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Sample records for water recovery iii

  1. Lyophilization for Water Recovery III, System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwiller, Eric; Reinhard, Martin; Fisher, John; Flynn, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Mixed liquid/solid wastes, including feces, water processor effluents, and food waste, can be lyophilized (freeze-dried) to recover the water they contain and stabilize the solids that remain. Our previous research has demonstrated the potential benefits of using thermoelectric heat pumps to build a lyophilizer for processing waste in microgravity. These results were used to build a working prototype suitable for ground- based human testing. This paper describes the prototype design and presents results of functional and performance tests.

  2. Transboundary water interaction III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeitoun, Mark; Cascão, Ana Elisa; Warner, Jeroen; Mirumachi, Naho; Matthews, Nathanial; Menga, Filippo; Farnum, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    This paper serves international water conflict resolution efforts by examining the ways that states contest hegemonic transboundary water arrangements. The conceptual framework of dynamic transboundary water interaction that it presents integrates theories about change and counter-hegemony to

  3. Transboundary water interaction III

    OpenAIRE

    Zeitoun, Mark; Cascão, Ana Elisa; Warner, Jeroen; Mirumachi, Naho; Matthews, Nathanial; Menga, Filippo; Farnum, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    This paper serves international water conflict resolution efforts by examining the ways that states contest hegemonic transboundary water arrangements. The conceptual framework of dynamic transboundary water interaction that it presents integrates theories about change and counter-hegemony to ascertain coercive, leverage, and liberating mechanisms through which contest and transformation of an arrangement occur. While the mechanisms can be active through sociopolitical processes either of com...

  4. Resource recovery from black water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de M.S.

    2010-01-01

    New sanitation systems based on separation at source offer a large potential for resource recovery from wastewater, e.g. energy and nutrients from black water and irrigation water from grey water. This review focuses on the components in source separated black water. The treatment options for the

  5. Recovery boiler model; Soodakattilan kehitystyoe III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janka, K.; Ylitalo, M.; Sundstroem, K.; Helke, R.; Heinola, M. [Kvaerner Pulping Oy, Tampere (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The recovery boiler model was further tested and developed. At this moment the model includes submodels for: droplet drying, pyrolysis, char burning, gas burning and for droplet trajectory. During 1996 the formation of CH{sub 4} during pyrolysis and release of sulfur was included to the model. Further the formation of NO from fuel nitrogen and formation of thermal- NO were included to the model using Arrhenius type reaction rate equations. The calculated results are realistic and the model is used as a tool to find out methods to increase the efficiency and availability and decrease the emissions. Analysing the results of the earlier field study of 8 boilers showed that the furnace heat load, fuming rate, find the black liquor composition have influence on the enrichment of the potassium to the fly ash. (orig.)

  6. Visible and near-infrared intense luminescence from water-soluble lanthanide [Tb(III), Eu(III), Sm(III), Dy(III), Pr(III), Ho(III), Yb(III), Nd(III), Er(III)] complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quici, Silvio; Cavazzini, Marco; Marzanni, Giovanni; Accorsi, Gianluca; Armaroli, Nicola; Ventura, Barbara; Barigelletti, Francesco

    2005-02-07

    The synthesis of a new ligand (1) containing a single phenanthroline (phen) chromophore and a flexibly connected diethylenetriamine tetracarboxylic acid unit (DTTA) as a lanthanide (Ln) coordination site is reported [1 is 4-[(9-methyl-1,10-phenantrol-2-yl)methyl]-1,4,7-triazaheptane-1,1,7,7-tetraacetic acid]. From 1, an extended series of water-soluble Ln.1 complexes was obtained, where Ln is Eu(III), Tb(III), Gd(III), Sm(III), Dy(III), Pr(III), Ho(III), Yb(III), Nd(III), and Er(III). The stoichiometry for the association was found 1:1, with an association constant K(A) > or = 10(7) s(-1) as determined by employing luminescence spectroscopy. The luminescence and photophysical properties of the series of lanthanide complexes were investigated in both H2O and D2O solutions. High efficiencies for the sensitized emission, phi(se), in air-equilibrated water were observed for the Ln.1 complexes of Eu(III) and Tb(III) in the visible region (phi(se) = 0.24 and 0.15, respectively) and of Sm(III), Dy(III), Pr(III), Ho(III), Yb(III), Nd(III), and Er(III) in the vis and/or near-infrared region [phi(se) = 2.5 x 10(-3), 5 x 10(-4), 3 x 10(-5), 2 x 10(-5), 2 x 10(-4), 4 x 10(-5), and (in D2O) 4 x 10(-5), respectively]. For Eu.1 and Tb.1, luminescence data for water and deuterated water allowed us to estimate that no solvent molecules (q) are bound to the ion centers (q = 0). Luminescence quenching by oxygen was investigated in selected cases.

  7. Shock Recovery of the High Pressure Phase Bismuth III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussell, Zachary; Tschauner, Oliver; Hawkins, Cameron; Ma, Chi; Smith, Jesse; Advanced Photon Source Team; California Institution of Technology Team; National Security Technologies Team; University of Nevada, Las Vegas Team

    2017-06-01

    Between 0 and 10 GPa there are five different bismuth phases. High-pressure bismuth (Bi) phases have been examined in static compression experiments; however, none could be recovered to ambient conditions. Here we report Bi-III recovery (stable above 3 GPa) to ambient conditions from a shock compression experiment to 5.7 GPa. Bi-III was identified by synchrotron micro-diffraction and backscatter electron imaging. Our work shows shock-compression provides a tool for recovering high-pressure phases that otherwise elude decompression. This work supported by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy and by the Site-Directed Research and Development Program. DOE/NV/25946-3070.

  8. Energy and phosphorus recovery from black water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de M.S.; Temmink, B.G.; Zeeman, G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Source-separated black water (BW) (toilet water) containing 38% of the organic material and 68% of the phosphorus in the total household waste (water) stream including kitchen waste, is a potential source for energy and phosphorus recovery. The energy recovered, in the form of electricity and heat,

  9. Used water resource recovery using green microalgae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta

    A paradigm shift is promoted in wastewater treatment whereby wastewater is considered as a source of nutrients, water and energy, rather than waste and it is referred to as used water. Microalgae cultivation on used water resources offers the potential to recover nitrogen, phosphorus, water...... and energy. When coupling with used water treatment, microalgae is mostly considered to produce energy through biofuel production. A novel used water resource recovery approach was presented earlier, referred to as TRENS – a fully biochemical process for the removal, recovery and reuse of used water...... was lowered to a sub-optimal level diatoms proliferated in the PBR cultivating the mixed green microalgal consortium. Once the ratio was increased again, the diatoms could be washed out of the system. Model predictive accuracy deteriorated as a result of the changes in culture composition due to the possible...

  10. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  11. Recovery of Chromium (III) from Tannery wastewater | ALI AWAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three aqueous oxidants, Hydrogen peroxide, Sodium Hypochlorite and Calcium Hypochlorite were employed independently in oxidizing Chromium (III) containing tannery wastewaters to soluble chromate (CrO42-) under alkaline conditions. The amount of chromate recovered was determined via spectrophotometry.

  12. Upgrades to the ISS Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayatin, Matthew J.; Carter, Donald L.; Schunk, Richard G.; Pruitt, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station Water Recovery System (WRS) is comprised of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). The WRS produces potable water from a combination of crew urine (first processed through the UPA), crew latent, and Sabatier product water. Though the WRS has performed well since operations began in November 2008, several modifications have been identified to improve the overall system performance. These modifications can reduce resupply and improve overall system reliability, which is beneficial for the ongoing ISS mission as well as for future NASA manned missions. The following paper details efforts to reduce the resupply mass of the WPA Multifiltration Bed, develop improved catalyst for the WPA Catalytic Reactor, evaluate optimum operation of UPA through parametric testing, and improve reliability of the UPA fluids pump and Distillation Assembly.

  13. Lyophilization for Water Recovery From Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael; Litwiller, Eric; Reinhard, Martin

    2003-01-01

    This abstract describes the development of a solid waste treatment system designed for a near term human exploration mission. The technology being developed is an energy- efficient lyophilization technique that recovers water from spacecraft solid waste. In the lyophilization process water in an aqueous waste is frozen and then sublimed, resulting in the separation of the waste into a dried solid material and liquid water. This technology is ideally suited to applications where water recovery rates approaching 100% are desirable but production of CO, is not. Water contained within solid wastes accounts for approximately 3% of the total water balance. If 100% closure of the water loop is desired the water contained within this waste would need to be recovered. To facilitate operation in microgravity thermoelectric heat pumps have be used in place of traditional fluid cycle heat pumps. A mathematical model of a thermoelectric lyophilizer has been developed and used to generate energy use and processing rate parameters. The results of laboratory investigations and discussions with ALS program management have been used to iteratively arrive at a prototype design. This design address operational limitations which were identified in the laboratory studies and handling and health concerns raised by ALS program management. The current prototype design is capable of integration into the ISS Waste Collection System.

  14. Water Recovery from Brines to Further Close the Water Recovery Loop in Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Barta, Daniel J.; Anderson, Molly S.; Lange, Kevin E.; Hanford, Anthony J.; Shull, Sarah A.; Carter, D. Layne

    2014-01-01

    Further closure of water recovery systems will be necessary for future long duration human exploration missions. NASA's Space Technology Roadmap for Human Health, Life Support and Habitation Systems specified a milestone to advance water management technologies during the 2015 to 2019 timeframe to achieve 98% H2O recovery from a mixed wastewater stream containing condensate, urine, hygiene, laundry, and water derived from waste. This goal can only be achieved by either reducing the amount of brines produced by a water recovery system or by recovering water from wastewater brines. NASA convened a Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM) on the topic of Water Recovery from Brines (WRB) that was held on January14-15th, 2014 at Johnson Space Center. Objectives of the TIM were to review systems and architectures that are sources of brines and the composition of brines they produce, review the state of the art in NASA technology development and perspectives from other industries, capture the challenges and difficulties in developing brine processing hardware, identify key figures of merit and requirements to focus technology development and evaluate candidate technologies, and identify other critical issues including microgravity sensitivity, and concepts of operation, safety. This paper represents an initial summary of findings from the workshop.

  15. 40 CFR 144.21 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. 144.21 Section 144.21 Protection of Environment... hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. (a) An existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... decision; or (9) For Class II wells (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage), five years after...

  16. Hexavalent Americium Recovery Using Copper(III) Periodate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Kevin; Brigham, Derek M; Morrison, Samuel; Braley, Jenifer C

    2016-11-21

    Separation of americium from the lanthanides is considered one of the most difficult separation steps in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. One approach to this separation could involve oxidizing americium to the hexavalent state to form a linear dioxo cation while the lanthanides remain as trivalent ions. This work considers aqueous soluble Cu 3+ periodate as an oxidant under molar nitric acid conditions to separate hexavalent Am with diamyl amylphosphonate (DAAP) in n-dodecane. Initial studies assessed the kinetics of Cu 3+ periodate autoreduction in acidic media to aid in development of the solvent extraction system. Following characterization of the Cu 3+ periodate oxidant, solvent extraction studies optimized the recovery of Am from varied nitric acid media and in the presence of other fission product, or fission product surrogate, species. Short aqueous/organic contact times encouraged successful recovery of Am (distribution values as high as 2) from nitric acid media in the absence of redox active fission products. In the presence of a post-plutonium uranium redox extraction (post-PUREX) simulant aqueous feed, precipitation of tetravalent species (Ce, Ru, Zr) occurred and the distribution values of 241 Am were suppressed, suggesting some oxidizing capacity of the Cu 3+ periodate is significantly consumed by other redox active metals in the simulant. The manuscript demonstrates Cu 3+ periodate as a potentially viable oxidant for Am oxidation and recovery and notes the consumption of oxidizing capacity observed in the presence of the post-PUREX simulant feed will need to be addressed for any approach seeking to oxidize Am for separations relevant to the nuclear fuel cycle.

  17. Amoxicillin in a biological water recovery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, A.; Jackson, A.; Rainwater, K. [Texas Tech Univ., Water Resources Center, Lubbock, Texas (United States); Pickering, K. [Johnson Space Center, NASA, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2002-06-15

    considering a closed loop wastewater recovery system as a drinking water supply source. (author)

  18. Upgrades to the ISS Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayatin, Matthew; Takada, Kevin; Carter, Layne

    2017-01-01

    The ISS Water Recovery System (WRS) includes the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). The WRS produces potable water from a combination of crew urine (first processed through the UPA), crew latent, and Sabatier product water. Though the WRS has performed well since operations began in November 2008, several modifications have been identified to improve the overall system performance. These modifications can reduce resupply and improve overall system reliability, which is beneficial for the ongoing ISS mission as well as for future NASA manned missions. The following paper details efforts to improve the WPA through the use of Reverse Osmosis technology to reduce the resupply mass of the WPA Multifiltration Bed and improved catalyst for the WPA Catalytic Reactor to reduce the operational temperature and pressure. For the UPA, this paper discusses progress on various concepts for improving the reliability of the UPA, including the implementation of a more reliable drive belt, improved methods for managing condensate in the stationary bowl of the Distillation Assembly, deleting the Separator Plumbing Assembly, and evaluating upgrades to the UPA vacuum pump.

  19. 40 CFR 147.1653 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1653 Section 147.1653 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The owner...

  20. 40 CFR 147.1953 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1953 Section 147.1953 Protection of... enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure...

  1. 40 CFR 147.1453 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1453 Section 147.1453 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The owner...

  2. 40 CFR 147.2153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.2153 Section 147.2153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The owner...

  3. 40 CFR 147.1353 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1353 Section 147.1353 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The owner...

  4. 40 CFR 147.1153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1153 Section 147.1153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The owner...

  5. Phosphate and organic fertilizer recovery from black water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tervahauta, T.H.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis the integration of treatment systems for black and grey water was investigated to improve resource recovery within source-separated sanitation concepts. Special focus was set on phosphate and organic fertilizer recovery from vacuum collected black water. Currently, the soil

  6. Adsorption of Eu(III) onto roots of water hyacinth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, C.; Mielke, R.E.; Dimaquibo, D.; Curtis, A.J. [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Dewitt, J.G. [San Francisco State Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1999-05-01

    The water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) has drawn attention as a plant capable of removing pollutants, including toxic metals, from water. The authors are interested in the capacity of the water hyacinth to remediate aquatic environments that have been contaminated with the lanthanide metal, europium Eu(III). Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) they have been able to determine that Eu(III) is adsorbed onto the surface of the roots from water and that the highest concentration of Eu(III) is on the root hairs. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques were used to speciate the Eu(III) adsorbed onto the surface of the roots. The XAS data for Eu-contaminated water hyacinth roots provides evidence of a Eu-oxygen environment and establishes that Eu(III) is coordinated to 10--11 oxygen atoms at a distance of 2.44 {angstrom}. This likely involves binding of Eu(III) to the root via carboxylate groups and hydration of Eu(III) at the root surface.

  7. Waste water heat recovery appliance. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapin, H.D.; Armstrong, P.R.; Chapin, F.A.W.

    1983-11-21

    An efficient convective waste heat recovery heat exchanger was designed and tested. The prototype appliance was designed for use in laundromats and other small commercial operations which use large amounts of hot water. Information on general characteristics of the coin-op laundry business, energy use in laundromats, energy saving resources already in use, and the potential market for energy saving devices in laundromats was collected through a literature search and interviews with local laundromat operators in Fort Collins, Colorado. A brief survey of time-use patterns in two local laundromats was conducted. The results were used, with additional information from interviews with owners, as the basis for the statistical model developed. Mathematical models for the advanced and conventional types were developed and the resulting computer program listed. Computer simulations were made using a variety of parameters; for example, different load profiles, hold-up volumes, wall resistances, and wall areas. The computer simulation results are discussed with regard to the overall conclusions. Various materials were explored for use in fabricating the appliance. Resistance to corrosion, workability, and overall suitability for laundromat installations were considered for each material.

  8. Energy saving and recovery measures in integrated urban water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freni, Gabriele; Sambito, Mariacrocetta

    2017-11-01

    The present paper describes different energy production, recovery and saving measures which can be applied in an integrated urban water system. Production measures are often based on the installation of photovoltaic systems; the recovery measures are commonly based on hydraulic turbines, exploiting the available pressure potential to produce energy; saving measures are based on substitution of old pumps with higher efficiency ones. The possibility of substituting some of the pipes of the water supply system can be also considered in a recovery scenario in order to reduce leakages and recovery part of the energy needed for water transport and treatment. The reduction of water losses can be obtained through the Active Leakage Control (ALC) strategies resulting in a reduction in energy consumption and in environmental impact. Measures were applied to a real case study to tested it the efficiency, i.e., the integrated urban water system of the Palermo metropolitan area in Sicily (Italy).

  9. Speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in geological and water samples by ytterbium(III) hydroxide coprecipitation system and atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Ali; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2011-07-01

    A novel coprecipitation method with ytterbium(III) hydroxide has been established for speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in geological and water samples. At pH 10, while Cr(III) was quantitatively recovered, Cr(VI) was recovered under 10% levels. Total chromium was determined reducing of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in acidic media with KI reagent. The concentration of Cr(VI) was calculated by the concentration difference between the total chromium and Cr(III). For the quantitative recovery of Cr(III), parameters such as pH, amount of ytterbium, centrifugation time and speed, matrix effect, KI amount, and sample volume were investigated. The preconcentration factor was 30. The limit of detection was obtained as 1.1 μg/L for Cr(III). The accuracy was checked by analyte addition and analyses of standard reference materials (TMDA-54.4 Certified Reference Water, NIST 2710 Montana Soil). Method has been successfully applied to the chromium speciation for industrial waste water of leather factories located in Bor-Nigde, and also for mine and soil samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of water ingestion throughout exercise and recovery on cardiac autonomic modulation during and after exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Isadora Lessa Moreno; Luiz Carlos Marques Vanderlei; Franciele Marques Vanderlei; Carlos Marcelo Pastre; Luiz Carlos de Abreu; Celso Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To analyze the effects of water intake on heart rate variability (HRV) during and after exercise. Methods: Thirty-one young males performed three different procedures: I) a maximal exercise test to determine the load for the protocols; II) the control protocol (CP); III) the experimental protocol (EP). The protocols comprised 10 minutes at rest, 90 minutes of treadmill exercise (60% of VO2 peak), and 60 minutes of recovery. No rehydration beverage consumption was allowed dur...

  11. Status of ISS Water Management and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Layne; Pruitt, Jennifer; Brown, Christopher A.; Bazley, Jesse; Gazda, Daniel; Schaezler, Ryan; Bankers, Lyndsey

    2016-01-01

    Water management on ISS is responsible for the provision of water to the crew for drinking water, food preparation, and hygiene, to the Oxygen Generation System (OGS) for oxygen production via electrolysis, to the Waste & Hygiene Compartment (WHC) for flush water, and for experiments on ISS. This paper summarizes water management activities on the ISS US Segment and provides a status of the performance and issues related to the operation of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). This paper summarizes the on-orbit status as of May 2016 and describes the technical challenges encountered and lessons learned over the past year.

  12. Status of ISS Water Management and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Layne; Takada, Kevin; Gazda, Daniel; Brown, Christopher; Bazley, Jesse; Schaezler, Ryan; Bankers, Lyndsey

    2017-01-01

    Water management on ISS is responsible for the provision of water to the crew for drinking water, food preparation, and hygiene, to the Oxygen Generation System (OGS) for oxygen production via electrolysis, to the Waste & Hygiene Compartment (WHC) for flush water, and for experiments on ISS. This paper summarizes water management activities on the ISS US Segment and provides a status of the performance and issues related to the operation of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). This paper summarizes the on-orbit status as of June 2017 and describes the technical challenges encountered and lessons learned over the past year.

  13. Process Control for Precipitation Prevention in Space Water Recovery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargusingh, Miriam; Callahan, Michael R.; Muirhead, Dean

    2015-01-01

    The ability to recover and purify water through physiochemical processes is crucial for realizing long-term human space missions, including both planetary habitation and space travel. Because of their robust nature, rotary distillation systems have been actively pursued by NASA as one of the technologies for water recovery from wastewater primarily comprised of human urine. A specific area of interest is the prevention of the formation of solids that could clog fluid lines and damage rotating equipment. To mitigate the formation of solids, operational constraints are in place that limits such that the concentration of key precipitating ions in the wastewater brine are below the theoretical threshold. This control in effected by limiting the amount of water recovered such that the risk of reaching the precipitation threshold is within acceptable limits. The water recovery limit is based on an empirically derived worst case wastewater composition. During the batch process, water recovery is estimated by monitoring the throughput of the system. NASA Johnson Space Center is working on means of enhancing the process controls to increase water recovery. Options include more precise prediction of the precipitation threshold. To this end, JSC is developing a means of more accurately measuring the constituent of the brine and/or wastewater. Another means would be to more accurately monitor the throughput of the system. In spring of 2015, testing will be performed to test strategies for optimizing water recovery without increasing the risk of solids formation in the brine.

  14. Incoordination, Paralysis and Recovery after Pyrethroid Treatment on Nymphs III of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl A Alzogaray

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms of poisoning for deltamethrin and cis-permethrin on nymphs III of Triatoma infestans were described. The time required for incoordination and paralysis were determined. Deltamethrin was equal or more rapid in the onset of the first effect (accordingly to dose, and cis-permethrin in the onset of the second one. There were no significant differences between incoordination doses 50% (IncD50s at different times for the two pyrethroids. They showed equivalent incoordination power, but the nymphs treated with deltamethrin recovered slightly more rapid and in greater amount than the nymphs treated with cis-permethrin. The recovery was inhibited by the simultaneus application of piperonyl butoxide. This result suggests that biotransformation by mixed-function microsomal oxidases are involved in the process of recovery

  15. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware River...

  16. Annex III-evaluation of past and ongoing enhanced oil recovery projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The Infill Drilling Predictive Model (IDPM) was developed by Scientific Software-Intercomp (SSI) for the Bartlesville Project Office (BPO) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The model and certain adaptations thereof were used in conjunction with other models to support the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission`s (IOGCC) 1993 state-by-state assessment of the potential domestic reserves achievable through the application of Advanced Secondary Recovery (ASR) and Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques. Funding for this study was provided by the DOE/BPO, which additionally provided technical support. The IDPM is a three-dimensional (stratified, five-spot), two-phase (oil and water) model which uses a minimal amount of reservoir and geologic data to generate production and recovery forecasts for ongoing waterflood and infill drilling projects. The model computes water-oil displacement and oil recovery using finite difference solutions within streamtubes. It calculates the streamtube geometries and uses a two-dimensional reservoir simulation to track fluid movement in each streamtube slice. Thus the model represents a hybrid of streamtube and numerical simulators.

  17. Improved Energy Recovery by Anaerobic Grey Water Sludge Treatment with Black Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tervahauta, T.H.; Bryant, I.M.; Hernandez Leal, L.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Zeeman, G.

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the potential of combining anaerobic grey water sludge treatment with black water in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor to improve energy recovery within source-separated sanitation concepts. Black water and the mixture of black water and grey water sludge were

  18. Recovery of water from acid mine drainage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mulopo, J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metrohm 691 pH meter. BACKGRounD The CSIR patented Alkali Barium and Calcium (ABC) process uses the barium technology to remove sulphate from acid mine drainage (AMD) water and other industrial effluents. The sulphate removal process involves...

  19. Analysis of Water Recovery Rate from the Heat Melt Compactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Hegde, U.; Gokoglu, S.

    2013-01-01

    Human space missions generate trash with a substantial amount of plastic (20% or greater by mass). The trash also contains water trapped in food residue and paper products and other trash items. The Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) under development by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) compresses the waste, dries it to recover water and melts the plastic to encapsulate the compressed trash. The resulting waste disk or puck represents an approximately ten-fold reduction in the volume of the initial trash loaded into the HMC. In the current design concept being pursued, the trash is compressed by a piston after it is loaded into the trash chamber. The piston face, the side walls of the waste processing chamber and the end surface in contact with the waste can be heated to evaporate the water and to melt the plastic. Water is recovered by the HMC in two phases. The first is a pre-process compaction without heat or with the heaters initially turned on but before the waste heats up. Tests have shown that during this step some liquid water may be expelled from the chamber. This water is believed to be free water (i.e., not bound with or absorbed in other waste constituents) that is present in the trash. This phase is herein termed Phase A of the water recovery process. During HMC operations, it is desired that liquid water recovery in Phase A be eliminated or minimized so that water-vapor processing equipment (e.g., condensers) downstream of the HMC are not fouled by liquid water and its constituents (i.e., suspended or dissolved matter) exiting the HMC. The primary water recovery process takes place next where the trash is further compacted while the heated surfaces reach their set temperatures for this step. This step will be referred to herein as Phase B of the water recovery process. During this step the waste chamber may be exposed to different selected pressures such as ambient, low pressure (e.g., 0.2 atm), or vacuum. The objective for this step is to remove both bound and

  20. Improved Energy Recovery by Anaerobic Grey Water Sludge Treatment with Black Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taina Tervahauta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the potential of combining anaerobic grey water sludge treatment with black water in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor to improve energy recovery within source-separated sanitation concepts. Black water and the mixture of black water and grey water sludge were compared in terms of biochemical methane potential (BMP, UASB reactor performance, chemical oxygen demand (COD mass balance and methanization. Grey water sludge treatment with black water increased the energy recovery by 23% in the UASB reactor compared to black water treatment. The increase in the energy recovery can cover the increased heat demand of the UASB reactor and the electricity demand of the grey water bioflocculation system with a surplus of 0.7 kWh/cap/y electricity and 14 MJ/cap/y heat. However, grey water sludge introduced more heavy metals in the excess sludge of the UASB reactor and might therefore hinder its soil application.

  1. Enhanced recovery of unconventional gas. The methodology--Volume III (of 3 volumes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuuskraa, V. A.; Brashear, J. P.; Doscher, T. M.; Elkins, L. E.

    1979-02-01

    The methodology is described in chapters on the analytic approach, estimated natural gas production, recovery from tight gas sands, recovery from Devonian shales, recovery from coal seams, and recovery from geopressured aquifers. (JRD)

  2. Recovery of Alum Coagulant from Water Treatment Plant Sludge: A Greener Approach for Water Purification

    OpenAIRE

    Smita Joshi; Kriti Shrivastava

    2011-01-01

    The present work is based on Alum Recovery from the sludge obtained from Shyamala Water Treatment Plant by Acidic and Alkaline methods. In the acidic and alkaline method, the maximum recovery of alum coagulant is found to be 84.18% and 76.98% respectively. The recovered alum is as efficient as commercial alum and can be used again as coagulant for Water Treatment. This recovery can solve the vast problem of WTP (Water Treatment Plant) sludge management together with the problem of water pollu...

  3. Water Out Shit In: a new paradigm for resource recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, W.S.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphate is the most essential nutrient that must be recovered from waste streams in the future, because the easily minable phosphorus rock reserves will be depleted within 50 to 100 years. For an efficient recovery and reuse, a waste water flow with a high concentration and a low volume is needed.

  4. Water recovery by catalytic treatment of urine vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budininkas, P.; Quattrone, P. D.; Leban, M. I.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of water recovery on a man-rated scale by the catalytic processing of untreated urine vapor. For this purpose, two catalytic systems, one capable of processing an air stream containing low urine vapor concentrations and another to process streams with high urine vapor concentrations, were designed, constructed, and tested to establish the quality of the recovered water.

  5. Coagulant recovery and reuse for drinking water treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Keeley, James; Jarvis, Peter; Smith, Andrea D.; Judd, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Coagulant recovery and reuse from waterworks sludge has the potential to significantly reduce waste disposal and chemicals usage for water treatment. Drinking water regulations demand purification of recovered coagulant before they can be safely reused, due to the risk of disinfection by-product precursors being recovered from waterworks sludge alongside coagulant metals. While several full-scale separation technologies have proven effective for coagulant purification, none have matched virgi...

  6. ENHANCED RECOVERY FROM WATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki Bassiouni

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultimate recovery from water—drive gas reservoirs is governed primarily by the reservoir heterogeneity, residual gas saturation behind the water front, and by relatively high—pressure free gas abandoned updip of the highest perforation. Typical recovery from these reservoirs ranges between 35 and 75% of gas in place. Gas recovery can be enhanced using the »co — production« technique, in this process, as the downdip wells begin to water out, they are converted to high-rate water producers while the updip gas wells maintain gas production. If enough water is produced, the water influx can be halted or at least slowed down, allowing updip wells to deplete the free gas zone to lower pressure. Also, bypassed gas may regain mobility as pressure is lowered in the water-swept zone. Material balance calculations and numerical simulation arc used to support the technical feasibility of co—production. The technical as well as the economic feasibility is demonstrated using actual reservoirs.

  7. Heat-treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae for antimony speciation and antimony(III) preconcentration in water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcellino, Sebastien [Universite de Lyon, Lyon1, Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques, CNRS UMR 5180, bat CPE, 43, boulevard du 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Attar, Hossein [Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Sciences Separatives, CNRS UMR 7178, ECPM, 25 rue Becquerel 67087 Strasbourg (France); Lievremont, Didier; Lett, Marie-Claire [Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire, Genetique et Microbiologie, CNRS UMR 7156, 28 rue Goethe, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Barbier, Frederique [CNRS USR 59, Service Central d' Analyse, 59 Chemin du Canal BP22 69390 Vernaison (France); Lagarde, Florence [Universite de Lyon, Lyon1, Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques, CNRS UMR 5180, bat CPE, 43, boulevard du 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Sciences Separatives, CNRS UMR 7178, ECPM, 25 rue Becquerel 67087 Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: florence.lagarde@univ-lyon1.fr

    2008-11-23

    An analytical method was developed for antimony speciation and antimony(III) preconcentration in water samples. The method is based on the selective retention of Sb(III) by modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of Sb(V). Heat, caustic and solvent pretreatments of the biomass were investigated to improve the kinetics and thermodynamics of Sb(III) uptake process at room temperature. Heating for 30 min at 80 deg. C was defined as the optimal treatment. Antimony accumulation by the cells was independent of pH (5-10) and ionic strength (0.01-0.1 mol L{sup -1}). 140 mg of yeast and 2 h of contact were necessary to ensure quantitative sequestration of Sb(III) up to 750 {mu}g L{sup -1}. In these conditions, Sb(V) was not retained. Sb(V) was quantified in sorption supernatant by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) or inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Sb(III) was determined after elution with 40 mmol L{sup -1} thioglycolic acid at pH 10. A preconcentration factor close to nine was achieved for Sb(III) when 100 mL of sample was processed. After preconcentration, the detection limits for Sb(III) and Sb(V) were 2 and 5 ng L{sup -1}, respectively, using ICP-MS, 7 and 0.9 {mu}g L{sup -1} using ICP-OES. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in spiked river and mineral water samples. The relative standard deviations (n = 3) were in the 2-5% range at the tenth {mu}g L{sup -1} level and less than 10% at the lowest Sb(III) and Sb(V) tested concentration (0.1 {mu}g L{sup -1}). Corrected recoveries were in all cases close to 100%.

  8. Development of the Next Generation Type Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Tachihara, Satoru; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Ueoka, Terumi; Soejima, Fujito; Teranishi, Hiromitsu

    According to NASA, an astronaut living on the International Space Station (ISS) requires approximately 7 kg of water per day. This includes 2 kg of drinking water as well as sanitary fresh water for hand washing, gargling, etc. This water is carried to the space station from the earth, so when more people are staying on the space station, or staying for a longer period of time, the cost of transporting water increases. Accordingly, water is a valuable commodity, and restrictions are applied to such activities as brushing teeth, washing hair, and washing clothes. The life of an astronaut in space is not necessarily a healthy one. JAXA has experience in the research of water recovery systems. Today, utilizing knowledge learned through experiences living on the space station and space shuttles, and taking advantage of the development of new materials for device construction, it is possible to construct a new water recovery system. Therefore, JAXA and New Medican Tech Corporation (NMT) have created a system for collaborative development. Based on the technologies of both companies, we are proceeding to develop the next generation of water recovery devices in order to contribute to safe, comfortable, and healthy daily life for astronauts in space. The goal of this development is to achieve a water purification system based on reverse osmosis (RO) membranes that can perform the following functions. • Preprocessing that removes ammonia and breaks down organic matter contained in urine. • Post-processing that adds minerals and sterilizes the water. • Online TOC measurement for monitoring water quality. • Functions for measuring harmful substances. The RO membrane is an ultra-low-pressure type membrane with a 0.0001 micron (0.1 nanometer) pore size and an operating pressure of 0.4 to 0.6 MPa. During processing with the RO membrane, nearly all of the minerals contained in the cleaned water are removed, resulting in water that is near the quality of deionized water

  9. Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

  10. WatER: The proposed Water Elevation Recovery satellite mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsdorf, D.; Mognard, N.; Rodriguez, E.; Participants, W.

    2005-12-01

    Surface fresh water is essential for life, yet we have surprisingly poor knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamics of surface water storage and discharge globally. The core mission objective is to describe and understand the continental water cycle and the hydrological processes (e.g., floodplain hydraulics) at work in a river basin. The key question that will be answered by WatER is: "Where is water stored on Earth's land surfaces, and how does this storage vary in space and time?" WatER will facilitate societal needs by (1) improving our understanding of flood hazards; (2) freely providing water volume information to countries who critically rely on rivers that cross political borders; and (3) mapping the variations in water bodies that contribute to disease vectors (e.g., malaria). Conventional altimeter profiles are, without question, incapable of supplying the measurements needed to address scientific and societal questions. WatER will repeatedly measure the spatially distributed water surface elevations (h) of wetlands, rivers, lakes, reservoirs, etc. Successive h measurements yield dh/dt, (t is time), hence a volumetric change in water stored or lost. Individual images of h yield dh/dx (x is distance), hence surface water slope, which is necessary for estimating streamflow. WatER's main instrument is a Ka-band radar interferometer (KaRIN) which is the only technology capable of supplying the required imaging capability of h. KaRIN has a rich heritage based on (1) the many highly successful ocean observing radar altimeters, (2) the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and (3) the development effort of the Wide Swath Ocean Altimeter (WSOA). The interferometric altimeter is a near-nadir viewing, 120 km wideswath based instrument that uses interferometric SAR processing of the returned pulses to yield single-look 5m azimuth and 10m to 70m range resolution, with an elevation accuracy of approximately 50 cm. Polynomial based averaging of heights along the

  11. Metal interferences and their removal prior to the determination of As(T) and As(III) in acid mine waters by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Ball, James W.

    2003-01-01

    Hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) is a sensitive and selective method for the determination of total arsenic (arsenic(III) plus arsenic(V)) and arsenic(III); however, it is subject to metal interferences for acid mine waters. Sodium borohydride is used to produce arsine gas, but high metal concentrations can suppress arsine production. This report investigates interferences of sixteen metal species including aluminum, antimony(III), antimony(V), cadmium, chromium(III), chromium(IV), cobalt, copper(II), iron(III), iron(II), lead, manganese, nickel, selenium(IV), selenium(VI), and zinc ranging in concentration from 0 to 1,000 milligrams per liter and offers a method for removing interfering metal cations with cation exchange resin. The degree of interference for each metal without cation-exchange on the determination of total arsenic and arsenic(III) was evaluated by spiking synthetic samples containing arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) with the potential interfering metal. Total arsenic recoveries ranged from 92 to 102 percent for all metals tested except antimony(III) and antimony(V) which suppressed arsine formation when the antimony(III)/total arsenic molar ratio exceeded 4 or the antimony(V)/total arsenic molar ratio exceeded 2. Arsenic(III) recoveries for samples spiked with aluminum, chromium(III), cobalt, iron(II), lead, manganese, nickel, selenium(VI), and zinc ranged from 84 to 107 percent over the entire concentration range tested. Low arsenic(III) recoveries occurred when the molar ratios of metals to arsenic(III) were copper greater than 120, iron(III) greater than 70, chromium(VI) greater than 2, cadmium greater than 800, antimony(III) greater than 3, antimony(V) greater than 12, or selenium(IV) greater than 1. Low recoveries result when interfering metals compete for available sodium borohydride, causing incomplete arsine production, or when the interfering metal oxidizes arsenic(III). Separation of interfering metal cations using

  12. Application of Membrane Crystallization for Minerals’ Recovery from Produced Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamer Ali

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Produced water represents the largest wastewater stream from oil and gas production. Generally, its high salinity level restricts the treatment options. Membrane crystallization (MCr is an emerging membrane process with the capability to extract simultaneously fresh water and valuable components from various streams. In the current study, the potential of MCr for produced water treatment and salt recovery was demonstrated. The experiments were carried out in lab scale and semi-pilot scale. The effect of thermal and hydrodynamic conditions on process performance and crystal characteristics were explored. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX and X-ray diffraction (XRD analyses confirmed that the recovered crystals are sodium chloride with very high purity (>99.9%, also indicated by the cubic structure observed by microscopy and SEM (scanning electron microscopy analysis. It was demonstrated experimentally that at recovery factor of 37%, 16.4 kg NaCl per cubic meter of produced water can be recovered. Anti-scaling surface morphological features of membranes were also identified. In general, the study provides a new perspective of isolation of valuable constituents from produced water that, otherwise, is considered as a nuisance.

  13. Development of a Water Recovery System Resource Tracking Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambliss, Joe; Stambaugh, Imelda; Sargusingh, Miriam; Shull, Sarah; Moore, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A simulation model has been developed to track water resources in an exploration vehicle using Regenerative Life Support (RLS) systems. The Resource Tracking Model (RTM) integrates the functions of all the vehicle components that affect the processing and recovery of water during simulated missions. The approach used in developing the RTM enables its use as part of a complete vehicle simulation for real time mission studies. Performance data for the components in the RTM is focused on water processing. The data provided to the model has been based on the most recent information available regarding the technology of the component. This paper will describe the process of defining the RLS system to be modeled, the way the modeling environment was selected, and how the model has been implemented. Results showing how the RLS components exchange water are provided in a set of test cases.

  14. Impact of Water Recovery from Wastes on the Lunar Surface Mission Water Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Hogan, John Andrew; Wignarajah, Kanapathipi; Pace, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Future extended lunar surface missions will require extensive recovery of resources to reduce mission costs and enable self-sufficiency. Water is of particular importance due to its potential use for human consumption and hygiene, general cleaning, clothes washing, radiation shielding, cooling for extravehicular activity suits, and oxygen and hydrogen production. Various water sources are inherently present or are generated in lunar surface missions, and subject to recovery. They include: initial water stores, water contained in food, human and other solid wastes, wastewaters and associated brines, ISRU water, and scavenging from residual propellant in landers. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the contribution of water recovery from life support wastes on the overall water balance for lunar surface missions. Water in human wastes, metabolic activity and survival needs are well characterized and dependable figures are available. A detailed life support waste model was developed that summarizes the composition of life support wastes and their water content. Waste processing technologies were reviewed for their potential to recover that water. The recoverable water in waste is a significant contribution to the overall water balance. The value of this contribution is discussed in the context of the other major sources and loses of water. Combined with other analyses these results provide guidance for research and technology development and down-selection.

  15. Permeability recovery of damaged water sensitive core using ultrasonic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nasir; Pu, Chunsheng; Li, Xu; He, Yanlong; Zhang, Lei; Jing, Cheng

    2017-09-01

    It is imperative to recover the well productivity lose due to formation damage nearby wellbore during variant well operations. Some indispensable issues in conventional techniques make ultrasonic technology more attractive due to simple, reliable, favorable, cost-effective, and environment friendly nature. This study proposes the independent and combined use of ultrasonic waves and chemical agents for the treatment of already damaged core samples caused by exposure to distilled water. Results elucidate that ultrasonic waves with optimum (20kHz, 1000W) instead of maximum frequency and power worked well in the recovery owing to peristaltic transport caused by matching of natural frequency with acoustic waves frequency. In addition, hundred minutes was investigated as optimum irradiation time which provided ample time span to detach fine loosely suspended particles. However, further irradiation adversely affected the damaged permeability recovery. Moreover, permeability improvement attributes to cavitation due to ultrasonic waves propagation through fluid contained in porous medium and thermal energy generated by three different ways. Eventually, experimental outcomes indicated that maximum (25.3%) damaged permeability recovery was witnessed by applying ultrasonic waves with transducer #2 (20kHz and 1000W) and optimum irradiation timeframe (100min). This recovery was further increased to 45.8% by applying chemical agent and optimum ultrasonic waves simultaneously. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Methods to maximise recovery of environmental DNA from water samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rheyda Hinlo

    Full Text Available The environmental DNA (eDNA method is a detection technique that is rapidly gaining credibility as a sensitive tool useful in the surveillance and monitoring of invasive and threatened species. Because eDNA analysis often deals with small quantities of short and degraded DNA fragments, methods that maximize eDNA recovery are required to increase detectability. In this study, we performed experiments at different stages of the eDNA analysis to show which combinations of methods give the best recovery rate for eDNA. Using Oriental weatherloach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus as a study species, we show that various combinations of DNA capture, preservation and extraction methods can significantly affect DNA yield. Filtration using cellulose nitrate filter paper preserved in ethanol or stored in a -20°C freezer and extracted with the Qiagen DNeasy kit outperformed other combinations in terms of cost and efficiency of DNA recovery. Our results support the recommendation to filter water samples within 24hours but if this is not possible, our results suggest that refrigeration may be a better option than freezing for short-term storage (i.e., 3-5 days. This information is useful in designing eDNA detection of low-density invasive or threatened species, where small variations in DNA recovery can signify the difference between detection success or failure.

  17. Methods to maximise recovery of environmental DNA from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinlo, Rheyda; Gleeson, Dianne; Lintermans, Mark; Furlan, Elise

    2017-01-01

    The environmental DNA (eDNA) method is a detection technique that is rapidly gaining credibility as a sensitive tool useful in the surveillance and monitoring of invasive and threatened species. Because eDNA analysis often deals with small quantities of short and degraded DNA fragments, methods that maximize eDNA recovery are required to increase detectability. In this study, we performed experiments at different stages of the eDNA analysis to show which combinations of methods give the best recovery rate for eDNA. Using Oriental weatherloach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) as a study species, we show that various combinations of DNA capture, preservation and extraction methods can significantly affect DNA yield. Filtration using cellulose nitrate filter paper preserved in ethanol or stored in a -20°C freezer and extracted with the Qiagen DNeasy kit outperformed other combinations in terms of cost and efficiency of DNA recovery. Our results support the recommendation to filter water samples within 24hours but if this is not possible, our results suggest that refrigeration may be a better option than freezing for short-term storage (i.e., 3-5 days). This information is useful in designing eDNA detection of low-density invasive or threatened species, where small variations in DNA recovery can signify the difference between detection success or failure.

  18. Possibility of heat recovery from gray water in residential building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Aleksandra; Słyś, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    Recovery of waste heat from gray water can be an interesting alternative to other energy saving systems in a building, including alternative energy sources. Mainly, due to a number of advantages including independence from weather conditions, small investment outlay, lack of user support, or a slight interference with the installation system. The purpose of this article is to present the financial effectiveness of installations which provide hot, usable water to a detached house, using a Drain Water Heat Recovery (DWHR) system depending on the number of system users and the various combinations of bathing time in the shower, which has an influence on the daily warm water demand in each of the considered options. The economic analysis of the adopted installation variants is based on the Life Cycle Cost (LCC) method, which is characterized by the fact that it also includes the operating costs in addition to the capital expenditure during the entire analysis period. For each case, the necessary devices were selected and the cost of their installation was estimated.

  19. Treatment of Arsenazo III contaminated heavy water stored at Darlington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suryanarayan, S.; Husain, A., E-mail: sriram.s@kinectrics.com [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Williams, D., E-mail: denny.williams@opg.com [Ontario Power Generation, Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, Bowmanville, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Darlington Nuclear Generating Station (DNGS) has accumulated over 48 drums of chemistry laboratory waste arising from analysis of heavy water (D{sub 2}O). Several organic, including Arsenazo III, and inorganic contaminants present in these drums results in high total organic carbon (TOC) and conductivity. These drums have not been processed due to uncertainties related to clean-up of Arsenazo III contaminated heavy water. This paper provides details of chemical characterization as well as bench scale studies performed to demonstrate the feasibility of treating the downgraded D{sub 2}O to the stringent target specifications of <1 ppm TOC and <0.1mS/m conductivity, required for feed to the Station Upgrading Plant (SUP). Both ionic organic species such as glycolate, acetate and formate as well as neutral organics such as acetone, methanol and ethylene glycol were detected in all the samples. Morpholine and propylene glycol were detected in one sample. Arsenazo III was determined to be not a major contaminant (maximum 8.4 ppm) in these waste drums, compared to the other organic contaminants present. Various unit processes such as pH adjustment, granular activated carbon (GAC), ion exchange resin (IX), UV-peroxide oxidation (UV-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatments, nanofiltration (NF) as well as reverse osmosis (RO) were tested on a bench scale both singly as well as in various combinations to evaluate their ability to achieve the stringent target conductivity and TOC specifications. Among the various bench scale tests evaluated, the successive processing train used at DNGS and consisting of GAC+IX+UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}+IX (polishing) unit operations was found to meet target specifications for both conductivity and TOC. Unit processes comprising (GAC+IX) and (RO-double pass + GAC+IX) met conductivity targets but failed to meet TOC specifications. The results of GAC+IX tests clearly emphasize the importance of using low flow rates for successful reduction in both conductivity as

  20. Removal of arsenic from water using manganese (III) oxide: Adsorption of As(III) and As(V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeivelni, Kamel; Khodadoust, Amid P

    2016-01-01

    Removal of arsenic from water was evaluated with manganese (III) oxide (Mn2O3) as adsorbent. Adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto Mn2O3 was favorable according to the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption equilibrium equations, while chemisorption of arsenic occurred according to the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation. Adsorption parameters from the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin equations showed a greater adsorption and removal of As(III) than As(V) by Mn2O3. Maximum removal of As(III) and As(V) occurred at pH 3-9 and at pH 2, respectively, while removal of As(V) in the pH range of 6-9 was 93% (pH 6) to 61% (pH 9) of the maximum removal. Zeta potential measurements for Mn2O3 in As(III) was likely converted to As(V) solutions indicated that As(III) was likely converted to As(V) on the Mn2O3 surface at pH 3-9. Overall, the effective Mn2O3 sorbent rapidly removed As(III) and As(V) from water in the pH range of 6-9 for natural waters.

  1. Water Recovery System Architecture and Operational Concepts to Accommodate Dormancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Layne; Tabb, David; Anderson, Molly

    2017-01-01

    Future manned missions beyond low Earth orbit will include intermittent periods of extended dormancy. The mission requirement includes the capability for life support systems to support crew activity, followed by a dormant period of up to one year, and subsequently for the life support systems to come back online for additional crewed missions. NASA personnel are evaluating the architecture and operational concepts that will allow the Water Recovery System (WRS) to support such a mission. Dormancy could be a critical issue due to concerns with microbial growth or chemical degradation that might prevent water systems from operating properly when the crewed mission began. As such, it is critical that the water systems be designed to accommodate this dormant period. This paper identifies dormancy issues, concepts for updating the WRS architecture and operational concepts that will enable the WRS to support the dormancy requirement.

  2. Solar water splitting with III-N nanocolumn structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, O. S.; Puzyk, M. V.; Usikov, A. S.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu N.

    2017-11-01

    HVPE – grown GaN/AlGaN p-n structures with nanocolumns fabricated on the top (1.0 μm of height and 100-130 nm of diameter) were used in a photoelectrochemical process to investigate direct water splitting. The H2 production rate of 0.56 ml/cm2 × h was measured for the GaN/AlGaN structures in KOH electrolyte under the Xe-lamp illumination. H2 evolution was observed at the Pt electrode. However an etching and a small amount of generated gas was observed at the working electrode. Possible mechanisms of corrosion in GaN/AlGAN nanocolumn structures are discussed. A sacrificial agent (like HBr) or the surface passivation by nitrogen atoms is needed to prevent oxidation and etching of the III-N materials.

  3. Separation and preconcentration of Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Fe(III) and Cr(III) ions with coprecipitation method without carrier element and their determination in food and water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendil, Durali; Karatas, Murat; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2015-06-15

    In this study, Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Fe(III) and Cr(III) were determined in some food and water samples after development 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) coprecipitation procedure using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Effects of some analytical parameter including pH, sample volume, reagent amount, centrifuge rate and time, etc. on the presented coprecipitation system were studied for the quantitative recoveries of Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Fe(III) and Cr(III) ions. The influences of matrix ions were examined. The recovery values for analyte ions were calculated ⩾ 95%. The relative standard deviation was found 8.0% and the preconcentration factor was found as 25 for all analyte ions. The detection limits (k=3, N=21) were found to be as 0.80 μg L(-1) Cu(II), 3.08 μg L(-1) Pb(II), 0.28 μg L(-1) Zn(II), 0.91 μg L(-1) Fe(III) and 1.82 μg L(-1) Cr(III). NIST SRM 1515 Apple leaves and GBW-07605 Tea certified reference materials were used to confirm the accuracy of the method. The simultaneous coprecipitation method was applied to various water and microwave digested food samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Upgrades to the International Space Station Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayatin, Matthew J.; Pruitt, Jennifer M.; Nur, Mononita; Takada, Kevin C.; Carter, Layne

    2017-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Water Recovery System (WRS) includes the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). The WRS produces potable water from a combination of crew urine (first processed through the UPA), crew latent, and Sabatier product water. Though the WRS has performed well since operations began in November 2008, several modifications have been identified to improve the overall system performance. These modifications aim to reduce resupply and improve overall system reliability, which is beneficial for the ongoing ISS mission as well as for future NASA manned missions. The following paper details efforts to improve the WPA through the use of reverse osmosis membrane technology to reduce the resupply mass of the WPA Multi-filtration Bed and improved catalyst for the WPA Catalytic Reactor to reduce the operational temperature and pressure. For the UPA, this paper discusses progress on various concepts for improving the reliability of the system, including the implementation of a more reliable drive belt, improved methods for managing condensate in the stationary bowl of the Distillation Assembly, and evaluating upgrades to the UPA vacuum pump.

  5. Coagulant recovery and reuse for drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, James; Jarvis, Peter; Smith, Andrea D; Judd, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Coagulant recovery and reuse from waterworks sludge has the potential to significantly reduce waste disposal and chemicals usage for water treatment. Drinking water regulations demand purification of recovered coagulant before they can be safely reused, due to the risk of disinfection by-product precursors being recovered from waterworks sludge alongside coagulant metals. While several full-scale separation technologies have proven effective for coagulant purification, none have matched virgin coagulant treatment performance. This study examines the individual and successive separation performance of several novel and existing ferric coagulant recovery purification technologies to attain virgin coagulant purity levels. The new suggested approach of alkali extraction of dissolved organic compounds (DOC) from waterworks sludge prior to acidic solubilisation of ferric coagulants provided the same 14:1 selectivity ratio (874 mg/L Fe vs. 61 mg/L DOC) to the more established size separation using ultrafiltration (1285 mg/L Fe vs. 91 mg/L DOC). Cation exchange Donnan membranes were also examined: while highly selective (2555 mg/L Fe vs. 29 mg/L DOC, 88:1 selectivity), the low pH of the recovered ferric solution impaired subsequent treatment performance. The application of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to ultrafiltration or alkali pre-treated sludge, dosed at 80 mg/mg DOC, reduced recovered ferric DOC contamination to water quality parameters. Several PAC-polished recovered coagulants provided the same or improved DOC and turbidity removal as virgin coagulant, as well as demonstrating the potential to reduce disinfection byproducts and regulated metals to levels comparable to that attained from virgin material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Monitoring Environmental Recovery at Terminated Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Continental Shelf Associates, Inc.

    1999-08-16

    This report presents the results of a study of terminated produced water discharge sites in the coastal waters of Louisiana. Environmental recovery at the sites is documented by comparing pre-termination and post-termination (six months and one year) data. Produced water, sediments, and sediment interstitial water samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons. Benthic infauna were identified from samples collected in the vicinity of the discharge and reference sites. Radium isotope activities were determined in fish and crustacean samples. In addition, an environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

  7. Effects of water ingestion throughout exercise and recovery on cardiac autonomic modulation during and after exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora Lessa Moreno

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose: To analyze the effects of water intake on heart rate variability (HRV during and after exercise. Methods: Thirty-one young males performed three different procedures: I a maximal exercise test to determine the load for the protocols; II the control protocol (CP; III the experimental protocol (EP. The protocols comprised 10 minutes at rest, 90 minutes of treadmill exercise (60% of VO2 peak, and 60 minutes of recovery. No rehydration beverage consumption was allowed during the CP. During the EP, the participants were given water every 15 minutes, being that the amount of water to be ingested by each volunteer was divided over the time of exercise and recovery. For the analysis of HRV data, time and frequency domain indices were investigated in the following moments (M: M1 (5 minutes final of rest, M2 (25-30 minutes of exercise, M3 (55-60 minutes of exercise, M4 (85-90 minutes of exercise, M5 (5-10 minutes of recovery, M6 (15-20 minutes of recovery, M7 (25-30 minutes of recovery, M8 (40-45 minutes of recovery, and M9 (55-60 minutes of recovery. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the groups that were examined during the exercise. HRV values for the CP and EP at the end of the exercise period were as follows SDNN (5.95±1.89 vs 6.89±2.11; RMSSD (3.29±0.78 vs 3.39±0.95; HF [nu] (24.06±14.26 vs 19.10±11.94; LF [nu] (75.93±14.26 vs 80.89±11.94; HF [ms2] (0.90±1.16 vs 0.94±0.89; LF [ms2] (4.65±5.94 vs 5.35±5.09; and LF/HF ratio (4.64±3.15 vs 6.95±5.57. HRV values for the CP and the EP at the end of the recovery period were as follows: SDNN (39.63±19.63 vs 49.95±17.79; RMSSD (21.63±15.55 vs 36.43±22.73; HF [ms2] (285.51±392.27 vs 699.29±699.66; LF [nu] (74.55±13.25 vs 61.19±19.27; and HF [nu] (25.44±13.25 vs 38.8±19.27. Conclusion: The hydration with water was not enough to significantly influence the linear HRV indices during exercise; however, it promoted faster recovery of these

  8. RECOVERY OF COPPER(II) AND CHROMIUM(III) FROM NITRATE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guerdouh A and Barkat D

    2016-05-01

    May 1, 2016 ... ABSTRACT. The solvent extraction of copper(II) and chromium(III) from nitrate medium with salicylideneaniline (HL) is studied as a function of various parameters: pH, concentration of salicylideneaniline, contact time and the nature of anoin (nitrate and sulfate) in aqueous phase. Chromium(III) is not ...

  9. Method selection for sustainability assessments: The case of recovery of resources from waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijp, M C; Waaijers-van der Loop, S L; Heijungs, R; Broeren, M L M; Peeters, R; Van Nieuwenhuijzen, A; Shen, L; Heugens, E H W; Posthuma, L

    2017-07-15

    Sustainability assessments provide scientific support in decision procedures towards sustainable solutions. However, in order to contribute in identifying and choosing sustainable solutions, the sustainability assessment has to fit the decision context. Two complicating factors exist. First, different stakeholders tend to have different views on what a sustainability assessment should encompass. Second, a plethora of sustainability assessment methods exist, due to the multi-dimensional characteristic of the concept. Different methods provide other representations of sustainability. Based on a literature review, we present a protocol to facilitate method selection together with stakeholders. The protocol guides the exploration of i) the decision context, ii) the different views of stakeholders and iii) the selection of pertinent assessment methods. In addition, we present an online tool for method selection. This tool identifies assessment methods that meet the specifications obtained with the protocol, and currently contains characteristics of 30 sustainability assessment methods. The utility of the protocol and the tool are tested in a case study on the recovery of resources from domestic waste water. In several iterations, a combination of methods was selected, followed by execution of the selected sustainability assessment methods. The assessment results can be used in the first phase of the decision procedure that leads to a strategic choice for sustainable resource recovery from waste water in the Netherlands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Water Recovery X-ray Rocket (WRX-R)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Drew

    2017-08-01

    The Water Recovery X-ray Rocket (WRX-R) is a diffuse soft X-ray spectrometer that will launch on a sounding rocket from the Kwajalein Atoll. WRX-R has a field of view of >10 deg2 and will observe the Vela supernova remnant. A mechanical collimator, state-of-the-art off-plane reflection grating array and hybrid CMOS detector will allow WRX to achieve the most highly-resolved spectrum of the Vela SNR ever recorded. In addition, this payload will fly a hard X-ray telescope that is offset from the soft X-ray spectrometer in order to observe the pulsar at the center of the remnant. We present here an introduction to the instrument, the expected science return, and an update on the state of the payload as we work towards launch.

  11. Studies Concerning Water-Surface Deposits in Recovery Boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandberg, O.; Arvesen, J.; Dahl, L.

    1971-11-15

    The Feed-water Committee of the Stiftelsen Svensk Cellulosaforskning (Foundation for Swedish Cellulose Research) has initiated research and investigations which aim to increase knowledge about water-surface deposits in boiler tubes, and the resulting risks of gas-surface corrosion in chemical recovery boilers (sulphate pulp industry). The Committee has arranged with AB Atomenergi, Studsvik, for investigations into the water-surface deposits on tubes from six Scandinavian boilers. These investigations have included direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of the deposits, and determinations of their quantity, thickness and structure have been carried out. Previous investigations have shown that gas-surface corrosion can occur at tube temperatures above 330 deg C. The measured values for the thermal conductivity of the deposits indicate that even with small quantities of deposit (c. 1 g/dm2 ) and a moderate boiler pressure (40 atm), certain types of deposit can give rise to the above-mentioned surface temperature, at which the risk of gas-surface corrosion becomes appreciable. For higher boiler pressures the risk is great even with a minimal layer of deposit. The critical deposit thickness can be as low as 0.1 mm

  12. [Direct determination of water-soluble antimony(III) and antimony(V) in soil by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhao-Shui; Zhang, Qin

    2009-12-01

    A simple, rapid and useful method for the determination of water-soluble antimony(III) and antimony(V) in soil was established using hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The method was based on the different chemical reaction efficiency between Sb(III) and Sb(V) with KBH4 in the media of HCl. The amounts of Sb(III) and Sb(V) can be obtained through measuring antimony fluorescence intensities before and after reduction with reductant. The effects of HCl and KBH4 on the sensitivities of Sb(III) and Sb(V) were investigated, and the interferences from coexistent elements were studied. The reduction efficiencies of both reductants were compared. The detection limits of the method were 1.11 ng x g(-1) for Sb(III) and 1.57 ng x g(-1) for Sb(V). The accuracy of the method was verified by recovery experiments on spiked real soil samples.

  13. An introduction to the water recovery x-ray rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Drew M.; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Schultz, Ted B.; Donovan, Benjamin D.; Tutt, James H.; Yastishock, Daniel; Steiner, Tyler; Hillman, Christopher R.; McCoy, Jake A.; Wages, Mitchell; Hull, Sam; Falcone, Abe; Burrows, David N.; Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; Anderson, Tyler; McQuaide, Maria

    2017-08-01

    The Water Recovery X-ray Rocket (WRXR) is a sounding rocket payload that will launch from the Kwajalein Atoll in April 2018 and seeks to be the first astrophysics sounding rocket payload to be water recovered by NASA. WRXR's primary instrument is a grating spectrometer that consists of a mechanical collimator, X-ray reflection gratings, grazing-incidence mirrors, and a hybrid CMOS detector. The instrument will obtain a spectrum of the diffuse soft X-ray emission from the northern part of the Vela supernova remnant and is optimized for 3rd and 4th order OVII emission. Utilizing a field of view of 3.25° × 3.25° and resolving power of λ/δλ ≍40-50 in the lines of interest, the WRXR spectrometer aims to achieve the most highly-resolved spectrum of Vela's diffuse soft X-ray emission. This paper presents introductions to the payload and the science target.

  14. Assessment of susceptibility to pollution in littoral waters using the concept of recovery time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Aina G; Juanes, José A; Ondiviela, Bárbara; Revilla, José A

    2014-04-15

    Susceptibility to pollution can be related to the flushing capacity of aquatic systems. Transport time scales constitute a useful tool for representing the water exchange and transport processes. A new transport time scale, recovery time, and a methodology to estimate it by means of numerical models is hereby developed. Recovery time, calculated in Gijon, Santander and Tarragona harbours, is significantly related to physical, chemical and biological water quality indicators. Susceptibility, assessed through recovery time values, provides spatial patterns of expected flushing capacity, being sensitive to physical and hydrodynamic characteristics. The developed method is appropriate to estimate recovery time and assess susceptibility against pollution in littoral waters having great potential to be applied to different disciplines. Recovery time could be used in littoral waters as a surrogate of water quality indicators, to establish efficient monitoring programs, to define and characterize modified water bodies or to improve the design of marine infrastructures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bead Evaporator for Complete Water and Salt Recovery from Brine Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A microgravity-compatible Brine Evaporation and Mineralization System (BEMS) is proposed for 100% water recovery from highly contaminated wastewater as well as water...

  16. Evaluation of an Ultrafiltration-Based Procedure for Simultaneous Recovery of Diverse Microbes in Source Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M. Kahler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, hollow-fiber ultrafiltration (UF was assessed for recovery of Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens spores, Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, echovirus 1, and bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 from ground and surface waters. Microbes were seeded into twenty-two 50-L water samples that were collected from the Southeastern United States and concentrated to ~500 mL by UF. Secondary concentration was performed for C. parvum by centrifugation followed by immunomagnetic separation. Secondary concentration for viruses was performed using centrifugal ultrafilters or polyethylene glycol precipitation. Nine water quality parameters were measured in each water sample to determine whether water quality data correlated with UF and secondary concentration recovery efficiencies. Average UF recovery efficiencies were 66%–95% for the six enteric microbes. Average recovery efficiencies for the secondary concentration methods were 35%–95% for C. parvum and the viruses. Overall, measured water quality parameters were not significantly associated with UF recovery efficiencies. However, recovery of ΦX174 was negatively correlated with turbidity. The recovery data demonstrate that UF can be an effective method for concentrating diverse microbes from ground and surface waters. This study highlights the utility of tangential-flow hollow fiber ultrafiltration for recovery of bacteria, viruses, and parasites from large volume environmental water samples.

  17. Water immersion recovery for athletes: effect on exercise performance and practical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versey, Nathan G; Halson, Shona L; Dawson, Brian T

    2013-11-01

    Water immersion is increasingly being used by elite athletes seeking to minimize fatigue and accelerate post-exercise recovery. Accelerated short-term (hours to days) recovery may improve competition performance, allow greater training loads or enhance the effect of a given training load. However, the optimal water immersion protocols to assist short-term recovery of performance still remain unclear. This article will review the water immersion recovery protocols investigated in the literature, their effects on performance recovery, briefly outline the potential mechanisms involved and provide practical recommendations for their use by athletes. For the purposes of this review, water immersion has been divided into four techniques according to water temperature: cold water immersion (CWI; ≤20 °C), hot water immersion (HWI; ≥36 °C), contrast water therapy (CWT; alternating CWI and HWI) and thermoneutral water immersion (TWI; >20 to sports, with immersion in 10-15 °C water for 5-15 min duration appearing to be most effective at accelerating performance recovery. However, the optimal CWI duration may depend on the water temperature, and the time between CWI and the subsequent exercise bout appears to influence the effect on performance. The few studies examining the effect of post-exercise HWI on subsequent performance have reported conflicting findings; therefore the effect of HWI on performance recovery is unclear. CWT is most likely to enhance performance recovery when equal time is spent in hot and cold water, individual immersion durations are short (~1 min) and the total immersion duration is up to approximately 15 min. A dose-response relationship between CWT duration and recovery of exercise performance is unlikely to exist. Some articles that have reported CWT to not enhance performance recovery have had methodological issues, such as failing to detect a decrease in performance in control trials, not performing full-body immersion, or using hot

  18. Recovery of water and minerals from shale gas produced water by membrane distillation crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Jungwon; Hong, Seungkwan

    2017-11-08

    Shale gas produced water (SGPW) treatment imposes greater technical challenges because of its high concentration of various contaminants. Membrane distillation crystallization (MDC) has a great potential to manage SGPW since it is capable of recovering both water and minerals at high rates, up to near a zero liquid discharge (ZLD) condition. To evaluate the feasibility of MDC for SGPW treatment, MDC performance indicators, such as water recovery rate, solid production rate (SPR) and specific energy consumption (SEC), were systematically investigated, to our knowledge for the first time, by using actual SGPW from Eagle Ford Shale (USA). The main operating parameters including feed cross-flow velocity (CFV) and crystallization temperature (TCr) were optimized by performing a series of MDC experiments. The results reported that water and minerals were effectively recovered with 84% of recovery rate and 2.72 kg/m2day of SPR under respective optimal operating conditions. Furthermore, the scale mechanism was firstly identified as limiting factor for MDC performance degradation. Lastly, SEC of MDC was estimated to be as low as 28.2 kWh/m3 under ideal optimal operating conditions. Our experimental observations demonstrated that MDC could sustainably and effectively recover water and mineral with low energy consumption from SGPW by optimizing operating condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of Long-Term Research Needs for Shale-Oil Recovery (FERWG-III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, S.S.

