaf extract was obtained by phytochemical analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The AuNP-TLE growth was characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The particle size and the distribution of AuNP were confirmed by particle size analyzer (PSA). AuNP-TLE formation was optimized by varying the extract concentration and time of the synthesis process. UV-Vis absorption spectrum of optimum AuNP formation displayed by the surface plasmon resonance at maximum wavelength of λmax 536 nm. The PSA result showed that AuNP has size distribution of 80.60 nm and stable up to 21 days. TEM images showed that the size of the AuNP is ± 25 nm.

  16. A multi-agent design for a pressurized water reactor (P.W.R.) control system; Modelisation multi-agents pour la conduite d'un reacteur a eau sous pression (REP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimar-Lichtenberger, M. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-01-01

    This PhD work is in keeping with the complex industrial process control. The starting point is the analysis of control principles in a Pressurized Water Reactor (P.W.R). In order to cope with the limits of the present control procedures, a new control organisation by objectives and means is defined. This functional organisation is based on the state approach and is characterized by the parallel management of control functions to ensure the continuous control of the installation essential variables. With regard to this complex system problematic, we search the most adapted computer modeling. We show that a multi-agent system approach brings an interesting answer to manage the distribution and parallelism of control decisions and tasks. We present a synthetic study of multi-agent systems and their application fields.The choice of a multi-agent approach proceeds with the design of an agent model. This model gains experiences from other applications. This model is implemented in a computer environment which combines the mechanisms of an object language with Prolog. We propose in this frame a multi-agent modeling of the control system where each function is represented by an agent. The agents are structured in a hierarchical organisation and deal with different abstraction levers of the problem. Following a prototype process, the validation is realized by an implementation and by a coupling to a reactor simulator. The essential contributions of an agent approach turn on the mastery of the system complexity, the openness, the robustness and the potentialities of human-machine cooperation. (author)

  17. Treatment with immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory agents delays onset of canine genetic narcolepsy and reduces symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, L N; Wu, M-F; John, J; Siegel, J M

    2004-08-01

    All Doberman pinschers and Labrador retrievers homozygous for a mutation of the hypocretin (orexin) receptor-2 (hcrtr2) gene develop narcolepsy under normal conditions. Degenerative changes and increased display of major histocompatibility complex class II antigens have been linked to symptom onset in genetically narcoleptic Doberman pinschers. This suggests that the immune system may contribute to neurodegenerative changes and narcoleptic symptomatology in these dogs. We therefore attempted to alter the course of canine genetic narcolepsy, as an initial test of principle, by administering a combination of three immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory drugs chosen to suppress the immune response globally. Experimental dogs were treated with a combination of methylprednisolone, methotrexate and azathioprine orally starting within 3 weeks after birth, and raised in an environment that minimized pathogen exposure. Symptoms in treated and untreated animals were quantified using the food elicited cataplexy test (FECT), modified FECT and actigraphy. With drug treatment, time to cataplexy onset more than doubled, time spent in cataplexy during tests was reduced by more than 90% and nighttime sleep periods were consolidated. Short-term drug administration to control dogs did not reduce cataplexy symptoms, demonstrating that the drug regimen did not directly affect symptoms. Treatment was stopped at 6 months, after which experimental animals remained less symptomatic than controls until at least 2 years of age. This treatment is the first shown to affect symptom development in animal or human genetic narcolepsy. Our findings show that hcrtr2 mutation is not sufficient for the full symptomatic development of canine genetic narcolepsy and suggest that the immune system may play a role in the development of this disorder.

  18. A jazz-based approach for optimal setting of pressure reducing valves in water distribution networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paola, Francesco; Galdiero, Enzo; Giugni, Maurizio

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a model for valve setting in water distribution networks (WDNs), with the aim of reducing the level of leakage. The approach is based on the harmony search (HS) optimization algorithm. The HS mimics a jazz improvisation process able to find the best solutions, in this case corresponding to valve settings in a WDN. The model also interfaces with the improved version of a popular hydraulic simulator, EPANET 2.0, to check the hydraulic constraints and to evaluate the performances of the solutions. Penalties are introduced in the objective function in case of violation of the hydraulic constraints. The model is applied to two case studies, and the obtained results in terms of pressure reductions are comparable with those of competitive metaheuristic algorithms (e.g. genetic algorithms). The results demonstrate the suitability of the HS algorithm for water network management and optimization.

  19. Water contamination reduces the tolerance of coral larvae to thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P Negri

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are highly susceptible to climate change, with elevated sea surface temperatures (SST posing one of the main threats to coral survival. Successful recruitment of new colonies is important for the recovery of degraded reefs following mortality events. Coral larvae require relatively uncontaminated substratum on which to metamorphose into sessile polyps, and the increasing pollution of coastal waters therefore constitutes an additional threat to reef resilience. Here we develop and analyse a model of larval metamorphosis success for two common coral species to quantify the interactive effects of water pollution (copper contamination and SST. We identify thresholds of temperature and pollution that prevent larval metamorphosis, and evaluate synergistic interactions between these stressors. Our analyses show that halving the concentration of Cu can protect corals from the negative effects of a 2-3°C increase in SST. These results demonstrate that effective mitigation of local impacts can reduce negative effects of global stressors.

  20. Water-dispersible magnetite-reduced graphene oxide composites for arsenic removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Vimlesh; Park, Jaesung; Chun, Young; Lee, Jung Woo; Hwang, In-Chul; Kim, Kwang S

    2010-07-27

    Magnetite-graphene hybrids have been synthesized via a chemical reaction with a magnetite particle size of approximately 10 nm. The composites are superparamagnetic at room temperature and can be separated by an external magnetic field. As compared to bare magnetite particles, the hybrids show a high binding capacity for As(III) and As(V), whose presence in the drinking water in wide areas of South Asia has been a huge problem. Their high binding capacity is due to the increased adsorption sites in the M-RGO composite which occurs by reducing the aggregation of bare magnetite. Since the composites show near complete (over 99.9%) arsenic removal within 1 ppb, they are practically usable for arsenic separation from water.

  1. Reducing dissolved inorganic nitrogen in surface runoff water from sugarcane production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, A J; Bartley, R; Armour, J D; Brodie, J E; Thorburn, P J

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) lost from farms, especially as the highly bioavailable dissolved inorganic form, may be damaging Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR). As sugarcane is the dominant cropping system in GBR catchments, its N management practises are coming under increasing scrutiny. This study measured dissolved inorganic N lost in surface runoff water and sugarcane productivity over 3 years. The experiment compared the conventional fertiliser N application rate to sugarcane (average 180kg N/ha/year) and a rate based on replacing N exported in the previous crop (average 94kg N/ha/year). Dissolved inorganic N losses in surface water were 72%, 48% and 66% lower in the three monitored years in the reduced N fertiliser treatment. There was no significant difference in sugarcane yield between the two fertiliser N treatments, nor any treatment difference in soil mineral N - both of these results are indicators of the sustainability of the lower fertiliser N applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of Polymer Gel Systems to Improve Volumetric Sweep and Reduce Producing Water/Oil Ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

    2005-12-31

    Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of a 42-month research program that focused on the understanding of gelation chemistry and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work was conducted on a widely applied system in the field, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A rate equation that describes the reaction between chromium acetate and polymer molecules was regressed from experimental data. A mathematical model that describes the crosslinking reaction between two polymer molecules as a function of time was derived. The model was based on probability concepts and provides molecular-weight averages and molecular-weight distributions of the pre-gel aggregates as a function of time and initial system conditions. Average molecular weights of pre-gel aggregates were measured as a function of time and were comparable to model simulations. Experimental methods to determine molecular weight distributions of pre-gel aggregates were unsuccessful. Dissolution of carbonate minerals during the injection of gelants causes the pH of the gelant to increase. Chromium precipitates from solution at the higher pH values robbing the gelant of crosslinker. Experimental data on the transport of chromium acetate solutions through dolomite cores were obtained. A mathematical model that describes the transport of brine and chromium acetate solutions through rocks containing carbonate minerals was used to simulate the experimental results and data from literature. Gel treatments usually reduce the permeability

  3. Hemoglobin and Myoglobin as Reducing Agents in Biological Systems. Redox Reactions of Globins with Copper and Iron Salts and Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnikova, G B; Shekhovtsova, E A

    2016-12-01

    In addition to reversible O2 binding, respiratory proteins of the globin family, hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb), participate in redox reactions with various metal complexes, including biologically significant ones, such as those of copper and iron. HbO2 and MbO2 are present in cells in large amounts and, as redox agents, can contribute to maintaining cell redox state and resisting oxidative stress. Divalent copper complexes with high redox potentials (E0, 200-600 mV) and high stability constants, such as [Cu(phen)2]2+, [Cu(dmphen)2]2+, and CuDTA oxidize ferrous heme proteins by the simple outer-sphere electron transfer mechanism through overlapping π-orbitals of the heme and the copper complex. Weaker oxidants, such as Cu2+, CuEDTA, CuNTA, CuCit, CuATP, and CuHis (E0 ≤ 100-150 mV) react with HbO2 and MbO2 through preliminary binding to the protein with substitution of the metal ligands with protein groups and subsequent intramolecular electron transfer in the complex (the site-specific outer-sphere electron transfer mechanism). Oxidation of HbO2 and MbO2 by potassium ferricyanide and Fe(3) complexes with NTA, EDTA, CDTA, ATP, 2,3-DPG, citrate, and pyrophosphate PPi proceeds mainly through the simple outer-sphere electron transfer mechanism via the exposed heme edge. According to Marcus theory, the rate of this reaction correlates with the difference in redox potentials of the reagents and their self-exchange rates. For charged reagents, the reaction may be preceded by their nonspecific binding to the protein due to electrostatic interactions. The reactions of LbO2 with carboxylate Fe complexes, unlike its reactions with ferricyanide, occur via the site-specific outer-sphere electron transfer mechanism, even though the same reagents oxidize structurally similar MbO2 and cytochrome b5 via the simple outer-sphere electron transfer mechanism. Of particular biological interest is HbO2 and MbO2 transformation into met-forms in the presence of small amounts of

  4. Investigation of chemical and biochemical properties of Maerua subcordata plant extract: a local water clarification agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.J. Mavura

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports some findings of chemical as well as biochemical studies of Maerua subcordata plant juice extract. The studies include: chemical composition of the juice such as mineral contents, protein and polysaccharide contents. These tests were carried out both in the juice extracts and in the “flocs”. The latter samples were analyzed to establish whether the material that settled as a result of clarification had minerals, protein and/or polysaccharides. While there were no significant amounts of minerals found in the juice or in the flocs, there were significant amounts of polysaccharides in the juice as well as in the flocs. However it was found that there were insignificant amounts of proteins in the settled flocs. This was indication that polysaccharides in the juice were precipitated along with the sediments present in water. Further biochemical experiments on the identity of polysaccharides which apparently aided flocculation indicated that they were of branched type, amylopectin. The paper attempts to explain the mechanism of sediments settling as aided by the plant juice components.

  5. Neutronic study on seed-blanket type reduced-moderation water reactor fuel assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Shelley, A.; 久語 輝彦; 嶋田 昭一郎; 大久保 努; 岩村 公道

    2004-01-01

    Neutronic study has been done for a PWR-type reduced-moderation water reactor with seed-blanket fuel assemblies to achieve a high conversion ratio, a negative void coefficient and a high burnup by using a MOX fuel. The results of the precise assembly burnup calculations show that the recommended numbers of seed and blanket layers are 15(S15) and 5(B5), respectively. By the optimization of axial configuration, the S15B5 assembly with the seed of 1000times2 mm high, internal blanket of 150 mm h...

  6. One-pot high-yield synthesis of single-crystalline gold nanorods using glycerol as a low-cost and eco-friendly reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parveen, Rashida [University of São Paulo, Institute of Chemistry of São Carlos (Brazil); Gomes, Janaina F. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Engenharia Química (Brazil); Ullah, Sajjad [University of São Paulo, Institute of Chemistry of São Carlos (Brazil); Acuña, José J. S. [Universidade Federal do ABC, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas (Brazil); Tremiliosi-Filho, Germano, E-mail: germano@iqsc.usp.br [University of São Paulo, Institute of Chemistry of São Carlos (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    The formation of gold nanorods (AuNRs) has recently attracted great attention due to their shape-dependent optical properties that are important for many applications. The development of simpler and safer methods for the high-yield synthesis of AuNRs employing low-cost and easily handled reagents is thus of great importance. Here, we introduce, for the first time, a one-pot seedless method for the preparation of single-crystalline AuNRs in almost 100 % yield based on the use of glycerol in alkaline medium as an eco-friendly, low-cost and pH-tunable reducing agent. The synthesized AuNRs were characterized by UV–Vis–NIR spectroscopy, FEG–SEM and HRTEM. The effect of the presence of capping agent (CTAB) and the concentration of reactants (glycerol, NaOH and AgNO{sub 3}) on the yield and aspect ratio (AR) of AuNRs is discussed. The AR and yield of AuNRs showed a clear dependence on the pH and temperature of the reaction mixture as well as on the concentration of AgNO{sub 3} added as an auxiliary reagent. The longitudinal plasmon resonance band of the resulting AuNRs can be tuned between 620 and 1200 nm by varying the reaction conditions. AuNRs with an aspect ratio (AR) of around 4 were obtained in almost 100 % yield at room temperature and under mild reducing environment. The formation of AuNRs is faster at higher pH (>11) and higher temperature (>30 °C), but the AuNR yield is smaller (<70 %). Variation in the pH of the reaction mixture in the range 12–13.5 results in the formation of AuNRs with different ARs and in different yields (27–99 %). Detailed study of the AuNRs crystallography by HRTEM showed that the AuNRs grow in [001] direction and have a perfect single-crystalline fcc structure, free from structural faults or dislocations. The present green method, which introduces glycerol as a tunable reducing agent with a pH-dependent reducing power, can provide a more general strategy for the preparation of a wide range of metallic nanoparticles.

