WorldWideScience

Sample records for water reactor pressure

  1. Pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, S.H.

    1983-03-01

    An overview of the pressurized-water reactor (PWR) pressure boundary problems is presented. Specifically exempted will be discussions of problems with pumps, valves and steam generators on the basis that they will be covered in other papers. Pressure boundary reliability is examined in the context of real or perceived problems occurring over the past 5 to 6 years since the last IAEA Reliability Symposium. Issues explicitly covered will include the status of the pressurized thermal-shock problem, reliability of inservice inspections with emphasis on examination of the region immediately under the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) cladding, history of piping failures with emphasis on failure modes and mechanisms. Since nondestructive examination is the topic of one session, discussion will be limited to results rather than techniques

  2. The pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor technology has reached a maturity that has engendered a new surge of innovation, which in turn, has led to significant advances in the technology. These advances, characterized by bold thinking but conservative execution, are resulting in nuclear plant designs which offer significant performance and safety improvements. This paper describes the innovations which are being designed into mainstream PWR technology as well as the desings which are resulting from such innovations. (author)

  3. Pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Design and mode of operation of the main PWR components are described: reactor core, pressure vessel and internals, cooling systems with pumps and steam generators, ancillary systems, and waste processing. (TK) [de

  4. Pressurized water reactor flow arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; Knapp, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A flow path is provided for cooling the control rods of a pressurized water reactor. According to this scheme, a small amount of cooling water enters the control rod guide tubes from the top and passes downwards through the tubes before rejoining the main coolant flow and passing through the reactor core. (LL)

  5. Fundamentals of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, L.

    1982-01-01

    In many countries, the pressurized water reactor (PWR) is the most widely used, even though it requires enrichment of the uranium to about 3% in U-235 and the moderator-coolant must be maintained at a high pressure, about 2200 pounds per square inch. Our objective in this series of seven lectures is to describe the design and operating characteristics of the PWR system, discuss the reactor physics methods used to evaluate performance, examine the way fuel is consumed and produced, study the instrumentation system, review the physics measurements made during initial startup of the reactor, and outline the administrative aspects of starting up a reactor and operating it safely and effectively

  6. The European pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leny, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The present state of development of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) is outlined. During the so-called harmonization phase, the French and German utilities drew up their common requirements and evaluated the reactor concept developed until then with respect to these requirements. A main result of the harmonization phase was the issue, in September 1993, of the 'EPR Conceptual Safety Feature Review File' to be jointly assessed by the safety authorities in France and Germany. The safety objectives to be met by the EPR are specified in the second part of the paper, and some details of the primary and secondary side safety systems are given. (orig.) [de

  7. Pressurized water reactor inspection procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, D.; Mueller, G.; Otte, H.J.; Roth, W.

    1998-01-01

    Inspections of the reactor pressure vessels of pressurized water reactors (PWR) so far used to be carried out with different central mast manipulators. For technical reasons, parallel inspections of two manipulators alongside work on the refueling cavity, so as to reduce the time spent on the critical path in a revision outage, are not possible. Efforts made to minimize the inspection time required with one manipulator have been successful, but their effects are limited. Major reductions in inspection time can be achieved only if inspections are run with two manipulators in parallel. The decentralized manipulator built by GEC Alsthom Energie and so far emmployed in boiling water reactors in the USA, Spain, Switzerland and Japan allows two systems to be used in parallel, thus reducing the time required for standard inspection of a pressure vessel from some six days to three days. These savings of approximately three days are made possible without any compromises in terms of positioning by rail-bound systems. During inspection, the reactor refueling cavity is available for other revision work without any restrictions. The manipulator can be used equally well for inspecting standard PWR, PWR with a thermal shield, for inspecting the land between in-core instrumentation nozzles, BWR with and without jet pumps (complementary inspection), and for inspecting core support shrouds. (orig.) [de

  8. Pressurized water reactor with reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werres, L.

    1985-01-01

    The pressure vessel has a cylindrical jacket with a domed floor. A guide is arranged on the domed floor to even out the flow in the core. It consists of a cylindrical jacket, whose lower end has slots and fins. These fins are welded to the domed floor. (orig./PW)

  9. Pressurized water reactor with reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werres, L.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure vessel has a cylindrical jacket with a domed floor. A guide is arranged on the domed floor to even out the flow in the core. It consists of a cylindrical jacket, whose lower end has slots and fins. These fins are welded to the domed floor. (DG) [de

  10. Reactor vessel pressure transient protection for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zech, G.

    1978-09-01

    During the past few years the NRC has been studying the issue of protection of the reactor pressure vessels at Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) from transients when the vessels are at a relatively low temperature. This effort was prompted by concerns related to the safety margins available to vessel damage as a result of such events. Nuclear Reactor Regulation Category A Technical Activity No. A-26 was established to set forth the NRC plan for resolution of the generic aspects of this safety issue. The purpose of the report is to document the completion of this generic technical activity

  11. Supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest reactor concepts, single pass core and experimental findings in thermal hydraulics, materials, corrosion, and water chemistry. It highlights research on supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWRs), one of the Generation IV reactors that are studied around the world. This book includes cladding material development and experimental findings on heat transfer, corrosion and water chemistry. The work presented here will help readers to understand the fundamental elements of reactor design and analysis methods, thermal hydraulics, materials and water

  12. Functional systems of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, V.

    1982-01-01

    The main topics, discussed in the present paper, are: - Principle design of the reactor coolant system - reactor pressure vessel with internals - containment design - residual heat removal and emergency cooling systems - nuclear component cooling systems - emergency feed water systems - plant electric power supply system. (orig./RW)

  13. Reactor water spontaneous circulation structure in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazumi

    1998-01-01

    The gap between the inner wall of a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor and a reactor core shroud forms a down comer in which reactor water flows downwardly. A feedwater jacket to which feedwater at low temperature is supplied is disposed at the outer circumference of the pressure vessel just below a gas/water separator. The reactor water at the outer circumferential portion just below the air/water separator is cooled by the feedwater jacket, and the feedwater after cooling is supplied to the feedwater entrance disposed below the feedwater jacket by way of a feedwater introduction line to supply the feedwater to the lower portion of the down comer. This can cool the reactor water in the down comer to increase the reactor water density in the down comer thereby forming strong downward flows and promote the recycling of the reactor water as a whole. With such procedures, the reactor water can be recycled stably only by the difference of the specific gravity of the reactor water without using an internal pump. In addition, the increase of the height of the pressure vessel can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  14. Pressurized water reactor fuel rod design methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.T.; Esteves, A.M.

    1988-08-01

    The fuel performance program FRAPCON-1 and the structural finite element program SAP-IV are applied in a pressurized water reactor fuel rod design methodology. The applied calculation procedure allows to dimension the fuel rod components and characterize its internal pressure. (author) [pt

  15. Pressurized water reactor simulator. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 reactor department simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, the Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 21 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2002). Course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated of Canada (CTI) is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No.23 'Boiling Water Reactor Simulator' (2003). This report consists of course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor simulator

  16. Physics of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, A.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this lecture is to demonstrate typical problems and solutions encountered in the design and operation of PWR power plants. The examples selected for illustration refer to PWR's of KWU design and to results of KWU design methods. In order to understand the physics of a power reactor it is necessary to have some knowledge of the structure and design of the power plant system of which the reactor is a part. It is therefore assumed that the reader is familiar with the design of the more important components and systems of a PWR, such as fuel assemblies, control assemblies, core lay-out, reactor coolant system, instrumentation. (author)

  17. Pressurized water reactors: the EPR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Py, J.P.; Yvon, M.

    2007-01-01

    EPR (originally 'European pressurized water reactor', and now 'evolutionary power reactor') is a model of reactor initially jointly developed by French and German engineers which fulfills the particular safety specifications of both countries but also the European utility requirements jointly elaborated by the main European power companies under the initiative of Electricite de France (EdF). Today, two EPR-based reactors are under development: one is under construction in Finland and the other, Flamanville 3 (France), received its creation permit decree on April 10, 2007. This article presents, first, the main objectives of the EPR, and then, describes the Flamanville 3 reactor: reactor type and general conditions, core and conditions of operation, primary and secondary circuits with their components, main auxiliary and recovery systems, man-machine interface and instrumentation and control system, confinement and serious accidents, arrangement of buildings. (J.S.)