    1981-03-01

    The Fossil Energy Research Working Group (FERWG), at the request of E. Frieman (Director, Office of Energy Research) and G. Fumich, Jr. (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Fuels), has reviewed and evaluated the U.S. programs on shale-oil recovery. These studies were performed in order to provide an independent assessment of critical research areas that affect the long-term prospects for shale-oil availability. This report summarizes the findings and research recommendations of FERWG.

  20. The effect of lanthanum(III) and cerium(III) ions between layers of manganese oxide on water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Isaloo, Mohsen Abbasi; Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman

    2015-12-01

    Manganese oxide structure with lanthanum(III) or cerium(III) ions between the layers was synthesized by a simple method. The ratio of Mn to Ce or La in samples was 0.00, 0.04, 0.08, 0.16, 0.32, 0.5, 0.82, or 1.62. The compounds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction studies, and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The compounds show efficient catalytic activity of water oxidation in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate with a turnover frequency of 1.6 mmol O2/mol Mn.s. In contrast to the water-oxidizing complex in Photosystem II, calcium(II) has no specific role to enhance the water-oxidizing activity of the layered manganese oxides and other cations can be replaced without any significant decrease in water-oxidizing activities of these layered Mn oxides. Based on this and previously reported results from oxygen evolution in the presence of H 2 (18) O, we discuss the mechanism and the important factors influencing the water-oxidizing activities of the manganese oxides.

  1. Simultaneous oxidation and adsorption of As(III) from water by cerium modified chitosan ultrafine nanobiosorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lingfan [School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Research Center of Analysis and Test, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhu, Tianyi [School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liu, Xin, E-mail: liuxin@ecust.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhang, Wenqing, E-mail: zhwqing@ecust.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • A novel ultrafine nanobiosorbent of cerium modified chitosan (Ce-CNB) was prepared. • The Ce-CNB possessed properties for simultaneous oxidation and adsorption As(III). • Adsorption of As(III) by Ce-CNB was in high efficiency. • Mechanisms for As(III) adsorption on Ce-CNB were elucidated. - Abstract: Since most existing arsenic removal adsorbents are difficult to effectively remove arsenite (As(III)), an urgent need is to develop an efficient adsorbent for removing As(III) from contaminated water. In this study, a novel ultrafine nanobiosorbent of cerium modified chitosan (Ce-CNB) with simultaneous oxidation and adsorption As(III) performance has been successfully developed. The resulting Ce-CNB with or without As(III) adsorption was characterized by FTIR, XRD, SEM, EDS, TEM, EMI and XPS analysis. Batch of adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the effects of various conditions on the As(III) adsorption. The adsorption behaviors were well described by the Langmuir isotherm and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, with the maximum adsorption capacities of 57.5 mg g{sup −1}. The adsorption mechanisms for As(III) were (i) formed monodentate and bidentate complexes between hydroxyl groups and arsenite; and (ii) partial As(III) oxidized to As(V) followed by simultaneously adsorbed on the surface of Ce-CNB. This novel nanocomposite can be reused while maintaining a high removal efficiency and can be applied to treat 5.8 L of As(III)-polluted water with the effluent concentration lower than the World Health Organization standard, which suggests its great potential to remove As(III) from contaminated water.

  2. New method for the direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) concentration in acid mine waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, T.B.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Cunningham, K.M.; Ball, J.W.; McCleskey, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    A new method for direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) in acid mine water has been developed. In most present methods, Fe(III) is determined by computing the difference between total dissolved Fe and dissolved Fe(II). For acid mine waters, frequently Fe(II) >> Fe(III); thus, accuracy and precision are considerably improved by determining Fe(III) concentration directly. The new method utilizes two selective ligands to stabilize Fe(III) and Fe(II), thereby preventing changes in Fe reduction-oxidation distribution. Complexed Fe(II) is cleanly removed using a silica-based, reversed-phase adsorbent, yielding excellent isolation of the Fe(III) complex. Iron(III) concentration is measured colorimetrically or by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The method requires inexpensive commercial reagents and simple procedures that can be used in the field. Calcium(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), AI(III), Zn(II), and Cd(II) cause insignificant colorimetric interferences for most acid mine waters. Waters containing >20 mg of Cu/L could cause a colorimetric interference and should be measured by GFAAS. Cobalt(II) and Cr(III) interfere if their molar ratios to Fe(III) exceed 24 and 5, respectively. Iron(II) interferes when its concentration exceeds the capacity of the complexing ligand (14 mg/L). Because of the GFAAS elemental specificity, only Fe(II) is a potential interferent in the GFAAS technique. The method detection limit is 2 ??g/L (40 nM) using GFAAS and 20 ??g/L (0.4 ??M) by colorimetry.A new method for direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) in acid mine water has been developed. In most present methods, Fe(III) is determined by computing the difference between total dissolved Fe and dissolved Fe(II). For acid mine waters, frequently Fe(II)???Fe(III); thus, accuracy and precision are considerably improved by determining Fe(III) concentration directly. The new method utilizes two selective ligands to stabilize Fe(III) and Fe(II), thereby preventing changes

  3. Kinetics of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal from water by two floating macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine, M A; Hadad, H R; Sánchez, G; Caffaratti, S; Pedro, M C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal kinetics from water by Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia herzogii. The accumulation in plant tissues and the effects of both Cr forms on plant growth were also evaluated. Plants were exposed to 2 and 6 mg L(-1) of Cr(III) or Cr(VI) during 30 days. At the end of the experiment, Cr(VI) removal percentages were significantly lower than those obtained for Cr(III) for both macrophytes. Cr(III) removal kinetics involved a fast and a slow component. The fast component was primarily responsible for Cr(III) removal while Cr(VI) removal kinetics involved only a slow process. Cr accumulated principally in the roots. In the Cr(VI) treatments a higher translocation from roots to aerial parts than in Cr(III) treatments was observed. Both macrophytes demonstrated a high ability to remove Cr(III) but not Cr(VI). Cr(III) inhibited the growth at the highest studied concentration of both macrophytes while Cr(VI) caused senescence. These results have important implications in the use of constructed wetlands for secondary industrial wastewater treatment. Common primary treatments of effluents containing Cr(VI) consists in its reduction to Cr(III). Cr(III) concentrations in these effluents are normally below the highest studied concentrations in this work.

  4. [Recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estingoy, Pierrette; Gilliot, Élodie; Parisot, Clément

    2015-01-01

    The historical fatalism of the impossibility of recovering from psychosis eased from the 1970s with the shaping of the idea of a possible recovery. Recovery is today the objective for the patient and caregivers. The key to achieving this lies in the encounter with Others. A collective approach, on the level of the institution, must be established. The aim is to create opportunities for the patient to express their doubts and feelings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficient removal of Cr(III)-organic complexes from water using UV/Fe(III) system: Negligible Cr(VI) accumulation and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yuxuan; Jiang, Zhao; Xu, Zhe; Zhang, Xiaolin; Wang, Dandan; Lv, Lu; Pan, Bingcai

    2017-12-01

    Most available processes are incapable of removing Cr(III)-organic complexes from water due to their high solubility, extremely slow decomplexation rate, and possible formation of more toxic Cr(VI) during oxidation. Herein, we proposed a new combined process, i.e., UV/Fe(III) followed by alkaline precipitation (namely UV/Fe(III)+OH), to achieve highly efficient and environmentally benign removal of Cr(III)-organic complexes from water. The combined process could remove Cr(III)-citrate from 10.4 mg Cr/L to 0.36 mg Cr/L and ∼60% total organic carbon as well. More attractively, negligible Cr(VI) (Fe(III) generates ·OH radicals to transform Cr(III) into Cr(VI) and simultaneously released the citrate ligand to form Fe(III)-citrate simultaneously. Then, the photolysis of Fe(III)-citrate under UV irradiation involved the citrate degradation and the production of massive Fe(II) species, which in turn transformed the formed Cr(VI) back to Cr(III). The free metal ions, including Cr(III), Fe(II) and Fe(III) were removed by the subsequent alkaline precipitation. Also, the combined process is applicable to other Cr(III) complexes with EDTA, tartrate, oxalate, acetate. The applicability of the combined process was further demonstrated by treating two real tanning effluents, resulting in the residual Cr(III) below 1.5 mg/L (the discharge standard of China) and negligible formation of Cr(VI) (<0.004 mg/L) as well. In general, the combined process has a great potential for efficient removal of Cr(III) complexes from contaminated waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. High Recovery Desalination of Brackish Water by Chemically-Enhanced Seeded Precipitation

    OpenAIRE

    McCool, Brian Carey

    2012-01-01

    Various regions around the world are confronted with dwindling water supplies and thus the need for exploiting non-traditional inland brackish water resource, as well as reclamation and reuse of municipal wastewater and agricultural drainage (AD) water. Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane desalination is the primary technology for inland brackish water desalting. However, successful implementation of RO technology requires operation at high product water recovery (>85%) in order to minimize the vol...

  7. Heterocyclic methacrylates for clinical applications. III. Water absorption characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M P; Braden, M

    1991-09-01

    The water absorption and desorption behaviour of poly(isobornyl methacrylate) and poly(tetrahydropyran-2-ylmethyl methacrylate) obeyed diffusion laws on repeated absorption/desorption cycles. However, the polymers of 2,3-epoxypropyl, tetrahydrofurfuryl and tetrahydropyranyl methacrylates did not obey diffusion laws, did not equilibrate after 2 yr immersion in water and exhibited very high uptake values (30-90%). For 2,3-epoxypropyl methacrylate, the sample disintegrated. A clearly detailed structure of the heterocyclic ring is critical. The use of these monomers in room temperature polymerizing poly(ethyl methacrylate)/monomer systems generally reflected the behaviour of the related homopolymers.

  8. Evaluation of using Smart Water to enhance oil recovery from Norwegian Continental Shelf sandstone reservoirs.

    OpenAIRE

    Piotrowska, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering. Recently, the scale of studies on smart water – one of EOR method - has increased. From decades, water flooding is one of the most used methods to increase oil recovery. However, more effective in sandstone reservoirs is injecting low salinity brine. Due to changing wettability, improved oil mobility in pores can be reached. The studies show, that the significant increase of oil recovery might be achieved. Main objective of the thesis is to answ...

  9. Water value, resource rent recovery and economic welfare cost of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study developed an analytical framework and an empirical water sector model to evaluate current and alternative water allocation regimes in the Steelpoort sub-basin (SPSB) in terms of the key objectives of the national water act of South Africa. The analyses showed that bulk water is currently not only oversupplied to ...

  10. ENERGY RECOVERY POTENTIAL FROM EXCESS PRESSURE in WATER SUPPLY and DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Ethem Karadirek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability of water supply systems has started to become an important issue besides continuous and hygienic supply of water. Sustainable water supply systems require improvement of energy efficiency, reduction of energy and water losses in water distribution systems and reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. Pressure is one of the main design parameters for gravity water supply systems and water distribution networks. Therefore, pressure has to be between certain limits. An excess pressure occurs during water transmission from high elevations of water resources to low elevations. By use of break pressure tanks, water storage tanks or pressure reducing valves (PRV excess pressure is reduced and damages on transmission pipes are prevented. However, energy recovery from excess pressure is possible at this stage by using turbines. Similarly, PRVs are used at certain locations of water distribution networks to control excess water pressure and to reduce it down to optimum operational levels. Energy recovery from excess pressure is also possible at this stage although energy recovery will be low. High pressure at water supply systems causes both energy and water losses. In Turkey, allowable water pressure at water distribution networks is between 20-60 m water column but excess pressure is commonly observed. At low pressure levels, water cannot reach water subscribers and this causes customer dissatisfaction. On the other side, at high pressure levels, water losses and pipe bursts increase which causes indirect increase in energy losses. For sustainable operation of water distribution networks, it is recommended to divide the network into smaller and independent subzones (District Metered Area, DMA. By placing a flow meter and a pressure meter at the entrance of a DMA, flow rate and pressure could be monitored on-line. However, in order to monitor spatial and temporal variations of flow rate and pressure at all pipes in the network, a hydraulic

  11. Development of the Next Generation Type Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Tachihara, Satoru; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Ueoka, Terumi; Soejima, Fujito

    We are working in the development of a compact, low power water recycling device that can supply delicious drinking water which can be consumed safely and with peace of mind in order to help astronauts lead a healthy and comfortable life in space. This device uses electrolysis to decompose ammonia and organic matter, purifies the water using a reverse osmosis membrane, adds minerals to the water, and then sterilizes the water, thereby maintaining water quality. An online system for measuring TOC and harmful substances is also used to manage the water quality.

  12. Recovery from repeated on-court tennis sessions: combining cold-water immersion, compression, and sleep recovery interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Rob; Murphy, Alistair; Kellett, Aaron; Reid, Machar

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the effects of combining cold-water immersion (CWI), full-body compression garments (CG), and sleep-hygiene recommendations on physical, physiological, and perceptual recovery after 2-a-day on-court training and match-play sessions. In a crossover design, 8 highly trained tennis players completed 2 sessions of on-court tennis-drill training and match play, followed by a recovery or control condition. Recovery interventions included a mixture of 15 min CWI, 3 h of wearing full-body CG, and following sleep-hygiene recommendations that night, while the control condition involved postsession stretching and no regulation of sleeping patterns. Technical performance (stroke and error rates), physical performance (accelerometry, countermovement jump [CMJ]), physiological (heart rate, blood lactate), and perceptual (mood, exertion, and soreness) measures were recorded from each on-court session, along with sleep quantity each night. While stroke and error rates did not differ in the drill session (P > .05, d effects were evident for increased time in play and stroke rate in match play after the recovery interventions (P > .05, d > 0.90). Although accelerometry values did not differ between conditions (P > .05, d recovery (P > .05, d = 0.90). Furthermore, CWI and CG resulted in faster postsession reductions in heart rate and lactate and reduced perceived soreness (P > .05, d > 1.00). In addition, sleep-hygiene recommendations increased sleep quantity (P > .05, d > 2.00) and maintained lower perceived soreness and fatigue (P 2.00). Mixed-method recovery interventions (CWI and CG) used after tennis sessions increased ensuing time in play and lower-body power and reduced perceived soreness. Furthermore, sleep-hygiene recommendations helped reduce perceived soreness.

  13. Water in star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH) III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karska, A.; J. Herczeg, G.; F. van Dishoeck, E.

    2013-01-01

    . We also determine the spatial extent of the emission and investigate the underlying excitation conditions. Most of the protostars in our sample show strong atomic and molecular far-infrared emission. Water is detected in 17 objects, including 5 Class I sources. The high-excitation H2O line at 63...

  14. Hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the speciation of arsenic (III) and arsenic (V) in fresh waters and human hair extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Hongmei [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hu Bin [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)], E-mail: binhu@whu.edu.cn; Chen Beibei; Xia Linbo [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2009-02-16

    A new method of hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) using ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) as extractant combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) using Pd as permanent modifier has been described for the speciation of As(III) and As(V). In a pH range of 3.0-4.0, the complex of As(III)-APDC complex can be extracted using toluene as the extraction solvent leaving As(V) in the aqueous layer. The post extraction organic phase was directly injected into ETAAS for the determination of As(III). To determine total arsenic in the samples, first As(V) was reduced to As(III) by L-cysteine, and then a microextraction method was performed prior to the determination of total arsenic. As(V) assay was based on subtracting As(III) form the total arsenic. All parameters, such as pH of solution, type of organic solvent, the amount of APDC, stirring rate and extraction time, affecting the separation of As(III) from As(V) and the extraction efficiency of As(III) were investigated, and the optimized extraction conditions were established. Under optimized conditions, a detection limit of 0.12 ng mL{sup -1} with enrichment factor of 78 was achieved. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of the method for five replicate determinations of 5 ng mL{sup -1} As(III) was 8%. The developed method was applied to the speciation of As(III) and As(V) in fresh water and human hair extracts, and the recoveries for the spiked samples are 86-109%. In order to validate the developed method, three certified reference materials such as GBW07601 human hair, BW3209 and BW3210 environmental water were analyzed, and the results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values provided.

  15. A new system for higher recovery rate of water borne Cryptosporidium and Giardia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Sabi, Mohammad Nafi Solaiman; Gad, J.; Berg, T.

    2012-01-01

    The two most common water borne pathogenic protozoa, Cryptosporidium and Giardia, are a common cause of outbreaks of diarrhea. Detecting these parasites in water samples depends on effective parasite recovery from the water matrix. The recovery rates of the currently used filter methods are low...... the concentration of parasites by ensuring a backwash volume of less than 1ml. The collected parasites may be used for molecular typing and other diagnostic and research purposes. The presented design of the filter system can be used as a robust, cheap, and time effective method of isolating water borne parasites...

  16. Recovery of West Nile Virus Envelope Protein Domain III Chimeras with Altered Antigenicity and Mouse Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, Alexander J; Torres, Maricela; Plante, Jessica A; Huang, Claire Y-H; Bente, Dennis A; Beasley, David W C

    2016-05-01

    Flaviviruses are positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses responsible for millions of human infections annually. The envelope (E) protein of flaviviruses comprises three structural domains, of which domain III (EIII) represents a discrete subunit. The EIII gene sequence typically encodes epitopes recognized by virus-specific, potently neutralizing antibodies, and EIII is believed to play a major role in receptor binding. In order to assess potential interactions between EIII and the remainder of the E protein and to assess the effects of EIII sequence substitutions on the antigenicity, growth, and virulence of a representative flavivirus, chimeric viruses were generated using the West Nile virus (WNV) infectious clone, into which EIIIs from nine flaviviruses with various levels of genetic diversity from WNV were substituted. Of the constructs tested, chimeras containing EIIIs from Koutango virus (KOUV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV), and Bagaza virus (BAGV) were successfully recovered. Characterization of the chimeras in vitro and in vivo revealed differences in growth and virulence between the viruses, within vivo pathogenesis often not being correlated within vitro growth. Taken together, the data demonstrate that substitutions of EIII can allow the generation of viable chimeric viruses with significantly altered antigenicity and virulence. The envelope (E) glycoprotein is the major protein present on the surface of flavivirus virions and is responsible for mediating virus binding and entry into target cells. Several viable West Nile virus (WNV) variants with chimeric E proteins in which the putative receptor-binding domain (EIII) sequences of other mosquito-borne flaviviruses were substituted in place of the WNV EIII were recovered, although the substitution of several more divergent EIII sequences was not tolerated. The differences in virulence and tissue tropism observed with the chimeric viruses indicate a

  17. Dysprosium(III) hydroxide coprecipitation system for the separation and preconcentration of heavy metal contents of table salts and natural waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peker, Dondu Serpil Kacar [Erciyes University, Faculty of Art and Science, Department of Chemistry, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Turkoglu, Orhan [Erciyes University, Faculty of Art and Science, Department of Chemistry, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Art and Science, Department of Chemistry, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)]. E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr

    2007-05-08

    A procedure for the determination of trace amounts of Pb(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) is described, that combines atomic absorption spectrometry-dysprosium hydroxide coprecipitation. The influences of analytical parameters including amount of dysprosium(III), centrifugation time, sample volume, etc. were investigated on the recoveries of analyte ions. The effects of concomitant ions were also examined. The recoveries of the analyte ions were in the range of 95.00-104.00%. The detection limits corresponding to three times the standard deviation of the blank for the analytes were in the range of 14.1-25.3 {mu}g/L. The method was applied to the determination of lead, copper, nickel, cobalt, cadmium and manganese ions in natural waters and table salts good results were obtained (relative standard deviations <10%, recoveries >95%)

  18. Water value, resource rent recovery and economic welfare cost of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Second, the study can benefit from improved specification of the water sector model parameters, particularly the supply side as better information will allow estimation of an upward sloping supply (marginal cost) curve. Key words: water value, resource rent and subsidies, water sector model, price elasticity of demand

  19. RECOVERY OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI FROM WATER BY IMMUNOMAGNETIC CAPTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A few reports have been written stating that H. pylori can be found in waters. However, detection and identification of H. pylori from water samples remains a very difficult task. One method that seems to work successfully is immunomagnetic capture. Water samples were concentr...

  20. Maximizing recovery of water-soluble proteins through acetone precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Andrew M J; Wall, Mark J; Doucette, Alan A

    2013-09-24

    Solvent precipitation is commonly used to purify protein samples, as seen with the removal of sodium dodecyl sulfate through acetone precipitation. However, in its current practice, protein loss is believed to be an inevitable consequence of acetone precipitation. We herein provide an in depth characterization of protein recovery through acetone precipitation. In 80% acetone, the precipitation efficiency for six of 10 protein standards was poor (ca. ≤15%). Poor recovery was also observed for proteome extracts, including bacterial and mammalian cells. As shown in this work, increasing the ionic strength of the solution dramatically improves the precipitation efficiency of individual proteins, and proteome mixtures (ca. 80-100% yield). This is obtained by including 1-30 mM NaCl, together with acetone (50-80%) which maximizes protein precipitation efficiency. The amount of salt required to restore the recovery correlates with the amount of protein in the sample, as well as the intrinsic protein charge, and the dielectric strength of the solution. This synergistic approach to protein precipitation in acetone with salt is consistent with a model of ion pairing in organic solvent, and establishes an improved method to recover proteins and proteome mixtures in high yield. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Representation of solid and nutrient concentrations in irrigation water from tailwater recovery systems by surface water grab samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailwater recovery (TWR) systems are being implemented on agricultural landscapes to create an additional source of irrigation water. Existing studies have sampled TWR systems using grab samples; however, the applicability of solids and nutrient concentrations in these samples to water being irrigat...

  2. Analytical recovery of protozoan enumeration methods: have drinking water QMRA models corrected or created bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, P J; Emelko, M B; Thompson, M E

    2013-05-01

    Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) is a tool to evaluate the potential implications of pathogens in a water supply or other media and is of increasing interest to regulators. In the case of potentially pathogenic protozoa (e.g. Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts), it is well known that the methods used to enumerate (oo)cysts in samples of water and other media can have low and highly variable analytical recovery. In these applications, QMRA has evolved from ignoring analytical recovery to addressing it in point-estimates of risk, and then to addressing variation of analytical recovery in Monte Carlo risk assessments. Often, variation of analytical recovery is addressed in exposure assessment by dividing concentration values that were obtained without consideration of analytical recovery by random beta-distributed recovery values. A simple mathematical proof is provided to demonstrate that this conventional approach to address non-constant analytical recovery in drinking water QMRA will lead to overestimation of mean pathogen concentrations. The bias, which can exceed an order of magnitude, is greatest when low analytical recovery values are common. A simulated dataset is analyzed using a diverse set of approaches to obtain distributions representing temporal variation in the oocyst concentration, and mean annual risk is then computed from each concentration distribution using a simple risk model. This illustrative example demonstrates that the bias associated with mishandling non-constant analytical recovery and non-detect samples can cause drinking water systems to be erroneously classified as surpassing risk thresholds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Preconcentration of Cr(III from Natural Water by Modified Nano Polyacrylonitrile Fiber by Methanolamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Moghimi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber (PANF was prepared by adding acrylic fibers to methanolamine (MMA with different concentration solutions. The stability of a chemically modified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber especially in concentrated hydrochloric acid which was then used as a recycling and pre-concentration reagent for further uses of modified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber. The application of this modified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber for sorption of a series of metal ions was performed by using different controlling factors such as the pH of metal ion solution and the equilibration shaking time by the static technique. Cr(III was found to exhibit the highest affinity towards extraction by these modified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber phases. The pronounced selectivity was also confirmed from the determined distribution coefficient (Kd of all the metal ions, showing the highest value reported for Cr(III to occur by modified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber. The modified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber for selective extraction of Cr(III were successfully accomplished in aqueous solution as well as preconcentration of low concentration of Cr(III (60 pg mL-1 from natural tap water with a preconcentration factor of 100 for Cr(III and then off-line Cr(III in water samples were determined by flame atomic absorption.

  4. On-line solid-phase extraction and multisyringe flow injection analysis of Al(III) and Fe(III) in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanloot, Pierre; Branger, Catherine; Margaillan, André; Brach-Papa, Christophe; Boudenne, Jean-Luc; Coulomb, Bruno

    2007-11-01

    A new analytical method was developed for on-line monitoring of residual coagulants (aluminium and iron salts) in potable water. The determination was based on a sequential procedure coupling an extraction/enrichment step of the analytes onto a modified resin and a spectrophotometric measurement of a surfactant-sensitized binary complex formed between eluted analytes and Chrome Azurol S. The optimization of the solid phase extraction was performed using factorial design and a Doehlert matrix considering six variables: sample percolation rate, sample metal concentration, flow-through sample volume (all three directly linked to the extraction step), elution flow rate, concentration and volume of eluent (all three directly linked to the elution step). A specific reagent was elaborated for sensitive and specific spectrophotometric determination of Al(III) and Fe(III), by optimizing surfactant and ligand concentrations and buffer composition. The whole procedure was automated by a multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system. Detection limits of 4.9 and 5.6 microg L(-1) were obtained for Al(III) and Fe(III) determination , respectively, and the linear calibration graph up to 300 microg L(-1) (both for Al(III) and Fe(III)) was well adapted to the monitoring of drinking water quality. The system was successfully applied to the on-site determination of Al(III) and Fe(III) at the outlet of two water treatment units during two periods of the year (winter and summer conditions).

  5. The Effect of Water Temperature during Cold-Water Immersion on Recovery from Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, A; Siqueira, A F; Ferreira-Junior, J B; do Carmo, J; Durigan, J L Q; Blazevich, A; Bottaro, M

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of 5 and 15°C cold-water immersion on recovery from exercise resulting in exercise-induced muscle damage. 42 college-aged men performed 5×20 drop-jumps and were randomly allocated into one of 3 groups: (1) 5°C; (2) 15°C; or (3) control. After exercise, individuals from the cold-water immersion groups had their lower limbs immerged in iced water for 20 min. Isometric knee extensor torque, countermovement jump, muscle soreness, and creatine kinase were measured before, immediately after, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 168 h post-exercise. There was no between-group difference in isometric strength recovery (p=0.73). However, countermovement jump recovered quicker in cold-water immersion groups compared to control group (pcold-water immersion promote recovery of stretch-shortening cycle performance, but not influence the recovery of maximal contractile force. Immersion at warmer temperature may be more effective than colder temperatures promoting recovery from strenuous exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. A Novel Ion Exchange System to Purify Mixed ISS Waste Water Brines for Chemical Production and Enhanced Water Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Griffin; Spencer, LaShelle; Ruby, Anna-Maria; McCaskill, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Current International Space Station water recovery regimes produce a sizable portion of waste water brine. This brine is highly toxic and water recovery is poor: a highly wasteful proposition. With new biological techniques that do not require waste water chemical pretreatment, the resulting brine would be chromium-free and nitrate rich which can allow possible fertilizer recovery for future plant systems. Using a system of ion exchange resins we can remove hardness, sulfate, phosphate and nitrate from these brines to leave only sodium and potassium chloride. At this point modern chlor-alkali cells can be utilized to produce a low salt stream as well as an acid and base stream. The first stream can be used to gain higher water recovery through recycle to the water separation stage while the last two streams can be used to regenerate the ion exchange beds used here, as well as other ion exchange beds in the ISS. Conveniently these waste products from ion exchange regeneration would be suitable as plant fertilizer. In this report we go over the performance of state of the art resins designed for high selectivity of target ions under brine conditions. Using ersatz ISS waste water we can evaluate the performance of specific resins and calculate mass balances to determine resin effectiveness and process viability. If this system is feasible then we will be one step closer to closed loop environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) for current or future applications.

  7. Phosphate Removal and Recovery using Drinking Water Plant Waste Residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water treatment plants are used to provide safe drinking water. In parallel, however, they also produce a wide variety of waste products which, in principle, could be possible candidates as resources for different applications. Calcium carbonate is one of such residual waste in ...

  8. Superoxide-mediated Fe(II) formation from organically complexed Fe(III) in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Manabu; Ito, Hiroaki; Rose, Andrew L.; Waite, T. David; Omura, Tatsuo

    2008-12-01

    Fe(III) complexed by organic ligands (Fe(III)L) is the primary form of dissolved Fe in marine and coastal environments. Superoxide, typically produced in biological and photochemical processes, is one of the reducing agents that contributes to transformation of Fe(III)L to bioavailable, free dissolved Fe(II) (Fe(II)'). In this work, the kinetics of superoxide-mediated Fe(II)' formation from Fe(III)L in a simulated coastal water system were investigated and a comprehensive kinetic model was developed using citrate and fulvic acid as exemplar Fe-binding ligands. To simulate a coastal environment in laboratory experiments, Fe(III)L samples with various ligand/Fe ratios were incubated for 5 min to 1 week in seawater medium. At each ratio and incubation time, the rate of superoxide-mediated Fe(II)' formation was determined in the presence of the strong Fe(II) binding ligand ferrozine by spectrophotometrically measuring the ferrous-ferrozine complex generated at a constant concentration of superoxide. The Fe(II)' formation rate generally decreased with incubation time, as Fe(III)L gradually dissociated to form less reactive Fe(III) oxyhydroxide. However, when the ligand/Fe ratio was sufficiently high, the dissociation of Fe(III)L (and subsequent Fe precipitation) was suppressed and Fe(II)' was formed at a higher rate. The rate of Fe(II)' produced during the experiment was explained by the kinetic model. The model confirmed that both the ligand/Fe ratio and incubation time have a significant effect on the pathway via which Fe(II)' is formed from Fe(III)-fulvic acid complexes.

  9. A comparative study of boron and arsenic (III) rejection from brackish water by reverse osmosis membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Teychene, Benoît

    2013-02-01

    This study aims to compare at lab-scale the rejection efficiency of several reverse osmosis membranes (RO) toward arsenic (III) and boron during the filtration of a synthetic brackish water. The effect of pH and operating conditions on the rejection of each RO membrane was studied. Two types of membrane were investigated: "brackish water" and "sea water" membranes. Our results showed that the metalloid rejection depends on the membrane type, pH and transmembrane pressure applied. Increasing pH above the dissociation constant (pKa) of each specie improves significantly the metalloid rejection by RO membranes, whatever the membrane type. Moreover, at identical operating conditions (pH, transmembrane pressure), results showed that the brackish water membranes have a higher water flux and exhibit lower metalloid rejection. The highest As(III) rejection value for the tested brackish water membranes was 99% obtained at pH = 9.6 and 40 bars, whereas it was found that the sea water RO membranes could highly reject As(III), more than 99%, even at low pH and low pressure (pH = 7.6 and 24 bars).Regarding Boron rejection, similar conclusions could be drawn. The sea water RO membranes exert higher removal, with a high rejection value above 96% over the tested conditions. More generally, this study showed that, whatever the operating conditions or the tested membranes, the boron and As(III) permeate concentrations are below the WHO guidelines. In addition, new data about the boron and arsenic permeability of each tested RO membrane was brought thanks to a theoretical calculation. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Coiled Brine Recovery Assembly (CoBRA): A New Approach to Recovering Water from Wastewater Brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensinger, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Brine water recovery represents a current technology gap in water recycling for human spaceflight. The role of a brine processor is to take the concentrated discharge from a primary wastewater processor, called brine, and recover most of the remaining water from it. The current state-of-the-art primary processor is the ISS Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) that currently achieves 70% water recovery. Recent advancements in chemical pretreatments are expected to increase this to 85% in the near future. This is a welcome improvement, yet is still not high enough for deep space transit. Mission architecture studies indicate that at least 95% is necessary for a Mars mission, as an example. Brine water recovery is the technology that bridges the gap between 85% and 95%, and moves life support systems one step closer to full closure of the water loop. Several brine water recovery systems have been proposed for human spaceflight, most of them focused on solving two major problems: operation in a weightless environment, and management and containment of brine residual. Brine residual is the leftover byproduct of the brine recovery process, and is often a viscous, sticky paste, laden with crystallized solid particles. Due to the chemical pretreatments added to wastewater prior to distillation in a primary processor, these residuals are typically toxic, which further complicates matters. Isolation of crewmembers from these hazardous materials is paramount. The Coiled Brine Recovery Assembly (CoBRA) is a recently developed concept from the Johnson Space Center that offers solutions to these challenges. CoBRA is centered on a softgoods evaporator that enables a passive fill with brine, and regeneration by discharging liquid brine residual to a collection bag. This evaporator is meant to be lightweight, which allows it to be discarded along with the accumulated brine solids contained within it. This paper discusses design and development of a first CoBRA prototype, and reports

  11. Bitumen recovery from surface mined oil sands recycle water ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikula, R.J.; Munoz, V.A.; Elliott, G. L. [Natural Resources Canada, CanmetENERGY, Devon, Alberta (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In surface mined oil sands, high bitumen recovery can be achieved but tailings have accumulated over the years. Several technologies have been proposed for recovering bitumen from tailings, but because this bitumen carries high surfactant concentrations there have been processing problems. This paper presents the application of oxidized ore characterization and processing methods to process tailings pond bitumen. Laboratory tests were carried out to characterize bitumen samples coming from four different tailings sources and tests were run with caustic additive. Results showed that high caustic additions can be applied to surfactant rich tailings pond bitumen to avoid downstream froth treatment emulsion problems; the oxidation degree should be carefully monitored. This study demonstrated that the use of caustic additive, already used for oxidized ores, can be applied to treat the bitumen recovered from tailings streams.

  12. Integration of electrically driven membrane separation processes for water treatment and resources recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Reig i Amat, Mònica

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, due to the growing fresh water demand, several processes are used to purify seawater by means of desalination or industrial brackish water by different treatment processes. The main limitation of these techniques is the production of rejected brines. For this reason, new management techniques for brines valorization are being studied to achieve the maximum water recovery, avoid liquid streams disposal and recover the valuable compounds from the concentrated streams. In this thesis, ...

  13. Exceptionally long-lived luminescence emitted from Tb(III) ion caged in an Ag(I)-Tb(III)-thiacalix[4]arene supramolecular complex in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iki, Nobuhiko; Ohta, Munehiro; Horiuchi, Takayuki; Hoshino, Hitoshi

    2008-05-05

    The compositions and photophysical properties of luminescent ternary complexes of thiacalix[4]arene-p-sulfonate (TCAS), Tb(III), and Ag(I) ions were determined. At pH 6, Ag(I) (2)Tb(III) (2)TCAS(2) formed. Moreover, at pH 10, in the presence of a 20-fold excess of Ag(I) and a 50-fold excess of TCAS with respect to Tb(III), Ag(I) (2)Tb(III)TCAS(2) formed as the main luminescent species. The structure of these complexes was proposed: two TCAS ligands are linked by two S-Ag(I)-S linkages to adopt a double-cone supramolecular structure. Furthermore, each Tb(III) ion in the former complex accepts O(-), S, O(-) donation, whereas in the latter, the Tb(III) center accepts eightfold O(-) donation. The luminescence quantum yield (Phi) of Ag(I) (2)Tb(III) (2)TCAS(2) (0.16) was almost equal to that of Tb(III)TCAS, but the luminescence lifetime tau of the former (=1.09 ms) was larger than that of the latter. For Ag(I) (2)Tb(III)TCAS(2), the yield Phi (=0.11) was small, which is attributed to the low efficiency of photosensitization (eta=0.11). However, the tau value (4.61 ms) was exceptionally large and almost equal to the natural luminescence lifetime of Tb(III) (4.7 ms), which is due to the absence of coordinating water molecules (q=0.1). This is compatible with the proposed structure in which the Tb(III) ion is shielded by a supramolecular cage that expels coordinated water molecules responsible for luminescence quenching.

  14. Removal of Chromium (III from Water by Using Modified and Nonmodified Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muataz Ali Atieh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate the environmental application of modified and nonmodified carbon nanotubes through the experiment removal of chromium trivalent (III from water. The aim was to find the optimal condition of the chromium (III removal from water under different treatment conditions of pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time and agitation speed. Multi wall carbon nanotubes (MW-CNTs were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The diameter of the carbon nanotubes produced varied from 20–40 nm with average diameter of 24 nm and 10 micrometer in length. Adsorption isotherms were used to model the adsorption behavior and to calculate the adsorption capacity of the absorbents. The results showed that, 18% of chromium (III removal was achieved using modified carbon nanotubes (M-CNTs at pH 7, 150 rpm, and 2 hours for a dosage of 150 mg of CNTs. The removal of Cr (III is mainly attributed to the affinity of chromium (III to the physical and chemical properties of the CNTs. The adsorption isotherms plots were well fitted with experimental data.

  15. Offsetting Water Requirements and Stress with Enhanced Water Recovery from CO2 Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Kelsey Anne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-04

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) operations ultimately require injecting and storing CO2 into deep saline aquifers. Reservoir pressure typically rises as CO2 is injected increasing the cost and risk of CCUS and decreasing viable storage within the formation. Active management of the reservoir pressure through the extraction of brine can reduce the pressurization while providing a number of benefits including increased storage capacity for CO2, reduced risks linked to reservoir overpressure, and CO2 plume management. Through enhanced water recovery (EWR), brine within the saline aquifer can be extracted and treated through desalination technologies which could be used to offset the water requirements for thermoelectric power plants or local water needs such as agriculture, or produce a marketable such as lithium through mineral extraction. This paper discusses modeled scenarios of CO2 injection into the Rock Springs Uplift (RSU) formation in Wyoming with EWR. The Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code (FEHM), developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), was used to model CO2 injection with brine extraction and the corresponding pressure tradeoffs. Scenarios were compared in order to analyze how pressure management through the quantity and location of brine extraction wells can increase CO2 storage capacity and brine extraction while reducing risks associated with over pressurization. Future research will couple a cost-benefit analysis to these simulations in order to determine if the benefit of subsurface pressure management and increase CO2 storage capacity can outweigh multiple extraction wells with increased cost of installation and maintenance as well as treatment and/or disposal of the extracted brine.

  16. High-Zinc Recovery from Residues by Sulfate Roasting and Water Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming; Peng, Bing; Chai, Li-yuan; Li, Yan-chun; Peng, Ning; Yuan, Ying-zhen; Chen, Dong

    2015-09-01

    An integrated process for the recovery of zinc that is generated from zinc hydrometallurgy in residues was developed. A mixture of residue and ferric sulfate was first roasted to transform the various forms of zinc in the residue, such as ferrite, oxide, sulfide, and silicate, into zinc sulfate. Next, water leaching was conducted to extract the zinc while the iron remained in the residue as ferric oxide. The effects of the roasting and leaching parameters on zinc recovery were investigated. A maximum zinc recovery rate of 90.9% was achieved for a mixture with a ferric sulfate/residue weight ratio of 0.05 when roasting at 640°C for 30 min before leaching with water at room temperature for 20 min using a liquid/solid ratio of 10. Only 0.13% of the iron was dissolved in the water. Thus, the leaching liquor could be directly returned for zinc smelting.

  17. New system for higher recovery rate of water borne Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Sabi, Mohammad Nafi Solaiman; Gad, Jens; Klinting, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Background: The two most common water borne pathogenic protozoa, Cryptosporidium and Giardia, cause diarrhea worldwide. Detecting these parasites in water samples depends on effective parasite recovery from the water matrix. The reported low recovery rates of the currently used filter methods...... motivate the development of systems with higher recovery rates. Materials and methods: Five replicates of IMS purified Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts (N=2x103) were injected into a specially coated filter unit with a carefully chosen pore size. Following filtration, sonication was performed...... were 85% were recorded when the filter was sonicated. Sonication usually affects parasite viability but could be tuned into a useful tool for enhanced backwash collection of parasites using a specially constructed filter unit and a sonication protocol. The filtration...

  18. Membrane crystallization for recovery of salts from produced water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quist-Jensen, Cejna Anna; Jensen, Henriette Casper; Ali, Aamer

    Membrane Crystallization (MCr) is a novel technology able to recover freshwater and high-purity salts from complex solutions and therefore, is suggested for a better exploitation of wastewater streams. Unlike other membrane processes, MCr is not limited by high concentrations and, therefore, the ......, the membrane maintained its hydrophobic nature despite that produced water contained oil residues. Conductivity and HPLC was utilized to analyze the quality of the permeate stream......., the solutions can be treated to achieve saturation level. Hereby different salts can be precipitated and directly recovered from various streams. In this study, it is shown that MCr is able to treat produced water by producing clean water and simultaneously NaCl crystals. The recovered crystals exhibited high...

  19. Determination of As(III and As(V in waters by chronopotentiometric stripping analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Švarc-Gajić Jaroslava V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a naturally occurring toxic and carcinogenic element. The degree of the toxicity depends on its chemical form and the concentration. Application of a sensitive, selective, simple and rapid method for detection and monitoring of different oxidation states of arsenic in waters is of great importance because main route of population exposure is through drinking water. In this work chronopotentiometric stripping analysis (CSA was used for the determination of As(III and As(V in tap, well, river and rain waters from Vojvodina (Serbia. Gold film electrode on the glassy carbon support was used as the working electrode. The experimental parameters of the technique were investigated and optimized. Detection limit of the method for the electrolysis time of 600 s was 2 μg/dm3 of As(III.

  20. Scope of detection and determination of gallium(III) in industrial ground water by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry on bismuth film electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, J V; Guin, Saurav K; Pillai, Jisha S; Aggarwal, Suresh K

    2011-10-30

    Gallium(III) in ground water may cause human health hazards due to the antineoplastic and antimicrobial activities of gallium. However, the exposure limit of Ga(III) has not been set. This paper demonstrates the scope of employing the square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) on bismuth film electrode (BiFE) for selective and sensitive detection of Ga(III) as well as its accurate and precise determination. The key parameters were optimized and the bismuth film morphology was characterized. The performance of BiFE was also compared with that of the mercury film electrode (MFE). The performance of BiFE was also studied for interferences of Zn(II), Cd(II), Tl(I) and Cu(II) ions. Gaussian peak fitting was performed to improve the calibration curve and the fitting process revealed almost similar stripping peak heights as obtained from the experimentally observed data though slight improvement in calibration was obtained from the peak area analysis. A good linear dynamic range (R(2)=0.996) was obtained in the concentration range of 20-100 μg/L with a limit of detection (LOD) of 6.6 μg/L (S/N=3) of Ga(III). A relative standard deviation of 2.9% (n=10) was obtained for 20 μg/L of Ga(III) solution. The practical analytical utility of the method was verified by the determination of Ga(III) in spiked water samples, where 100-105% recovery of Ga(III) was achieved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Filtration recovery of extracellular DNA from environmental water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    qPCR methods are able to analyze DNA from microbes within hours of collecting water samples, providing the promptest notification and public awareness possible when unsafe pathogenic levels are reached. Health risk, however, may be overestimated by the presence of extracellular ...

  2. Recovery of condensate water quality in power generator's surface condenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Lilik Adib

    2017-03-01

    In PT Badak NGL Plant, steam turbines are used to drive major power generators, compressors, and pumps. Steam exiting the turbines is condensed in surface condensers to be returned to boilers. Therefore, surface condenser performance and quality of condensate water are very important. One of the recent problem was caused by the leak of a surface condenser of Steam Turbine Power Generator. Thesteam turbine was overhauled, leaving the surface condenser idle and exposed to air for more than 1.5 years. Sea water ingress due to tube leaks worsens the corrosionof the condenser shell. The combination of mineral scale and corrosion product resulting high conductivity condensate at outlet condenser when we restarted up, beyond the acceptable limit. After assessing several options, chemical cleaning was the best way to overcome the problem according to condenser configuration. An 8 hour circulation of 5%wt citric acid had succeed reducing water conductivity from 50 μmhos/cm to below 5 μmhos/cm. The condensate water, then meets the required quality, i.e. pH 8.3 - 9.0; conductivity ≤ 5 μmhos/cm, therefore the power generator can be operated normally without any concern until now.

  3. Comparative Recoveries of Naegleria fowleri Amoebae from Seeded River Water by Filtration and Centrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernin, P.; Pélandakis, M.; Rouby, Y.; Faure, A.; Siclet, F.

    1998-01-01

    Detection of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri in environmental water samples, which is necessary for the prevention of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, generally requires concentrating the samples. Two concentration techniques, filtration and centrifugation, were used to study the recovery of N. fowleri, in vegetative or cystic form, that had been mixed with the two other thermotolerant Naegleria species, N. lovaniensis and N. australiensis. Counting of amoebae was performed by the most probable number method on 10 water replicates of 100 ml and 10 ml each. With both concentration methods, recovery was better for cysts than for trophozoites (53% ± 21% versus 5% ± 5% by filtration and 57% ± 25% versus 22% ± 5% by centrifugation). The recovery of Naegleria trophozoites by filtration was very low, and centrifugation was significantly better than filtration in recovery of Naegleria trophozoites (22% ± 5% versus 5% ± 5%; P 0.7). Although the recovery of cysts of N. fowleri obtained by filtration (51% ± 24%) appeared higher than that by centrifugation (36% ± 23%), the difference was not significant (P > 0.1). Both concentration methods have highly variable recovery rates, making accurate quantification of low concentrations (fowleri in the environment difficult. PMID:9501435

  4. Recovery of energetically overexploited urban aquifers using surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Sánchez-Navarro, José Ángel; Mateo Lázaro, Jesús

    2015-12-01

    Shallow aquifers have an important role in reducing greenhouse gases through helping manage the temperature of urban environments. Nevertheless, the uncontrolled rapid use of shallow groundwater resources to heat or cool urban environments can cause thermal pollution that will limit the long term sustainability of the resource. Therefore, there is a need for appropriate mitigation/remediation strategies capable of recovering energetically overexploited aquifers. In this work, a novel remediation strategy based on surface water recharge into aquifers is presented. To evaluate the capabilities of such measures for effective remediation, this strategy is optimized for a management problem raised in the overheated "Urban Alluvial Aquifer of Zaragoza" (Spain). The application of a transient groundwater flow and heat transport model under 512 different mitigation scenarios has enabled to quantify and discuss the magnitude of the remediation effect as a respond to injection rates of surface water, seasonal schedule of the injection and location of injection. The quantification of the relationship between these variables together with the evaluation of the amount of surface water injected per year in each scenario proposed have provided a better understanding of the system processes and an optimal management alternative. This work also makes awareness of the magnitude of the remediation procedure which is in an order of magnitude of tenths of years.

  5. Reverse osmosis for wash water recovery in space vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, R. W.; Saltonstall, C. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were carried out on both synthetic and real wash water derived from clothes laundry to determine the utility of reverse osmosis in recovering the water for recycle use. A blend membrane made from cellulose di- and triacetates, and a cross-linked cellulose acetate/methacrylate were evaluated. Both were found acceptable. A number of detergents were evaluated, including a cationic detergent, sodium dodecyl sulfate, potassium palmitate, and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate. The tests were all made at a temperature of 165 F to minimize microbial growth. Long-term (15 to 30 day) runs were made at 600 and 400 psi on laundry water which was pretreated either by alum addition and sand filtration or by filtration only through 0.5 micron filters. A 30-day run was made using a 2-in. diameter by 22-in. long spiral module at 400 psig with filtering as the pretreatment. The membrane fouling by colloidal matter was found to be controllable. The unit produced initially 55 gal/day and 27 gal/day after 30 days.

  6. Impacts of water and nitrogen addition on nitrogen recovery in Haloxylon ammodendron dominated desert ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoqing; Yue, Ping; Gong, Yanming; Li, Kaihui; Tan, Dunyan; Goulding, Keith; Liu, Xuejun

    2017-12-01

    Desert ecosystems are likely to change in response to global climate change and nitrogen (N) deposition. The effects of increased precipitation and N deposition on plant growth and the N cycle largely depend on N allocation and N recovery efficiency in the plant-soil ecosystem, but there is limited research on this in desert ecosystems. Here we report results using double-labeled (15)NH4(15)NO3 (30 and 60kgNha(-1)yr(-1)) as a tracer under ambient (no additional water addition) and enhanced precipitation (60mm water addition) in a Haloxylon ammodendron dominated ecosystem in the Gurbantunggut Desert of Northwest China. Herbaceous plants were a significantly larger sink for added (15)N than the H. ammodendron trees, and N retention varied with water and N addition, relative to growing season precipitation. The retention of added (15)N varied within the components of H. ammodendron, with the stems retaining most, followed by the assimilation branches. Soil was the dominant sink for added (15)N, in which the topsoil and subsoil respond differently to water and N addition over the two-year period. Nitrogen relative recovery percentage in the whole ecosystem ranged from 43% to 61%, lower than average recovery rate in temperate forests; N tracer recovery percentage significantly increased with water addition but decreased with enhanced N deposition. Future N cycling in central Asian deserts will depend on changes in precipitation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Conceptual energy and water recovery system for self-sustained nano membrane toilet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanak, Dawid P; Kolios, Athanasios J; Onabanjo, Tosin; Wagland, Stuart T; Patchigolla, Kumar; Fidalgo, Beatriz; Manovic, Vasilije; McAdam, Ewan; Parker, Alison; Williams, Leon; Tyrrel, Sean; Cartmell, Elise

    2016-10-15

    With about 2.4 billion people worldwide without access to improved sanitation facilities, there is a strong incentive for development of novel sanitation systems to improve the quality of life and reduce mortality. The Nano Membrane Toilet is expected to provide a unique household-scale system that would produce electricity and recover water from human excrement and urine. This study was undertaken to evaluate the performance of the conceptual energy and water recovery system for the Nano Membrane Toilet designed for a household of ten people and to assess its self-sustainability. A process model of the entire system, including the thermochemical conversion island, a Stirling engine and a water recovery system was developed in Aspen Plus®. The energy and water recovery system for the Nano Membrane Toilet was characterised with the specific net power output of 23.1 Wh/kgsettledsolids and water recovery rate of 13.4 dm(3)/day in the nominal operating mode. Additionally, if no supernatant was processed, the specific net power output was increased to 69.2 Wh/kgsettledsolids. Such household-scale system would deliver the net power output (1.9-5.8 W). This was found to be enough to charge mobile phones or power clock radios, or provide light for the household using low-voltage LED bulbs.

  8. Managing Injected Water Composition To Improve Oil Recovery: A Case Study of North Sea Chalk Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahid, Adeel; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2012-01-01

    is to investigate the potential of the advanced waterflooding process by carrying out experiments with reservoir chalk samples. The study results in a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in increasing the oil recovery with potential determining ions. We carried out waterflooding instead of spontaneous...... of the temperature dependence of the oil recovery indicated that the interaction of the ions contained in brine with the rock cannot be the only determining mechanism of enhanced recovery. We observed no substitution of Ca2+ ions with Mg2+ ions at high temperatures for both rocks. Not only the injection brine...... composition but also the formation water composition affected the oil recovery at high temperatures from the Stevns Klint chalk rock....

  9. Climate change mitigation by recovery of energy from the water cycle: a new challenge for water management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoek, J P

    2012-01-01

    Waternet is responsible for drinking water treatment and distribution, wastewater collection and treatment, and surface water management and control (quality and quantity) in and around Amsterdam. Waternet has the ambition to operate climate neutral in 2020. To realise this ambition, measures are required to compensate for the emission of 53,000 ton CO(2)-eq/year. Energy recovery from the water cycle looks very promising. First, calculations reveal that energy recovery from the water cycle in and around Amsterdam may contribute to a total reduction in greenhouse gas emissions up to 148,000 ton CO(2)-eq/year. The challenge for the coming years is to choose combinations of all the possibilities to fulfil the energy demand as much as possible. Only then the use of fossil fuel can be minimized and inevitable greenhouse gas emissions can be compensated, supporting the target to operate climate neutral in 2020.

  10. Speciation and separation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) using coprecipitation with Ni2+/2-Nitroso-1-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid and determination by FAAS in water and food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluozlu, Ozgur Dogan; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-10-01

    A speciation procedure for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in the water and food samples has been established in the presented work. The procedure presented based on quantitative recoveries of Cr(III)>95% using coprecipitation of Ni(2+)/2-Nitroso-1-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid. The total chromium was measured after reduction of Cr(VI) by concentrated H(2)SO(4) and ethanol. The Cr(VI) was calculated as the difference between the total Cr content and the Cr(III) contents. The analytical variables, pH, amounts of precipitate, sample volume for optimum recoveries of Cr(III) were investigated. The influences of the some alkaline and earth alkaline ions and some transition metals on the recoveries of analyte ions were also investigated. The preconcentration factor was 50. The detection limit (3 sigma) of the reagent blank for chromium(III) was 1.33 microg L(-1). The relative standard deviations for determinations were found to be bush branches and leaves (GBW 0703). The procedure was successfully applied to the speciation of chromium in natural water and food samples (fish, white cheese, cow's meat, black tea, boiled wheat).

  11. The watering of trees. Embolization and recovery in xylem microtubes

    CERN Document Server

    Gouin, Henri

    2014-01-01

    In any tree, crude sap is driven through xylem microtubes. The crude sap is submitted to intermolecular forces shaping it into very thin liquid films in embolized xylem microtubes. The concept of disjoining pressure must be taken into account and a strong negative pressure can be present in liquid-water bulks. The disjoining pressure gradient induced by the flux of transpiration initiates crude sap motion. Applications enable to understand why the xylem microtubes can be refilled and why the ascent of sap is possible even for the tallest trees avoiding the problems due to cavitation.

  12. Air Evaporation closed cycle water recovery technology - Advanced energy saving designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morasko, Gwyndolyn; Putnam, David F.; Bagdigian, Robert

    1986-01-01

    The Air Evaporation water recovery system is a visible candidate for Space Station application. A four-man Air Evaporation open cycle system has been successfully demonstrated for waste water recovery in manned chamber tests. The design improvements described in this paper greatly enhance the system operation and energy efficiency of the air evaporation process. A state-of-the-art wick feed design which results in reduced logistics requirements is presented. In addition, several design concepts that incorporate regenerative features to minimize the energy input to the system are discussed. These include a recuperative heat exchanger, a heat pump for energy transfer to the air heater, and solar collectors for evaporative heat. The addition of the energy recovery devices will result in an energy reduction of more than 80 percent over the systems used in earlier manned chamber tests.

  13. Study on the extraction of AP components in HTPB solid propellant by water/ethanol recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingqi; Du, Shiguo; Yan, Jun

    2017-10-01

    In order to improve the recovery of ammonium perchlorate (AP) components in scrapped HTPB solid propellants, the AP in HTPB solid propellants were extracted by water/ethanol mixed solvent system. The effects of extraction time, extraction temperature, volume ratio of water/ethanol, ratio of liquid to material, thickness of sample and extraction rate on AP extraction rate were discussed. The extraction results were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the best process parameter for extracting AP components from HTPB solid propellants: the extraction temperature was 70°C, the extraction time was 6h, the volume ratio of water/ethanol was 1:1, the ratio of liquid to material was 6:1(water/ethanol volume and sample mass ratio, ml/g) and the extraction frequency was 2 times. Under this condition, the recovery of AP was 90.5% and the purity of AP was 91.1%.

  14. Ammonium recovery from reject water combined with hydrogen production in a bioelectrochemical reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue; Modin, Oskar

    2013-10-01

    In this study, a bioelectrochemical reactor was investigated for simultaneous hydrogen production and ammonium recovery from reject water, which is an ammonium-rich side-stream produced from sludge treatment processes at wastewater treatment plants. In the anode chamber of the reactor, microorganisms converted organic material into electrical current. The electrical current was used to generate hydrogen gas at the cathode with 96±6% efficiency. Real or synthetic reject water was fed to the cathode chamber where proton reduction into hydrogen gas resulted in a pH increase which led to ammonium being converted into volatile ammonia. The ammonia could be stripped from the solution and recovered in acid. Overall, ammonium recovery efficiencies reached 94% with synthetic reject water and 79% with real reject water. This process could potentially be used to make wastewater treatment plants more resource-efficient and further research is warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Water Recovery with the Heat Melt Compactor in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golliher, Eric L.; Goo, Jonathan; Fisher, John

    2015-01-01

    The Heat Melt Compactor is a proposed utility that will compact astronaut trash, extract the water for eventual re-use, and form dry square tiles that can be used as additional ionizing radiation shields for future human deep space missions. The Heat Melt Compactor has been under development by a consortium of NASA centers. The downstream portion of the device is planned to recover a small amount of water while in a microgravity environment. Drop tower low gravity testing was performed to assess the effect of small particles on a capillary-based water/air separation device proposed for the water recovery portion of the Heat Melt Compactor.

  16. On-line solid-phase extraction and multisyringe flow injection analysis of Al(III) and Fe(III) in drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanloot, Pierre; Boudenne, Jean-Luc; Coulomb, Bruno [Universite de Provence - Case 29, Laboratoire de Chimie et Environnement (FRE 2704), Marseille cedex 3 (France); Branger, Catherine; Margaillan, Andre [ISITV - Universite du Sud Toulon Var, Laboratoire de Chimie Appliquee MFS (EA 1356), La Garde du Var (France); Brach-Papa, Christophe [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Isotope Measurements Unit, Geel (Belgium)

    2007-11-15

    A new analytical method was developed for on-line monitoring of residual coagulants (aluminium and iron salts) in potable water. The determination was based on a sequential procedure coupling an extraction/enrichment step of the analytes onto a modified resin and a spectrophotometric measurement of a surfactant-sensitized binary complex formed between eluted analytes and Chrome Azurol S. The optimization of the solid phase extraction was performed using factorial design and a Doehlert matrix considering six variables: sample percolation rate, sample metal concentration, flow-through sample volume (all three directly linked to the extraction step), elution flow rate, concentration and volume of eluent (all three directly linked to the elution step). A specific reagent was elaborated for sensitive and specific spectrophotometric determination of Al(III) and Fe(III), by optimizing surfactant and ligand concentrations and buffer composition. The whole procedure was automated by a multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system. Detection limits of 4.9 and 5.6 {mu}g L{sup -1} were obtained for Al(III) and Fe(III) determination, respectively, and the linear calibration graph up to 300 {mu}g L{sup -1} (both for Al(III) and Fe(III)) was well adapted to the monitoring of drinking water quality. The system was successfully applied to the on-site determination of Al(III) and Fe(III) at the outlet of two water treatment units during two periods of the year (winter and summer conditions). (orig.)

  17. Phosphorus and water recovery by a novel osmotic membrane bioreactor-reverse osmosis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wenhai; Hai, Faisal I; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Nghiem, Long D

    2016-01-01

    An osmotic membrane bioreactor-reverse osmosis (OMBR-RO) hybrid system integrated with periodic microfiltration (MF) extraction was evaluated for simultaneous phosphorus and clean water recovery from raw sewage. In this hybrid system, the forward osmosis membrane effectively retained inorganic salts and phosphate in the bioreactor, while the MF membrane periodically bled them out for phosphorus recovery with pH adjustment. The RO process was used for draw solute recovery and clean water production. Results show that phosphorus recuperation from the MF permeate was most effective when the solution pH was adjusted to 10, whereby the recovered precipitate contained 15-20% (wt/wt) of phosphorus. Periodic MF extraction also limited salinity build-up in the bioreactor, resulting in a stable biological performance and an increase in water flux during OMBR operation. Despite the build-up of organic matter and ammonia in the draw solution, OMBR-RO allowed for the recovery of high quality reused water. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulation of nutrient uptake, water uptake and growth under calcium starvation and recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amor, del F.M.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2003-01-01

    To analyze the dynamics of growth, water and nutrient uptake, the effects of 1, 3 and 7 d of calcium starvation and the recovery capability during 7 d afterwards were investigated in vegetative tomato plants. Results showed that after only 1 d of Ca-starvation, leaf photosynthesis, leaf expansion

  19. Spontaneous Recovery of Human Spatial Memory in a Virtual Water Maze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, David; Martínez, Héctor

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of spontaneous recovery in human spatial memory was assessed using a virtual environment. In Experiment 1, spatial memory was established by training participants to locate a hidden platform in a virtual water maze using a set of four distal landmarks. In Experiment 2, after learning about the location of a hidden platform, the…

  20. Fouling Characterization of Forward Osmosis Biomimetic Aquaporin Membranes Used for Water Recovery from Municipal Wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarebska, Agata; Petrinic, Irena; Hey, Tobias

    , organic, and biological fouling, membrane characterization is not a trivial task. The aim of this work is to characterize fouling of FO biomimetic aquaporin membranes during water recovery from municipal wastewater. Membrane fouling was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Dispersive...

  1. Cleavage and recovery of molecular water in silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ginhoven, Renée M; Jónsson, Hannes; Park, Byeongwon; Corrales, L René

    2005-06-02

    The network response associated with the incorporation and reactivity of water molecules in bulk phases of amorphous and crystalline silica are investigated using density functional theory. The extent of network relaxation is found to change the relative stabilities of the reactant and product states. A highly reactive site, with a low activation barrier, is associated with a highly strained site in which network relaxation significantly stabilizes the silanol state by effectively annealing the local structure. Diffusion and exchange reaction paths are found to likely be associated with minimum energy paths in which the stability of the product and reactant states are equal. These latter paths are associated with minimal network response, although the ability of the silanol groups to take on several conformations has an overall effect of changing the stability along a given reaction path.

  2. Recovery of real dye bath wastewater using integrated membrane process: considering water recovery, membrane fouling and reuse potential of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcik-Canbolat, Cigdem; Sengezer, Cisel; Sakar, Hacer; Karagunduz, Ahmet; Keskinler, Bulent

    2017-11-01

    It has been recognized by the whole world that textile industry which produce large amounts of wastewater with strong color and toxic organic compounds is a major problematical industry requiring effective treatment solutions. In this study, reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were tested on biologically treated real dye bath wastewater with and without pretreatment by nanofiltration (NF) membrane to recovery. Also membrane fouling and reuse potential of membranes were investigated by multiple filtrations. Obtained results showed that only NF is not suitable to produce enough quality to reuse the wastewater in a textile industry as process water while RO provide successfully enough permeate quality. The results recommend that integrated NF/RO membrane process is able to reduce membrane fouling and allow long-term operation for real dye bath wastewater.

  3. Post conflict water management: learning from the past for recovery planning in the Orontes River basin

    OpenAIRE

    Saadé-Sbeih, Myriam; Zwahlen, François; Haj Asaad, Ahmed; Gonzalez, Raoul; Jaubert, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Water management is a fundamental issue in post-conflict planning in Syria. Based on historical water balance assessment, this study identifies the drivers of the profound changes that took place in the Lebanese and Syrian parts of the Orontes River basin since the 1930s. Both drastic effects of the conflict on the hydro-system and the strong uncontrolled anthropization of the river basin prior to the crisis have to be considered in the design of recovery interventions.

  4. Post conflict water management: learning from the past for recovery planning in the Orontes River basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saadé-Sbeih

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Water management is a fundamental issue in post-conflict planning in Syria. Based on historical water balance assessment, this study identifies the drivers of the profound changes that took place in the Lebanese and Syrian parts of the Orontes River basin since the 1930s. Both drastic effects of the conflict on the hydro-system and the strong uncontrolled anthropization of the river basin prior to the crisis have to be considered in the design of recovery interventions.