  7. Identification and on-line monitoring of reduced sulphur species (RSS) by voltammetry in oxic waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superville, Pierre-Jean; Pižeta, Ivanka; Omanović, Dario; Billon, Gabriel

    2013-08-15

    Based on automatic on-line measurements on the Deûle River that showed daily variation of a peak around -0.56V (vs Ag|AgCl 3M), identification of Reduced Sulphur Species (RSS) in oxic waters was performed applying cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) with the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). Pseudopolarographic studies accompanied with increasing concentrations of copper revealed the presence of elemental sulphur S(0), thioacetamide (TA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) as the main sulphur compounds in the Deûle River. In order to resolve these three species, a simple procedure was developed and integrated in an automatic on-line monitoring system. During one week monitoring with hourly measurements, GSH and S(0) exhibited daily cycles whereas no consequential pattern was observed for TA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Levy

    2005-10-01

    Low rank fuels such as subbituminous coals and lignites contain significant amounts of moisture compared to higher rank coals. Typically, the moisture content of subbituminous coals ranges from 15 to 30 percent, while that for lignites is between 25 and 40 percent, where both are expressed on a wet coal basis. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit. High fuel moisture results in fuel handling problems, and it affects heat rate, mass rate (tonnage) of emissions, and the consumption of water needed for evaporative cooling. This project deals with lignite and subbituminous coal-fired pulverized coal power plants, which are cooled by evaporative cooling towers. In particular, the project involves use of power plant waste heat to partially dry the coal before it is fed to the pulverizers. Done in a proper way, coal drying will reduce cooling tower makeup water requirements and also provide heat rate and emissions benefits. The technology addressed in this project makes use of the hot circulating cooling water leaving the condenser to heat the air used for drying the coal (Figure 1). The temperature of the circulating water leaving the condenser is usually about 49 C (120 F), and this can be used to produce an air stream at approximately 43 C (110 F). Figure 2 shows a variation of this approach, in which coal drying would be accomplished by both warm air, passing through the dryer, and a flow of hot circulating cooling water, passing through a heat exchanger located in the dryer. Higher temperature drying can be accomplished if hot flue gas from the boiler or extracted steam from the turbine cycle is used to supplement the thermal energy obtained from the circulating cooling water. Various options such as these are being examined in this investigation. This is the eleventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits

  9. Is allicin able to reduce Campylobacter jejuni colonization in broilers when added to drinking water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robyn, J; Rasschaert, G; Hermans, D; Pasmans, F; Heyndrickx, M

    2013-05-01

    Reducing Campylobacter shedding on the farm could result in a reduction of the number of human campylobacteriosis cases. In this study, we first investigated if allicin, allyl disulfide, and garlic oil extract were able to either prevent C. jejuni growth or kill C. jejuni in vitro. Allyl disulfide and garlic oil extract reduced C. jejuni numbers in vitro below a detectable level at a concentration of 50 mg/kg (no lower concentrations were tested), whereas allicin reduced C. jejuni numbers below a detectable level at a concentration as low as 7.5 mg/kg. In further experiments we screened for the anti-C. jejuni activity of allicin in a fermentation system closely mimicking the broiler cecal environment using cecal microbiota and mucus isolated from C. jejuni-free broilers. During these fermentation experiments, allicin reduced C. jejuni numbers below a detectable level after 24 h at a concentration of 50 mg/kg. In contrast, 25 mg/kg of allicin killed C. jejuni in the first 28 h of incubation, but anti-C. jejuni activity was lost after 48 h of incubation, probably due to the presence of mucin in the growth medium. This had been confirmed in fermentation experiments in the presence of broiler cecal mucus. Based on these results, we performed an in vivo experiment to assess the prevention or reduction of cecal C. jejuni colonization in broiler chickens when allicin was added to drinking water. We demonstrated that allicin in drinking water did not have a statistically significant effect on cecal C. jejuni colonization in broilers. It was assumed, based on in vitro experiments, that the activity of allicin was thwarted by the presence of mucin-containing mucus. Despite promising in vitro results, allicin was not capable of statistically influencing C. jejuni colonization in a broiler flock, although a trend toward lower cecal C. jejuni numbers in allicin-treated broilers was observed.

  10. Poly(vinyl alcohol) as a water protecting agent for silver nanoparticles: the role of polymer size and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Pasko, Dmitry A; Kalugin, Oleg N

    2017-03-29

    Chemical modification of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with a stabilizing agent, such as poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), plays an important role in shape-controlled seeded-growth and colloidal stability. However, theoretical aspects of the stabilizing mechanism of PVA are still poorly understood. To gain a better understanding of the role of PVA in water protecting effects for silver nanoparticles, we developed an atomistic model of a AgNP grafted with single-chain PVA of various lengths. Our model, designed for classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, approximates the AgNP as a quasi-spherical silver nanocrystal with 3.9 nm diameter and uses a united-atom representation for PVA with its polymer chain length varying from 220 up to 1540 repeating units. We found that PVA adsorbs onto the AgNP surface through multiple non-covalent interactions, among which non-covalent bonding of the hydroxyl groups plays a key role. The analysis of adsorption isotherms by using the Hill, Scatchard, and McGhee & von Hippel models exhibits evidence for positive binding cooperativity with the cooperativity parameter varying from 1.55 to 2.12. Our results indicate that the size of the PVA polymer rather than its structure plays a crucial role in providing water protecting effects for the AgNP core, varying from 40% up to 91%. The water-protecting efficiency was well approximated by the Langmuir-Freundlich equation, allowing us to predict that the saturated coverage of the nanoparticle of a given diameter of 3.9 nm should occur when the PVA molecular weight approaches 115 kDa, which corresponds to the number of vinyl alcohol monomers being equal to 3100 units.

  11. Electrochemical decomposition of fluorinated wetting agents in plating industry waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath, Andreas; Sacher, Frank; McCaskie, John E

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical decomposition of fluorinated surfactants (PFAS, perfluorinated alkyl substances) used in the plating industry was analyzed and the decomposition process parameters optimized at the laboratory scale and production scale of a 500-liter reactor using lead electrodes. The method and system was successfully demonstrated under production conditions to treat PFAS) with up to 99% efficiency in the concentration range of 1,000-20,000 μg/l (1 ppm-20 ppm). The treatment also reduced hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) ions to trivalent chromium (Cr(3+)) ions in the wastewater. If the PFAS-containing wastewater is mixed with other wastewater streams, specifically from nickel plating drag out solution or when pH values >5, the treatment process is ineffective. For the short chain PFAS, (perfluorobutylsulfonate) the process was less efficient than C6-C8 PFAS. The process is automated and has safety procedures and controls to prevent hazards. The PFAS were decomposed to hydrogen fluoride (HF) under the strong acid electrochemical operating conditions. Analytical tests showed no evidence of organic waste products remaining from the process. Conventional alternative PFAS removal systems were tested on the waste streams and compared with each other and with the-E-destruct (electrochemical oxidation) process. For example, ion exchange resin (IX resin) treatment of wastewater to complex and remove PFAS was found to be seven times more efficient when compared to the conventional activated carbon absorption (C-treat) process. However, the E-destruct process is higher in capacity, exhibits longer service life and lower operating costs than either IX or C-treat methods for elimination of PFAS from these electroplating waste streams.

  12. Bench-scale study of active mine water treatment using cement kiln dust (CKD) as a neutralization agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Allison L; Walsh, Margaret E

    2012-02-01

    The overall objective of this study was to investigate the potential impact on settled water quality of using cement kiln dust (CKD), a waste by-product, to replace quicklime in the active treatment of acidic mine water. Bench-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the treatment performance of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)(2)) slurries generated using four different CKD samples compared to a control treatment with quicklime (CaO) in terms of reducing acidity and metals concentrations in acid mine drainage (AMD) samples taken from the effluent of a lead/zinc mine in Atlantic Canada. Results of the study showed that all of the CKD samples evaluated were capable of achieving greater than 97% removal of total zinc and iron. The amount of solid alkaline material required to achieve pH targets required for neutralization of the AMD was found to be higher for treatment with the CKD slurries compared to the quicklime slurry control experiments, and varied linearly with the free lime content of the CKD. The results of this study also showed that a potential benefit of treating mine water with CKD could be reduced settled sludge volumes generated in the active treatment process, and further research into the characteristics of the sludge generated from the use of CKD-generated calcium hydroxide slurries is recommended. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti-obesity effect of alkaline reduced water in high fat-fed obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacio, Rosa Mistica Coles; Kang, Tae-Young; Kim, Cheol-Su; Kim, Soo-Ki; Yang, Young-Chul; Sohn, Joon-Hyung; Lee, Kyu-Jae

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not alkaline reduced water (ARW) has a positive effect on obesity is unclear. This study aims to prove the positive effect of ARW in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity (DIO) in C57BL/6 mice model. Toward this, obesity was induced by feeding the C57BL/6 male mice with high-fat diet (w/w 45% fat) for 12 weeks. Thereafter, the animals were administered with either ARW or tap water. Next, the degree of adiposity and DIO-associated parameters were assessed: clinico-pathological parameters, biochemical measurements, histopathological analysis of liver, the expression of cholesterol metabolism-related genes in the liver, and serum levels of adipokine and cytokine. We found that ARW-fed mice significantly ameliorated adiposity: controlled body weight gain, reduced the accumulation of epididymal fats and decreased liver fats as compared to control mice. Accordingly, ARW coordinated the level of adiponectin and leptin. Further, mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)7A1 was upregulated. In summary, our data shows that ARW intake inhibits the progression of HF-DIO in mice. This is the first note on anti-obesity effect of ARW, clinically implying the safer fluid remedy for obesity control.

  14. Utilization of water-reducing admixtures in cemented paste backfill of sulphide-rich mill tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Cihangir, Ferdi; Kesimal, Ayhan; Deveci, Haci; Alp, Ibrahim

    2010-07-15

    This study presents the effect of three different water-reducing admixtures (WRAs) on the rheological and mechanical properties of cemented paste backfill (CPB) samples. A 28-day strength of > or = 0.7 MPa and the maintenance of the stability (i.e. > or = 0.7 MPa) over 360 days of curing were desired as the design criteria. Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and Portland composite cement (PCC) were used as binders at 5 wt.% dose. WRAs were initially tested to determine the dosage of a WRA for a required consistency of 7'' for CPB mixtures. A total of 192 CPB samples were then prepared using WRAs. The utilization of WRAs enhanced the flow characteristics of the CPB mixture and allowed to achieve the same consistency at a lower water-to-cement ratio. For OPC, the addition of WRAs appeared to improve the both short- and long-term performance of CPB samples. However, only polycarboxylate-based superplasticiser produced the desired 28-day strength of > or = 0.7 MPa when PCC was used as the binder. These findings suggest that WRAs can be suitably exploited for CPB of sulphide-rich tailings to improve the strength and stability in short and long terms allowing to reduce binder costs in a CPB plant. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The behaviour of a floating water bridge under reduced gravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Elmar C; Agostinho, Luewton L F; Wexler, Adam; Wagterveld, R Martijn; Tuinstra, Jan [Wetsus, Center of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, Agora 1, 8900 CC Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Woisetschlaeger, Jakob, E-mail: elmar.fuchs@wetsus.nl [Institute for Thermal Turbomachinery and Machine Dynamics, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 25A, Graz (Austria)

    2011-01-19

    When high voltage is applied to pure water filled into two beakers close to each other, a connection forms spontaneously, giving the impression of a floating water bridge (Armstrong 1893 The Electrical Engineer pp 154-45, Uhlig W 2005 personal communication, Fuchs et al 2007 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 6112-4, Fuchs et al 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 185502, Fuchs et al 2009 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42 065502, Fuchs et al 2010 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 43 105502, Woisetschlaeger et al 2010 Exp. Fluids 48 121-31, Nishiumi and Honda 2009 Res. Lett. Phys. Chem. 2009 371650). This phenomenon is of special interest, since it comprises a number of phenomena currently tackled in modern water science. In this work, the behaviour of this phenomenon under reduced gravity conditions during a parabolic flight is presented by the means of high speed imaging with fringe projection. An analysis of the behaviour is presented and compared with theoretical considerations.

  16. Waffle production: influence of batter ingredients on sticking of waffles at baking plates-Part II: effect of fat, leavening agent, and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Regina; Schoenlechner, Regine

    2017-05-01

    Fresh egg waffles are continuously baked in tunnel baking ovens in industrial scale. Waffles that partly or fully stick to the baking plates cause significant product loss and increased costs. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate the effect of different recipe ingredients on the sticking behavior of waffles. In this second part, ingredients investigated were different leavening agents (sodium acid pyrophosphate, ammonium bicarbonate, magnesium hydroxide carbonate, or monocalcium phosphate), different fat sources (rapeseed oil, cocos fat, butter, or margarine), and different water sources (tap water 12°dH and distilled water). Within the different types of fats, solid fats with high amount of short-chain fatty acids (cocos fat or butter) decreased the number of sticking waffles compared to liquid oils (rapeseed oil). Regarding leavening agents, magnesium hydroxide carbonate and ammonium bicarbonate were superior to sodium acid pyrophosphate or monocalcium phosphate. Between the two water sources, effects were small.

  17. Emergency Response Planning to Reduce the Impact of Contaminated Drinking Water during Natural Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural disasters can be devastating to local water supplies affecting millions of people. Disaster recovery plans and water industry collaboration during emergencies protect consumers from contaminated drinking water supplies and help facilitate the repair of public water system...

  18. Brushing teeth with purified water to reduce ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Li-Yin; Chang, Cheng-Kuei; Maa, Suh-Hwa; Wang, Charlotte; Chen, Cheryl Chia-Hui

    2011-12-01

    , toothbrushing twice daily with purified water reduces VAP and improves oral health and hygiene.

  19. Use of a charge reducing agent to enable intact mass analysis of cysteine-linked antibody-drug-conjugates by native mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila J. Pacholarz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-drug-conjugates (ADC are a growing class of anticancer biopharmaceuticals. Conjugation of cysteine linked ADCs, requires initial reduction of mAb inter-chain disulfide bonds, as the drugs are attached via thiol chemistry. This results in the active mAb moiety being transformed from a covalently linked tetramer to non-covalently linked complexes, which hinders precise determination of drug load with LC–MS. Here, we show how the addition of the charge reducing agent triethylammonium acetate (TEAA preserves the intact mAb structure, is well suited to the study of cysteine linked conjugates and facilitates easy drug load determination by direct infusion native MS.

  20. Determination of therapeutic strategy for adhesive small bowel obstruction using water-soluble contrast agents: An audit of 776 cases in a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Haruki; Kaneoka, Yuji; Maeda, Atsuyuki; Takayama, Yuichi; Takahashi, Takamasa; Onoe, Shunsuke; Fukami, Yasuyuki

    2017-07-01

    Several studies have investigated the diagnostic and therapeutic role of water-soluble contrast agents in adhesive small bowel obstruction, but there is no clear diagnostic classification for the determination of therapeutic strategy. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical value of classification using water-soluble contrast agents in patients with adhesive small bowel obstruction. Between January 2009 and December 2015, 776 consecutive patients with adhesive small bowel obstruction were managed initially with water-soluble contrast agents and were included in the study. Abdominal x-rays were taken 5 hours after administration of 100 mL water-soluble contrast agents and classified into 4 types. The medical records of the patients with adhesive small bowel obstruction were analyzed retrospectively and divided into 2 groups of patients with complete obstruction (ie, the absence of contrast agent in the colon) with (type I) or without (type II) a detectable point of obstruction and a group with an incomplete obstruction (ie, the presence of contrast agent in the colon) with (type IIIA) or without (type IIIB) dilated small intestine. Types I, II, IIIA, and IIIB were identified in 27, 90, 358, and 301 patients, respectively. The overall operative rate was 16.6%. In the patients treated conservatively (types IIIA and IIIB), 647 patients (98.2%) were treated successfully without operative intervention. The operative rate was 3.4% (n = 12/358) in type IIIA vs 0% (n = 0/301) in the type IIIB group (P = .001). Compared with type IIIA, type IIIB was associated with earlier initiation of oral intake (2.1 vs 2.6 days, P strategy for adhesive small bowel obstruction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sulfate reducing bacteria and their activities in oil sands process-affected water biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hong; Yu, Tong, E-mail: tong.yu@ualberta.ca; Liu, Yang, E-mail: yang.liu@ualberta.ca

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm reactors were constructed to grow stratified multispecies biofilm in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) supplemented with growth medium. The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within the biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated. The community structure and potential activity of SRB in the biofilm were investigated with H{sub 2}S microsensor measurements, dsrB gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H{sub 2}S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the stratified biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. The study expands current knowledge of biofilm treatment of OSPW and the function of anaerobic SRB in OSPW biofilm, and thus provides information for future bioreactor development in the reclamation of OSPW. - Graphical abstract: The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within Oil Sands Process-affected Water (OSPW) biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated by Liu and coworkers. Combined microsensor and molecular biology techniques were utilized in this study. Their results demonstrated that multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H{sub 2}S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. - Highlights: • Biofilm in oil sands wastewater was developed on engineered biocarriers. • Bacterial community and in situ activity of SRB were studied in the

  2. The design and synthesis of water-soluble analogues of CB30865, a quinazolin-4-one-based antitumor agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavetsias, V; Skelton, L A; Yafai, F; Mitchell, F; Wilson, S C; Allan, B; Jackman, A L

    2002-08-15

    4-[N-[7-Bromo-2-methyl-4-oxo-3,4-dihydroquinazolin-6-ylmethyl]-N-(prop-2-ynyl)amino]-N-(3-pyridylmethyl)benzamide (CB30865) is a quinazolin-4-one antitumor agent whose high growth-inhibitory activity (W1L2 IC(50) = 2.8 +/- 0.50 nM) is believed to have a folate-independent locus of action. In addition, CB30865 represents a class of compounds with unique biochemical characteristics such as a delayed, non-phase specific, cell-cycle arrest. The low aqueous solubility of CB30865 prompted a search for more water-soluble analogues for in vivo evaluation of this class of compounds. It was thought that aqueous solubility could be increased by the introduction of amino functionalities at the 2-position of the quinazolin-4-one ring. A variety of compounds (5a-j, 31a-c, 32, and 33) were synthesized in a linear fashion starting from 3-chloro-4-methylaniline. Most of these compounds (e.g., 5a, 5b, 5g) were significantly more water-soluble than CB30865 (636 microM for 5a at pH 6 and 992 microM for 5g at pH 6). In addition, some of them were up to 6-fold more cytotoxic than CB30865 (e.g., for 5a, W1L2 IC(50) = 0.49 +/- 0.24 nM) and retained its novel biochemical characteristics.