  18. Thermohydraulic analysis of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    The computer program PANTERA is applied in the thermo-hydraulic analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Cores (PWR). It is a version of COBRA-IIIC in which a new thermal conduction model for fuel rods was introduced. The results calculated by this program are compared with experimental data obtained from bundles of fuel rods, simulating reactor conditions. The validity of the new thermal model is checked too. The PANTERA code, through a simplified procedure of calculation, is used in the thermo-hydraulic analysis of Indian Point, Unit 2, reactor core, in stationary conditions. The results are discussed and compared with design data. (Autor) [pt

  19. Tritium issues in commercial pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.

    2008-01-01

    Tritium has become an important radionuclide in commercial Pressurized Water Reactors because of its mobility and tendency to concentrate in plant systems as tritiated water during the recycling of reactor coolant. Small quantities of tritium are released in routine regulated effluents as liquid water and as water vapor. Tritium has become a focus of attention at commercial nuclear power plants in recent years due to inadvertent, low-level, chronic releases arising from routine maintenance operations and from component failures. Tritium has been observed in groundwater in the vicinity of stations. The nuclear industry has undertaken strong proactive corrective measures to prevent recurrence, and continues to eliminate emission sources through its singular focus on public safety and environmental stewardship. This paper will discuss: production mechanisms for tritium, transport mechanisms from the reactor through plant, systems to the environment, examples of routine effluent releases, offsite doses, basic groundwater transport and geological issues, and recent nuclear industry environmental and legal ramifications. (authors)

  20. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, T; Grunwald, G

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of PWRs during cold water or boron dilution transients is strongly influenced by the distribution of coolant temperature and boron concentration at the core inlet. This distribution is the needed input to 3-dimensional neutron kinetics to calculate the power distribution in the core. It mainly depends on how the plugs of cold or unborated water formed in a single loop are mixed in the downcomer and in the lower plenum. To simulate such mixture phenomena requires the application of 3-dimensional CFD (computational fluid dynamics) codes. The results of the simulation have to be validated against mixture experiments at scaled facilities. Therefore, in the framework of a research project funded by BMBF, the institute creates a 1:5 mixture facility representing first the geometry of a German pressurized water reactor and later the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) geometry. The calculations are based on the CFD Code CFX-4. (orig.)

  1. Pressurized water reactor with a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werres, L.

    1979-01-01

    The core barrel is suspended from a flange by means of a grid. The coolant enters the barrel from below through the grid. In order to get a uniform flow over the reactor core there is provided for a guiding device below the grid. It consists of a cylindrical shell with borings uniformly distributed around the shell as well as fins on the inner surface of the shell and slots at the bottom facing the pressure vessel. (GL) [de

  2. Pumps for German pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dernedde, R.

    1984-01-01

    The article describes the development of a selection of pumps which are used in the primary coolant system and the high-pressure safety injection system and feed water system during the past 2 decades. The modifications were caused by the step-wise increasing power output of the plants from 300 MW up to 1300 MW. Additional important influences were given be the increased requirements for quality assurance and final-documentation. The good operating results of the delivered pumps proved that the reliability is independent of the volume of the software-package. The outlook expects that consolidation will be followed by additional steps for the order processing of components for the convoy pumps. KW: main coolant pump; primary system; boiler feed pump; reactor pump; secondary system; barrel insert pump; pressure water reactor; convoy pump; state of the art.

  3. Integral Pressurized Water Reactor Simulator Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication provides detailed explanations of the theoretical concepts that the simulator users have to know to gain a comprehensive understanding of the physics and technology of integral pressurized water reactors. It provides explanations of each of the simulator screens and various controls that a user can monitor and modify. A complete description of all the simulator features is also provided. A detailed set of exercises is provided in the Exercise Handbook accompanying this publication.

  4. Reactor Safety Commission Code of Practice for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Commission of the Federal German Republic has summarized in the form of Official Guidelines the safety requirements which, in the Commission's view, have to be met in the design, construction and operation of a nuclear power station equipped with a pressurized water reactor. The Third Edition of the RSK Guidelines for pressurized water reactors dated 14.10.81. is a revised and expanded version of the Second Edition dated 24.1.79. The Reactor Safety Commission will with effect from October 1981 use these Guidelines in consultations on the siting of and safety concept for the installation approval of future pressurized water reactors and will assess these nuclear power stations during their erection in the light of these Guidelines. They have not however been immediately conceived for the adaptation of existing nuclear power stations, whether under construction or in operation. The scope of application of these Guidelines to such nuclear power stations will have to be examined for each individual case. The main aim of the Guidelines is to simplify the consultation process within the reactor Safety Commission and to provide early advice on the safety requirements considered necessary by the Commission. (author)

  5. The safety of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panossian, J.; Tanguy, P.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present a review of the status of the safety level of modern pressurized water reactors, that is to say those that meet the safety criteria accepted today by the international nuclear community. We will mainly rely on the operating experience and the Probabilistic Safety Assessments concerning French reactors. We will not back over the basic safety concepts of these reactors, which are well known. We begin with a brief review of some of the lessons learned from the two main accidents discussed in the present meeting. Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, without entering into details presented in previous papers. The presentation ends with a rather lengthy conclusion, aimed more at those not directly involved in the technical details of nuclear safety matters

  6. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  7. Startup and commissioning of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, L.J.; Gilbert, C.F.

    1983-05-01

    A critical phase of plant development is the test, startup, and commissioning period. The effort expended prior to commissioning has a definite effect on the reliability and continuing availability of the plant during its life. This paper describes a test, startup, and commissioning program for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant. This program commences with the completion of construction and continues through the turnover of equipment/systems to the owner's startup/ commissioning group. The paper addresses the organization of the test/startup group, planning and scheduling, test procedures and initial testing, staffing and certification of the test group, training of operators, and turnover to the owner

  8. Status of advanced small pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Peipei; Zhou Yun

    2012-01-01

    In order to expand the nuclear power in energy and desalination, increase competitiveness in global nuclear power market, many developed countries with strong nuclear energy technology have realized the importance of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) and initiated heavy R and D programs in SMR. The Advanced Small Pressurized Water Reactor (ASPWR) is characterized by great advantages in safety and economy and can be used in remote power grid and replace mid/small size fossil plant economically. This paper reviews the history and current status of SMR and ASPWR, and also discusses the design concept, safety features and other advantages of ASPWR. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overall review of ASPWR technology in western countries, and to promote the R and D in ASPWR in China. (authors)

  9. Cooling of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curet, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    The improvement of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels comprising flow dividers providing separate and distinct passages for the flow of core coolant water from each coolant water inlet, the flow dividers being vertically disposed in the annular flow areas provided by the walls of the vessel, the thermal shield (if present), and the core barrel is described. In the event of rupture of one of the coolant water inlet lines, water, especially emergency core coolant water, in the intact lines is thus prevented from by-passing the core by circumferential flow around the outermost surface of the core barrel and is instead directed so as to flow vertically downward through the annulus area between the vessel wall and the core barrel in a more normal manner to increase the probability of cooling of the core by the available cooling water in the lower plenum, thus preventing or delaying thermal damage to the core, and providing time for other appropriate remedial or damage preventing action by the operator

  10. Pressurized-water-reactor station blackout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbe, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program was to investigate accident scenarios beyond the design basis. The primary objective of SASA was to analyze nuclear plant transients that could lead to partial or total core melt and evaluate potential mitigating actions. The following summarizes the pressurized water reactor (PWR) SASA effort at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is presently evaluating Unresolved Safety Issue A-44 - Station Blackout from initiation of the transient to core uncovery. The balance of the analysis from core uncovery until fission product release is being performed at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The current analyses involve the Bellefonte Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS), a Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) 205 Fuel Assembly (205-FA) raised loop design to be operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority

  11. Operator Support System for Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Renjie; Shen Shifei

    1996-01-01

    Operator Support System for Pressurized Water Reactor (OSSPWR) has been developed under the sponsorship of IAEA from August 1994. The project is being carried out by the Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. The Design concepts of the operator support functions have been established. The prototype systems of OSSPWR has been developed as well. The primary goal of the project is to create an advanced operator support system by applying new technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, advanced communication technologies, etc. Recently, the advanced man-machine interface for nuclear power plant operators has been developed. It is connected to the modern computer systems and utilizes new high performance graphic displays. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  12. EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor) The advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear energy, which provides a steady supply of electricity at low cost, has its rightful place in the energy mix of the 21. century, which puts the emphasis on sustainable development. The EPR is the only 3. generation reactor under construction today. It is an evolutionary reactor that represents a new generation of pressurized water reactors with no break in the technology used for the most recent models. The EPR was developed by Framatome and Siemens, whose nuclear activities were combined in January 2001 to form Framatome ANP, a subsidiary of AREVA and Siemens. EDF and the major German electricity companies played an active part in the project. The safety authorities of the two countries joined forces to bring their respective safety standards into line and draw up joint design rules for the new reactor. The project had three objectives: meet the requirements of European utilities, comply with the safety standards laid down by the French safety authority for future pressurized water reactors, in concert with its German counterpart, and make nuclear energy even more competitive than energy generated using fossil fuels. The EPR can guarantee a safe, inexpensive electricity supply, without adding to the greenhouse effect. It meets the requirements of the safety authorities and lives up to the expectations of electricity utilities. This document presents the main characteristics of the EPR, and in particular the additional measures to prevent the occurrence of events likely to damage the core, the leak-tight containment, the measures to reduce the exposure of operating and maintenance personnel, the solutions for an even greater protection of the environment. The foreseen development of the EPR in France and abroad (Finland, China, the United States) is summarized

  13. Computerized cost model for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneely, T.K.; Tabata, Hiroaki; Labourey, P.

    1999-01-01

    A computerized cost model has been developed in order to allow utility users to improve their familiarity with pressurized water reactor overnight capital costs and the various factors which influence them. This model organizes its cost data in the standard format of the Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB), and encapsulates simplified relationships between physical plant design information and capital cost information in a computer code. Model calculations are initiated from a base case, which was established using traditional cost calculation techniques. The user enters a set of plant design parameters, selected to allow consideration of plant models throughout the typical three- and four-loop PWR power range, and for plant sites in Japan, Europe, and the United States. Calculation of the new capital cost is then performed in a very brief time. The presentation of the program's output allows comparison of various cases with each other or with separately calculated baseline data. The user can start at a high level summary, and by selecting values of interest on a display grid show progressively more and more detailed information, including links to background information such as individual cost driver accounts and physical plant variables for each case. Graphical presentation of the comparison summaries is provided, and the numerical results may be exported to a spreadsheet for further processing. (author)

  14. Pressurized water-reactor feedwater piping response to water hammer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, D.

    1978-03-01

    The nuclear power industry is interested in steam-generator water hammer because it has damaged the piping and components at pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Water hammer arises when rapid steam condensation in the steam-generator feedwater inlet of a PWR causes depressurization, water-slug acceleration, and slug impact at the nearest pipe elbow. The resulting pressure pulse causes the pipe system to shake, sometimes violently. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential structural effects of steam-generator water hammer on feedwater piping. This was accomplished by finite-element computation of the response of two sections of a typical feedwater pipe system to four representative water-hammer pulses. All four pulses produced high shear and bending stresses in both sections of pipe. Maximum calculated pipe stresses varied because the sections had different characteristics and were sensitive to boundary-condition modeling

  15. Water hammer characteristics of integral pressurized water reactor primary loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Qiaolin; Qiu, Suizheng; Lu, Wei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui; Xiao, Zejun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Water hammer models developed for IPWR primary loop using MOC. • Good agreement between the developed code and the experiment. • The good agreement between WAHAP and Flowmaster can validate the equations in WAHAP. • The primary loop of IPWR suffers from slight water hammer impact. -- Abstract: The present work discussed the single-phase water hammer phenomenon, which was caused by the four-pump-alternate startup in an integral pressurized water reactor (IPWR). A new code named water hammer program (WAHAP) was developed independently based on the method of characteristic to simulate hydraulic transients in the primary system of IPWR and its components such as reactor core, once-through steam generators (OTSG), the main coolant pumps and so on. Experimental validation for the correctness of the equations and models in WAHAP was carried out and the models fit the experimental data well. Some important variables were monitored including transient volume flow rates, opening angle of valve disc and pressure drop in valves. The water hammer commercial software Flowmaster V7 was also employed to compare with WAHAP and the good agreement can validate the equations in WAHAP. The transient results indicated that the primary loop of IPWR suffers from slight water hammer impact under pump switching conditions

  16. Water hammer characteristics of integral pressurized water reactor primary loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Qiaolin [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shanxi 710049 (China); Qiu, Suizheng, E-mail: szqiu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shanxi 710049 (China); Lu, Wei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shanxi 710049 (China); Xiao, Zejun [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • Water hammer models developed for IPWR primary loop using MOC. • Good agreement between the developed code and the experiment. • The good agreement between WAHAP and Flowmaster can validate the equations in WAHAP. • The primary loop of IPWR suffers from slight water hammer impact. -- Abstract: The present work discussed the single-phase water hammer phenomenon, which was caused by the four-pump-alternate startup in an integral pressurized water reactor (IPWR). A new code named water hammer program (WAHAP) was developed independently based on the method of characteristic to simulate hydraulic transients in the primary system of IPWR and its components such as reactor core, once-through steam generators (OTSG), the main coolant pumps and so on. Experimental validation for the correctness of the equations and models in WAHAP was carried out and the models fit the experimental data well. Some important variables were monitored including transient volume flow rates, opening angle of valve disc and pressure drop in valves. The water hammer commercial software Flowmaster V7 was also employed to compare with WAHAP and the good agreement can validate the equations in WAHAP. The transient results indicated that the primary loop of IPWR suffers from slight water hammer impact under pump switching conditions.

  17. Evolution of Framatome pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, C.; Bitsch, D.; Millot, J.P.

    1985-10-01

    FRAMATOME's PWR experience covers a total of 63 units, 36 of which are operating by end of 1984. More than 10 units were operated in load follow mode. Progress features, resulting from the feedback of construction and operating experience, and from the returns of a vast research and development program, were incorporated in their design through subsequent series of standard units. The last four loop standard, the N4 model, integrates in a rational way all those progress features, together with a significant design effort. The core design is based on the new Advanced Fuel Assemblies. The reactor control implements the ''Reactor Maximum Flexibility Package'' (R-MAX) which provides a high level of automatic reactor control. The steam generator incorporates an axial-mixed flow economizer design. The triangular-pitch tube bundle, together with modular steam/water separators and a rearrangement of the dryers resulted in a compact design. The reactor coolant pump benefits of higher performances over that of previous models due to an optimal hydraulic design, and of mechanical features which increase margins and facilitate the maintenance work. Following the N4 project, design work on advanced concepts is pursued by FRAMATOME. A main way of research is focused on the optimal use of fissile materials. These concepts are based on tight pitch fuel arrays, associated with a mechanical spectral shift device

  18. Instrumentation and control strategies for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several vendors have recently been actively pursuing the development of integral pressurized water reactors (iPWRs that range in power levels from small to large reactors. Integral reactors have the features of minimum vessel penetrations, passive heat removal after reactor shutdown, and modular construction that allow fast plant integration and a secure fuel cycle. The features of an integral reactor limit the options for placing control and safety system instruments. The development of instrumentation and control (I&C strategies for a large 1,000 MWe iPWR is described. Reactor system modeling—which includes reactor core dynamics, primary heat exchanger, and the steam flashing drum—is an important part of I&C development and validation, and thereby consolidates the overall implementation for a large iPWR. The results of simulation models, control development, and instrumentation features illustrate the systematic approach that is applicable to integral light water reactors.

  19. Decay ratio estimation in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.; Runkel, J.

    1990-11-01

    The well known decay ratio (DR) from stability analysis of boiling water reactors (BWR) is estimated from the impulse response function which was evaluated using a simplified univariate autoregression method. This simplified DR called modified DR (mDR) was applied on neutron noise measurements carried out during five fuel cycles of a 1300 MWe PWR. Results show that this fast evaluation method can be used for monitoring of the growing oscillation of the neutron flux during the fuel cycles which is a major concern of utilities in PWRs, thus it can be used for estimating safety margins. (author) 17 refs.; 10 figs

  20. Heat insulation device for reactor pressure vessel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Heiichiro; Tanaka, Yoshimi.