  5. Post conflict water management: learning from the past for recovery planning in the Orontes River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadé-Sbeih, Myriam; Zwahlen, François; Haj Asaad, Ahmed; Gonzalez, Raoul; Jaubert, Ronald

    2016-10-01

    Water management is a fundamental issue in post-conflict planning in Syria. Based on historical water balance assessment, this study identifies the drivers of the profound changes that took place in the Lebanese and Syrian parts of the Orontes River basin since the 1930s. Both drastic effects of the conflict on the hydro-system and the strong uncontrolled anthropization of the river basin prior to the crisis have to be considered in the design of recovery interventions.

  6. [Determination of water-soluble antimony (III) and antimony (V) in leigongteng using ultrasound-assisted extraction by HG-ICP-AES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian-xin; Deng, Bi-yang

    2005-08-01

    A method for the determination of water-soluble antimony (III) and antimony (V) in Leigongteng using ultrasound-assisted extraction by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry was developed in the present paper. Affecting parameters of ultrasound extraction, the pH of antimony species, the operation condition of hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry were investigated and optimized. The effect of coexisting ions on the determination of antimony was also investigated. The detection limits are 0.3 and 2.4 ng x mL(-1) for antimony (and antimony (V), respectively, and with RSD 3.9% for antimony (III) and 4.5% for antimony (V). The recovery is in the range of 93% to 105%.

  7. Zeta potential in oil-water-carbonate systems and its impact on oil recovery during controlled salinity water-flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew D; Al-Mahrouqi, Dawoud; Vinogradov, Jan

    2016-11-23

    Laboratory experiments and field trials have shown that oil recovery from carbonate reservoirs can be increased by modifying the brine composition injected during recovery in a process termed controlled salinity water-flooding (CSW). However, CSW remains poorly understood and there is no method to predict the optimum CSW composition. This work demonstrates for the first time that improved oil recovery (IOR) during CSW is strongly correlated to changes in zeta potential at both the mineral-water and oil-water interfaces. We report experiments in which IOR during CSW occurs only when the change in brine composition induces a repulsive electrostatic force between the oil-brine and mineral-brine interfaces. The polarity of the zeta potential at both interfaces must be determined when designing the optimum CSW composition. A new experimental method is presented that allows this. Results also show for the first time that the zeta potential at the oil-water interface may be positive at conditions relevant to carbonate reservoirs. A key challenge for any model of CSW is to explain why IOR is not always observed. Here we suggest that failures using the conventional (dilution) approach to CSW may have been caused by a positively charged oil-water interface that had not been identified.

  8. Coagulant Recovery from Water Treatment Residuals: A Review of Applicable Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, J; Jarvis, P; Judd, S J

    2014-12-17

    Conventional water treatment consumes large quantities of coagulant and produces even greater volumes of sludge. Coagulant recovery (CR) presents an opportunity to reduce both the sludge quantities and the costs they incur, by regenerating and purifying coagulant before reuse. Recovery and purification must satisfy stringent potable regulations for harmful contaminants, while remaining competitive with commercial coagulants. These challenges have restricted uptake and lead research towards lower-gain, lower-risk alternatives. This review documents the context in which CR must be considered, before comparing the relative efficacies and bottlenecks of potential technologies, expediting identification of the major knowledge gaps and future research requirements.

  9. Integrating tunable anion exchange with reverse osmosis for enhanced recovery during inland brackish water desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ryan C; SenGupta, Arup K

    2015-05-05

    For inland brackish water desalination by reverse osmosis or RO, concentrate or reject disposal poses a major challenge. However, enhanced recovery and consequent reduction in the reject volume using RO processes is limited by the solubility of ions present in the feedwater. One of the most common and stubborn precipitate formed during desalination is calcium sulfate. Reducing or eliminating the presence of sulfate would allow the process to operate at higher recoveries without threat to membrane scaling. In this research, this goal is accomplished by using an appropriate mixture of self-regenerating anion exchange resins that selectively remove and replace sulfate by chloride prior to the RO unit. Most importantly, the mixed bed of anion exchange resins is self-regenerated with the reject brine from the RO process, thus requiring no addition of external chemicals. The current work demonstrates the reversibility of the hybrid ion exchange and RO (HIX-RO) process with 80% recovery for a brackish water composition representative of groundwater in San Joaquin Valley in California containing approximately 5200 mg/L of total dissolved solids or TDS. Consequently, the reject volume can be reduced by 50% without the threat of sulfate scaling and use of antiscaling chemicals can be eliminated altogether. By appropriately designing or tuning the mixed bed of anion exchange resins, the process can be extended to nearly any composition of brackish water for enhanced recovery and consequent reduction in the reject volume.

  10. New procedure for multielemental speciation analysis of five toxic species: As(III), As(V), Cr(VI), Sb(III) and Sb(V) in drinking water samples by advanced hyphenated technique HPLC/ICP-DRC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkowska, Monika; Komorowicz, Izabela; Barałkiewicz, Danuta

    2016-05-12

    Analytical procedure dedicated for multielemental determination of toxic species: As(III), As(V), Cr(VI), Sb(III) and Sb(V) in drinking water samples using high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC/ICP-DRC-MS) technique was developed. Optimization of the detection and separation conditions was conducted. Dynamic reaction cell (DRC) with oxygen as a reaction gas was involved in the experiments. Obtained analytical signals for species separation were symmetrical, as studied by anion-exchange chromatography. Applied mobile phase consisted of 3 mM of EDTANa2 and 36 mM of ammonium nitrate. Full separation of species in the form of the following forms: H3AsO3, H2AsO4(-), SbO2(-), Sb(OH)6(-), CrO4(2-) was achieved in 15 min with use of gradient elution program. Detailed validation of analytical procedure proved the reliability of analytical measurements. The procedure was characterized by high precision in the range from 1.7% to 2.4%. Detection limits (LD) were 0.067 μg L(-1), 0.068 μg L(-1), 0.098 μg L(-1), 0.083 μg L(-1) and 0.038 μg L(-1) for As(III), As(V), Cr(VI), Sb(III) and Sb(V), respectively. Obtained recoveries confirmed the lack of interferences' influence on analytical signals as their values were in the range of 91%-110%. The applicability of the proposed procedure was tested on drinking water samples characterized by mineralization up to 650 mg L(-1). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Design Status of the Capillary Brine Residual in Containment Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargusingh, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    One of the goals of the AES Life Support System (LSS) Project is to achieve 98% water loop closure for long duration human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. To meet this objective, the AES LSS Project is developing technologies to recover water from wastewater brine; highly concentrated waste products generated from a primary water recovery system. The state of the art system used aboard the International Space Station (ISS) has the potential to recover up to 85% water from unine wastewater, leaving a significant amounts of water in the waste brine, the recovery of which is a critical technology gap that must be filled in order to enable long duration human exploration. Recovering water from the urine wastewater brine is complicated by the concentration of solids as water is removed from the brine, and the concentration of the corrosive, toxic chemicals used to stabilize the urine which fouls and degrades water processing hardware, and poses a hazard to operators and crew. Brine Residual in Containment (BRIC) is focused on solids management through a process of "in-place" drying - the drying of brines within the container used for final disposal. Application of in-place drying has the potential to improve the safety and reliability of the system by reducing the exposure to crew and hardware to the problematic brine residual. Through a collaboration between the NASA Johnson Space Center and Portland Status University, a novel water recovery system was developed that utilizes containment geometry to support passive capillary flow and static phase separation allowing free surface evaporation to take place in a microgravity environment. A notional design for an ISS demonstration system was developed. This paper describes the concept for the system level design.

  12. Study of the effectiveness of polyamide reverse osmosis membranes in the recovery of Cr(III) in tanning. Estudio sobre la efectividad de las membranas de osmosis inversa de poliamida en la recuperacion de Cr(III) en curticion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galan, M.; Gonzalez, C.; Llorens, J.; Mans, C. (Barcelona Univ., Tarragona (Spain). Dept. d' Enginyeria Quimica i Bioqumica)

    1992-12-01

    Laboratory experiments on reverse osmosis using water containing Cr2(SO4)3 and a Film Tech Corporation TW30-2514 membrane are described. The type of cell employed allowed the membrane's rejection of Cr(III) to be measured with a high degree of accuracy. Tests were carried out varying the Cr concentration, the pressure and the temperature. The results obtained have implications regarding the suitability of reverse osmosis in recovering Cr from tanning waste water. (Author)

  13. Advances in Spacecraft Brine Water Recovery: Development of a Radial Vaned Capillary Drying Tray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargusingh, Miriam J.; Pickering, Karen D.; Weislogel, Mark M.

    2014-01-01

    Technology improvements in the recovery of water from brine are critical to establishing closed-loop water recovery systems, enabling long-duration missions, and achieving a sustained human presence in space. A genre of 'in-place drying' brine water recovery concepts, collectively referred to herein as Brine Residual In-Containment, are under development. These brine water recovery concepts aim to increase the overall robustness and reliability of the brine recovery process by performing drying inside the container used for final disposal of the solid residual waste. Implementation of in-place drying techniques have been demonstrated for applications where gravity is present and phase separation occurs naturally by buoyancy-induced effects. In this work, a microgravity-compatible analogue of the gravity-driven phase separation process is considered by exploiting capillarity in the form of surface wetting, surface tension, and container geometry. The proposed design consists of a series of planar radial vanes aligned about a central slotted core. Preliminary testing of the fundamental geometry in a reduced gravity environment has shown the device to spontaneously fill and saturate rapidly, thereby creating a free surface from which evaporation and phase separation can occur similar to a terrestrial-like 'cylindrical pool' of fluid. Mathematical modeling and analysis of the design suggest predictable rates of filling and stability of fluid containment as a function of relevant system dimensions; e.g., number of vanes, vane length, width, and thickness. A description of the proposed capillary design solution is presented along with preliminary results from testing, modeling, and analysis of the system.

  14. Cost Effective Recovery of Low-TDS Frac Flowback Water for Re-use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claire Henderson; Harish Acharya; Hope Matis; Hareesh Kommepalli; Brian Moore; Hua Wang

    2011-03-31

    The project goal was to develop a cost-effective water recovery process to reduce the costs and envi-ronmental impact of shale gas production. This effort sought to develop both a flowback water pre-treatment process and a membrane-based partial demineralization process for the treatment of the low-Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) portion of the flowback water produced during hydrofracturing operations. The TDS cutoff for consideration in this project is < 35,000 {approx} 45,000 ppm, which is the typical limit for economic water recovery employing reverse osmosis (RO) type membrane desalination processes. The ultimate objective is the production of clean, reclaimed water suitable for re-use in hydrofracturing operations. The team successfully compiled data on flowback composition and other attributes across multiple shale plays, identified the likely applicability of membrane treatment processes in those shales, and expanded the proposed product portfolio to include four options suitable for various reuse or discharge applications. Pretreatment technologies were evaluated at the lab scale and down-selected based upon their efficacy in removing key contaminants. The chosen technologies were further validated by performing membrane fouling studies with treated flowback water to demonstrate the technical feasibility of flowback treatment with RO membranes. Process flow schemes were constructed for each of the four product options based on experimental performance data from actual flowback water treatment studies. For the products requiring membrane treatment, membrane system model-ing software was used to create designs for enhanced water recovery beyond the typical seawater desalination benchmark. System costs based upon vendor and internal cost information for all process flow schemes were generated and are below target and in line with customer expectations. Finally, to account for temporal and geographic variability in flowback characteristics as well as local

  15. An assessment of climate change impacts on micro-hydropower energy recovery in water supply networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Jennifer; Patil, Sopan; McNabola, Aonghus; Gallagher, John; Coughlan, Paul; Harris, Ian; Packwood, Andrew; Williams, Prysor

    2015-04-01

    Continuity of service of a high quality water supply is vital in sustaining economic and social development. However, water supply and wastewater treatment are highly energy intensive processes and the overall cost of water provision is rising rapidly due to increased energy costs, higher capital investment requirements, and more stringent regulatory compliance in terms of both national and EU legislation. Under the EU Directive 2009/28/EC, both Ireland and the UK are required to have 16% and 15% respectively of their electricity generated by renewable sources by 2020. The projected impacts of climate change, population growth and urbanisation will place additional pressures on resources, further increasing future water demand which in turn will lead to higher energy consumption. Therefore, there is a need to achieve greater efficiencies across the water industry. The implementation of micro-hydropower turbines within the water supply network has shown considerable viability for energy recovery. This is achieved by harnessing energy at points of high flow or pressure along the network which can then be utilised on site or alternatively sold to the national grid. Micro-hydropower can provide greater energy security for utilities together with a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. However, potential climate change impacts on water resources in the medium-to-long term currently act as a key barrier to industry confidence as changes in flow and pressure within the network can significantly alter the available energy for recovery. The present study aims to address these uncertainties and quantify the regional and local impacts of climate change on the viability of energy recovery across water infrastructure in Ireland and the UK. Specifically, the research focuses on assessing the potential future effects of climate change on flow rates at multiple pressure reducing valve sites along the water supply network and also in terms of flow at a number of wastewater

  16. Simultaneous Waste Heat and Water Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gases for Advanced Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dexin [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2016-12-31

    This final report presents the results of a two-year technology development project carried out by a team of participants sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project is to develop a membrane-based technology to recover both water and low grade heat from power plant flue gases. Part of the recovered high-purity water and energy can be used directly to replace plant boiler makeup water as well as improving its efficiency, and the remaining part of the recovered water can be used for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD), cooling tower water makeup or other plant uses. This advanced version Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) with lower capital and operating costs can be applied to existing plants economically and can maximize waste heat and water recovery from future Advanced Energy System flue gases with CO2 capture in consideration, which will have higher moisture content that favors the TMC to achieve higher efficiency.

  17. Phosphorous recovery from sewage sludge ash suspended in water in a two-compartment electrodialytic cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie

    2016-01-01

    was suspended in water in the anolyte, which was separated from the catholyte by a cation exchange membrane. Electrolysis at the anode acidified the SSA suspension, and hereby P, Cu, Pb, Cd and Zn were extracted. The heavy metal ions electromigrated into the catholyte and were thus separated from the filtrate......Phosphorus (P) is indispensable for all forms of life on Earth and as P is a finite resource, it is highly important to increase recovery of P from secondary resources. This investigation is focused on P recovery from sewage sludge ash (SSA) by a two-compartment electrodialytic separation (EDS......) technique. Two SSAs are included in the investigation and they contained slightly less P than phosphate rock used in commercial fertilizer production and more heavy metals. The two-compartment electrodialytic technique enabled simultaneous recovery of P and separation of heavy metals. During EDS the SSA...

  18. Effect of a 5-min cold-water immersion recovery on exercise performance in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, J J; Abbiss, C R; Watson, G; Nosaka, K; Laursen, P B

    2010-05-01

    This study examined the effect of a 5-min cold-water immersion (14 degrees C) recovery intervention on repeated cycling performance in the heat. 10 male cyclists performed two bouts of a 25-min constant-paced (254 (22) W) cycling session followed by a 4-km time trial in hot conditions (35 degrees C, 40% relative humidity). The two bouts were separated by either 15 min of seated recovery in the heat (control) or the same condition with 5-min cold-water immersion (5th-10th minute), using a counterbalanced cross-over design (CP(1)TT(1) --> CWI or CON --> CP(2)TT(2)). Rectal temperature was measured immediately before and after both the constant-paced sessions and 4-km timed trials. Cycling economy and Vo(2) were measured during the constant-paced sessions, and the average power output and completion times were recorded for each time trial. Compared with control, rectal temperature was significantly lower (0.5 (0.4) degrees C) in cold-water immersion before CP(2) until the end of the second 4-km timed trial. However, the increase in rectal temperature (0.5 (0.2) degrees C) during CP(2) was not significantly different between conditions. During the second 4-km timed trial, power output was significantly greater in cold-water immersion (327.9 (55.7) W) compared with control (288.0 (58.8) W), leading to a faster completion time in cold-water immersion (6.1 (0.3) min) compared with control (6.4 (0.5) min). Economy and Vo(2) were not influenced by the cold-water immersion recovery intervention. 5-min cold-water immersion recovery significantly lowered rectal temperature and maintained endurance performance during subsequent high-intensity exercise. These data indicate that repeated exercise performance in heat may be improved when a short period of cold-water immersion is applied during the recovery period.

  19. Supercritical water gasification of sewage sludge: gas production and phosphorus recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acelas, Nancy Y; López, Diana P; Brilman, D W F Wim; Kersten, Sascha R A; Kootstra, A Maarten J

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the feasibility of the gasification of dewatered sewage sludge in supercritical water (SCW) for energy recovery combined with P-recovery from the solid residue generated in this process was investigated. SCWG temperature (400°C, 500°C, 600°C) and residence time (15min, 30min, 60min) were varied to investigate their effects on gas production and the P recovery by acid leaching. The results show that the dry gas composition for this uncatalyzed gasification of sewage sludge in SCW mainly comprised of CO2, CO, CH4, H2, and some C2-C3 compounds. Higher temperatures and longer residence times favored the production of H2 and CH4. After SCWG, more than 95% of the P could be recovered from the solid residue by leaching with acids. SCWG combined with acid leaching seems an effective method for both energy recovery and high P recovery from sewage sludge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A new spectrophotometric method for determination of EDTA in water using its complex with Mn(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Carlos Eduardo O.; Oliveira, André F.; Neves, Antônio A.; Queiroz, Maria Eliana L. R.

    2016-11-01

    EDTA is an important ligand used in many industrial products as well as in agriculture, where it is employed to assist in phytoextraction procedures and the absorption of nutrients by plants. Due to its intensive use and recalcitrance, it is now considered an emerging pollutant in water, so there is great interest in techniques suitable for its monitoring. This work proposes a method based on formation of the Mn(III)-EDTA complex after oxidation of the Mn(II)-EDTA complex by PbO2 immobilized on cyanoacrylate spheres. A design of experiments (DOE) based on the Doehlert matrix was used to determine the optimum conditions of the method, and the influence of the variables was evaluated using a multiple linear regression (MLR) model. The optimized method presented a linear response in the range from 0.77 to 100.0 μmol L- 1, with analytical sensitivity of 7.7 × 103 L mol- 1, a coefficient of determination of 0.999, and a limit of detection of 0.23 μmol L- 1. The method was applied using samples fortified at different concentration levels, and the recoveries achieved were between 97.0 and 104.9%.

  1. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.

    2001-11-04

    The objective of this Class III project was demonstrate that reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by CO2 flood can increase production from slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, focused on Geraldine Ford and East Ford fields, which are Delaware Mountain Group fields that produce from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The demonstration phase of the project was a CO2 flood conducted in East Ford field, which is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit.

  2. Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project Probability/Coordination Study Resident Fish and Wildlife Impacts Phase III, 1997 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitzinger, Eric J. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    1998-10-01

    Phase III began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River Basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water.

  3. Effect of acidified drinking water on the recovery of Salmonella enteritidis from broiler crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avila LAF de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Crop is a known source of Salmonella contamination during broiler carcass processing. The effect of drinking water acidification by lactic acid or citric acid or a combination of those with cupric sulfate and d-limonene in the reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE recovered from the crop of broilers was evaluated. Treatments were administered during 8 hours of preslaughter fasting period (Experiments I and II and during the last 32 hours of preslaughter (Experiment III. It was observed that acidification reduced water intake when treatments began at preslaughter feed withdrawal, and affected the possible reducing effect of these acids on SE recovering (Experiments I and II. Water intake during preslaughter feed withdrawal was not affected when treatment began 32 hours before slaughter (Experiment III. Treatments reduced SE recovering from crop (p<0.05. In Experiment III, 0.470% of lactic acid reduced the number of recovered SE in 99%. This study suggested that the addition of organic acids in the drinking water 24 hours before beginning the preslaughter feed withdrawal might reduce crop SE colonization and might be an important strategy to reduce SE contamination of broiler products during processing.

  4. Nanofiltration of Mine Water: Impact of Feed pH and Membrane Charge on Resource Recovery and Water Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Mullett

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Two nanofiltration membranes, a Dow NF 270 polyamide thin film and a TriSep TS 80 polyamide thin film, were investigated for their retention of ionic species when filtering mine influenced water streams at a range of acidic pH values. The functional iso-electric point of the membranes, characterized by changes in retention over a small pH range, were examined by filtering solutions of sodium sulphate. Both membranes showed changes in retention at pH 3, suggesting a zero net charge on the membranes at this pH. Copper mine drainage and synthetic solutions of mine influenced water were filtered using the same membranes. These solutions were characterized by pH values within 2 and 5, thus crossing the iso-electric point of both membranes. Retention of cations was maximized when the feed solution pH was less than the iso-electric point of the membrane. In these conditions, the membrane has a net positive charge, reducing the transmission rate of cations. From the recoveries of a range of cations, the suitability of nanofiltration was discussed relative to the compliance with mine water discharge criteria and the recovery of valuable commodity metals. The nanofiltration process was demonstrated to offer advantages in metal recovery from mine waste streams, concomitantly enabling discharge criteria for the filtrate disposal to be met.

  5. Recovery of Cr as Cr(III) from Cr(VI)-contaminated kaolinite clay by electrokinetics coupled with a permeable reactive barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tasuma; Kawai, Katsunori; Moribe, Mai; Niinae, Masakazu

    2014-08-15

    Zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) and magnetite (Fe3O4) were investigated as potential reductants in an electrokinetic/permeable reactive barrier hybrid system (EK/PRB) for the recovery of Cr as Cr(III) from Cr(VI)-contaminated kaolinite. For the EK/Fe(0) PRB, regardless of the pH in the anode well, the system facilitated the reduction of Cr(VI) into Cr(III), but the recovery of the Cr(III) in the PRB was low. Conversely, the reduction of Cr(VI) occurred only in the PRB for the EK/Fe3O4 PRB. However, when the anode pH was not controlled and the soil pH values correspondingly decreased gradually from the anode side, a greater fraction of Cr(VI) sorbed onto the kaolinite; as a result, a lower amount of Cr(VI) migrated to the Fe3O4 PRB. In addition, it was found that the majority of Cr(VI) migrating to the Fe3O4 PRB retained its oxidation state without being converted into Cr(III). These two adverse effects were mitigated by maintaining the soil pH values at 6.8, but at the same time, 18% of Cr(VI) penetrated through the Fe3O4 PRB. The penetration of Cr(VI) through the Fe3O4 PRB was successfully prevented by increasing the reaction time through the introduction of a cation exchange membrane between the Fe3O4 PRB and the anode well. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Preconcentration, separation and spectrophotometric determination of aluminium(III) in water samples and dialysis concentrates at trace levels with 8-hydroxyquinoline-cobalt(II) coprecipitation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Volkan Numan; Arslan, Deniz; Ozdes, Duygu; Soylak, Mustafa; Tufekci, Mehmet

    2010-10-15

    A separation-preconcentration procedure was developed for the determination of trace amounts of aluminium in water samples and dialysis concentrates by UV-vis Spectrophotometry after coprecipitation using 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) as a chelating agent and Co(II) as a carrier element. This procedure is based on filtration of the solution containing precipitate on a cellulose nitrate membrane filter following aluminium(III) coprecipitation with Co/8-HQ and then the precipitates together with membrane filter were dissolved in concentrated nitric acid. The metal contents of the final solution were determined by UV-vis Spectrophotometry with Erio Chrome Cyanine-R standard method. Several parameters including pH of sample solution, amount of carrier element and reagent, standing time, sample volume for precipitation and the effects of diverse ions were examined. The enrichment factor was calculated as 50 and the detection limits, corresponding to three times the standard deviation of the blank (N: 10), was found to be 0.2 microg L(-1). The accuracy of the method was tested with standard reference material (CRM-TMDW-500) and spiked addition. Determination of aluminium(III) was carried out in sea water, river water, tap water and haemodialysis fluids samples. The recoveries were >95%. The relative standard deviations of determination were less than 6%. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sustainable water recovery from oily wastewater via forward osmosis-membrane distillation (FO-MD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sui; Wang, Peng; Fu, Xiuzhu; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2014-04-01

    This study proposed and investigated a hybrid forward osmosis - membrane distillation (FO-MD) system for sustainable water recovery from oily wastewater by employing lab-fabricated FO and MD hollow fiber membranes. Stable oil-in-water emulsions of different concentrations with small droplet sizes (wastewater containing petroleum, surfactant, NaCl and acetic acid at 60 °C in the batch mode. The water flux in FO undergoes three-stage decline due to fouling and reduction in osmotic driving force, but is quite stable in MD regardless of salt concentration. Oily wastewater with relatively high salinity could be effectively recovered by the FO-MD hybrid system while maintaining large water flux, at least 90% feed water recovery could be readily attained with only trace amounts of oil and salts, and the draw solution was re-generated for the next rounds of FO-MD run. Interestingly, significant amount of acetic acid was also retained in the permeate for further reuse as a chemical additive during the production of crude oil. The work has demonstrated that not only water but also organic additives in the wastewater could be effectively recovered by FO-MD systems for reuse or other utilizations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Copper Recovery from Roasted Chalcopyrite Concentrate by Using Hydrochloric Acid or Water Leaching Method

    OpenAIRE

    Bahar, Nurdan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the sulphation roasting in atmospheric medium of chalcopyrite concentrate and hydrochloric acid or water leaching of roasted chalcopyrite concentrate were investigated. The effects of roasting temperature (200-700 oC) and roasting time (15-120 min.) on recovery of copper were also researched. The optimum roasting temperature and roasting time were determined to be 450 oC and 60 min., respectively. The roasted chalcopyrite concentrate is leached with hydrochloric acid solution o...

  9. Analysis of tritium behaviour and recovery from a water-cooled Pb17Li blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malara, C. [Institute Regional des Materiaux Avances, Ispra (Italy); Casini, G. [Systems Engineering and Informatics Institute, JRC Ispra, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy); Viola, A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy)

    1995-03-01

    The question of the tritium recovery in water-cooled Pb17Li blankets has been under investigation for several years at JRC Ispra. The method which has been more extensively analysed is that of slowly circulating the breeder out from the blanket units and of extracting the tritium from it outside the plasma vacuum vessel by helium gas purging or vacuum degassing in a suited process apparatus. A computerized model of the tritium behaviour in the blanket units and in the extraction system was developed. It includes four submodels: (1) tritium permeation process from the breeder to the cooling water as a function of the local operative conditions (tritium concentration in Pb17Li, breeder temperature and flow rate); (2) tritium mass balance in each breeding unit; (3) tritium desorption from the breeder material to the gas phase of the extraction system; (4) tritium extraction efficiency as a function of the design parameters of the recovery apparatus. In the present paper, on the basis of this model, a parametric study of the tritium permeation rate in the cooling water and of the tritium inventory in the blanket is carried out. Results are reported and discussed in terms of dimensionless groups which describe the relative effects of the overall resistance on tritium transfer to the cooling water (with and without permeation barriers), circulating Pb17Li flow rate and extraction efficiency of the tritium recovery unit. The parametric study is extended to the recovery unit in the case of tritium extraction by helium purge or vacuum degassing in a droplet spray unit. (orig.).

  10. Europium(III) DOTA-derivatives having ketone donor pendant arms display dramatically slower water exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kayla N.; Viswanathan, Subha; Rojas-Quijano, Federico A.; Kovacs, Zoltan; Sherry, A. Dean

    2011-01-01

    A series of new 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-derivatives having a combination of amide and ketone donor groups as side-arms were prepared and their complexes with europium(III) studied in detail by high resolution NMR spectroscopy. The chemical shift of the Eu3+-bound water resonance, the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) characteristics of the complexes, and the bound water residence lifetimes (τm) were found to vary dramatically with the chemical structure of the side-arms. Substitution of ketone oxygen donor atoms for amide oxygen donor atoms resulted in an increase in residence water lifetimes (τm) and a decrease in chemical shift of the Eu3+-bound water molecule (Δω). These experimental results along with density functional theory (DFT) calculations demonstrate that introduction of weakly donating oxygen atoms in these complexes results in a much weaker ligand field, more positive charge on the Eu3+ ion and an increased water residence lifetime as expected for a dissociative mechanism. These results provide new insights into the design of paramagnetic CEST agents with even slower water exchange kinetics that will make them more efficient for in vivo imaging applications. PMID:21306137

  11. Soy-Based, Water-Cooled, TC W-III Two Cycle Engine Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharf, Curtis R.; Miller, Mark E.

    2003-08-30

    The objective of this project was to achieve technical approval and commercial launch for a biodegradable soy oil-based, environmentally safe, TC W-III performance, water-cooled, two cycle engine oil. To do so would: (1) develop a new use for RBD soybean oil; (2) increase soybean utilization in North America in the range of 500 K-3.0 MM bushels; and (3) open up supply opportunities of 1.5-5.0 MM bushels worldwide. These goals have been successfully obtained.

  12. Determination of traces of Sb(III) using ASV in Sb-rich water samples affected by mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cidu, Rosa, E-mail: cidur@unica.it; Biddau, Riccardo; Dore, Elisabetta

    2015-01-07

    Highlights: • Antimony speciation affects the toxicity of this element. • A simple method for Sb(III) analyses in Sb-rich waters was developed. • Sb(III) was determined by ASV in water stabilized with tartaric and nitric acids. • Pre-concentration and/or separation of Sb(III) prior to analysis are not required. - Abstract: Chemical speciation [Sb(V) and Sb(III)] affects the mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of antimony. In oxygenated environments Sb(V) dominates whereas thermodynamically unstable Sb(III) may occur. In this study, a simple method for the determination of Sb(III) in non acidic, oxygenated water contaminated with antimony is proposed. The determination of Sb(III) was performed by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV, 1–20 μg L{sup −1} working range), the total antimony, Sb(tot), was determined either by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, 1–100 μg L{sup −1} working range) or inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES, 100–10,000 μg L{sup −1} working range) depending on concentration. Water samples were filtered on site through 0.45 μm pore size filters. The aliquot for determination of Sb(tot) was acidified with 1% (v/v) HNO{sub 3}. Different preservatives, namely HCl, L(+) ascorbic acid or L(+) tartaric acid plus HNO{sub 3}, were used to assess the stability of Sb(III) in synthetic solutions. The method was tested on groundwater and surface water draining the abandoned mine of Su Suergiu (Sardinia, Italy), an area heavily contaminated with Sb. The waters interacting with Sb-rich mining residues were non acidic, oxygenated, and showed extreme concentrations of Sb(tot) (up to 13,000 μg L{sup −1}), with Sb(III) <10% of total antimony. The stabilization with L(+) tartaric acid plus HNO{sub 3} appears useful for the determination of Sb(III) in oxygenated, Sb-rich waters. Due to the instability of Sb(III), analyses should be carried out within 7 days upon the water collection. The main

  13. Modeling Reservoir Formation Damage due to Water Injection for Oil Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao

    2010-01-01

    The elliptic equation for non-Fickian transport of suspension in porous media is applied to simulate the reservoir formation damage due to water injection for oil recovery. The deposition release (erosion of reservoir formation) and the suspension deposition (pore plugging) are both taken...... into account. 1-D numerical simulations are carried out to reveal the erosion of reservoir formation due to water injection. 2-D numerical simulations are carried out to obtain the suspension and deposition profiles around the injection wells. These preliminary results indicate the non-Fickian behaviors...

  14. An automated system for oxygen-18 water recovery and fluorine-18 delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller, Michael J. [Chemistry Department, 57 Cornell Street, Building 901, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)]. E-mail: mschueller@bnl.gov; Ferrieri, Richard A. [Chemistry Department, 57 Cornell Street, Building 901, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Schlyer, David J. [Chemistry Department, 57 Cornell Street, Building 901, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    BNL has recently purchased an EBCO TR-19 cyclotron for routine isotope production. A system has been built to recover oxygen-18 enriched water from the fluorine-18 target, and then transport the F-18 a distance of 50 m to a shielded dose splitter. The remotized system provides the operator with feedback on flow rates and radiation levels during processing. Recovery of the 2.6 mL of enriched water and transport of the F-18 to the radiochemistry labs takes under 10 min, with more than 80% of the activity arriving in the chemistry lab.

  15. An automated system for oxygen-18 water recovery and fluorine-18 delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueller, Michael J.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Schlyer, David J.

    2005-12-01

    BNL has recently purchased an EBCO TR-19 cyclotron for routine isotope production. A system has been built to recover oxygen-18 enriched water from the fluorine-18 target, and then transport the F-18 a distance of 50 m to a shielded dose splitter. The remotized system provides the operator with feedback on flow rates and radiation levels during processing. Recovery of the 2.6 mL of enriched water and transport of the F-18 to the radiochemistry labs takes under 10 min, with more than 80% of the activity arriving in the chemistry lab.

  16. Recovery From Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage: Cold-Water Immersion Versus Whole-Body Cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaïdia, Abd-Elbasset; Lamblin, Julien; Delecroix, Barthélémy; Leduc, Cédric; McCall, Alan; Nédélec, Mathieu; Dawson, Brian; Baquet, Georges; Dupont, Grégory

    2017-03-01

    To compare the effects of cold-water immersion (CWI) and whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) on recovery kinetics after exercise-induced muscle damage. Ten physically active men performed single-leg hamstring eccentric exercise comprising 5 sets of 15 repetitions. Immediately postexercise, subjects were exposed in a randomized crossover design to CWI (10 min at 10°C) or WBC (3 min at -110°C) recovery. Creatine kinase concentrations, knee-flexor eccentric (60°/s) and posterior lower-limb isometric (60°) strength, single-leg and 2-leg countermovement jumps, muscle soreness, and perception of recovery were measured. The tests were performed before and immediately, 24, 48, and 72 h after exercise. Results showed a very likely moderate effect in favor of CWI for single-leg (effect size [ES] = 0.63; 90% confidence interval [CI] = -0.13 to 1.38) and 2-leg countermovement jump (ES = 0.68; 90% CI = -0.08 to 1.43) 72 h after exercise. Soreness was moderately lower 48 h after exercise after CWI (ES = -0.68; 90% CI = -1.44 to 0.07). Perception of recovery was moderately enhanced 24 h after exercise for CWI (ES = -0.62; 90% CI = -1.38 to 0.13). Trivial and small effects of condition were found for the other outcomes. CWI was more effective than WBC in accelerating recovery kinetics for countermovement-jump performance at 72 h postexercise. CWI also demonstrated lower soreness and higher perceived recovery levels across 24-48 h postexercise.

  17. Drinking Water Quality Criterion - Based site Selection of Aquifer Storage and Recovery Scheme in Chou-Shui River Alluvial Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H. E.; Liang, C. P.; Jang, C. S.; Chen, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Land subsidence due to groundwater exploitation is an urgent environmental problem in Choushui river alluvial fan in Taiwan. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR), where excess surface water is injected into subsurface aquifers for later recovery, is one promising strategy for managing surplus water and may overcome water shortages. The performance of an ASR scheme is generally evaluated in terms of recovery efficiency, which is defined as percentage of water injected in to a system in an ASR site that fulfills the targeted water quality criterion. Site selection of an ASR scheme typically faces great challenges, due to the spatial variability of groundwater quality and hydrogeological condition. This study proposes a novel method for the ASR site selection based on drinking quality criterion. Simplified groundwater flow and contaminant transport model spatial distributions of the recovery efficiency with the help of the groundwater quality, hydrological condition, ASR operation. The results of this study may provide government administrator for establishing reliable ASR scheme.

  18. Recovery of Organic and Amino Acids from Sludge and Fish Waste in Sub Critical Water Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Faisal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of organic and amino acid production from the treatment of sludge and fish waste using water at sub critical conditions was investigated. The results indicated that at sub-critical conditions, where the ion product of water went through a maximum, the formation of organic acids was favorable. The presence of oxidant favored formation of acetic and formic acid. Other organic acids of significant amount were propionic, succinic and lactic acids. Depending on the type of wastes, formation of other organic acids was also possible. Knowing the organic acids obtained by hydrolysis and oxidation in sub-critical water of various wastes are useful in designing of applicable waste treatment process, complete degradation of organic wastes into volatile carbon and water, and also on the viewpoint of resource recovery. The production of lactic acid was discussed as well. The results indicated that temperature of 573 K, with the absence of oxidant, yield of lactic acid from fish waste was higher than sewage sludge. The maximum yield of total amino acids (137 mg/g-dry fish from waste fish entrails was obtained at subcritical condition (T = 523 K, P = 4 MPa at reaction time of 60 min by using the batch reactor. The amino acids obtained in this study were mainly alanine and glycine. Keywords:  organic acids, amino acids, sub-critical water, hydrothermal, resources recovery

  19. Water and detergent recovery from rinsing water in an industrial environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Linclau

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wash water streams coming from rinsing of equipment in a detergent production site is in many cases considered as waste. On site treatment in waste water plants is possible but typically requires advanced oxidation process (AOP technology which uses chemicals and creates a waste sludge. A new treatment approach, based on nanofiltration, has been demonstrated at industrial scale in a detergent production site in China. Wash water could be split into a concentrate stream and water fraction. The concentrate stream contains most of the valuable surfactants and has a value to recycle. The water fraction can easily be polished by MBR to feed cooling towers. As such, this production site does not discharge any process wash water and recovers all resources out of the rinsing water: both chemicals (as surfactants as the water.

  20. The Effect of early physiotherapy on the recovery of mandibular function after orthognathic surgery for Class III correction: part I--jaw-motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Terry Te-Yi; Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Huang, Chiung Shing; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to compare the mandibular range of motion in Class III patients with and without early physiotherapy after orthognathic surgery (OGS). This study consisted of 63 Class III patients who underwent 2-jaw OGS. The experimental group comprised 31 patients who received early systematic physical rehabilitation. The control group consisted of 32 patients who did not have physical rehabilitation. Twelve variables of 3-dimensional (3D) jaw-motion analysis (JMA) were recorded before surgery (T1) and 6 weeks (T2) and 6 months (T3) after surgery. A 2-sample t test was conducted to compare the JMA results between the two groups at different time points. At T2, the JMA data were measured to be 77.5%-145.7% of presurgical values in the experimental group, and 60.3%-90.6% in the control group. At T3, the measurements were 112.2%-179.2% of presurgical values in the experimental group, and 77.6%-157.2% in the control group. The patients in the experimental group exhibited more favorable recovery than did those in the control group, from T1 to T2 and T1 to T3. However, after termination of physiotherapy, no significant difference in the extent of recovery was observed between groups up to 6 months after OGS. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Recovery of the water content of hydrogel contact lenses after use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Josefa Velasco; Velasco, María José García

    2005-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the amount and time of water-content recovery of ionic contact lenses (Surevue and Acuvue) and non-ionic contact lenses (Soflens 38, Soflens 66 and Optima 38) when submerged in maintenance solution for 9 h. Using a hand-held refractometer, we measured the water content of the lenses upon removal from the eye, and after 15, 30, 45 min, 1, 2 and 9 h in soaking solution. Both ionic lenses presented pre-wear water content of 58%, while two of the non-ionic ones (Soflens 38 and Optima 38) registered 38.6% and the third (Soflens 66) had 66%. We found a significant increase (p 0.05) between ionic and non-ionic lenses, although the non-ionic lenses reached slightly higher water-content values at all the times studied. These results indicate that when the refractometer technique is used to measure water content, the lens types used in this study regain their initial water-content values after 9 h in soaking solution. These data indicate the time needed for hydrogel contact lenses to reach their maximum water content after removal from the eye and submersion in maintenance solution. By ensuring maximum water content and minimum reduction of oxygen for the cornea, the specialist can help avoid clinical signs and symptoms related to low water content in the lenses.

  2. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

  3. A customised cold-water immersion protocol favours one-size-fits-all protocols in improving acute performance recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvoort, Coen S.; de Zwart, Jelmer R.; van Keeken, Brenda L.; Viroux, Patrick J.F.; Tiemessen, Ivo J.H.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether a customised cold-water immersion (CWIc) protocol was more effective in enhancing acute performance recovery than a one-size-fits-all CWI (CWIs) or active recovery (AR) protocol. On three separate testing days, 10 healthy, physically

  4. Effects of Cold Water Immersion and Contrast Water Therapy for Recovery From Team Sport: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Trevor R; Greene, David A; Baker, Michael K

    2017-05-01

    Higgins, TR, Greene, DA, Baker, MK. Effects of cold water immersion and contrast water therapy for recovery from team sport: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Strength Cond Res 31(5): 1443-1460, 2017-To enhance recovery from sport, cold water immersion (CWI) and contrast water therapy (CWT) have become common practice within high level team sport. Initially, athletes relied solely on anecdotal support. As there has been an increase in the volume of research into recovery including a number of general reviews, an opportunity existed to narrow the focus specifically examining the use of hydrotherapy for recovery in team sport. A Boolean logic [AND] keyword search of databases was conducted: SPORTDiscus; AMED; CINAHL; MEDLINE. Data were extracted and the standardized mean differences were calculated with 95% confidence interval (CI). The analysis of pooled data was conducted using a random-effect model, with heterogeneity assessed using I. Twenty-three peer reviewed articles (n = 606) met the criteria. Meta-analyses results indicated CWI was beneficial for recovery at 24 hours (countermovement jump: p = 0.05, CI: -0.004 to 0.578; All-out sprint: p = 0.02, -0.056 to 0.801) following team sport. The CWI was beneficial for recovery at 72 hours (fatigue: p = 0.03, CI: 0.061-1.418) and CWT was beneficial for recovery at 48 hours (fatigue: p = 0.04, CI: 0.013-0.942) following team sport. The CWI was beneficial for neuromuscular recovery 24 hours following team sport, whereas CWT was not beneficial for recovery following team sport. In addition, when evaluating accumulated sprinting, CWI was not beneficial for recovery following team sports. In evaluating subjective measures, both CWI (72 hours) and CWT (24 hours) were beneficial for recovery of perceptions of fatigue, following team sport. However neither CWI nor CWT was beneficial for recovery, of perceptions of muscle soreness, following team sport.

  5. Improved recovery of trace amounts of gold (III), palladium (II) and platinum (IV) from large amounts of associated base metals using anion-exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, I; Takeda, Y; Ishida, K

    2000-02-01

    The adsorption and desorption behaviors of gold (III), palladium (II) and platinum (IV) were surveyed in column chromatographic systems consisting of one of the conventional anion-exchange resins of large ion-exchange capacity and dilute thiourea solutions. The noble metals were strongly adsorbed on the anion-exchange resins from dilute hydrochloric acid, while most base metals did not show any marked adsorbability. These facts made it possible to separate the noble metals from a large quantity of base metals such as Ag (I), Al (III), Co (II), Cu (II), Fe (III), Mn (II), Ni (II), Pb (II), and Zn (II). Although it used to be very difficult to desorb the noble metals from the resins used, the difficulty was easily overcome by use of dilute thiourea solutions as an eluant. In the present study, as little as 1.00 microg of the respective noble metals was quantitatively separated and recovered from as much as ca. 10 mg of a number of metals on a small column by elution with a small amount of dilute thiourea solution. The present systems should be applicable to the separation, concentration and recovery of traces of the noble metals from a number of base metals coexisting in a more extended range of amounts and ratios.

  6. Recovery of Zn from acid mine water and electric arc furnace dust in an integrated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Francisco; Romero, Rafael; Mazuelos, Alfonso; Iglesias, Nieves

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the purification of acid mine water and the treatment of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) are integrated into one process with the aim of recovering the Zn content of both effluent and waste. Zinc recovery can reduce the cost of their environmental management: purified acid mine water is discharged after removing all metals; EAFD ceases to be hazardous waste; and Zn is valorised. The process consists of the recovery of Zn as zinc oxide and its purification into commercial products. First, EAFD is leached with acid water and the dissolved metals are selectively precipitated as hydroxides. After EADF leaching, ferrous iron is bio-oxidized and Fe and Al are then precipitated; in the following stage, Cu, Ni, Co and Cd are cemented and finally Zn is precipitated as ZnO. In order to purify water that finally is discharged to a river, lime is used as the neutralizing agent, which results in a precipitate of mainly gypsum, MnO, and ZnO. From the impure zinc oxide produced, various alternatives for the attainment of commercial products, such as basic zinc carbonate and electrolytic zinc, are studied in this work. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Recovery And Valorization Of Snakehead Fish Channa Striata Surimi Wash Water As Stock Albumin Tablet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikbal Syukroni

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Surimi washing process is aimed to concentrate the myofibril protein by removing catepsin enzyme fat pigment blood and sarcoplasmic protein which is soluble in wash water. The soluble subtances cause trouble environment if it was untreated. In addition recovery protein will give benefit both in reducing trouble environment and utilizing soluble protein as sources of albumin protein. The objectives of research were to recover albumin from snakehead fish surimi wash water and to valorize as stock albumin tablet. Recovery of albumin use 0.05 m ultrafiltration membrane and the valorization of albumin tablets was by direct compression. The protein band with molecular weight of 67.741 kDa on the retentate was detected as albumin. Concentration of protein recover by ultrafiltration membrane increased 89.98 and the albumin content 3.50.4 gdl. Based on the result of chemical composition and microbiology analysis albumin of snakehead surimi wash water appropriate with Indonesia National Standard SNI quality requirement about snakehead fish albumin extract. The best formulation in the preparation of surimi wash water albumin tablet was by using corn starch excipients with uniformity weight value 410.39 0.09 g hardness value 7.65 0.8 Kp uniformity size of tablet with diameter 1 cm and thickness 0.59 cm friability value 2.3 and disintregation time of the tablet is 2 minutes 16 second.

  8. Advanced Energy and Water Recovery Technology from Low Grade Waste Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexin Wang

    2011-12-19

    The project has developed a nanoporous membrane based water vapor separation technology that can be used for recovering energy and water from low-temperature industrial waste gas streams with high moisture contents. This kind of exhaust stream is widely present in many industrial processes including the forest products and paper industry, food industry, chemical industry, cement industry, metal industry, and petroleum industry. The technology can recover not only the sensible heat but also high-purity water along with its considerable latent heat. Waste heats from such streams are considered very difficult to recover by conventional technology because of poor heat transfer performance of heat-exchanger type equipment at low temperature and moisture-related corrosion issues. During the one-year Concept Definition stage of the project, the goal was to prove the concept and technology in the laboratory and identify any issues that need to be addressed in future development of this technology. In this project, computational modeling and simulation have been conducted to investigate the performance of a nanoporous material based technology, transport membrane condenser (TMC), for waste heat and water recovery from low grade industrial flue gases. A series of theoretical and computational analyses have provided insight and support in advanced TMC design and experiments. Experimental study revealed condensation and convection through the porous membrane bundle was greatly improved over an impermeable tube bundle, because of the membrane capillary condensation mechanism and the continuous evacuation of the condensate film or droplets through the membrane pores. Convection Nusselt number in flue gas side for the porous membrane tube bundle is 50% to 80% higher than those for the impermeable stainless steel tube bundle. The condensation rates for the porous membrane tube bundle also increase 60% to 80%. Parametric study for the porous membrane tube bundle heat transfer

  9. Adsorption Characteristics of Different Adsorbents and Iron(III Salt for Removing As(V from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Ćurko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the adsorption performance of three types of adsorbents for removal of As(V from water: Bayoxide® E33 (granular iron(III oxide, Titansorb® (granular titanium oxide and a suspension of precipitated iron(III hydroxide. Results of As(V adsorption stoichiometry of two commercial adsorbents and precipitated iron(III hydroxide in tap and demineralized water were fitted to Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherm equations, from which adsorption constants and adsorption capacity were calculated. The separation factor RL for the three adsorbents ranged from 0.04 to 0.61, indicating effective adsorption. Precipitated iron(III hydroxide had the greatest, while Titansorb had the lowest capacity to adsorb As(V. Comparison of adsorption from tap or demineralized water showed that Bayoxide and precipitated iron(III hydroxide had higher adsorption capacity in demineralized water, whereas Titansorb showed a slightly higher capacity in tap water. These results provide mechanistic insights into how commonly used adsorbents remove As(V from water.

  10. Magnetic solid-phase extraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong-mei; Yang, Ting; Wang, Yan-hong; Lian, Hong-zhen; Hu, Xin

    2013-11-15

    A new approach of magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) has been developed for the speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) using zincon-immobilized silica-coated magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Zincon-Si-MNPs) as the MSPE absorbent. Cr(III) was quantitatively reserved on the absorbent at pH 9.1 while total Cr was reserved at pH 6.5. The absorbed Cr species were eluted by using 2 mol/L HCl and detected by GFAAS. The concentration of Cr(VI) could be calculated by subtracting Cr(III) from total Cr. All the parameters affecting the separation and extraction efficiency of Cr species such as pH, extraction time, concentration and volume of eluent, sample volume and influence of co-existing ions were systematically examined and the optimized conditions were established accordingly. The detection limit (LOD) of the method was 0.016 and 0.011 ng mL(-1) for Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively, with the enrichment factor of 100 and 150. The precisions of this method (Relative standard deviation, RSD, n=7) for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) at 0.1 ng mL(-1) were 6.0% and 6.2%, respectively. In order to validate the proposed method, a certified reference material of environmental water was analyzed, and the result of Cr speciation was in good agreement with the certified value. This MSPE-GFAAS method has been successfully applied for the speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in lake and tap waters with the recoveries of 88-109% for the spiked samples. Moreover, the MSPE separation mechanism of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) based on their adsorption-desorption on Zincon-Si-MNPs has been explained through various spectroscopic characterization. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mesosponge Optical Sinks for Multifunctional Mercury Ion Assessment and Recovery from Water Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, Sherif A; Sakai, Masaru; Selim, Mahmoud M; Hendi, Awatif A

    2015-06-24

    Using the newly developed organic-inorganic colorant membrane is an attractive approach for the optical detection, selective screening and removal, and waste management recovery of highly toxic elements, such as Hg(II) ions, from water sources. In the systematic mesosponge optical sinks (MOSs), anchoring organic colorants into 3D, well-defined cage cavities and interconnected tubular pores (10 nm) in the long microscale channels of membrane scaffolds enhances the requirements and intrinsic properties of the hierarchal membrane. This scalable design is the first to allow control of the multifunctional processes of a membrane in a one-step screening procedure, such as the detection/recognition, removal, and filtration of ultratrace Hg(II) ions, even from actual water sources (i.e., tap, underground). The selective recovery, detection, and extraction processes of Hg(II) ions in a heterogeneous mixture with inorganic cations and anions as well as organic molecules and surfactants are mainly dependent on the structure of the colorant agent, the pH conditions, competitive ion-system compositions and concentrations, and Hg-to-colorant binding events. Our result shows that the solid MOS membrane arrays can be repeatedly recycled and retain their hierarchal mesosponge sink character, avoiding fouling via the precipitation of metal salts as a result of the reuse cycle. The Hg(II) ion rejection and the permeation of nonselective elements based on the membrane filtration protocol may be key considerations in water purification and separation requirements. The selective recovery process of Hg(II) ions in actual contaminated samples collected from tap and underground water sources in Saudi Arabia indicates the practical feasibility of our designed MOS membrane arrays.

  12. Performance characterization of water recovery and water quality from chemical/organic waste products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, W. M.; Rogers, T. D.; Chowdhury, H.; Cullingford, H. S.

    1989-01-01

    The water reclamation subsystems currently being evaluated for the Space Shuttle Freedom are briefly reviewed with emphasis on a waste water management system capable of processing wastes containing high concentrations of organic/inorganic materials. The process combines low temperature/pressure to vaporize water with high temperature catalytic oxidation to decompose volatile organics. The reclaimed water is of potable quality and has high potential for maintenance under sterile conditions. Results from preliminary experiments and modifications in process and equipment required to control reliability and repeatability of system operation are presented.

  13. Including arm exercise during a cold water immersion recovery better assists restoration of sprint cycling performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, D; Egaña, M; Donne, B; Warmington, S A

    2014-08-01

    Sprint (high-intensity) exercise performance is reduced when immediately preceded by cold water immersion (CWI). We aimed to investigate whether this performance effect could be attenuated by combining an active recovery (arm exercise) with hip-level CWI, and whether this attenuation may be related to an effect on core temperature (Tcore ). Participants (n = 8) completed three Wingate tests before (Ex1) and after (Ex2) four different 30-min recovery interventions: CWI at 15 °C (CW15), arm exercise during CWI at 15 °C (CW15+AE), arm exercise during thermoneutral immersion at 34 °C (TW34+AE) and non-immersed arm exercise (AE). After AE and TW34+AE, performance during Ex2 was not different from Ex1; while after CW15+AE and CW15, performance was reduced by 4.9% and 7.6%, respectively. Arm exercise maintained Tcore during recovery in CW15+AE, while it declined to a larger extent upon commencement of Ex2 (-0.9 °C) when compared with CW15 (-0.6 °C). This suggests similar leg muscle cooling during recovery in CW15 and CW15+AE. Without any other significant effects (e.g., on blood lactate), these data suggest that the improvement in sprint performance following an active CWI recovery, over CWI alone, may be related to maintained Tcore and its effect on neurophysiological mechanisms that drive muscle activation, but not by reduced muscle cooling. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Recovery data for surface water, groundwater and lab reagent samples analyzed by the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory schedule 2437, water years 2013-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Megan E.; Nowell, Lisa H.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Stone, Wesley W.

    2017-01-01

    Analytical recovery is the concentration of an analyte measured in a water-quality sample expressed as a percentage of the known concentration added to the sample (Mueller and others, 2015). Analytical recovery (hereafter referred to as “recovery”) can be used to understand method bias and variability and to assess the temporal changes in a method over time (Martin and others, 2009). This data set includes two tables: one table of field spike recovery data and one table of lab reagent spike recovery data. The table of field spike recovery data includes results from paired environmental and spike samples collected by the National Water Quality Program, National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Project in surface water and groundwater. These samples were collected as part of the NAWQA Project’s National Water Quality Network: Rivers and Streams assessment, Regional Stream Quality Assessment studies and in multiple groundwater networks following standard practices (Mueller and others, 1997).  This table includes environmental and spike water-quality sample data stored in the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) database (https://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7P55KJN). Concentrations of pesticides in spike samples, while stored in the NWIS database, are not publically available. The calculation of recovery based on these field sample data is outlined in Mueller and others (2015). Lab reagent spikes are pesticide-free reagent water spiked with a known concentration of pesticide. Lab reagent spikes are prepared in the lab and their recovery can be directly measured. The table of lab reagent spike data contains quality control sample information stored in the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) database. Both tables include fields for data-quality indicators that are described in the data processing steps of this metadata file. These tables were developed in order to support a USGS Scientific Investigations Report with the working title

  15. Determination of As(III) and total inorganic As in water samples using an on-line solid phase extraction and flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigrist, Mirna, E-mail: msigrist@fiq.unl.edu.ar [Laboratorio Central, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2654-Piso 6, (3000) Santa Fe (Argentina); Albertengo, Antonela; Beldomenico, Horacio [Laboratorio Central, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2654-Piso 6, (3000) Santa Fe (Argentina); Tudino, Mabel [Laboratorio de Analisis de Trazas, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica/INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-04-15

    A simple and robust on-line sequential injection system based on solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled to a flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer (FI-HGAAS) with a heated quartz tube atomizer (QTA) was developed and optimized for the determination of As(III) in groundwater without any kind of sample pretreatment. The method was based on the selective retention of inorganic As(V) that was carried out by passing the filtered original sample through a cartridge containing a chloride-form strong anion exchanger. Thus the most toxic form, inorganic As(III), was determined fast and directly by AsH{sub 3} generation using 3.5 mol L{sup -1} HCl as carrier solution and 0.35% (m/v) NaBH{sub 4} in 0.025% NaOH as the reductant. Since the uptake of As(V) should be interfered by several anions of natural occurrence in waters, the effect of Cl{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -} on retention was evaluated and discussed. The total soluble inorganic arsenic concentration was determined on aliquots of filtered samples acidified with concentrated HCl and pre-reduced with 5% KI-5% C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 6} solution. The concentration of As(V) was calculated by difference between the total soluble inorganic arsenic and As(III) concentrations. Detection limits (LODs) of 0.5 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 0.6 {mu}g L{sup -1} for As(III) and inorganic total As, respectively, were obtained for a 500 {mu}L sample volume. The obtained limits of detection allowed testing the water quality according to the national and international regulations. The analytical recovery for water samples spiked with As(III) ranged between 98% and 106%. The sampling throughput for As(III) determination was 60 samples h{sup -1}. The device for groundwater sampling was especially designed for the authors. Metallic components were avoided and the contact between the sample and the atmospheric oxygen was carried to a minimum. On-field arsenic species

  16. RECOVERY OF COPPER(II AND CHROMIUM(III FROM NITRATE MEDIUM WITH SALICYLIDENEANILINE DISSOLVED IN 1-OCTANOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guerdouh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The solvent extraction of copper(II and chromium(III from nitrate medium with salicylideneaniline (HL is studied as a function of various parameters: pH, concentration of salicylideneaniline, contact time and the nature of anoin (nitrate and sulfate in aqueous phase. Chromium(III is not extracted by salicylideneaniline  diluted in 1-octanol. Copper(II is only extracted by salicylideneaniline and it was found that the highest extractability achieved to 95% at pH 4.9, The stoichiometry of the extracted species was determined by using the method of slope analysis. Elemental analysis, UV–vis and IR-spectra were used to confirm the structure. It is found that the copper (II is extracted as CuL2.2H2O Their equilibrium constant, distribution coefficient, percentage extraction (%E and free energy are also calculated.

  17. Effects of pressure drawdown and recovery on the Cerro Prieto beta reservoir in the CP-III area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truesdell, A.H. [Truesdell (Alfred H.), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lippmann, M.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-02-01

    The production characteristics of wells in the northwestern Cerro Prieto III area changed greatly when the Cp-III power plant went on line in 1986. Fluid extraction in the field more than doubled and reservoir-wide boiling started immediately, greatly increasing the enthalpy of produced fluids. Some well fluids showed a decrease in chloride due to adiabatic steam condensation in the well and separator, and others were enriched in chloride due to boiling. As reservoir drawdown increased, entrance of cooler and more dilute groundwaters into the reservoir became evident (i.e., condensation stopped, and there was a decrease in enthalpy and chloride in produced fluids). Although some groundwater inflow was from the leaky western margin of the reservoir, the majority is in the northeast, inferred to be local and downward, possibly through more permeable zones associated with the normal fault H. This natural recharge and some reinjection have slowed and possibly reversed pressure drawdown throughout CP-III. Enthalpy has decreased and liquid saturation has increased as the steam-rich zone in the upper part of the reservoir has either disappeared or become thinner.

  18. Integration of Aquifer Storage Transfer and Recovery and HACCP for Ensuring Drinking Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. I.; Ji, H. W.

    2015-12-01

    The integration of ASTR (Aquifer Storage Transfer and Recovery) and HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point) is being attempted to ensure drinking water quality in a delta area. ASTR is a water supply system in which surface water is injected into a well for storage and recovered from a different well. During the process natural water treatment is achieved in the aquifer. ASTR has advantages over surface reservoirs in that the water is protected from external contaminants and free from water loss by evaporation. HACCP, originated from the food industry, can efficiently manage hazards and reduce risks when it is introduced to the drinking water production. The study area is the located in the Nakdong River Delta, South Korea. Water quality of this region has been deteriorated due to the increased pollution loads from the upstream cities and industrial complexes. ASTR equipped with HACCP system is suggested as a means to heighten the public trust in drinking water. After the drinking water supply system using ASTR was decomposed into ten processes, principles of HACCP were applied. Hazardous event analysis was conducted for 114 hazardous events and nine major hazardous events were identified based on the likelihood and the severity assessment. Potential risk of chemical hazards, as a function of amounts, travel distance and toxicity, was evaluated and the result shows the relative threat a city poses to the drinking water supply facility. Next, critical control points were determined using decision tree analysis. Critical limits, maximum and/or minimum values to which biological, chemical or physical parameters must be controlled, were established. Other procedures such as monitoring, corrective actions and will be presented.

  19. Recovery of metals from waste printed circuit boards by supercritical water pre-treatment combined with acid leaching process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Fu-Rong; Qi, Yingying; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2013-05-01

    Waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) contain a large number of metals such as Cu, Sn, Pb, Cd, Cr, Zn, and Mn. In this work, an efficient and environmentally friendly process for metals recovery from waste PCBs by supercritical water (SCW) pre-treatment combined with acid leaching was developed. In the proposed process, waste PCBs were pre-treated by SCW, then the separated solid phase product with concentrated metals was subjected to an acid leaching process for metals recovery. The effect of SCW pre-treatment on the recovery of different metals from waste PCBs was investigated. Two methods of SCW pre-treatment were studied: supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) and supercritical water depolymerization (SCWD). Experimental results indicated that SCWO and SCWD pre-treatment had significant effect on the recovery of different metals. SCWO pre-treatment was highly efficient for enhancing the recovery of Cu and Pb, and the recovery efficiency increased significantly with increasing pre-treatment temperature. The recovery efficiency of Cu and Pb for SCWO pre-treatment at 420°C was 99.8% and 80%, respectively, whereas most of the Sn and Cr were immobilized in the residue. The recovery of all studied metals was enhanced by SCWD pre-treatment and increased along with pre-treatment temperature. Up to 90% of Sn, Zn, Cr, Cd, and Mn could be recovered for SCWD pre-treatment at 440°C. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of early physiotherapy on the recovery of mandibular function after orthognathic surgery for class III correction. Part II: electromyographic activity of masticatory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Teng, Terry Te-Yi; Huang, Chiung Shing; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of early physical rehabilitation by comparing the differences of surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles after surgical correction of skeletal class III malocclusion. The prospective study included 63 patients; the experimental groups contained 31 patients who received early systematic physical rehabilitation; the control group (32 patients) did not receive physiotherapy. The amplitude of sEMG in the masticatory muscles reached 72.6-121.3% and 37.5-64.6% of pre-surgical values in the experimental and control groups respectively at 6 weeks after orthognathic surgery (OGS). At 6 months after OGS, the sEMG reached 135.1-233.4% and 89.6-122.5% of pre-surgical values in the experimental and control groups respectively. Most variables in the sEMG examination indicated that recovery of the masticatory muscles in the experimental group was better than the control group as estimated in the early phase (T1 to T2) and the total phase (T1 to T3); there were no significant differences between the mean recovery percentages in the later phase (T2 to T3). Early physical rehabilitative therapy is helpful for early recovery of muscle activity in masticatory muscles after OGS. After termination of physical therapy, no significant difference in recovery was indicated in patients with or without early physiotherapy. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biofouling of contaminated ground-water recovery wells: Characterization of microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, S.W. [Bechtel Environmental, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lange, C.R. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Lesold, E.A. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The taxonomy and physiology of microorganisms isolated from contaminated ground-water recovery wells prone to biofouling are characterized for an industrial site in Rochester, New York. Principal aquifer contaminants include acetone, cyclohexane, dichloroethane, dichloromethane, 1,4-dioxane, isopropanol, methanol, and toluene. These contaminants represent a significant fraction (up to 95%) of the total organic carbon in the ground water. Ground-water samples from 12 recovery wells were used to isolate, quantify, and identify aerobic and anaerobic bacterial populations. Samples from selected wells were also characterized geochemically to assess redox conditions and availability of essential and trace nutrients. Dominant bacteria, listed in order of descending numbers, including sulfate-reducers (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans), anaerobic heterotrophs (Actinomyces, Bacteriodes, Bacillus, Agrobacterium), aerobic heterotrophs (Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Nocardia, Citrobacter), iron-oxidizers (Gallionella ferruginea, Crenothrix polyspora), iron-reducers (Shewanella), and sulfur-oxidizers (Thiobacillus ferrooxidans). Fungi were also recovered in low numbers. Both aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophs were able to utilize all principal contaminants as sole carbon and energy sources except 1,4-dioxane. The prevalence of heterotrophic bacteria and their ability to use the available anthropogenic carbon suggests that aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophs contribute to the biofouling of wells at this site, in addition to the often cited fouling due to iron-oxidizing bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  2. Direct Energy Recovery from Primary and Secondary Sludges by Supercritical Water Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svanstroem, Magdalena; Modell, Michael; Tester, Jefferson

    2003-07-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) oxidizes organic and biological materials virtually completely to benign products without the need for stack gas scrubbing. Heavy metals are recovered as stabilized solid, along with the sand and clay that is present in the feed. The technology has been under development for twenty years. The major obstacle to commercialization has been developing reactors that are not clogged by inorganic solid deposits. That problem has been solved by using tubular reactors with fluid velocities that are high enough to keep solids in suspension. Recently, system designs have been created that reduce the cost of processing sewage sludges below that of incineration. At 10 wt-% dry solids, sludge can be oxidized with virtually complete recovery of the sludge heating value as hot water or high-pressure steam. Liquid carbon dioxide of high purity can be recovered from the gaseous effluent and excess oxygen can be recovered for recycle. The net effect is to reduce the stack to a harmless vent with minimal flow rate of a clean gas. Complete simulations have been developed using physical property models that accurately simulate the thermodynamic properties of sub- and supercritical water in mixtures with O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}. and organics. Capital and operating cost estimates are given for sewage sludge treatment, which are less costly than incineration. The scenario of direct recovery of energy from sludges has inherent benefits compared to other gasification or liquefaction options. (author)

  3. Simultaneous recovery of bacteria and viruses from contaminated water and spinach by a filtration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Julie; Guévremont, Évelyne; Gagné, Marie-Josée; Lamoureux, Lisyanne

    2011-01-05

    Water and leafy vegetables eaten fresh are increasingly reported as being involved in food-borne illness cases. The pathogenic agents responsible for these infections are mainly bacteria and viruses and are present in very small quantities on the contaminated food matrices. Laboratory techniques used to isolate or detect the contaminating agent differ enormously according to the type of microorganisms, generating time and economical losses. The purpose of this study was to optimize a single method which allows at the same time the recovery and concentration of these two main types of pathogenic organisms. Water and spinach samples were artificially contaminated with the feline calicivirus (FCV), rotavirus, hepatitis A virus (HAV), Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella Typhimurium. The principle behind the recovery technique is based on the use of a positively charged membrane which adsorbs both viruses and bacteria present in the water or in the rinse from the vegetables. Using conventional microbiology, PCR and RT-PCR, this filtration technique allowed a detection level superior to 10² CFU/g for S. Typhimurium, E. coli, L. monocytogenes and C. jejuni and to 10¹ PFU/g for FCV, HAV and rotavirus. This combined method can also be applied to other bacterial and viral species for the identification of the responsible agent for food-borne illnesses. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The enrichment and removal of arsenic (III) from water samples using HFSLM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafu, L. D.; Msagati, T. A. M.; Mamba, B. B.