  3. Study of the leaching of heavy metals from waste water sludge and incinerator's ash, using coupled thermostated columns and DTPA as complex agent; Estudio de la extraccion de metales pesados de lodos y cenizas de aguas residuales usando columnas termostatizadas acopladas y DTPA como agente complejante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vite T, J.; Vite T, M.; Guerrero D, J.; Carreno de Leon, M.C. [Departamento de Estudios del Ambiente, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    We studied the metallic composition from waste water sludge and incinerators ashes of an incinerator located in Toluca, Mexico, the qualitative studies were made using the Activation Analysis technique, and fluorescence X-ray techniques. The quantitative analysis of heavy metals in the wastes were made using Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (Icp-Aes). For leaching the samples, we used four coupled thermostated columns, each one had a p H of 2,5, 7 and 10. The flux of the air was of 1600 cc/min. The temperature was maintain constant in 60 Centigrade using a thermostated system. For this study we used 100 g of wastes mixed with mineral acid or sodium hydroxide to reach p H 2,5,7 and 10. We added a reducing and tensoactive agents and finally DTPA as complex agent. With this method, we obtain a better leaching efficiency using a complex agent. However the high DTPA cost, make this process expansive that is why we recommend to work with another classes of complex agents, that be cheaper to leach metals of different chemistry matrix. (Author)

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF POLYMER GEL SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE VOLUMETRIC SWEEP AND REDUCE PRODUCING WATER/OIL RATIOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Paul Willhite; Don W. Green; Stan McCool; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

    2004-02-01

    The objectives of the research are to improve the effectiveness of polymer gels to increase volumetric sweep efficiency of fluid displacement processes and to reduce water production in production wells. The research is based on experimental data and conceptual and mathematical models developed from interpretation of experimental data. This report describes two types of mathematical models that were developed. One model type simulates the chemical reactions where polymer molecules are crosslinked to form a 3-dimensional network or gel. The model is based on statistical probabilities of reactions and yields molecular weights averages and distributions as functions of conversion. The second model type simulates the transport of chromium acetate, a common polymer crosslinker, through porous dolomite rock and includes the mechanisms of dolomite dissolution and chromium precipitation. The chromium transport model reasonably agreed with experimental data.

  5. Efficient degradation of trichloroethylene in water using persulfate activated by reduced graphene oxide-iron nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ayyaz; Gu, Xiaogang; Li, Li; Lv, Shuguang; Xu, Yisheng; Guo, Xuhong

    2015-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and nano-sized zero-valent iron-reduced graphene oxide (nZVI-rGO) composite were prepared. The GO and nZVI-rGO composite were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy. The size of nZVI was about 6 nm as observed by TEM. The system of nZVI-rGO and persulfate (PS) was used for the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in water, and showed 26.5% more efficiency as compared to nZVI/PS system. The different parameters were studied to determine the efficiency of nZVI-rGO to activate the PS system for the TCE degradation. By increasing the PS amount, TCE removal was also improved while no obvious effect was observed by varying the catalyst loading. Degradation was decreased as the TCE initial concentration was increased from 20 to 100 mg/L. Moreover, when initial solution pH was increased, efficiency deteriorated to 80%. Bicarbonate showed more negative effect on TCE removal among the solution matrix. To better understand the effects of radical species in the system, the scavenger tests were performed. The •SO4(-) and •O2(-) were predominant species responsible for TCE removal. The nZVI-rGO-activated PS process shows potential applications in remediation of highly toxic organic contaminants such as TCE present in the groundwater. Graphical abstract Persulfate activated by reduced graphene oxide and nano-sized zero-valent iron composite can be used for efficient degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in water.

  6. Reducing future river export of nutrients to coastal waters of China in optimistic scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strokal, Maryna; Kroeze, Carolien; Wang, Mengru; Ma, Lin

    2017-02-01

    Coastal waters of China are rich in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and thus often eutrophied. This is because rivers export increasing amounts of nutrients to coastal seas. Animal production and urbanization are important sources of nutrients in Chinese rivers. In this study we explored the future from an optimistic perspective. We present two optimistic scenarios for 2050 (OPT-1 and OPT-2) for China. Maximized recycling of manure on land in OPT-1 and OPT-2, and strict sewage control in OPT-2 (e.g., all sewage is collected and treated efficiently) are essential nutrient strategies in these scenarios. We also analyzed the effect of the current policy plans aiming at "Zero Growth in Synthetic Fertilizers after 2020" (the CP scenario). We used the MARINA (a Model to Assess River Inputs of Nutrients to seAs) model to quantify dissolved N and P export by Chinese rivers to the Bohai Gulf, Yellow Sea and South China Sea and the associated coastal eutrophication potential (ICEP). The Global Orchestration (GO) scenario of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment was used as a basis. GO projects increases in river export of dissolved N and P (up to 90%) between 2000 and 2050 and thus a high potential for coastal eutrophication (ICEP>0). In contrast, the potential for coastal eutrophication is low in optimistic scenarios (ICEPseas are around their levels of 1970. Maximizing manure recycling can reduce nutrient pollution of Chinese seas considerably. Sewage control is effective in reducing P export by rivers from urbanized areas. The CP scenario, on the other hand, shows that current policy plans may not be sufficient to avoid coastal eutrophication in the future. Our study may help policy makers in formulating strategies to ensure clean coastal waters in China in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Physico-Chemical, Biological and Therapeutic Characteristics of Electrolyzed Reduced Alkaline Water (ERAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Henry

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of alkaline reduced water produced by domestic electrolysis devices was approved in Japan in 1965 by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for the cure of gastro-intestinal disorders. Today, these devices are freely available in several countries and can be easily purchased without reserve. The commercial information included with the device recommends the consumption of 1–1.5 L of water per day, not only for gastro-intestinal disorders but also for numerous other illnesses such as diabetes, cancer, inflammation, etc. Academic research in Japan on this subject has been undergoing since 1990 only but has established that the active ingredient is dissolved dihydrogen that eliminates the free radical HO• in vivo. In addition, it was demonstrated that degradation of the electrodes during functioning of the device releases very reactive nanoparticles of platinum, the toxicity of which has not yet been clearly proven. This report recommends alerting health authorities of the uncontrolled availability of these devices used as health products, but which generate drug substances and should therefore be sold according to regulatory requirements.

  8. Delays in reducing waterborne and water-related infectious diseases in China under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Maggie; Belle, Jessica H.; Carlton, Elizabeth J.; Liang, Song; Li, Huazhong; Luo, Wei; Freeman, Matthew C.; Liu, Yang; Gao, Yang; Hess, Jeremy J.; Remais, Justin V.

    2014-12-01

    Despite China's rapid progress in improving water, sanitation and hygiene (WSH) access, in 2011, 471 million people lacked access to improved sanitation and 401 million to household piped water. As certain infectious diseases are sensitive to changes in both climate and WSH conditions, we projected impacts of climate change on WSH-attributable diseases in China in 2020 and 2030 by coupling estimates of the temperature sensitivity of diarrhoeal diseases and three vector-borne diseases, temperature projections from global climate models, WSH-infrastructure development scenarios, and projected demographic changes. By 2030, climate change is projected to delay China's rapid progress towards reducing WSH-attributable infectious disease burden by 8-85 months. This development delay summarizes the adverse impact of climate change on WSH-attributable infectious diseases in China, and can be used in other settings where a significant health burden may accompany future changes in climate even as the total burden of disease falls owing to non-climate reasons.

  9. Long-term impact of reduced tillage on water and pesticide flow in a drained context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dairon, R; Dutertre, A; Tournebize, J; Marks-Perreau, J; Carluer, N

    2017-03-01

    Influence of more than 20 years (1988-2010) of reduced tillage (RT) practices on water and pesticide balances and dynamics is analyzed and compared to results from a conventional tillage plot (CT). The field study soils are described as silty clay stagnic luvisol, developed on a low permeable schist layer. A drainage network was set up according to French criteria (0.9 m deep, 10 m space) to avoid soil winter waterlogging. Climate is temperate oceanic and drainage generally occurs from November to March. Data were analyzed at yearly, weekly (pesticides) and hourly (water) time steps. Over the long term, cumulated drainage decreases significantly on RT (3999 mm) compared to CT (5100 mm). This differentiation becomes significant from 1999, 10 years after plowing was stopped. Strikingly, hourly drainage peak flows are higher under RT, especially during the second period (2000-2010), associated with low or no base flow. These results suggest a strong influence of the macropore network under RT practice. In particular, drainage peaks are higher at the beginning of the drainage season (mid-October to December). Consistently, pesticides applied in late autumn, which are the most quantified on this site, are often significantly more exported under RT. For atrazine, applied in spring, fluxes are linked to cumulative flow and are de facto higher under CT. For others pesticides, losses appear to be heterogeneous, with generally low or null export rates for spring application. Generally speaking, higher concentrations are measured on RT plot and explain observed exportation rate differences. Finally, there is no clear evidence of correlation between pesticide losses and long-term impacts of RT on hydrodynamics, pointing the importance of studying the short-term effect of tillage on water and especially solute flow.

  10. Estimated general population control limits for unitary agents in drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items. For use in reentry decision-making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, A.P.; Adams, J.D.; Cerar, R.J.; Hess, T.L.; Kistner, S.L.; Leffingwell, S.S.; MacIntosh, R.G.; Ward, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of chemical agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the potential exists for contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. Persistent agents such as VX or sulfur mustard pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. This White Paper has been prepared to provide technical bases for these decisions by developing working estimates of agent control limits in selected environmental media considered principal sources of potential human exposure. To date, control limits for public exposure to unitary agents have been established for atmospheric concentrations only. The current analysis builds on previous work to calculate working estimates of control limits for ingestion and dermal exposure to potentially contaminated drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items such as garden produce. Information characterizing agent desorption from, and detection on or in, contaminated porous media are presently too developed to permit reasonable estimation of dermal exposure from this source. Thus, dermal contact with potentially contaminated porous surfaces is not considered in this document.

  11. Biotreatment of Cr(VI) contaminated waters by sulphate reducing bacteria fed with ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagnanelli, F., E-mail: francesca.pagnanelli@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Cruz Viggi, C., E-mail: carolina.cruzviggi@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Cibati, A., E-mail: alessio.cibati@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Uccelletti, D., E-mail: daniela.uccelletti@uniroma1.it [Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Toro, L., E-mail: luigi.toro@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Palleschi, C., E-mail: claudio.palleschi@uniroma1.it [Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of ethanol as electron donor for sulphate-reducing bacteria for the treatment of Cr(VI). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation of contribution in Cr removal (adsorption vs. bioprecipitation). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bioassessment of the process effectiveness by ecotoxicological in vivo tests using C. elegans. - Abstract: Biological treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated waters was performed in fixed bed reactors inoculated with SRB (sulphate-reducing bacteria) growing on ethanol. Treatment efficiency was evaluated by checking chemical abatement of Cr(VI) and by ecotoxicological tests using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. A preliminary comparison between ethanol and lactate was performed, denoting that using ethanol, the same values of final sulphate abatement were obtained. In addition ethanol showed to be a substrate more competitive than lactate in kinetic terms. Fixed bed column reactors were continuously fed with a solution containing sulphates (3 g L{sup -1}), ethanol (1.5 g L{sup -1}) and Cr(VI) (50 mg L{sup -1}). At steady state the column inoculated with SRB removed 65 {+-} 5% of sulphate and 95 {+-} 5% of chromium. Bioactive removal mechanisms predominated over biosorption. Diminution of Cr(VI) toxicity was assessed by using the nematode C. elegans as a test organism showing that the survival of nematodes was 20% in the presence of the untreated influent and raised up to 53% when the nematodes were exposed to the treated effluent.

  12. Enhancing Hematite Photoanode Activity for Water Oxidation by Incorporation of Reduced Graphene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Amaral Carminati, Saulo; Souza, Flavio L; Nogueira, Ana F

    2016-01-04

    Two effective methods to prepare reduced graphene oxide (rGO)/hematite nanostructured photoanodes and their photoelectrochemical characterization towards water splitting reactions are presented. First, graphene oxide (GO) is reduced to rGO using hydrazine in a basic solution containing tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAOH), and then deposited over the nanostructured hematite photoanodes previously treated at 750 °C for 30 min. The second method follows the deposition of a paste containing a mixture of hematite nanoparticles and rGO sheets by the doctor-blade method, varying the rGO concentration. Since hematite suffers from low electron mobility, a low absorption coefficient, high recombination rates and slow reaction kinetics, the incorporation of rGO in the hematite can overcome such limitations due to graphene's exceptional properties. Using the first method, the rGO incorporation results in a photocurrent density increase from 0.56 to 0.82 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 VRHE. Our results indicate that the rGO incorporation in the hematite photoanodes shows a positive effect in the reduction of the electron-hole recombination rate. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Combined subcritical water and enzymatic hydrolysis for reducing sugar production from coconut husk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muharja, Maktum; Junianti, Fitri; Nurtono, Tantular; Widjaja, Arief

    2017-05-01

    Coconut husk wastes are abundantly available in Indonesia. It has a potential to be used into alternative renewable energy sources such as hydrogen using enzymatic hydrolysis followed by a fermentation process. Unfortunately, enzymatic hydrolysis is hampered by the complex structure of lignocellulose, so the cellulose component is hard to degrade. In this study, Combined Subcritical Water (SCW) and enzymatic hydrolysis are applied to enhance fermentable, thereby reducing production of sugar from coconut husk. There were two steps in this study, the first step was coconut husk pretreated by SCW in batch reactor at 80 bar and 150-200°C for 60 minutes reaction time. Secondly, solid fraction from the results of SCW was hydrolyzed using the mixture of pure cellulose and xylanase enzymes. Analysis was conducted on untreated and SCW-treated by gravimetric assay, liquid fraction after SCW and solid fraction after enzymatic hydrolysis using DNS assay. The maximum yield of reducing sugar (including xylose, arabinose glucose, galactose, mannose) was 1.254 gr per 6 gr raw material, representing 53.95% of total sugar in coconut husk biomass which was obtained at 150°C 80 bar for 60 minutes reaction time of SCW-treated and 6 hour of enzymatic hydrolysis using mixture of pure cellulose and xylanase enzymes (18.6 U /gram of coconut husk).