    1993-01-01

    Outer walls of a reactor pressure vessel are covered with water-tight walls made of metals. A heat insulation metal material is disposed between them. The water tight walls are joined by welding and flanges. A supply pipeline for filling gases and a discharge pipeline are in communication with the inside of the water tight walls. Further, a water detector is disposed in the midway of the gas discharge pipeline. With such a constitution, the following advantages can be attained. (1) Heat transfer from the reactor pressure vessel to water of a reactor container can be suppressed by filled gases and heat insulation metal material. (2) Since the pressure at the inside of the water tight walls can be equalized with the pressure of the inside of the reactor container, the thickness of the water-tight walls can be reduced. (3) Since intrusion of water to the inside of the walls due to rupture of the water tight walls is detected by the water detector, reactor scram can be conducted rapidly. (4) The sealing property of the flange joint portion is sufficient and detaching operation thereof is easy. (I.S.)

  1. Neutron fluence determination for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1994-01-01

    A general description of limitations that exist in pressure vessel neutron fluence determinations for commercial light water reactors is presented. Complexity factors that arise in light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence calculations are identified and used to analyze calculational limitations. Two broad categories of calculational limitations are introduced, namely benchmark field limitations and deep penetration limitations. Explicit examples of limitations that can arise in each of these two broad categories are presented. These limitations are used to show that the recent draft regulatory guide for the determination of pressure vessel neutron fluence, developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is based upon procedures and assumptions that are not valid. To eliminate the complexity and limitations of calculational methods, it is recommended that the determination of light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence be based upon experiment. Recommendations for improved methods of pressure vessel surveillance neutron dosimetry are advanced

  2. The inner containment of an EPR trademark pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostermann, Dirk; Krumb, Christian; Wienand, Burkhard [AREVA GmbH, Offenbach (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    On February 12, 2014 the containment pressure and subsequent leak tightness tests on the containment of the Finnish Olkiluoto 3 EPR trademark reactor building were completed successfully. The containment of an EPR trademark pressurized water reactor consists of an outer containment to protect the reactor building against external hazards (such as airplane crash) and of an inner containment that is subjected to internal overpressure and high temperature in case of internal accidents. The current paper gives an overview of the containment structure, the design criteria, the validation by analyses and experiments and the containment pressure test.

  3. Standard Technical Specifications for Westinghouse pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgilio, M.J.

    1980-09-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors (W-STS) is a generic document prepared by the U.S. NRC for use in the licensing process of current Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors. The W-STS sets forth the Limits, Operating Conditions and other requirements applicable to nuclear reactor facility operation as set forth in by Section 50.36 of 10 CFR Part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public. This document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  4. Standard Technical Specifications for Combustion Engineering Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vito, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Combustion Engineering Pressurized Water Reactors (CE-STS) is a generic document prepared by the US NRC for use in the licensing process of current Combustion Engineering Pressurized Water Reactors. The CE-STS sets forth the limits, operating conditions, and other requirements applicable to nuclear reactor facility operation as set forth by Section 50.36 of 10 CFR 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public. The document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  5. The future 700 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    The design of a 700 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor has been developed. The design is based on the twin 540 MWe reactors at Tarapur of which the first unit has been made critical in less than 5 years from construction commencement. In the 700 MWe design boiling of the coolant, to a limited extent, has been allowed near the channel exit. While making the plant layout more compact, emphasis has been on constructability. Saving in capital cost of about 15%, over the present units, is expected. The paper describes salient design features of 700 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor

  6. Methodology of fuel rod design for pressurized light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira e Silva, A.; Esteves, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The fuel performance program FRAPCON-1 and the structural finite element program SAP-IV are applied in a pressurized water reactor fuel rod design methodology. The applied calculation procedure allows to dimension the fuel rod components and characterize its internal pressure. (author) [pt

  7. Some local dilution transient in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, S.

    1989-01-01

    Reactivity accidents are important in the safety analysis of a pressurized water reactor. In this anlysis ejected control rod, steam line break, start of in-active loop and boron dilution accidents are usually dealt with. However, in the analysis is not included what reactivity excursions might happen when a zone,depleted of boron passes the reactor core. This thesis investigates during what operation and emergency conditions diluted zones might exist in a pressurized water reactor and what should be the maximum volumes for then. The limiting transport means are also established in terms of reactivty addition, for the depleted zones. In order to describe the complicated mixing process in the reactor vessel during such a transportation, a typical 3-loop reactor vessel has been modulated by means of TRAC-PF1's VESSEL component. Three cases have been analysed. In the first case the reactor is in a cold condition and the ractor coolant has boron concentration of 2000 ppm. To the reactor vessel is injected an clean water colume of 14 m 3 . In the two other cases the reactor is close to hot shutdown and borated to 850 ppm. To the reactor vessel is added 41 and 13 m 3 clean water, respectively. In the thesis is shown what spatial distribution the depleted zone gets when passing through the reactor vessel in the three cases. The boron concentration in the first case did not decrease the values which would bring the reactor to critical condition. For case two was shown by means of TRAC's point kinetics model that the reactor reaches prompt criticality after 16.03 seconds after starting of the reactor coolant pump. Another prompt criticality occured two seconds later. The total energy developed during the two power escalations were about 55 GJ. A comparision with the criteria used to evaluate the ejected control rod reactivity transient showed that none of these criteria were exceeded. (64 figs.)

  8. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehne, T.; Grunwald, G.; Rohde, U.

    1998-10-01

    For the analysis of boron dilution transients and main steam like break scenarios the modelling of the coolant mixing inside the reactor vessel is important. The reactivity insertion due to overcooling or deboration depends strongly on the coolant temperature and boron concentration. The three-dimensional flow distribution in the downcomer and the lower plenum of PWR's was calculated with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (CFX-4). Calculations were performed for the PWR's of SIEMENS KWU, Westinghouse and VVER-440 / V-230 type. The following important factors were identified: exact representation of the cold leg inlet region (bend radii etc.), extension of the downcomer below the inlet region at the PWR Konvoi, obstruction of the flow by the outlet nozzles penetrating the downcomer, etc. The k-ε turbulence model was used. Construction elements like perforated plates in the lower plenum have large influence on the velocity field. It is impossible to model all the orifices in the perforated plates. A porous region model was used to simulate perforated plates and the core. The porous medium is added with additional body forces to simulate the pressure drop through perforated plates in the VVER-440. For the PWR Konvoi the whole core was modelled with porous media parameters. The velocity fields of the PWR Konvoi calculated for the case of operation of all four main circulation pumps show a good agreement with experimental results. The CFD-calculation especially confirms the back flow areas below the inlet nozzles. The downcomer flow of the Russian VVER-440 has no recirculation areas under normal operation conditions. By CFD calculations for the downcomer and the lower plenum an analytical mixing model used in the reactor dynamic code DYN3D was verified. The measurements, the analytical model and the CFD-calculations provided very well agreeing results particularly for the inlet region. The difficulties of analytical solutions and the uncertainties of turbulence

  9. The nuclear reactor strategy between fast breeder reactors and advanced pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor strategy between fast breeder reactors (FBRs) and advanced pressurized water reactors (APWRs) is being studied. The principal idea of this strategy is that the discharged plutonium from light water reactors (LWRs) provides the inventories of the FBRs and the high-converter APWRs, whereby the LWRs are installed according to the derivative of a logistical S curve. Special emphasis is given to the dynamics of reaching an asymptotic symbiosis between FBRs and APWRs. The main conclusion is that if a symbiotic APWR-FBR family with an asymptotic total power level in the terawatt range is to exist in about half a century from now, we need a large number of FBRs already in an early phase

  10. Pressurized water reactor simulator. Workshop material. 2. ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development. And the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 reactor department simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, the Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 21, 2nd edition, 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2005). Course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated of Canada (CTI) is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No.23, 2nd edition, 'Boiling Water Reactor Simulator' (2005). This report consists of course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor simulator

  11. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijaksono, Umar; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor

  12. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijaksono, Umar, E-mail: umar.wijaksono@student.upi.edu; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman [Electrical Power System Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering Education, Jl. Dr. Setiabudi No. 207 Bandung, Indonesia 40154 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor.