    At specific concentrations oxyanions such as arsenic pose a major threat to human beings and to the environment because of their ability to biomagnify. The World Health Organization has set the drinking water standard at 10 μg l-1 for arsenic. It is in this regard that novel and cheaper methods to detect oxyanions and remove them from the environment are developed. In this work, we have developed sample preparation methods involving solid phase and liquid membrane for the extraction and enrichment of these oxyanions in aqueous environments. Various parameters which govern their optimal extraction and enrichment have been optimised. The manipulation of the liquid membrane extraction process was utilised to selectively extract arsenic (III) which is more toxic as compared to arsenic (V). The liquid membrane consisted of a combination of two organic solvents, and n-undecane and di-n-hexyl ether were used in a combination at various ratios of the two liquid membranes. The means of detection was by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS) as well as inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The applicability of the method was tested in real wastewater samples where it was able to remove at least 50% of As (III) with enrichment factors of up to 20.

  5. The sorption-chromaticity determination of Fe(III in the waters of the galvanic production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Sukhanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Developed out express Sorption-colorimetric methods for the determination of iron in water, based on the sorption concentration of detecting component of the solution impregnated in the polyurethane foam, the formation on the surface of a colored compound and then its definition in the sorbent matrix by measuring color intensity or chromaticity characteristics. The first method is based on determining the agitation of the sample solution with a tablet impregnated with PPU known mass, from which the air bubbles are removed, the second dynamic – by sampling by suction solution in the analytical cartridge impregnated with PPU. Discoloration polyurethane indicates the presence of iron (III in water, and its content was determined by comparing the color intensity of foam tablets previously prepared color chart or chromaticity characteristics comparing analyte and standard solutions. The conditions of sorption-photometric analysis: the concentration of the photometric reagent impregnated in the foam, the degree of loading it impregnant, the phases of contact, the acidity of the environment. When using analytical cartridges lower limit of detection is 2 times higher, and the measurement error to 3.5% lower than with the tablets. The proposed test methods using polyurethane enable to carry out the analysis of wash water and the total flow of galvanizing plant before and after neutralization station “on the spot”, without the use of sophisticated instruments and highly skilled operator.

  6. Recovery of energy from geothermal brine and other hot water sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, III, Edward F.; Boucher, Frederic B.

    1981-01-01

    Process and system for recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources, by direct contact heat exchange between the brine or hot water, and an immiscible working fluid, e.g. a hydrocarbon such as isobutane, in a heat exchange column, the brine or hot water therein flowing countercurrent to the flow of the working fluid. The column can be operated at subcritical, critical or above the critical pressure of the working fluid. Preferably, the column is provided with a plurality of sieve plates, and the heat exchange process and column, e.g. with respect to the design of such plates, number of plates employed, spacing between plates, area thereof, column diameter, and the like, are designed to achieve maximum throughput of brine or hot water and reduction in temperature differential at the respective stages or plates between the brine or hot water and the working fluid, and so minimize lost work and maximize efficiency, and minimize scale deposition from hot water containing fluid including salts, such as brine. Maximum throughput approximates minimum cost of electricity which can be produced by conversion of the recovered thermal energy to electrical energy.

  7. Remediation and selective recovery of metals from acidic mine waters using novel modular bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrich, Sabrina; Johnson, D Barrie

    2014-10-21

    Mine waters are widely regarded as environmental pollutants, but are also potential sources of valuable metals. Water draining the Maurliden mine (Sweden) is highly acidic (pH 2.3) and rich in zinc (∼ 460 mg L(-1)) and iron (∼ 400 mg L(-1)), and contains smaller concentrations (0.3-49 mg L(-1)) of other transition metals and arsenic. We have developed novel techniques that promote the concurrent amelioration of acidic waste waters and selective recovery of metals, and have used these systems to treat synthetic Maurliden mine water in the laboratory. The two major metals present were removed via controlled biomineralization: zinc as ZnS in a sulfidogenic bioreactor, and iron as schwertmannite by microbial iron oxidation and precipitation of ferric iron. A small proportion (∼ 11%) of the schwertmannite produced was used to remove arsenic as the initial step in the process, and other chalcophilic metals (copper, cadmium and cobalt) were removed (as sulfides) in the stage 1 metal sulfide precipitation reactor. Results from this work have demonstrated that modular biomineralization units can be effective at processing complex mine waters and generating metal products that may be recycled. The economic and environmental benefits of using an integrated biological approach for treating metal-rich mine waters is discussed.

  8. Watering, fertilization, and slurry inoculation promote recovery of biological crust function in degraded soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, Fernando T; Martín, Noelia; Díez, Beatriz; López-Poma, Rosario; Santos, Fernando; Luque, Ignacio; Cortina, Jordi

    2006-10-01

    Biological soil crusts are very sensitive to human-induced disturbances and are in a degraded state in many areas throughout their range. Given their importance in the functioning of arid and semiarid ecosystems, restoring these crusts may contribute to the recovery of ecosystem functionality in degraded areas. We conducted a factorial microcosm experiment to evaluate the effects of inoculation type (discrete fragments vs slurry), fertilization (control vs addition of composted sewage sludge), and watering frequency (two vs five times per week) on the cyanobacterial composition, nitrogen fixation, chlorophyll content, and net CO2 exchange rate of biological soil crusts inoculated on a semiarid degraded soil from SE Spain. Six months after the inoculation, the highest rates of nitrogen fixation and chlorophyll a content were found when the biological crusts were inoculated as slurry, composted sewage sludge was added, and the microcosms were watered five times per week. Net CO2 exchange rate increased when biological crusts were inoculated as slurry and the microcosms were watered five times per week. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints and phylogenetic analyses indicated that most of the cyanobacterial species already present in the inoculated crust had the capability to spread and colonize the surface of the surrounding soil. These analyses showed that cyanobacterial communities were less diverse when the microcosms were watered five times per week, and that watering frequency (followed in importance by the addition of composted sewage sludge and inoculation type) was the treatment that most strongly influenced their composition. Our results suggest that the inoculation of biological soil crusts in the form of slurry combined with the addition of composted sewage sludge could be a suitable technique to accelerate the recovery of the composition and functioning of biological soil crusts in drylands.

  9. A study on the irradiation embrittlement and recovery characteristics of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung; Song, Sook Hyang; Milan, Brumovsky [NRI Czech (Czech Republic)

    1999-03-01

    The neutron irradiation embrittlement phenomenon of light water RPV steels greatly affects the life span for safe operation of a reactor. Reliable evaluation and prediction of the embrittlement of RPV steels, especially of aged reactors, are of importance to the safe operation of a reactor. In addition, the thermal recovery of embrittled RPV has been recognized as an option for life extension. This study aimed to tracer/refine available technologies for embrittlement characterization and prediction, to prepare relevant materials for several domestic RPV steels of the embrittlement and recovery, and to find out possible remedy for steel property betterment. Small specimen test techniques, magnetic measurement techniques, and the Meechan and Brinkmann's recovery curve analysis method were examined/applied as the evaluation techniques. Results revealed a high irradiation sensitivity in YG 3 RPV steel. Further extended study may be urgently needed. Both the small specimen test technique for the direct determination of fracture toughness, and the magnetic measurement technique for embrittlement evaluation appeared to be continued for the technical improvement and data base preparation. Manufacturing process relevant to the heat treatment appeared to be improved in lowering the irradiation sensitivity of the steel. Further study is needed especially in applying the present techniques to the new structural materials under new irradiation environment of advanced reactors. (author)

  10. Ultrasound-assisted cloud point extraction for speciation and indirect spectrophotometric determination of chromium(III) and (VI) in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Mahdi; Daryanavard, Seyed Mosayeb

    Ultrasound-assisted cloud point extraction (UACPE) procedure was developed for speciation and indirect spectrophotometric determination of chromium(III) and (VI) in environmental water samples. The method is based on the reduction of Cr(VI) by iodide in acidic media and subsequently formation of I3- anion. The I3- formed can further react with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and induce its clouding due to formation of an ion-association complex. The formed complex was separated from solution and dissolved in ethanol for spectrophotometric measurement. Cerium(IV) ammonium sulphate was chosen as an oxidizing reagent for pre-oxidation step of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) species before the addition of iodide to the system, up to chromium in trivalent can be determined by the procedure. Experimental parameters for both spectrophotometric reaction and extraction procedure have been optimized. Under optimized conditions Cr(VI) can be determined in the range 20-400 ng mL-1 (R2 = 0.999). Detection limit, preconcentration factor and relative standard deviation were 12 ng mL-1, 20.0 and 2.2% (n = 5), respectively with 10 mL sample volumes. The proposed method has been successfully applied for determination of chromium(V) in spiked water, synthetic seawater and electroplating wastewater samples with average recoveries of 100.1, 99.4 and 99.1%, respectively.

  11. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  12. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  13. Combined desalination, water reuse, and aquifer storage and recovery to meet water supply demands in the GCC/MENA region

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2013-01-01

    Desalination is no longer considered as a nonconventional resource to supply potable water in several countries, especially in the Gulf Corporation Countries (GCC) and Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region as most of the big cities rely almost 100% on desalinated water for their supply. Due to the continuous increase in water demand, more large-scale plants are expected to be constructed in the region. However, most of the large cities in these countries have very limited water storage capacity, ranging from hours to a few days only and their groundwater capacity is very limited. The growing need for fresh water has led to significant cost reduction, because of technological improvements of desalination technologies which makes it an attractive option for water supply even in countries where desalination was unthinkable in the past. In the GCC/MENA region, operating records show that water demand is relatively constant during the year, while power demand varies considerably with a high peak in the summer season. However, desalination and power plants are economically and technically efficient only if they are fully operated at close to full capacity. In addition, desalination plants are exposed to external constraints leading to unexpected shutdowns (e.g. red tides). Hybridization of different technologies, including reverse osmosis and thermal-based plants, is used to balance the power to water mismatch in the demand by using the idle power from co-generation systems during low power demand periods. This has led to consideration of storage of additional desalinated water to allow for maximum production and stability in operation. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) would then be a good option to store the surplus of desalinated water which could be used when water demand is high or during unexpected shutdowns of desalination plants. In addition, increased reuse of treated wastewater could bring an integrated approach to water resources management. In this

  14. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poole, Loree Joanne [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1990-03-01

    Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO2 and H2S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, SUCCiOlC acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The

  15. Grey water treatment concept integrating water and carbon recovery and removal of micropollutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez Leal, L.; Zeeman, G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    A total treatment concept was developed for grey water from 32 houses in Sneek, The Netherlands. A thorough characterization of COD, nutrients, metals, micropollutants and anions was carried out. Four biological treatment systems were tested: aerobic, anaerobic, combined anaerobic¿+¿aerobic and a

  16. Flight Testing of the Forward Osmosis Bag for Water Recovery on STS-135

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael S.; Soler, Monica; Mortenson, Todd; McCoy, LaShelle; Woodward, Spencer; Levine, Howard G.

    2011-01-01

    The Forward Osmosis Bag (FOB) is a personal water purification device for recovery of potable liquid from almost any non-potable water source. The FOB experiment was flown as a sortie mission on STS-135/ULF7 using flight-certified materials and a design based on the X-Pack(TradeMark) from Hydration Technology Innovations (Albany, OR). The primary objective was to validate the technology for use under microgravity conditions. The FOB utilizes a difference in solute concentration across a selectively permeable membrane to draw water molecules from the non-potable water while rejecting most chemical and all microbial contaminants contained within. Six FOB devices were tested on STS-135 for their ability to produce a potable liquid permeate from a feed solution containing 500 mL potassium chloride (15 g/L) amended with 0.1% methyl blue dye (w:v) tracer against an osmotic gradient created by addition of 60 mL of concentrate containing the osmolytes fructose and glucose, and 0.01% sodium fluorescein (w:v) tracer. Three FOB devices were physically mixed by hand for 2 minutes by a crewmember after loading to augment membrane wetting for comparison with three unmixed FOB devices. Hydraulic flux rate and rejection of salt and dye in microgravity were determined from a 60-mL sample collected by the crew on orbit after 6 hours. Post-flight analysis of samples collected on orbit demonstrated that the Forward Osmosis Bag achieved expected design specifications in microgravity. The hydraulic flux rate of water across the membrane was reduced approximately 50% in microgravity relative to ground controls that generated an average of 50 mL per hour using the same water and osmolyte solutions. The membrane rejected both potassium and chloride at >92% and methyl blue dye at >99.9%. Physical mixing of the FOB during water recovery did not have any significant effect on either flux rate or rejection of solutes from the water solution. The absence of buoyancy-driven convection in

  17. A taxonomy of chemicals of emerging concern based on observed fate at water resource recovery facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven M; Chowdhury, Zaid K; Watts, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    As reuse of municipal water resource recovery facility (WRRF) effluent becomes vital to augment diminishing fresh drinking water resources, concern exists that conventional barriers may prove deficient, and the upcycling of chemicals of emerging concern (CECs) could prove harmful to human health and aquatic species if more effective and robust treatment barriers are not in place. A multiple month survey, of both primary and secondary effluents, from three (3) WRRFs, for 95 CECs was conducted in 2014 to classify CECs by their persistence through conventional water reclamation processes. By sampling the participating WRRF process trains at their peak performance (as determined by measured bulk organics and particulates removal), a short-list of recalcitrant CECs that warrant monitoring to assess treatment performance at advanced water reclamation and production facilities. The list of identified CECs for potable water reclamation (indirect or direct potable reuse) include a herbicide and its degradants, prescription pharmaceuticals and antibiotics, a female hormone, an artificial sweetener, and chlorinated flame retardants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Post-Flight Microbial Analysis of Samples from the International Space Station Water Recovery System and Oxygen Generation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmele, Michele N.

    2011-01-01

    The Regenerative, Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) on the International Space Station (ISS) includes the the Water Recovery System (WRS) and the Oxygen Generation System (OGS). The WRS consists of a Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) and Water Processor Assembly (WPA). This report describes microbial characterization of wastewater and surface samples collected from the WRS and OGS subsystems, returned to KSC, JSC, and MSFC on consecutive shuttle flights (STS-129 and STS-130) in 2009-10. STS-129 returned two filters that contained fluid samples from the WPA Waste Tank Orbital Recovery Unit (ORU), one from the waste tank and the other from the ISS humidity condensate. Direct count by microscopic enumeration revealed 8.38 x 104 cells per mL in the humidity condensate sample, but none of those cells were recoverable on solid agar media. In contrast, 3.32 x lOs cells per mL were measured from a surface swab of the WRS waste tank, including viable bacteria and fungi recovered after S12 days of incubation on solid agar media. Based on rDNA sequencing and phenotypic characterization, a fungus recovered from the filter was determined to be Lecythophora mutabilis. The bacterial isolate was identified by rDNA sequence data to be Methylobacterium radiotolerans. Additional UPA subsystem samples were returned on STS-130 for analysis. Both liquid and solid samples were collected from the Russian urine container (EDV), Distillation Assembly (DA) and Recycle Filter Tank Assembly (RFTA) for post-flight analysis. The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa and fungus Chaetomium brasiliense were isolated from the EDV samples. No viable bacteria or fungi were recovered from RFTA brine samples (N= 6), but multiple samples (N = 11) from the DA and RFTA were found to contain fungal and bacterial cells. Many recovered cells have been identified to genus by rDNA sequencing and carbon source utilization profiling (BiOLOG Gen III). The presence of viable bacteria and fungi from WRS

  19. Microbiological methods for the water recovery systems test, revision 1.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Tim; Kilgore, M. V., Jr.; Mikell, A. T., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Current microbiological parameters specified to verify microbiological quality of Space Station Freedom water quality include the enumeration of total bacteria, anaerobes, aerobes, yeasts and molds, enteric bacteria, gram positives, gram negatives, and E. coli. In addition, other parameters have been identified as necessary to support the Water Recovery Test activities to be conducted at the NASA/MSFC later this year. These other parameters include aerotolerant eutrophic mesophiles, legionellae, and an additional method for heterotrophic bacteria. If inter-laboratory data are to be compared to evaluate quality, analytical methods must be eliminated as a variable. Therefore, each participating laboratory must utilize the same analytical methods and procedures. Without this standardization, data can be neither compared nor validated between laboratories. Multiple laboratory participation represents a conservative approach to insure quality and completeness of data. Invariably, sample loss will occur in transport and analyses. Natural variance is a reality on any test of this magnitude and is further enhanced because biological entities, capable of growth and death, are specific parameters of interest. The large variation due to the participation of human test subjects has been noted with previous testing. The resultant data might be dismissed as 'out of control' unless intra-laboratory control is included as part of the method or if participating laboratories are not available for verification. The purpose of this document is to provide standardized laboratory procedures for the enumeration of certain microorganisms in water and wastewater specific to the water recovery systems test. The document consists of ten separate cultural methods and one direct count procedure. It is not intended nor is it implied to be a complete microbiological methods manual.

  20. The role of water channel proteins in facilitating recovery of leaf hydraulic conductance from water stress in Populus trichocarpa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Laur

    Full Text Available Gas exchange is constrained by the whole-plant hydraulic conductance (Kplant. Leaves account for an important fraction of Kplant and may therefore represent a major determinant of plant productivity. Leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf decreases with increasing water stress, which is due to xylem embolism in leaf veins and/or the properties of the extra-xylary pathway. Water flow through living tissues is facilitated and regulated by water channel proteins called aquaporins (AQPs. Here we assessed changes in the hydraulic conductance of Populus trichocarpa leaves during a dehydration-rewatering episode. While leaves were highly sensitive to drought, Kleaf recovered only 2 hours after plants were rewatered. Recovery of Kleaf was absent when excised leaves were bench-dried and subsequently xylem-perfused with a solution containing AQP inhibitors. We examined the expression patterns of 12 highly expressed AQP genes during a dehydration-rehydration episode to identify isoforms that may be involved in leaf hydraulic adjustments. Among the AQPs tested, several genes encoding tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs showed large increases in expression in rehydrated leaves, suggesting that TIPs contribute to reversing drought-induced reductions in Kleaf. TIPs were localized in xylem parenchyma, consistent with a role in facilitating water exchange between xylem vessels and adjacent living cells. Dye uptake experiments suggested that reversible embolism formation in minor leaf veins contributed to the observed changes in Kleaf.

  1. Salinity of injection water and its impact on oil recovery absolute permeability, residual oil saturation, interfacial tension and capillary pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mohammad Salehi

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents laboratory investigation of the effect of salinity injection water on oil recovery, pressure drop, permeability, IFT and relative permeability in water flooding process. The experiments were conducted at the 80 °C and a net overburden pressure of 1700 psi using core sample. The results of this study have been shown oil recovery increases as the injected water salinity up to 200,000 ppm and appointment optimum salinity. This increase has been found to be supported by a decrease in the IFT. This effect caused a reduction in capillary pressure increasing the tendency to reduce the residual oil saturation.

  2. A study of water chemistry extends the benefits of using silica-based nanoparticles on enhanced oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendraningrat, Luky; Torsæter, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Chemistry of the injected water has been investigated as an important parameter to improve/enhance oil recovery (IOR/EOR). Numerous extensive experiments have observed that water chemistry, such as ionic composition and salinity, can be modified for IOR/EOR purposes. However, the possible oil displacement mechanism remains debatable. Nanoparticle recently becomes more popular that have shown a great potential for IOR/EOR purposes in lab-scale, where in most experiments, water-based fluid were used as dispersed fluid. As yet, there has been no discussion in the literature on the study of water chemistry on enhanced oil recovery using silica-based nanoparticles. A broad range of laboratory studies involving rock, nanoparticles and fluid characterization; fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions; surface conductivity measurement; coreflood experiment; injection strategy formulation; filtration mechanism and contact angle measurement are conducted to investigate the impact of water chemistry, such as water salinity and ionic composition including hardness cations, on the performance of silica-based nanoparticles in IOR/EOR process and reveal possible displacement mechanism. The experimental results demonstrated that water salinity and ionic composition significantly impacted oil recovery using hydrophilic silica-based nanoparticles and that the oil recovery increased with the salinity. The primary findings from this study are that the water salinity, the ionic composition and the injection strategy are important parameters to be considered in Nano-EOR.

  3. Photoinduced oxidation of a water-soluble manganese(III) porphyrin

    OpenAIRE

    Maliyackel, Anthony C.; Otvos, John W.; Spreer, Larry O.; Calvin, Melvin

    1986-01-01

    The photoinduced oxidation of tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrinmanganese(III) has been achieved in homogeneous solution. The manganese porphyrin was used as an electron donor in a three-component system with tris-(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) as the photosensitizer and chloropentaamminecobalt(III) as the electron acceptor. The photooxidized manganese porphyrin is unstable in aqueous solution, reverting to the starting manganese(III) porphyrin. The oxidation of manganese(III) porphyrin and t...

  4. Interact to Survive: Phyllobacterium brassicacearum Improves Arabidopsis Tolerance to Severe Water Deficit and Growth Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresson, Justine; Vasseur, François; Dauzat, Myriam; Labadie, Marc; Varoquaux, Fabrice; Touraine, Bruno; Vile, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Mutualistic bacteria can alter plant phenotypes and confer new abilities to plants. Some plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are known to improve both plant growth and tolerance to multiple stresses, including drought, but reports on their effects on plant survival under severe water deficits are scarce. We investigated the effect of Phyllobacterium brassicacearum STM196 strain, a PGPR isolated from the rhizosphere of oilseed rape, on survival, growth and physiological responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to severe water deficits combining destructive and non-destructive high-throughput phenotyping. Soil inoculation with STM196 greatly increased the survival rate of A. thaliana under several scenarios of severe water deficit. Photosystem II efficiency, assessed at the whole-plant level by high-throughput fluorescence imaging (Fv/Fm), was related to the probability of survival and revealed that STM196 delayed plant mortality. Inoculated surviving plants tolerated more damages to the photosynthetic tissues through a delayed dehydration and a better tolerance to low water status. Importantly, STM196 allowed a better recovery of plant growth after rewatering and stressed plants reached a similar biomass at flowering than non-stressed plants. Our results highlight the importance of plant-bacteria interactions in plant responses to severe drought and provide a new avenue of investigations to improve drought tolerance in agriculture. PMID:25226036

  5. Interact to survive: Phyllobacterium brassicacearum improves Arabidopsis tolerance to severe water deficit and growth recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine Bresson

    Full Text Available Mutualistic bacteria can alter plant phenotypes and confer new abilities to plants. Some plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR are known to improve both plant growth and tolerance to multiple stresses, including drought, but reports on their effects on plant survival under severe water deficits are scarce. We investigated the effect of Phyllobacterium brassicacearum STM196 strain, a PGPR isolated from the rhizosphere of oilseed rape, on survival, growth and physiological responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to severe water deficits combining destructive and non-destructive high-throughput phenotyping. Soil inoculation with STM196 greatly increased the survival rate of A. thaliana under several scenarios of severe water deficit. Photosystem II efficiency, assessed at the whole-plant level by high-throughput fluorescence imaging (Fv/Fm, was related to the probability of survival and revealed that STM196 delayed plant mortality. Inoculated surviving plants tolerated more damages to the photosynthetic tissues through a delayed dehydration and a better tolerance to low water status. Importantly, STM196 allowed a better recovery of plant growth after rewatering and stressed plants reached a similar biomass at flowering than non-stressed plants. Our results highlight the importance of plant-bacteria interactions in plant responses to severe drought and provide a new avenue of investigations to improve drought tolerance in agriculture.

  6. Energy consumption by forward osmosis treatment of landfill leachate for water recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, Syeed Md; Zou, Shiqiang; Brazil, Brian; Novak, John T; He, Zhen

    2017-05-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) is an alternative approach for treating landfill leachate with potential advantages of reducing leachate volume and recovering high quality water for direct discharge or reuse. However, energy consumption by FO treatment of leachate has not been examined before. Herein, the operational factors such as recirculation rates and draw concentrations were studied for their effects on the quantified energy consumption by an FO system treating actual leachate collected from two different landfills. It was found that the energy consumption increased with a higher recirculation rate and decreased with a higher draw concentration, and higher water recovery tended to reduce energy consumption. The highest energy consumption was 0.276±0.033kWhm -3 with the recirculation rate of 110mLmin -1 and 1-M draw concentration, while the lowest of 0.005±0.000kWhm -3 was obtained with 30mLmin -1 recirculation and 3-M draw concentration. The leachate with lower concentrations of the contaminants had a much lower requirement for energy, benefited from its higher water recovery. Osmotic backwashing appeared to be more effective for removing foulants, but precise understanding of membrane fouling and its controlling methods will need a long-term study. The results of this work have implied that FO treatment of leachate could be energy efficient, especially with the use of a suitable draw solute that can be regenerated in an energy efficient way and/or through combination with other treatment technologies that can reduce contaminant concentrations before FO treatment, which warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Photosynthetic response of an alpine plant, Rhododendron delavayi Franch, to water stress and recovery: the role of mesophyll conductance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfei eCai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhododendron delavayi Franch is an evergreen shrub or small tree with large scarlet flowers that makes it highly attractive as an ornamental species. The species is native to southwest China and southeast Asia, especially the Himalayan region, showing good adaptability and tolerance to drought. To understand the water stress coping mechanisms of R. delavayi, we analysed the plant’s photosynthetic performance during water stress and recovery. In particular, we looked at the regulation of stomatal (gs and mesophyll conductance (gm, and maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax. After four days of water stress treatment, the net CO2 assimilation rate (AN declined slightly while gs and gm were not affected and stomatal limitation (SL was therefore negligible. At this stage mesophyll conductance limitation (MCL and biochemical limitation (BL constituted the main limitation factors. After eight days of water stress treatment, AN, gs and gm had decreased notably. At this stage SL increased markedly and MCL even more so, while BL remained relatively constant. After re-watering, the recovery of AN, gs and gm was rapid, although remaining below the levels of the control plants, while Vcmax fully regained control levels after three days of re-watering. MCL remained the main limitation factor irrespective of the degree of photosynthetic recovery. In conclusion, in our experiment MCL was the main photosynthetic limitation factor of R. delavayi under water stress and during the recovery phase, with the regulation of gm probably being the result of interactions between the environment and leaf anatomical features.

  8. Next generation of CO2 enhanced water recovery with subsurface energy storage in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Kühn, Michael; Ma, Jianli; Niu, Zhiyong

    2017-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) utilization and storage (CCUS) is very popular in comparison with traditional CO2 capture and storage (CCS) in China. In particular, CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers with enhanced water recovery (CO2-EWR) [1] is gaining more and more attention as a cleaner production technology. The CO2-EWR was written into the "U.S.-China Joint Announcement on Climate Change" released November 11, 2014. "Both sides will work to manage climate change by demonstrating a new frontier for CO2 use through a carbon capture, use, and sequestration (CCUS) project that will capture and store CO2 while producing fresh water, thus demonstrating power generation as a net producer of water instead of a water consumer. This CCUS project with enhanced water recovery will eventually inject about 1.0 million tonnes of CO2 and create approximately 1.4 million cubic meters of freshwater per year." In this article, at first we reviewed the history of the CO2-EWR and addressed its current status in China. Then, we put forth a new generation of the CO2-EWR with emphasizing the collaborative solutions between carbon emission reductions and subsurface energy storage or renewable energy cycle [2]. Furthermore, we figured out the key challenging problems such as water-CCUS nexus when integrating the CO2-EWR with the coal chemical industry in the Junggar Basin, Xinjiang, China [3-5]. Finally, we addressed some crucial problems and strategic consideration of the CO2-EWR in China with focuses on its technical bottleneck, relative advantage, early opportunities, environmental synergies and other related issues. This research is not only very useful for the current development of CCUS in the relative "cold season" but also beneficial for the energy security and clean production in China. [1] Li Q, Wei Y-N, Liu G, Shi H (2015) CO2-EWR: a cleaner solution for coal chemical industry in China. Journal of Cleaner Production 103:330-337. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.09.073 [2] Streibel M

  9. Natural recovery and leaf water potential after fire influenced by salvage logging and induced drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Moya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Salvage logging is one of the most common emergency actions in the short-term management after a fire. Several studies have been carried out and some obtained positive results which incite to carry it out but other, found negative effects on seedling establishment and regeneration. In addition, climatic changes will have large impacts on vegetation productivity and resilience since the regional models for south-eastern Spain predicts a rainfall decrease of about 20% and temperature increase of 4.5 ºC. Our aim was to determine how short-term forest management and induced drought affect the ecosystem recovery in Aleppo pine stands naturally recovered after a fire.In summer 2009, a mid-high severity fire burned 968 ha of Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Mill. forest in south-eastern Spain. Six months later, a salvage logging was carried out. The Aleppo pine recruitment was negligible. During summer 2010, twelve square plots (2m x 2m were set in the three scenarios: control, salvaged and drought induced. The surface cover and soil water availability for three dominant understory species were recorded in four field campaigns: Spring-2010, Fall-2010, Spring-2011 and Fall-2011.The season, management and the target species showed significant differences in growing and water stress. In general, Esparto grass showed lower water stress, mainly in Fall, a higher increase of total coverage. Both effects were showing their highest values in non-salvaged areas and no drought. Changes in leaf water potential and soil water content after the drought season influence the survival and development of individuals.Our results indicate that soil water content and ecosystem response can be modified by short-term silvicultural treatments. Therefore, management after fire could cause opposite effects to those initially foreseen, since they depend on fire severity, and type of ecosystem management response. So, their application must be evaluated and assessed before

  10. The Advanced Exploration Systems Water Recovery Project: Innovation on 2 Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam M.; Neumeyer, Derek; Shull, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    As NASA looks forward to sending humans farther away from Earth, we will have to develop a transportation architecture that is highly reliable and that can sustain life for long durations without the benefit of Earth s proximity for continuous resupply or even operational guidance. NASA has consistently been challenged with performing great feats of innovation, but particularly in this time of economic stress, we are challenged to go farther with less. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) projects were implemented to address both of these needs by not only developing innovative technologies, but by incorporating innovative management styles and processes that foster the needed technical innovation given a small amount of resources. This presentation explains how the AES Water Recovery Project is exhibiting innovation on both fronts; technical and process. The AES Water Recovery Project (WRP) is actively engineering innovative technologies in order to maximize the efficiency of water recovery. The development of reliable, energy-efficient, and low-mass spacecraft systems to provide environmental control and life support (ECLS) is critical to enable long-duration human missions outside of low-Earth orbit. Recycling of life support consumables is necessary to reduce resupply mass and provide for vehicle autonomy. To address this, the WRP is working on a rotary distiller that has shown enhanced performance over the state-of-the-art (SOA). Additionally, the WRP is looking at innovative ways to address issues present in the state-of-the-art (SOA) systems pertaining to toxicity and calcium scale buildup. As an AES project, the WRP has a more streamlined Skunk Works like approach to technology development intended to reduce overhead but achieve a more refined end product. The project has incorporated key partnerships between NASA centers as well as between NASA and industry. A minimal project management style has been implemented such that risks are managed and

  11. Salinity of injection water and its impact on oil recovery absolute permeability, residual oil saturation, interfacial tension and capillary pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Salehi, Mehdi; Omidvar, Pouria; Naeimi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory tests and field applications show that low-salinity water flooding could lead to significant reduction of residual oil saturation. There has been a growing interest with an increasing number of low-salinity water flooding studies. However, there are few quantitative studies on flow and transport behavior of low-salinity IOR processes. This paper presents laboratory investigation of the effect of salinity injection water on oil recovery, pressure drop, permeability, IFT and relat...

  12. Stagewise processing of yellow water using clinoptilolite for nitrogen and phosphorus recovery and higher residual quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allar, A D; Beler Baykal, B

    2015-01-01

    Source-separated human urine may be used as a source of fertilizers indirectly through processing with clinoptilolite. The suggested form of fertilizer is clinoptilolite loaded with plant nutrients from urine, where nitrogen and phosphorus will be released upon contact with water. Triggered by the need for handling high concentrations remaining in the liquid phase to be disposed of, this paper aims to present the option of improving the residual nutrient quality through stagewise processing with clinoptilolite, while investigating any improvement in nutrient removal. Two sets of experiments, stagewise operation under (i) constant loadings and (ii) variable loadings in each stage, are discussed. Stagewise operation has been observed to be successful for attaining reduced residual liquid phase concentrations as well as improvements in nitrogen recovery as compared to single-stage operation. Comparing constant and variable stagewise loadings, the final concentration is 10 times lower with variable loadings. The latter is comparable to a level found in only 1% of conventional domestic wastewater volume. Stagewise operation was beneficial from the standpoint of both additional nutrient recovery and for residuals control, with more pronounced benefits for attaining higher quality residual liquid phase concentrations to be disposed of.

  13. Identification of Preferential Paths of Fossil Carbon within Water Resource Recovery Facilities via Radiocarbon Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Linda Y; Robinson, Alice K; Zhang, Xiaying; Xu, Xiaomei; Southon, John; Hamilton, Andrew J; Sobhani, Reza; Stenstrom, Michael K; Rosso, Diego

    2016-11-15

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reported that all carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions generated by water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) during treatment are modern, based on available literature. Therefore, such emissions were omitted from IPCC's greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting procedures. However, a fraction of wastewater's carbon is fossil in origin. We hypothesized that since the fossil carbon entering municipal WRRFs is mostly from soaps and detergents as dissolved organic matter, its fate can be selectively determined during the universally applied separation treatment processes. Analyzing radiocarbon at different treatment points within municipal WRRFs, we verified that the fossil content could amount to 28% in primary influent and showed varying distribution leaving different unit operations. We recorded the highest proportion of fossil carbon leaving the secondary treatment as off-gas and as solid sludge (averaged 2.08 kg fossil-CO 2 -emission-potential m -3 wastewater treated). By including fossil CO 2 , total GHG emission in municipal WRRFs increased 13%, and 23% if an on-site energy recovery system exists although much of the postdigestion fossil carbon remained in biosolids rather than in biogas, offering yet another carbon sequestration opportunity during biosolids handling. In comparison, fossil carbon contribution to GHG emission can span from negligible to substantial in different types of industrial WRRFs. With such a considerable impact, CO 2 should be analyzed for each WRRF and not omitted from GHG accounting.

  14. Shape Recovery with Concomitant Mechanical Strengthening of Amphiphilic Shape Memory Polymers in Warm Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ben; DeBartolo, Janae E; Song, Jie

    2017-02-08

    Maintaining adequate or enhancing mechanical properties of shape memory polymers (SMPs) after shape recovery in an aqueous environment are greatly desired for biomedical applications of SMPs as self-fitting tissue scaffolds or minimally invasive surgical implants. Here we report stable temporary shape fixing and facile shape recovery of biodegradable triblock amphiphilic SMPs containing a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) center block and flanking poly(lactic acid) or poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) blocks in warm water, accompanied by concomitant enhanced mechanical strengths. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WXRD), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses revealed that the unique stiffening of the amphiphilic SMPs upon hydration was due to hydration-driven microphase separation and PEG crystallization. We further demonstrated that the chemical composition of degradable blocks in these SMPs could be tailored to affect the persistence of hydration-induced stiffening upon subsequent dehydration. These properties combined open new horizons for these amphiphilic SMPs for smart weight-bearing in vivo applications (e.g., as self-fitting intervertebral discs). This study also provides a new material design strategy to strengthen polymers in aqueous environment in general.

  15. Nanofiber Ion-Exchange Membranes for the Rapid Uptake and Recovery of Heavy Metals from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithinart Chitpong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of the performance of polyelectrolyte-modified nanofiber membranes was undertaken to determine their efficacy in the rapid uptake and recovery of heavy metals from impaired waters. The membranes were prepared by grafting poly(acrylic acid (PAA and poly(itaconic acid (PIA to cellulose nanofiber mats. Performance measurements quantified the dynamic ion-exchange capacity for cadmium (Cd, productivity, and recovery of Cd(II from the membranes by regeneration. The dynamic binding capacities of Cd(II on both types of nanofiber membrane were independent of the linear flow velocity, with a residence time of as low as 2 s. Analysis of breakthrough curves indicated that the mass flow rate increased rapidly at constant applied pressure after membranes approached equilibrium load capacity for Cd(II, apparently due to a collapse of the polymer chains on the membrane surface, leading to an increased porosity. This mechanism is supported by hydrodynamic radius (Rh measurements for PAA and PIA obtained from dynamic light scattering, which show that Rh values decrease upon Cd(II binding. Volumetric productivity was high for the nanofiber membranes, and reached 0.55 mg Cd/g/min. The use of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as regeneration reagent was effective in fully recovering Cd(II from the membranes. Ion-exchange capacities were constant over five cycles of binding-regeneration.

  16. Nanofiber Ion-Exchange Membranes for the Rapid Uptake and Recovery of Heavy Metals from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitpong, Nithinart; Husson, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    An evaluation of the performance of polyelectrolyte-modified nanofiber membranes was undertaken to determine their efficacy in the rapid uptake and recovery of heavy metals from impaired waters. The membranes were prepared by grafting poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(itaconic acid) (PIA) to cellulose nanofiber mats. Performance measurements quantified the dynamic ion-exchange capacity for cadmium (Cd), productivity, and recovery of Cd(II) from the membranes by regeneration. The dynamic binding capacities of Cd(II) on both types of nanofiber membrane were independent of the linear flow velocity, with a residence time of as low as 2 s. Analysis of breakthrough curves indicated that the mass flow rate increased rapidly at constant applied pressure after membranes approached equilibrium load capacity for Cd(II), apparently due to a collapse of the polymer chains on the membrane surface, leading to an increased porosity. This mechanism is supported by hydrodynamic radius (Rh) measurements for PAA and PIA obtained from dynamic light scattering, which show that Rh values decrease upon Cd(II) binding. Volumetric productivity was high for the nanofiber membranes, and reached 0.55 mg Cd/g/min. The use of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as regeneration reagent was effective in fully recovering Cd(II) from the membranes. Ion-exchange capacities were constant over five cycles of binding-regeneration. PMID:27999394

  17. Recovery of hexavalent chromium from water using photoactive TiO2-montmorillonite under sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Djellabi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium was removed from water under sunlight using a synthesized TiO2-montmorillonite (TiO2-M employing tartaric acid as a hole scavenger. Cr(VI species was then reduced to Cr(III species by electrons arising from TiO2 particles. After that, the produced Cr(III species  was transferred to montmorillonite  due to electrostatic attractions leading to  set free TiO2 particles for a further Cr(VI species reduction. Furthermore, produced Cr(III, after Cr(VI reduction, does not  penetrate into the solution. The results indicate that no dark adsorption of Cr(VI species on TiO2-M is present, however, the reduction of Cr(VI species under sunlight increased strongly as a function of tartaric acid concentration up to 60 ppm, for which the extent of reduction is maximum within 3 h. On the other hand, the reduction extent of Cr(VI species is maximum with an initial concentration of Cr(VI species lower than 30 ppm by the use of 0.2 g/L of TiO2-M. Nevertheless, the increase of the Cr(VI initial concentration led to increase the amount of Cr(VI species reduced (capacity of reduction until a Cr(VI concentration of 75 and 100 ppm, for which  it remained constant at around 221 mg/g. For comparison, the increase of Cr(VI species concentration in the case of the commercial TiO2 P25 under the same conditions exhibited its deactivation when the reduced amount decreased from 198.1 to 157.6 mg/g as the concentration increased from 75 to 100 ppm.

  18. Recovery, a mathematical model to predict the temporal response of surface water to contaminated sediments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, J.M.; Chapra, S.C.; Ruiz, C.E.; Dortch, M.S.

    1994-11-01

    RECOVERY is a PC-based screening-level model to assess the impact of contaminated bottom sediments on surface waters. The analysis is limited to organic contaminants with the assumption that the water column is well mixed. The contaminant is assumed to follow linear, reversible, equilibrium sorption and first-order decay kinetics. The physical representation of a system by RECOVERY consists of a well-mixed water column (i.e., zero- dimensional) underlain by a vertically stratified sediment column (i.e., one-dimensional). The sediment is well mixed horizontally, but segmented vertically into a well-mixed surface (active) layer and deep sediment. The deep sediment is segmented into contaminated and clean sediment regions. Pathways incorporated in the RECOVERY model, in addition to sorption and decay, are volatilization, burial, resuspension, settling, advection, and pore-water diffusion. RECOVERY is designed for interactive implementation via a personal computer. The program allows the user to rapidly generate and analyze recovery scenarios for contaminated sediments. The software includes graphical displays and is self-documented. A description of the model, a confumation application, and a user`s guide are included in this report.

  19. Dynamic Modeling of Process Technologies for Closed-Loop Water Recovery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allada, Rama Kumar; Lange, Kevin E.; Anderson, Molly S.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed chemical process simulations are a useful tool in designing and optimizing complex systems and architectures for human life support. Dynamic and steady-state models of these systems help contrast the interactions of various operating parameters and hardware designs, which become extremely useful in trade-study analyses. NASA s Exploration Life Support technology development project recently made use of such models to compliment a series of tests on different waste water distillation systems. This paper presents dynamic simulations of chemical process for primary processor technologies including: the Cascade Distillation System (CDS), the Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) system, the Wiped-Film Rotating Disk (WFRD), and post-distillation water polishing processes such as the Volatiles Removal Assembly (VRA). These dynamic models were developed using the Aspen Custom Modeler (Registered TradeMark) and Aspen Plus(Registered TradeMark) process simulation tools. The results expand upon previous work for water recovery technology models and emphasize dynamic process modeling and results. The paper discusses system design, modeling details, and model results for each technology and presents some comparisons between the model results and available test data. Following these initial comparisons, some general conclusions and forward work are discussed.

  20. An integrated approach to energy recovery from biomass and waste: Anaerobic digestion-gasification-water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, M; Montorsi, L; Stefani, M

    2014-07-01

    The article investigates the performance of an integrated system for the energy recovery from biomass and waste based on anaerobic digestion, gasification and water treatment. In the proposed system, the organic fraction of waste of the digestible biomass is fed into an anaerobic digester, while a part of the combustible fraction of the municipal solid waste is gasified. Thus, the obtained biogas and syngas are used as a fuel for running a cogeneration system based on an internal combustion engine to produce electric and thermal power. The waste water produced by the integrated plant is recovered by means of both forward and inverse osmosis. The different processes, as well as the main components of the system, are modelled by means of a lumped and distributed parameter approach and the main outputs of the integrated plant such as the electric and thermal power and the amount of purified water are calculated. Finally, the implementation of the proposed system is evaluated for urban areas with a different number of inhabitants and the relating performance is estimated in terms of the main outputs of the system. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Water oxidation catalysis upon evolution of molecular Co(III) cubanes in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genoni, Andrea; La Ganga, Giuseppina; Volpe, Andrea; Puntoriero, Fausto; Di Valentin, Marilena; Bonchio, Marcella; Natali, Mirco; Sartorel, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The increasing global energy demand has stimulated great recent efforts in investigating new solutions for artificial photosynthesis, a potential source of clean and renewable solar fuel. In particular, according to the generally accepted modular approach aimed at optimising separately the different compartments of the entire process, many studies have focused on the development of catalytic systems for water oxidation to oxygen. While in recent years there have been many reports on new catalytic systems, the mechanism and the active intermediates operating the catalysis have been less investigated. Well-defined, molecular catalysts, constituted by transition metals stabilised by a suitable ligand pool, could help in solving this aspect. However, in some cases molecular species have been shown to evolve to active metal oxides that constitute the other side of this catalysis dichotomy. In this paper, we address the evolution of tetracobalt(III) cubanes, stabilised by a pyridine/acetate ligand pool, to active species that perform water oxidation to oxygen. Primary evolution of the cubane in aqueous solution is likely initiated by removal of an acetate bridge, opening the coordination sphere of the cobalt centres. This cobalt derivative, where the pristine ligands still impact on the reactivity, shows enhanced electron transfer rates to Ru(bpy)3(3+) (hole scavenging) within a photocatalytic cycle with Ru(bpy)3(2+) as the photosensitiser and S2O8(2-) as the electron sink. A more accentuated evolution occurs under continuous irradiation, where Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy reveals the formation of Co(ii) intermediates, likely contributing to the catalytic process that evolves oxygen. All together, these results confirm the relevant effect of molecular species, in particular in fostering the rate of the electron transfer processes involved in light activated cycles, pivotal in the design of a photoactive device.

  2. Zinc recovery from the water-jacket furnace flue dusts by leaching and electrowinning in a SEC-CCS cell

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mukongo, T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Mukongo_d1_2009.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 35577 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Mukongo_d1_2009.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Zinc recovery from the water..., dusts, recovery, electrowinning return solution, SEC-C.C.S. cell. 1. Introduction The copper matte smelting in water-jacket furnaces in Lubumbashi plants yields three separated phases consisting of a matte, a slag and the dusts. The copper sulphide...

  3. Effects of In-Water Passive Recovery on Sprint Swimming Performance and Heart Rate in Adolescent Swimmers

    OpenAIRE

    Casuso, Rafael A.; Emilio Martínez-López, Fidel Hita-Contreras, Irene Ruiz-Cazalilla, David Cruz-Díaz, Antonio Martínez-Amat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to test the hypothesis that sprint swimming performance is enhanced by in-water passive recovery (IN) after sprint swimming bouts in well-trained adolescent swimmers. Using a randomized crossover study design, twelve well-trained adolescent swimmers performed two tests at the swimming pool after preliminary testing. They performed 5 bouts of 100m all-out swimming separated by 5 minutes of passive rest. Their individual in- or out-of-water passive recovery condi...

  4. Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsions for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, David; Golomb, Dan; Shi, Guang; Shih, Cherry; Lewczuk, Rob; Miksch, Joshua; Manmode, Rahul; Mulagapati, Srihariraju; Malepati, Chetankurmar

    2011-09-30

    This project involves the use of an innovative new invention Particle Stabilized Emulsions (PSEs) of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water and Water-in-Carbon Dioxide for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. The EOR emulsion would be injected into a semi-depleted oil reservoir such as Dover 33 in Otsego County, Michigan. It is expected that the emulsion would dislocate the stranded heavy crude oil from the rock granule surfaces, reduce its viscosity, and increase its mobility. The advancing emulsion front should provide viscosity control which drives the reduced-viscosity oil toward the production wells. The make-up of the emulsion would be subsequently changed so it interacts with the surrounding rock minerals in order to enhance mineralization, thereby providing permanent sequestration of the injected CO{sub 2}. In Phase 1 of the project, the following tasks were accomplished: 1. Perform laboratory scale (mL/min) refinements on existing procedures for producing liquid carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) and water-in-liquid carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsion stabilized by hydrophilic and hydrophobic fine particles, respectively, using a Kenics-type static mixer. 2. Design and cost evaluate scaled up (gal/min) C/W and W/C emulsification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 at the Otsego County semi-depleted oil field. 3. Design the modifications necessary to the present CO{sub 2} flooding system at Otsego County for emulsion injection. 4. Design monitoring and verification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 for measuring potential leakage of CO{sub 2} after emulsion injection. 5. Design production protocol to assess enhanced oil recovery with emulsion injection compared to present recovery with neat CO{sub 2} flooding. 6. Obtain Federal and State permits for emulsion injection. Initial research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions with the smallest possible globule size so that the emulsion can penetrate even low-permeability crude

  5. Multistate evaluation of an ultrafiltration-based procedure for simultaneous recovery of enteric microbes in 100-liter tap water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Vincent R; Kahler, Amy M; Jothikumar, Narayanan; Johnson, Trisha B; Hahn, Donghyun; Cromeans, Theresa L

    2007-07-01

    Ultrafiltration (UF) is increasingly being recognized as a potentially effective procedure for concentrating and recovering microbes from large volumes of water and treated wastewater. Because of their very small pore sizes, UF membranes are capable of simultaneously concentrating viruses, bacteria, and parasites based on size exclusion. In this study, a UF-based water sampling procedure was used to simultaneously recover representatives of these three microbial classes seeded into 100-liter samples of tap water collected from eight cities covering six hydrologic areas of the United States. The UF-based procedure included hollow-fiber UF as the primary step for concentrating microbes and then used membrane filtration for bacterial culture assays, immunomagnetic separation for parasite recovery and quantification, and centrifugal UF for secondary concentration of viruses. Water samples were tested for nine water quality parameters to investigate whether water quality data correlated with measured recovery efficiencies and molecular detection levels. Average total method recovery efficiencies were 71, 97, 120, 110, and 91% for phiX174 bacteriophage, MS2 bacteriophage, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium perfringens spores, and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, respectively. Real-time PCR and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for seeded microbes and controls indicated that tap water quality could affect the analytical performance of molecular amplification assays, although no specific water quality parameter was found to correlate with reduced PCR or RT-PCR performance.

  6. Effects of In-Water Passive Recovery on Sprint Swimming Performance and Heart Rate in Adolescent Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Casuso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to test the hypothesis that sprint swimming performance is enhanced by in-water passive recovery (IN after sprint swimming bouts in well-trained adolescent swimmers. Using a randomized crossover study design, twelve well-trained adolescent swimmers performed two tests at the swimming pool after preliminary testing. They performed 5 bouts of 100m all-out swimming separated by 5 minutes of passive rest. Their individual in- or out-of-water passive recovery condition was randomized on the first day. In their second visit to the swimming pool the opposite recovery condition was indicated. More than 60% of the subjects which rested in-water were faster in the 5th bout when compared to the OUT group. However, no significant differences were found in blood lactate when IN and OUT were compared. After the first bout peak heart rate (HR peak was lower in subsequent bouts for IN recovery when compared with OUT (p < 0.001. Thus, coaches and researchers should take into account that IN passive recovery may decrease loss of performance and diminish HR peak during sprint swimming bouts. This is particularly important given the use that many coaches give to HR as a tool in daily training.

  7. Programmable Shape Recovery Process of Water-Responsive Shape-Memory Poly(vinyl alcohol) by Wettability Contrast Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhiqiang; Kuang, Yudi; Zhou, Panpan; Ming, Siyi; Zhu, Penghui; Liu, Yu; Ning, Honglong; Chen, Gang

    2017-02-15

    Water-responsive shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are desirable for biomedical applications, but their limited shape recovery process is problematic. Herein, we demonstrate a shape-memory poly(vinyl alcohol) (SM-PVA) with programmable multistep shape recovery processes in water via a wettability contrast strategy. A hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS)-treated SiO2 nanoparticle layer with varying loading weights was rationally deposited onto the surface of SM-PVA, aiming to create surface-wettability contrast. The varying wettability led to different water adsorption behaviors of SM-PVA that could be well-described by the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The results calculated from the kinetic model showed that both the pseudo-first order-adsorption rate constant and the saturated water absorption of SM-PVA demonstrated a declining trend as the loading weight of SiO2 increased, which laid the foundation for the local regulation of the water-responsive rate of SM-PVA. Finally, two proof-of-concept drug-delivery devices with diverse three-dimensional structures and actuations are presented based on the water-responsive SM-PVA with preprogrammed multistep shape recovery processes. We believe the programmable shape-memory behavior of water-responsive SM-PVA could highly extend its use in drug delivery, tissue engineering scaffolds, and smart implantable devices, etc.

  8. Recovery of the Pristine Surface of Black Phosphorus by Water Rinsing and Its Device Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhyun; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Kim, Jihyun

    2017-06-28

    Black phosphorus (BP) has attracted significant attention due to its excellent optical and electrical properties. However, the rapid degradation of BP under ambient air limits further research on its properties and implementation in various fields. This degrading behavior lowers the performance of BP-based devices and can even result in a complete failure when exposed to air for an extended period of time. In our research, the degraded surface with "bubbles" was recovered to its pristine state by rinsing with deionized water and following with post-treatments. The formation of bubbles and their optical, morphological, and electrical effects were systematically investigated by fabricating BP field-effect transistors (FETs) in conjunction with micro-Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Water rinsing of the degraded BP flakes also allowed us to thin BP flakes down because phosphorus atoms are consumed while forming bubbles. Therefore, recovery of the pristine surface not only results in a smoother and thinner morphology but also improves device performances. After the rinsing process, field-effect mobility of the BP FET was maintained, whereas a significant enhancement in the switching behaviors was achieved in conclusion. The capability of reversing the inevitable degradation that occurs once exposed to ambient conditions can open up new opportunities for further applications of BP that was limited due to its instability.

  9. Water Influx, and Its Effect on Oil Recovery: Part 1. Aquifer Flow, SUPRI TR-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigham, William E.

    1999-08-09

    Natural water encroachment is commonly seen in many oil and gas reservoirs. In fact, overall, there is more water than oil produced from oil reservoirs worldwide. Thus it is clear that an understanding of reservoir/aquifer interaction can be an important aspect of reservoir management to optimize recovery of hydrocarbons. Although the mathematics of these processes are difficult, they are often amenable to analytical solution and diagnosis. Thus this will be the ultimate goal of a series of reports on this subject. This first report deals only with aquifer behavior, so it does not address these important reservoir/aquifer issues. However, it is an important prelude to them, for the insight gained gives important clues on how to address reservoir/aquifer problems. In general when looking at aquifer flow, there are two convenient inner boundary conditions that can be considered; constant pressure or constant flow rate. There are three outer boundary conditions that are convenient to consider; infinite, closed and constant pressure. And there are three geometries that can be solved reasonably easily; linear, radial and spherical. Thus there are a total of eighteen different solutions that can be analyzed.

  10. Removal and recovery of Critical Rare Elements from contaminated waters by living Gracilaria gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacinto, Jéssica; Henriques, Bruno; Duarte, A C; Vale, Carlos; Pereira, E

    2017-10-27

    The experiments performed in this work proved the ability of Gracilaria gracilis to concentrate and recover Critical Rare Elements (CRE) from contaminated waters. The importance of recycling these elements is related to their very limited sources in Nature and progressive use in technologies. Moreover, their mining exploitation has negative environmental impact, and recent studies point them as new emerging pollutants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the application of living macroalgae for the removal and recovery of CRE. G. gracilis (2.5gL-1, fresh weight) was exposed to mono- and multi-element saline solutions of 500μgL-1 of Y, Ce, Nd, Eu and La. Removal was up to 70% in 48h, with bioaccumulation following Elovich kinetic model. In multi-element solutions, selectivity was not observed although removal of lanthanides improved comparatively to single-element solutions. No mortality or adverse effect on growth was registered. The subsequent macroalgae digestion allowed collecting virtually 100% of all elements in a 300-fold more concentrated solution. The overall results suggest the application of living macroalgae as a simple and effective alternative technology for removing and recovering CRE from wastewaters, contributing to an improvement of water quality and CRE recycling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Voltammetric Study of Arsenic (III and Arsenic (V in Ground Water of Hajigonj and Kalkini in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Arifur Rahman

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The speciation of arsenic in groundwater samples using Square Wave Anodic Stripping Voltammetry (SWASV, Differential Pulse Anodic Stripping Voltammetry (DPASV and Normal Pulse Anodic Stripping Voltammetry (NPASV are described. Good resolution of the species, arsenic (III and arsenic (V is achieved using SWASV. The reliability of the methods was checked by analyzing the total arsenic content of the samples by Hydride Generation Atomic Absorptioion Spectrophotometer and by analyzing prepared controlled laboratory standard solution. Since this technique is comparatively cheaper than other available techniques it could be a better analytical technique for arsenic speciation from water. In this study, the assessment of inorganic arsenic species in ground water of Kalkini (Madaripur and Hajigonj (Chandpur is reported. It shows that arsenic content in water in different locations is irregular. Most of the locations contain higher level of As(III than As(V. The highest concentration of arsenic is found in Anayetnagor (554.46 ± 0.07 mg/L of Kalkini and Raichar (562 ± 0.50 mg/L of Hajigonj. However, the level of total arsenic and As(III of most of the villages of the study areas are more than the WHO guideline value (50mg/L. Therefore a proper monitoring process should be evolved along with the development of methods to keep the water free from arsenic.

  12. Quantification of biomolecules in herring (Clupea harengus) industry processing waters and their recovery using electroflocculation and ultrafiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osman, Ali; Gringer, Nina; Svendsen, Tore

    2015-01-01

    Four types of herring industry processing waters; refrigerated sea water (RSW), storage water (SW), processing water from cutting (PW) and pre-salting brines (SB) were subjected to chemical characterization and biomolecule recovery using electroflocculation (EF) and ultrafiltration (UF...... and magnesium were the dominating trace elements. EF plus UF in series recovered up to 80% proteins and fatty acids from SB's and reduced chemical oxygen demand by 70%. Foaming and emulsifying properties of biomolecules were improved or unaffected by EF/UF treatment. To conclude, large amounts of biomass...

  13. Temporal trends of perfluoroalkyl substances in limed biosolids from a large municipal water resource recovery facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Dana L; Lozano, Nuria; Rice, Clifford P; Ramirez, Mark; Torrents, Alba

    2016-01-01

    While the recycling of wastewater biosolids via land-application is a sustainable practice for nutrient recovery and soil reclamation that has become increasingly common worldwide, concerns remain that this practice may become a source of toxic, persistent organic pollutants to the environment. This study concentrates on assessing the presence and the temporal trends of 12 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), pollutants of global consequence, in limed Class B biosolids from a municipal water resource recovery facility (WRRF), also know as a wastewater treatment plant. PFASs are of significant concern due to their extensive presence and persistence in environmental and biotic samples worldwide, most notably human blood samples. Class B biosolids were collected from the WRRF, prior to land-application, approximately every two to three months, from 2005 to 2013. Overall, this study found that concentrations of the 7 detectable PFAS compounds remained unchanged over the 8-year period, a result that is consistent with other temporal studies of these compounds in sewage sludges. From these analyzed compounds, the highest mean concentrations observed over the study period were 25.1 ng/g dw, 23.5 ng/g dw, and 22.5 ng/g dw for perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), respectively, and these compounds were detected at concentrations 2.5-5 times higher than the remaining, detectable PFASs. Furthermore, it was observed that PFOS, while demonstrating no overall change during the study, exhibited a visible spike in concentration from late 2006 to early 2007. This study indicates that concentrations of PFASs in WRRFs have been stagnant over time, despite regulation. This study also demonstrates that the use of glass jars with polytetrafluoroethylene-lined lids, a common storage method for environmental samples, will not influence PFOA and PFNA concentrations in archived biosolids samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  14. Fine Formation During Brine-Crude Oil-Calcite Interaction in Smart Water Enhanced Oil Recovery for Caspian Carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    Modified sea water has been shown to affect the oil recovery fraction considerably during secondary and tertiary waterfloods. Available soluble potential ions (i.e. Ca2+, Mg2+ & SO42-) in the interacting waterflood (ITW) are suggested to play a key role in increasing the displacement efficiency...

  15. Food Waste to Energy: How Six Water Resource Recovery Facilities are Boosting Biogas Production and the Bottom Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water Resource Recovery Facilities (WRRFs) with anaerobic digestion have been harnessing biogas for heat and power since at least the 1920’s. A few are approaching “energy neutrality” and some are becoming “energy positive” through a combination of energy efficiency measures and...

  16. Intermittent Water Injection on Top of Continuous CO2 Injection to Co-Optimize Oil Recovery and CO2-Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Pranoto, Arif

    2016-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering The objective of this project is to maximize oil recovery and the CO2 stored during CO2-EOR. To reach that goal there are two important things to be achieved: gas production rate reduction and the oil production rate improvement. To attain the co-optimization, the following CO2 injection approaches were compared: CO2 continuous injection, WAG, Continuous water injection over continuous CO2 injection, and intermittent water injection over continuous ...

  17. Removal of iron and arsenic (III) from drinking water using iron oxide-coated sand and limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Rashmi R.; Umlong, Iohborlang M.; Das, Bodhaditya; Borah, Kusum; Thakur, Ashim J.; Raul, Prasanta K.; Banerjee, Saumen; Singh, Lokendra

    2014-06-01

    A method for removal of iron and arsenic (III) from contaminated water using iron oxide-coated sand and limestone has been developed for drinking water. For the intended use, sand was coated with ferric chloride and used as filtering media. Limestone was added onto the coated sand and the effect of limestone addition on removal efficiency of iron and arsenic was monitored. Both batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the efficiency of coated sand and limestone as filtering media. Maximum removal of iron (99.8 %) was obtained with coated sand at a dose of 5 g/100 ml and by adding 0.2 g/100 ml of limestone at pH 7.3. Arsenic (III) removal efficiency increased with the increased dose of coated sand and was best removed at pH 7.12. The maximum adsorption capacity for arsenic (III) obtained from Langmuir model was found to be 0.075 mg/g and the kinetics data followed pseudo-first order better than pseudo-second order. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis and FT-IR study proved the removal of iron and arsenic. Column experiment showed removal of iron and arsenic (III) to arsenic).