  14. Stability of barley and malt lipid transfer protein 1 (LTP1) toward heating and reducing agents: relationships with the brewing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrocheau, Ludivine; Bakan, Benedicte; Boivin, Patrick; Marion, Didier

    2006-04-19

    Barley lipid transfer protein (LTP1) is a heat-stable and protease-resistant albumin that concentrates in beer, where it participates in the formation and stability of beer foam. Whereas the barley LTP1 does not display any foaming properties, the corresponding beer protein is surface-active. Such an improvement is related to glycation by Maillard reactions on malting, acylation on mashing, and structural unfolding on brewing. The structural stability of purified barley and glycated malt LTP1 toward heating has been analyzed. Whatever the modification, lipid adduction or glycation, barley LTP1s are highly stable proteins that resisted temperatures up to 100 degrees C. Unfolding of LTP1 occurred only when heating was conducted in the presence of a reducing agent. In the presence of sodium sulfite, the lipid-adducted barley and malt LTP1 displayed higher heat stability than the nonadducted protein. Glycation had no or weak effect on heat-induced unfolding. Finally, it was shown that unfolding occurred on wort boiling before fermentation and that the reducing conditions are provided by malt extract.

  15. Green synthesis and antibacterial effects of aqueous colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles using camomile terpenoids as a combined reducing and capping agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Kus-Liskiewicz, Małgorzata; Depciuch, Joanna; Sadik, Omowunmi

    2016-08-01

    Green synthesis method using camomile extract was applied to synthesize silver nanoparticles to tune their antibacterial properties merging the synergistic effect of camomile and Ag. Scanning transmission electron microscopy revealed that camomile extract (CE) consisted of porous globular nanometer sized structures, which were a perfect support for Ag nanoparticles. The Ag nanoparticles synthesized with the camomile extract (AgNPs/CE) of 7 nm average sizes, were uniformly distributed on the CE support, contrary to the pure Ag nanoparticles synthesized with glucose (AgNPs/G), which were over 50 nm in diameter and strongly agglomerated. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy chemical analysis showed that camomile terpenoids act as a capping and reducing agent being adsorbed on the surface of AgNPs/CE enabling their reduction from Ag(+) and preventing them from agglomeration. Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy measurements confirmed these findings, as the spectra of AgNPs/CE, compared to pure CE, did not contain the 1109 cm(-1) band, corresponding to -C-O groups of terpenoids and the peaks at 280 and 320 nm, respectively. Antibacterial tests using four bacteria strains showed that the AgNPs/CE performed five times better compared to CE AgNPs/G samples, reducing totally all the bacteria in 2 h.

  16. The effect of adjuvants and reduced rates of crop protection agents on weed infestation, health and lodging of spring barley (Hordeum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezary A. Kwiatkowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment in the cultivation of spring barley was carried out in the period 2007-2009 at the Experimental Farm in Czesławice (central Lublin region on grey-brown podzolic soil derived from loess (soil quality class II. The study involved 3 rates of herbicides, growth retardant and fungicides (100%, 75%, 50% as well as different adjuvant types (oil, surface- active, mineral adjuvant. Plots without any adjuvant were the control treatment. Conventional tillage was used, while mineral fertilization was adjusted to high initial soil nutrient availability. A hypothesis was made that the reduction of pesticide rates by 25-50%, with the simultaneous addition of adjuvants, would allow health, weed infestation and lodging of spring barley to be maintained at a level similar to that obtained under the conditions when maximum rates are applied without any adjuvant. It was also assumed that particular adjuvants could show different interactions with the tested groups of crop protection agents. It was proved that the application of full recommended rates of pesticides gave the best values of the indicators relating to weed infestation, health and lodging of spring barley. However, thanks to the addition of adjuvants to the spray solution, the application of pesticide doses reduced by 25% produced similar results. A higher reduction of pesticide rates (by 50% had an adverse effect on the traits in question. In such case, there was noted higher weed infestation of the spring barley crop, compensation of some weed species, and increased stem-base infection by the fungal disease complex. On the other hand, less radical changes were observed in the case of spring barley lodging. The above-mentioned situation occurred in spite of the fact that the action of pesticides was aided by adjuvants. From the group of adjuvants under comparison, the oil adjuvant Atpolan 80 EC showed the best interaction with the crop protection agents under consideration.

  17. Shark Spotters: Successfully reducing spatial overlap between white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) and recreational water users in False Bay, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Tamlyn; Kock, Alison; Waries, Sarah; O'Riain, M Justin

    2017-01-01

    White sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) are apex predators that play an important role in the structure and stability of marine ecosystems. Despite their ecological importance and protected status, white sharks are still subject to lethal control to reduce the risk of shark bites for recreational water users. The Shark Spotters program, pioneered in Cape Town, South Africa, provides a non-lethal alternative for reducing the risk of human-shark conflict. In this study we assessed the efficacy of the Shark Spotters program in reducing overlap between water users and white sharks at two popular beaches in False Bay, South Africa. We investigated seasonal and diel patterns in water use and shark presence at each beach, and thereafter quantified the impact of different shark warnings from shark spotters on water user abundance. We also assessed the impact of a fatal shark incident on patterns of water use. Our results revealed striking diel and seasonal overlap between white sharks and water users at both beaches. Despite this, there was a low rate of shark-human incidents (0.5/annum) which we attribute partly to the success of the Shark Spotters program. Shark spotters use visual (coloured flags) and auditory (siren) cues to inform water users of risk associated with white shark presence in the surf zone. Our results showed that the highest risk category (denoted by a white flag and accompanying siren) caused a significant reduction in water user abundance; however the secondary risk category (denoted by a red flag with no siren) had no significant effect on water users. A fatal shark incident was shown to negatively impact the number of water users present for at least three months following the incident. Our results indicate that the Shark Spotters program effectively reduces spatial overlap between white sharks and water users when the risk of conflict is highest.

  18. N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-hydroxy-N'-(3-chlorophenyl)urea, a general reducing agent for 5-, 12-, and 15-lipoxygenases and a substrate for their pseudoperoxidase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falgueyret, J P; Desmarais, S; Roy, P J; Riendeau, D

    1992-01-01

    Lipoxygenases contain a nonheme iron that undergoes oxidation and reduction during the catalytic cycle. The conversion from the Fe3+ enzyme form to the Fe2+ form can be achieved using reducing inhibitors, a reaction that can be reversed with lipid hydroperoxides. The present study describes the properties of N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-hydroxy-N'-(3-chlorophenyl)urea (CPHU), which functions as a reducing agent for various lipoxygenases and stimulates the degradation of lipid hydroperoxide catalyzed by these enzymes (pseudoperoxidase activity). CPHU was a substrate for the pseudoperoxidase reaction of purified soybean lipoxygenase-1 with apparent Km values for CPHU and 13-hydroperoxy-9,11-octadecadienoic acid (13-HpODE) of 14 and 15 microM, respectively. CPHU was converted during the pseudoperoxidase reaction to a mixture of products that can be resolved by reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography. By comparison with the chemical reaction of CPHU and potassium nitrosodisulfonate, the major enzymatic reaction product was tentatively identified as a one-electron oxidation product of CPHU. At low concentrations (50 microM), dithiothreitol completely protected against the degradation of hydroxyurea without inhibiting the pseudoperoxidase reaction. Under these conditions, the rate of the pseudoperoxidase reaction with CPHU as a substrate can be quantitated by the change in absorbance at 234 nm owing to the consumption of 13-HpODE. In addition to soybean lipoxygenase-1, CPHU was found to be a substrate for the pseudoperoxidase activities of purified recombinant human 5-lipoxygenase and porcine leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase. The results are consistent with CPHU reacting with lipoxygenase by a one-electron oxidation to generate the ferrous enzyme form and the nitroxide radical, which could be reduced back to CPHU by DTT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Effect of Soil Structure At Different Scales On The Water Infiltration. Consequences of Reduced Tillage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, I.; Vogel, H. J.

    The soil structure in the cultivated layer is strongly dependent of some human activ- ities (like traffic or ploughing) and its evolution results in modifications of the gas, water and solute properties of the soil. The conjoint study of the structure and the transport properties of cultivated soils may also give new arguments to adjust the hu- man actions toward the protection of soil resources. We have then studied the infiltra- tion characteristics of a cultivated soil, that has been let under fallow for 5 years. An infiltration experiment using a dye tracer was carried out in the field to investigate the influence of the structure of each soil horizon on the pattern of water flow and solute transport in the entire soil profile. At a smaller scale, soil cores (16 cm diameter, 10 cm high) were taken to analyse the structure within the different horizons. This was done by x-ray tomography at a resolution of 0.5 mm. The tracer distribution after an infiltration of 90 mm is homogeneous in the top layer (0-10cm) and is then focused to preferential flow paths in the compacted layer below so that the tracer front already reaches the bottom of the soil profile at 80 cm depth. This pattern can be explained by the structure of macropores which is found to be highly continuous in the top layer, as shown by CT analyses, while their continuity is lost in the compacted horizon where only a few earthworm burrows or root channels are active. Obviously, there is no re- generation of the soil structure within the formerly ploughed layer after 5 years of reduced tillage. The observed characteristics of solute transport cannot be reproduced by one dimensional models using homogeneous material properties for the different horizons. To predict the observed preferential flow an explicit consideration of the relevant structures is required.

  20. Development of Polymer Gel Systems to Improve Volumetric Sweep and Reduce Producing Water/Oil Ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

    2005-04-03

    Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of the third year of a 42 month research program that is aimed at an understanding of gelation chemistry and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work focused on a widely applied system in the field, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A mathematical model that describes uptake and crosslinking reactions as a function of time was derived. The model was probability based and provides molecular-weight averages and molecular-weight distributions of the pre-gel aggregates as a function of time and initial system conditions. A liquid chromatography apparatus to experimentally measure the size and molecular weight distributions of polymer samples was developed. The method worked well for polymer samples without the chromium crosslinker. Sample retention observed during measurements of gelant samples during the gelation process compromised the results. Other methods will be tested to measure size distributions of the pre-gel aggregates. Dissolution of carbonate minerals during the injection of gelants causes the pH of the gelant to increase. Chromium precipitates from solution at the higher pH values robbing the gelant of crosslinker. Experimental data on the transport of chromium acetate solutions through dolomite cores were obtained. A mathematical model that describes the transport of brine and chromium acetate solutions through rocks containing carbonate minerals was used to simulate the experimental results.

  1. Physicochemical Quality and Chemical Safety of Chlorine as a Reconditioning Agent and Wash Water Disinfectant for Fresh-Cut Lettuce Washing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Haute, Sam; Holvoet, Kevin; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine was assessed as a reconditioning agent and wash water disinfectant in the fresh-cut produce industry. Artificial fresh-cut lettuce wash water, made from butterhead lettuce, was used for the experiments. In the reconditioning experiments, chlorine was added to artificial wash water inoculated with Escherichia coli O157 (6 log CFU/ml). Regression models were constructed based on the inactivation data and validated in actual wash water from leafy vegetable processing companies. The model that incorporated chlorine dose and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the wash water accurately predicted inactivation. Listeria monocytogenes was more resistant to chlorine reconditioning in artificial wash water than Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli O157. During the washing process with inoculated lettuce (4 log CFU/g), in the absence of chlorine, there was a rapid microbial buildup in the water that accumulated to 5.4 ± 0.4 log CFU/100 ml after 1 h. When maintaining a residual concentration of 1 mg/liter free chlorine, wash water contamination was maintained below 2.7, 2.5, and 2.5 log CFU/100 ml for tap water and artificial process water with COD values of 500 and 1,000 mg O2/liter, respectively. A model was developed to predict water contamination during the dynamic washing process. Only minor amounts of total trihalomethanes were formed in the water during reconditioning. Total trihalomethanes accumulated to larger amounts in the water during the wash water disinfection experiments and reached 124.5 ± 13.4 μg/liter after 1 h of execution of the washing process in water with a COD of 1,000 mg O2/liter. However, no total trihalomethanes were found on the fresh-cut lettuce after rinsing. PMID:23396332

  2. Physicochemical quality and chemical safety of chlorine as a reconditioning agent and wash water disinfectant for fresh-cut lettuce washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Haute, Sam; Sampers, Imca; Holvoet, Kevin; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2013-05-01

    Chlorine was assessed as a reconditioning agent and wash water disinfectant in the fresh-cut produce industry. Artificial fresh-cut lettuce wash water, made from butterhead lettuce, was used for the experiments. In the reconditioning experiments, chlorine was added to artificial wash water inoculated with Escherichia coli O157 (6 log CFU/ml). Regression models were constructed based on the inactivation data and validated in actual wash water from leafy vegetable processing companies. The model that incorporated chlorine dose and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the wash water accurately predicted inactivation. Listeria monocytogenes was more resistant to chlorine reconditioning in artificial wash water than Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli O157. During the washing process with inoculated lettuce (4 log CFU/g), in the absence of chlorine, there was a rapid microbial buildup in the water that accumulated to 5.4 ± 0.4 log CFU/100 ml after 1 h. When maintaining a residual concentration of 1 mg/liter free chlorine, wash water contamination was maintained below 2.7, 2.5, and 2.5 log CFU/100 ml for tap water and artificial process water with COD values of 500 and 1,000 mg O2/liter, respectively. A model was developed to predict water contamination during the dynamic washing process. Only minor amounts of total trihalomethanes were formed in the water during reconditioning. Total trihalomethanes accumulated to larger amounts in the water during the wash water disinfection experiments and reached 124.5 ± 13.4 μg/liter after 1 h of execution of the washing process in water with a COD of 1,000 mg O2/liter. However, no total trihalomethanes were found on the fresh-cut lettuce after rinsing.

  3. Earth Battery: An Approach for Reducing the Carbon and Water Intensity of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscheck, T. A.; Bielicki, J. M.; Randolph, J.