  13. Electrochemical noise measurements under pressurized water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R.

    2000-01-01

    Electrochemical potential noise measurements on sensitized stainless steel pressure tubes under pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions were performed for the first time. Very short potential spikes, believed to be associated to crack initiation events, were detected when stressing the sample above the yield strength and increased in magnitude until the sample broke. Sudden increases of plastic deformation, as induced by an increased tube pressure, resulted in slower, high-amplitude potential transients, often accompanied by a reduction in noise level

  14. Assessment of a small pressurized water reactor for industrial energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.H.; Fuller, L.C.; Myers, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    An evaluation of several recent ERDA/ORNL sponsored studies on the application of a small, 365 MW(t) pressurized water reactor for industrial energy is presented. Preliminary studies have investigated technical and reliability requirements; costs for nuclear and fossil based steam were compared, including consideration of economic inflation and financing methods. For base-load industrial steam production, small reactors appear economically attractive relative to coal fired boilers that use coal priced at $30/ton

  15. An expert system for pressurized water reactor load maneuvers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaung Lin; Jungping Chen; Yihjiunn Lin; Lianshin Lin

    1993-01-01

    Restartup after reactor shutdown and load-follow operations are the important tasks in operating pressurized water reactors. Generally, the most efficient method is to apply constant axial offset control (CAOC) strategy during load maneuvers. An expert system using CAOC strategy, fuzzy reasoning, a two-node core model, and operational constraints has been developed. The computation time is so short that this system, which leads to an approximate closed-loop control, could be useful for on-site calculation

  16. Containment for small pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siler, W.C.; Marda, R.S.; Smith, W.R.

    1977-01-01

    Babcock and Wilcox Company has prepared studies under ERDA contract of small and intermediate size (313, 365 and 1200 MWt) PWR reactor plants, for industrial cogeneration or electric power generation. Studies and experience with nuclear plants in this size range indicate unfavorable economics. To offset this disadvantage, modular characteristics of an integral reactor and close-coupled vapor suppression containment have been exploited to shorten construction schedules and reduce construction costs. The resulting compact reactor/containment complex is illustrated. Economic studies to date indicate that the containment design and the innovative construction techniques developed to shorten erection schedules have been important factors in reducing estimated project costs, thus potentially making such smaller plants competetive with competing energy sources

  17. Pressurized heavy-water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, L.; Wilson, R.

    1977-09-01

    CANDU-PWR type reactors routinely release small amounts of radioactive liquids and gases and large quantities of low-grade waste heat. Radioactive emissions are usually below 1% of the derived release limits based on ICRP limits. Waste heat is common to all power plants and is not foreseen as a problem in Canadian conditions. Risk analysis shows a very low accident probability for CANDU type reactors. Multiple barriers to release of radionuclides, quality assurance, control, and inspection, containment systems, the shutdown system, the ECCS, and leak-before-break design, would all combine to mitigate the effects of an accident. (E.C.B.)

  18. BWR [boiling-water reactor] and PWR [pressurized-water reactor] off-normal event descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This document chronicles a total of 87 reactor event descriptions for use by operator licensing examiners in the construction of simulator scenarios. Events are organized into four categories: (1) boiling-water reactor abnormal events; (2) boiling-water reactor emergency events; (3) pressurized-water reactor abnormal events; and (4) pressurized-water reactor emergency events. Each event described includes a cover sheet and a progression of operator actions flow chart. The cover sheet contains the following general information: initial plant state, sequence initiator, important plant parameters, major plant systems affected, tolerance ranges, final plant state, and competencies tested. The progression of operator actions flow chart depicts, in a flow chart manner, the representative sequence(s) of expected immediate and subsequent candidate actions, including communications, that can be observed during the event. These descriptions are intended to provide examiners with a reliable, performance-based source of information from which to design simulator scenarios that will provide a valid test of the candidates' ability to safely and competently perform all licensed duties and responsibilities

  19. Limit regulation system for pressurized water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleite, W.; Bock, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    Described is a limit regulation system for a pressurized water nuclear reactor in combination with a steam generating system connected to a turbine, the nuclear reactor having control rods as well as an operational regulation system and a protective system, which includes reactor power limiting means operatively associated with the control rods for positioning the same and having response values between operating ranges of the operational regulation system, on the one hand, and response values of the protective system, on the other hand, and a live steam-minimal pressure regulation system cooperating with the reactor power limiting means and operatively connected to a steam inlet valve to the turbine for controlling the same

  20. Pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, H.; Schroder, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor steam generator having a vertical housing for the steam generating water and containing an upstanding heat exchanger to which the pressurized-water coolant passes and which is radially surrounded by a guide jacket supporting a water separator on its top. By thermosiphon action the steam generating water flows upward through and around the heat exchanger within the guide chamber to the latter's top from which it flows radially outwardly and downwardly through a down draft space formed between the outside of the jacket and the housing. The water separator discharges separated water downwardly. The housing has a feedwater inlet opening adjacent to the lower portion of the heat exchanger, providing preheating of the introduced feedwater. This preheated feedwater is conveyed by a duct upwardly to a location where it mixes with the water discharged from the water separator

  1. PWR [pressurized water reactor] pressurizer transient response: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, S.I.

    1987-08-01

    To predict PWR pressurizer transients, Ahl proposed a three region model with a universal coefficient to represent condensation on the water surface. Specifically, this work checks the need for three regions and the modeling of the interfacial condensation coefficient. A computer model has been formulated using the basic mass and energy conservation laws. A two region vapor and liquid model was first used to predict transients run on a one-eleventh scale Freon pressurizer. These predictions verified the need for a second liquid region. As a result, a three region model was developed and used to predict full-scale pressurizer transients at TMI-2, Shippingport, and Stade. Full-scale pressurizer predictions verified the three region model and pointed out the shortcomings of Ahl's universal condensation coefficient. In addition, experiments were run using water at low pressure to study interface condensation. These experiments showed interface condensation to be significant only when spray flow is turned on; this result was incorporated in the final three region model

  2. Development of alternative fuel for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, P.E.; Ferreira, R.A.N.; Ferraz, W.B.; Lameiras, F.S.; Santos, A.; Assis, G. de; Doerr, W.O.; Wehner, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of alternative fuel cycles in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) such as Th/U and Th/Pu cycles can permit a better utilization of uranium reserves without the necessity of developing new power reactor concepts. The development of the technology of alternative fuels for PWR is one of the objectives of the 'Program on Thorium Utilization in Pressurized Water Reactors' carried out jointly by Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras S.A. (NUCLEBRAS), through its Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN) and by German institutions, the Julich Nuclear Research Center (KFA), the Kraftwerk Union A.G. (KWU) and NUKEM GmbH. This paper summarizes the results so far obtained in the fuel technology. The development of a fabrication process for PWR fuel pellets from gel-microspheres is reported as well as the design, the specification, and the fabrication of prototype fuel rods for irradiation tests. (Author) [pt

  3. Dual pressurized light water reactor producing 2000 M We

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-10-15

    The dual unit optimizer 2000 M We (Duo2000) is proposed as a new design concept for large nuclear power plant. Duo is being designed to meet economic and safety challenges facing the 21 century green and sustainable energy industry. Duo2000 has two nuclear steam supply systems (NSSS) of the unit nuclear optimizer (Uno) pressurized water reactor (PWR) in a single containment so as to double the capacity of the plant. Uno is anchored to the optimized power reactor 1000 M We (OPR1000) of the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. The concept of Duo can be extended to any number of PWRs or pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR s), or even boiling water reactor (BWRs). Once proven in water reactors, the technology may even be expanded to gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and molten salt cooled reactors. In particular, since it is required that the small and medium sized reactors (SMRs) be built as units, the concept of Duo2000 will apply to SMRs as well. With its in-vessel retention as severe accident management strategy, Duo can not only put the single most querulous PWR safety issue to end, but also pave ways to most promising large power capacity dispensing with huge redesigning cost for generation III + nuclear systems. The strengths of Duo2000 include reducing the cost of construction by decreasing the number of containment buildings from two to one, minimizing the cost of NSSS and control systems by sharing between the dual units, and lessening the maintenance cost by uniting NSSS. The technology can further be extended to coupling modular reactors as dual, triple, or quadruple units to increase their economics, thus accelerating the commercialization as well as the customization of SMRs. (Author)

  4. Steam generator for pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, E.

    1971-01-01

    In the steam generator for a PWR the central fall space of a U-tube bundel heat exchanger is used as a preliminary cyclon separator. The steam escaping upwards, which is largely free of water, can flow through the residual heating surface, i.e. the U-tube turns. In this way substantial drying and less superheating by the heat still added becomes possible. In its upper part the central fall space for the water separated in the preliminary separator, enclosed by a cylindrical guide wall and the U-tube bundle, is provided with tangential inlet slots. Through these, the water-steam mixture steams out of the section of the vertical legs of the U-tube bundle into the fall space. Above the inlet slots the rising space is closed by means of a turn-round plate. At the lower end of the guide wall outlet, slots are provided for the water flowing downwards and radially outwards into the unfilled space. (DG/PB) [de

  5. Absorber rod bundle actuator in a pressurized water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.; Peletan, R.