  18. Recovery of copper and water from copper-electroplating wastewater by the combination process of electrolysis and electrodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Changsheng; Liu, Yanyan; Bi, Jingjing; Xu, Huizhen; Ahmed, Abou-Shady

    2011-05-30

    In this paper, a laboratory-scale process which combined electrolysis (EL) and electrodialysis (ED) was developed to treat copper-containing wastewater. The feasibility of such process for copper recovery as well as water reuse was determined. Effects of three operating parameters, voltage, initial Cu(2+) concentration and water flux on the recovery of copper and water were investigated and optimized. The results showed that about 82% of copper could be recovered from high concentration wastewater (HCW, >400mg/L) by EL, at the optimal conditions of voltage 2.5 V/cm and water flux 4 L/h; while 50% of diluted water could be recycled from low concentration wastewater (LCW, water flux 4 L/h. However, because of the limitation of energy consumption (EC), LCW for EL and HCW for ED could not be treated effectively, and the effluent water of EL and concentrated water of ED should be further treated before discharged. Therefore, the combination process of EL and ED was developed to realize the recovery of copper and water simultaneously from both HCW and LCW. The results of the EL-ED process showed that almost 99.5% of copper and 100% of water could be recovered, with the energy consumption of EL ≈ 3 kW h/kg and ED ≈ 2 kW h/m(3). According to SEM and EDX analysis, the purity of recovered copper was as high as 97.9%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Selective and sensitive speciation analysis of Cr(VI) and Cr(III), at sub-μgL-1 levels in water samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after electromembrane extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Zeinab; Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny

    2016-12-01

    In this work, electromembrane extraction in combination with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) was investigated for speciation, preconcentration and quantification of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in water samples through the selective complexation of Cr(VI) with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (DPC) as a complexing agent. DPC reduces Cr(VI) to Cr(III) ions and then Cr(III) species are extracted based on electrokinetic migration of their cationic complex (Cr(III)-DPC) toward the negative electrode placed in the hollow fiber. Also, once oxidized to Cr(VI), Cr(III) ions in initial sample were determined by this procedure. The influence of extraction parameters such as pH, type of organic solvent, chelating agent concentration, stirring rate, extraction time and applied voltage were evaluated following a one-at-a-time optimization approach. Under optimized conditions, the extracted analyte was quantified by ETAAS, with an acceptable linearity in the range of 0.05-5ngmL-1 (R2 value=0.996), and a repeatability (%RSD) between 3.7% and 12.2% (n=4) for 5.0 and 1.0ngmL-1 of Cr(VI), respectively. Also, we obtained an enrichment factor of 110 that corresponded to the recovery of 66%. The detection limit (S/N ratio of 3:1) was 0.02ngmL-1. Finally, this new method was successfully employed to determine Cr(III) and Cr(VI) species in real water samples. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Determination of organic carbon and ionic accountability of various waste and product waters derived from ECLSS water recovery tests and Spacelab humidity condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Donald L.; Cole, Harold; Habercom, Mark; Griffith, Guy

    1992-01-01

    The development of a closed-loop water recovery system for Space Station Freedom involves many technical challenges associated with contaminant removal. Attention is presently given to the characterization of contaminants constituting total organic carbon (TOC), and to the Hubaux and Vos (1970) statistical model for low level TOC that has been employed. A tabulation is given for TOC accountability in the case of both potable and hygiene waters.

  1. Parametric analysis of air–water heat recovery concept applied to HVAC systems: Effect of mass flow rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ramadan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last three decades, the world has experienced enormous increases in energy and fuel consumption as a consequence of the economic and population growth. This causes renewable energy and energy recovery to become a requirement in building designs rather than option. The present work concerns a coupling between energy recovery and Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning HVAC domains and aims to apply heat recovery concepts to HVAC applications working on refrigeration cycles. It particularly uses the waste energy of the condenser hot air to heat/preheat domestic water. The heat exchanger considered in the recovery system is concentric tube heat exchanger. A thermal modeling of the complete system as well as a corresponding iterative code are developed and presented. Calculations with the code are performed and give pertinent magnitude orders of energy saving and management in HVAC applications. A parametric analysis based on several water and air flow rates is carried out. It was shown that water can be heated from 25 to 70 °C depending on the mass flow rates and cooling loads of the HVAC system. The most efficient configurations are obtained by lowering the air flow rate of the condenser fan.

  2. Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knutson, Chad [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Dastgheib, Seyed A. [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Yang, Yaning [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Ashraf, Ali [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Duckworth, Cole [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Sinata, Priscilla [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Sugiyono, Ivan [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Shannon, Mark A. [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Werth, Charles J. [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Power generation in the Illinois Basin is expected to increase by as much as 30% by the year 2030, and this would increase the cooling water consumption in the region by approximately 40%. This project investigated the potential use of produced water from CO2 enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) operations; coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery; and active and abandoned underground coal mines for power plant cooling in the Illinois Basin. Specific objectives of this project were: (1) to characterize the quantity, quality, and geographic distribution of produced water in the Illinois Basin; (2) to evaluate treatment options so that produced water may be used beneficially at power plants; and (3) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the treatment and transportation of produced water to thermoelectric power plants in the Illinois Basin. Current produced water availability within the basin is not large, but potential flow rates up to 257 million liters per day (68 million gallons per day (MGD)) are possible if CO2-enhanced oil recovery and coal bed methane recovery are implemented on a large scale. Produced water samples taken during the project tend to have dissolved solids concentrations between 10 and 100 g/L, and water from coal beds tends to have lower TDS values than water from oil fields. Current pretreatment and desalination technologies including filtration, adsorption, reverse osmosis (RO), and distillation can be used to treat produced water to a high quality level, with estimated costs ranging from $2.6 to $10.5 per cubic meter ($10 to $40 per 1000 gallons). Because of the distances between produced water sources and power plants, transportation costs tend to be greater than treatment costs. An optimization algorithm was developed to determine the lowest cost pipe network connecting sources and sinks. Total water costs increased with flow rate up to 26 million liters per day (7 MGD), and the range was from $4 to $16 per cubic meter

  3. Recovery of phosphorus from sewage sludge in combination with the supercritical water process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yunbo; Xiang, Bobin; Chen, Hongmei; Xu, Bibo; Zhu, Lu; Li, Caiting; Zeng, Guangming

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the fraction transformation and recovering of phosphorus (P) from sewage sludge (SS) residues, derived from supercritical water process, was investigated by extraction and precipitation processes. In addition, the form of heavy metals existing during the recovery process is also discussed. First, P in the solid residues was recovered by acid leaching with HCl, and then the derived P was adsorbed by activated alumina (Al(2)O(3)). Finally, the Al2O3 was desorbed with low concentration of NaOH. Results showed that 80% organic P was converted into HCl-P. The total P (the chief ingredient of HCl-P) in solid residue increased from 86.1 to 95.6% as temperature increased from 350 to 400 °C. The amount of P in the solid residue that was dissolved by 1 M HCl was 97.8%, and over 95% of P in the leaching solution (15 mg/L for P concentration) was adsorbed after 5.0 g of Al(2)O(3) powder was added. The amount of P desorbed from Al(2)O(3) with 0.1 M NaOH was 98.7%. Ultimately, over 85% of TP in SS was recovered. Moreover, the proportion of Cu, Zn and Pb in the extracted P products was lower than 5%.

  4. A study on the quantitative recovery of dissolved inorganic carbonates in ground water for radiocarbon measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Sang Ki; Woo, Hyung Joo; Cho, Soo Young; Kim, Nak Bae [Korea Institute of Geology Minning and Meterials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Dae [Chungbuk Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbonates in ground water were quantitatively by using gas evolution method. Gas evolution method was found to be less time-consuming, less susceptible to the contamination fromatmospheric CO{sub 2} and little affected by the sulfate ions in comparison to the direct precipitation method. Extraction efficiency of nearly 99% could be achieved by gas evolution method in two hours using recirculated gas at a sweeping rate of 4 liter per minute. Samples for carbon isotope fractionation study were collected in three fractions with collection times. The evolution time for the first fraction was one hours, and then second and third fractions were collected at intervals of 30 minutes, respectively. A small portion of each fraction was analyzed to evaluate {delta}{sup 13}C values, which were measured to be -7.9% ,-3.0% and +0.4% for the each fraction. The result clearly indicated that gas evolution method generates isotopically lighter carbon at the beginning of the purging process and heavier isotopes at the end. However, this isotope fractionation effect could be neglected by the almost complete recovery of carbonates.

  5. Recovery of energy, water and carbon exchange in degraded forests in eastern Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbore, Susan; Brando, Paulo; Oliveira dos Santos, Claudinei; Silvério, Divino; Coe, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Large regions in the state of Mato Grosso in Brazil have been deforested and converted to pasture and soy agriculture. In addition to deforestation, remnant forests in the region are degraded by repeated fire and edge related effects. We are combining eddy covariance with other measures to study the impact of these changes in land cover on energy, water and carbon balance, in a region that sits at the ecotone between continuous forest and savanna. The degraded forest plot is part of a multi-year experimental fire treatment and had experienced large-scale mortality in the years prior to tower installation. Leaf area was strongly reduced in degraded forest, but surprisingly latent energy fluxes nearly equaled those in the intact forest. Carbon uptake rates in the intact forest exceeded those in the degraded forest, though not when expressed on a leaf-area basis. Overall, these results corroborate those found in experimentally logged tropical forest showing rapid recovery of fluxes, despite losses of biomass. Compared to both forests, the soy field reflected more incoming energy, and lost a greater proportion of absorbed radiation as sensible rather than latent heat.

  6. Energy recovery from dairy waste-waters: impacts of biofilm support systems on anaerobic CST reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasamy, E.V.; Abbasi, S.A. [Pondicherry Central Univ., Centre for Pollution Control and Energy Technology, Pondicherry (India)

    2000-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion is one of the major steps involved in the treatment of dairy industry waste-waters and many CSTRs (continuously-stirred tank reactors) are functioning for this purpose all over the world. In this paper, the authors describe their attempts to upgrade a CSTR's performance by incorporating a biofilm support system (BSS) within the existing reactor. The focus of the work was to find an inexpensive and easy to install BSS which could significantly enhance the rates of waste treatment and methane recovery. Rolls of nylon mesh (with {approx}1 mm openings), of 5 cm height and 2 cm dia, when incorporated in the CSTR at the biofilm surface (with a digester volume ratio 0.3 cm{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}), enabled the CSTR to perform better with > 20% improvement in the methane yield. Such simple BSS devices can significantly improve the performance of a CSTR anaerobic digester treating dairy wastes. The enhancement is due to the development of active biofilms which not only enhance the micro-organism-waste contact but also reduce the microbial washout. Such devices are inexpensive and very easy to incorporate -- the gains are thus achieved with very little cost and effort. (Author)

  7. Effect of tart cherry juice on recovery and next day performance in well-trained Water Polo players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Rachel; Peeling, Peter; Binnie, Martyn; Dawson, Brian; Sim, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Tart Montmorency cherries contain high concentrations of phytochemicals and anthocyanins, which have recently been linked to improved athletic recovery and subsequent performance. To date however, previous work reporting promising results has focused on land-based endurance sports, with any potential benefits to team sports remaining unknown. As such, this investigation set-out to examine the effect of supplemental tart cherry juice (CJ) on recovery and next day athletic performance in highly-trained water-based team sport athletes over seven days. In a randomised, double-blind, repeated measures, crossover design, nine male Water Polo athletes were supplemented with CJ or a placebo equivalent (PLA) for six consecutive days. Prior to, and at the completion of the supplementation period, water-based performance testing was conducted. On day 6, participants also undertook a fatiguing simulated team game activity. Venous blood samples were collected (Pre-exercise: day 1, 6 and 7; Post-exercise: day 6) to investigate markers of inflammation [Interleukin-6 (IL-6); C-reactive protein (CRP)] and oxidative stress [Uric Acid (UA); F2-Isoprostane (F2-IsoP)]. A daily diary was also completed (total quality of recovery, delayed onset muscle soreness) as a measure of perceptual recovery. In both conditions, day 6 post-exercise IL-6 was significantly higher than pre-exercise and day 7 (p  0.05). No differences were found for any performance or recovery measures. The lack of difference observed in the blood markers between groups may reflect the intermittent, non-weight bearing demands of Water Polo, with such activity possibly unable to create a substantial inflammatory response or oxidative stress (over 7 days) to impede performance; thereby negating any potential beneficial effects associated with CJ supplementation. This trial was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR). Registration number: ACTRN12616001080415. Date registered

  8. Evaluation of liquid and solid culture media for the recovery and enrichment of Burkholderia cenocepacia from distilled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Youngbeom; Kim, Jeong Myeong; Ahn, Hyeri; Lee, Yong-Jin; LiPuma, John J; Hussong, David; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2014-07-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) presence has been the cause of recalls of both sterile and non-sterile pharmaceutical products since these opportunistic pathogens have been implicated to cause infections to susceptible individuals. BCC are ubiquitous in nature, but in pharmaceutical settings the most common source is contaminated water systems. Some strains of BCC, previously described as Pseudomonas cepacia, were not readily detected by standard culture methods. We have explored different strategies to recover and enrich Burkholderia cenocepacia previously cultured in distilled water for 40 days. Enrichment media of varied nutrient concentrations and composition were used, including modified Tryptic Soy Agar or Broth (TSA or TSB), Reasoner's 2nd Agar or Broth (R2A or R2AB), Brain-Heart Infusion Broth (BHIB), Mueller-Hinton Broth (MHB), and Ashdown's (ASH) medium. Of the various broth media tested, cell growth was significantly greater in TSB and R2AB than in BHIB, MHB, or ASH broth. TSB and R2AB were also compared for their recovery efficiency. Generally, there was no significant difference between the numbers of B. cenocepacia grown on 15 differently modified TSA and five modified R2A solid media. Overall, however, diluted TSA and TSB media, and R2A and R2AB showed better recovery efficiency than TSA and TSB for inocula containing small numbers of cells. All strains persisted in distilled water for 40 days. Broth media were more effective than solid media for recovery of B. cenocepacia from distilled water. These results may assist in improving detection assays with recovery and enrichment strategies to maximize recovery of these fastidious organisms.

  9. Analysis of profitability of using a heat recovery system from grey water discharged from the shower (case study of Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordana, Sabina; Słys, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    The paper analyses the profitability of the use of Drain Water Heat Recovery units. An original simulation model was used for this purpose, and a detached residential building located in Poland was selected as the test facility. The conducted analysis proved that the type of the hot water heater has decisive influence on the profitability level of such an investment. Application of the abovementioned technology is particularly profitable, when water is heated with the use of an electrical device. When the energy source in the system is a gas water heater, the obtained calculation results are not as favourable, and the period of investment return in many cases exceeds the expected service life of these devices. Moreover, the analysis demonstrated that the potential energy savings, and thus also the financial savings, may be in both cases increased as a result of simultaneous intake of water from various water taps.

  10. Percent recoveries of anthropogenic organic compounds with and without the addition of ascorbic acid to preserve finished-water samples containing free chlorine, 2004-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valder, Joshua F.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Bender, David A.; Price, Curtis V.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents finished-water matrix-spike recoveries of 270 anthropogenic organic compounds with and without the addition of ascorbic acid to preserve water samples containing free chlorine. Percent recoveries were calculated using analytical results from a study conducted during 2004-10 for the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The study was intended to characterize the effect of quenching on finished-water matrix-spike recoveries and to better understand the potential oxidation and transformation of 270 anthropogenic organic compounds. The anthropogenic organic compounds studied include those on analytical schedules 1433, 2003, 2033, 2060, 2020, and 4024 of the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory. Three types of samples were collected from 34 NAWQA locations across the Nation: (1) quenched finished-water samples (not spiked), (2) quenched finished-water matrix-spike samples, and (3) nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples. Percent recoveries of anthropogenic organic compounds in quenched and nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples are presented. Comparisons of percent recoveries between quenched and nonquenched spiked samples can be used to show how quenching affects finished-water samples. A maximum of 18 surface-water and 34 groundwater quenched finished-water matrix-spike samples paired with nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples were analyzed. Percent recoveries for the study are presented in two ways: (1) finished-water matrix-spike samples supplied by surface-water or groundwater, and (2) by use (or source) group category for surface-water and groundwater supplies. Graphical representations of percent recoveries for the quenched and nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples also are presented.

  11. Water-Soluble and Highly Luminescent Europium(III) Complexes with Favorable Photostability and Sensitive pH Response Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chen; Wei, Huibo; Yan, Weibo; Zhao, Zifeng; Cai, Zelun; Sun, Boxun; Meng, Zhaosha; Liu, Zhiwei; Bian, Zuqiang; Huang, Chunhui

    2016-10-17

    Two highly luminescent and water-soluble Eu(III) complexes, Eu1 and Eu2, based on novel carboxyl-functionalized 1,5-naphthyridine derivatives 8-hydroxy-1,5-naphthyridine-2-carboxylic acid (H2L1) and 7-cyano-8-hydroxy-1,5-naphthyridine-2-carboxylic acid (H2L2), respectively, are designed and synthesized. The crystal structure of Eu2 indicates that the central Eu(III) ion is nine-coordinated by three tridentate ligands (O^N^O). Both Eu1 and Eu2 show strong luminescence in aqueous solution with quantum yields (lifetimes) of 28% (1.1 ms) and 14% (0.76 ms), respectively. The chelates display unique UV-light stability in solution and remain highly emissive after 100 min of strong UV irradiation (∼300 W·m-2 at 345 nm). Moreover, they exhibit reversible luminescence intensity changes with varied pH values, and the response mechanism is investigated. "Turn-on" of the Eu(III) emission upon increasing pH is realized by ligand structure change from keto to enol anion form, resulting in red-shifted absorption band and suppressed quenching from solvents and N-H vibration upon deprotonating. The results show that these novel Eu(III) complexes are quite intriguing for potential application as bioimaging agents and pH probes.

  12. Diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arene for Am(III) recovery from radioactive wastes: liquid membrane studies using a hollow fiber contactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansari, S.A.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Kandwal, P.; Verboom, Willem

    2016-01-01

    The transport of Am(III) from nitric acid feeds was investigated using hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) containing a diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arene (C4DGA) as the carrier extractant. The effect of feed acidity and Nd(III) concentration (used to represent Am(III)) in the

  13. Spectrophotometric determination of Er(III) in water solution of nitrilotriacetic acid and tiron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lis, S.; Hnatejko, Z.; Makowska, B.; Elbanowski, M. (Uniwersytet Adama Mickiewicza, Poznan (Poland). Inst. Chemii)

    1994-01-01

    The paper presents the results of study of absorption spectra of chosen ternary Ln/NTA/Tiron systems. The analysis of the spectra has been performed to test the possibility of using the ternary complexes for the spectrophotometric determination of lanthanide(III) ions. The system Er/NTA/Tiron, showing the highest value of molar absorptivity, was selected for spectrophotometric determination of the erbium ion. An acceptable level of other lanthanide ions and yttrium introduced into the Er(III) solution was determined. (author). 12 refs, 4 tabs.

  14. Microbial biofilm studies of the environmental control and life support system water recovery test for Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, E. B.; Obenhuber, D. C.; Huff, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    NASA is developing a water recovery system (WRS) for Space Station Freedom to reclaim human waste water for reuse by astronauts as hygiene or potable water. A water recovery test (WRT) currently in progress investigates the performance of a prototype of the WRS. Analysis of biofilm accumulation, the potential for microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the WRT, and studies of iodine disinfection of biofilm are reported. Analysis of WRT components indicated the presence of organic deposits and biofilms in selected tubing. Water samples for the WRT contained acid-producing and sulfate-reducing organisms implicated in corrosion processes. Corrosion of an aluminum alloy was accelerated in the presence of these water samples; however, stainless steel corrosion rates were not accelerated. Biofilm iodine sensitivity tests using an experimental laboratory scale recycled water system containing a microbial check valve (MCV) demonstrated that an iodine concentration of 1 to 2 mg/L was ineffective in eliminating microbial biofilm. For complete disinfection, an initial concentration of 16 mg/L was required, which was gradually reduced by the MCV over 4 to 8 hours to 1 to 2 mg/L. This treatment may be useful in controlling biofilm formation.

  15. Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles for oil-water interfacial tension reduction in enhanced oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Hassan; Baig, Mirza Khurram; Yahya, Noorhana; Khodapanah, Leila; Sabet, Maziyar; Demiral, Birol M. R.; Burda, Marek

    2018-02-01

    Nanoparticles show potential use in applications associated with upstream oil and gas engineering to increase the performance of numerous methods such as wettability alteration, interfacial tension reduction, thermal conductivity and enhanced oil recovery operations. Surface tension optimization is an important parameter in enhanced oil recovery. Current work focuses on the new economical method of surface tension optimization of ZnO nanofluids for oil-water interfacial tension reduction in enhanced oil recovery. In this paper, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystallites were prepared using the chemical route and explored for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Adsorption of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) on calcite (111) surface was investigated using the adsorption locator module of Materials Studio software. It was found that ZnO nanoparticles show maximum adsorption energy of - 253 kcal/mol. The adsorption of ZnO on the rock surface changes the wettability which results in capillary force reduction and consequently increasing EOR. The nanofluids have been prepared by varying the concentration of ZnO nanoparticles to find the optimum value for surface tension. The surface tension (ST) was calculated with different concentration of ZnO nanoparticles using the pendant drop method. The results show a maximum value of ST 35.57 mN/m at 0.3 wt% of ZnO NPs. It was found that the nanofluid with highest surface tension (0.3 wt%) resulted in higher recovery efficiency. The highest recovery factor of 11.82% at 0.3 wt% is due to the oil/water interfacial tension reduction and wettability alteration.

  16. Effect of NOM on arsenic adsorption by TiO(2) in simulated As(III)-contaminated raw waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guojing; Zhang, Xiangru; Talley, Jeffrey W; Neal, Clive R; Wang, Hangyao

    2008-04-01

    The effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on arsenic adsorption by a commercial available TiO(2) (Degussa P25) in various simulated As(III)-contaminated raw waters was examined. Five types of NOM that represent different environmental origins were tested. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted under anaerobic conditions and in the absence of light. Either with or without the presence of NOM, the arsenic adsorption reached steady-state within 1h. The presence of 8 mg/L NOM as C in the simulated raw water, however, significantly reduced the amount of arsenic adsorbed at the steady-state. Without NOM, the arsenic adsorption increased with increasing solution pH within the pH range of 4.0-9.4. With four of the NOMs tested, the arsenic adsorption firstly increased with increasing pH and then decreased after the adsorption reached the maximum at pH 7.4-8.7. An appreciable amount of arsenate (As(V)) was detected in the filtrate after the TiO(2) adsorption in the simulated raw waters that contained NOM. The absolute amount of As(V) in the filtrate after TiO(2) adsorption was pH dependent: more As(V) was presented at pH>7 than that at pHNOM were modelled by both Langmuir and Frendlich adsorption equations, with Frendlich adsorption equation giving a better fit for the water without NOM and Langmuir adsorption equation giving a better fit for the waters with NOM. The modelling implies that NOM can occupy some available binding sites for arsenic adsorption on TiO(2) surface. This study suggests that in an As(III)-contaminated raw water, NOM can hinder the uptake of arsenic by TiO(2), but can facilitate the As(III) oxidation to As(V) at TiO(2) surface under alkaline conditions and in the absence of O(2) and light. TiO(2) thus can be used in situ to convert As(III) to the less toxic As(V) in NOM-rich groundwaters.

  17. Theoretical investigation of the thermodynamic structures and kinetic water-exchange reactions of aqueous Al(III)-salicylate complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenjing; Jin, Xiaoyan; Dong, Shaonan; Bi, Shuping

    2013-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed on the structures and water-exchange reactions of aqueous Al(III)-salicylate complexes. Based on the four models (gas phase (GP); polarizable continuum model (PCM), which estimates the bulk solvent effect; supermolecule model (SM), which considers the explicit solvent effect, and supermolecule-polarizable continuum model (SM-PCM), which accounts for both types of solvent effects), we systematically conducted this study by examining three different properties of the complexes. (1) The microscopic properties of the aqueous Al(III)-salicylate complexes were studied by optimizing their various structures (including the possible 1:1 mono- and bidentate complexes, cis and trans isomers of the 1:2 bidentate complexes and 1:3 bidentate complexes) at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d, p) level. (2) The 27Al and 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated using the GIAO method at the HF/6-311+G(d, p) level. The calculation results show that the values obtained with the SM-PCM models are in good agreement with the experimental data available in the literature, indicating that the models we employed are appropriate for Al(III)-salicylate complexes. (3) The water-exchange reactions of 1:1 mono- and bidentate Al(III)-salicylate complexes were simulated using supermolecule models at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d, p) level. The logarithm of the water-exchange rate constant (log kex) of the 1:1 bidentate complex predicted using the "log kex-dAl-OH2" correlation is 4.0, which is in good agreement with the experimental value of 3.7, whereas the calculated range of log kex of the 1:1 monodentate complexes is 1.3-1.9. By effectively combining the results for the thermodynamic static structures with the simulations of the kinetic water-exchange reactions, this work promotes further understanding of the configurations and formation mechanism of Al(III)-salicylate complexes.

  18. Water Ingestion into Axial Flow Compressors. Part III. Experimental Results and Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    specifications, or other data, is not to be re- garded by implication or otherwise as in any manner licensing the holder or any other person or corporation , or...arises a large change In gas phase and liquid phase (a) mass flow and (b) temperatura and also a change in gas phase composition. In regime (iii) one

  19. Determination of Trace Amounts of Chromium(III) in Water Samples Using Online Flow Injection Catalytic Spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z. X.; Zhang, X. S.

    2017-01-01

    A new online flow injection spectrophotometric method for the determination of trivalent chromium was developed. This method is based on the property of trivalent chromium to be a catalyst for the oxidation of Indigo Carmine (IC) with potassium periodate and to lose its color in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium tripolyphosphate. It was shown that Tween-20 serves as an additional accelerator of the catalytic oxidation. The linear dynamic range of the determination of Cr(III) was 1-40.0 μg/L, while the limit of detection was 0.05 μg/L. The correlation coefficient r was 0.998, while the relative standard deviation for 5 μg/L of the Cr(III) solution was 3.83%. The feasibility of this method was checked by its application to trivalent chromium determination in real water samples.

  20. A flow method based on solvent extraction coupled on-line to a reversed micellar mediated chemiluminescence detection for selective determination of gold(III) and gallium(III) in water and industrial samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanin, Tamer H A; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fujiwara, Terufumi

    2016-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive flow method, based on the combination of on-line solvent extraction with reversed micellar mediated chemiluminescence (CL) detection using rhodamine B (RB), was investigated for the selective determination of Au(III) and Ga(III) in aqueous solutions. 2.0 M HCl was the optimum for extracting Au(III) while a 5.0M HCl solution containing 2.5M LiCl was selected as an optimum acidic medium for extraction of Ga(III). The Au(III) and Ga(III) chloro-complex anions were extracted from the above aqueous acidic solutions into toluene as their ion-pair complexes with the protonated RBH(+) ion followed by membrane phase separation in a flow system. In a flow cell of a detector, the extract was mixed with the reversed micellar solution of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) in 1-hexanol-cyclohexane/water (1.0M HCl) containing 0.10 M cerium(IV) and 0.05 M lithium sulfate. Then uptake of the ion-pair by the CTAC reversed micelles and the subsequent CL oxidation of RB with Ce(IV) occurred easily and the CL signals produced were recorded. Using a flow injection system, a detection limit (DL) of 0.4 μM Au(III) and 0.6 μM Ga(III), and linear calibration graphs with dynamic ranges from the respective DLs to 10 μM for Au(III) and Ga(III) were obtained under the optimized experimental conditions. The relative standard deviations (n=6) obtained at 2.0 µM Au(III) and 4.0 µM Ga(III) were 3.0% and 2.4%, respectively. The presented CL methodology has been applied for the determination of Au(III) and Ga(III) in water and industrial samples with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrologic Engineering Center River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) Water Temperature Models Developed for the Missouri River Recovery Management Plan and Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-18

    ER D C/ EL T R- 17 -1 8 Missouri River Recovery Program (MRRP) Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) Water... Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) Water Temperature Models Developed for the Missouri River Recovery Management Plan and Environmental...Impact Statement” ERDC/EL TR-17-18 ii Abstract This report describes the Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) water

  2. Biomass partitioning, morphology and water status of four alfalfa genotypes submitted to progressive drought and subsequent recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erice, Gorka; Louahlia, Saïd; Irigoyen, Juan José; Sanchez-Diaz, Manuel; Avice, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-15

    The predicted worldwide increase of arid areas and water stress episodes will strongly affect crop production. Numerous plants have developed specific morphological and physiological mechanisms as a means to increase their tolerance to drought. Water stress modifies dry matter partitioning and morphological components such as leaf area ratio (LAR), specific leaf area (SLA) and leaf weight ratio (LWR). Alfalfa has a wide-ranging distribution and is thus expected to show differing levels of drought tolerance. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of progressive drought and subsequent recovery in four alfalfa genotypes differing in drought sensitivity: three cultivars adapted to a Mediterranean climate, Tafilalet (TA), Tierra de Campos (TC) and Moapa (MO), and another representative of an oceanic climate, Europe (EU). Mild drought did not affect biomass production or water status in the studied varieties. Under moderate drought conditions, TA and MO showed decreased leaf production, which may help them to maintain relative water content (RWC). Despite observations that water stress did not affect root growth, after the recovery period, TA increased its root biomass, making higher water soil prospecting possible. Mediterranean cultivars modified LAR and SLA depending on water availability, whereas EU alters LWR. At the end of the experiment, TC was the most productive cultivar, but severe drought did not predict differences among cultivars. Severe water stress increased the root/shoot ratio in order to diminish water consumption and increase absorption of water. In spite of all cultivars showing a decreased LWR, TA also decreased SLA, which may suggest higher drought resistance. Morphological traits from Mediterranean cultivars, including the ability to alter SLA or LAR may be used for drought-tolerant cultivar improvement.

  3. Integrating the Carbon and Water Footprints’ Costs in the Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC Full Water Cost Recovery Concept: Basic Principles Towards Their Reliable Calculation and Socially Just Allocation

    OpenAIRE

    Kanakoudis, Vasilis; Tsitsifli, Stavroula; Papadopoulou, Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the basic principles for the integration of the water and carbon footprints cost into the resource and environmental costs respectively, taking the suggestions set by the Water Framework Directive (WFD) 2000/60/EC one step forward. WFD states that full water cost recovery (FWCR) should be based on the estimation of the three sub-costs related: direct; environmental; and resource cost. It also strongly suggests the EU Member States develop and apply effective water pricing ...

  4. Differential recovery of water quality parameters eight years after severe wildfire and salvage logging in Alberta's southern Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silins, U.; Bladon, K. D.; Stone, M.; Emelko, M. B.; Collins, A.; Boon, S.; Williams, C.; Wagner, M. J.; Martens, A. M.; Anderson, A.

    2012-12-01

    Broad regions of western North America rely on water supplies that originate from forested regions of the Rocky Mountain cordillera where landuse pressures, and stresses including changing natural disturbance regimes associated with shifting climates has been impacting critical source water supplies from this region. Increases in magnitude and severity of wildfires along with impacts on downstream water supplies has been observed along the length of the North American Rocky Mountain chain, however, the longevity of these impacts (including impacts to important water quality parameters) remain highly uncertain because processes regulating recovery from such disturbances can span a range of timescales from a few years to decades depending on both the hydro-climatic regime, and which water quality parameters are important. Studies document such long-term changes are few. The Southern Rockies Watershed Project (SRWP) was established to document the magnitude and recovery from the severe 2003 Lost Creek wildfire in the Crowsnest Pass region of southwest Alberta, Canada. Hydrology, water quality (physical & chemical) have been studies in 9 instrumented catchments (4-14 km2) encompassing burned, burned and salvage logged, prescribed burned, and unburned (reference) conditions since late winter 2004. While most important water quality parameters were strongly elevated in burned and burned-salvage logged catchments after the fire, strongly differential rates of recovery were observed for contaminant concentration, export, and yield across a range of water quality parameters (2004-2011). For example, while various nitrogen (N) species (total nitrogen, dissolved nitrogen, NO3-, NH4+) showed 2-7 fold increases in concentration the first 1-2 years after the wildfire, N recovered back to baseline concentrations 4-5 years after the wildfire. In contrast, eight full years after the wildfire (2011), no recovery of sediment or phosphorus (P) production (soluble reactive, total

  5. A Roadmap for Recovery/Decontamination Plan for Critical Infrastructure after CBRN Event Involving Drinking Water Utilities: Scoping Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    INFORMATIVE STATEMENTS CSSP -2012-CD-1020 A Roadmap for Recovery/Decontamination Plan for Critical Infrastructure after CBRN Event Involving...Drinking Water Utilities was supported by the Canadian Safety and Security Program ( CSSP ) which is led by Defence Research and Development Canada’s Centre...Section. CSSP is a federally-funded program to strengthen Canada’s ability to anticipate, prevent/mitigate, prepare for, respond to, and recover

  6. Coagulant recovery from water treatment plant sludge and reuse in post-treatment of UASB reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Abhilash T; Ahammed, M Mansoor

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, feasibility of recovering the coagulant from water treatment plant sludge with sulphuric acid and reusing it in post-treatment of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater were studied. The optimum conditions for coagulant recovery from water treatment plant sludge were investigated using response surface methodology (RSM). Sludge obtained from plants that use polyaluminium chloride (PACl) and alum coagulant was utilised for the study. Effect of three variables, pH, solid content and mixing time was studied using a Box-Behnken statistical experimental design. RSM model was developed based on the experimental aluminium recovery, and the response plots were developed. Results of the study showed significant effects of all the three variables and their interactions in the recovery process. The optimum aluminium recovery of 73.26 and 62.73 % from PACl sludge and alum sludge, respectively, was obtained at pH of 2.0, solid content of 0.5 % and mixing time of 30 min. The recovered coagulant solution had elevated concentrations of certain metals and chemical oxygen demand (COD) which raised concern about its reuse potential in water treatment. Hence, the coagulant recovered from PACl sludge was reused as coagulant for post-treatment of UASB reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater. The recovered coagulant gave 71 % COD, 80 % turbidity, 89 % phosphate, 77 % suspended solids and 99.5 % total coliform removal at 25 mg Al/L. Fresh PACl also gave similar performance but at higher dose of 40 mg Al/L. The results suggest that coagulant can be recovered from water treatment plant sludge and can be used to treat UASB reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater which can reduce the consumption of fresh coagulant in wastewater treatment.

  7. Recovery of nitrogen and water from landfill leachate by a microbial electrolysis cell-forward osmosis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Mohan; Molitor, Hannah; Brazil, Brian; Novak, John T; He, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC)-forward osmosis (FO) system was previously reported for recovering ammonium and water from synthetic solutions, and here it has been advanced with treating landfill leachate. In the MEC, 65.7±9.1% of ammonium could be recovered in the presence of cathode aeration. Without aeration, the MEC could remove 54.1±10.9% of ammonium from the leachate, but little ammonia was recovered. With 2M NH4HCO3 as the draw solution, the FO process achieved 51% water recovery from the MEC anode effluent in 3.5-h operation, higher than that from the raw leachate. The recovered ammonia was used as a draw solute in the FO for successful water recovery from the treated leachate. Despite the challenges with treating returning solution from the FO, this MEC-FO system has demonstrated the potential for resource recovery from wastes, and provide a new solution for sustainable leachate management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Capacity of rehydration and influence of cut on the recovery of water flow in inflorescences of Epidendrum ibaguense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joice Simone Dos Santos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study had the goals to evaluate the effect of the dry storage length on the occlusion and rehydration of E. ibaguense inflorescences, and the influence of the cut at the basis of the stem on the recovery of water uptake. The inflorescences were harvested patronized to 30 cm, long, followed by dry storage at 24ºC for 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours. At the end of each stress period, the inflorescences returned to the water for 24 hours, and during this period, it was determined the alterations on the fresh mass and the relative water content (RWC of petals, followed by the length of vase life. In another experiment, the inflorescences were dry stored for 36 hours, and after it was done cut at the lower base of the stem with lengths varying from 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0 cm, and then placed in deionized water. The inflorescences dry stored for 12 hours recovered the fresh mass and RWC when placed in water, but there was no recovery when the inflorescences had 24, 36 or 48 hours of water stress. Regardless the length of the dry storage, there was reduction of flower vase life compared to inflorescences without water stress. The 0.5 cm cut at the base of the stem after 36 hours of dry storage, did not affect the vase life, but cuts of 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 or 4.0 cm increased the vase life compared to control flowers without any cut. Cuts of 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 or 4.0 cm at the base of the stem enhanced the water uptake, lowering temporarily the rate transpiration: water uptake of the inflorescences.

  9. Application of Moringa Oleifera Seed Powder For Iron (III Coagulation on Local Water Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadillah Utami Prasetyaningtyas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to know the effect of the use of powder moringa seed to coagulant mass and coagulation process, and its effectiveness to increase the quality of pure water. This research uses factorial research design and statistic test MANOVA. To analyse water quality, the researcher uses Fe parameter.  A graphic of coagulant mass and time for each parameter is used to analyse the data. Based on the research result, the uses of moringa seed as coagulant in each 300 mL mineral water gives a possitives result to the river water sample using 100 mg coagulant mass and sedimentations time for 60 minutes, well water sample using 500 mg coagulant mass and sedimentations time for 60 minutes, tap water sample using 300 mg  coagulant mass and sedimentations time for 90 minutes. The effective coagulant that increase the water quality on well water is 98,32% of moringa seed powder, on river water is 96,64%  and for tap water is 25,62%.

  10. Water management during climate change using aquifer storage and recovery of stormwater in a dunefield in western Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Lopez Valencia, Oliver Miguel

    2014-07-28

    An average of less than 50 mm yr-1 of rainfall occurs in the hyperarid region of central Western Saudi Arabia. Climate change is projected to create greater variation in rainfall accumulation with more intense rainfall and flood events and longer duration droughts. To manage climate change and variability in ephemeral stream basins, dams are being constructed across wadi channels to capture stormwater, but a large percentage of this stored water is lost to evaporation. A dam/reservoir system located in Wadi Al Murwani in Western Saudi Arabia was recently constructed and is expected to contain a maximum stored water volume of 150 million m3. A hydrologic assessment of a dunefield lying 45 km downstream was conducted to evaluate its potential use for aquifer storage and recovery of the reservoir water. A 110 m elevation difference between the base of the dam and the upper level of the dunefield occurs, allowing conveyance of the water from the reservoir to the dunefield storage site by gravity feed without pumping, making the recharge system extremely energy efficient. Aquifer storage and recovery coupled with dams would allow water management during extreme droughts and climate change and has widespread potential application in arid regions. 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  11. Effect of heat recovery water heater system on the performance of residential split air conditioner using hydrocarbon refrigerant (HCR22)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, A.; Thalal; Amri, I.; Herisiswanto; Mainil, A. K.

    2017-09-01

    This This paper presents the performance of residential split air conditioner (RSAC) using hydrocarbon refrigerant (HCR22) as the effect on the use of heat recovery water heater system (HRWHS). In this study, RSAC was modified with addition of dummy condenser (trombone coil type) as heat recovery water heater system (HRWHS). This HRWHS is installed between a compressor and a condenser by absorbing a part of condenser waste heat. The results show that RSAC with HRWHS is adequate to generate hot water with the temperature range about 46.58˚C - 48.81˚C when compared to without HRWHS and the use of dummy condenser does not give significant effect to the split air conditioner performance. When the use of HRWHS, the refrigerant charge has increase about 19.05%, the compressor power consumption has slightly increase about 1.42% where cooling capacity almost the same with slightly different about 0.39%. The condenser heat rejection is lower about 2.68% and the COP has slightly increased about 1.05% when compared to without HRWHS. The use of HRWHS provide free hot water, it means there is energy saving for heating water without negative impact to the system performance of RSAC.

  12. Natural product based composite for extraction of arsenic (III) from waste water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    N Akartasse; E Mejdoubi; B Razzouki; K Azzaoui; S Jodeh; O Hamed; M Ramdani; A Lamhamdi; M Berrabah; I Lahmass; W Jodeh; S El Hajjaji

    2017-01-01

    ...) from waste water were synthesized and evaluated. Several composites with various compositions were prepared by the wet chemical method and analyzed using various spectroscopic and analytical methods...

  13. Selective adsorption and recovery of Au(III) from three kinds of acidic systems by persimmon residual based bio-sorbent: a method for gold recycling from e-wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ruiyi; Xie, Feng; Guan, Xueliang; Zhang, Qinglin; Luo, Zhengrong

    2014-07-01

    A low cost bio-sorbent, named "PPF resin", was prepared by crosslinking the persimmon residual with formaldehyde. The adsorption behavior of PPF resin towards Au(III) from varied HCl and HNO3 concentration solutions was studied. PPF resin could adsorb almost complete Au(III) from high acidic systems. The influence of dilution ratio, solid-liquid ratio and time towards Au(III) from aqua regia leached PCBs liquor was censored in detail by batch and continuous adsorption methods. The PPF resin before and after adsorption was characterized by FT-IR, XRD and XPS spectra which provided evidences for the reduction of Au(III) to Au(0) with a proposed mechanism of Au(III) adsorption-reduction process. After saturated column adsorption of 0.1g PPF resin, 0.0506 g gold (purity: 99.9%) was obtained by the method of incineration. The present results provide a new approach for gold recovery from the secondary resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A study of a desuperheater heat recovery system complete with a reversibly used water cooling tower (RUWCT) for hot water supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kunxiong

    Recovering heat rejected from the condenser in a refrigeration system to generate service hot water for buildings is commonly seen in both tropics and subtropics. This study included a critical literature review on heat recovery from air-conditioning/refrigeration systems, with particular emphasis on the direct condenser heat recovery and its related mathematical simulation models. The review identified many applications of desuperheaters to small-scaled residential air-conditioning or heat pump units. The heat and mass transfer characteristics of a RUWCT have been studied in detail, which is based on the theory of direct contact heat and mass transfer between moist air and water. The thesis reports on the differences in the heat and mass transfer process that takes place in a RUWCT, a standard water cooling tower and a spray room. A corrective factor that accounts for the change of chilled water mass flow rate is incorporated into the theoretical analysis of a RUWCT. The algorithms developed from the theoretical analysis are capable of predicting the heat exchange capacity of a RUWCT at any operating conditions. This theoretical analysis is the first of its kind. Extensive field experimental work on the heat and mass transfer characteristics of a RUWCT has been carried out in a hotel building in Haikou, Hainan province of China, where the RUWCT is installed. Results from the experimental work indicate that the theoretical analysis can represent the heat and mass transfer characteristics in a RUWCT with an acceptable accuracy. A numerical analysis for a RUWCT is undertaken to determine both air and water states at intermediate horizontal sections along the tower height. Field experimental data confirm that the predicted air and water conditions at the tower inlet and outlet are of acceptable accuracy. A steady-state mathematical model is developed to simulate the operational performance of a water chiller plant complete with a desuperheater heat recovery system and

  15. Recovery and reuse of sludge from active and passive treatment of mine drainage-impacted waters: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotonimaro, Tsiverihasina V; Neculita, Carmen Mihaela; Bussière, Bruno; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Zagury, Gérald J

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of mine drainage-impacted waters generates considerable amounts of sludge, which raises several concerns, such as storage and disposal, stability, and potential social and environmental impacts. To alleviate the storage and management costs, as well as to give the mine sludge a second life, recovery and reuse have recently become interesting options. In this review, different recovery and reuse options of sludge originating from active and passive treatment of mine drainage are identified and thoroughly discussed, based on available laboratory and field studies. The most valuable products presently recovered from the mine sludge are the iron oxy-hydroxides (ochre). Other by-products include metals, elemental sulfur, and calcium carbonate. Mine sludge reuse includes the removal of contaminants, such as As, P, dye, and rare earth elements. Mine sludge can also be reused as stabilizer for contaminated soil, as fertilizer in agriculture/horticulture, as substitute material in construction, as cover over tailings for acid mine drainage prevention and control, as material to sequester carbon dioxide, and in cement and pigment industries. The review also stresses out some of the current challenges and research needs. Finally, in order to move forward, studies are needed to better estimate the contribution of sludge recovery/reuse to the overall costs of mine water treatment.

  16. The Effectiveness of Whole Body Cryotherapy Compared to Cold Water Immersion: Implications for Sport and Exercise Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Holmes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cryotherapy is the process of cooling the body, is typically used therapeutically, and is often used as a method of recovery relative to sport and exercise performance.  The purpose of this review is to compare the current literature on WBC to that of CWI and determine whether WBC provides any additional enhancements for sport and exercise recovery. These include tissue temperature reduction, markers of muscle damage, markers of inflammation, and parasympathetic reactivation. Method: Common methods of cryotherapy include cold water immersion (CWI, ice packs, ice massages, and gel or cooling creams. CWI is the most common method among athletes; however, a new form of cryotherapy, known as whole-body cryotherapy (WBC, has recently emerged.  Since its introduction, WBC has grown in popularity among practitioners and athletes. WBC involves short exposures (generally between 2-4 minutes to very cold air (-100o C to -140o C in a controlled room and setting. Furthermore, many of the studies on WBC were observational and did not contain a control group. Conclusion: Despite its growing popularity, the alleged benefits of WBC are largely based on anecdotal evidence as randomized, clinically-controlled studies regarding its efficacy are limited.  Keywords: cryotherapy, cold water immersion, exercise, recovery, muscle damage, inflammation

  17. Degradation of perfluoro compounds and f{sup -} recovery in water using discharge plasmas generated within gas bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuoka, K.; Sasaki, K.; Hayashi, R.; Kosugi, A.; Takeuchi, N. [Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The widespread use of perfluorocarbons (PFCs) has raised environmental concerns because of their chemical stability and the toxicity of long-chain PFCs. Since PFCs such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) or perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) cannot be decomposed by advanced oxidation technologies utilizing OH radicals, other methods have been tested to decompose their strong C-F bonds. Recent studies have shown that direct plasma-water interaction can easily decompose such persistent substances in water. A DC plasma generated within oxygen bubbles in water showed a higher decomposition rate and efficiency than pulsed plasmas. During decomposition, fluorine ions were generated in the solution. The recovery of fluorine from PFOA in water was tested by combining the PFOA decomposition process and calcium precipitation method. The recovery of fluorine is important due to the increasing price of fluorite. The PFC decomposing rate and efficiency were evaluated by measuring the fluorine ions generated in the solution. The decomposing rate for PFOA was slightly higher than that for PFOS. The direct plasma interaction to the solution surfaces appeared to enhance the degradation of PFOA/PFOS. 10 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  18. Exploring the temporal effects of seasonal water availability on the snail kite of Florida: Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Wolf M.; Martin, Julien; Kitchens, Wiley M.; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Bissonette, John A.; Storch, Ilse

    2007-01-01

    The Florida snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis) is an endangered raptor that occurs as an isolated population, currently of about 2,000 birds, in the wetlands of southern and central Florida, USA. Its exclusive prey species, the apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) is strongly influenced by seasonal changes in water abundance. Droughts during the snail kite breeding season have a direct negative effect on snail kite survival and reproduction, but droughts are also needed to maintain aquatic vegetation types favorable to snail kite foraging for snails. We used a spatially explicit matrix model to explore the effects of temporal variation in water levels on the viability of the snail kite population under different temporal drought regimes in its wetland breeding habitat. We focused on three aspects of variations in water levels that were likely to affect kites: (1) drought frequency; (2) drought duration; and (3) drought timing within the year. We modeled a 31-year historical scenario using four different scenarios in which the average water level was maintained constant, but the amplitude of water level fluctuations was modified. Our results reveal the complexity of the effects of temporal variation in water levels on snail kite population dynamics. Management implications of these results are discussed. In particular, management decisions should not be based on annual mean water levels alone, but must consider the intra-annual variability.

  19. Analysis of environmental issues related to small-scale hydroelectric development. III. Water level fluctuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-10-01

    Potential environmental impacts in reservoirs and downstream river reaches below dams that may be caused by the water level fluctuation resulting from development and operation of small scale (under 25MW) hydroelectric projects are identified. The impacts discussed will be of potential concern at only those small-scale hydroelectric projects that are operated in a store and release (peaking) mode. Potential impacts on physical and chemical characteristics in reservoirs resulting from water level fluctuation include resuspension and redistribution of bank and bed sediment; leaching of soluble organic matter from sediment in the littoral zone; and changes in water quality resulting from changes in sediment and nutrient trap efficiency. Potential impacts on reservoir biota as a result of water level fluctuation include habitat destruction and the resulting partial or total loss of aquatic species; changes in habitat quality, which result in reduced standing crop and production of aquatic biota; and possible shifts in species diversity. The potential physical effects of water level fluctuation on downstream systems below dams are streambed and bank erosion and water quality problems related to resuspension and redistribution of these materials. Potential biological impacts of water level fluctuation on downstream systems below dams result from changes in current velocity, habitat reduction, and alteration in food supply. These alterations, either singly or in combination, can adversely affect aquatic populations below dams. The nature and potential significance of adverse impacts resulting from water level fluctuation are discussed. Recommendations for site-specific evaluation of water level fluctuation at small-scale hydroelectric projects are presented.

  20. Enhancing forward osmosis water recovery from landfill leachate by desalinating brine and recovering ammonia in a microbial desalination cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, Syeed Md; Novak, John T; He, Zhen

    2018-01-31

    In this work, a microbial desalination cell (MDC) was employed to desalinate the FO treated leachate for reduction of both salinity and chemical oxygen demand (COD). The FO recovered 51.5% water from a raw leachate and the recovery increased to 83.5% from the concentrated leachate after desalination in the MDC fed with either acetate or another leachate as an electron source and at a different hydraulic retention time (HRT). Easily-degraded substrate like acetate and a long HRT resulted in a low conductivity desalinated effluent. Ammonia was also recovered in the MDC cathode with a recovery efficiency varying from 11 to 64%, affected by current generation and HRT. Significant COD reduction, as high as 65.4%, was observed in the desalination chamber and attributed to the decrease of both organic and inorganic compounds via diffusion and electricity-driven movement. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A customised cold-water immersion protocol favours one-size-fits-all protocols in improving acute performance recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvoort, Coen S; de Zwart, Jelmer R; van Keeken, Brenda L; Viroux, Patrick J F; Tiemessen, Ivo J H

    2017-10-26

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether a customised cold-water immersion (CWIc) protocol was more effective in enhancing acute performance recovery than a one-size-fits-all CWI (CWIs) or active recovery (AR) protocol. On three separate testing days, 10 healthy, physically active, non-smoking males completed the same fatiguing protocol (60 squat jumps and a 2'30″ all-out cycling time-trial) followed by CWIc (12°C, 10-17 min), CWIs (15°C, 10 min) or AR (60 W, 10 min). Outcome measures to assess acute recovery were heart rate variability (HRV) as HRVrecovery, muscle power (MP) as absolute and relative decline, and muscle soreness (MS) at 0 and 24 h. HRVrecovery for CWIc was significantly higher compared to CWIs (p = .026, r = 0.74) and AR (p = .000, r = 0.95). The relative decline in MP after CWIc was significantly lower than after CWIs (p = .017, r = 0.73). MS 0 h and MS 24 h post-intervention were not different after CWIc compared to CWIs and AR (p > .05). The findings of the present study demonstrated that CWIc outperforms CWIs and AR in the acute recovery of cardiovascular (HRV) and CWIs in neuromuscular (MP) performance with no differences in MS. To optimise the effects of CWI, contributions of the protocol duration and water temperature should be considered to guarantee an optimal customised dose.

  2. Water-Responsive Shape Recovery Induced Buckling in Biodegradable Photo-Cross-Linked Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) Hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvekar, Abhijit Vijay; Huang, Wei Min; Xiao, Rui; Wong, Yee Shan; Venkatraman, Subbu S; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Shen, Ze Xiang

    2017-02-21

    The phenomenon of recovering the permanent shape from a severely deformed temporary shape, but only in the presence of the right stimulus, is known as the shape memory effect (SME). Materials with such an interesting effect are known as shape memory materials (SMMs). Typical stimuli to trigger shape recovery include temperature (heating or cooling), chemical (including water/moisture and pH value), and light. As a SMM is able not only to maintain the temporary shape but also to respond to the right stimulus when it is applied, via shape-shifting, a seamless integration of sensing and actuation functions is achieved within one single piece of material. Hydrogels are defined by their ability to absorb a large amount of water (from 10-20% up to thousands of times their dry weight), which results in significant swelling. On the other hand, dry hydrogels indeed belong to polymers, so they exhibit heat- and chemoresponsive SMEs as most polymers do. While heat-responsive SMEs have been spotted in a handful of wet hydrogels, so far, most dry hydrogels evince the heat and water (moisture)-responsive SMEs. Since water is one of the major components in living biological systems, water-responsive SMMs hold great potential for various implantable applications, including wound healing, intravascular devices, soft tissue reconstruction, and controlled drug delivery. This provides motivation to combine water-activated SMEs and swelling in hydrogels together to enhance the performance. In many applications, such as vascular occlusion via minimally invasive surgery for liver cancer treatment, the operation time (for both start and finish) is required to be well controlled. Due to the gradual and slow manner of water absorption for water-activated SMEs and swelling in hydrogels, even a combination of both effects encounters many difficulties to meet the timerequirements in real procedures of vascular occlusion. Recently, we have reported a bioabsorbable radiopaque water

  3. Flow analysis by using solenoid valves for As(III determination in natural waters by an on-line separation and pre-concentration system coupled to a tungsten coil atomizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Y. Neira

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A flow system coupled to a tungsten coil atomizer in an atomic absorption spectrometer (TCA-AAS was developed for As(III determination in waters, by extraction with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDTC as complexing agent, and by sorption of the As(III-DDTC complex in a micro-column filled with 5 mg C18 reversed phase (10 µL dry sorbent, followed by elution with ethanol. A complete pre-concentration/elution cycle took 208 s, with 30 s sample load time (1.7 mL and 4 s elution time (71 µL. The interface and software for the synchronous control of two peristaltic pumps (RUN/ STOP, an autosampler arm, seven solenoid valves, one injection valve, the electrothermal atomizer and the spectrometer Read function were constructed. The system was characterized and validated by analytical recovery studies performed both in synthetic solutions and in natural waters. Using a 30 s pre-concentration period, the working curve was linear between 0.25 and 6.0 µg L-1 (r = 0.9976, the retention efficiency was 94±1% (6.0 µg L-1, and the pre-concentration coefficient was 28.9. The characteristic mass was 58 pg, the mean repeatability (expressed as the variation coefficient was 3.4% (n=5, the detection limit was 0.058 µg L-1 (4.1 pg in 71 µL of eluate injected into the coil, and the mean analytical recovery in natural waters was 92.6 ± 9.5 % (n=15. The procedure is simple, economic, less prone to sample loss and contamination and the useful lifetime of the micro-column was between 200-300 pre-concentration cycles.

  4. Bioelectrochemical systems-driven directional ion transport enables low-energy water desalination, pollutant removal, and resource recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Liang, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Xia

    2016-09-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are integrated water treatment technologies that generate electricity using organic matter in wastewater. In situ use of bioelectricity can direct the migration of ionic substances in a BES, thereby enabling water desalination, resource recovery, and valuable substance production. Recently, much attention has been placed on the microbial desalination cells in BESs to drive water desalination, and various configurations have optimized electricity generation and desalination performance and also coupled hydrogen production, heavy metal reduction, and other reactions. In addition, directional transport of other types of charged ions can remediate polluted groundwater, recover nutrient, and produce valuable substances. To better promote the practical application, the use of BESs as directional drivers of ionic substances requires further optimization to improve energy use efficiency and treatment efficacy. This article reviews existing researches on BES-driven directional ion transport to treat wastewater and identifies a few key factors involved in efficiency optimization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. On a novel strategy for water recovery and recirculation in biorefineries through application of forward osmosis membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalafatakis, Stavros; Braekevelt, Sylvie; Carlsen, Vilhelmsen

    2017-01-01

    and financial benefits of this technology can be undermined from the fact that FO should be usually coupled with reverse osmosis (RO) for subsequent water purification and draw solution regeneration. Hence, a different approach was applied in order to omit the RO step. Crude glycerol and enzymatically...... pretreated wheat straw, which are common 2nd generation biorefinery feedstocks, have been evaluated as possible draw solution. In this way, water can be directly recovered and transferred back into the fermentation loop without further purification. Applying the Aquaporin InsideTM Forward Osmosis system......A great amount of research has been performed during the last 10 years focusing on forward osmosis (FO)processes. The main driving force is to find an effective and low energy demanding methodology for water recovery as well as up-concentration of valuable products. Nevertheless, the energetic...

  6. In situ generation of steam and alkaline surfactant for enhanced oil recovery using an exothermic water reactant (EWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Eric P

    2011-05-24

    A method for oil recovery whereby an exothermic water reactant (EWR) encapsulated in a water soluble coating is placed in water and pumped into one or more oil wells in contact with an oil bearing formation. After the water carries the EWR to the bottom of the injection well, the water soluble coating dissolves and the EWR reacts with the water to produce heat, an alkali solution, and hydrogen. The heat from the EWR reaction generates steam, which is forced into the oil bearing formation where it condenses and transfers heat to the oil, elevating its temperature and decreasing the viscosity of the oil. The aqueous alkali solution mixes with the oil in the oil bearing formation and forms a surfactant that reduces the interfacial tension between the oil and water. The hydrogen may be used to react with the oil at these elevated temperatures to form lighter molecules, thus upgrading to a certain extent the oil in situ. As a result, the oil can flow more efficiently and easily through the oil bearing formation towards and into one or more production wells.

  7. Integrating water flow, locomotor performance and respiration of Chinese sturgeon during multiple fatigue-recovery cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Cai

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to provide information on metabolic changes occurring in Chinese sturgeon (an ecologically important endangered fish subjected to repeated cycles of fatigue and recovery and the effect on swimming capability. Fatigue-recovery cycles likely occur when fish are moving through the fishways of large dams and the results of this investigation are important for fishway design and conservation of wild Chinese sturgeon populations. A series of four stepped velocity tests were carried out successively in a Steffensen-type swimming respirometer and the effects of repeated fatigue-recovery on swimming capability and metabolism were measured. Significant results include: (1 critical swimming speed decreased from 4.34 bl/s to 2.98 bl/s; (2 active oxygen consumption (i.e. the difference between total oxygen consumption and routine oxygen consumption decreased from 1175 mgO2/kg to 341 mgO2/kg and was the primary reason for the decrease in Ucrit; (3 excess post-exercise oxygen consumption decreased from 36 mgO2/kg to 22 mgO2/kg; (4 with repeated step tests, white muscle (anaerobic metabolism began contributing to propulsion at lower swimming speeds. Therefore, Chinese sturgeon conserve energy by swimming efficiently and have high fatigue recovery capability. These results contribute to our understanding of the physiology of the Chinese sturgeon and support the conservation efforts of wild populations of this important species.

  8. Resource recovery from source separated domestic waste(water) streams; Full scale results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeman, G.; Kujawa, K.

    2011-01-01

    A major fraction of nutrients emitted from households are originally present in only 1% of total wastewater volume. New sanitation concepts enable the recovery and reuse of these nutrients from feces and urine. Two possible sanitation concepts are presented, with varying degree of source separation

  9. Comparison of the effects of hydration with water or isotonic solution on the recovery of cardiac autonomic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Moreno, Isadora Lessa; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Ferreira, Celso

    2015-04-01

    Despite the importance of hydration during exercise, the impact of ingesting water or isotonic solution during and after exercise on the regulation of autonomic modulation is unclear. The study aimed to compare the effect of ingesting water or isotonic solution (Gatorade®, Brazil) on cardiac autonomic modulation in young people after submaximal aerobic exercise. Thirty-one young men were subjected to a protocol consisting of 4 steps: 1) incremental test, 2) control protocol without hydration, 3) protocol with ingestion of water, and 4) protocol with ingestion of isotonic solution. The protocol consisted of 10 min of rest, 90 min of treadmill exercise at 60% VO2peak, and 60 min of recovery at rest. In the hydration protocols, hydration occurred during and after exercise, every 15 min beginning after the 15th minute of exercise, with the amount ingested proportional to body mass lost in the control protocol. Autonomic modulation was evaluated by heart rate variability. The hydration protocols promoted a more efficient recovery of autonomic modulation, and for the exercise performed, regardless of the hydration administered, the effect on autonomic modulation was similar.

  10. Effects of sports massage and intermittent cold-water immersion on recovery from matches by basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delextrat, Anne; Calleja-González, Julio; Hippocrate, Audrey; Clarke, Neil David

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of intermittent cold-water immersion and massage on perceptual and performance markers of recovery by basketball players after competitive matches. Eight men (age 23 ± 3 years; stature 190.5 ± 8.9 cm; body mass 90.3 ± 9.6 kg; body fat 12.8 ± 4.8%) and eight women (age 22 ± 2 years; stature 179.0 ± 8.5 cm; body mass 77.6 ± 9.2 kg; body fat 22.5 ± 6.6%) basketball players participated. Massage, cold-water immersion or control were applied immediately after competitive matches, followed by assessments of perceptual measures of recovery and physical performance, countermovement jump and repeated-sprint ability 24 h after intervention. There was lower perception of fatigue overall and in the legs immediately after the massage and cold-water immersion condition (P basketball matches, especially in women.

  11. Acute weight loss followed by an aggressive nutritional recovery strategy has little impact on on-water rowing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, G; Rice, A J; Tanner, R; Sharpe, K; Gore, C J; Jenkins, D G; Hahn, A G

    2006-01-01

    To assess the influence of moderate, acute weight loss on on-water rowing performance when aggressive nutritional recovery strategies were used in the two hours between weigh in and racing. Competitive rowers (n = 17) undertook three on-water 1800 m time trials under cool conditions (mean (SD) temperature 8.4 (2.0) degrees C), each separated by 48 hours. No weight limit was imposed for the first time trial--that is, unrestricted body mass (UNR1). However, one of the remaining two trials followed a 4% loss in body mass in the previous 24 hours (WT(-4%)). No weight limit was imposed for the other trial (UNR2). Aggressive nutritional recovery strategies (WT(-4%), 2.3 g/kg carbohydrate, 34 mg/kg Na+, and 28.4 ml/kg fluid; UNR, ad libitum) were used in the first 90 minutes of the two hours between weigh in and performance trials. WT(-4%) had only a small and statistically non-significant effect on the on-water time trial performance (mean 1.0 second, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.9 to 2.8; p = 0.29) compared with UNR. This was despite a significant decrease in plasma volume at the time of weigh in for WT(-4%) compared with UNR (-9.2%, 95% CI -12.8% to -5.6%; prowing performance, at least in cool conditions.

  12. Stability Proxies for Water-in-Oil Emulsions and Implications in Aqueous-based Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnoosh Moradi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Several researchers have proposed that mobility control mechanisms can positively contribute to oil recovery in the case of emulsions generated in Enhanced-Oil Recovery (EOR operations. Chemical EOR techniques that use alkaline components or/and surfactants are known to produce undesirable emulsions that create operational problems and are difficult to break. Other water-based methods have been less studied in this sense. EOR processes such as polymer flooding and LoSalTM injection require adjustments of water chemistry, mainly by lowering the ionic strength of the solution or by decreasing hardness. The decreased ionic strength of EOR solutions can give rise to more stable water-in-oil emulsions, which are speculated to improve mobility ratio between the injectant and the displaced oil. The first step toward understanding the connection between the emulsions and EOR mechanisms is to show that EOR conditions, such as salinity and hardness requirements, among others, are conducive to stabilizing emulsions. In order to do this, adequate stability proxies are required. This paper reviews commonly used emulsion stability proxies and explains the advantages and disadvantage of methods reviewed. This paper also reviews aqueous-based EOR processes with focus on heavy oil to contextualize in-situ emulsion stabilization conditions. This context sets the basis for comparison of emulsion stability proxies.

  13. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR by Miscible CO2 and Water Flooding of Asphaltenic and Non-Asphaltenic Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin A. Chukwudeme

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available An EOR study has been performed applying miscible CO2 flooding and compared with that for water flooding. Three different oils are used, reference oil (n-decane, model oil (n-C10, SA, toluene and 0.35 wt % asphaltene and crude oil (10 wt % asphaltene obtained from the Middle East. Stearic acid (SA is added representing a natural surfactant in oil. For the non-asphaltenic oil, miscible CO2 flooding is shown to be more favourable than that by water. However, it is interesting to see that for first years after the start of the injection (< 3 years it is shown that there is almost no difference between the recovered oils by water and CO2, after which (> 3 years oil recovery by gas injection showed a significant increase. This may be due to the enhanced performance at the increased reservoir pressure during the first period. Maximum oil recovery is shown by miscible CO2 flooding of asphaltenic oil at combined temperatures and pressures of 50 °C/90 bar and 70 °C/120 bar (no significant difference between the two cases, about 1% compared to 80 °C/140 bar. This may support the positive influence of the high combined temperatures and pressures for the miscible CO2 flooding; however beyond a certain limit the oil recovery declined due to increased asphaltene deposition. Another interesting finding in this work is that for single phase oil, an almost linear relationship is observed between the pressure drop and the asphaltene deposition regardless of the flowing fluid pressure.