    2016-12-01

    Mitigating climate change requires a range of measures, including increased use of renewable and low-carbon energy and reducing the CO2 intensity of fossil energy use. Our approach, called the Earth Battery, uses the storage of supercritical CO2, N2, or pressurized air to enable utility-scale energy storage needed for increased use of variable renewable energy and low-carbon baseload power. When deployed with CO2, the Earth Battery is designed to address the major deployment barriers to CO2 capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) by managing overpressure and creating a business case for CO2 storage. We use the huge fluid and thermal storage capacity of the earth, together with overpressure driven by CO2, N2, or pressurized air storage, to harvest, store, and dispatch energy from subsurface (geothermal) and surface (solar, fossil) thermal resources, as well as excess energy from electric grids. The storage of CO2, N2, or air enables the earth to function as a low-carbon energy-system hub. Stored CO2, N2, or air plays three key roles: (1) as a supplemental fluid that creates pressure to efficiently recirculate working fluids that store and recover energy, (2) as a working fluid for efficient, low-water-intensity electricity conversion, and (3) as a shock absorber to allow diurnal and seasonal recharge/discharge cycles with minimal pressure oscillations, providing large pressure-storage capacity, with reduced risk of induced seismicity or leakage of stored CO2. To keep reservoir pressures in a safe range, a portion of the produced brine is diverted to generate water. Concentric rings of injection and production wells create a hydraulic divide to store pressure, CO2, N2/air, and thermal energy. Such storage can take excess power from the grid and excess thermal energy, and dispatch that energy when it is demanded. The system is pressurized and heated when power supply exceeds demand and depressurized when demand exceeds supply. The Earth Battery is designed for

  4. Reducing drinking water supply chemical contamination: risks from underground storage tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enander, Richard T; Hanumara, R Choudary; Kobayashi, Hisanori; Gagnon, Ronald N; Park, Eugene; Vallot, Christopher; Genovesi, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Drinking water supplies are at risk of contamination from a variety of physical, chemical, and biological sources. Ranked among these threats are hazardous material releases from leaking or improperly managed underground storage tanks located at municipal, commercial, and industrial facilities. To reduce human health and environmental risks associated with the subsurface storage of hazardous materials, government agencies have taken a variety of legislative and regulatory actions--which date back more than 25 years and include the establishment of rigorous equipment/technology/operational requirements and facility-by-facility inspection and enforcement programs. Given a history of more than 470,000 underground storage tank releases nationwide, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency continues to report that 7,300 new leaks were found in federal fiscal year 2008, while nearly 103,000 old leaks remain to be cleaned up. In this article, we report on an alternate evidence-based intervention approach for reducing potential releases from the storage of petroleum products (gasoline, diesel, kerosene, heating/fuel oil, and waste oil) in underground tanks at commercial facilities located in Rhode Island. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a new regulatory model can be used as a cost-effective alternative to traditional facility-by-facility inspection and enforcement programs for underground storage tanks. We conclude that the alternative model, using an emphasis on technical assistance tools, can produce measurable improvements in compliance performance, is a cost-effective adjunct to traditional facility-by-facility inspection and enforcement programs, and has the potential to allow regulatory agencies to decrease their frequency of inspections among low risk facilities without sacrificing compliance performance or increasing public health risks. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  5. Noncovalently-functionalized reduced graphene oxide sheets by water-soluble methyl green for supercapacitor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Xiaoying; Hu, Zhongai, E-mail: zhongai@nwnu.edu.cn; Hu, Haixiong; Qiang, Ruibin; Li, Li; Li, Zhimin; Yang, Yuying; Zhang, Ziyu; Wu, Hongying

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Electroactive methyl green (MG) is selected to functionalize reduced graphene oxide (RGO) through non-covalent modification and the composite achieves high specific capacitance, good rate capability and excellent long life cycle. - Highlights: • MG–RGO composites were firstly prepared through non-covalent modification. • The mass ratio in composites is a key for achieving high specific capacitance. • MG–RGO 5:4 exhibits the highest specific capacitance of 341 F g{sup −1}. • MG–RGO 5:4 shows excellent rate capability and long life cycle. - Abstract: In the present work, water-soluble electroactive methyl green (MG) has been used to non-covalently functionalize reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for enhancing supercapacitive performance. The microstructure, composition and morphology of MG–RGO composites are systematically characterized by UV–vis absorption, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electrochemical performances are investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The fast redox reactions from MG could generate additional pseudocapacitance, which endows RGO higher capacitances. As a result, the MG–RGO composite (with the 5:4 mass ratio of MG:RGO) achieve a maximum value of 341 F g{sup −1} at 1 A g{sup −1} within the potential range from −0.25 to 0.75 V and provide a 180% enhancement in specific capacitance in comparison with pure RGO. Furthermore, excellent rate capability (72% capacitance retention from 1 A g{sup −1} to 20 A g{sup −1}) and long life cycle (12% capacitance decay after 5000 cycles) are achieved for the MG–RGO composite electrode.

  6. Decision support system to maximize economic value of irrigation water at the Egyptian governorates meanwhile reducing the national food gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inas K. El-Gafy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The water resources and agricultural policies in Egypt tend to minimize the food gap, increase self-sufficiency, maximize the economic value of water, decrease the cultivated area of voracious crop water and optimize the water allocation and use. The main goal of the present study is developing a decision support system that can be utilized to assist in achiving these polices and stategies. The decision support system was applied to: (i analyze of the current situation of the consumed water and the cultivated areas by main crops and their net return, (ii calculate economic value of irrigation water for main crops at twenty two governorates in Egypt, and (iii solve a linear optimization problem where the objective function is maximizing the economic value of the irrigation water, and finally (iv propose an optimal cropping pattern at the Egyptian governorate level. The paper concludes that proposing a cropping pattern at the governorate level is essential where it provides a reliable and accurate view of the economic value of irrigation water rather than the national level. The proposed cropping pattern reduces the national food gap and the cultivated areas of voracious crops water, and saves the irrigation water. Alternatives to utilize the saved water due to the proposed cropping pattern are suggested.

  7. Quantitative evaluation on activated property-tunable bulk liquid water with reduced hydrogen bonds using deconvoluted Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Yang, Kuang-Hsuan; Chen, Liang-Yih; Yang, Chih-Ping; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-01-06

    Interesting properties of water with distinguishable hydrogen-bonding structure on interfacial phase or in confined environment have drawn wide attentions. However, these unique properties of water are only found within the interfacial phase and confined environment, thus, their applications are limited. In addition, quantitative evaluation on these unique properties associating with the enhancement of water's physical and chemical activities represents a notable challenge. Here we report a practicable production of free-standing liquid water at room temperature with weak hydrogen-bonded structure naming Au nanoparticles (NPs)-treated (AuNT) water via treating by plasmon-induced hot electron transfer occurred on resonantly illuminated gold NPs (AuNPs). Compared to well-known untreated bulk water (deionized water), the prepared AuNT water exhibits many distinct activities in generally physical and chemical reactions, such as high solubilities to NaCl and O2. Also, reducing interaction energy within water molecules provides lower overpotential and higher efficiency in electrolytic hydrogen production. In addition, these enhanced catalytic activities of AuNT water are tunable by mixing with deionized water. Also, most of these tunable activities are linearly proportional to its degree of nonhydrogen-bonded structure (DNHBS), which is derived from the O-H stretching in deconvoluted Raman spectrum.

  8. A non-linear reduced order methodology applicable to boiling water reactor stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prill, Dennis Paul

    2013-12-06

    Thermal-hydraulic coupling between power, flow rate and density, intensified by neutronics feedback are the main drivers of boiling water reactor (BWR) stability behavior. High-power low-flow conditions in connection with unfavorable power distributions can lead the BWR system into unstable regions where power oscillations can be triggered. This important threat to operational safety requires careful analysis for proper understanding. Analyzing an exhaustive parameter space of the non-linear BWR system becomes feasible with methodologies based on reduced order models (ROMs), saving computational cost and improving the physical understanding. Presently within reactor dynamics, no general and automatic prediction of high-dimensional ROMs based on detailed BWR models are available. In this thesis a systematic self-contained model order reduction (MOR) technique is derived which is applicable for several classes of dynamical problems, and in particular to BWRs of any degree of details. Expert knowledge can be given by operational, experimental or numerical transient data and is transfered into an optimal basis function representation. The methodology is mostly automated and provides the framework for the reduction of various different systems of any level of complexity. Only little effort is necessary to attain a reduced version within this self-written code which is based on coupling of sophisticated commercial software. The methodology reduces a complex system in a grid-free manner to a small system able to capture even non-linear dynamics. It is based on an optimal choice of basis functions given by the so-called proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). Required steps to achieve reliable and numerical stable ROM are given by a distinct calibration road-map. In validation and verification steps, a wide spectrum of representative test examples is systematically studied regarding a later BWR application. The first example is non-linear and has a dispersive character

  9. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Wei Zhang

    2004-10-01

    This is the seventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Coal drying experiments were performed with lignite and Powder River Basin coals to determine the effects of inlet air moisture level on the equilibrium relationship between coal moisture and exit air relative humidity and temperature. The results show that, for lignite, there is a slight dependence of equilibrium moisture on inlet humidity level. However, the equilibrium relationship for PRB coal appears to be independent of inlet air humidity level. The specific equilibrium model used for computing lignite coal dryer performance has a significant effect on the prediction accuracy for exit air relative humidity; but its effects on predicted coal product moisture, exit air temperature and specific humidity are minimal. Analyses were performed to determine the effect of lignite product moisture on unit performance for a high temperature drying system. With this process design, energy for drying is obtained from the hot flue gas entering the air preheater and the hot circulating cooling water leaving the steam condenser. Comparisons were made to the same boiler operating with lignite which had been dried off-site.

  10. Parameters of Drag Reducing Polymers and Drag Reduction Performance in Single-Phase Water Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abubakar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents experimental investigation about the effect of polymer parameters on the performance of the drag reducing polymers in single-phase water flowing in a horizontal pipe of 30.6 mm ID. Master solutions (1000 ppm of ten high-molecular weight polymers were injected at different flow rates to achieve polymer concentrations in the range of 2–40 ppm in the test section. The drag reduction increased with polymer concentration up to 10 ppm, above which it reached a plateau value. While the drag reduction at the plateau value increases with polymer molecular weight, the maximum drag reduction was not affected by the increase in polymer charge density up to 13%. For instance, the maximum drag reduction for anionic polymers with molecular weight 6–8 million Da. and charge density between 5 and 13% was around 60%, which decreased to around 38% for the polymer with charge density of 25%. Ionic polymers provided more drag reduction than nonionic ones. The overall conclusion is that drag reduction depends on polymer ability to form intermolecular associations and/or its flexibility, which can be enhanced by increasing molecular weight, decreasing charge density, and selecting smaller side groups in the main polymer backbone.

  11. A New System to Estimate and Reduce Electrical Energy Consumption of Domestic Hot Water in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Gutierrez-Escolar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption rose about 28% over the 2001 to 2011 period in the Spanish residential sector. In this environment, domestic hot water (DHW represents the second highest energy demand. There are several methodologies to estimate DHW consumption, but each methodology uses different inputs and some of them are based on obsolete data. DHW energy consumption estimation is a key tool to plan modifications that could enhance this consumption and we decided to update the methodologies. We studied DHW consumption with data from 10 apartments in the same building during 18 months. As a result of the study, we updated one chosen methodology, adapting it to the current situation. One of the challenges to improve efficiency of DHW use is that most of people are not aware of how it is consumed in their homes. To help this information to reach consumers, we developed a website to allow users to estimate the final electrical energy needed for DHW. The site uses three estimation methodologies and chooses the best fit based on information given by the users. Finally, the application provides users with recommendations and tips to reduce their DHW consumption while still maintaining the desired comfort level.

  12. Desulfovibrio alkalitolerans sp. nov., a novel alkalitolerant, sulphate-reducing bacterium isolated from district heating water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildgaard, Lone; Nielsen, Marie Bank; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2006-05-01

    A novel alkalitolerant, sulphate-reducing bacterium (strain RT2T) was isolated from alkaline district heating water. Strain RT2T was a motile vibrio (0.5-0.8 microm wide and 1.4-1.9 microm long) and grew at pH 6.9-9.9 (optimum at pH 9.0-9.4) and at 16-47 degrees C (optimum at 43 degrees C). The genomic DNA G+C content was 64.7 mol%. A limited number of compounds were used as electron donors with sulphate as electron acceptor, including lactate, pyruvate, formate and hydrogen/acetate. Sulphite and thiosulphate also served as electron acceptors. Based on physiological and genotypic properties, the isolate was considered to represent a novel species of the genus Desulfovibrio, for which the name Desulfovibrio alkalitolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RT2T (=DSM 16529T=JCM 12612T). The strain is the first alkali-tolerant member of the genus Desulfovibrio to be described.

  13. Subcritical carbon dioxide-water hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse pith for reducing sugars production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiezhen; Chen, Xiaopeng; Wang, Linlin; Wei, Xiaojie; Wang, Huasheng; Lu, Songzhou; Li, Yunhua

    2017-03-01

    The aim of present study was to obtain total reducing sugars (TRS) by hydrolysis in subcritical CO2-water from sugarcane bagasse pith (SCBP), the fibrous residue remaining after papermaking from sugarcane bagasse. The optimum hydrolysis conditions were evaluated by L16(4(5)) orthogonal experiments. The TRS yield achieved 45.8% at the optimal conditions: 200°C, 40min, 500rmin(-1), CO2 initial pressure of 1MPa and liquid-to-solid ratio of 50:1. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance were used to characterize hydrolysis liquor, treated and untreated SCBP, resulting in the removal of hemicelluloses to mainly produce xylose, glucose and arabinose during hydrolysis. The severity factors had no correlation to TRS yield, indicating that the simple kinetic processes of biomass solubilisation cannot perfectly describe the SCBP hydrolysis. The first-order kinetic model based on consecutive reaction was used to obtain rate constants, activation energies and pre-exponential factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of casting investment preventing blackening of noble metal alloys part 3. Effect of reducing agent addition on the strength and expansion of the investments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yukun; Nakai, Akira; Ogura, Hideo

    2004-06-01

    Different reducing agents (B, Al, Si and Ti) were individually added to two gypsum-bonded investments to prepare investments preventing surface blackening of some noble cast alloys. The effect of different additive contents on green-body and burnout compressive strength, setting and thermal expansion of the investments were evaluated. The strength and expansion of the investments were changed by the additives. The compressive strength of Al-, Si- and Ti-added investments decreased with the increase of additive contents. The burnout strength of B-added investments significantly increased while green-body strength remained unchanged. The setting expansion of the B-added investments increased while those of the Al-, Si- and Ti-added investments decreased with the increase of additive contents. The thermal expansion of the Si- and Ti-added investments decreased, and that of the Al- and B-added investments remained unchanged. Further study is necessary to evaluate the effects of these additives on the accuracy of dental castings.

  15. Sugar and hexokinase suppress expression of PIP aquaporins and reduce leaf hydraulics that preserves leaf water potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Gilor; Sade, Nir; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Lerner, Stephen; Shatil-Cohen, Arava; Yeselson, Yelena; Egbaria, Aiman; Kottapalli, Jayaram; Schaffer, Arthur A; Moshelion, Menachem; Granot, David

    2017-07-01

    Sugars affect central aspects of plant physiology, including photosynthesis, stomatal behavior and the loss of water through the stomata. Yet, the potential effects of sugars on plant aquaporins (AQPs) and water conductance have not been examined. We used database and transcriptional analyses, as well as cellular and whole-plant functional techniques to examine the link between sugar-related genes and AQPs. Database analyses revealed a high level of correlation between the expression of AQPs and that of sugar-related genes, including the Arabidopsis hexokinases 1 (AtHXK1). Increased expression of AtHXK1, as well as the addition of its primary substrate, glucose (Glc), repressed the expression of 10 AQPs from the plasma membrane-intrinsic proteins (PIP) subfamily (PIP-AQPs) and induced the expression of two stress-related PIP-AQPs. The osmotic water permeability of mesophyll protoplasts of AtHXK1-expressing plants and the leaf hydraulic conductance of those plants were significantly reduced, in line with the decreased expression of PIP-AQPs. Conversely, hxk1 mutants demonstrated a higher level of hydraulic conductance, with increased water potential in their leaves. In addition, the presence of Glc reduced leaf water potential, as compared with an osmotic control, indicating that Glc reduces the movement of water from the xylem into the mesophyll. The production of sugars entails a significant loss of water and these results suggest that sugars and AtHXK1 affect the expression of AQP genes and reduce leaf water conductance, to coordinate sugar levels with the loss of water through transpiration. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Adsorption Study on Moringa Oleifera Seeds and Musa Cavendish as Natural Water Purification Agents for Removal of Lead, Nickel and Cadmium from Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, N. A. A.; Jayasuriya, N.; Fan, L.

    2016-07-01

    to the other water treatment agents for removing the Pb, Ni and Cd from drinking water.

  17. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance for the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John W.; Etter, David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, Robert; Vandezande, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with on-orbit ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post-Shuttle 6-year service life.

  18. 3Ts for Reducing Lead in Drinking Water in Schools and Child Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s 3Ts was developed to assist schools with lead in drinking water prevention programs. It is intended for use by school officials responsible for the maintenance and/or safety of school’s drinking water.