    1984-01-01

    The invention concerns an absorber rod bundle actuator in a pressurized water reactor with spectral shift control. The device comprises two coaxial control bars. The inner bar is integral with the absorber rod bundle; it has an enlarged zone which acts as a proton under pressure difference across an annular seal which can be radially expanded, the pressure difference allowing to the absorber rod bundles actuating on the piston. When a pressure difference is applied, the seal expands radially by a sufficient amount to make sealing contact with the zone of larger diameter in the outer bar. The invention applies more particularly to reactors with spectral shift control using bundles of fertile rods [fr

  6. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W. [Department of Mathematical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Shamsuddin, Mustaffa [Institute of Ibnu Sina, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Abdullah, M. Adib [Swinburne University of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Science, Jalan Simpang Tiga, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  7. Steam plant for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This book discusses the research and development organisations and users to highlight those aspects of the steam turbine and associated plant which are particularly related to the PWR system. The contents include: Characteristics of the steam system (including feed train, dump system and safety aspects); overall design aspects of high and half speed turbines; design aspects of the steam generator and seismic considerations; moisture separators and reheaters; feed pumps and their drives; water treatment; safety related valves; operational experience; availability and performance

  8. Introduction of advanced pressurized water reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millot, J.P.; Nigon, M.; Vitton, M.

    1988-01-01

    Designed >30 yr ago, pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have evolved well to match the current safety, operating, and economic requirements. The first advanced PWR generation, the N4 reactor, is under construction with 1992 as a target date for commercial operation. The N4 may be considered to be a technological outcome of PWR evolution, providing advances in the fields of safety, man/machine interfaces, and load flexibility. As a step beyond N4, a second advanced PWR generation is presently under definition with, as a main objective, a greater ability to cope with the possible deterioration of the natural uranium market. In 1986, Electricite de France (EdF) launched investigations into the possible characteristics of this advanced PWR, called REP-2000 (PWR-2000: the reactor for the next century). Framatome joined EdF in 1987 but had been working on a new tight-lattice reactor. Main options are due by 1988; preliminary studies will begin and, by 1990, detailed design will proceed with the intent of firm commitments for the first unit by 1995. Commissioning is planned in the early years of the next century. This reactor type should be either an improved version of the N4 reactor or a spectral shift convertible reactor (RCVS). Through research and development efforts, Framatome, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), and EdF are investigating the physics of fuel rod tight lattices including neutronics, thermohydraulics, fuel behavior, and reactor mechanics

  9. Light-water reactor pressure vessel surveillance standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The master matrix standard describes a series of standard practices, guides, and methods for the prediction of neutron-induced changes in light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel steels throughout a pressure vessel's service life. Some of these are existing American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards, some are ASTM standards that have been modified, and some are newly proposed ASTM standards. The current (1) scope, (2) areas of application, (3) interrelationships, and (4) status and time table of development, improvement, validation, and calibration for a series of 16 ASTM standards are defined. The standard also includes a discussion of LWR pressure vessel surveillance - justification, requirements, and status of work

  10. Steam generator for a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, H.J.; Berger, W.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a steam generator which has a vertical cylindrical housing having a steam output outlet, a horizontal tube sheet closing the lower end of this housing, and an inverted U-shaped tube bundle inside of the housing and having vertical inlet and outlet legs with their ends mounted in the tube sheet. Beneath the tube sheet there are inlet and outlet manifolds for the respective ends of the tube bundle so that pressurized-water coolant from a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor can be circulated through the tube bundle

  11. Fracture risk assessment for the pressurized water reactor pressure vessel under pressurized thermal shock events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Hsoung-Wei; Huang, Chin-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlight: • The PTS loading conditions consistent with the USNRC's new PTS rule are applied as the loading condition for a Taiwan domestic PWR. • The state-of-the-art PFM technique is employed to analyze a reactor pressure vessel. • Novel flaw model and embrittlement correlation are considered in the study. • The RT-based regression formula of NUREG-1874 was also utilized to evaluate the failure risks of RPV. • For slightly embrittled RPV, the SO-1 type PTSs play more important role than other types of PTS. - Abstract: The fracture risk of the pressurized water reactor pressure vessel of a Taiwan domestic nuclear power plant has been evaluated according to the technical basis of the U.S.NRC's new pressurized thermal shock (PTS) screening criteria. The ORNL's FAVOR code and the PNNL's flaw models were employed to perform the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis associated with plant specific parameters of the domestic reactor pressure vessel. Meanwhile, the PTS thermal hydraulic and probabilistic risk assessment data analyzed from a similar nuclear power plant in the United States for establishing the new PTS rule were applied as the loading conditions. Besides, an RT-based regression formula derived by the U.S.NRC was also utilized to verify the through-wall cracking frequencies. It is found that the through-wall cracking of the analyzed reactor pressure vessel only occurs during the PTS events resulted from the stuck-open primary safety relief valves that later reclose, but with only an insignificant failure risk. The results indicate that the Taiwan domestic PWR pressure vessel has sufficient structural margin for the PTS attack until either the current license expiration dates or during the proposed extended operation periods.

  12. Neutron physics of a high converting advanced pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    The neutron physics of an APWR are analysed by single pin-cell calculations as well as two-dimensional whole-reactor computations. The calculational methods of the two codes employed for this study, viz. the cell code SPEKTRA and the diffusion-burnup code DIBU, are presented in detail. The APWR-investigations carried out concentrate on the void coefficient characteristics of tight UO 2 /PuO 2 -lattices, control rod worths, burnup behaviour and spatial power distributions in APWR cores. The principal physics design differences between advanced pressurized water reactors and present-day PWRs are identified and discussed. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Safety systems and features of boiling and pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khair, H. O. M.

    2012-06-01

    The safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPP) requires a deep understanding of the functioning of physical processes and systems involved. This study was carried out to present an overview of the features of safety systems of boiling and pressurized water reactors that are available commercially. Brief description of purposes and functions of the various safety systems that are employed in these reactors was discussed and a brief comparison between the safety systems of BWRs and PWRs was made in an effort to emphasize of safety in NPPs.(Author)

  14. State of the art of the advanced pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.; Chawla, R.

    1987-01-01

    A review is given of the present status of the works concerned with an advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR). It includes the following items: reactor physics, thermal and hydraulic investigations and other engineering aspects as well as an analysis of electricity generation cost and long-term problems of embedding the APWR in a plutonium economy. As a summary it can be stated that there are discernible no principal obstacles of technically accomplishing an APWR, but there will be necessary considerable expenses in research and development works if it should be intended to start commercial service of an APWR up to the end of this century. (author)

  15. The Westinghouse Advanced Passive Pressurized Water Reactor, AP1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schene, R.