  14. Determination of organophosphorus pesticides in water samples by using a new sensitive luminescent probe of Eu (III) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azab, Hassan A., E-mail: azab2@yahoo.com; Anwar, Z.M.; Rizk, M.A.; Khairy, Gasser M.; El-Asfoury, M.H.

    2015-01-15

    This work describes the application of fluorescence for investigating the interactions of Eu(III)-TAN-1,10 phenanthroline (where TAN=4,4,4-Trifluoro-1-(2-naphthyl)-1,3-butanedione) with pesticides Chlorpyrifos, Malathion, Endosulfan, Heptachlor. The complex was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR, x-ray spectroscopy, solid fluorescence and thermal analysis. The results indicated that the composition of this complex is [Eu(TAN){sub 2}(Phen)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]Cl. The luminescence properties of the complex in different solvents and at different pH values have been investigated. The results show that the complex exhibits more efficient luminescence at pH=7.5. The interactions of Eu-complex with different pesticides (Chlorpyrifos, Malathion, Endosulfan, and Heptachlor) in aqueous medium have been investigated by fluorescence measurements. The luminescence intensity of the probe is quenched by Malathion and enhanced by (Endosulfan, Heptachlor, and Chlorpyrifos). Direct methods for the determination of the pesticides under investigation have been developed using the luminescence variations of the probe in solution. The detection limits are 0.47, 1.02, 0.66, 0.64 µmol/L for Chlorpyrifos, Endosulfan, Heptachlor, and Malathion, respectively. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters of the pesticides with probe were evaluated. The emission quantum yield (QY=0.71) of Eu(III)-complex was determined using tris (2,2'-bipyridyl) dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate. A thermodynamic analysis showed that the reaction is spontaneous with negative ΔG. Effect of some relevant interferents on the detection of pesticides has been investigated. The new method was applied to the determination of the pesticides in different types of water samples (tap, river, and waste water). - Highlights: • A new luminescent probe of Eu (III) complex has been developed for sensing some organophosphorus pesticides. • Four guest pesticides Chlorpyrifos, Malathion

  15. Space shuttle solid rocket booster recovery system definition. Volume 2: SRB water impact Monte Carlo computer program, user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The HD 220 program was created as part of the space shuttle solid rocket booster recovery system definition. The model was generated to investigate the damage to SRB components under water impact loads. The random nature of environmental parameters, such as ocean waves and wind conditions, necessitates estimation of the relative frequency of occurrence for these parameters. The nondeterministic nature of component strengths also lends itself to probabilistic simulation. The Monte Carlo technique allows the simultaneous perturbation of multiple independent parameters and provides outputs describing the probability distribution functions of the dependent parameters. This allows the user to determine the required statistics for each output parameter.

  16. Characterization and Alteration of Wettability States of Alaskan Reserviors to Improve Oil Recovery Efficiency (including the within-scope expansion based on Cyclic Water Injection - a pulsed waterflood for Enhanced Oil Recovery)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhijit Dandekar; Shirish Patil; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    Numerous early reports on experimental works relating to the role of wettability in various aspects of oil recovery have been published. Early examples of laboratory waterfloods show oil recovery increasing with increasing water-wetness. This result is consistent with the intuitive notion that strong wetting preference of the rock for water and associated strong capillary-imbibition forces gives the most efficient oil displacement. This report examines the effect of wettability on waterflooding and gasflooding processes respectively. Waterflood oil recoveries were examined for the dual cases of uniform and non-uniform wetting conditions. Based on the results of the literature review on effect of wettability and oil recovery, coreflooding experiments were designed to examine the effect of changing water chemistry (salinity) on residual oil saturation. Numerous corefloods were conducted on reservoir rock material from representative formations on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The corefloods consisted of injecting water (reservoir water and ultra low-salinity ANS lake water) of different salinities in secondary as well as tertiary mode. Additionally, complete reservoir condition corefloods were also conducted using live oil. In all the tests, wettability indices, residual oil saturation, and oil recovery were measured. All results consistently lead to one conclusion; that is, a decrease in injection water salinity causes a reduction in residual oil saturation and a slight increase in water-wetness, both of which are comparable with literature observations. These observations have an intuitive appeal in that water easily imbibes into the core and displaces oil. Therefore, low-salinity waterfloods have the potential for improved oil recovery in the secondary recovery process, and ultra low-salinity ANS lake water is an attractive source of injection water or a source for diluting the high-salinity reservoir water. As part of the within-scope expansion of this project

  17. River water quality model no. 1 (RWQM1): III. Biochemical submodel selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanrolleghem, P.; Borchardt, D.; Henze, Mogens

    2001-01-01

    The new River Water Quality Model no.1 introduced in the two accompanying papers by Shanahan et al. and Reichert et al. is comprehensive. Shanahan et al. introduced a six-step decision procedure to select the necessary model features for a certain application. This paper specifically addresses on...

  18. Notes on the fishes of western New Guinea III. The fresh water shark of Jamoer lake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeseman, M.

    1964-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In 1954, during a visit to Hollandia, western New Guinea, it was rumoured that sharks had been observed in the fresh water of Jamoer Lake, at a distance by effluent river of about 130 km from the Arafoera Sea. For further information on the locality, including a map of the area, I refer

  19. Evaluation of different conditions and culture media for the recovery of Aeromonas spp. from water and shellfish samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif-Eugenín, F; Beaz-Hidalgo, R; Figueras, M J

    2016-09-01

    To perform a comparative study for determining the optimum culture method (direct plating or enrichment) and medium (ampicillin dextrin agar (ADA), starch ampicillin agar (SAA), bile salts irgasan brilliant green modified (BIBG-m)) for recovering Aeromonas species from water and shellfish samples. By direct culture, Aeromonas was detected in 65% (13/20) of the water samples and in 54·5% (6/11) of the shellfish samples. However, when a pre-enrichment step was included, the number of positive water samples increased to 75% (15/20) and the ones of shellfish to 90·1% (10/11). The enriched culture significantly favoured (P culture medium for detecting Aeromonas from water was ADA. However, no differences were observed in the case of shellfish samples (P > 0·05). Isolation of Aeromonas media from water was favoured (P culture method and medium used influenced the recovery of some Aeromonas species from water and shellfish samples. This fact should be considered in future prevalence studies to avoid overestimating the above mentioned Aeromonas species. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. A System Dynamics Model to Conserve Arid Region Water Resources through Aquifer Storage and Recovery in Conjunction with a Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Niazi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater depletion poses a significant threat in arid and semi-arid areas where rivers are usually ephemeral and groundwater is the major source of water. The present study investigated whether an effective water resources management strategy, capable of minimizing evaporative water losses and groundwater depletion while providing water for expanded agricultural activities, can be achieved through aquifer storage and recovery (ASR implemented in conjunction with water storage in an ephemeral river. A regional development modeling framework, including both ASR and a dam design developed through system dynamics modeling, was validated using a case study for the Sirik region of Iran. The system dynamics model of groundwater flow and the comprehensive system dynamics model developed in this study showed that ASR was a beneficial strategy for the region’s farmers and the groundwater system, since the rate of groundwater depletion declined significantly (from 14.5 meters per 40 years to three meters over the same period. Furthermore, evaporation from the reservoir decreased by 50 million cubic meters over the simulation period. It was concluded that the proposed system dynamics model is an effective tool in helping to conserve water resources and reduce depletion in arid regions and semi-arid areas.

  1. Recovery Act: Water Heater ZigBee Open Standard Wireless Controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, William P. [Emerson Electric Co., St. Louis, MO (United States); Buescher, Tom [Emerson Electric Co., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-04-30

    The objective of Emerson's Water Heater ZigBee Open Standard Wireless Controller is to support the DOE's AARA priority for Clean, Secure Energy by designing a water heater control that levels out residential and small business peak electricity demand through thermal energy storage in the water heater tank.

  2. Effective, Low-Cost Recovery of Toxic Arsenate Anions from Water by Using Hollow-Sphere Geode Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenashen, Mohamed A; Akhtar, Naeem; Selim, Mahmoud M; Morsy, Wafaa M; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Kawada, Satoshi; Alhamid, Abdulaziz A; Ohashi, Naoki; Ichinose, Izumi; Alamoudi, Ahmad S; El-Safty, Sherif A

    2017-08-04

    Because of the devastating impact of arsenic on terrestrial and aquatic organisms, the recovery, removal, disposal, and management of arsenic-contaminated water is a considerable challenge and has become an urgent necessity in the field of water treatment. This study reports the controlled fabrication of a low-cost adsorbent based on microscopic C-,N-doped NiO hollow spheres with geode shells composed of poly-CN nanospherical nodules (100 nm) that were intrinsically stacked and wrapped around the hollow spheres to form a shell with a thickness of 500-700 nm. This C-,N-doped NiO hollow-sphere adsorbent (termed CNN) with multiple diffusion routes through open pores and caves with connected open macro/meso windows over the entire surface and well-dispersed hollow-sphere particles that create vesicle traps for the capture, extraction, and separation of arsenate (AsO 4 3- ) species from aqueous solution. The CNN structures are considered to be a potentially attractive adsorbent for AsO 4 3- species due to 1) superior removal and trapping capacity from water samples and 2) selective trapping of AsO 4 3- from real water samples that mainly contained chloride and nitrate anions and Fe 2+ , and Mn 2+ , Ca 2+ , and Mg 2+ cations. The structural stability of the hierarchal geodes was evident after 20 cycles without any significant decrease in the recovery efficiency of AsO 4 3- species. To achieve low-cost adsorbents and toxic-waste management, this superior CNN AsO 4 3- dead-end trapping and recovery system evidently enabled the continuous control of AsO 4 3- disposal in water-scarce environments, presents a low-cost and eco-friendly adsorbent for AsO 4 3- species, and selectively produced water-free arsenate species. These CNN geode traps show potential as excellent adsorbent candidates in environment remediation tools and human healthcare. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Study design and percent recoveries of anthropogenic organic compounds with and without the addition of ascorbic acid to preserve water samples containing free chlorine, 2004-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valder, Joshua F.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Price, Curtis V.; Sandstrom, Mark W.

    2008-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began implementing Source Water-Quality Assessments (SWQAs) in 2002 that focus on characterizing the quality of source water and finished water of aquifers and major rivers used by some of the larger community water systems in the United States. As used for SWQA studies, source water is the raw (ambient) water collected at the supply well prior to water treatment (for ground water) or the raw (ambient) water collected from the river near the intake (for surface water). Finished water is the water that is treated, which typically involves, in part, the addition of chlorine or other disinfection chemicals to remove pathogens, and is ready to be delivered to consumers. Finished water is collected before the water enters the distribution system. This report describes the study design and percent recoveries of anthropogenic organic compounds (AOCs) with and without the addition of ascorbic acid to preserve water samples containing free chlorine. The percent recoveries were determined by using analytical results from a laboratory study conducted in 2004 by the USGS's National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) and from data collected during 2004-06 for a field study currently (2008) being conducted by the USGS's NAWQA Program. The laboratory study was designed to determine if preserving samples with ascorbic acid (quenching samples) adversely affects analytical performance under controlled conditions. During the laboratory study, eight samples of reagent water were spiked for each of five analytical schedules evaluated. Percent recoveries from these samples were then compared in two ways: (1) four quenched reagent spiked samples analyzed on day 0 were compared with four quenched reagent spiked samples analyzed on day 7 or 14, and (2) the combined eight quenched reagent spiked samples analyzed on day 0, 7, or 14 were compared with eight laboratory reagent spikes (LRSs). Percent

  4. Experimental investigation and SIMMER-III code modelling of LBE–water interaction in LIFUS5/Mod2 facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesetti, A., E-mail: alessio.pesetti@for.unipi.it [University of Pisa, DICI, 56122 Pisa, PI (Italy); Del Nevo, A. [ENEA, C.R. Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, BO (Italy); Forgione, N. [University of Pisa, DICI, 56122 Pisa, PI (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • In the framework of THINS Project, four experimental tests were performed investigating water–LBE interaction in LIFUS5/Mod2 facility at ENEA RC Brasimone. • High quality data were acquired to improve the phenomena understanding and support codes development/validation. • Post-test activity by SIMMER III code was performed by a simplified model. • The obtained numerical results are qualitatively in agreement with the experimental data. - Abstract: In the frame of the THINS Project, an experimental campaign was performed on LIFUS5/Mod2 facility at ENEA RC Brasimone, aiming to investigate the water–LBE interaction. Such a phenomenon occurs as consequence of a postulated Steam Generator Tube Rupture event in a HLMFR system. Four tests were performed injecting sub-cooled water at 40 bar into a reaction vessel partially filled by low pressure LBE at 400 °C. The post-test activity was performed by the SIMMER-III code in order to improve the understanding of the involved phenomena and to confirm the code capabilities in simulating the water–LBE interaction. The calculated data showed a qualitatively agreement with the measured values and a faster reaction kinetics due to the modelling assumptions.

  5. Natural conditions influencing petroleum recovery and field development in Norwegian waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiberg, S. (Oljedirektoratet, Stavanger (Norway)); Loeken, T.; Torsethaugen, K. (Norges Hydrodynamiske Laboratorier, Trondheim (Norway))

    1982-01-01

    One of the main concerns of the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate is to identify precisely the characteristics of the oil and gas resources as well as the natural conditions influencing their exploitation. Without this prerequisite it is not possible to contribute to a high recovery of the petroleum resources under cost efficient and safe conditions. This paper is an introduction to the natural conditions on the Shelf. It may serve as an overview and as a background against which further research and development efforts may be evaluated with regard to improving the efficiency of the petroleum recovery operations. Main topics included are petroleum geology; earthquake hazards; quaternary geology and geotechnical conditions; environmental conditions. 29 drawings.

  6. Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David B. Burnett

    2004-09-29

    Produced water is a major waste generated at the oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source of new fresh water to meet the growing demands of the state after treatment and purification. Treatment of brine generated in oil fields or produced water with an ultrafiltration membranes were the subject of this thesis. The characterization of ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal of produced water, coupled with the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of brine were studied on lab size membrane testing equipment and a field size testing unit to test whether a viable membrane system could be used to treat produced water. Oil and suspended solids were evaluated using turbidity and oil in water measurements taken periodically. The research considered the effect of pressure and flow rate on membrane performance of produced water treatment of three commercially available membranes for oily water. The study also analyzed the flux through the membrane and any effect it had on membrane performance. The research showed that an ultrafiltration membrane provided turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be asset as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Further results on selected RO membranes showed that salt rejection of greater than 97% could be achieved with satisfactory flux and at reasonable operating cost.

  7. Divergent effects of cold water immersion versus active recovery on skeletal muscle fiber type and angiogenesis in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Randall F; Zeng, Nina; Markworth, James F; Figueiredo, Vandre Casagrande; Roberts, Llion Arwyn; Raastad, Truls; Coombes, Jeff S; Peake, Jonathan M; Cameron-Smith, David; Mitchell, Cameron J

    2018-02-21

    Resistance training (RT) increases muscle fiber size and induces angiogenesis to maintain capillary density. Cold water immersion (CWI), a common post-exercise recovery modality may improve acute recovery, but it attenuates muscle hypertrophy compared with active recovery (ACT). It is unknown if CWI following RT alters muscle fiber type expression or angiogenesis. Twenty-one men strength trained for 12 weeks, with either 10 min of CWI (n=11) or ACT (n=10) performed following each session. Vastus lateralis biopsies were collected at rest before and after training. Type IIx myofiber % decreased (p=0.013) and type IIa myofiber % increased with training (p=0.012), with no difference between groups. The number of capillaries per-fiber increased from pre-training in the CWI group (p=0.004), but not the ACT group (p=0.955). Expression of myosin heavy chain genes (MYH1 and MYH2), encoding type IIx and IIa fibers respectively, decreased in the ACT group whereas MYH7 (encoding type I fibers) increased in the ACT group vs. CWI (p=0.004). MyHCIIa protein increased with training (p=0.012) with no difference between groups. The pro-angiogenic VEGF protein decreased post-training in the ACT group vs. CWI (p<0.001), whereas anti-angiogenic SPRED-1 protein increased with training in both groups (p=0.015). Expression of microRNAs that regulate muscle fiber type (miR-208b and -499a) and angiogenesis (miR-15a, -16 and -126) increased only in the ACT group (P<0.05). CWI recovery after each training session altered the angiogenic and fiber-type specific response to RT through regulation at the levels of microRNA, gene and protein expression.

  8. Integrating Microbial Electrochemical Technology with Forward Osmosis and Membrane Bioreactors: Low-Energy Wastewater Treatment, Energy Recovery and Water Reuse

    KAUST Repository

    Werner, Craig M.

    2014-06-01

    Wastewater treatment is energy intensive, with modern wastewater treatment processes consuming 0.6 kWh/m3 of water treated, half of which is required for aeration. Considering that wastewater contains approximately 2 kWh/m3 of energy and represents a reliable alternative water resource, capturing part of this energy and reclaiming the water would offset or even eliminate energy requirements for wastewater treatment and provide a means to augment traditional water supplies. Microbial electrochemical technology is a novel technology platform that uses bacteria capable of producing an electric current outside of the cell to recover energy from wastewater. These bacteria do not require oxygen to respire but instead use an insoluble electrode as their terminal electron acceptor. Two types of microbial electrochemical technologies were investigated in this dissertation: 1) a microbial fuel cell that produces electricity; and 2) a microbial electrolysis cell that produces hydrogen with the addition of external power. On their own, microbial electrochemical technologies do not achieve sufficiently high treatment levels. Innovative approaches that integrate microbial electrochemical technologies with emerging and established membrane-based treatment processes may improve the overall extent of wastewater treatment and reclaim treated water. Forward osmosis is an emerging low-energy membrane-based technology for seawater desalination. In forward osmosis water is transported across a semipermeable membrane driven by an osmotic gradient. The microbial osmotic fuel cell described in this dissertation integrates a microbial fuel cell with forward osmosis to achieve wastewater treatment, energy recovery and partial desalination. This system required no aeration and generated more power than conventional microbial fuel cells using ion exchange membranes by minimizing electrochemical losses. Membrane bioreactors incorporate semipermeable membranes within a biological wastewater

  9. Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

    2006-12-29

    Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes

  10. Improved Dynamic Modeling of the Cascade Distillation Subsystem and Integration with Models of Other Water Recovery Subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2015-01-01

    The Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) is a rotary multistage distiller being developed to serve as the primary processor for wastewater recovery during long-duration space missions. The CDS could be integrated with a system similar to the International Space Station (ISS) Water Processor Assembly (WPA) to form a complete Water Recovery System (WRS) for future missions. Independent chemical process simulations with varying levels of detail have previously been developed using Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM) to aid in the analysis of the CDS and several WPA components. The existing CDS simulation could not model behavior during thermal startup and lacked detailed analysis of several key internal processes, including heat transfer between stages. The first part of this paper describes modifications to the ACM model of the CDS that improve its capabilities and the accuracy of its predictions. Notably, the modified version of the model can accurately predict behavior during thermal startup for both NaCl solution and pretreated urine feeds. The model is used to predict how changing operating parameters and design features of the CDS affects its performance, and conclusions from these predictions are discussed. The second part of this paper describes the integration of the modified CDS model and the existing WPA component models into a single WRS model. The integrated model is used to demonstrate the effects that changes to one component can have on the dynamic behavior of the system as a whole.

  11. Mesotubular-Structured Hybrid Membrane Nanocontainer for Periodical Monitoring, Separation, and Recovery of Cobalt Ions from Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, Sherif A; Sakai, Masaru; Selim, Mahmoud M; Alhamid, Abdulaziz A

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to toxins can cause deleterious effects even at very low concentrations. We have developed an optical sensor, filter, and extractor (i.e., containerlike) in a nanoscale membrane (NSM) for the ultratrace sensing, separation, and recovery of Co(2+) ions from water. The design of the NSM is successfully controlled by dense decoration of a hydrophobic oil-hydrophilic receptor onto mesoscale tubular-structured silica nanochannels made of a hybrid anodic alumina membrane. The particular structure of the nanocontainer is ideal to control the multiple functions of the membrane, such as the optical detection/recognition, rejection/permeation, and recovery of Co(2+) species in a single step. A typical sensor, filter, and extractor assessment experiment was performed by using a benchtop contact time technique and a flow-through cell detector to allow for precise control of the optical detection and exclusive rejection of target ions and the permeation of nontarget metal ions in water. This nanocontainer membrane has great potential to meet the increasing needs of purification and separation of Co(2+) ions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Engineering Behavior and Characteristics of Water-Soluble Polymers: Implication on Soil Remediation and Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Cindy Cao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers have shown a great effect in enhanced oil recovery because of the improvement of water-flood performance by mobility control, as well as having been considered for oil contaminated-soil remediation thanks to their mobility control and water-flood performance. This study focused on the wettability analysis of biopolymers such as chitosan (85% deacetylated power, PEO (polyethylene oxide, Xanthan (xanthan gum, SA (Alginic Acid Sodium Salt, and PAA (polyacrylic acid, including the measurements of contact angles, interfacial tension, and viscosity. Furthermore, a micromodel study was conducted to explore pore-scale displacement phenomena during biopolymer injection into the pores. The contact angles of biopolymer solutions are higher on silica surfaces submerged in decane than at atmospheric conditions. While interfacial tensions of the biopolymer solutions have a relatively small range of 25 to 39 mN/m, the viscosities of biopolymer solutions have a wide range, 0.002 to 0.4 Pa·s, that dramatically affect both the capillary number and viscosity number. Both contact angles and interfacial tension have effects on the capillary entry pressure that increases along with an applied effective stress by overburden pressure in sediments. Additionally, a high injection rate of biopolymer solutions into the pores illustrates a high level of displacement ratio. Thus, oil-contaminated soil remediation and enhanced oil recovery should be operated in cost-efficient ways considering the injection rates and capillary entry pressure.

  13. Mekong schistosomiasis. III: a parasitological survey of domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) on Khong Island, Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, C R; Kitikoon, V; Sornmani, S; Thirachantra, S

    1975-06-01

    Of 103 water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) examined on Khong Island by means of the M.I.F.C. and hatching techniques, none were passing eggs resimbling those of the Mekong schistosome. One buffalo calf was infected with Orientobilharzia harinasutai and another with Schistosoma spindale; this is the first time these parasites have been reported from Laos. Since the buffalo that were examined had constant and year-round access to a part of the Mekong River that has been shown to be a site of heavy transmission of schistosomiasis to humans and dogs, it was considered that the buffalo would have acquired the infection with the human Mekong schistosome if this were possible. In the absence of buffalo necropsies, and since no eggs of the Mekong schistosome were detected in the stools of these animals, we assumed that they had either not become infected with this parasite or, if they had, that the infections did not produce eggs in the faeces which were detectable by the methods employed. On the basis of our examinations, it would not seem that domestic water buffalo are involved as reservoirs in the epidemiology of human schistosomiasis on Khong Island.

  14. Feasibility study of a combi-pv panel for greenhouse energy supply and water recovery by nightly radiation towards the sky

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bibbiani, C.; Campiotti, C.; Dondi, F.; Incrocci, L.; Sapounas, A.

    2011-01-01

    In southern European areas, characterized by high irradiation, the use of water for both evaporative cooling systems and hydroponic fertigation, represents a serious drawback for crop cultivation under cover. Water recovery systems seem to be an attractive solution, especially when they are

  15. A Microfiltration Polymer-Based Hollow-Fiber Cathode as a Promising Advanced Material for Simultaneous Recovery of Energy and Water

    KAUST Repository

    Katuri, Krishna

    2016-09-12

    A novel electrocatalytic and microfiltration polymeric hollow fiber is fabricated for simultaneous recovery of energy (H2) and clean fresh water from wastewater, hence addressing two grand challenges facing society in the current century (i.e., providing adequate supplies of clean fresh water and energy as the world\\'s population increases).

  16. Recovery of water from cacti for use in small farming communities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, an extensive investigation was conducted to determine if declared weeds could be used as a source of water for agricultural practices in dry areas. The objective of this study was to determineif declared weeds could successfully be used as a source of water for agricultural practices in dry areas by extracting ...

  17. Bark water uptake promotes localized hydraulic recovery in coastal redwood crown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), the world’s tallest tree species, rehydrates leaves via foliar water uptake during fog/rain events. Here we examine if bark also permits water uptake in redwood branches, along with potential flow mechanisms and biological significance. Using isotopic labeling...

  18. Transformation of a Cp*-iridium(III) precatalyst for water oxidation when exposed to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaccia, Cristiano; Bellachioma, Gianfranco; Bortolini, Olga; Bucci, Alberto; Savini, Arianna; Macchioni, Alceo

    2014-03-17

    The reaction of [Cp*Ir(bzpy)NO3 ] (1; bzpy=2-benzoylpyridine, Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl anion), a competent water-oxidation catalyst, with several oxidants (H2 O2 , NaIO4 , cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN)) was studied to intercept and characterize possible intermediates of the oxidative transformation. NMR spectroscopy and ESI-MS techniques provided evidence for the formation of many species that all had the intact Ir-bzpy moiety and a gradually more oxidized Cp* ligand. Initially, an oxygen atom is trapped in between two carbon atoms of Cp* and iridium, which gives an oxygen-Ir coordinated epoxide, whereas the remaining three carbon atoms of Cp* are involved in a η(3) interaction with iridium (2 a). Formal addition of H2 O to 2 a or H2 O2 to 1 leads to 2 b, in which a double MeCOH functionalization of Cp* is present with one MeCOH engaged in an interaction with iridium. The structure of 2 b was unambiguously determined in the solid state and in solution by X-ray single-crystal diffractometry and advanced NMR spectroscopic techniques, respectively. Further oxidation led to the opening of Cp* and transformation of the diol into a diketone with one carbonyl coordinated at the metal (2 c). A η(3) interaction between the three non-oxygenated carbons of "ex-Cp*" and iridium is also present in both 2 b and 2 c. Isolated 2 b and mixtures of 2 a-c species were tested in water-oxidation catalysis by using CAN as sacrificial oxidant. They showed substantially the same activity than 1 (turnover frequency values ranged from 9 to 14 min(-1) ). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David B. Burnett

    2005-09-29

    This study is developing a comprehensive study of what is involved in the desalination of oil field produced brine and the technical developments and regulatory changes needed to make the concept a commercial reality. It was originally based on ''conventional'' produced water treatment and reviewed (1) the basics of produced water management, (2) the potential for desalination of produced brine in order to make the resource more useful and available in areas of limited fresh water availability, and (3) the potential beneficial uses of produced water for other than oil production operations. Since we have begun however, a new area of interest has appeared that of brine water treatment at the well site. Details are discussed in this technical progress report. One way to reduce the impact of O&G operations is to treat produced brine by desalination. The main body of the report contains information showing where oil field brine is produced, its composition, and the volume available for treatment and desalination. This collection of information all relates to what the oil and gas industry refers to as ''produced water management''. It is a critical issue for the industry as produced water accounts for more than 80% of all the byproducts produced in oil and gas exploration and production. The expense of handling unwanted waste fluids draws scarce capital away for the development of new petroleum resources, decreases the economic lifetimes of existing oil and gas reservoirs, and makes environmental compliance more expensive to achieve. More than 200 million barrels of produced water are generated worldwide each day; this adds up to more than 75 billion barrels per year. For the United States, the American Petroleum Institute estimated about 18 billion barrels per year were generated from onshore wells in 1995, and similar volumes are generated today. Offshore wells in the United States generate several hundred million barrels of

  20. Hydrodynamic properties of sedimentation particles of decantation process in recovery of secondary water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Kalashnikovdoctor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The water management is the important component in industrial sphere of everyone sugar beet a factory. It on the complexity and specific water consumption has no analogues among other food enterprises. At productivity sugar beet a factory on a beet 9 thou-sand т in day is required for a washing of a beet the big specific charge of water and it is necessary nearby 60 thousand т waters. In this connection the big attention is given clearing of transporter-washing waters that allows to use repeatedly her for a washing of a beet, and also to carry out better clearing secondary waters. On the basis of studying technology of clearing of secondary waters it is carried out the analysis of research of process of gravitational sedimentation of particles at the constrained movement. Sedimentation of firm particles in suspensions under action of gravities and centrifugal forces, mechanical hashing in liquid environments is connected with movement of firm bodies in liquids. At movement of a body in a liquid there is a resistance which depends on a mode of movement and the form of a streamline body. In processes of sedimentation the weighed particle moves to liquids under action of various forces: gravities and elevating (ascending forces directed aside, return to a direction of a gravity, and also force of movement of the environment (suspension due to mechanical hashing. On the basis of modeling gravitational sedimentation of particles at the constrained movement during clearing secondary waters sugar beet manufactures and the offered design procedure speed of sedimentation of particles depending on presence of a disperse phase and Reynolds's variable number is certain at various diameters of besieged particles. It is analysed the mechanism of gravitational sedimentation at the constrained movement and results of calculation in the form of schedules of change of function of the attitude of speeds are resulted at the constrained and summary movement from a

  1. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. III. An anion-exchange resin technique for sampling and preservation of sulfoxyanions in natural waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball James W

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A sampling protocol for the retention, extraction, and analysis of sulfoxyanions in hydrothermal waters has been developed in the laboratory and tested at Yellowstone National Park and Green Lake, NY. Initial laboratory testing of the anion-exchange resin Bio-Rad™ AG1-X8 indicated that the resin was well suited for the sampling, preservation, and extraction of sulfate and thiosulfate. Synthetic solutions containing sulfate and thiosulfate were passed through AG1-X8 resin columns and eluted with 1 and 3 M KCl, respectively. Recovery ranged from 89 to 100%. Comparison of results for water samples collected from five pools in Yellowstone National Park between on-site IC analysis (U.S. Geological Survey mobile lab and IC analysis of resin-stored sample at SUNY-Stony Brook indicates 96 to 100% agreement for three pools (Cinder, Cistern, and an unnamed pool near Cistern and 76 and 63% agreement for two pools (Sulfur Dust and Frying Pan. Attempts to extract polythionates from the AG1-X8 resin were made using HCl solutions, but were unsuccessful. Bio-Rad™ AG2-X8, an anion-exchange resin with weaker binding sites than the AG1-X8 resin, is better suited for polythionate extraction. Sulfate and thiosulfate extraction with this resin has been accomplished with KCl solutions of 0.1 and 0.5 M, respectively. Trithionate and tetrathionate can be extracted with 4 M KCl. Higher polythionates can be extracted with 9 M hydrochloric acid. Polythionate concentrations can then be determined directly using ion chromatographic methods, and laboratory results indicate recovery of up to 90% for synthetic polythionate solutions using AG2-X8 resin columns.

  2. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. III. An anion-exchange resin technique for sampling and preservation of sulfoxyanions in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druschel, G.K.; Schoonen, M.A.A.; Nordstorm, D.K.; Ball, J.W.; Xu, Y.; Cohn, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    A sampling protocol for the retention, extraction, and analysis of sulfoxyanions in hydrothermal waters has been developed in the laboratory and tested at Yellowstone National Park and Green Lake, NY. Initial laboratory testing of the anion-exchange resin Bio-Rad??? AG1-X8 indicated that the resin was well suited for the sampling, preservation, and extraction of sulfate and thiosulfate. Synthetic solutions containing sulfate and thiosulfate were passed through AG1-X8 resin columns and eluted with 1 and 3 M KCl, respectively. Recovery ranged from 89 to 100%. Comparison of results for water samples collected from five pools in Yellowstone National Park between on-site IC analysis (U.S. Geological Survey mobile lab) and IC analysis of resin-stored sample at SUNY-Stony Brook indicates 96 to 100% agreement for three pools (Cinder, Cistern, and an unnamed pool near Cistern) and 76 and 63% agreement for two pools (Sulfur Dust and Frying Pan). Attempts to extract polythionates from the AG1-X8 resin were made using HCl solutions, but were unsuccessful. Bio-Rad??? AG2-X8, an anion-exchange resin with weaker binding sites than the AG1-X8 resin, is better suited for polythionate extraction. Sulfate and thiosulfate extraction with this resin has been accomplished with KCl solutions of 0.1 and 0.5 M, respectively. Trithionate and tetrathionate can be extracted with 4 M KCl. Higher polythionates can be extracted with 9 M hydrochloric acid. Polythionate concentrations can then be determined directly using ion chromatographic methods, and laboratory results indicate recovery of up to 90% for synthetic polythionate solutions using AG2-X8 resin columns. ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry and the Division of Geochemistry of the American Chemical Society 2003.

  3. Removal of arsenic(III) from water by magnetic binary oxide particles (MBOP): Experimental studies on fixed bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhoble, Rajesh M; Maddigapu, Pratap Reddy; Rayalu, Sadhana S; Bhole, A G; Dhoble, Ashwinkumar S; Dhoble, Shubham R

    2017-01-15

    Magnetic binary oxide particles (MBOP) were prepared by template method using chitosan in the laboratory for the removal of As(III) from water. The prepared MBOP has super paramagnetic property which is sufficient for magnetic separation. Column study was performed at two different flow rates of 2.0ml/min and 5.0ml/min and comparison was made with regenerated MBOP, commercial activated carbon and commercial activated alumina. It is observed that fresh MBOP has higher breakthrough time and capacity than regenerated MBOP by a factor of 1.25 and 1.37 respectively. In Logit method, the values of K (adsorption rate constant) and N (adsorption capacity coefficient) were obtained as 0.2066 (L/mgh) and 1014(mg/L) for 5.0ml/min flow rate. All the drinking water parameters are within the limit of BIS 10500-2012. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and semi dynamic tests were performed for the mix ratios of 01:02:01, 01:02:05 and 01:02:10 and were found safe for the disposal. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Comparison of oil removal in surfactant alternating gas with water alternating gas, water flooding and gas flooding in secondary oil recovery process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Mehdi Mohammad; Safarzadeh, Mohammad Amin; Sahraei, Eghbal; Nejad, Seyyed Alireza Tabatabaei

    2014-08-01

    Growing oil prices coupled with large amounts of residual oil after operating common enhanced oil recovery methods has made using methods with higher operational cost economically feasible. Nitrogen is one of the gases used in both miscible and immiscible gas injection process in oil reservoir. In heterogeneous formations gas tends to breakthrough early in production wells due to overriding, fingering and channeling. Surfactant alternating gas (SAG) injection is one of the methods commonly used to decrease this problem. Foam which is formed on the contact of nitrogen and surfactant increases viscosity of injected gas. This increases the oil-gas contact and sweep efficiency, although adsorption of surfactant on rock surface can causes difficulties and increases costs of process. Many parameters must be considered in design of SAG process. One of the most important parameters is SAG ratio that should be in optimum value to improve the flooding efficiency. In this study, initially the concentration of surfactant was optimized due to minimization of adsorption on rock surface which results in lower cost of surfactant. So, different sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentrations of 100, 500, 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 ppm were used to obtain the optimum concentration at 70 °C and 144.74×105 Pa. A simple, clean and relatively fast spectrophotometric method was used for determination of surfactant which is based on the formation of an ion-pair. Then the effect of surfactant to gas volume ratio on oil recovery in secondary oil recovery process during execution of immiscible surfactant alternating gas injection was examined experimentally. The experiments were performed with sand pack under certain temperature, pressure and constant rate. Experiments were performed with surfactant to gas ratio of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 2:1 and 3:1 and 1.2 pore volume injected. Then, comparisons were made between obtained results (SAG) with water flooding, gas flooding and water alternating gas

  5. The application of zeolite in thickeners for optimal water recovery and preventing environmental pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini Nasab Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thickener is the most important device that separates water from concentrate. Outlet water from thickener overflow must comply with the standards of transparency and the level of toxins. One way to reduce the hardness of water is ion replacement. In this paper we use the zeolite powder (coagulant in combination with materials such as bentonite powder (coagulant aid, FeCl3 and poly aluminum chloride. If the settling time of particles in the deposition experiments was about an hour, this compound was recorded as appropriate case for water purification. Results showed that polyaluminum chloride had the highest efficiency in removing turbidity and low color of the water. On the other hand, pH for coagulant was less effective in reducing alkalinity. Due to cation exchange and high absorbing aqueous solution cations, such as ammonium and heavy metals, natural zeolite can be considered as an important material with low cost for water purification in a thickener. An interesting point is that the natural zeolite was not good adsorbent for organic and anionic ions. Bentonite as an adsorbent and heavier due to the high density and berry color properties and adsorption played an important role in clarifying water.

  6. OTEC modular experiment cold water pipe concept evaluation. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The Cold Water Pipe System Design Study was undertaken to evaluate the diverse CWP concepts, recommend the most viable alternatives for a 1984 deployment of the 10 to 40 MWe MEP, and carry out preliminary designs of three concepts. The concept evaluation phase reported involved a systems analysis of design alternatives in the broad categories of rigid walled (with hinges), compliant walled, stockade and bottom mounted buoyant. Quantitative evaluations were made of concept performance, availability, deployment schedule, technical feasibility and cost. CWP concepts were analyzed to determine if they met or could be made to meet established system requirements and could be deployed by 1984. Fabrication, construction and installation plans were developed for successful concepts, and costs were determined in a WBS format. Evaluations were performed on the basis of technical and cost risk. This volume includes the following appendices: (A) materials and associated design criteria; (B) summary of results of dynamic flow and transportation analysis; (C) CWP sizing analysis; (D) CWP thermal performance; and (E) investigation of the APL/ABAM CWP design. (WHK)

  7. Water dimers in the atmosphere III: equilibrium constant from a flexible potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Yohann; Goldman, Nir; Saykally, R J; Leforestier, Claude

    2006-04-27

    We present new results for the water dimer equilibrium constant K(p)(T) in the range 190-390 K, using a flexible potential energy surface fitted to spectroscopical data. The increased numerical complexity due to explicit consideration of the monomer vibrations is handled via an adiabatic (6 + 6)d decoupling between intra- and intermolecular modes. The convergence of the canonical partition function of the dimer is ensured by computing all energy levels up to dissociation for total angular momentum values J = 0-5 and using an extrapolation scheme to higher values. The newly calculated values for K(p)(T) are in very good agreement with available experimental data at room temperature. At higher temperatures, an analysis of the convergence of the partition function reveals that quasi-bound states are likely to contribute to the equilibrium constant. Additional thermodynamical quantities (deltaG, deltaH, deltaS, and C(p)) have also been determined and fit to quadratic expressions a + bT + cT2.

  8. Advanced Air Evaporation System with Reusable Wicks for Water Recovery Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A microgravity-compatible Advanced Air Evaporation System (AAES) is proposed for recovering nearly 100% of water from highly contaminated wastewater without concern...

  9. Community analysis and recovery of phenol-degrading bacteria from drinking water biofilters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihui eGu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenol is a ubiquitous organic contaminant in drinking water. Biodegradation plays an important role in the elimination of phenol pollution in the environment, but the information about phenol removal by drinking water biofilters is still lacking. Herein, we study an acclimated bacterial community that can degrade over 80% of 300 mg/L phenol within 3 d. PCR detection of genotypes involved in bacterial phenol degradation revealed that the degradation pathways contained the initial oxidative attack by phenol hydroxylase, and subsequent ring fission by catechol 1,2-dioxygenase. Based on the PCR denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE profiles of bacteria from biological activated carbon (BAC, the predominant bacteria in drinking water biofilters including Delftia sp., Achromobacter sp., and Agrobacterium sp., which together comprised up to 50% of the total microorganisms. In addition, a shift in bacterial community structure was observed during phenol biodegradation. Furthermore, the most effective phenol-degrading strain DW-1 that correspond to the main band in DGGE profile was isolated and identified as Acinetobacter sp., according to phylogenetic analyses of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA gene sequences. The strain DW-1 also produced the most important enzyme, phenol hydroxylase, and it also exhibited a good ability to degrade phenol when immobilized on GAC. This study indicates that the enrichment culture has great potential application for treatment of phenol-polluted drinking water sources, and the indigenous phenol-degrading microorganism could recover from drinking water biofilters as an efficient resource for phenol removal. Therefore, the aim of this study is to draw attention to recover native phenol-degrading bacteria from drinking water biofilters, and use these native microorganisms as phenolic water remediation in drinking water sources.

  10. Community Analysis and Recovery of Phenol-degrading Bacteria from Drinking Water Biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qihui; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Guo, Weipeng; Wu, Huiqing; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Phenol is a ubiquitous organic contaminant in drinking water. Biodegradation plays an important role in the elimination of phenol pollution in the environment, but the information about phenol removal by drinking water biofilters is still lacking. Herein, we study an acclimated bacterial community that can degrade over 80% of 300 mg/L phenol within 3 days. PCR detection of genotypes involved in bacterial phenol degradation revealed that the degradation pathways contained the initial oxidative attack by phenol hydroxylase, and subsequent ring fission by catechol 1,2-dioxygenase. Based on the PCR denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) profiles of bacteria from biological activated carbon (BAC), the predominant bacteria in drinking water biofilters including Delftia sp., Achromobacter sp., and Agrobacterium sp., which together comprised up to 50% of the total microorganisms. In addition, a shift in bacterial community structure was observed during phenol biodegradation. Furthermore, the most effective phenol-degrading strain DW-1 that correspond to the main band in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profile was isolated and identified as Acinetobacter sp., according to phylogenetic analyses of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene sequences. The strain DW-1 also produced the most important enzyme, phenol hydroxylase, and it also exhibited a good ability to degrade phenol when immobilized on granular active carbon (GAC). This study indicates that the enrichment culture has great potential application for treatment of phenol-polluted drinking water sources, and the indigenous phenol-degrading microorganism could recover from drinking water biofilters as an efficient resource for phenol removal. Therefore, the aim of this study is to draw attention to recover native phenol-degrading bacteria from drinking water biofilters, and use these native microorganisms as phenolic water remediation in drinking water sources.

  11. Bleaching susceptibility and recovery of Colombian Caribbean corals in response to water current exposure and seasonal upwelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktarov, Elisa; Pizarro, Valeria; Eidens, Corvin; Wilke, Thomas; Wild, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching events are globally occurring more frequently and with higher intensity, mainly caused by increases in seawater temperature. In Tayrona National Natural Park (TNNP) in the Colombian Caribbean, local coral communities are subjected to seasonal wind-triggered upwelling events coinciding with stronger water currents depending on location. This natural phenomenon offers the unique opportunity to study potential water current-induced mitigation mechanisms of coral bleaching in an upwelling influenced region. Therefore, coral bleaching susceptibility and recovery patterns were compared during a moderate and a mild bleaching event in December 2010 and 2011, and at the end of the subsequent upwelling periods at a water current-exposed and -sheltered site of an exemplary bay using permanent transect and labeling tools. This was accompanied by parallel monitoring of key environmental variables. Findings revealed that in 2010 overall coral bleaching before upwelling was significantly higher at the sheltered (34%) compared to the exposed site (8%). Whereas 97% of all previously bleached corals at the water current-exposed site had recovered from bleaching by April 2011, only 77% recovered at the sheltered site, but 12% had died there. In December 2011, only mild bleaching (corals recovered significantly at both sites in the course of upwelling. No differences in water temperatures between sites occurred, but water current exposure and turbidity were significantly higher at the exposed site, suggesting that these variables may be responsible for the observed site-specific mitigation of coral bleaching. This indicates the existence of local resilience patterns against coral bleaching in Caribbean reefs.

  12. Bleaching Susceptibility and Recovery of Colombian Caribbean Corals in Response to Water Current Exposure and Seasonal Upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktarov, Elisa; Pizarro, Valeria; Eidens, Corvin; Wilke, Thomas; Wild, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching events are globally occurring more frequently and with higher intensity, mainly caused by increases in seawater temperature. In Tayrona National Natural Park (TNNP) in the Colombian Caribbean, local coral communities are subjected to seasonal wind-triggered upwelling events coinciding with stronger water currents depending on location. This natural phenomenon offers the unique opportunity to study potential water current-induced mitigation mechanisms of coral bleaching in an upwelling influenced region. Therefore, coral bleaching susceptibility and recovery patterns were compared during a moderate and a mild bleaching event in December 2010 and 2011, and at the end of the subsequent upwelling periods at a water current-exposed and -sheltered site of an exemplary bay using permanent transect and labeling tools. This was accompanied by parallel monitoring of key environmental variables. Findings revealed that in 2010 overall coral bleaching before upwelling was significantly higher at the sheltered (34%) compared to the exposed site (8%). Whereas 97% of all previously bleached corals at the water current-exposed site had recovered from bleaching by April 2011, only 77% recovered at the sheltered site, but 12% had died there. In December 2011, only mild bleaching (corals recovered significantly at both sites in the course of upwelling. No differences in water temperatures between sites occurred, but water current exposure and turbidity were significantly higher at the exposed site, suggesting that these variables may be responsible for the observed site-specific mitigation of coral bleaching. This indicates the existence of local resilience patterns against coral bleaching in Caribbean reefs. PMID:24282551

  13. Pattern Water Use Efficiency perspective on degradation and recovery of shrublands across Mediterranean to Arid transition zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshany, Maxim

    2017-04-01

    Shrublands cover a total of 12.7 million km2 , a considerable part of them along semi-arid to arid transition zones. Varying patterns of shrubs, grasses and barren land along such climatic gradients express the spatial dimension of climate change and human disturbance which attracted limited attention in the eco-geomorphic literature. Questions concerning relationships between rainfall, shrublands biomass and their patterns are fundamental for the understanding of these ecosystems response to the expected changes in water availability due to global warming and the increase in human disturbance to natural ecosystems following World population growth. While processes leading to the formation of patterns had attracted considerable attention, the spatial dimension of Water Use Efficiency (WUE) which is a parameter measuring ecosystems productivity in relation to water availability is severely missing. Relative shrub cover is a primary estimator of the fraction of water utilized for shrubs growth. Edge effects must be considered as well in fragmented ecosystems in general and in hot regions in particular since soil temperature in hot regions which frequently exceed 50oC during summer months decreases photosynthesis and productivity in plants bordering bare soil. This edge effect is decreasing with the increase in shrubs' height. Pattern Water Use Efficiency describes the combined effect of shrub cover, shrub height and shrub patches edge zone proportion on water use efficiency. In my presentation I will first present mapping od PWUEs across Mediterranean to arid transition zones in the Eastern Mediterranean. Then I will present several mathematical models describing PWUE for simulated patterns, searching for the spatial parameterization providing the highest sensitivity to patterns responses to changes in habitat conditions. Such simulations would allow us to discuss several PWUE strategies for shrublands recovery under the current scenarios of climate change and human

  14. Effects of Nitrogen Supply on Water Stress and Recovery Mechanisms in Kentucky Bluegrass Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saud, Shah; Fahad, Shah; Yajun, Chen; Ihsan, Muhammad Z; Hammad, Hafiz M; Nasim, Wajid; Amanullah; Arif, Muhammad; Alharby, Hesham

    2017-01-01

    Non-irrigated crops in temperate and irrigated crops in arid regions are exposed to an incessant series of drought stress and re-watering. Hence, quick and efficient recuperation from drought stress may be amongst the key determinants of plant drought adjustment. Efficient nitrogen (N) nutrition has the capability to assuage water stress in crops by sustaining metabolic activities even at reduced tissue water potential. This study was designed to understand the potential of proper nutrition management by studying the morphological and physiological attributes, and assimilation of nitrogen in Kentucky bluegrass under drought stress. In present study, one heterogeneous habitat and four treatments homogenous habitats each with four replications were examined during field trial. Drought stress resulted in a significant reduction in the nitrogen content of both mother and first ramets, maximum radius, above and below ground mass, number of ramets per plot, leaf water contents and water potential and increased the carbon content and the C:N ratio in both homogenous and heterogeneous plots compared to well-watered and nutritional conditions. Observation using electron microscopy showed that drought stress shrunk the vessel diameter, circumference and xylem area, but increased the sieve diameter, and phloem area in the leaf crosscutting structure of Kentucky bluegrass, first, second, and third ramet leaf. Thus, it can be concluded that water stress markedly reduced all the important traits of Kentucky bluegrass, however, proper nutritional management treatment resulted in the best compensatory performance under drought assuaging its adversity up to some extent and may be considered in formulating good feasible and cost-effective practices for the environmental circumstances related to those of this study.

  15. Effects of Nitrogen Supply on Water Stress and Recovery Mechanisms in Kentucky Bluegrass Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saud, Shah; Fahad, Shah; Yajun, Chen; Ihsan, Muhammad Z.; Hammad, Hafiz M.; Nasim, Wajid; Amanullah; Arif, Muhammad; Alharby, Hesham

    2017-01-01

    Non-irrigated crops in temperate and irrigated crops in arid regions are exposed to an incessant series of drought stress and re-watering. Hence, quick and efficient recuperation from drought stress may be amongst the key determinants of plant drought adjustment. Efficient nitrogen (N) nutrition has the capability to assuage water stress in crops by sustaining metabolic activities even at reduced tissue water potential. This study was designed to understand the potential of proper nutrition management by studying the morphological and physiological attributes, and assimilation of nitrogen in Kentucky bluegrass under drought stress. In present study, one heterogeneous habitat and four treatments homogenous habitats each with four replications were examined during field trial. Drought stress resulted in a significant reduction in the nitrogen content of both mother and first ramets, maximum radius, above and below ground mass, number of ramets per plot, leaf water contents and water potential and increased the carbon content and the C:N ratio in both homogenous and heterogeneous plots compared to well-watered and nutritional conditions. Observation using electron microscopy showed that drought stress shrunk the vessel diameter, circumference and xylem area, but increased the sieve diameter, and phloem area in the leaf crosscutting structure of Kentucky bluegrass, first, second, and third ramet leaf. Thus, it can be concluded that water stress markedly reduced all the important traits of Kentucky bluegrass, however, proper nutritional management treatment resulted in the best compensatory performance under drought assuaging its adversity up to some extent and may be considered in formulating good feasible and cost-effective practices for the environmental circumstances related to those of this study. PMID:28642781

  16. Batch sorption-desorption of As(III) from waste water by magnetic palm kernel shell activated carbon using optimized Box-Behnken design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyika, Chinedum; Asri, Nur Asilayana Mohd; Majid, Zaiton Abdul; Jaafar, Jafariah; Yahya, Adibah

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we converted activated carbon (AC) into magnetic activated carbon (MAC), which was established to have removed arsenic (III) from wastewater. Arsenic (III) is a toxic heavy metal which is readily soluble in water and can be detrimental to human health. The MAC was prepared by incorporating Fe3O4 into the AC by using Fe3O4 extracted from a ferrous sulfate solution, designated: magnetic palm kernel shell from iron suspension (MPKSF). Batch experiments were conducted using two methods: (1) one-factor-at-a-time and (2) Box-Behnken statistical analysis. Results showed that the optimum conditions resulted in 95% of As(III) removal in the wastewater sample. The adsorption data were best fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption of As(III) onto the MPKSF was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry analysis which detected the presence of As(III) of 0.52% on the surface of the MPKSF. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of the MPKSF-As presented a peak at 573 cm-1, which was assigned to M-O (metal-oxygen) bending, indicating the coordination of As(III) with oxygen through the formation of inner-sphere complexation, thereby indicating a covalent bonding between the MPKSF functional groups and As(III). The findings suggested that the MPKSF exhibited a strong capacity to efficiently remove As(III) from wastewater, while the desorption studies showed that the As(III) was rigidly bound to the MPKSF thereby eliminating the possibility of secondary pollution.

  17. Multi-purpose rainwater harvesting for water resource recovery and the cooling effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Kyoung Jin; Lam, Yun Fat; Hao, Song; Morakinyo, Tobi Eniolu; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2015-12-01

    The potential use of rainwater harvesting in conjunction with miscellaneous water supplies and a rooftop garden with rainwater harvesting facility for temperature reduction have been evaluated in this study for Hong Kong. Various water applications such as toilet flushing and areal climate controls have been systematically considered depending on the availability of seawater toilet flushing using the Geographic Information System (GIS). For water supplies, the district Area Precipitation per Demand Ratio (APDR) has been calculated to quantify the rainwater utilization potential of each administrative district in Hong Kong. Districts with freshwater toilet flushing prove to have higher potential for rainwater harvest and utilization compared to the areas with seawater toilet flushing. Furthermore, the effectiveness of using rainwater harvesting for miscellaneous water supplies in Hong Kong and Tokyo has been analyzed and compared; this revives serious consideration of diurnal and seasonal patterns of rainfall in applying such technology. In terms of the cooling effect, the implementation of a rooftop rainwater harvesting garden has been evaluated using the ENVI-met model. Our results show that a temperature drop of 1.3 °C has been observed due to the rainwater layer in the rain garden. This study provides valuable insight into the applicability of the rainwater harvesting for sustainable water management practice in a highly urbanized city. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pricing Unmetered Irrigation Water under Asymmetric Information and Full Cost Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Lika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to define an efficient pricing scheme for irrigation water in conditions of unmetered water use. The study is based on a principal-agent model and identifies a menu of contracts, defined as a set of payments and share of irrigated area, able to provide incentives for an efficient use of the resource by maximizing social welfare. The model is applied in the case study of the Çukas region (Albania where irrigation water is not metered. The results demonstrate that using a menu of contracts makes it possible to define a second best solution that may improve the overall social welfare derived from irrigation water use compared with the existing pricing structure, though, in the specific case study, the improvement is small. Furthermore, the results also suggest that irrigation water pricing policy needs to take into account different farm types, and that appropriate contract-type pricing schemes have a potential role in providing incentives to farmers to make irrigation choices to the social optimum.

  19. Lake Recovery Through Reduced Sulfate Deposition: A New Paradigm for Drinking Water Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lindsay E; Krkošek, Wendy H; Stoddart, Amina K; Trueman, Benjamin F; Gagnon, Graham A

    2017-02-07

    This study examined sulfate deposition in Nova Scotia from 1999 to 2015, and its association with increased pH and organic matter in two protected surface water supplies (Pockwock Lake and Lake Major) located in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The study also examined the effect of lake water chemistry on drinking water treatment processes. Sulfate deposition in the region decreased by 68%, whereas pH increased by 0.1-0.4 units over the 16-year period. Average monthly color concentrations in Pockwock Lake and Lake Major increased by 1.7 and 3.8×, respectively. Accordingly, the coagulant demand increased by 1.5 and 3.8× for the water treatment plants supplied by Pockwock Lake and Lake Major. Not only was this coagulant increase costly for the utility, it also resulted in compromised filter performance, particularly for the direct-biofiltration plant supplied by Pockwock Lake that was found to already be operating at the upper limit of the recommended direct filtration thresholds for color, total organic carbon and coagulant dose. Additionally, in 2012-2013 geosmin occurred in Pockwock Lake, which could have been attributed to reduced sulfate deposition as increases in pH favor more diverse cyanobacteria populations. Overall, this study demonstrated the impact that ambient air quality can have on drinking water supplies.

  20. Characterization and optimization of the visualization performance of continuous flow overhauser DNP hyperpolarized water MRI: Inversion recovery approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terekhov, Maxim; Krummenacker, Jan; Denysenkov, Vasyl; Gerz, Kathrin; Prisner, Thomas; Schreiber, Laura Maria

    2016-03-01

    Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) allows the production of liquid hyperpolarized substrate inside the MRI magnet bore as well as its administration in continuous flow mode to acquire MR images with enhanced signal-to-noise ratio. We implemented inversion recovery preparation in order to improve contrast-to-noise ratio and to quantify the overall imaging performance of Overhauser DNP-enhanced MRI. The negative enhancement created by DNP in combination with inversion recovery (IR) preparation allows canceling selectively the signal originated from Boltzmann magnetization and visualizing only hyperpolarized fluid. The theoretical model describing gain of MR image intensity produced by steady-state continuous flow DNP hyperpolarized magnetization was established and proved experimentally. A precise quantification of signal originated purely from DNP hyperpolarization was achieved. A temperature effect on longitudinal relaxation had to be taken into account to fit experimental results with numerical prediction. Using properly adjusted IR preparation, the complete zeroing of thermal background magnetization was achieved, providing an essential increase of contrast-to-noise ratio of DNP-hyperpolarized water images. To quantify and optimize the steady-state conditions for MRI with continuous flow DNP, an approach similar to that incorporating transient-state thermal magnetization equilibrium in spoiled fast field echo imaging sequences can be used. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Formation of Anhydrite due to Interaction Between Water Soluble CO2 (aq) and Calcite Mineral During Enhanced Oil Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    place during CO2 injection in limestone reservoirs. At reservoir conditions, a considerable fraction of the injected CO2 becomes soluble in sea water. This dissolved CO2 causes dissolution of CaCO3 from the mineral surface and releases Ca2+ ions into the pore space. Excess Ca2+ ions form anhydrite fines......In the Low Salinity based EOR method, formation and migration of fines have proved to have profound effect on the displacement efficiency of residual oil. Salinity variations of injected brines have also been shown to affect oil recovery for WAG-CO2 processes. But the effect of fines in EOR during...... simulations were conducted over a temperature range of 50°C to 250°C and a pressure range of 5 bars to 500 bars. The amounts of fines formation taking place for different LSWAG-CO2 processes were correlated to the described oil recovery. It is observed that significant amounts of fines formation can take...

  2. Recovery and cryopreservation of epididymal sperm from agouti (Dasiprocta aguti) using powdered coconut water (ACP-109c) and Tris extenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M A; Peixoto, G C X; Santos, E A A; Castelo, T S; Oliveira, M F; Silva, A R

    2011-10-01

    The objective was to compare the use of powdered coconut water (ACP-109c; ACP Biotecnologia, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil) and Tris extenders for recovery and cryopreservation of epididymal sperm from agouti. The caudae epididymus and proximal ductus deferens from 10 sexually mature agoutis were subjected to retrograde washing using ACP-109c (ACP Biotecnologia) or Tris. Epididymal sperm were evaluated for motility, vigor, sperm viability, membrane integrity, and morphology. Samples were centrifuged, and extended in the same diluents plus egg yolk (20%) and glycerol (6%), frozen in liquid nitrogen, and subsequently thawed at 37°C for 1 min, followed by re-evaluation of sperm characteristics. The two extenders were similarly efficient for epididymal recovery, with regard to the number and quality of sperm recovered. However, for both extenders, sperm quality decreased (P Biotecnologia) group, which was significantly better than 9.7 ± 2.6% motile sperm with 1.2 ± 0.3 vigor in Tris. In conclusion, agouti epididymal sperm were successfully recovered using either ACP-109c (ACP Biotecnologia) or Tris extenders; however, ACP-109c (ACP Biotecnologia) was a significantly better extender for processing and cryopreserving these sperm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Femtomolar level sensing of inorganic arsenic(III) in water and in living-systems using a non-toxic fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Biswajit; Mukherjee, Priyanka; Mondal, Ranjan Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Asoke Prasun; Hauli, Ipsit; Mukhopadhyay, Subhra Kanti; Fleck, Michel

    2014-12-14

    A highly selective femtomolar level sensing of inorganic arsenic(III) as arsenious acid has been accomplished in water medium and in living-systems (on pollen grains of Tecoma stans; Candida albicans cells (IMTECH No. 3018) and Peperomia pellucida stem section) using a non-toxic fluorescent probe of a Cu(II)-complex.

  4. Development and evaluation of methods for recovery of Noroviruses from food, water and air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrbrand, Katrine

    in the both oysters and mussels. Consequently, the method was found to be a good candidate as a future qualitative standard for routine viral analysis of oysters and mussels. The ability of a rapid method to recover NoV GI, NoV GII and adenovirus (AdV) from Nordic drinking water (tap water) of various types...... evaluated the efficiency of a surface decontamination strategy based on combined treatment with steam and ultrasound to inactivate the NoV surrogates FCV, MNV and bacteriophage MS2. The steam-ultrasound treatment was found to be effective for decontamination of plastic surfaces with near complete...

  5. Design and Testing of an H2RG HCD Camera Package for the Water Recovery X-Ray Rocket Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaide, Maria; Anderson, Tyler; Bray, Evan; Burrows, David N.; Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; Hull, Samuel; Kern, Matthew; WAGES, MITCHELL

    2018-01-01

    The Water Recovery X-Ray Rocket (WRX-R) is to be launched from Kwajalein Atoll carrying a soft X-ray detector to observe the Vela supernova remnant. The payload consists of an H2RG Hybrid CMOS X-ray detector and a Teledyne SIDECAR supported by an in-house designed camera package. We will report on the process of designing the camera package to meet the requirements of the mission, including factors such as the capability of holding high vacuum and the need to cryogenically cool the detector and SIDECAR. The mechanical and thermal properties of the camera package, discovered through both simulation and experimentation, will also be explored.

  6. The Impact of Integrated Aquifer Storage and Recovery and Brackish Water Reverse Osmosis (ASRRO on a Coastal Groundwater System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Eugenius Marijnus Ros

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR of local, freshwater surpluses is a potential solution for freshwater supply in coastal areas, as is brackish water reverse osmosis (BWRO of relatively shallow groundwater in combination with deeper membrane concentrate disposal. A more sustainable and reliable freshwater supply may be achieved by combining both techniques in one ASRRO system using multiple partially penetrating wells (MPPW. The impact of widespread use of ASRRO on a coastal groundwater system was limited based on regional groundwater modelling but it was shown that ASRRO decreased the average chloride concentration with respect to the autonomous scenario and the use of BWRO. ASRRO was successful in mitigating the local negative impact (saltwater plume formation caused by the deep disposal of membrane concentrate during BWRO. The positive impacts of ASRRO with respect to BWRO were observed in the aquifer targeted for ASR and brackish water abstraction (Aquifer 1, but foremost in the deeper aquifer targeted for membrane concentrate disposal (Aquifer 2. The formation of a horizontal freshwater barrier was found at the top of both aquifers, reducing saline seepage. The disposal of relatively fresh concentrate in Aquifer 2 led to brackish water outflow towards the sea. The net abstraction in Aquifer 1 enforced saltwater intrusion, especially when BWRO was applied. The conclusion of this study is that ASRRO can provide a sustainable alternative for BWRO.

  7. Rapid recovery of cyanobacterial pigments in desiccated biological soil crusts following addition of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abed, R M M; Polerecky, Lubos; Al-Habsi, Amal; Oetjen, Janina; Strous, Marc; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    We examined soil surface colour change to green and hydrotaxis following addition of water to biological soil crusts using pigment extraction, hyperspectral imaging, microsensors and 13C labeling experiments coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry

  8. Phosphate Remediation and Recovery from Lake Water using Modified Iron Oxide-based Adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsorption behavior of Bayoxide ® E33 (E33) and three E33-modified sorbents for the removal of phosphate from lake water was investigated in this study. E33-modified sorbents were synthesized by coating with manganese and nanoparticles. Characterization was done by X-ray diffract...

  9. Thermotropic nanostructured gels with complex hierarchical structure and two gelling components for water shut-off and enhance of oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunina, L. K.; Kuvshinov, I. V.; Kuvshinov, V. A.; Kozlov, V. V.; Stasyeva, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    This work presents the results of laboratory and field tests of thermotropic composition MEGA with two simultaneously acting gelling components, polymer and inorganic. The composition is intended for improving oil recovery and water shut-off at oilfields developed by thermal flooding, and cyclic-steam stimulated oil production wells. The composition forms an in-situ "gel-in-gel" system with improved structural-mechanical properties, using reservoir or carrier fluid heat for gelling. The gel blocks water breakthrough into producing wells and redistribute fluid flows, thus increasing the oil recovery factor.