  19. To add or not to add: the use of quenching agents for the analysis of disinfection by-products in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiana, Ina; Lethorn, Arron; Joll, Cynthia; Heitz, Anna

    2014-08-01

    The formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) is a public health concern due to their potential adverse health effects. Robust and sensitive methods for the analysis of DBPs, as well as appropriate sample handling procedures, are essential to obtain accurate, precise and reliable data on DBP occurrence and formation. In particular, the use of an appropriate quenching agent is critical to prevent further formation of DBPs during the holding time between sample collection and analysis. Despite reports of decomposition of DBPs caused by some quenching agents, particularly sulphite and thiosulphate, a survey of the literature shows that they are still the most commonly used quenching agents in analysis of DBPs. This study investigated the effects of five quenching agents (sodium sulphite, sodium arsenite, sodium borohydride, ascorbic acid, and ammonium chloride) on the stability of seven different classes of DBPs commonly found in drinking waters, in order to determine the most appropriate quenching agent for the different classes of DBPs. All of the quenching agents tested did not adversely affect the concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), and thus are suitable for quenching of disinfectant residual prior to analysis of these DBPs. Ascorbic acid was found to be suitable for the analysis of haloacetonitriles (HANs) and haloketones (HKs), but should not be used for the analysis of chlorite. Sodium arsenite, sodium borohydride, and ascorbic acid were all acceptable for the analysis of haloacetaldehydes (HALs). All of the quenching agents tested adversely affected the concentration of chloropicrin. A 'universal' quenching agent, suitable for all groups of DBPs studied, was not identified. However, based on the results of this study, we recommend the use of ascorbic acid for quenching of samples to be analysed for organic DBPs (i.e. THMs, HAAs, HANs, HKs, and HALs) and sodium sulphite for analysis of inorganic DBPs. Our study is the first

  20. Integrating Disease Control Strategies: Balancing Water Sanitation and Hygiene Interventions to Reduce Diarrheal Disease Burden

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eisenberg, Joseph N.S; Scott, James C; Porco, Travis

    2007-01-01

    ... intervention.Results. We found that the benefits of a water quality intervention depend on sanitation and hygiene conditions. When sanitation conditions are poor, water quality improvements may have minimal impact regardless of amount of water contamination. If each transmission pathway alone is sufficient to maintain diarrheal disease, single-pathway ...

  1. Bio-corrosion of water pipeline by sulphate-reducing bacteria in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the presence of SRB in water, in a water pipeline and in the soil near the pipeline at a mining operation, under conditions that would be expected to be stable toward corrosion. Samples of water in pipes showed a high frequency of SRB. Cast iron coupons placed in pipes gave positive results for SRB ...

  2. Simulating partially illegal markets of private tanker water providers on the country level: A multi-agent, hydroeconomic case-study of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassert, C. J. A.; Yoon, J.; Gawel, E.; Klauer, B.; Sigel, K.; Talozi, S.; Lachaut, T.; Selby, P. D.; Knox, S.; Gorelick, S.; Tilmant, A.; Harou, J. J.; Mustafa, D.; Medellin-Azuara, J.; Rajsekhar, D.; Avisse, N.; Zhang, H.

    2016-12-01

    In arid countries around the world, markets of private small-scale water providers, mostly delivering water via tanker trucks, have emerged to balance the shortcomings of public water supply systems. While these markets can provide substantial contributions to meeting customers' water demands, they often partially rely on illegal water abstractions, thus imposing an unregulated and unmonitored strain on ground and surface water resources. Despite their important impacts on water users' welfare and resource sustainability, these markets are still poorly understood. We use a multi-agent, hydroeconomic simulation model, developed as part of the Jordan Water Project, to investigate the role of these markets in a country-wide case-study of Jordan. Jordan's water sector is characterized by a severe and growing scarcity of water resources, high intermittency in the public water network, and a strongly increasing demand due to an unprecedented refugee crisis. The tanker water market serves an important role in providing water from rural wells to households and commercial enterprises, especially during supply interruptions. In order to overcome the lack of direct data about this partially illegal market, we simulate demand and supply for tanker water. The demand for tanker water is conceptualized as a residual demand, remaining after a water user has depleted all available cheap and qualitatively reliable piped water. It is derived from residential and commercial demand functions on the basis of survey data. Tanker water supply is determined by farm simulation models calculating the groundwater pumping cost and the agricultural opportunity cost of tanker water. A market algorithm is then used to match rural supplies with users' demands, accounting for survey data on tanker operators' transport costs and profit expectations. The model is used to gain insights into the size of the tanker markets in all 89 subdistricts of Jordan and their responsiveness to various policy

  3. Exponentially increased thermal resistance ofSalmonellaandEnterococcus faeciumat reduced water activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuxiang; Tang, Juming; Tadapaneni, Ravi Kiran; Yang, Ren; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2018-02-09

    Salmonella exhibited prolonged survivability and high tolerance to heat in low-moisture foods. Reported thermal resistance parameters of Salmonella spp. in low-moisture foods is unpredictable due to various factors. We report here that an external factor temperature-dependent water activity (a w, treatment temperature ) of bacterial cells plays an important role in the sharply increased thermal resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 ( S Enteritidis) and its potential surrogate Enterococcus faecium NRRL B-2354 ( E. faecium ). In our study, silicon dioxide granules, as inert carriers, were separately inoculated with these two microorganisms and heated at 80°C with controlled relative humidity between 18-72% (result in corresponding a w,80°C of bacteria between 0.18 and 0.72) in custom-designed test cells. Inactivation kinetics of both microorganisms fitted a log-linear model (R 2 =0.83-0.97). Reduced a w,80°C of bacterial cells increased the D 80°C -values (the time needed to achieve 1 log reduction of a bacterial population at 80°C) exponentially for S Enteritidis and E. faecium on silicon dioxide. The log-linear relationship between D 80°C of both strains in silicon dioxide and a w,80°C also were verified for organic wheat flour. E. faecium showed consistently higher D 80°C values than S. Enteritidis over the tested a w,80°C range. The estimated z a w values (the a w,80°C needed to alter 1 log of D 80°C ) of S Enteritidis and E. faecium were 0.31 and 0.28, respectively. This study provides an insight into the interpretation of thermal resistances of Salmonella that could guide the development and validation of thermal processing of low-moisture foods. Importance In this paper, we established that thermal resistance of the pathogen Salmonella and its surrogate Enterococcus faecium , as reflected by D values at 80°C, increases sharply with reducing relative humidity in the environment. The log-linear relationship between D 80°C of both strains in

  4. Facile synthesis of reduced graphene oxide films at the air-water interface and in situ loading of noble metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramhaiah, K.; John, Neena S.

    2012-12-01

    Transparent free-standing films of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) are obtained from graphene oxide solution at the air-water interface in a simple, rapid, one-step reduction process with tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium chloride (THPC), a widely used reducing agent for synthesizing metal nanoparticles from metal salts. The thickness of the films depends on the initial concentration of graphene oxide (GO). The restoration of the aromatic basal plane network and the removal of oxygen groups are confirmed by UV-visible and infrared spectroscopies. Atomic force microscopy shows that the film consists of a self-assembled monolayer of RGO platelets that are continuous over micrometre scale areas. In the presence of noble metal ions, THPC reduces both GO and metal ions to form free-standing films of RGO decorated by noble metal nanoparticles. Compared to other reported methods, the THPC route offers a very rapid and one-step process to obtain ultra-thin films of RGO loaded with noble metal nanoparticles.

  5. Microbial fouling community analysis of the cooling water system of a nuclear test reactor with emphasis on sulphate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, P; Joshi, M Hiren; Rao, T S

    2011-10-01

    Culture and molecular-based techniques were used to characterize bacterial diversity in the cooling water system of a fast breeder test reactor (FBTR). Techniques were selected for special emphasis on sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Water samples from different locations of the FBTR cooling water system, in addition to biofilm scrapings from carbon steel coupons and a control SRB sample were characterized. Whole genome extraction of the water samples and SRB diversity by group specific primers were analysed using nested PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results of the bacterial assay in the cooling water showed that the total culturable bacteria (TCB) ranged from 10(3) to 10(5) cfu ml(-1); iron-reducing bacteria, 10(3) to 10(5) cfu ml(-1); iron oxidizing bacteria, 10(2) to 10(3) cfu ml(-1) and SRB, 2-29 cfu ml(-1). However, the counts of the various bacterial types in the biofilm sample were 2-3 orders of magnitude higher. SRB diversity by the nested PCR-DGGE approach showed the presence of groups 1, 5 and 6 in the FBTR cooling water system; however, groups 2, 3 and 4 were not detected. The study demonstrated that the PCR protocol influenced the results of the diversity analysis. The paper further discusses the microbiota of the cooling water system and its relevance in biofouling.

  6. Preparation, characterization, and theoretical analysis of group 14 element(I) dimers: a case study of magnesium(I) compounds as reducing agents in inorganic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cameron; Bonyhady, Simon J; Holzmann, Nicole; Frenking, Gernot; Stasch, Andreas

    2011-12-19

    A synthetic route to the new amidine (DipNH)(DipN)C(C(6)H(4)Bu(t)-4) (ButisoH; Dip = C(6)H(3)Pr(i)(2)-2,6) has been developed. Its deprotonation with either LiBu(n) or KN(SiMe(3))(2) yields the amidinate complexes [M(Butiso)] (M = Li or K). Their reactions with group 14 element halides/pseudohalides afford the heteroleptic group 14 complexes [(Butiso)SiCl(3)], [(Butiso)ECl] (E = Ge or Sn), and [{(Butiso)Pb(μ-O(3)SCF(3))(THF)}(∞)], all of which have been crystallographically characterized. In addition, the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of the homoleptic complex [Pb(Butiso)(2)] is reported. Reductions of the heteroleptic complexes with a soluble magnesium(I) dimer, [{((Mes)Nacnac)Mg}(2)] ((Mes)Nacnac = [(MesNCMe)(2)CH](-); Mes = mesityl), have given moderate-to-high yields of the group 14 element(I) dimers [{(Butiso)E}(2)] (E = Si, Ge, or Sn), the X-ray crystallographic studies of which reveal trans-bent structures. The corresponding lead(I) complex could not be prepared. Comprehensive spectroscopic and theoretical analyses of [{(Butiso)E}(2)] have allowed their properties to be compared. All complexes possess E-E single bonds and can be considered as intramolecularly base-stabilized examples of ditetrelynes, REER. Taken as a whole, this study highlights the synthetic utility of soluble and easy to prepare magnesium(I) dimers as valuable alternatives to the harsh, and often insoluble, alkali-metal reducing agents that are currently widely employed in the synthesis of low-oxidation-state organometallic/inorganic complexes. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Diallyl sulfide as a potential dietary agent to reduce TNF-α- and histamine-induced proinflammatory responses in A7r5 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cheng-Ying; Weng, Chia-Jui; Jhang, Jhih-Jia; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Huang, Shang-Ming; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2014-05-01

    Oxidative stress-aggravated chronic inflammatory diseases of the airway are well documented; hence, treatment with antioxidants to ameliorate oxidative stress might be an effective strategy to reduce airway complications. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and molecular mechanism of diallyl sulfide (DAS), which is a natural organosulfuric compound found in garlic, on the inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)- or histamine-induced inflammation in rat aortic smooth muscle A7r5 cells. A7r5 cells were coincubated with DAS before exposure to TNF-α or histamine. DAS significantly blocked the accumulation of the nuclear p65 protein in TNF-α-induced A7r5 cells by attenuating the TNF-α receptor complex through the dissociation of the TNF receptor-associated death domain and TNF receptor-associated factor 2. Moreover, DAS inhibited histamine-induced inflammation by decreasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels by enhancing the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2-related antioxidative enzyme. DAS also inhibited inflammation by suppressing interleukin-1β and TNF-α through the inhibition of ROS-induced PI3K/Akt and the downstream NF-κB and activator protein-1. Our results demonstrate that DAS is a potential phytochemical to inhibit TNF-α- and histamine-induced inflammation, suggesting that DAS might be an effective dietary agent for the prevention of oxidative stress-induced inflammation of the airway. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Quantifying the economic importance of irrigation water reuse in a Chilean watershed using an integrated agent-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, R. T.; Troost, Christian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Irrigation with surface water enables Chilean agricultural producers to generate one of the country's most important economic exports. The Chilean water code established tradable water rights as a mechanism to allocate water amongst farmers and other water-use sectors. It remains contested whether this mechanism is effective and many authors have raised equity concerns regarding its impact on water users. For example, speculative hoarding of water rights in expectations of their increasing value has been described. This paper demonstrates how farmers can hoard water rights as a risk management strategy for variable water supply, for example, due to the cycles of El Niño or as consequence of climate change. While farmers with insufficient water rights can rely on unclaimed water during conditions of normal water availability, drought years overproportionally impact on their supply of irrigation water and thereby farm profitability. This study uses a simulation model that consists of a hydrological balance model component and a multiagent farm decision and production component. Both model components are parameterized with empirical data, while uncertain parameters are calibrated. The study demonstrates a thorough quantification of parameter uncertainty, using global sensitivity analysis and multiple behavioral parameter scenarios.

  9. Wetlands as a means to reduce the environmental impact of mine drainage waters

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöblom, Åsa

    2003-01-01

    In many mining regions of the world, pollution of surface water and groundwater by drainage water originating from mines aiming waste poses either a serious threat to the environment, or a severe environmental problem. During the last two and a half decades, treatment of mine drainage water in constructed and natural wetlands has emerged as an alternative to more conventional methods to handle the problem. In this thesis, the major biogeochemical processes behind metal immobilization in wetla...

  10. The Sonoma Water Evaluation Trial (SWET): A randomized drinking water intervention trial to reduce gastrointestinal illness in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives. We estimate the risk of highly credible gastrointestinal illness (HCGI) among adults 55 and older in a community drinking tap water meeting current U.S. standards. Methods. We conducted a randomized, triple-blinded, crossover trial in 714 households (988 indiv...

  11. Reducing ventilation requirements in semi-closed greenhouses increases water use efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsoulas, N.; Sapounas, A.; Zwart, de H.F.; Dieleman, J.A.; Stanghellini, C.

    2015-01-01

    We explore an under-appreciated side effect of semi-closed greenhouses: the ability to recover transpired water, thereby increasing water use efficiency. Semi-closed greenhouses are fit with cooling equipment, to limit natural ventilation requirements for temperature and humidity control. We assess

  12. Reduced cerebral perfusion on sudden immersion in ice water: a possible cause of drowning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantoni, Teit; Belhage, Bo; Pedersen, Lars M

    2007-01-01

    Near-drowning incidents and drowning deaths after accidental immersion in open waters have been linked to cold shock response. It consists of inspiratory gasps, hyperventilation, tachycardia, and hypertension in the first 2-3 min of cold-water immersion. This study explored the immediate changes ...

  13. Filter-feeding bivalves can remove avian influenza viruses from water and reduce infectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses are transmitted within wild aquatic bird populations through an indirect fecal-oral route involving fecal-contaminated water. In this study, the influence of filter-feeding bivalves, Corbicula fluminea, on the infectivity of AI virus in water was examined. A single cla...

  14. Reduced cerebral perfusion on sudden immersion in ice water: a possible cause of drowning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantoni, Teit; Belhage, Bo; Pedersen, Lars M

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Near-drowning incidents and drowning deaths after accidental immersion in open waters have been linked to cold shock response. It consists of inspiratory gasps, hyperventilation, tachycardia, and hypertension in the first 2-3 min of cold-water immersion. This study explored the imme...