    2009-01-01

    Featuring proven technology and innovative passive safety systems, the Westinghouse AP1000 pressurized water reactor can achieve competitive generation costs in the current electricity market without emitting harmful greenhouse gases and further harming the environment. Westinghouse Electric Company, the pioneer in nuclear energy once again sets a new industry standard with the AP1000. The AP1000 is a two-loop pressurized water reactor that uses simplified, innovative and effective approach to safety. With a gross power rating of 3415 megawatt thermal and a nominal net electrical output of 1117 megawatt electric, the AP1000 is ideal for new base load generation. The AP1000 is the safest and most economical nuclear power plant available in the worldwide commercial marketplace, and is the only Generation III+ reactor to receive a design certification from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Based on nearly 20 years of research and development, the AP1000 builds and improves upon the established technology of major components used in current Westinghouse designed plants. These components, including steam generators, digital instrumentation and controls, fuel, pressurizers, and reactor vessels, are currently in use around the world and have years of proven, reliable operating experience. Historically, Westinghouse plant designs and technology have forged the cutting edge technology of nuclear plant around the world. Today, nearly 50 percent of the world's 440 nuclear plants are based on Westinghouse technology. Westinghouse continues to be the nuclear industry's global leader. (author)

  16. The installation welding of pressure water reactor coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Feng

    2010-01-01

    Large pressure water reactor nuclear power plants are constructing in our country. There are three symmetry standard loops in reactor coolant system. Each loop possesses a steam generator and a primary poop, in which one of the loops is equipped with a pressurizer. These components are connected with reactor pressure vessel by installation welding of the coolant piping. The integrity of reactor coolant pressure boundary is the second barrier to protect the radioactive substance from release to outside, so the safe operation of nuclear power plant is closely related to the quality of coolant piping installation welding. The heavy tube with super low carbon content austenitic stainless steel is selected for coolant piping. This kind of material has good welding behavior, but the poor thermal conductivity, the big liner expansion coefficient and the big welding deformation will cause bigger welding stress. To reduce the welding deformation, to control the dimension precision, to reduce the residual stress and to ensure the welding quality the installation sequence should be properly designed and the welding technology should be properly controlled. (authors)

  17. EDF's nuclear safety approach for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.; Kus, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The realization of the important French program fifty-four units equipped with pressurized water reactors in service, or under construction-had led to the progressive implementation of an original approach in the field of nuclear safety. From an initial core consisting of the deterministic approach to safety devised on the other side of the Atlantic, which has been entirely preserved and often specified, further extras have been added which overall increase the level of safety of the installations, without any particular complications. This paper aims at presenting succinctly the outcome of the deliberation, which constitutes now the approach adopted by Electricite de France for the safety of nuclear units equipped with pressurized water reactors. This approach is explained in more detail in EDF's 'with book' on nuclear safety. (author)

  18. Sources of radioiodine at pressurized water reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelletier, C.A.; Cline, J.E.; Barefoot, E.D.; Hemphill, R.T.; Voilleque, P.G.; Emel, W.A.

    1978-11-01

    The report determines specific components and operations at operating pressurized water reactors that have a potential for being significant emission sources of radioactive iodine. The relative magnitudes of these specific sources in terms of the chemical forms of the radioiodine and the resultant annual averages from major components are established. The data are generalized for broad industry use for predictive purposes. The conclusions of this study indicate that the majority of radioiodine emanating from the primary side of pressurized water reactors comes from a few major areas; in some cases these sources are locally treatable; the interaction of radioiodine with plant interior surfaces is an important phenomenon mediating the source and affecting its release to the atmosphere; the chemical form varies depending on the circumstances of the release

  19. EDF'S nuclear safety approach for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.; Kus, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The realization of the important French program fifty-four units equipped with pressurized water reactors in service, or under construction - had led to the progressive implementation of an original approach in the field of nuclear safety. From an initial core consisting of the deterministic approach to safety devised on the other side of the Atlantic, which has been entirely preserved and often specified, further extras have been added which overall increase the level of safety of the installations, without any particular complications. This paper aims at presenting succinctly the outcome of the deliberation, which constitutes now the approach adopted by Electricite de France for the safety of nuclear units equipped with pressurized water reactors. This approach is explained in more detail in EDF's white book on nuclear safety

  20. Detection of steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, W.H.

    1984-11-01

    This report addresses the early detection of small steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors. It identifies physical parameters, establishes instrumentation performance goals, and specifies sensor types and locations. It presents a simple algorithm that yields the leak rate as a function of known or measurable quantities. Leak rates of less than one-tenth gram per second should be detectable with existing instrumentation

  1. Decommissioning of the BR3 pressurized-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaut, V.

    1996-01-01

    The dismantling and the decommissioning of nuclear installations at the end of their life-cycle is a new challenge to the nuclear industry. Different techniques and procedures for the dismantling of a nuclear power plant on an existing installation, the BR-3 pressurized-water reactor, are described. The scientific programme, objectives, achievements in this research area at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN for 1995 are summarized

  2. Prestressed concrete pressure vessels for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.

    1979-12-01

    Following a general description of the Scandinavian cooperative project on prestressed concrete pressure vessels for boiling water reactors, detailed discussion is given in four appendices of the following aspects: the verification programme of tests and studies, the development and testing of a liner venting system, a preliminary safety philosophy and comparative assessment of cold and hot liners. Vessel failure probability is briefly discussed and some figures presented. The pressure gradients in the vessel wall resulting from various stipulated linear cracks, with a liner venting system are presented graphically. (JIW)

  3. Introduction to reactor internal materials for pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo Suk; Hong, Joon Hwa; Jee, Se Hwan; Lee, Bong Sang; Kuk, Il Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-01

    This report reviewed the R and D states of reactor internal materials in order to be a reference for researches and engineers who are concerning on localization of the materials in the field or laboratory. General structure of PWR internals and material specification for YGN 3 and 4 were reviewed. States-of-arts on R and D of stainless steel and Alloy X-750 were reviewed, and degradation mechanisms of the components were analyzed. In order to develop the good domestic materials for reactor internal, following studies would be carried out: microstructure, sensitization behavior, fatigue property, irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking/radiation-induced segregation, radiation embrittlement. (Author) 7 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.,.

  4. Introduction to reactor internal materials for pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Suk; Hong, Joon Hwa; Jee, Se Hwan; Lee, Bong Sang; Kuk, Il Hyun

    1994-06-01

    This report reviewed the R and D states of reactor internal materials in order to be a reference for researches and engineers who are concerning on localization of the materials in the field or laboratory. General structure of PWR internals and material specification for YGN 3 and 4 were reviewed. States-of-arts on R and D of stainless steel and Alloy X-750 were reviewed, and degradation mechanisms of the components were analyzed. In order to develop the good domestic materials for reactor internal, following studies would be carried out: microstructure, sensitization behavior, fatigue property, irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking/radiation-induced segregation, radiation embrittlement. (Author) 7 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.,

  5. A dual pressurized water reactor producing 2000 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K. M.; Suh, K. Y.

    2010-01-01

    The Dual Unit Optimizer 2000 MWe (DUO2000) is proposed as a new design concept for large nuclear power plant. DUO is being designed to meet economic and safety challenges facing the 21. century green and sustainable energy industry. DUO2000 has two nuclear steam supply systems (NSSSs) of the Unit Nuclear Optimizer (UNO) pressurized water reactor (PWR) in a single containment so as to double the capacity of the plant. UNO is anchored to the Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MWe (OPR1000). The concept of DUO can be extended to any number of PWRs or pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), or even boiling water reactor (BWRs). Once proven in water reactors, the technology may even be expanded to gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and molten salt cooled reactors. In particular, since it is required that the Small and Medium sized Reactors (SMRs) be built as units, the concept of DUO2000 will apply to SMRs as well. With its in-vessel retention external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) as severe accident management strategy, DUO can not only put the single most querulous PWR safety issue to end, but also pave ways to most promising large power capacity dispensing with huge redesigning cost for Generation III+ nuclear systems. Also, the strengths of DUO2000 include reducing the cost of construction by decreasing the number of containment buildings from two to one, minimizing the cost of NSSS and control systems by sharing between the dual units, and lessening the maintenance cost by uniting the NSSS. Two prototypes are presented for the DUO2000, and their respective advantages and drawbacks are considered. The strengths include, but are not necessarily limited to, reducing the cost of construction by decreasing the number of containment buildings from two to one, minimizing the cost of NSSS and control systems by sharing between the dual units, and lessening the maintenance cost by uniting the NSSS, just to name the few. The Coolant Unit Branching Apparatus (CUBA) is proposed