  10. Design Solutions for the Treatment of DMSD in the ISS Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jay; Carter, Donald; Kayatin, Matthew; Bowman, Elizabeth; Gentry, Greg; Muirhead, Brian; Gazda, Daniel; Wilson, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Dimethylsilanediol (DMSD) has been identified as a problematic organic on ISS. This contaminant was initially identified in the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) product water in 2010 by the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA). DMSD is not a crew health hazard at the levels observed in the product water, but it may degrade the performance of the Oxygen Generation System (OGS) which uses the WPA product water for electrolysis and does impact the effective operation of the WPA catalytic reactor. To mitigate these impacts, early replacement of the Multifiltration Beds in the WPA is required. An investigation has determined that the decomposition of atmospheric polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMSs) is the primary source of DMSD in the condensate. PDMSs are prevalent on ISS from a variety of sources, including crew hygiene products, adhesives, caulks, lubricants, and various nonmetallics. These PDMSs also contribute to degradation of the CHX hydrophilic coating, rendering it hydrophobic and therefore affecting its ability to transmit water to the condensate bus. In addition, literature research has determined that PDMSs are likely oxidized to DMSD in the atmosphere when exposed to hydroxyl radicals in the ISS atmosphere. To address these mechanisms, filters have been developed for removal of PDMSs from the ISS atmosphere. However, ongoing analysis indicates a significant reduction in atmospheric PDMSs is required to achieve a measurable reduction of DMSD in the condensate. As a result, additional measures are being pursued to mitigate this issue. First, credible sources are being investigated to quantity to the extent possible the significant sources of PDMSs and identify sources that can be reasonably removed from ISS. Second, a Reverse Osmosis technology is being investigated as an alternate means for removing DMSD from the condensate. This paper summarizes the current status of the overall effort to mitigate DMSD in the US condensate.

  11. Synthesis and Evaluation of a Water-Soluble Hyperbranched Polymer as Enhanced Oil Recovery Chemical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanjun Lai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel hyperbranched polymer was synthesized using acrylamide (AM, acrylic acid (AA, N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP, and dendrite functional monomer as raw materials by redox initiation system in an aqueous medium. The hyperbranched polymer was characterized by infrared (IR spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectroscopy, 13C NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The viscosity retention rate of the hyperbranched polymer was 22.89% higher than that of the AM/AA copolymer (HPAM at 95°C, and the viscosity retention rate was 8.17%, 12.49%, and 13.68% higher than that of HPAM in 18000 mg/L NaCl, 1800 mg/L CaCl2, and 1800 mg/L MgCl2·6H2O brine, respectively. The hyperbranched polymer exhibited higher apparent viscosity (25.2 mPa·s versus 8.1 mPa·s under 500 s−1 shear rate at 80°C. Furthermore, the enhanced oil recovery (EOR of 1500 mg/L hyperbranched polymer solutions was up to 23.51% by the core flooding test at 80°C.

  12. Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maryn, S.

    1994-03-01

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

  13. Effect of Water Content Components on Desiccation and Recovery in Sphagnum Mosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájek, Tomáš; Beckett, Richard P.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The basic parameters of water relations were measured in Sphagnum mosses. The relationships of these parameters to the photosynthetic response to desiccation and the ecology of these mosses were then tested. Methods The water relations parameters of six Sphagnum species (mosses typical of wet habitats) and Atrichum androgynum (a moss more typical of mesophytic conditions) were calculated from pressure–volume isotherms. Photosynthetic properties during and after moderate desiccation were monitored by chlorophyll fluorescence. Key Results When desiccated, the hummock-forming species S. fuscum and S. magellanicum lost more water before turgor started dropping than other sphagna inhabiting less exposed habitats (73 % compared with 56 % on average). Osmotic potentials at full turgor were similar in all species, with an average value of −1·1 MPa. Hummock sphagna had clearly more rigid cell walls than species of wet habitats (ε = 3·55 compared with 1·93 MPa). As a result, their chlorophyllous cells lost turgor at higher relative water contents (RWCs) than species of wet habitats (0·61 compared with 0·46) and at less negative osmotic potentials (–2·28 compared with −3·00 MPa). During drying, ΦPSII started declining earlier in hummock species (at an RWC of 0·65 compared with 0·44), and Fv/Fm behaved similarly. Compared with other species, hummock sphagna desiccated to −20 or −40 MPa recovered more completely after rehydration. Atrichum androgynum responded to desiccation similarly to hummock sphagna, suggesting that their desiccation tolerance may have a similar physiological basis. Conclusions Assuming a fixed rate of desiccation, the higher water-holding capacities of hummock sphagna will allow them to continue metabolism for longer than other species. While this could be viewed as a form of ‘desiccation avoidance’, hummock species also recover faster than other species during rehydration, suggesting that they have higher

  14. Integrating the Carbon and Water Footprints’ Costs in the Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC Full Water Cost Recovery Concept: Basic Principles Towards Their Reliable Calculation and Socially Just Allocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Papadopoulou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the basic principles for the integration of the water and carbon footprints cost into the resource and environmental costs respectively, taking the suggestions set by the Water Framework Directive (WFD 2000/60/EC one step forward. WFD states that full water cost recovery (FWCR should be based on the estimation of the three sub-costs related: direct; environmental; and resource cost. It also strongly suggests the EU Member States develop and apply effective water pricing policies to achieve FWCR. These policies must be socially just to avoid any social injustice phenomena. This is a very delicate task to handle, especially within the fragile economic conditions that the EU is facing today. Water losses play a crucial role for the FWC estimation. Water losses should not be neglected since they are one of the major “water uses” in any water supply network. A methodology is suggested to reduce water losses and the related Non Revenue Water (NRW index. An Expert Decision Support System is proposed to assess the FWC incorporating the Water and Carbon Footprint costs.

  15. Complexing of copper in drinking water samples to enhance recovery of Aeromonas and other bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteegh, J F; Havelaar, A H; Hoekstra, A C; Visser, A

    1989-11-01

    The presence of copper in drinking water samples at concentrations as low as 10 micrograms/l resulted in a rapid die-off of aeromonads. Coliform bacteria, heterotrophic plate count bacteria and faecal streptococci were also sensitive to copper but to a lesser degree than aeromonads. The effect was particularly noticeable in soft water (less than 3 meq/l Ca + Mg) and at pH-values below 8.0. The toxic effect of copper concentrations up to 500 micrograms/l could be neutralized for a period of up to 24 h by the addition to samples of 50 mg/l of disodium-ethylene-diamino-tetraacetate (Na2EDTA) and keeping the samples on melting ice.

  16. Phosphorus Recovery from a Water Reservoir–Potential of Nanofiltration Coupled to Electrodialytic Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couto, N.; Guedes, P.; Mateus, E. P.

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide waste streams can represent an environmental problem if they are considered “deleterious material”. These streams may also be a source of secondary resources when enclosing compounds with potential to be recovered. Phosphorus (P) is one of those, with an increasing interest, as it is es......Worldwide waste streams can represent an environmental problem if they are considered “deleterious material”. These streams may also be a source of secondary resources when enclosing compounds with potential to be recovered. Phosphorus (P) is one of those, with an increasing interest......, as it is essential for life but its non-renewable reserves are expected to last about one century. Nanofiltration (NF) and electrodialytic process (ED) were applied to a stream from a Water Treatment Plant (WTP). Water from Funcho Dam Reservoir, Portugal, was subject of NF treatment followed by ED process for P...

  17. Novel Recovery of Nano-Structured Ceria (CeO2 from Ce(III-Benzoxazine Dimer Complexes via Thermal Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattamon Koonsaeng

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available N,N-bis(2-hydroxybenzylalkylamines, benzoxazine dimers, are the major product produced from benzoxazine monomers on mono-functional phenol by the one  step ring opening reaction. Due to the metal responsive property of benzoxazine dimers, in this present work, N,N-bis(5-methyl-2-hydroxybenzylmethylamine (MMD, N,N-bis (5-ethyl-2-hydroxybenzylmethylamine (EMD, and N,N-bis(5-methoxy-2-hydroxybenzyl methyl amine (MeMD, are considered as novel ligands for rare earth metal ion, such as cerium(III ion. The complex formed when the clear and colorless solutions of cerium nitrate and benzoxazine dimers were mixed, results in a brown colored solution. The metal-ligand ratios determined by the molar ratio and the Job’s methods were found to be in a ratio of 1:6. To clarify the evidence of the complex formation mechanism, the interactions among protons in benzoxazine dimers both prior to and after the formation of complexes were determined by means of 1H-NMR, 2D-NMR and a computational simulation. The single phase ceria (CeO2 was successfully prepared by thermal decomposition of the Ce(III-benzoxazine dimer complexes at 600 °C for 2 h, was then characterized using XRD. In addition, the ceria powder investigated by TEM is spherical with an average diameter of 20 nm.

  18. Deep-sea benthic ecosystem collapse and recovery after an intense Dense Shelf Water Cascading event

    OpenAIRE

    Pusceddu, A.; Mea, M.; M. Canals; Heussner, S; Durrieu de Madron, X.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.; Bianchelli, S.; Corinaldesi, C.; Dell'Anno, A.; Thomsen, L.; Danovaro, R.

    2012-01-01

    Submarine canyons of several regions of the world are preferential conduits for Dense Shelf Water Cascading (DSWC), which quickly modify physical and chemical conditions while transporting large amounts of material towards the adjacent deep margin. Observations conducted during the last 15 yr in the Cap de Creus Canyon (Gulf of Lion, NW Mediterranean Sea) reported several intense events of DSWC. Their effects on the deep-sea biodiversity and ecosystem functioning are almost unknown. To in...

  19. On The Recovery of Total Water Storage in Iran Using GRACE Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaram, A.; Naeimi, M.; Nikkhoo, M.

    2009-05-01

    Iran has a dry climate with limited water resources and different parts of which suffer lack of seasonal and annual precipitation. Therefore, management of water resources is indeed, of a challenge in this region. Thanks to successful launch of GRACE mission in March 2002, which has provided us with a set of reliable data source for studying hydrological cycles in the earth fluid envelope up to now. Temporal changes in total water storage in the regional and global scales are the predominant reason of monthly and annual variations of the Earth gravity field which could be observed and detected by GRACE satellites. current hydrological models which are now being constructed using several data set (i.e. soil moisture data, in-situ measurements, raining and snowing record and so on) still seem to need more concentration and improvements. However GRACE data could be regarded as an external evidence to evaluate and modify these models; and even in some regions, as the only available information about the water storage. In this study, in-situ measurements of all existing piezometric wells in Iran have been used. The wells are not distributed homogeneously over the land and are not available every where. The data have been combined with soil moisture and snow cover information provided by GLDAS model in a monthly resolution and finally have been compared with GRACE observations in the period of time from October 2003 to September 2008. Results explicitly reveal an acceptable agreement between two sources of information and most likely it should be possible to fill the gaps in the land where in-situ measurements are not applicable.

  20. Synthesis and fabrication of nanostructured hydrophobic polyazole membranes for low-energy water recovery

    KAUST Repository

    Maab, Husnul

    2012-12-01

    Aromatic fluorinated polyoxadiazoles (F-POD) and polytriazoles (F-PT) were synthesized and for the first time manufactured into porous membranes by phase inversion and by electrospinning. The phase inversion F-POD membranes had a mean flow pore size (MFP) of 51nm, while for F-PT it was around 74nm. The electrospun membranes had a much larger pore size, the MFP for F-POD membrane was around 1.7μm and for F-PT it was 2.7μm. The membranes were tested for desalination of Red Sea water using direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). By combining the high polymer hydrophobicity and high porosity, apparent contact angles up to 162° were obtained, assuring the operation with practically no liquid water leakage under pressure up to 0.9bar. Salt selectivity as high as 99.95% and water fluxes as high as 85Lm -2h -1 were demonstrated, operating at 80°C feed temperature and 22°C permeate. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Exhaust gas heat recovery through secondary expansion cylinder and water injection in an internal combustion engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassiri Toosi Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance thermal efficiency and increase performance of an internal combustion engine, a novel concept of coupling a conventional engine with a secondary 4-stroke cylinder and direct water injection process is proposed. The burned gases after working in a traditional 4-stroke combustion cylinder are transferred to a secondary cylinder and expanded even more. After re-compression of the exhaust gases, pre-heated water is injected at top dead center. The evaporation of injected water not only recovers heat from exhaust gases, but also increases the mass of working gas inside the cylinder, therefore improves the overall thermal efficiency. A 0-D/1-D model is used to numerically simulate the idea. The simulations outputs showed that the bottoming cycle will be more efficient at higher engines speeds, specifically in a supercharged/turbocharged engine, which have higher exhaust gas pressure that can reproduce more positive work. In the modeled supercharged engine, results showed that brake thermal efficiency can be improved by about 17%, and brake power by about 17.4%.

  2. Oil Recovery from Water under Environmentally Relevant Conditions Using Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshahghassemi, Seyyedali; Lead, Jamie R

    2015-10-06

    Large oil spills and oily wastewater discharges from ships and industrial activities can have serious impacts on the environment with potentially major economic impacts. Current oil remediation techniques are inefficient and may have deleterious environmental consequences. However, nanotechnology offers a new route to potentially remediate oil pollution. In this study, a cheap and facile hydrothermal method was developed to synthesize polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated magnetite nanoparticles to separate a reference MC252 oil from oil-water mixture under environmentally relevant conditions. Fluorescence and Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy results showed near 100% oil removal from oil-water mixture in the ultrapure water under optimum condition. Based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry data, approximately 100% of lower molecular mass alkanes (C9-C21) were removed within 10 min of magnetic separation and by increasing the separation time to 40 min, greater than 67% of C22-25 alkanes were removed. Moreover, nanoparticles removed near 100% oil from synthetic seawater solutions in the presence and absence of fulvic acid showing excellent oil removal capacity of the nanoparticles under different conditions. Results show that these nanoparticles can be utilized to remove oil over a short time with a high removal efficiency under environmentally relevant conditions.

  3. Partitioning of chromium (VI) and chromium (III) between dissolved and colloidal forms in a stream and reservoir contaminated with tannery waste water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominik, J.; Bas, B.; Bobrowski, A.; Dworak, T.; Koukal, B.; Niewiara, E.; Pereira de Abreu, M.-H.; Rossé, P.; Szalinska, E.; Vignati, D.

    2003-05-01

    Environmental fate of chromium rejected from tannery wastewater to the Dunajec River (southern Poland) was investigated using separation with tangential flow filtration followed by measurements with Cathodic Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry (CAdSV) and ICP-MS. Virtually all Cr(VI) was found in the dissolved fraction (<1 kDa). Thus form was present at low concentrations. Cr(III) was rapidly transferred from dissolved and low molecular weight colloidal fractions to particles and high molecular weight colloids and thus scavenged from the water column of the Czorsztyn Reservoir to the sediments. The possibility of Cr remobilization via oxidation of Cr(III) in the presence of freshly precipitated Mn-oxides in water or at the water-sediment interface needs further investigation.

  4. Impact of Bioreactor Environment and Recovery Method on the Profile of Bacterial Populations from Water Distribution Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Luo

    Full Text Available Multiple rotating annular reactors were seeded with biofilms flushed from water distribution systems to assess (1 whether biofilms grown in bioreactors are representative of biofilms flushed from the water distribution system in terms of bacterial composition and diversity, and (2 whether the biofilm sampling method affects the population profile of the attached bacterial community. Biofilms were grown in bioreactors until thickness stabilized (9 to 11 weeks and harvested from reactor coupons by sonication, stomaching, bead-beating, and manual scraping. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons was used to profile bacterial populations from flushed biofilms seeded into bioreactors as well as biofilms recovered from bioreactor coupons by different methods. β diversity between flushed and reactor biofilms was compared to β diversity between (i biofilms harvested from different reactors and (ii biofilms harvested by different methods from the same reactor. These analyses showed that average diversity between flushed and bioreactor biofilms was double the diversity between biofilms from different reactors operated in parallel. The diversity between bioreactors was larger than the diversity associated with different biofilm recovery methods. Compared to other experimental variables, the method used to recover biofilms had a negligible impact on the outcome of water biofilm analyses based on 16S amplicon sequencing. Results from this study show that biofilms grown in reactors over 9 to 11 weeks are not representative models of the microbial populations flushed from a distribution system. Furthermore, the bacterial population profile of biofilms grown in replicate reactors from the same flushed water are likely to diverge. However, four common sampling protocols, which differ with respect to disruption of bacterial cells, provide similar information with respect to the 16S rRNA population profile of the biofilm community.

  5. Impact of Bioreactor Environment and Recovery Method on the Profile of Bacterial Populations from Water Distribution Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xia; Jellison, Kristen L; Huynh, Kevin; Widmer, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Multiple rotating annular reactors were seeded with biofilms flushed from water distribution systems to assess (1) whether biofilms grown in bioreactors are representative of biofilms flushed from the water distribution system in terms of bacterial composition and diversity, and (2) whether the biofilm sampling method affects the population profile of the attached bacterial community. Biofilms were grown in bioreactors until thickness stabilized (9 to 11 weeks) and harvested from reactor coupons by sonication, stomaching, bead-beating, and manual scraping. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons was used to profile bacterial populations from flushed biofilms seeded into bioreactors as well as biofilms recovered from bioreactor coupons by different methods. β diversity between flushed and reactor biofilms was compared to β diversity between (i) biofilms harvested from different reactors and (ii) biofilms harvested by different methods from the same reactor. These analyses showed that average diversity between flushed and bioreactor biofilms was double the diversity between biofilms from different reactors operated in parallel. The diversity between bioreactors was larger than the diversity associated with different biofilm recovery methods. Compared to other experimental variables, the method used to recover biofilms had a negligible impact on the outcome of water biofilm analyses based on 16S amplicon sequencing. Results from this study show that biofilms grown in reactors over 9 to 11 weeks are not representative models of the microbial populations flushed from a distribution system. Furthermore, the bacterial population profile of biofilms grown in replicate reactors from the same flushed water are likely to diverge. However, four common sampling protocols, which differ with respect to disruption of bacterial cells, provide similar information with respect to the 16S rRNA population profile of the biofilm community.

  6. Energy recovery from waste glycerol by utilizing thermal water vapor plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamošiūnas, Andrius; Valatkevičius, Pranas; Gimžauskaitė, Dovilė; Jeguirim, Mejdi; Mėčius, Vladas; Aikas, Mindaugas

    2017-04-01

    Glycerol, considered as a waste feedstock resulting from biodiesel production, has received much attention in recent years due to its properties, which offer to recover energy. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of a thermal water vapor plasma for waste (crude) glycerol conversion to synthesis gas, or syngas (H2 + CO). In parallel of crude glycerol, a pure glycerol (99.5%) was used as a reference material in order to compare the concentrations of the formed product gas. A direct current (DC) arc plasma torch stabilized by a mixture of argon/water vapor was utilized for the effective glycerol conversion to hydrogen-rich synthesis gas. It was found that after waste glycerol treatment, the main reaction products were gases with corresponding concentrations of H2 50.7%, CO 23.53%, CO2 11.45%, and CH4 3.82%, and traces of C2H2 and C2H6, which concentrations were below 0.5%. The comparable concentrations of the formed gas products were obtained after pure glycerol conversion-H2 46.4%, CO 26.25%, CO2 11.3%, and CH4 4.7%. The use of thermal water vapor plasma producing synthesis gas is an effective method to recover energy from both crude and pure glycerol. The performance of the glycerol conversion system was defined in terms of the produced gas yield, the carbon conversion efficiency, the cold gas efficiency, and the specific energy requirements.

  7. The effect of common imaging and hot water maceration on DNA recovery from skeletal remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Emilie M; Mundorff, Amy Z; Davoren, Jon M

    2015-12-01

    Identifying human remains often begins with cleaning and imaging the material. Hot water maceration is used to remove adherent soft tissue from bone and radiographs are taken to better visualize osseous details. Heat and radiation are known to have harmful effects on DNA, but their ability to degrade DNA when used for cleaning and imaging has not been well studied. To better understand their individual and combined effects on the recoverability of DNA from bone, skeletal samples were subjected to (1) hot water maceration (62 °C for 45 min); (2) CT scanning (0.6mm slices, 120 kV, 10.4s); (3) X-ray (50 kVp, 150 mA, 0.03 s, 40 in); and (4) all 3 treatments combined. Forty-eight DNA samples were extracted, quantified and amplified with the AmpFLSTR(®) Identifiler(®) system. Nearly all of the processed samples had reduced RFU values relative to the unprocessed samples, indicating some amount of genetic loss. This loss did not always translate into loss of profile completeness, since only a few samples had a reduction in the number of loci detected after processing. DNA yields were not significantly reduced by any one of the processing methods, however the results indicate that the damaging effects are additive. It is possible that processing may reduce a bone's DNA reservoir and as more procedures are preformed, the pool of available genetic information might be diminished. Many intrinsic and extrinsic factors can affect the recoverability of DNA from bone. Collecting a DNA sample prior to processing avoids the negative effects from hot water maceration and radiological imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Recovery of used frying sunflower oil with sugar cane industry waste and hot water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rehab F M; El Anany, A M

    2014-11-01

    The main goal of the current investigation was to use sugar cane bagasse ash (SCBA) and to compare its adsorption efficiency with Magnesol XL as synthetic adsorbents to regenerate the quality of used frying sunflower oil. In addition, to evaluate the effect of water washing process on the quality of used frying oil and the treated oil. The metal patterns of sugar cane bagasse ash and Magnesol XL were determined. Some physical and chemical properties of unused, used frying and used-treated sunflower oil were determined. Sunflower oil sample was heated at 180 °C + 5 °C, then frozen French fries potato were fried every 30 min. during a continuous period of 20 h. Oil samples were taken every 4 h. The filter aids were added individually to the used frying oil at levels 1, 2 and 3 % (w / v), then mechanically stirred for 60 min at 105 °C. The results indicate that all the filter aids under study were characterized by high levels of Si and variable levels of other minerals. The highest level of Si was recorded for sugar cane bagasse ash (SCBA) was 76.79 wt. %. Frying process caused significant (P ≤ 0.05) increases in physico-chemical properties of sunflower oil. The treatments of used frying sunflower oil with different levels of sugar cane bagasse ash and Magnesol XL caused significant (P ≤ 0.05) increase in the quality of treated oil, however the soap content of treated oil was increased, therefore, the effect of water washing process on the quality of used frying and used-treated sunflower oil was evaluated. The values of soap and Total polar compounds after water treatment were about 4.62 and 7.27 times as low as that for sunflower oil treated with 3 % sugar cane bagasse ash (SCBA). The results of the present study indicate that filtration treatment with different levels of sugar cane bagasse ash( SCBA) regenerated the quality of used sunflower oil and possess higher adsorbing effects than the synthetic filter aid ( Magnesol XL ) in

  9. Bio-drying and size sorting of municipal solid waste with high water content for improving energy recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Li-Ming; Ma, Zhong-He; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Dong-Qing; He, Pin-Jing

    2010-07-01

    Bio-drying can enhance the sortability and heating value of municipal solid waste (MSW), consequently improving energy recovery. Bio-drying followed by size sorting was adopted for MSW with high water content to improve its combustibility and reduce potential environmental pollution during the follow-up incineration. The effects of bio-drying and waste particle size on heating values, acid gas and heavy metal emission potential were investigated. The results show that, the water content of MSW decreased from 73.0% to 48.3% after bio-drying, whereas its lower heating value (LHV) increased by 157%. The heavy metal concentrations increased by around 60% due to the loss of dry materials mainly resulting from biodegradation of food residues. The bio-dried waste fractions with particle size higher than 45 mm were mainly composed of plastics and papers, and were preferable for the production of refuse derived fuel (RDF) in view of higher LHV as well as lower heavy metal concentration and emission. However, due to the higher chlorine content and HCl emission potential, attention should be paid to acid gas and dioxin pollution control. Although LHVs of the waste fractions with size bio-drying, they were still below the quality standards for RDF and much higher heavy metal pollution potential was observed. Different incineration strategies could be adopted for different particle size fractions of MSW, regarding to their combustibility and pollution property. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Review: Water recovery from brines and salt-saturated solutions: operability and thermodynamic efficiency considerations for desalination technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vane, Leland M

    2017-03-08

    When water is recovered from a saline source, a brine concentrate stream is produced. Management of the brine stream can be problematic, particularly in inland regions. An alternative to brine disposal is recovery of water and possibly salts from the concentrate. This review provides an overview of desalination technologies and discusses the thermodynamic efficiencies and operational issues associated with the various technologies particularly with regard to high salinity streams. Due to the high osmotic pressures of the brine concentrates, reverse osmosis, the most common desalination technology, is impractical. Mechanical vapor compression which, like reverse osmosis, utilizes mechanical work to operate, is reported to have the highest thermodynamic efficiency of the desalination technologies for treatment of salt-saturated brines. Thermally-driven processes, such as flash evaporation and distillation, are technically able to process saturated salt solutions, but suffer from low thermodynamic efficiencies. This inefficiency could be offset if an inexpensive source of waste or renewable heat could be used. Overarching issues posed by high salinity solutions include corrosion and the formation of scales/precipitates. These issues limit the materials, conditions, and unit operation designs that can be used.

  11. Microalgae Recovery from Water for Biofuel Production Using CO2-Switchable Crystalline Nanocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shijian; Champagne, Pascale; Wang, Haidong; Jessop, Philip G; Cunningham, Michael F

    2016-07-19

    There is a pressing need to develop efficient and sustainable approaches to harvesting microalgae for biofuel production and water treatment. CO2-switchable crystalline nanocellulose (CNC) modified with 1-(3-aminopropyl)imidazole (APIm) is proposed as a reversible coagulant for harvesting microalgae. Compared to native CNC, the positively charged APIm-modified CNC, which dispersed well in carbonated water, showed appreciable electrostatic interaction with negatively charged Chlorella vulgaris upon CO2-treatment. The gelation between the modified CNC, triggered by subsequent air sparging, can also enmesh adjacent microalgae and/or microalgae-modified CNC aggregates, thereby further enhancing harvesting efficiencies. Moreover, the surface charges and dispersion/gelation of APIm-modified CNC could be reversibly adjusted by alternatively sparging CO2/air. This CO2-switchability would make the reusability of redispersed CNC for further harvesting possible. After harvesting, the supernatant following sedimentation can be reused for microalgal cultivation without detrimental effects on cell growth. The use of this approach for harvesting microalgae presents an advantage to other current methods available because all materials involved, including the cellulose, CO2, and air, are natural and biocompatible without adverse effects on the downstream processing for biofuel production.

  12. Development of Low-Toxicity Wastewater Stabilization for Spacecraft Water Recovery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Julie L.; Adam, Niklas; Pickering, Karen D.; Alvarez, Giraldo N.

    2015-01-01

    Wastewater stabilization was an essential component of the spacecraft water cycle. The purpose of stabilizing wastewater was two-fold. First, stabilization prevents the breakdown of urea into ammonia, a toxic gas at high concentrations. Second, it prevents the growth of microorganisms, thereby mitigating hardware and water quality issues due to due biofilm and planktonic growth. Current stabilization techniques involve oxidizers and strong acids (pH=2) such as chromic and sulfuric acid, which are highly toxic and pose a risk to crew health. The purpose of this effort was to explore less toxic stabilization techniques, such as food-grade and commercial care preservatives. Additionally, certain preservatives were tested in the presence of a low-toxicity organic acid. Triplicate 300-milliliter volumes of urine were dosed with a predetermined quantity of stabilizer and stored for two weeks. During that time, pH, total organic carbon (TOC), ammonia, and turbidity were monitored. Those preservatives that showed the lowest visible microbial growth and stable pH were further tested in a six-month stability study. The results of the six-month study are also included in this paper.

  13. Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali Mohan, Arvind; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa γ-proteobacteria, α-proteobacteria, δ-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the α-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel Application of the Flotation Technique To Measure the Wettability Changes by Ionically Modified Water for Improved Oil Recovery in Carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohal, Muhammad Adeel Nassar; Thyne, Geoffrey; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2016-01-01

    equipment. Using this technique we were able to quantify the wettability alteration caused by low salinity and potential determining anions (PDAs) such as SO42−, BO33−, and PO43−. The wettability data show maximum oil recovery by dilution is coincident with maximum wettability alteration. The experiments...... the wettability, we need to understand the initial wetting conditions and design an ionically modified water (advanced water) to alter wettability and improve oil recovery. If a reservoir has already been reached to the optimum wetting conditions by injecting formation water or any other fluid......, then there is no need for ionically modified water. A number of methods have been devised to identify the wetting conditions including contact angle measurements, spontaneous imbibition, and chromatographic separation, etc. But contact angle measurement requires surfaces that lack natural surface roughness, spontaneous...

  15. Validity of Core Temperature Measurements at 3 Rectal Depths During Rest, Exercise, Cold-Water Immersion, and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin C; Hughes, Lexie E; Long, Blaine C; Adams, William M; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-04-01

      No evidence-based recommendation exists regarding how far clinicians should insert a rectal thermistor to obtain the most valid estimate of core temperature. Knowing the validity of temperatures at different rectal depths has implications for exertional heat-stroke (EHS) management.   To determine whether rectal temperature (Trec) taken at 4 cm, 10 cm, or 15 cm from the anal sphincter provides the most valid estimate of core temperature (as determined by esophageal temperature [Teso]) during similar stressors an athlete with EHS may experience.   Cross-sectional study.   Laboratory.   Seventeen individuals (14 men, 3 women: age = 23 ± 2 years, mass = 79.7 ± 12.4 kg, height = 177.8 ± 9.8 cm, body fat = 9.4% ± 4.1%, body surface area = 1.97 ± 0.19 m2).   Rectal temperatures taken at 4 cm, 10 cm, and 15 cm from the anal sphincter were compared with Teso during a 10-minute rest period; exercise until the participant's Teso reached 39.5°C; cold-water immersion (∼10°C) until all temperatures were ≤38°C; and a 30-minute postimmersion recovery period. The Teso and Trec were compared every minute during rest and recovery. Because exercise and cooling times varied, we compared temperatures at 10% intervals of total exercise and cooling durations for these periods.   The Teso and Trec were used to calculate bias (ie, the difference in temperatures between sites).   Rectal depth affected bias (F2,24 = 6.8, P = .008). Bias at 4 cm (0.85°C ± 0.78°C) was higher than at 15 cm (0.65°C ± 0.68°C, P .05). Bias varied over time (F2,34 = 79.5, P < .001). Bias during rest (0.42°C ± 0.27°C), exercise (0.23°C ± 0.53°C), and recovery (0.65°C ± 0.35°C) was less than during cooling (1.72°C ± 0.65°C, P < .05). Bias during exercise was less than during postimmersion recovery (0.65°C ± 0.35°C, P < .05).   When EHS is suspected, clinicians should insert the flexible rectal thermistor to 15 cm (6 in) because it is the most valid depth. The low

  16. Detailed Modeling of Distillation Technologies for Closed-Loop Water Recovery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allada, Rama Kumar; Lange, Kevin E.; Anderson, Molly S.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed chemical process simulations are a useful tool in designing and optimizing complex systems and architectures for human life support. Dynamic and steady-state models of these systems help contrast the interactions of various operating parameters and hardware designs, which become extremely useful in trade-study analyses. NASA?s Exploration Life Support technology development project recently made use of such models to compliment a series of tests on different waste water distillation systems. This paper presents efforts to develop chemical process simulations for three technologies: the Cascade Distillation System (CDS), the Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) system and the Wiped-Film Rotating Disk (WFRD) using the Aspen Custom Modeler and Aspen Plus process simulation tools. The paper discusses system design, modeling details, and modeling results for each technology and presents some comparisons between the model results and recent test data. Following these initial comparisons, some general conclusions and forward work are discussed.

  17. Separation and recovery of heavy metals from waste water using synergistic solvent extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yang, Limei; Xu, Zheng; Sun, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metal wastewater pollution is one of the three major water pollutions in the world. The zinc hydrometallurgy smelting process usually discharge large quantities of heavy metal wastewater into the environment. In this paper, a synergistic solvent extraction process has been developed to recover copper, nickel, zinc and cadmium respectively from calcium and magnesium. The synergistic organic system contained 0.50 M Versatic 10 and 0.5 M Mextral 984H in DT100. Adjusting pH to 2.0 at 40 °C, the copper will be extracted preferentially with the extraction rate more than 99%. Continuing to adjust pH to 4.2 at 40 °C, the nickel will be extracted secondly with an extraction rate more than 98%; the zinc and cadmium in raffinate could be extracted separately while pH is about 6.5.

  18. Recovery and decline of lake whitefish in U.S. waters of eastern Lake Ontario, 1980-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Randall W.; O'Gorman, Robert; Eckert, Thomas H.; Lantry, Brian F.; Dittman, Dawn E.

    2005-01-01

    The lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) was an important member of the native fish community and a valued commercial species in Lake Ontario. Lake whitefish were common in U.S. waters of the lake until 1965 and very abundant in Canadian waters through the early 1970s, although their numbers declined shortly thereafter. During 1975-1985, lake whitefish stocks remained depressed throughout the lake as a result of the combined effects of degraded water quality, overfishing, and predation. Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) probably preyed on whitefish fry, and sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) preyed on adults. During 1985-1987, lake whitefish stocks began to recover in eastern Lake Ontario, and their buildup continued into the mid-1990s. Reasons for the recovery likely included control of the sea lamprey population and a reduction in the number of piscivorous rainbow smelt. By 1997, lake whitefish abundance had declined severely again; some fish appeared to have dispersed from the northeastern to the southeastern regions of the lake, and the depth of capture increased. We believe that the collapse of Diporeia spp. populations during 1992-1999 was responsible for the decline in the lake whitefish populations and the shifts in geographic and bathymetric distribution because lake whitefish fed primarily on Diporeia spp. After the collapse of Diporeia spp. populations, lake whitefish in southeastern Lake Ontario fed on Mysis relicta and quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis). Changing from a diet of high-lipid Diporeia spp to low-lipid dreissenids and foraging on Mysis relicta at lower temperatures are apparently hampering the rebuilding of lake whitefish stocks.

  19. Recovery of solid fuel from municipal solid waste by hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, In-Hee, E-mail: hwang@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan); Aoyama, Hiroya; Matsuto, Toshihiko; Nakagishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuo, Takayuki [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water was studied to recover solid fuel from MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More than 75% of carbon in MSW was recovered as char. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heating value of char was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyvinyl chloride was decomposed at 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa and was removed by washing. - Abstract: Hydrothermal treatments using subcritical water (HTSW) such as that at 234 Degree-Sign C and 3 MPa (LT condition) and 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa (HT condition) were investigated to recover solid fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW). Printing paper, dog food (DF), wooden chopsticks, and mixed plastic film and sheets of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene were prepared as model MSW components, in which polyvinylchloride (PVC) powder and sodium chloride were used to simulate Cl sources. While more than 75% of carbon in paper, DF, and wood was recovered as char under both LT and HT conditions, plastics did not degrade under either LT or HT conditions. The heating value (HV) of obtained char was 13,886-27,544 kJ/kg and was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Higher formation of fixed carbon and greater oxygen dissociation during HTSW were thought to improve the HV of char. Cl atoms added as PVC powder and sodium chloride to raw material remained in char after HTSW. However, most Cl originating from PVC was found to converse into soluble Cl compounds during HTSW under the HT condition and could be removed by washing. From these results, the merit of HTSW as a method of recovering solid fuel from MSW is considered to produce char with minimal carbon loss without a drying process prior to HTSW. In addition, Cl originating from PVC decomposes into soluble Cl compound under the HT condition. The combination of HTSW under the HT condition and char washing might improve the quality of char as alternative fuel.

  20. Integrated subsurface water solutions for coastal environments through integrated pump&treat and aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdikaki, Martha; Kallioras, Andreas; Christoforidis, Christophoros; Iossifidis, Dimitris; Zafeiropoulos, Anastasios; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Makropoulos, Christos; Raat, Klaasjan; van den Berg, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Coastal wetlands in semi-arid regions, as in Circum-Mediterranean, are considered important ecosystems that provide valuable services to human population and the environment, such as: flood protection, erosion control, wildlife habitat, water quality, recreation and carbon sequestration. Un-managed surface and groundwater exploitation in these areas usually leads to deterioration of such sensitive ecosystems by means of water resources degradation and/or increased salinity. Groundwater usually plays a vital role for the sustainability of these hydrological systems, as the underlying aquifers operate as regulators for both quantity and quality of their waters. Multi-layer and multi-objective Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) systems can be proved effective groundwater engineered solutions for the restoration of deteriorated coastal wetlands in semi- and arid regions. The plain of Marathon is a typical Mediterranean environment that hosts a naturally occurring -and today degraded- coastal wetland with the characteristics of a distinct ecosystem linked to a typical coastal hydrogeological system of a semi-arid region; and therefore can serve as a model for similar systems world-wide. The geo-hydrological setting of the area involves a multi-layer aquifer system consisting of (i) an upper un-consolidated formation of depositional unit dominated mostly by fluvial sediments and (ii) the surrounding and underlying karstified marbles; both being linked to the investigated wetland and also subjected to seawater encroachment. A smart engineered MAR system via an optimised Pump & Treat system integrated with an Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) scheme in this area would include the abstraction of brackish groundwater from the deeper karst aquifer at a location close to the shoreline and direct treatment with Reverse Osmosis (RO). for desalination. Two-fold re-use scheme of the purified effluent can then be engineered for (i) the restoration of the coastal wetland; and (ii

  1. A Robust, Gravity-Insensitive, High-Temperature Condenser for Water Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weibo; Conboy, Thomas; Ewert, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative life support systems are vital for NASA's future long-duration human space exploration missions. A Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) system is being developed by NASA to dry and compress trash generated during space missions. The resulting water vapor is recovered and separated from the process gas flow by a gravity-insensitive condenser. Creare is developing a high-temperature condenser for this application. The entire condenser is constructed from metals that have excellent resistance to chemical attack from contaminants and is suitable for high-temperature operation. The metal construction and design configuration also offer greatest flexibility for potential coating and regeneration processes to reduce biofilm growth and thus enhancing the reliability of the condenser. The proposed condenser builds on the gravity-insensitive phase separator technology Creare developed for aircraft and spacecraft applications. This paper will first discuss the design requirements for the condenser in an HMC system that will be demonstrated on the International Space Station (ISS). Then, it will present the overall design of the condenser and the preliminary thermal test results of a subscale condenser. Finally, this paper will discuss the predicted performance of the full-size condenser and the development plan to mature the technology and enhance its long-term reliability for a flight system.

  2. Byproduct recovery from reclaimed water reverse osmosis concentrate using lime and soda-ash treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadesmaeili, Farah; Badr, Mostafa Kabiri; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Fox, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Lime and soda-ash softening of reclaimed water reverse osmosis concentrates as a pretreatment step for concentration by seawater reverse osmosis was the focus of this study. The objectives were removal of the potential fouling minerals of calcium, magnesium, and silica by selective precipitation, while producing byproducts with potential resale value. Three different bench-scale lime-soda processes were evaluated. The traditional method produced low-quality magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) byproducts. A modified process with pre-acidification to eliminate carbonate removed 98 to 99% of calcium and magnesium and produced CaCO3 that was > 94% pure. To prevent the contamination of byproducts with calcium sulfate (CaSO4) in high-sulfate concentrates, a CaSO4 crystallization step was added successfully to the modified process to precipitate CaSO4 before Mg(OH)2 precipitation and produce gypsum that was 92% pure. The modified lime-soda process also removed 94 to 97% silica, 72 to 77% barium, and 95 to 96% strontium, which are known as reverse osmosis membrane foulants.

  3. Stability assessment of the chemical composition of the treated mining water used to replenish the cooling circuit in Jaworzno III Power Plant - Power Plant II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiński, Marcin; Kmiecik, Ewa

    2017-11-01

    In Poland, electricity is still produced mainly in conventional power plants where fuel and water are materials necessary to generate the electricity. Even in modern power plants operating according to the principles of the sustainable development, this involves a high intake of water and considerable production of wastewater. This, in turn, necessi-tates the application of some technological solutions aimed at limiting the negative impact on the environment. The Jaworzno III Power Plant - Power Plant II is located in Jaworzno, Silesian Province, Poland. In order to minimise the negative impact on the surface water, the plant replenishes the cooling circuit with the mining water obtained from the closed-down Jan Kanty mine. The paper presents a stability assessment of the chemical composition of the treated mining water used to replenish the cooling circuit based on the data from 2007-2017.

  4. Stability assessment of the chemical composition of the treated mining water used to replenish the cooling circuit in Jaworzno III Power Plant – Power Plant II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpiński Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Poland, electricity is still produced mainly in conventional power plants where fuel and water are materials necessary to generate the electricity. Even in modern power plants operating according to the principles of the sustainable development, this involves a high intake of water and considerable production of wastewater. This, in turn, necessi-tates the application of some technological solutions aimed at limiting the negative impact on the environment. The Jaworzno III Power Plant – Power Plant II is located in Jaworzno, Silesian Province, Poland. In order to minimise the negative impact on the surface water, the plant replenishes the cooling circuit with the mining water obtained from the closed-down Jan Kanty mine. The paper presents a stability assessment of the chemical composition of the treated mining water used to replenish the cooling circuit based on the data from 2007–2017.

  5. Deep-sea benthic ecosystem collapse and recovery after an intense Dense Shelf Water Cascading event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusceddu, A.; Mea, M.; Canals, M.; Heussner, S.; Durrieu de Madron, X.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.; Bianchelli, S.; Corinaldesi, C.; Dell'Anno, A.; Thomsen, L.; Danovaro, R.

    2012-12-01

    Submarine canyons of several regions of the world are preferential conduits for Dense Shelf Water Cascading (DSWC), which quickly modify physical and chemical conditions while transporting large amounts of material towards the adjacent deep margin. Observations conducted during the last 15 yr in the Cap de Creus Canyon (Gulf of Lion, NW Mediterranean Sea) reported several intense events of DSWC. Their effects on the deep-sea biodiversity and ecosystem functioning are almost unknown. To investigate the effects of these episodic events we analysed changes in the meiofaunal biodiversity inside and outside the canyon. Sediment samples were collected at depths varying from ca. 1000 to > 2100 m in May 2004 (before a major event), April 2005 (during a major cascading event) and in October 2005, August 2006 April 2008 and April 2009. We report here that the late winter-early spring 2005 cascading led to a reduction of the organic matter contents in canyon floor sediments down to 1800 m depth, whereas surface sediments at about 2200 m depth showed an increase. Our findings suggest that the nutritional material removed from the shallower continental shelf open slope and canyon was transported to the deep margin. During the cascading event the meiofaunal abundance and biodiversity in the studied deep-sea sediments dropped down by a factor of 5 to 10. Benthic assemblages in the impacted seafloor recovered to pre-cascading conditions after only six months from the cessation of the cascading. Since the present climate change is expected to increase the intensity and frequency of these episodic events, we anticipate that they will increasingly impact biodiversity and functioning of the benthic bathyal ecosystems, which may eventually challenge their resilience.

  6. Recovery of solid fuel from municipal solid waste by hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In-Hee; Aoyama, Hiroya; Matsuto, Toshihiko; Nakagishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuo, Takayuki

    2012-03-01

    Hydrothermal treatments using subcritical water (HTSW) such as that at 234°C and 3MPa (LT condition) and 295°C and 8MPa (HT condition) were investigated to recover solid fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW). Printing paper, dog food (DF), wooden chopsticks, and mixed plastic film and sheets of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene were prepared as model MSW components, in which polyvinylchloride (PVC) powder and sodium chloride were used to simulate Cl sources. While more than 75% of carbon in paper, DF, and wood was recovered as char under both LT and HT conditions, plastics did not degrade under either LT or HT conditions. The heating value (HV) of obtained char was 13,886-27,544 kJ/kg and was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Higher formation of fixed carbon and greater oxygen dissociation during HTSW were thought to improve the HV of char. Cl atoms added as PVC powder and sodium chloride to raw material remained in char after HTSW. However, most Cl originating from PVC was found to converse into soluble Cl compounds during HTSW under the HT condition and could be removed by washing. From these results, the merit of HTSW as a method of recovering solid fuel from MSW is considered to produce char with minimal carbon loss without a drying process prior to HTSW. In addition, Cl originating from PVC decomposes into soluble Cl compound under the HT condition. The combination of HTSW under the HT condition and char washing might improve the quality of char as alternative fuel. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Uranium recovery and uranium remove from acid mine waters by ion exchange resin; Remocao e recuperacao de uranio de aguas acidas de mina com resina de troca ionica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Marcos R.L. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao do Laborarorio; Fatibello Filho, Orlando [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    1999-11-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of few processes capable of reducing contaminants in effluents to very low levels according to environmental legislation. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The presence of pyrite in the waste rock piles, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants. Including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by an anionic exchanger. Studies of uranium sorption without treatment, and with lime pretreatment of water to precipitate the iron and recovery uranium as commercial product, are presented. Uranium elution was done with NaCl solutions. Saline concentration and retention time were the parameters studied. the uranium decontaminations level in the effluents from acid mine water was 94%. (author) 10 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs.

  8. Structure of short-range-ordered iron(III)-precipitates formed by iron(II) oxidation in water containing phosphate, silicate, and calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegelin, A.; Frommer, J.; Vantelon, D.; Kaegi, R.; Hug, S. J.

    2009-04-01

    The oxidation of Fe(II) in water leads to the formation of Fe(III)-precipitates that strongly affect the fate of nutrients and contaminants in natural and engineered systems. Examples include the cycling of As in rice fields irrigated with As-rich groundwater or the treatment of drinking water for As removal. Knowledge of the types of Fe(III)-precipitates forming in such systems is essential for the quantitative modeling of nutrient and contaminant dynamics and for the optimization of water purification techniques on the basis of a mechanistic understanding of the relevant biogeochemical processes. In this study, we investigated the local coordination of Fe, P, and Ca in Fe(III)-precipitates formed by aeration of synthetic Fe(II)-containing groundwater with variable composition (pH 7, 2-30 mg/L Fe(II), 2-20 mg/L phosphate-P, 2-20 mg/L silicate-Si, 8 mM Na-bicarbonate or 2.5 mM Ca-&1.5 mM Mg-bicarbonate). After 4 hours of oxidation, Fe(III)-precipitates were collected on 0.2 µm nylon filters and dried. The precipitates were analyzed by Fe K-edge EXAFS (XAS beamline, ANKA, Germany) and by P and Ca K-edge XANES spectroscopy (LUCIA beamline, SLS, Switzerland). The Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that local Fe coordination in the precipitates systematically shifted with water composition. As long as water contained P, mainly short-range-ordered Fe(III)-phosphate formed (with molar P/Fe ~0.5). In the absence of P, Fe(III) precipitated as hydrous ferric oxide at high Si/Fe>0.5, as ferrihydrite at intermediate Si/Fe, and mainly as lepidocrocite at Si/Fepatterns. The P K-edge XANES spectra revealed that phosphate was bound to both Fe as well as Ca (if present). The Ca K-edge XANES spectra showed that the mode of Ca uptake by the Fe(III)-precipitates shifted from mainly adsorption at high Fe/P to coprecipitation at low Fe/P ratio. Despite oversaturation, neither calcite nor hydroxyapatite formed to a significant extent. The results from this study indicated that

  9. Application of supercritical water to decompose brominated epoxy resin and environmental friendly recovery of metals from waste memory module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuo; Xu, Zhenming

    2015-02-03

    Waste Memory Modules (WMMs), a particular kind of waste printed circuit board (WPCB), contain a high amount of brominated epoxy resin (BER), which may bring a series of environmental and health problems. On the other hand, metals like gold and copper are very valuable and are important to recover from WMMs. In the present study, an effective and environmental friendly method using supercritical water (SCW) to decompose BER and recover metals from WMMs was developed instead of hydrometallurgy or pyrometallurgy simultaneously. Experiments were conducted under external-catalyst-free conditions with temperatures ranging from 350 to 550 °C, pressures from 25 to 40 MPa, and reaction times from 120 to 360 min in a semibatch-type reactor. The results showed that BER could be quickly and efficiently decomposed under SCW condition, and the mechanism was possibly free radical reaction. After the SCW treatments, the glass fibers and metal foils in the solid residue could be easily liberated and recovered, respectively. The metal recovery rate reached 99.80%. The optimal parameters were determined as 495 °C, 33 MPa, and 305 min on the basis of response surface methodology (RSM). This study provides an efficient and environmental friendly approach for WMMs recycling compared with electrolysis, pyrometallurgy, and hydrometallurgy.

  10. Concentration-driven models revisited: towards a unified framework to model settling tanks in water resource recovery facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfs, Elena; Martí, M Carmen; Locatelli, Florent; Balemans, Sophie; Bürger, Raimund; Diehl, Stefan; Laurent, Julien; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; François, Pierre; Nopens, Ingmar

    2017-02-01

    A new perspective on the modelling of settling behaviour in water resource recovery facilities is introduced. The ultimate goal is to describe in a unified way the processes taking place both in primary settling tanks (PSTs) and secondary settling tanks (SSTs) for a more detailed operation and control. First, experimental evidence is provided, pointing out distributed particle properties (such as size, shape, density, porosity, and flocculation state) as an important common source of distributed settling behaviour in different settling unit processes and throughout different settling regimes (discrete, hindered and compression settling). Subsequently, a unified model framework that considers several particle classes is proposed in order to describe distributions in settling behaviour as well as the effect of variations in particle properties on the settling process. The result is a set of partial differential equations (PDEs) that are valid from dilute concentrations, where they correspond to discrete settling, to concentrated suspensions, where they correspond to compression settling. Consequently, these PDEs model both PSTs and SSTs.

  11. Comparative evaluation of analytical procedures for the recovery of Enterobacteriaceae in coastal marine waters; Valutazione comparativa di procedure analitiche per il rilevamento di Enterobacteriaceae in acque marine costiere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonadonna, Lucia; Chiaretti, Gianluca; Coccia, Anna Maria; Semproni, Maurizio [Istituto Superiore di Sanita`, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Igiene Ambientale

    1997-03-01

    The use of quick and reliable procedures is fundamental for water quality evaluation control. In order to improve the analytical methods for microbiological examination of bathing waters, a comparison of different substrates for the recovery of Enterobacteriaceae from coastal marine waters was carried out. The medium indicated in the Italian technical normative has shown a good selectivity when the red colonies with a green metallic surface sheen were counted, as stated in the Standard Methods. On the other hand, the chronogenic substrate used in this study resulted easy to read, selective and specific for both Escherichia coli and total coliforms.

  12. Separation and Determination of Fe(III and Fe(II in Natural and Waste Waters Using Silica Gel Sequentially Modified with Polyhexamethylene Guanidine and Tiron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Didukh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Silica gel, sequentially modified with polyhexamethylene guanidine and pyrocatechin-3,5-disulfonic acid (Tiron, was suggested for sorption separation and determination of Fe(III and Fe(II. It was found that quantitative extraction of Fe(III and its separation from Fe(II were attained at pH 2.5–4.0, while quantitative extraction of Fe(II was observed at pH 6.0–7.5. An intensive signal with g=4.27, which is characteristic for Fe(III, appeared in EPR spectra of the sorbents after Fe(II and Fe(III sorption. During interaction between Fe(II and Tiron, fixed on the sorbent surface, its oxidation up to Fe(III occurred. Red-lilac complexes of the composition FeL3 were formed on the sorbent surface during sorption regardless of initial oxidation level of iron. Diffuse reflectance spectrum of surface complexes exhibited wide band with slightly expressed maxima at 480 and 510 nm. Procedures for separation and photometric determination of Fe(III and Fe(II at the joint presence and total Fe content determination as Fe(II in waste and natural waters was developed. The limit of detection for iron was 0.05 μg per 0.100 g of the sorbent. The calibration graph was linear up to 20.0 μg of Fe per 0.100 g of the sorbent. The RSD in the determination of more than 0.2 μg of Fe was less than 0.06.

  13. Separation and Determination of Fe(III) and Fe(II) in Natural and Waste Waters Using Silica Gel Sequentially Modified with Polyhexamethylene Guanidine and Tiron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didukh, Svetlana; Losev, Vladimir; Borodina, Elena; Maksimov, Nikolay; Trofimchuk, Anatoly; Zaporogets, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Silica gel, sequentially modified with polyhexamethylene guanidine and pyrocatechin-3,5-disulfonic acid (Tiron), was suggested for sorption separation and determination of Fe(III) and Fe(II). It was found that quantitative extraction of Fe(III) and its separation from Fe(II) were attained at pH 2.5-4.0, while quantitative extraction of Fe(II) was observed at pH 6.0-7.5. An intensive signal with g = 4.27, which is characteristic for Fe(III), appeared in EPR spectra of the sorbents after Fe(II) and Fe(III) sorption. During interaction between Fe(II) and Tiron, fixed on the sorbent surface, its oxidation up to Fe(III) occurred. Red-lilac complexes of the composition FeL3 were formed on the sorbent surface during sorption regardless of initial oxidation level of iron. Diffuse reflectance spectrum of surface complexes exhibited wide band with slightly expressed maxima at 480 and 510 nm. Procedures for separation and photometric determination of Fe(III) and Fe(II) at the joint presence and total Fe content determination as Fe(II) in waste and natural waters was developed. The limit of detection for iron was 0.05 μg per 0.100 g of the sorbent. The calibration graph was linear up to 20.0 μg of Fe per 0.100 g of the sorbent. The RSD in the determination of more than 0.2 μg of Fe was less than 0.06.

  14. Fluorescence enhancement effect of Eu(III)-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide in water-dissolved organic matter extracted from wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fei; Meng, Fanhui; Fan, Mengdi; Zhao, Yanyan; Wu, Xia; Shen, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The fluorescence spectral characteristics of water-dissolved organic matter extracted from wheat straw (DOM-WS) were studied using three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. The results indicated that 3D-EEM spectra of DOM-WS showed four different fluorophores: humic-like, visible fulvic-like, UV fulvic-like and protein-like substances. It is interesting that DOM-WS can obviously enhance the fluorescence intensity of Eu(III)-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide system. On the basis of this study, a new fluorescence method for the determination of trace amounts of Eu(III) was developed. Under the optimal conditions, the enhanced fluorescence intensity was in proportion to the concentration of Eu(III) in the range of 8.0×10(-8)-8.0×10(-7)mol/L. The detection limit (S/N=3) was 1.1×10(-9)mol/L. This method was applied to the analysis of Eu(III) concentration in standard sample and obtained satisfactory results. It may be a new way to use wheat straw effectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessing the potential hydrological impact of the Gibe III Dam on Lake Turkana water level using multi-source satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpuri, N. M.; Senay, G. B.

    2012-10-01

    Lake Turkana, the largest desert lake in the world, is fed by ungauged or poorly gauged river systems. To meet the demand of electricity in the East African region, Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies more than 80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa with a height of 241 m. However, the nature of interactions and potential impacts of regulated inflows to Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in situ datasets. In this study, we used 12 yr (1998-2009) of existing multi-source satellite and model-assimilated global weather data. We used a calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model evaluates the impact of the Gibe III dam using three different approaches - a historical approach, a rainfall based approach, and a statistical approach to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. All the approaches provided comparable and consistent results. Model results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam on Lake Turkana would vary with the magnitude and distribution of rainfall post-dam commencement. On average, the reservoir would take up to 8-10 months, after commencement, to reach a minimum operation level of 201 m depth of water. During the dam filling period, the lake level would drop up to 1-2 m (95% confidence) compared to the lake level modeled without the dam. The lake level variability caused by regulated inflows after the dam commissioning were found to be within the natural variability of the lake of 4.8 m. Moreover, modeling results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam would depend on the initial lake level at the time of dam commencement. Areas

  16. Assessing the potential hydrological impact of the Gibe III Dam on Lake Turkana water level using multi-source satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Velpuri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lake Turkana, the largest desert lake in the world, is fed by ungauged or poorly gauged river systems. To meet the demand of electricity in the East African region, Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies more than 80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa with a height of 241 m. However, the nature of interactions and potential impacts of regulated inflows to Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in situ datasets. In this study, we used 12 yr (1998–2009 of existing multi-source satellite and model-assimilated global weather data. We used a calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model evaluates the impact of the Gibe III dam using three different approaches – a historical approach, a rainfall based approach, and a statistical approach to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. All the approaches provided comparable and consistent results. Model results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam on Lake Turkana would vary with the magnitude and distribution of rainfall post-dam commencement. On average, the reservoir would take up to 8–10 months, after commencement, to reach a minimum operation level of 201 m depth of water. During the dam filling period, the lake level would drop up to 1–2 m (95% confidence compared to the lake level modeled without the dam. The lake level variability caused by regulated inflows after the dam commissioning were found to be within the natural variability of the lake of 4.8 m. Moreover, modeling results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam would depend on the initial lake level at the time of

  17. Rapid Recovery of Chironomidae (Diptera) in Little Mill Creek (Kansas, U.S.A.) After the Decommissioning of a Waste Water Treatment Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, R. W.; Ferrington, L. C.

    2005-05-01

    In June 1995 the Lenexa Waste Water Treatment Plant was decommissioned, providing an opportunity to study recovery of Chironomidae community structure in Little Mill Creek. Using pupal exuviae, weekly changes in the species richness and composition of Chironomidae emerging upstream and downstream of the effluent outfall was evaluated from two weeks before decommissioning to eight weeks post-decommissioning. Chironomidae emergence was clearly different between upstream and downstream sites both before and shortly after effluent input ceased. Before decommissioning, sites immediately downstream of the effluent had low species richness and were dominated by Chironomus riparius (Meigen) and other tolerant taxa, with some recovery at sites farther downstream. Two weeks after decommissioning, only sites immediately downstream of the former effluent were clearly impacted, but effects were reduced compared to pre-recovery collections. At five weeks post-decommissioning, species richness was only slightly lower at the sites immediately downstream of the former effluent and the composition of common species (i.e., >5% of relative abundance) was similar between upstream and downstream sites. Rapid recovery of chironomid emergence below the sewage effluent likely resulted from both colonization of drifting larvae from upstream sources and adult dispersal and oviposition, indicating rapid responses in emergence as water quality conditions improved.

  18. D/H isotope ratios of kerogen, bitumen, oil, and water in hydrous pyrolysis of source rocks containing kerogen types I, II, IIS, and III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, A.; Lewan, M.D.; Wintsch, R.P.

    1999-01-01

    Immature source rock chips containing different types of kerogen (I, II, IIS, III) were artificially matured in isotopically distinct waters by hydrous pyrolysis and by pyrolysis in supercritical water. Converging isotopic trends of inorganic (water) and organic (kerogen, bitumen, oil) hydrogen with increasing time and temperature document that water-derived hydrogen is added to or exchanged with organic hydrogen, or both, during chemical reactions that take place during thermal maturation. Isotopic mass-balance calculations show that, depending on temperature (310-381??C), time (12-144 h), and source rock type, between ca. 45 and 79% of carbon-bound hydrogen in kerogen is derived from water. Estimates for bitumen and oil range slightly lower, with oil-hydrogen being least affected by water-derived hydrogen. Comparative hydrous pyrolyses of immature source rocks at 330??C for 72 h show that hydrogen in kerogen, bitumen, and expelled oil/wax ranks from most to least isotopically influenced by water-derived hydrogen in the order IIS > II ~ III > I. Pyrolysis of source rock containing type II kerogen in supercritical water at 381 ??C for 12 h yields isotopic results that are similar to those from hydrous pyrolysis at 350??C for 72 h, or 330??C for 144 h. Bulk hydrogen in kerogen contains several percent of isotopically labile hydrogen that exchanges fast and reversibly with hydrogen in water vapor at 115??C. The isotopic equilibration of labile hydrogen in kerogen with isotopic standard water vapors significantly reduces the analytical uncertainty of D/H ratios when compared with simple D/H determination of bulk hydrogen in kerogen. If extrapolation of our results from hydrous pyrolysis is permitted to natural thermal maturation at lower temperatures, we suggest that organic D/H ratios of fossil fuels in contact with formation waters are typically altered during chemical reactions, but that D/H ratios of generated hydrocarbons are subsequently little or not affected

  19. X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a tool investigating arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) sorption by an aluminum-based drinking-water treatment residual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Parsons, Jason G; Datta, Rupali; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2009-11-15

    Historic applications of arsenical pesticides to agricultural land have resulted in accumulation of residual arsenic (As) in such soils. In situ immobilization represents a cost-effective and least ecological disrupting treatment technology for soil As. Earlier work in our laboratory showed that drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs), a low-cost, waste by-product of the drinking-water treatment process exhibit a high affinity for As. Wet chemical experiments (sorption kinetics and desorption) were coupled with X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements to elucidate the bonding strength and type of As(V) and As(III) sorption by an aluminum-based WTR. A fast (1h), followed by a slower sorption stage resulted in As(V) and As(III) sorption capacities of 96% and 77%, respectively. Arsenic desorption with a 5mM oxalate from the WTR was minimal, being always <4%. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data showed inner-sphere complexation between As and surface hydroxyls. Reaction time (up to 48h) had no effect on the initial As oxidation state for sorbed As(V) and As(III). A combination of inner-sphere bonding types occurred between As and Al on the WTR surface because mixed surface geometries and interatomic distances were observed.

  20. Significant role of Mn(III) sites in e(g)(1) configuration in manganese oxide catalysts for efficient artificial water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indra, Arindam; Menezes, Prashanth W; Schuster, Felix; Driess, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Development of efficient bio-inspired water oxidation system with transition metal oxide catalyst has been considered as the one of the most challenging task in the recent years. As the oxygen evolving center of photosystem II consists of Mn4CaO5 cluster, most of the water oxidation study was converged to build up manganese oxide based catalysts. Here we report the synthesis of efficient artificial water oxidation catalysts by transferring the inactive manganese monooxide (MnO) under highly oxidizing conditions with ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) and ozone (O3). MnO was partially oxidized to form mixed-valent manganese oxide (MnOx) with CAN whereas completely oxidized to mineral phase of ε-MnO2 (Akhtenskite) upon treatment of O3 in acidic solution, which we explore first time as a water oxidation catalyst. Chemical water oxidation, as well as the photochemical water oxidation in the presence of sacrificial electron acceptor and photosensitizer with the presented catalysts were carried out that followed the trends: MnOx>MnO2>MnO. Structural and activity correlation reveals that the presence of larger extent of Mn(III) in MnOx is the responsible factor for higher activity compared to MnO2. Mn(III) species in octahedral system with eg(1) configuration furnishes and facilitates the Mn-O and Mn-Mn bond enlargement with required structural flexibility and disorder in the manganese oxide structure which indeed facilitates water oxidation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Tuning the Redox Properties of a Nonheme Iron(III)-Peroxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Zinc Ions by Water Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Min; Bang, Suhee; Yoon, Heejung; Bae, Seong Hee; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-07-20

    Redox-inactive metal ions play important roles in tuning chemical properties of metal-oxygen intermediates. Herein we report the effect of water molecules on the redox properties of a nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions. The coordination of two water molecules to a Zn(2+) ion in (TMC)Fe(III) -(O2 )-Zn(CF3 SO3 )2 (1-Zn(2+) ) decreases the Lewis acidity of the Zn(2+) ion, resulting in the decrease of the one-electron oxidation and reduction potentials of 1-Zn(2+) . This further changes the reactivities of 1-Zn(2+) in oxidation and reduction reactions; no reaction occurred upon addition of an oxidant (e.g., cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)) to 1-Zn(2+) , whereas 1-Zn(2+) coordinating two water molecules, (TMC)Fe(III) -(O2 )-Zn(CF3 SO3 )2 -(OH2 )2 [1-Zn(2+) -(OH2 )2 ], releases the O2 unit in the oxidation reaction. In the reduction reactions, 1-Zn(2+) was converted to its corresponding iron(IV)-oxo species upon addition of a reductant (e.g., a ferrocene derivative), whereas such a reaction occurred at a much slower rate in the case of 1-Zn(2+) -(OH2 )2 . The present results provide the first biomimetic example showing that water molecules at the active sites of metalloenzymes may participate in tuning the redox properties of metal-oxygen intermediates. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A Functional Analysis of Circadian Pacemakers in Nocturnal Rodents. III. Heavy Water and Constant Light : Homeostasis of Frequency?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, Serge; Pittendrigh, Colin S.

    1976-01-01

    1. In a preceding paper differences in the lability of the freerunning circadian period (τ) in constant darkness (DD) were described among four species of rodents. This lability (i) is strongly correlated with the responses of τ to (ii) D2O-administration and to (iii) constant light (LL) of various

  3. Hydrophobic recovery of repeatedly plasma-treated silicone rubber .2. A comparison of the hydrophobic recovery in air, water, or liquid nitrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everaert, EP; VanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1996-01-01

    Surfaces of medical grade silicone rubber (Q7-4750, Dow Coming) were modified by repeated (six times) RF plasma treatments using various discharge gases: oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, and ammonia. The treated samples were stored for a period of 3 months in ambient air, water, or liquid nitrogen.