  15. Bio-corrosion of water pipeline by sulphate-reducing bacteria in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    esiri

    2013-11-13

    Nov 13, 2013 ... Mining and industrial drainage con- taining sulphate and heavy metal negatively affects terres- ... processes, this chemically stabilizes the toxic metal ions as solid metal sulphides (Zagury et al., 2006). Furthermore, SRB ..... Pipeline water chemistry. The water in the pipeline at Sarcheshmeh mine was.

  16. Reduction of the applied load by prioritizing hot water production; Reducering av anslutningseffekten med hjaelp av VV-prioritering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selinder, Patrik [ZW Energiteknik, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    The energy used in Swedish district heating networks is primarily used for heating purposes in buildings, whereas the energy used for heating the domestic hot water is a minor part - about 10 to 20 % - of the total energy used in district heating systems. However, as the involved heat capacity is concerned, both heating of hot water and heating of buildings are very often of comparable sizes. Although effect of simultaneity of hot water consumption reduces the total hot water heating capacity in the built environment, the behaviour pattern of the customers is such that the hot water use results in high hot water loads for a given building at certain hours of a day. The preparation of domestic hot water therefore makes large demands on the heating capacity of the district heating net in relation to the ability of repayment due to the energy consumption. However, a building exhibits in general a good possibility for decreasing the total heat load by involving its thermal mass and therefore borrowing under limited time a part of its house heating capacity for hot water heating purposes. The thermal mass of the building ensures that this 'capacity-borrowing' is not experienced as a decrease in comfort. The goal of this project was to develop and to test a control algorithm acting on the control system of a customer substation with the purpose of temporarily reduce the heat delivery when high hot water demands occur. This algorithm has then been tested in a residential building in Goeteborg, Sweden. The control principle was applied on a Swedish customer substation with two heat exchangers connected in parallel for both radiator heating and instantaneous domestic hot water preparation. The basic idea was to reduce the opening angle of the radiator valve when a larger demand of hot water occurs (indicated by opening of the hot water control valve). A control algorithm based on certain physical parameters calculates in this case the closing angle of the radiator

  17. Deprivation of both sucrose and water reduces the mosquito heart contraction rate while increasing the expression of nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Haley E; Estévez-Lao, Tania Y; Murphree, C Steven; Hillyer, Julián F

    2015-03-01

    Adult female mosquitoes rely on carbohydrate-rich plant nectars as their main source of energy. In the present study we tested whether the deprivation of a carbohydrate dietary source or the deprivation of both carbohydrate and water affects mosquito heart physiology. Intravital video imaging of Anopheles gambiae showed that, relative to sucrose fed mosquitoes, the deprivation of both sucrose and water for 24h, but not the deprivation of sucrose alone, reduces the heart contraction rate. Measurement of the protein, carbohydrate and lipid content of mosquitoes in the three treatment groups did not explain this cardiac phenotype. However, while the deprivation of sucrose reduced mosquito weight and abdominal width, the deprivation of both sucrose and water reduced mosquito weight even further without augmenting the change in abdominal width, indirectly suggesting that starvation and dehydration reduces hemolymph pressure. Analysis of the mRNA levels of crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP), FMRFamide, corazonin, neuropeptide F and short neuropeptide F then suggested that these neuropeptides do not regulate the cardiac phenotype observed. However, relative to sucrose fed and sucrose deprived mosquitoes, the mRNA level of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was significantly elevated in mosquitoes that had been deprived of both sucrose and water. Given that nitric oxide suppresses the heart rate of vertebrates and invertebrates, these data suggest a role for this free radical in modulating mosquito heart physiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effectiveness of buffer strips without added fertilizer to reduce phosphorus loads from flat fields to surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noij, I.G.A.M.; Heinen, M.; Heesmans, H.I.M.; Thissen, J.T.N.M.; Groenendijk, P.

    2013-01-01

    Buffer strips with no added fertilizers are a mitigation measure to reduce P loads from agricultural land to surface water. However, the experimental evidence on their effectiveness (BSE) has been from sloping locations with shallow flow and surface runoff. The aim of this experimental study was to

  19. Top soil removal reduces water pollution from phosphorus and dissolved organic matter and lowers methane emissions from rewetted peatlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, Dominik; Goldhammer, Tobias; Cabezas, Alavaro

    2018-01-01

    1. A valid strategy to mitigate the eutrophication of water bodies due to non-point source phosphorus (P) pollution and to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases is the rewetting of degraded peatlands. However, long-term drainage and intensive agricultural use make it unlikely that the original...

  20. Partial root zone drying (PRD) sustains yield of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) at reduced water supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahnazari, Ali; Andersen, Mathias Neumann; Liu, Fulai

    2008-01-01

    subsurface drip irrigation treatments ((1) Full Irrigation (FI) receiving 100% of evaporative demand; and (2) PRD receiving 70% water of FI) on potato yield, tuber size, leaf water relations and irrigation water use efficiency (IWUE). The PRD treatment was started just after the end of tuber initiation......Partial root zone drying (PRD) is a new water-saving irrigation strategy being tested in many crop species. Until now it has not been investigated in potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.). A field experiment on sandy soil in Denmark was conducted under a mobile rainout shelter to study effects of two...... for two months during tuber bulking and maturing stage and was shifted from one side to the other side of the plants every 5-10 days when FI plants had used 20-25 mm. Compared to FI plants, stomatal conductance was generally lower in the PRD-treated plants, whereas leaf water potential tended to be lower...

  1. [Water consumption in Saharan nomads. A remarkably reduced and constant consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paque, C

    1976-10-02

    The writer has carried out two studies of the Western Sahara (Missions UNESCO-Institut Scientifique Cherifien 1961 and 1964) bearing upon the consumption of water by the Saharan nomads. In spite of their environment, the consumption appeared to be remarkably low and constant. Very strict dietary practices, the salinity of the water, and special behavioural customs seemed to be the basis of this strict economy of fluid intake. Genetic factors could also, of course, be partly responsible. The dietary practices are characterised essentially: 1) by a regime which in general contains the minimum of protein: milk foods, cereals, and sugars, and 2) by the habitual exclusion of salt in the preparation of meals; the sodium necessary for water/sodium balance deriving solely from the salinity of the water. Water with little or average salt content (total 2-3 g/l) seems to meet the normal needs of the body - there is no need for the salt pill - and, moreover, to quench the thirst more effectively than pure water (Paque, 1964) - presumably by making good the deficit (cf. Stricker, 1970). On the other hand, saltier water (total 4-8g/; Na 1 g/l or more) appears to pose more complex physiological problems for which the prime solution is to apply the Saharan rule, i.e. that no supplementary salt should be added to the diet (Paque, 1963). In desert life there are thus certain rules which must be obeyed. As for the matter of behavioural customs influencing water balance, they consist in the main of habitually limiting the frequency of water intake (often just twice daily, sometime only once daily) together with a careful choice of clothing and the wearing of the veil. Finally, genetic factor could result in a more efficiently controlled loss of water (and of salt?) VIA THE SKIN.

  2. Evaluating the effect of river restoration techniques on reducing the impacts of outfall on water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mant, Jenny; Janes, Victoria; Terrell, Robert; Allen, Deonie; Arthur, Scott; Yeakley, Alan; Morse, Jennifer; Holman, Ian

    2015-04-01

    Outfalls represent points of discharge to a river and often contain pollutants from urban runoff, such as heavy metals. Additionally, erosion around the outfall site results in increased sediment generation and the release of associated pollutants. Water quality impacts from heavy metals pose risks to the river ecosystem (e.g. toxicity to aquatic habitats). Restoration techniques including establishment of swales, and the re-vegetation and reinforcement of channel banks aim to decrease outfall flow velocities resulting in deposition of pollutants and removal through plant uptake. Within this study the benefits of river restoration techniques for the removal of contaminants associated with outfalls have been quantified within Johnson Creek, Portland, USA as part of the EPSRC funded Blue-Green Cities project. The project aims to develop new strategies for protecting hydrological and ecological values of urban landscapes. A range of outfalls have been selected which span restored and un-restored channel reaches, a variety of upstream land-uses, and both direct and set-back outfalls. River Habitat Surveys were conducted at each of the sites to assess the level of channel modification within the reach. Sediment samples were taken at the outfall location, upstream, and downstream of outfalls for analysis of metals including Nickel, Lead, Zinc, Copper, Iron and Magnesium. These were used to assess the impact of the level of modification at individual sites, and to compare the influence of direct and set-back outfalls. Concentrations of all metals in the sediments found at outfalls generally increased with the level of modification at the site. Sediment in restored sites had lower metal concentrations both at the outfall and downstream compared to unrestored sites, indicating the benefit of these techniques to facilitate the effective removal of pollutants by trapping of sediment and uptake of contaminants by vegetation. However, the impact of restoration measures varied

  3. Reduced Deep Root Hydraulic Redistribution Due to Climate Change Impacts Carbon and Water Cycling in Southern US Pine Plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domec, J.; Noormets, A.; King, J. S.; Sun, G.; McNulty, S.; Gavazzi, M. J.; Treasure, E.; Caldwell, P.

    2010-12-01

    It is well known that plants lose water from the canopy through transpiration, and also lose a portion of water drawn up at night from deep, moist soil layers through roots and deposited to shallow, dry soil layers. This process is termed hydraulic redistribution (HR). Deep root water uptake and HR have been a major discovery during the last 15 years, but little is known about the impact of future climatic and environmental conditions on deep root water uptake and its impact on water balance and carbon sequestration. We investigated the temporal variability of soil moisture dynamics in three AmeriFlux sites and used data from the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment site to forecast future environmental impacts on HR and its impact on water cycling and carbon sequestration. Our results showed that HR played a critical role in delaying the drying of upper soil layers by replacing more than 25% of the water utilized during the day with water taken up by deep roots at night. Furthermore, HR mitigated the effects of soil drying in the understory and had important implications for net primary productivity and carbon sink potential of young plantations. A warming climate is associated with higher vapor pressure deficits, which will increase nighttime evapotranspiration and reduce HR because trees will act as a competitor with the upper soil for water. We predicted that increases in temperature, vapor pressure deficit and CO2 would reduce HR and limit shallow soil rewetting, thus decreasing net ecosystem productivity (NEP) especially in young and in shallow rooted forest plantations. Modeled carbon flux showed that in the absence of HR, gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) would be reduced by more than 30%, or 200 g C m-2 yr-1 and 750 g C m-2 yr-1 in a young and in a mid-rotation plantation, respectively. HR-induced decrease of GEP outweighed the decrease of ecosystem respiration, thus leading to a lower NEP. For these two types of managed forests, NEP would also be reduced by 100

  4. Morphological plasticity of root growth under mild water stress increases water use efficiency without reducing yield in maize

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Q; Sun, Z.; J. Zheng; Bai, W; Y. Zhang; Y. Liu; Feng, L.; Feng, C.; Zhang, Z.; Yang, N.; Evers, J.B.; L. Zhang

    2017-01-01

    A large yield gap exists in rain-fed maize (Zea mays L.) production in semi-arid regions, mainly caused by frequent droughts halfway through the crop-growing period due to uneven distribution of rainfall. It is questionable whether irrigation systems are economically required in such a region since the total amount of rainfall does generally meet crop requirements. This study aimed to quantitatively determine the effects of water stress from jointing to grain filling on root...

  5. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of trace quantities of cadmium in water samples after cloud point extraction in Triton X-114 without added chelating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afkhami, Abbas [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: afkhami@basu.ac.ir; Madrakian, Tayyebeh [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Siampour, Hajar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-11-16

    A new micell-mediated phase separation method for preconcentration of ultra-trace quantities of cadmium as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed. The method is based on the cloud point extraction (CPE) of cadmium in iodide media with Triton X-114 in the absence of any chelating agent. The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g., acid concentration, iodide concentration, effect of time) were studied, and the analytical characteristics of the method (e.g., limit of detection, linear range, preconcentration, and improvement factors) were obtained. Linearity was obeyed in the range of 3-300 ng mL{sup -1} of cadmium. The detection limit of the method is 1.0 ng mL{sup -1} of cadmium. The interference effect of some anions and cations was also tested. The method was applied to the determination of cadmium in tap water, waste water, and sea water samples.

  6. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of trace quantities of cadmium in water samples after cloud point extraction in Triton X-114 without added chelating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami, Abbas; Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Siampour, Hajar

    2006-11-16

    A new micell-mediated phase separation method for preconcentration of ultra-trace quantities of cadmium as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed. The method is based on the cloud point extraction (CPE) of cadmium in iodide media with Triton X-114 in the absence of any chelating agent. The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g., acid concentration, iodide concentration, effect of time) were studied, and the analytical characteristics of the method (e.g., limit of detection, linear range, preconcentration, and improvement factors) were obtained. Linearity was obeyed in the range of 3-300 ng mL(-1) of cadmium. The detection limit of the method is 1.0 ng mL(-1) of cadmium. The interference effect of some anions and cations was also tested. The method was applied to the determination of cadmium in tap water, waste water, and sea water samples.

  7. Water-assisted compounding of cellulose nanocrystals into polyamide 6 for use as a nucleating agent for microcellular foaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun Peng; Philip J. Walsh; Ronald C. Sabo; Lih-Sheng Turng; Craig M. Clemons

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are a biorenewable filler and can be an excellent nucleating agent for the development of microcellular foamed polymeric nanocomposites. However, their relatively low degradation temperature limits their use with engineering resins like polyamide 6 (PA6) in typical melt processing techniques such as injection molding, compounding, and...

  8. Agent-Based Modelling of Agricultural Water Abstraction in Response to Climate, Policy, and Demand Changes: Results from East Anglia, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinscoe, T. H. A.; Knoeri, C.; Fleskens, L.; Barrett, J.

    2014-12-01

    Freshwater is a vital natural resource for multiple needs, such as drinking water for the public, industrial processes, hydropower for energy companies, and irrigation for agriculture. In the UK, crop production is the largest in East Anglia, while at the same time the region is also the driest, with average annual rainfall between 560 and 720 mm (1971 to 2000). Many water catchments of East Anglia are reported as over licensed or over abstracted. Therefore, freshwater available for agricultural irrigation abstraction in this region is becoming both increasingly scarce due to competing demands, and increasingly variable and uncertain due to climate and policy changes. It is vital for water users and policy makers to understand how these factors will affect individual abstractors and water resource management at the system level. We present first results of an Agent-based Model that captures the complexity of this system as individual abstractors interact, learn and adapt to these internal and external changes. The purpose of this model is to simulate what patterns of water resource management emerge on the system level based on local interactions, adaptations and behaviours, and what policies lead to a sustainable water resource management system. The model is based on an irrigation abstractor typology derived from a survey in the study area, to capture individual behavioural intentions under a range of water availability scenarios, in addition to farm attributes, and demographics. Regional climate change scenarios, current and new abstraction licence reforms by the UK regulator, such as water trading and water shares, and estimated demand increases from other sectors were used as additional input data. Findings from the integrated model provide new understanding of the patterns of water resource management likely to emerge at the system level.

  9. Reducing water consumption in the paper mill; Paperitehtaan vedenkaeytoen vaehentaeminen (WACI) - EKY 02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekuri, T.; Pekkanen, A. [UPM-Kymmene Oyj, Valkeakoski (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    This WACI-project was divided into several subprojects, which were started with gathering of present knowledge and entering to laboratory and pilot tests. In some projects there were mill scale trials in water connections and internal purification systems. In the `Quality Demands of Water` subproject the process waters used in the printing paper machines of UPM-Kymmene were surveyed. Lab tests were made for the different applications like shower, washing, seal and dilution of internally purified circulation waters. In `Mechanical Pulp Washing` project the target was to study how the different water connections around the TMP washing press will affect the paper machine runnability. It was also started to develop separating technique for TMP fibre extractive. `Micro and Electroflotation` studies have been made mainly on pilot scale but also in new mill-scale unit. `Membrane Technology` research consisted of both lab, pilot and mill scale studies, where different membrane qualities with different process waters have been tested. `Evaporation` trials were made on pilot scale for different process waters and condensates and concentrates were analysed. Condensates were tested for different applications. The possibility to `Reuse Waste Water` concentrated mainly on how to remove the brown colour. `Simulations` were done to find out what will be the new dcs balance in different wet end processes after new water connections including so-called kidneys. In the `Paper Quality` subproject the effects of dcs on bonding ability of TMP fibres were studied on lab scale with artificial pitch component and also with circulation concentrates. This 2.5 year Tekes-project was completed at the end of April 1998. (orig.)

  10. Results and Lessons Learned from a Coupled Social and Physical Hydrology Model: Testing Alternative Water Management Policies and Institutional Structures Using Agent-Based Modeling and Regional Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J.; Lammers, R. B.; Prousevitch, A.; Ozik, J.; Altaweel, M.; Collier, N. T.; Kliskey, A. D.; Alessa, L.

    2015-12-01

    Water Management in the U.S. Southwest is under increasing scrutiny as many areas endure persistent drought. The impact of these prolonged dry conditions is a product of regional climate and hydrological conditions, but also of a highly engineered water management infrastructure and a complex web of social arrangements whereby water is allocated, shared, exchanged, used, re-used, and finally consumed. We coupled an agent-based model with a regional hydrological model to understand the dynamics in one richly studied and highly populous area: southern Arizona, U.S.A., including metropolitan Phoenix and Tucson. There, multiple management entities representing an array of municipalities and other water providers and customers, including private companies and Native American tribes are enmeshed in a complex legal and economic context in which water is bought, leased, banked, and exchanged in a variety of ways and on multiple temporal and physical scales. A recurrent question in the literature of adaptive management is the impact of management structure on overall system performance. To explore this, we constructed an agent-based model to capture this social complexity, and coupled this with a physical hydrological model that we used to drive the system under a variety of water stress scenarios and to assess the regional impact of the social system's performance. We report the outcomes of ensembles of runs in which varieties of alternative policy constraints and management strategies are considered. We hope to contribute to policy discussions in this area and connected and legislatively similar areas (such as California) as current conditions change and existing legal and policy structures are revised. Additionally, we comment on the challenges of integrating models that ostensibly are in different domains (physical and social) but that independently represent a system in which physical processes and human actions are closely intertwined and difficult to disentangle.

  11. Design and Analysis of Thorium-fueled Reduced Moderation Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Phillip Michael

    The Resource-renewable Boiling Water Reactors (RBWRs) are a set of light water reactors (LWRs) proposed by Hitachi which use a triangular lattice and high void fraction to incinerate fuel with an epithermal spectrum, which is highly atypical of LWRs. The RBWRs operate on a closed fuel cycle, which is impossible with a typical thermal spectrum reactor, in order to accomplish missions normally reserved for sodium fast reactors (SFRs)--either fuel self-sufficiency or waste incineration. The RBWRs also axially segregate the fuel into alternating fissile "seed" regions and fertile "blanket" regions in order to enhance breeding and leakage probability upon coolant voiding. This dissertation focuses on thorium design variants of the RBWR: the self-sufficient RBWR-SS and the RBWR-TR, which consumes reprocessed transuranic (TRU) waste from PWR used nuclear fuel. These designs were based off of the Hitachi-designed RBWR-AC and the RBWR-TB2, respectively, which use depleted uranium (DU) as the primary fertile fuel. The DU-fueled RBWRs use a pair of axially segregated seed sections in order to achieve a negative void coefficient; however, several concerns were raised with this multi-seed approach, including difficulty with controlling the reactor and unacceptably high axial power peaking. Since thorium-uranium fuel tends to have much more negative void feedback than uranium-plutonium fuels, the thorium RBWRs were designed to use a single elongated seed to avoid these issues. A series of parametric studies were performed in order to find the design space for the thorium RBWRs, and optimize the designs while meeting the required safety constraints. The RBWR-SS was optimized to maximize the discharge burnup, while the RBWR-TR was optimized to maximize the TRU transmutation rate. These parametric studies were performed on an assembly level model using the MocDown simulator, which calculates an equilibrium fuel composition with a specified reprocessing scheme. A full core model was

  12. Oil-in-water emulsion gels stabilized with chia (Salvia hispanica L.) and cold gelling agents: Technological and infrared spectroscopic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintado, T; Ruiz-Capillas, C; Jiménez-Colmenero, F; Carmona, P; Herrero, A M

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports on the development of olive oil-in-water emulsion gels containing chia (Salvia hispanica L.) (flour or seed) and cold gelling agents (transglutaminase, alginate or gelatin). The technological and structural characteristics of these emulsion gels were evaluated. Both structural and technological changes in emulsion gels resulting from chilled storage were also determined. The color and texture of emulsion gels depend on both the cold gelling agents used and chilled storage. Lipid oxidation increased (p oil lipid chain related to lipid interactions and droplet size in the emulsion gels could be decisive in determining their textural properties. The half-bandwidth of 2923 cm(-1) band and area of 3220 cm(-1) band did not show significant differences during chilled storage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ballast water management that adapts to climate changes and reduces harmful bio-invasions in marine eco-systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Hansen, Mette Sanne

    2015-01-01

    in marine ecosystem of changed factors in the shipping sector, for instance change of number, size, and design of vessels as well as treatment technologies of ballast water. New areas for shipping due to climate changes are also included. Our study would contribute to improve decision support tools, usable......The shipping ballast water is defined as water taken on board a ship to control trim, cargo, draught, stability and stress of the ship. Alien bio-organisms in ballast water have a range of ecological impacts, for instance reducing native bio-diversity, altering habitat and potentially the overall...... food-webs and eco-systems. Economic impacts include reductions in fisheries production and algae blooms harmful for fish farms, tourism and human health. Due to the rising temperatures of the Oceans, organisms that prefer a warm climate may take roots in marine ecosystems that were previously too cold...

  14. Mechanisms of Resilience in Common-pool Resource Management Systems: an Agent-based Model of Water Use in a River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Schlüter

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of resilience is widely promoted as a promising notion to guide new approaches to ecosystem and resource management that try to enhance a system's capacity to cope with change. A variety of mechanisms of resilience specific for different systems have been proposed. In the context of resource management those include but are not limited to the diversity of response options and flexibility of the social system to adaptively respond to changes on an adequate scale. However, implementation of resilience-based management in specific real-world systems has often proven difficult because of a limited understanding of suitable interventions and their impact on the resilience of the coupled social-ecological system. We propose an agent-based modeling approach to explore system characteristics and mechanisms of resilience in a complex resource management system, based on a case study of water use in the Amudarya River, which is a semiarid river basin. Water resources in its delta are used to sustain irrigated agriculture as well as aquatic ecosystems that provide fish and other ecosystem services. The three subsystems of the social-ecological system, i.e., the social system, the irrigation system, and an aquatic ecosystem, are linked by resource flows and the allocation decision making of actors on different levels. Simulation experiments are carried out to compare the resilience of different institutional settings of water management to changes in the variability and uncertainty of water availability. The aim is to investigate the influence of (1 the organizational structure of water management, (2 information on water availability, and (3 the diversity of water uses on the resilience of the system to short and long-term water scarcity. In this paper, the model concept and first simulation results are presented. As a first illustration of the approach the performances of a centralized and a decentralized regime are compared under different

  15. Reduced Near-Resonant Vibrational Coupling at the Surfaces of Liquid Water and Ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Wilbert J; Versluis, Jan; Backus, Ellen H G; Bonn, Mischa; Bakker, Huib J

    2018-02-26

    We study the resonant interaction of the OH stretch vibrations of water molecules at the surfaces of liquid water and ice using heterodyne-detected sum-frequency generation (HD-SFG) spectroscopy. By studying different isotopic mixtures of H 2 O and D 2 O, we vary the strength of the interaction, and we monitor the resulting effect on the HD-SFG spectrum of the OH stretch vibrations. We observe that the near-resonant coupling effects are weaker at the surface than in the bulk, both for water and ice, indicating that for both phases of water the OH vibrations are less strongly delocalized at the surface than in the bulk.

  16. Reduced Graphene Oxide Bipolar Membranes for Integrated Solar Water Splitting in Optimal pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael B; Bruce, Jared P; McEleney, Kevin; Freund, Michael S

    2015-08-24

    The integration of light absorbers and catalysts for the water splitting process requires a membrane capable of both ion and electron management and product separation to realize efficient solar fuels systems. Bipolar membranes can maintain a pH gradient for optimal reaction conditions by the dissociation of water. Such membranes that contain graphene in the interfacial layer are fabricated by the chemical reduction of a uniformly deposited graphene oxide layer to convert sp(3) catalyst regions to sp(2) conductive regions. The resulting electrical and water dissociation properties are optimized by adjusting the exposure conditions, and treatments of less than 5 min render an interface that exceeds the conductivity requirements for integrated solar water splitting and increases the overpotential by graphene and Si microwires, and we found that efficient Ohmic junctions are possible. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Water Table Management Reduces Tile Nitrate Loss in Continuous Corn and in a Soybean-Corn Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig F. Drury

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Water table management systems can be designed to alleviate soil water excesses and deficits, as well as reduce nitrate leaching losses in tile discharge. With this in mind, a standard tile drainage (DR system was compared over 8 years (1991 to 1999 to a controlled tile drainage/subirrigation (CDS system on a low-slope (0.05 to 0.1% Brookston clay loam soil (Typic Argiaquoll in southwestern Ontario, Canada. In the CDS system, tile discharge was controlled to prevent excessive drainage, and water was pumped back up the tile lines (subirrigation to replenish the crop root zone during water deficit periods. In the first phase of the study (1991 to 1994, continuous corn (Zea mays, L. was grown with annual nitrogen (N fertilizer inputs as per local soil test recommendations. In the second phase (1995 to 1999, a soybean (Glycine max L., Merr.-corn rotation was used with N fertilizer added only during the two corn years. In Phase 1 when continuous corn was grown, CDS reduced total tile discharge by 26% and total nitrate loss in tile discharge by 55%, compared to DR. In addition, the 4-year flow weighted mean (FWM nitrate concentration in tile discharge exceeded the Canadian drinking water guideline (10 mg N l–1 under DR (11.4 mg N l–1, but not under CDS (7.0 mg N l–1. In Phase 2 during the soybean-corn rotation, CDS reduced total tile discharge by 38% and total nitrate loss in tile discharge by 66%, relative to DR. The 4-year FWM nitrate concentration during Phase 2 in tile discharge was below the drinking water guideline for both DR (7.3 mg N l–1 and CDS (4.0 mg N l–1. During both phases of the experiment, the CDS treatment caused only minor increases in nitrate loss in surface runoff relative to DR. Hence CDS decreased FWM nitrate concentrations, total drainage water loss, and total nitrate loss in tile discharge relative to DR. In addition, soybean-corn rotation reduced FWM nitrate concentrations and total nitrate loss in tile discharge

  18. Effects of reduced water quality on coral reefs in and out of no-take marine reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Amelia S; Williamson, David H; da Silva, Eduardo T; Ceccarelli, Daniela M; Browne, Nicola K; Petus, Caroline; Devlin, Michelle J

    2016-02-01

    Near-shore marine environments are increasingly subjected to reduced water quality, and their ability to withstand it is critical to their persistence. The potential role marine reserves may play in mitigating the effects of reduced water quality has received little attention. We investigated the spatial and temporal variability in live coral and macro-algal cover and water quality during moderate and major flooding events of the Fitzroy River within the Keppel Bay region of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park from 2007 to 2013. We used 7 years of remote sensing data on water quality and data from long-term monitoring of coral reefs to quantify exposure of coral reefs to flood plumes. We used a distance linear model to partition the contribution of abiotic and biotic factors, including zoning, as drivers of the observed changes in coral and macro-algae cover. Moderate flood plumes from 2007 to 2009 did not affect coral cover on reefs in the Keppel Islands, suggesting the reef has intrinsic resistance against short-term exposure to reduced water quality. However, from 2009 to 2013, live coral cover declined by ∼ 50% following several weeks of exposure to turbid, low salinity water from major flood plume events in 2011 and subsequent moderate events in 2012 and 2013. Although the flooding events in 2012 and 2013 were smaller than the flooding events between 2007 to 2009, the ability of the reefs to withstand these moderate floods was lost, as evidenced by a ∼ 20% decline in coral cover between 2011 to 2013. Although zoning (no-take reserve or fished) was identified a significant driver of coral cover, we recorded consistently lower coral cover on reserve reefs than on fished reefs throughout the study period and significantly lower cover in 2011. Our findings suggest that even reefs with an inherent resistance to reduced water quality are not able to withstand repeated disturbance events. The limitations of reserves in mitigating the effects of reduced water

  19. An agent-based model of farmer decision-making and water quality impacts at the watershed scale under markets for carbon allowances and a second-generation biofuel crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tze Ling; Eheart, J. Wayland; Cai, Ximing; Braden, John B.

    2011-09-01

    An agent-based model of farmers' crop and best management practice (BMP) decisions is developed and linked to a hydrologic-agronomic model of a watershed, to examine farmer behavior, and the attendant effects on stream nitrate load, under the influence of markets for conventional crops, carbon allowances, and a second-generation biofuel crop. The agent-based approach introduces interactions among farmers about new technologies and market opportunities, and includes the updating of forecast expectations and uncertainties using Bayesian inference. The model is applied to a semi-hypothetical example case of farmers in the Salt Creek Watershed in Central Illinois, and a sensitivity analysis is performed to effect a first-order assessment of the plausibility of the results. The results show that the most influential factors affecting farmers' decisions are crop prices, production costs, and yields. The results also show that different farmer behavioral profiles can lead to different predictions of farmer decisions. The farmers who are predicted to be more likely to adopt new practices are those who interact more with other farmers, are less risk averse, quick to adjust their expectations, and slow to reduce their forecast confidence. The decisions of farmers have direct water quality consequences, especially those pertaining to the adoption of the second-generation biofuel crop, which are estimated to lead to reductions in stream nitrate load. The results, though empirically untested, appear plausible and consistent with general farmer behavior. The results demonstrate the usefulness of the coupled agent-based and hydrologic-agronomic models for normative research on watershed management on the water-energy nexus.

  20. Proposing of an aerated water treatment plant for reducing water pollution problem in Losari Beach after reclamation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani, Sri; Maharani, Hamzah, Muhammad Alimuddin

    2017-01-01

    Losari Beach is the most important site in Makassar. It lies at the west side of Makassar city. This place is known as the place where people are relaxed and gathering with friends or family after working, and now it becomes the icon of Makassar city. As the biggest city in eastern Indonesia, Makassar grows very fast. We can find constructions for building hospitals, shopping malls, bussines activities, and residences everywhere. The most important construction activities that will effect Losari Beach is the reclamation to build the Center Point of Indonesia that takes an area of 157 hectares and it is located at the west side of Losari Beach. In the last research presented in 9th International Conference on Marine Technology (October 2014) using surface-water modeling system (SMS) software showed that reclamation will significantly increase concentrations of BOD and COD (± 7 mg/L for BOD and 6.2 mg/L for COD). This condition will cause Losari Beach becomes very polluted. A probable solution to overcome this problem is to clean the wastewater before introducing to the sea. This paper will describe th