  4. What are the Physiological Mechanisms for Post-Exercise Cold Water Immersion in the Recovery from Prolonged Endurance and Intermittent Exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihsan, Mohammed; Watson, Greig; Abbiss, Chris R

    2016-08-01

    Intense training results in numerous physiological perturbations such as muscle damage, hyperthermia, dehydration and glycogen depletion. Insufficient/untimely restoration of these physiological alterations might result in sub-optimal performance during subsequent training sessions, while chronic imbalance between training stress and recovery might lead to overreaching or overtraining syndrome. The use of post-exercise cold water immersion (CWI) is gaining considerable popularity among athletes to minimize fatigue and accelerate post-exercise recovery. CWI, through its primary ability to decrease tissue temperature and blood flow, is purported to facilitate recovery by ameliorating hyperthermia and subsequent alterations to the central nervous system (CNS), reducing cardiovascular strain, removing accumulated muscle metabolic by-products, attenuating exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and improving autonomic nervous system function. The current review aims to provide a comprehensive and detailed examination of the mechanisms underpinning acute and longer term recovery of exercise performance following post-exercise CWI. Understanding the mechanisms will aid practitioners in the application and optimisation of CWI strategies to suit specific recovery needs and consequently improve athletic performance. Much of the literature indicates that the dominant mechanism by which CWI facilitates short term recovery is via ameliorating hyperthermia and consequently CNS mediated fatigue and by reducing cardiovascular strain. In contrast, there is limited evidence to support that CWI might improve acute recovery by facilitating the removal of muscle metabolites. CWI has been shown to augment parasympathetic reactivation following exercise. While CWI-mediated parasympathetic reactivation seems detrimental to high-intensity exercise performance when performed shortly after, it has been shown to be associated with improved longer term physiological recovery and day to day

  5. Experimental Evaluation of Hybrid Distillation-Vapor Permeation Process for Efficient Ethanol Recovery from Ethanol-Water Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    The energy demand of distillation-based systems for ethanol recovery and dehydration can be significant, particularly for dilute solutions [1]. An alternative separation process integrating vapor stripping with a vapor compression step and a vapor permeation membrane separation ...

  6. Peptide-based ambidextrous bifunctional gelator: applications in oil spill recovery and removal of toxic organic dyes for waste water management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Kingshuk; Nandi, Nibedita; Mondal, Biplab; Dehsorkhi, Ashkan; Hamley, Ian W; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-12-06

    A low molecular weight peptide-based ambidextrous gelator molecule has been discovered for efficient control of water pollution. The gelator molecules can gel various organic solvents with diverse polarity, e.g. n-hexane, n-octane, petroleum ether, petrol, diesel, aromatic solvents like chlorobenzene, toluene, benzene, o-xylene and even aqueous phosphate buffer of pH 7.5. These gels have been thoroughly characterized using various techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction analysis, small angle X-ray scattering and rheological experiments. Interestingly, hydrogel obtained from the gelator molecule has been found to absorb toxic organic dyes (both cationic and anionic dyes) from dye-contaminated water. The gelator molecule can be reused for several cycles, indicating its possible future use in waste water management. Moreover, this gelator can selectively gel petrol, diesel, pump oil from an oil-water mixture in the presence of a carrier solvent, ethyl acetate, suggesting its efficient application for oil spill recovery. These results indicate that the peptide-based ambidextrous gelator produces soft materials (gels) with dual function: (i) removal of toxic organic dyes in waste water treatment and (ii) oil spill recovery.

  7. Effect of a grey water heat recovery unit on storage volumes needed for domestic hot water; Influence d'un recuperateur de chaleur des eaux grises sur le volume de stockage requis pour l'eau chaude domestique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, D.; Bernier, M. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Mecanique

    2008-07-01

    This paper presented a method of reducing the energy consumption associated with domestic hot water (DHW) heating. The method involved a gravity film heat exchanger (GFX) to recuperate part of the energy contained in wastewater following a shower. A study was conducted in which the energy saved by the GFX was quantified for various configurations. The nature of a GFX installation is such that water flows simultaneously in the drain and in a heat recuperating coil, and is therefore well suited for showers. The potential for energy recovery can be significant. Simulations were performed using the TRNSYS simulation software for a typical hot water consumption profile and the actual water temperature in Montreal's water supply aqueduct. It was determined that large amounts of energy required to heat water for showers can be recuperated depending on the placement of the GFX in the plumbing circuit. 12 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs.

  8. CO2 SELECTIVE CERAMIC MEMBRANE FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION WITH CONCOMITANT RECOVERY OF CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2005-07-15

    A high temperature membrane reactor (MR) has been developed to enhance the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction efficiency with concomitant CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration. This improved WGS-MR with CO{sub 2} recovery capability is ideally suitable for integration into the Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power generation system. Two different CO{sub 2}-affinity materials were selected in this study. The Mg-Al-CO{sub 3}-layered double hydroxide (LDH) was investigated as an adsorbent or a membrane for CO{sub 2} separation. The adsorption isotherm and intraparticle diffusivity for the LDH-based adsorbent were experimentally determined, and suitable for low temperature shift (LTS) of WGS. The LDH-based membranes were synthesized using our commercial ceramic membranes as substrate. These experimental membranes were characterized comprehensively in terms of their morphology, and CO{sub 2} permeance and selectivity to demonstrate the technical feasibility. In parallel, an alternative material-base membrane, carbonaceous membrane developed by us, was characterized, which also demonstrated enhanced CO{sub 2} selectivity at the LTS-WGS condition. With optimization on membrane defect reduction, these two types of membrane could be used commercially as CO{sub 2}-affinity membranes for the proposed application. Based upon the unique CO{sub 2} affinity of the LDHs at the LTS/WGS environment, we developed an innovative membrane reactor, Hybrid Adsorption and Membrane Reactor (HAMR), to achieve {approx}100% CO conversion, produce a high purity hydrogen product and deliver a concentrated CO{sub 2} stream for disposal. A mathematical model was developed to simulate this unique one -step process. Finally a benchtop reactor was employed to generate experimental data, which were consistent with the prediction from the HAMR mathematical model. In summary, the project objective, enhancing WGS efficiency for hydrogen production with concomitant CO{sub 2} removal for

  9. A Mn(II)-Mn(III) EPR signal arises from the interaction of NO with the S1 state of the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrou, J; Ioannidis, N; Deligiannakis, Y; Petrouleas, V

    1998-03-17

    It was shown recently [Goussias, C., Ioannidis, N., and Petrouleas, V. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 9261-9266] that incubation of photosystem II preparations with NO at -30 degrees C in the dark results in the formation of a new intermediate of the water-oxidizing complex. This is characterized by an EPR signal centered at g = 2 with prominent manganese hyperfine structure. We have examined the detailed structure of the signal using difference EPR spectroscopy. This is facilitated by the observations that NO can be completely removed without decrease or modification of the signal, and illumination at 0 degree C eliminates the signal. The signal spans 1600 G and is characterized by sharp hyperfine structure. 14NO and 15NO cw EPR combined with pulsed ENDOR and ESEEM studies show no detectable contributions of the nitrogen nucleus to the spectrum. The spectrum bears similarities to the experimental spectrum of the Mn(II)-Mn(III) catalase [Zheng, M., Khangulov, S. V., Dismukes, G. C., and Barynin, V. V. (1994) Inorg. Chem. 33, 382-387]. Simulations allowing small variations in the catalase-tensor values result in an almost accurate reproduction of the NO-induced signal. This presents strong evidence for the assignment of the latter to a magnetically isolated Mn(II)-Mn(III) dimer. Since the starting oxidation states of Mn are higher than II, we deduce that NO acts effectively as a reductant, e.g., Mn(III)-Mn(III) + NO--> Mn(II)-Mn(III) + NO+. The temperature dependence of the nonsaturated EPR-signal intensity in the range 2-20 K indicates that the signal results from a ground state. The cw microwave power saturation data in the range 4-8 K can be interpreted assuming an Orbach relaxation mechanism with an excited state at delta = 42 K. Assuming antiferromagnetic coupling, -2JS1.S2, between the two manganese ions, J is estimated to be 10 cm-1. The finding that an EPR signal from the Mn cluster of PSII can be clearly assigned to a magnetically isolated Mn(II)-Mn(III) dimer

  10. Water Oxidation Catalysis by Co(II) Impurities in Co(III) 4 O 4 Cubanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullman, Andrew M.; Liu, Yi; Huynh, Michael; Bediako, D. Kwabena; Wang, Hongsen; Anderson, Bryce L.; Powers, David C.; Breen, John J.; Abruña, Héctor D.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2014-12-17

    The observed water oxidation activity of the compound class Co4O4(OAc)4(Py–X)4 emanates from a Co(II) impurity. This impurity is oxidized to produce the well-known Co-OEC heterogeneous cobaltate catalyst, which is an active water oxidation catalyst. We present results from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance line broadening analysis, and electrochemical titrations to establish the existence of the Co(II) impurity as the major source of water oxidation activity that has been reported for Co4O4 molecular cubanes. Differential electrochemical mass spectrometry is used to characterize the fate of glassy carbon at water oxidizing potentials and demonstrate that such electrode materials should be used with caution for the study of water oxidation catalysis.

  11. Water-soluble Ru(II)- and Ru(III)-halide-PTA complexes (PTA=1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane): Chemical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistin, F; Scaletti, F; Balducci, G; Pillozzi, S; Arcangeli, A; Messori, L; Alessio, E

    2016-07-01

    Four structurally related Ru(II)-halide-PTA complexes, of general formula trans- or cis-[Ru(PTA)4X2] (PTA=1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane, X=Cl (1, 2), Br (3, 4), were prepared and characterized. Whereas compounds 1 and 2 are known, the corresponding bromo derivatives 3 and 4 are new. The Ru(III)-PTA compound trans-[RuCl4(PTAH)2]Cl (5, PTAH=PTA protonated at one N atom), structurally similar to the well-known Ru(III) anticancer drug candidates (Na)trans-[RuCl4(ind)2] (NKP-1339, ind=indazole) and (Him)trans-[RuCl4(dmso-S)(im)] (NAMI-A, im=imidazole), was also prepared and similarly investigated. Notably, the presence of PTA confers to all complexes an appreciable solubility in aqueous solutions at physiological pH. The chemical behavior of compounds 1-5 in water and in physiological buffer, their interactions with two model proteins - cytochrome c and ribonuclease A - as well as with a single strand oligonucleotide (5'-CGCGCG-3'), and their in vitro cytotoxicity against a human colon cancer cell line (HCT-116) and a myeloid leukemia (FLG 29.1) were investigated. Upon dissolution in the buffer, sequential halide replacement by water molecules was observed for complexes 1-4, with relatively slow kinetics, whereas the Ru(III) complex 5 is more inert. All tested compounds manifested moderate antiproliferative properties, the cis compounds 2 and 4 being slightly more active than the trans ones (1 and 3). Mass spectrometry experiments evidenced that all complexes exhibit a far higher reactivity towards the reference oligonucleotide than towards model proteins. The chemical and biological profiles of compounds 1-5 are compared to those of established ruthenium drug candidates in clinical development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Post-exercise recovery of biological, clinical and metabolic variables after different temperatures and durations of cold water immersion: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlei, Franciele M; de Albuquerque, Maíra C; de Almeida, Aline C; Machado, Aryane F; Netto, Jayme; Pastre, Carlos M

    2017-10-01

    Cold water immersion (CWI) is a commonly used recuperative strategy. However there is a lack of standardization of protocols considering the duration and temperature of application of the technique and the stress model. Therefore it is important to study the issue of dose response in a specific stress model. Thus the objective was to analyze and compare the effects of CWI during intense post-exercise recovery using different durations and temperatures of immersion. One hundred and five male individuals were divided into five groups: one control group (CG) and four recovery groups (G1: 5' at 9±1 °C; G2: 5' at 14±1 °C; G3: 15' at 9±1 °C; G4: 15' at 14±1 °C). The volunteers were submitted to an exhaustion protocol that consisted of a jump program and the Wingate Test. Immediately after the exhaustion protocol, the volunteers were directed to a tank with water and ice, where they were immersed for the recovery procedure, during which blood samples were collected for later lactate and creatine kinase (CK) analysis. Variables were collected prior to the exercise and 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after its completion. For the CK concentration, 15 minutes at 14 °C was the best intervention option, considering the values at 72 hours after exercise, while for the moment of peak lactate an advantage was observed for immersion for 5 minutes at 14 °C. Regarding the perception of recovery, CWI for 5 minutes at 14 °C performed better long-term, from the time of the intervention to 96 hours post-exercise. For pain, no form of immersion responded better than the CG at the immediately post-intervention moment. There were no differences in behavior between the CWI intervention groups for the outcomes studied.

  13. Post-wildfire recovery of riparian vegetation during a period of water scarcity in the southwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Max Smith; Deborah M. Finch; Christian Gunning; Roy Jemison; Jeffrey F. Kelly

    2009-01-01

    Wildland fires occur with increasing frequency in southwestern riparian forests, yet little is known about the effects of fire on populations of native and exotic vegetation. From 2003 to 2006, we monitored recovering woody vegetation in wildfire sites in the bosque (riparian forest) along the Middle Rio Grande of central New Mexico, USA. To examine recovery potential...

  14. Amphiphilic copolymers based on PEG-acrylate as surface active water viscosifiers : Towards new potential systems for enhanced oil recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raffa, Patrizio; Broekhuis, Antonius A.; Picchioni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    With the purpose of investigating new potential candidates for enhanced oil recovery (EOR), amphiphilic copolymers based on Poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (PEGA) have been prepared by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP). A P(PEGA) homopolymer, a block copolymer with styrene

  15. Modeling Lake Turkana Hydrology: Evaluating the potential hydrological impact of Gibe III reservoir on the Lake Turkana water levels using multi-source satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpuri, N.; Senay, G. B.

    2012-12-01

    Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies >80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana, Kenya. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa (height of 241 m) with a storage capacity of 14.5 billion m3. Arguably, this is one of the most controversial hydro-power projects in the region because the nature of interactions and potential impacts of the dam regulated flows on Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in situ hydrological datasets. In this research, we used a calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account 12 years (1998-2009) of satellite rainfall, model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model was used to evaluate the impact of the Gibe III dam using three different simple but robust approaches - a historical approach; a rainfall based sampling approach; and a non-parametric bootstrap resampling approach to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. Modelling results indicate that, on average, the reservoir would take up to 8-10 months to reach minimum operation level of 201 m (initial impoundment period). During this period, the dam would regulate the lake inflows up to 50% and as a result the lake level would drop up to 2 m. However, after the initial impoundment period, due to releases from the dam, the rate of lake inflows would be around 10 m3/s less when compared to the rate without Gibe III (650 m3/s). Due to this, the lake levels will decline on average 1.5 m (3 m). Over the entire modeling period including the initial period of impoundment, the average rate of lake inflows due to Gibe III dam was estimated to be 500 m3/s. Results indicated that dam would also moderate the seasonal fluctuations in the lake. Areas along the Lake Turkana shoreline that are vulnerable to

  16. Experimental Study and Performance Investigation of Miscible Water-Alternating-CO2 Flooding for Enhancing Oil Recovery in the Sarvak Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimi Vahid

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This experimental study is aimed at evaluating the performance of the miscible Water-Alternating-CO2 (CO2-WAG flooding as a function of slug size and WAG ratio based on the ultimate oil recovery in the Sarvak formation. In this research, initially the slim-tube apparatus was used to determine the Minimum Miscibility Pressure (MMP of the Sarvak heavy oil and CO2 at the constant reservoir temperature. Then, a total of seven core flooding experiments were performed by using the sandstone core samples collected from the Sarvak formation. These experiments were conducted through respective water flooding, miscible continuous CO2 flooding, and miscible CO2-WAG flooding. In the miscible CO2-WAG flooding, different WAG slug sizes of 0.15, 0.25, and 0.50 Pore Volume (PV and different WAG ratios of 1:1, 2:1, and 1:2 were applied to investigate their effects on the oil Recovery Factor (RF in the Sarvak formation. The results showed that, in general, the miscible CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery (CO2-EOR process is capable of mobilizing the heavy oil and achieving a high and significant oil RF in the Sarvak formation. The miscible CO2-WAG flooding has the highest oil RF (84.3% in comparison with water flooding (37.7%, and miscible continuous CO2 flooding (61.5%. In addition, using a smaller WAG slug size for miscible CO2-WAG flooding leads to a higher oil RF. The optimum WAG ratio of the miscible CO2-WAG flooding for the Sarvak formation is approximately 2:1. The results also demonstrated that, more than 50% of the heavy oil is produced in the first two cycles of the miscible CO2-WAG flooding. The optimum miscible CO2-WAG flooding has a much less CO2 consumption than the miscible continuous CO2 flooding.

  17. Column solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese(II) and iron(III) ions in water, food and biological samples using 3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid on synthesized graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza; Sehat, Ali Akbari; Arabieh, Masoud; Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Hosseini, Majid Haji; Rezaee, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    A modified, selective, highly sensitive and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of manganese and iron ions is established in the presented work. 3-(1-Methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (MPPC) and graphene oxide (GO) were used in a glass column as chelating reagent and as adsorbent respectively prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The adsorption mechanism of titled metals complexes on GO was investigated by using computational chemistry approach based on PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface (PES). The effect of some parameters including pH, flow rate and volume of sample and type, volume and concentration of eluent, as well as the adsorption capacity of matrix ions on the recovery of Mn(II) and Fe(III) was investigated. The limit of detection was 145 and 162 ng L(-1) for Mn(II) and Fe(III), respectively. Calibration was linear over the range of 0.31-355 μg L(-1) for Mn(II) and 0.34-380 μg L(-1) for Fe(III) ions. The method was successfully applied for the determination of understudied ions in water, food and biological samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An Environmental Analysis of the Effect of Energy Saving, Production and Recovery Measures on Water Supply Systems under Scarcity Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Puleo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Water is one of the primary resources provided for maintaining quality of life and social status in urban areas. As potable water is considered to be a primary need, water service has usually been managed without examining the economic and environmental sustainability of supply processes. Currently, due to increases in energy costs and the growth of environment preservation policies, reducing water leakage, energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG production have become primary objectives in reducing the environmental footprint of water service. The present paper suggests the implementation of some performance indicators that show the interdependence of water loss, energy consumption and GHG emission. These indicators are used to compare a few possible mitigation scenarios involving water loss reduction and increasing the system’s energy efficiency. The proposed indicators were applied to a complex urban water supply system serving the city of Palermo (Italy.

  19. Effects of cold water immersion on the recovery of physical performance and muscle damage following a one-off soccer match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascensão, António; Leite, Marco; Rebelo, António N; Magalhäes, Sérgio; Magalhäes, José

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a single session of cold or thermoneutral water immersion after a one-off match on muscular dysfunction and damage in soccer players. Twenty-male soccer players completed one match and were randomly divided into cryotherapy (10 min cold water immersion, 10°C, n = 10) and thermoneutral (10 min thermoneutral water immersion, 35°C, n = 10) groups. Muscle damage (creatine kinase, myoglobin), inflammation (C-reactive protein), neuromuscular function (jump and sprint abilities and maximal isometric quadriceps strength), and delayed-onset muscle soreness were evaluated before, within 30 min of the end, and 24 and 48 h after the match. After the match, the players in both groups showed increased plasma creatine kinase activity (30 min, 24 h, 48 h), myoglobin (30 min) and C-reactive protein (30 min, 24 h) concentrations. Peak jump ability and maximal strength were decreased and delayed-onset muscle soreness increased in both groups. However, differential alterations were observed between thermoneutral water and cold water immersion groups in creatine kinase (30 min, 24 h, 48 h), myoglobin (30 min), C-reactive protein (30 min, 24 h, 48 h), quadriceps strength (24 h), and quadriceps (24 h), calf (24 h) and adductor (30 min) delayed-onset muscle soreness. The results suggest that cold water immersion immediately after a one-off soccer match reduces muscle damage and discomfort, possibly contributing to a faster recovery of neuromuscular function.

  20. Energy Recovery from Wastewater Treatment Plants in the United States: A Case Study of the Energy-Water Nexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlynn S. Stillwell

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript uses data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to analyze the potential for energy recovery from wastewater treatment plants via anaerobic digestion with biogas utilization and biosolids incineration with electricity generation. These energy recovery strategies could help offset the electricity consumption of the wastewater sector and represent possible areas for sustainable energy policy implementation. We estimate that anaerobic digestion could save 628 to 4,940 million kWh annually in the United States. In Texas, anaerobic digestion could save 40.2 to 460 million kWh annually and biosolids incineration could save 51.9 to 1,030 million kWh annually.

  1. Speciation of citric acid on anatase (TiO{sub 2})-water interface and its effect on Eu(III) sorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasar, Sharayu; Kumar, Sumit; Raut, Vaibhavi Vishwajeet; Jeyakumar, Subbiah; Tomar, Bhupendra Singh [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radioanalytical Chemistry Div.

    2015-06-01

    Citric acid is one of the low molecular weight organic acids which are ubiquitous in nature. In this study the sorption of citric acid at titania (anatase)/water interface was investigated using batch adsorption experiment and attenuated total reflectance - Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) over wide experimental conditions of pH, surface loading and ionic strengths. The batch adsorption experiment showed typical anionic characteristics; higher sorption was observed at lower pH values and sorption decreases with increasing pH. Strong dependence of sorption on ionic strength shows formation of citrate surface species in outer-sphere binding mode. At lower pH, ATR-FTIR spectra of aqueous citrate differs from that of sorbed citrate ions indicating lowering of pK{sub a} values of surface sorbed citrate compared to that present in solution. Detailed analysis of FTIR spectra of sorbed citrate in light of that of aqueous and Ca(II)/Eu(III) complexed citrate revealed formation of an inner sphere complex of citrate on anatase surface along with the outer sphere complex. Wavenumber difference between the asymmetric and symmetric COO{sup -} peaks (Δ = 159 cm{sup -1}) implies inner-sphere complex in bidentate bridging mode. These results help in explaining the sorption behaviour of Eu(III) on anatase in presence of citric acid.

  2. Diaqua[5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-chlorophenylporphyrinato-κ4N]iron(III trifluoromethanesulfonate–4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde–water (1/1/2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Ben Haj Hassen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [Fe(C44H24Cl4N4(H2O2](SO3CF3·C8H8O3·2H2O, the FeIII cation is chelated by the four N atoms of the deprotonated tetrakis(4-chlorotetraphenylporphyrin (TClPP and further coordinated by two water molecules in a distorted octahedral geometry. In the crystal, the cations, anions, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde and water molecules of crystallization are linked by classical O—H...O hydrogen bonds and weak C—H...O and C—H...Cl hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. The crystal packing is further stabilized by weak C—H...π interactions involving pyrrole and benzene rings. π–π stacking between parallel benzene rings of adjacent 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde molecules is also observed, the centroid–centroid distance being 3.8003 (13 Å. The three F atoms of the anion are disordered over two sets of sites, with a refined occupancy ratio 0.527 (12:0.473 (12. The O atom of one water molecule of crystallization is also disordered over two positions in an occupancy ratio of 0.68 (5:0.32 (5.

  3. Applications of advanced petroleum production technology and water alternating gas injection for enhanced oil recovery - Mattoon Oil Field, Illinois. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroni, M. [American Oil Recovery, Inc., Decatur, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Phase I results of a C0{sub 2}-assisted oil recovery demonstration project in selected Cypress Sandstone reservoirs at Mattoon Field, Illinois are reported. The design and scope of this project included C0{sub 2} injectvity testing in the Pinnell and Sawyer units, well stimulaton treatments with C0{sub 2} in the Strong unit and infill well drilling, completion and oil production. The field activities were supported by extensive C0{sub 2}-oil-water coreflood experiments, CO{sub 2} oil-phase interaction experiments, and integrated geologic modeling and reservoir simulations. The progress of the project was made public through presentations at an industry meeting and a DOEs contractors` symposium, through quarterly reports and one-to-one consultations with interested operators. Phase II of this project was not implemented. It would have been a water-alternating-gas (WAG) project of longer duration.

  4. Survey of fish impingement at power plants in the United States. Volume III. Estuaries and coastal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stupka, Richard C.; Sharma, Rajendra K.

    1977-03-01

    Impingement of fish at cooling-water intakes of 32 power plants, located on estuaries and coastal waters has been surveyed and data are presented. Descriptions of site, plant, and intake design and operation are provided. Reports in this volume summarize impingement data for individual plants in tabular and histogram formats. Information was available from differing sources such as the utilities themselves, public documents, regulatory agencies, and others. Thus, the extent of detail in the reports varies greatly from plant to plant. Histogram preparation involved an extrapolation procedure that has inadequacies. The reader is cautioned in the use of information presented in this volume to determine intake-design acceptability or intensity of impacts on ecosystems. No conclusions are presented herein; data comparisons are made in Volume IV.

  5. RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes the progress of 13 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1988. There are 16 individual hazardous waste facilities covered by the 13 ground-water monitoring projects. The Grout Treatment Facility is included in this series of quarterly reports for the first time. The 13 projects discussed in this report were designed according to applicable interim-status ground-water monitoring requirements specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). During this quarter, field activities primarily consisted of sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes sediment analyses in addition to ground-water monitoring results. Twelve new wells were installed during the previous quarter: two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, six at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells include drillers' logs and other drilling and site characterization data, and are provided in Volume 2 or on microfiche in the back of Volume 1. 26 refs., 28 figs., 74 tabs.

  6. Fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery as a potential problem for the WIPP: Proceedings of a June 1995 workshop and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.K.

    1996-08-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a facility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), designed and constructed for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) defense waste. The repository is sited in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin, at a depth of 655 meters, in the salt beds of the Salado Formation. The WIPP is surrounded by reserves and production of potash, crude oil and natural gas. In selecting a repository site, concerns about extensive oil field development eliminated the Mescalero Plains site in Chaves County and concerns about future waterflooding in nearby oil fields helped eliminate the Alternate II site in Lea County. Ultimately, the Los Medanos site in Eddy County was selected, relying in part on the conclusion that there were no oil reserves at the site. For oil field operations, the problem of water migrating from the injection zone, through other formations such as the Salado, and onto adjacent property has long been recognized. In 1980, the DOE intended to prohibit secondary recovery by waterflooding in one mile buffer surrounding the WIPP Site. However, the DOE relinquished the right to restrict waterflooding based on a natural resources report which maintained that there was a minimal amount of crude oil likely to exist at the WIPP site, hence waterflooding adjacent to the WIPP would be unlikely. This document presents the workshop presentations and analyses for the fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery utilizing fluid injection and their potential effects on the WIPP facility.

  7. The comparison of cold-water immersion and cold air therapy on maximal cycling performance and recovery markers following strength exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayter, Kane J; Doma, Kenji; Schumann, Moritz; Deakin, Glen B

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of cold-water immersion (CWI) and cold air therapy (CAT) on maximal cycling performance (i.e. anaerobic power) and markers of muscle damage following a strength training session. Twenty endurance-trained but strength-untrained male (n = 10) and female (n = 10) participants were randomised into either: CWI (15 min in 14 °C water to iliac crest) or CAT (15 min in 14 °C air) immediately following strength training (i.e. 3 sets of leg press, leg extensions and leg curls at 6 repetition maximum, respectively). Creatine kinase, muscle soreness and fatigue, isometric knee extensor and flexor torque and cycling anaerobic power were measured prior to, immediately after and at 24 (T24), 48 (T48) and 72 (T72) h post-strength exercises. No significant differences were found between treatments for any of the measured variables (p > 0.05). However, trends suggested recovery was greater in CWI than CAT for cycling anaerobic power at T24 (10% ± 2%, ES = 0.90), T48 (8% ± 2%, ES = 0.64) and T72 (8% ± 7%, ES = 0.76). The findings suggest the combination of hydrostatic pressure and cold temperature may be favourable for recovery from strength training rather than cold temperature alone.

  8. Development of novel polysulfone membranes with embedded zirconium sulfate-surfactant micelle mesostructure for phosphate recovery from water through membrane filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Kenji; Hafuka, Akira; Kuroiwa, Miho; Satoh, Hisashi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamura, Hiroshi

    2017-11-01

    We prepared novel membranes that could adsorb phosphate from water through membrane filtration for use in a phosphate recovery system. Zirconium sulfate surfactant micelle mesostructure (ZS), which was the phosphate adsorbent, was embedded in a polysulfone matrix and flat sheet ultrafiltration membranes were made by nonsolvent induced phase separation. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the ZS particles existed on both the top surface and in the internal surface of the membrane. Increases in ZS content led to greater pure water flux because of increases in the surface porosity ratio. The amount of phosphate adsorbed on the membrane made from the polymer solution containing 10.5 wt% ZS was 0.071 mg P/cm(2) (64.8 mg P/g-ZS) during filtration of 50 mg P/L synthetic phosphate solution. The membrane could be repeatedly used for phosphate recovery after regeneration by filtration of 0.1 M NaOH solution to desorb the phosphate. We applied the membrane to treat the effluent from an anaerobic membrane bioreactor as a real sample and successfully recovered phosphate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Integrating microbial fuel cells with anaerobic acidification and forward osmosis membrane for enhancing bio-electricity and water recovery from low-strength wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinmeng; Wang, Xinhua; Wang, Zhiwei; Lu, Yuqin; Li, Xiufen; Ren, Yueping

    2017-03-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and forward osmosis (FO) are two emerging technologies with great potential for energy-efficient wastewater treatment. In this study, anaerobic acidification and FO membrane were simultaneously integrated into an air-cathode MFC (AAFO-MFC) for enhancing bio-electricity and water recovery from low-strength wastewater. During a long-term operation of approximately 40 days, the AAFO-MFC system achieved a continuous and relatively stable power generation, and the maximum power density reached 4.38 W/m 3 . The higher bio-electricity production in the AAFO-MFC system was mainly due to the accumulation of ethanol resulted from anaerobic acidification process and the rejection of FO membrane. In addition, a proper salinity environment in the system controlled by the addition of MF membrane enhanced the electricity production. Furthermore, the AAFO-MFC system produced a high quality effluent, with the removal rates of organic matters and total phosphorus of more than 97%. However, the nitrogen removal was limited for the lower rejection of FO membrane. The combined biofouling and inorganic fouling were responsible for the lower water flux of FO membrane, and the Desulfuromonas sp. utilized the ethanol for bio-electricity production was observed in the anode. These results substantially improve the prospects for simultaneous wastewater treatment and energy recovery, and further studies are needed to optimize the system integration and operating parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimum Conditions for Microwave Assisted Extraction for Recovery of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Capacity from Macadamia (Macadamia tetraphylla Skin Waste Using Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Dailey

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop optimal microwave assisted extraction conditions for recovery of phenolic compounds and antioxidant properties from the macadamia skin, an abundant waste source from the macadamia industry. Water, a safe, accessible, and inexpensive solvent, was used as the extraction solvent and Response Surface Methodology (RSM was applied to design and analyse the conditions for microwave-assisted extraction (MAE. The results showed that RSM models were reliable for the prediction of extraction of phenolic compounds and antioxidant properties. Within the tested ranges, MAE radiation time and power, as well as the sample-to-solvent ratio, affected the extraction efficiency of phenolic compounds, flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, and antioxidant properties of the macadamia skin; however, the impact of these variables was varied. The optimal MAE conditions for maximum recovery of TPC, flavonoids, proanthocyanidins and antioxidant properties from the macadamia skin were MAE time of 4.5 min, power of 30% (360 W and sample-to-water ratio of 5 g/100 mL. Under these conditions, an extract could be prepared with TPC of 45 mg/g, flavonoids of 29 mg RUE/g of dried macadamia skin.

  11. The comparison of cold-water immersion and cold air therapy on maximal cycling performance and recovery markers following strength exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kane J. Hayter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of cold-water immersion (CWI and cold air therapy (CAT on maximal cycling performance (i.e. anaerobic power and markers of muscle damage following a strength training session. Twenty endurance-trained but strength-untrained male (n = 10 and female (n = 10 participants were randomised into either: CWI (15 min in 14 °C water to iliac crest or CAT (15 min in 14 °C air immediately following strength training (i.e. 3 sets of leg press, leg extensions and leg curls at 6 repetition maximum, respectively. Creatine kinase, muscle soreness and fatigue, isometric knee extensor and flexor torque and cycling anaerobic power were measured prior to, immediately after and at 24 (T24, 48 (T48 and 72 (T72 h post-strength exercises. No significant differences were found between treatments for any of the measured variables (p > 0.05. However, trends suggested recovery was greater in CWI than CAT for cycling anaerobic power at T24 (10% ± 2%, ES = 0.90, T48 (8% ± 2%, ES = 0.64 and T72 (8% ± 7%, ES = 0.76. The findings suggest the combination of hydrostatic pressure and cold temperature may be favourable for recovery from strength training rather than cold temperature alone.

  12. The use of continuous vs. intermittent cold water immersion as a recovery method in basketball players after training: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ureña, Braulio; Martínez-Guardado, Ismael; Crespo, Carmen; Timón, Rafael; Calleja-González, Julio; Ibañez, Sergio J; Olcina, Guillermo

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare two cold water immersion protocols, continuous or intermittent, on recovery in basketball players. Ten male basketball players (age: 14 ± 0.4 years, body mass: 65.4 ± 9.1 kg, height: 175 ± 7.3 cm, body fat %: 10.3 ± 4) were included in the study. After three 90-minute training sessions (avg. heart rate 158 ± 11.92, 156 ± 7.06 and 151 ± 10.44 bpm), participants were grouped into a continuous immersion (12 min at 12 ± 0.4°C) group, intermittent immersion (4 x 2 min immersion at 12 ± 0.4 °C + 1 min out of water) group and a control group (CG). Countermovement jump (CMJ), muscle pain and thigh volume were measured. Both cold water immersion protocols were effective in reducing the pain 24 and 48 hours after training compared with the CG (F (3.54) = 2.91, p = 0.016, η p 2  = .24). Concerning CMJ change, % differences occurred at 24 (Z = 11.04, p = 0.004) and 48 hours (Z = 14.01, p < 0.001) in comparison with the CG. Regarding the muscle volume, the statistical analysis did not report a significant interaction (F (3.54) = 2.42, p = 0.058). Both cold water immersion CWI protocols are effective in improving recovery in basketball players.

  13. Protein extraction into the bicontinuous microemulsion phase of a Water/SDS/pentanol/dodecane winsor-III system: Effect on nanostructure and protein conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Douglas G; Ye, Ran; Dunlap, Rachel N; Cuneo, Matthew J; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; O'Neill, Hugh M; Urban, Volker S

    2017-12-01

    Bicontinuous microemulsions (BμEs), consisting of water and oil nanodomains separated by surfactant monolayers of near-zero curvature, are potentially valuable systems for purification and delivery of biomolecules, for hosting multiphasic biochemical reactions, and as templating media for preparing nanomaterials. We formed Winsor-III systems by mixing aqueous protein and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solutions with dodecane and 1-pentanol (cosurfactant) to efficiently extract proteins into the middle (BμE) phase. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cytochrome c partitioned to the BμE phase at 64% and 81% efficiency, respectively, producing highly concentrated protein solutions (32 and 44gL -1 , respectively), through release of water and oil from the BμEs. Circular dichroism spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that BSA underwent minor secondary structural changes upon incorporation into BμEs, while the secondary structure of cytochrome c and pepsin underwent major changes. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) results show that proteins promoted an increase of the interfacial fluidity and surface area per volume for the BμE surfactant monolayers, and that each protein uniquely altered self-assembly in the Winsor-III systems. Cytochrome c partitioned via electrostatic attractions between SDS and the protein's positively-charged groups, residing near the surfactant head groups of BμE monolayers, where it decreased surfactant packing efficiency. BSA partitioned through formation of SDS-BSA complexes via hydrophobic and electrostatic attractive interactions. As the BSA-SDS ratio increased, complexes' partitioning favored BμEs over the oil excess phase due to the increased hydrophilicity of the complexes. This study demonstrates the potential utility of BμEs to purify proteins and prepare nanostructured fluids possessing high protein concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of brining on the corrosion of ZVI and its subsequent As(III/V) and Se(IV/VI) removal from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Xu, Hui; Shan, Chao; Jiang, Zhao; Pan, Bingcai

    2017-03-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) has been extensively applied in water remediation, and most of the ZVI materials employed in practical applications are iron scraps, which have usually been corroded to certain extent under different conditions. In this study, the effects of brining with six solutions (NaCl, Na2SO4, NaHCO3, Na2SiO3, NH4Cl, and NaH2PO4) on the corrosion of ZVI and its performance in the removal of As(III/V)/Se(IV/VI) were systematically investigated. All the studied solutions enhanced the corrosion of ZVI except for Na2SiO3, and the degrees of corrosion followed the order of NH4Cl > NaH2PO4 > Na2SO4 > NaCl > NaHCO3 > H2O > Na2SiO3. The corrosion products derived from ZVI were identified by SEM and XRD, and the dominant corrosion products varied with the type of brine solution. The positive correlation between the degree of ZVI corrosion and As(III/V)/Se(IV/VI) removal by the pre-corroded ZVI (pcZVI) was verified. In addition, As and Se removal by pcZVI was realized via a comprehensive process including adsorption and reduction, as further supported by the XPS analysis. We believe this study will shed new light upon the selection of iron materials pre-corroded under different saline conditions for practical water remediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Recovery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Disaster Debris Recovery Database (DDRD) promotes the proper recovery, recycling, and disposal of disaster debris for emergency responders at the federal,...

  16. Vertical-deformation, water-level, microgravity, geodetic, water-chemistry, and flow-rate data collected during injection, storage, and recovery tests at Lancaster, Antelope Valley, California, September 1995 through September 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Loren F.; Ikehara, Marti E.; Howle, James F.

    2001-01-01

    A series of freshwater injection, storage, and recovery tests were conducted from September 1995 through September 1998 to evaluate the feasibility of artificially recharging ground water in the Lancaster area of the Antelope Valley, California. The tests used two production wells at a well field located in the southern part of the city of Lancaster. Monitoring networks were established at or in the vicinity of the test site to measure vertical deformation of the aquifer system, water-level fluctuations, land-surface deformation, water chemistry, and injection well flow rates during water injection and recovery. Data presented in this report were collected from a dual extensometer; 10 piezometers; 1 barometer; 27 active or abandoned production wells; 31 gravity stations; 124 bench marks; 1 permanent and 1 temporary continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) station; 3 tiltmeters; and 2 electromagnetic flowmeters from September 1995 through September 1998. This report discusses the location and design of the monitoring networks and the methods used to collect and process the data, and presents the data in tables and graphs.

  17. Balloon Borne Soundings of Water Vapor, Ozone and Temperature in the Upper Tropospheric and Lower Stratosphere as Part of the Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voemel, Holger

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of our work was to provide in situ water vapor and ozone profiles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere as reference measurements for the validation of SAGE III water vapor and ozone retrievals. We used the NOAA/CMDL frost point hygrometer and ECC ozone sondes on small research balloons to provide continuous profiles between the surface and the mid stratosphere. The NOAA/CMDL frost point hygrometer is currently the only lightweight balloon borne instrument capable of measuring water vapor between the lower troposphere and middle stratosphere. The validation measurements were based in the arctic region of Scandinavia for northern hemisphere observations and in New Zealand for southern hemisphere observations and timed to coincide with overpasses of the SAGE III instrument. In addition to SAGE III validation we also tried to coordinate launches with other instruments and studied dehydration and transport processes in the Arctic stratospheric vortex.

  18. Comparison of oil removal in surfactant alternating gas with water alternating gas, water flooding and gas flooding in secondary oil recovery process

    OpenAIRE

    Salehi, Mehdi Mohammad; Safarzadeh, Mohammad Amin; Sahraei, Eghbal; Nejad, Seyyed Alireza Tabatabaei

    2014-01-01

    Growing oil prices coupled with large amounts of residual oil after operating common enhanced oil recovery methods has made using methods with higher operational cost economically feasible. Nitrogen is one of the gases used in both miscible and immiscible gas injection process in oil reservoir. In heterogeneous formations gas tends to breakthrough early in production wells due to overriding, fingering and channeling. Surfactant alternating gas (SAG) injection is one of the methods commonly us...

  19. Sulfonato-encapsulated bismuth(III) oxido-clusters from Bi2O3 in water under mild conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Philip C; Busse, Madleen; Junk, Peter C; Forsyth, Craig M; Peiris, Roshani

    2012-08-07

    Treatment of Bi(2)O(3) with the acids; S-(+)-10-camphorsulfonic, 2,4,6-mesitylenesulfonic and sulfamic, under sonication at room temperature in water for 2-4 h, results in the formation and subsequent crystallisation of polynuclear bismuth oxido-clusters; [Bi(18)O(12)(OH)(12)(O(3)S-Cam)(18)(H(2)O)(2)], [Bi(38)O(45)(O(3)S-Mes)(24)(H(2)O)(14)] and [Bi(6)O(4)(OH)(4)(O(3)SNH(2))(6)].

  20. Research on removing reservoir core water sensitivity using the method of ultrasound-chemical agent for enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenjun; Huang, Jiehao

    2018-04-01

    The phenomenon of water sensitivity often occurs in the oil reservoir core during the process of crude oil production, which seriously affects the efficiency of oil extraction. In recent years, near-well ultrasonic processing technology attaches more attention due to its safety and energy efficient. In this paper, the comparison of removing core water sensitivity by ultrasonic wave, chemical injection and ultrasound-chemical combination technique are investigated through experiments. Results show that: lower ultrasonic frequency and higher power can improve the efficiency of core water sensitivity removal; the effects of removing core water sensitivity under ultrasonic treatment get better with increase of core initial permeability; the effect of removing core water sensitivity using ultrasonic treatment won't get better over time. Ultrasonic treatment time should be controlled in a reasonable range; the effect of removing core water sensitivity using chemical agent alone is slightly better than that using ultrasonic treatment, however, chemical injection could be replaced by ultrasonic treatment for removing core water sensitivity from the viewpoint of oil reservoir protection and the sustainable development of oil field; ultrasound-chemical combination technique has the best effect for water sensitivity removal than using ultrasonic treatment or chemical injection alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Membrane fractionation of herring marinade for separation and recovery of fats, proteins, amino acids, salt, acetic acid and water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjerbæk Søtoft, Lene; Lizarazu, Juncal Martin; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz

    2015-01-01

    containing sugars, amino acids and smaller peptides and a NF permeate containing salt and acetic acid ready for reuse. 42% of the spent marinade is recovered to substitute fresh water and chemicals. The Waste water amount is reduced 62.5%. Proteins are concentrated 30 times, while amino acids and smaller...

  2. Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling and Water Recovery in Coal-Fired Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young Cho; Alexander Fridman

    2009-04-02

    The overall objective of the present work was to develop technologies to reduce freshwater consumption in a cooling tower of coal-based power plant so that one could significantly reduce the need of make-up water. The specific goal was to develop a scale prevention technology based an integrated system of physical water treatment (PWT) and a novel filtration method so that one could reduce the need for the water blowdown, which accounts approximately 30% of water loss in a cooling tower. The present study investigated if a pulsed spark discharge in water could be used to remove deposits from the filter membrane. The test setup included a circulating water loop and a pulsed power system. The present experiments used artificially hardened water with hardness of 1,000 mg/L of CaCO{sub 3} made from a mixture of calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) and sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in order to produce calcium carbonate deposits on the filter membrane. Spark discharge in water was found to produce strong shockwaves in water, and the efficiency of the spark discharge in cleaning filter surface was evaluated by measuring the pressure drop across the filter over time. Results showed that the pressure drop could be reduced to the value corresponding to the initial clean state and after that the filter could be maintained at the initial state almost indefinitely, confirming the validity of the present concept of pulsed spark discharge in water to clean dirty filter. The present study also investigated the effect of a plasma-assisted self-cleaning filter on the performance of physical water treatment (PWT) solenoid coil for the mitigation of mineral fouling in a concentric counterflow heat exchanger. The self-cleaning filter utilized shockwaves produced by pulse-spark discharges in water to continuously remove scale deposits from the surface of the filter, thus keeping the pressure drop across the filter at a relatively low value. Artificial hard water was used in the

  3. Evaluation of exposure conditions for the water-side corrosion test of a sodium heated steam generator evaporator model employing a duplex tube (2160 hours at critical heat flux - phase III SSGM tests). [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waszink, R.P.; Hwang, J.Y.; Efferding, L.E.

    1975-12-01

    This report describes the specialized corrosion test water steam loop, test procedures, test conditions, and test results. A complete water chemistry and thermal hydraulic performance history is given and evaluated for the Phase III test program. The movement of the dryout location and the heat flux variations in pre- and post-critical heat flux regions are documented and analyzed. On seven occasions during the course of the test program to date, the operating conditions drifted from the CHF reference Phase III operation in the dryout regime into the DNB regime. The corresponding corrosion mechanism experienced differing exposure conditions on these occasions. CHF sensitivity to this apparent drift behavior is evaluated.

  4. [Use of UV rays for the disinfection of water. III. UV sensitivity of Legionella pneumophila of different ages in cold and warm drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiny, H; Seidel, K; Rüden, H

    1989-05-01

    In drinking water the sensitivity of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 type Philadelphia and L. pneumophila serogroup 5 type Dallas were studied with a flowthrough u.v. light treatment apparatus. By washing purified cells from broth cultures were used as inoculum directly ( = young cultures) or kept 2-3 weeks in drinking water in the dark ( = old cultures). A decrease of 99,9999% was found after u.v. treatment by 19 mWs/cm2 for young cultures and by 15 mWs/cm2 for old cultures. Reductions of 99,9999% were obtained by 16 mWs/cm2 in cold drinking water (13-16 degrees C) and by 13 mWs/cm2 in warm drinking water (45-47 degrees C). L. pneumophila serogroup 1 and L. pneumophila serogroup 5 show a very similar susceptibility to u.v.-irradiation. Reductions of 99,9999% were obtained by 14 mWs/cm2 and 15 mWs/cm2, respectively. Thus L. pneumophila-suspensions proved to be more sensitive to u.v.-irradiation than E. coli oder E. faecium in earlier experiments.

  5. A novel plant-based-sea water culture media for in vitro cultivation and in situ recovery of the halophyte microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Y. Saleh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The plant-based-sea water culture medium is introduced to in vitro cultivation and in situ recovery of the microbiome of halophytes. The ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum was used, in the form of juice and/or dehydrated plant powder packed in teabags, to supplement the natural sea water. The resulting culture medium enjoys the combinations of plant materials as rich source of nutrients and sea water exercising the required salt stress. As such without any supplements, the culture medium was sufficient and efficient to support very good in vitro growth of halotolerant bacteria. It was also capable to recover their in situ culturable populations in the phyllosphere, ecto-rhizosphere and endo-rhizosphere of halophytes prevailing in Lake Mariout, Egypt. When related to the total bacterial numbers measured for Suaeda pruinosa roots by quantitative-PCR, the proposed culture medium increased culturability (15.3–19.5% compared to the conventional chemically-synthetic culture medium supplemented with (11.2% or without (3.8% NaCl. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, representative isolates of halotolerant bacteria prevailed on such culture medium were closely related to Bacillus spp., Halomonas spp., and Kocuria spp. Seed germination tests on 25–50% sea water agar indicated positive interaction of such bacterial isolates with the germination and seedlings’ growth of barley seeds.

  6. Experimental evaluation on the use of capillary tube and thermostatic expansion valve with heat recovery hot spot water heater in air source refrigeration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Azridjal; Mainil, Rahmat Iman; Mainil, Afdhal Kurniawan; Saputra, Eko

    2017-01-01

    The present experimental evaluation has been carried out to investigate the use of capillary tube (CT) and thermostatic expansion valve (TEV) with heat recovery hot spot water heater (HRHSWH) in air source compression refrigeration system. CT and TEV are the two basic types of refrigerant expansion devices that most frequently used in compression refrigeration system, but the identified about HRHSWH in extant literature are limited. The HRHSWH is modified from residential refrigeration system. The heat exchanger coil as HRHSWH was bonded with the compressor discharge pipe line as counter-flow heat exchanger, then insulated and placed them into transparent acrylic box. Water from storage tank with 50L capacity is pumped using circulation pump to the HRHSWH and heating the water in storage tank. The system performance of those two expansion devices in compression refrigeration system are evaluated and compared between with or without modified using HRHSWH. Results show that refrigeration system using TEV performs better performance than CT using HRHSWH compared to standard refrigeration system (without HRHSWH). The use of TEV device in HRHSWH causes a slight decrease in compressor power 0.0198 kW (4%), where the COP increases around 20% higher than the CT device. The finding indicates that the use of HRHSWH generates free hot water for TEV and CT with temperature around 54.06°C and 55.78°C, respectively. In general, HRHSWH give better perfomance than standar refrigeration system.

  7. Life-cycle impacts of shower water waste heat recovery: case study of an installation at a university sport facility in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Kenneth; She, Kaiming; Adeyeye, Kemi

    2017-10-18

    Recovering heat from waste water discharged from showers to preheat the incoming cold water has been promoted as a cost-effective, energy-efficient, and low-carbon design option which has been included in the UK's Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) for demonstrating compliance with the Building Regulation for dwellings. Incentivized by its carbon cost-effectiveness, waste water heat exchangers (WWHX) have been selected and incorporated in a newly constructed Sports Pavilion at the University of Brighton in the UK. This £2-m sports development serving several football fields was completed in August 2015 providing eight water- and energy-efficient shower rooms for students, staff, and external organizations. Six of the shower rooms are located on the ground floor and two on the first floor, each fitted with five or six thermostatically controlled shower units. Inline type of WWHX were installed, each consisted of a copper pipe section wound by an external coil of smaller copper pipe through which the cold water would be warmed before entering the shower mixers. Using the installation at Sport Pavilion as the case study, this research aims to evaluate the environmental and financial sustainability of a vertical waste heat recovery device, over a life cycle of 50 years, with comparison to the normal use of a PVC-u pipe. A heat transfer mathematical model representing the system has been developed to inform the development of the methodology for measuring the in-situ thermal performance of individual and multiple use of showers in each changing room. Adopting a system thinking modeling technique, a quasi-dynamic simulation computer model was established enabling the prediction of annual energy consumptions under different shower usage profiles. Data based on the process map and inventory of a functional unit of WWHX were applied to a proprietary assessment software to establish the relevant outputs for the life-cycle environmental impact assessment. Life-cycle cost

  8. Recovery of drinking water and by-products from gold mine effluents via alkali-bariumcalcium processing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wilsenach, J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage results from active as well as decommissioned mines in the gold mining and coal mining fields. This water is highly acidic, containing sulphate, iron, aluminium, heavy metals and some radioactivity. When discharged...

  9. Distribution (State Allotment) of Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Appropriation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The ARRA appropriation for the DWSRF program is $2,000,000,000. DWSRF allotments are based on percentages derived from the 2003 Drinking Water Infrastructure Needs...

  10. Water recovery from brines and salt-saturated solutions: operability and thermodynamic efficiency considerations for desalination technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review provides an overview of desalination technologies and discusses the thermodynamic efficiencies and operational issues associated with the various technologies particularly with regard to high salinity streams. When water is recovered from a saline source, a brine conc...

  11. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  12. Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project Probability/Coordination Study Resident Fish and Wildlife Impacts Phase III, 1996 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitzinger, Eric J. [Idaho Dept. of Fish and Game, Boise, ID (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Phase 3 began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River Basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transinontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased habitat for adult and juvenile white sturgeon and adult rainbow trout. But, the flows have failed to meet mean monthly flow recommendations for the past three years despite the addition of the flow augmentation releases. It is unlikely that the flow augmentation releases have had any significant long-term benefit for sturgeon and rainbow trout in the Snake River. Flow augmentation releases from the Boise and Payette rivers have in some years helped to meet or exceed minimum flow recommendations in these tributaries. The minimum flows would not have been reached without the flow augmentation releases. But, in some instances, the timing of the releases need to be adjusted in order to maximize benefits to resident fishes in the Boise and Payette rivers.

  13. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schamel, Steven; Deo, Milind; Deets, Mike

    2002-02-21

    The objective of the project is not just to commercially produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production volumes and costs.

  14. Water, Energy and Carbon Balance Research: Recovery Trajectories For Oil Sands Reclamation and Disturbed Watersheds in the Western Boreal Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, R. M.; Carey, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    The Oil Sand Region (OSR) of North-Central Alberta exists within the sub-humid Boreal Plains (BP) ecozone, with a slight long-term moisture deficit regime. Despite this deficit, the BP is comprised of productive wetland and mixed wood (aspen and conifer dominated) forests. Reclamation activities are now underway at a large number of surface mining operations in the OSR, where target ecosystems are identified, soil prescriptions placed and commercial forest species planted. Some watersheds have been created that now contain wetlands. However, recent work in the BP suggests that over time wetlands supply moisture for the productivity of upland forests. Thus, water use of reclaimed forests is going to be critical in determining the sustainability of these systems and adjacent wetlands, and whether in time, either will achieve some form of equivalent capability that will allow for certification by regulators. A critical component in the success of any reclamation is that sufficient water is available to support target ecosystems through the course of natural climate cycles in the region. Water Use Efficiency (WUE), which links photosynthesis (GEP) with water use (Evapotranspiration (ET)), provides a useful metric to compare ecosystems and evaluate their utilization of resources. In this study, 41 site years of total growing season water and carbon flux data over 8 sites (4 reclamation, 4 regeneration) were evaluated using eddy covariance micrometeorological towers. WUE shows clear discrimination among ecosystem types as aspen stands assimilate more carbon per unit weight of water than conifers. WUEs also change with time as ecosystems become more effective at transpiring water through plant pathways compared with bare-soil evaporation, which allows an assessment of ability to limit water loss without carbon uptake. In addition, clonal rooting systems allow aspen forests to recover quicker after disturbance than reclamation sites in terms of their WUE. For reclamation

  15. Photochemical behavior of carbon nanotubes in natural waters: reactive oxygen species production and effects on •OH generation by Suwannee River fulvic acid, nitrate, and Fe (III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Ya; Wang, Qi; Ferronato, Corinne; Yang, Xi; Chovelon, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-01

    The photochemical activities of three kinds of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated in the present study. Efficient procedures of dispersing the three kinds of carbon nanotubes in water were established, and the quantitative analysis methods were also developed by TOC-absorbance method. High pH value or low ionic strength of the colloidal solutions facilitated the dispersion of CNTs. The suspensions of three kinds of CNTs could generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and hydroxyl radical (•OH) under irradiation of simulated sunlight, while superoxide radical (O2 (•-)) was not detected. The steady-state concentrations of (1)O2 and •OH generated by these CNTs were also determined. The presence of CNTs in natural waters can affect the photochemical behavior of water constituents, such as nitrate, dissolved organic matter, and Fe(3+). Specifically, in nitrate solution, the presence of CNTs could inhibit the generation of •OH by nitrate through light screening effect, while the quenching effect of hydroxyl radicals by CNTs was not observed. Besides light screening effect, the three kinds of CNTs used in the experiments also have a strong inhibiting effect on the ability of DOM to produce •OH by binding to the active sites. Moreover, the adsorption of Fe(3+) on MWCNT-OH and MWCNT-COOH could lead to its inactivation of formation of •OH in acidic conditions. However, the presence of the three kinds of CNTs did not affect the ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) reaction of DOM-Fe (III) complex.

  16. Algorithm for Recovery of Integrated Water Vapor Content in the Atmosphere over Land Surfaces Based on Satellite Spectroradiometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisenko, S. A.

    2017-05-01

    An algorithm is proposed for making charts of the distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere based on multispectral images of the earth by the Ocean and Land Color Instrument (OLCI) on board of the European research satellite Sentinel-3. The algorithm is based on multiple regression fits of the spectral brightness coefficients at the upper boundary of the atmosphere, the geometric parameters of the satellite location (solar and viewing angles), and the total water vapor content in the atmosphere. A regression equation is derived from experimental data on the variation in the optical characteristics of the atmosphere and underlying surface, together with Monte-Carlo calculations of the radiative transfer characteristics. The equation includes the brightness coefficients in the near IR channels of the OLCI for the absorption bands of water vapor and oxygen, as well as for the transparency windows of the atmosphere. Together these make it possible to eliminate the effect of the reflection spectrum of the underlying surface and air pressure on the accuracy of the measurements. The algorithm is tested using data from a prototype OLCI, the medium resolution imaging spectrometer (MERIS). A sample chart of the distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere over Eastern Europe is constructed without using subsatellite data and digital models of the surface relief. The water vapor contents in the atmosphere determined using MERIS images and data provided by earthbound measurements with the aerosol robotic network (AERONET) are compared with a mean square deviation of 1.24 kg/m2.

  17. Comparison of the effects of aluminum and iron(III) salts on ultrafiltration membrane biofouling in drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Ma, Baiwen; Bai, Yaohui; Lan, Huachun; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2018-01-01

    Coagulation plays an important role in alleviating membrane fouling, and a noticeable problem is the development of microorganisms after long-time operation, which gradually secrete extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). To date, few studies have paid attention to the behavior of microorganisms in drinking water treatment with ultrafiltration (UF) membranes. Herein, the membrane biofouling was investigated with different aluminum and iron salts. We found that Al2(SO4)3·18H2O performed better in reducing membrane fouling due to the slower growth rate of microorganisms. In comparison to Al2(SO4)3·18H2O, more EPS were induced with Fe2(SO4)3·xH2O, both in the membrane tank and the sludge on the cake layer. We also found that bacteria were the major microorganisms, of which the concentration was much higher than those of fungi and archaea. Further analyses showed that Proteobacteria was dominant in bacterial communities, which caused severe membrane fouling by forming a biofilm, especially for Fe2(SO4)3·xH2O. Additionally, the abundances of Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia were relatively higher in the presence of Al2(SO4)3·18H2O, resulting in less severe biofouling by effectively degrading the protein and polysaccharide in EPS. As a result, in terms of microorganism behaviors, Al-based salts should be given preference as coagulants during actual operations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Behavior and Distribution of Heavy Metals Including Rare Earth Elements, Thorium, and Uranium in Sludge from Industry Water Treatment Plant and Recovery Method of Metals by Biosurfactants Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lidi; Kano, Naoki; Sato, Yuichi; Li, Chong; Zhang, Shuang; Imaizumi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the behavior, distribution, and characteristics of heavy metals including rare earth elements (REEs), thorium (Th), and uranium (U) in sludge, the total and fractional concentrations of these elements in sludge collected from an industry water treatment plant were determined and compared with those in natural soil. In addition, the removal/recovery process of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, and Ni) from the polluted sludge was studied with biosurfactant (saponin and sophorolipid) elution by batch and column experiments to evaluate the efficiency of biosurfactant for the removal of heavy metals. Consequently, the following matters have been largely clarified. (1) Heavy metallic elements in sludge have generally larger concentrations and exist as more unstable fraction than those in natural soil. (2) Nonionic saponin including carboxyl group is more efficient than sophorolipid for the removal of heavy metals in polluted sludge. Saponin has selectivity for the mobilization of heavy metals and mainly reacts with heavy metals in F3 (the fraction bound to carbonates) and F5 (the fraction bound to Fe-Mn oxides). (3) The recovery efficiency of heavy metals (Pb, Ni, and Cr) reached about 90–100% using a precipitation method with alkaline solution. PMID:22693485

  19. Development of Natural Gas Fired Combined Cycle Plant for Tri-Generation of Power, Cooling and Clean Water Using Waste Heat Recovery: Techno-Economic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowtham Mohan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tri-generation is one of the most efficient ways for maximizing the utilization of available energy. Utilization of waste heat (flue gases liberated by the Al-Hamra gas turbine power plant is analyzed in this research work for simultaneous production of: (a electricity by combining steam rankine cycle using heat recovery steam generator (HRSG; (b clean water by air gap membrane distillation (AGMD plant; and (c cooling by single stage vapor absorption chiller (VAC. The flue gases liberated from the gas turbine power cycle is the prime source of energy for the tri-generation system. The heat recovered from condenser of steam cycle and excess heat available at the flue gases are utilized to drive cooling and desalination cycles which are optimized based on the cooling energy demands of the villas. Economic and environmental benefits of the tri-generation system in terms of cost savings and reduction in carbon emissions were analyzed. Energy efficiency of about 82%–85% is achieved by the tri-generation system compared to 50%–52% for combined cycles. Normalized carbon dioxide emission per MW·h is reduced by 51.5% by implementation of waste heat recovery tri-generation system. The tri-generation system has a payback period of 1.38 years with cumulative net present value of $66 million over the project life time.

  20. Acid and base recovery from brine solution using PVP intermediate-based bipolar membrane through water splitting technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Krishnaveni; Murugappan, Minnoli; Dharmalingam, Sangeetha

    2017-07-01

    Potable water has become a scarce resource in many countries. In fact, the world is not running out of water, but rather, the relatively fixed quantity is becoming too contaminated for many applications. Hence, the present work was designed to evaluate the desalination efficiency of resin and glass fiber-reinforced Polysulfone polymer-based monopolar and bipolar (BPM) ion exchange membranes (with polyvinyl pyrrolidone as the intermediate layer) on a real sample brine solution for 8 h duration. The prepared ion exchange membranes (IEMs) were characterized using FTIR, SEM, TGA, water absorption, and contact angle measurements. The BPM efficiency, electrical conductivity, salinity, sodium, and chloride ion concentration were evaluated for both prepared and commercial-based IEM systems. The current efficiency and energy consumption values obtained during BPMED process were found to be 45 % and 0.41 Wh for RPSu-PVP-based IEM system and 38 % and 1.60 Wh for PSDVB-based IEM system, respectively.

  1. Luminescent Zn(II) Coordination Polymers for Highly Selective Sensing of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Tian-Yi; Dai, Ming; Young, David James; Ren, Zhi-Gang; Lang, Jian-Ping

    2017-04-17

    Three photoluminescent zinc coordination polymers (CPs), {[Zn2(tpeb)2(2,5-tdc)(2,5-Htdc)2]·2H2O}n (1), {[Zn2(tpeb)2(1,4-ndc)(1,4-Hndc)2]·2.6H2O}n (2), and {[Zn2(tpeb)2(2,3-ndc)2]·H2O}n (3) (tpeb = 1,3,5-tri-4-pyridyl-1,2-ethenylbenzene, 2,5-tdc = 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid, 1,4-ndc = 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid, and 2,3-ndc = 2,3-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid) were prepared from reactions of Zn(NO3)2·6H2O with tpeb and 2,5-H2tdc, 1,4-H2ndc, or 2,3-H2ndc under solvothermal conditions. Compound 1 has a two-dimensional (2D) grid-like network formed from bridging 1D [Zn(tpeb)]n chains via 2,5-tdc dianions. 2 and 3 possess similar one-dimensional (1D) double-chain structures derived from bridging the [Zn(tpeb)]n chains via pairs of 1,4-ndc or 2,3-ndc ligands. The solid-state, visible emission by 1-3 was quenched by Cr3+, CrO42-, and Cr2O72- ions in water with detection limits by the most responsive complex 3 of 0.88 ppb for Cr3+ and 2.623 ppb for Cr2O72- (pH = 3) or 1.734 ppb for CrO42- (pH = 12). These values are well below the permissible limits set by the USEPA and European Union and the lowest so far reported for any bi/trifunctional CPs sensors. The mechanism of Cr3+ luminescence quenching involves irreversible coordination to free pyridyl sites in the CP framework, while the Cr6+ quenching involves reversible overlap of the absorption bands of the analytes with those of the excitation and/or emission bands for 3.

  2. The Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative: III. A Round-Robin Comparison on In-Water Bio-Optical Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, Robert J.W.; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Muller, Dagmar; Brockmann, Carsten; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves; Devred, Emmanuel; Doerffer, Roland; Fomferra, Norman; Franz, Bryan; Grant, Mike;