  6. Liquid radioactive waste processing system for pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    This Standard sets forth design, construction, and performance requirements, with due consideration for operation, of the Liquid Radioactive Waste Processing System for pressurized water reactor plants for design basis inputs. For the purpose of this Standard, the Liquid Radioactive Waste Processing System begins at the interfaces with the reactor coolant pressure boundary and the interface valve(s) in lines from other systems, or at those sumps and floor drains provided for liquid waste with the potential of containing radioactive material; and it terminates at the point of controlled discharge to the environment, at the point of interface with the waste solidification system, and at the point of recycle back to storage for reuse

  7. Detection of steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    This report addresses the early detection of small steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors. It discusses the third, and final, year's work on an NRC-funded project examining diagnostic instrumentation in water reactors. The first two years were broad in coverage, concentrating on anticipatory measurements for detection of potential problems in both pressurized- and boiling-water reactors, with recommendations for areas of further study. One of these areas, the early detection of small steam tube leaks in PWRs, formed the basis of study for the last year of the project. Four tasks are addressed in this study of the detection of steam tube leaks. (1) Determination of which physical parameters indicate the onset of steam generator tube leaks. (2) Establishing performance goals for diagnostic instruments which could be used for early detection of steam generator tube leaks. (3) Defining the diagnostic instrumentation and their location which satisfy Items 1 and 2 above. (4) Assessing the need for diagnostic data processing and display. Parameters are identified, performance goals established, and sensor types and locations are specified in the report, with emphasis on the use of existing instrumentation with a minimum of retrofitting. A simple algorithm is developed which yields the leak rate as a function of known or measurable quantities. The conclusion is that leak rates of less than one-tenth gram per second should be detectable with existing instrumentation. (orig./HP)

  8. Pressure equalization systems in pressurized water reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steven, J.; Wunderlich, F.

    1979-01-01

    For the development of a pressure reduction system in PWR fuel rods the capability of charcoal to adsorb Helium, Xenon and Krypton at temperatures of about 300 0 C was investigated. The influence of the adsorption on fuel rod internal pressure and in creep strain on the tube was evaluated in a design study. (orig.) [de

  9. Decontamination and recycle of zirconium pressure tubes from Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantayet, L.M.; Verma, R.; Remya Devi, P.S.; Banerjee, S.; Kotak, V.; Raha, A.; Sandeep, K.C.; Joshi, Shreeram W.; Lali, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    An ion exchange process has been developed for decontamination of zirconium pressure tubes from Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor and recycling of neutronically improved zirconium. Distribution coefficient, equilibrium isotherm, kinetic and breakthrough data were used to develop the separation process. Effect of gamma radiation on indigenous resins was also studied to assess their suitability in high radiation field. (author)

  10. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-15

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8{approx}2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4{approx}2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure.

  11. Structural analysis of fuel rod applied to pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Danilo P.; Pinheiro, Andre Ricardo M.; Lotto, André A., E-mail: danilo.pinheiro@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The design of fuel assemblies applied to Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has several requirements and acceptance criteria that must be attended for licensing. In the case of PWR fuel rods, an important mechanical structural requirement is to keep the radial stability when submitted to the coolant external pressure. In the framework of the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program new materials have been studied to replace zirconium based alloys as cladding, including iron-based alloys. In this sense, efforts have been made to evaluate the behavior of these materials under PWR conditions. The present work aims to evaluate the collapse cold pressure of a stainless steel thin-walled tube similar to that used as cladding material of fuel rods by means of the comparison of numeric data, and experimental results. As a result of the simulations, it was observed that the collapse pressure has a value intermediate value between those found by regulatory requirements and analytical calculations. The experiment was carried out for the validation of the computational model using test specimens of thin-walled tubes considering empty tube. The test specimens were sealed at both ends by means of welding. They were subjected to a high pressure device until the collapse of the tubes. Preliminary results obtained from experiments with the empty test specimens indicate that the computational model can be validated for stainless steel cladding, considering the difference between collapse pressure indicated in the regulatory document and the actual limit pressure concerning to radial instability of tubes with the studied characteristics. (author)

  12. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200 degrees C (2,200 degrees F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed

  13. Aging considerations for PWR [pressurized water reactor] control rod drive mechanisms and reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes age-related degradation mechanisms affecting life extension of pressurized water reactor control rod drive mechanisms and reactor internals. The major sources of age-related degradation for control rod drive mechanisms are thermal transients such as plant heatups and cooldowns, latchings and unlatchings, long-term aging effects on electrical insulation, and the high temperature corrosive environment. Flow induced loads, the high-temperature corrosive environment, radiation exposure, and high tensile stresses in bolts all contribute to aging related degradation of reactor internals. Another problem has been wear and fretting of instrument guide tubes. The paper also discusses age-related failures that have occurred to date in pressurized water reactors

  14. Press kit. EPR (European pressurized water reactor). The advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    Nuclear energy, which provides a steady supply of electricity at low cost, has its rightful place in the energy mix of the 21 century, which puts the emphasis on sustainable development. In this framework, this document presents the advantages of the EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor). The EPR is the only third generation reactor under construction today. It is an evolutionary reactor that represents a new generation of pressurized water reactors with no break in the technology used for the most recent models. The EPR can guarantee a safe, inexpensive electricity supply, without adding to the greenhouse effect. It meets the requirements of the safety authorities and lives up to the expectations of electricity utilities. (A.L.B.)

  15. Contribution to a neutronic calculation scheme for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Del Campo, C.

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis aims at developing and validating the set of data and codes which build up the neutron computation scheme of pressurized water reactors. More precisely, it focuses on the improvement of the precision of calculation of command clusters (absorbing components which can be inserted into the core to control the reactivity), and on the modelling of reflector representation (material placed around the core and reflecting back the escaping neutrons). For the first case, a precise calculation is performed, based on the transport theory. For the second case, diffusion constants obtained in the previous case and simplified equations are used to reduce the calculation cost

  16. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, A.; Dufour, Ph.; Golfier, H.; Grouiller, J.P.; Guillet, J.L.; Poinot, Ch.; Youinou, G.; Zaetta, A.

    2003-01-01

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h) -1 . More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate

  17. Validation of the dynamic model for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwingelstein, Gilles.

    1979-01-01

    Dynamic model validation is a necessary procedure to assure that the developed empirical or physical models are satisfactorily representing the dynamic behavior of the actual plant during normal or abnormal transients. For small transients, physical models which represent isolated core, isolated steam generator and the overall pressurized water reactor are described. Using data collected during the step power changes that occured during the startup procedures, comparisons of experimental and actual transients are given at 30% and 100% of full power. The agreement between the transients derived from the model and those recorded on the plant indicates that the developed models are well suited for use for functional or control studies

  18. Environment sensitive cracking in light water reactor pressure boundary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, H.; Aho-Mantila, I.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to review the available methods and the most promising future possibilities of preventive maintenance to counteract the various forms of environment sensitive cracking of pressure boundary materials in light water reactors. Environment sensitive cracking is considered from the metallurgical, mechanical and environmental point of view. The main emphasis is on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels and high strenght Ni-base alloys, as well as on corrosion fatigue of low alloy and stainless steels. Finally, some general ideas how to predict, reduce or eliminate environment sensitive cracking in service are presented

  19. Twin header bore welded steam generator for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, R.J.; Hirst, B.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator concept, several examples of which have been in service for up to fourteen years. Details are given of the highly successful service record of this equipment and the features which have been incorporated to minimize corrosion and deposition pockets. The design employs a vertical U tube bundle carried off two horizontal headers to which the tubes are welded by the Foster Wheeler Power Products (FWPP) bore welding process. The factors to be considered in uprating the design to meet the current operating conditions for a 1000 MW unit are discussed. (author)

  20. Contemporary pressurized water reactor technology in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, A.

    1991-01-01

    The recent political events enabled Czechoslovak industrial companies to come into direct contact with leading western companies involved in pressurized water ractor technology. A survey is presented of the present situation at the world market of PWR type nuclear power plant suppliers and suppliers of fuel cycle services. Information is given on the potential bids for the next Czechoslovak nuclear power plants with PWR reactors. Economic aspects of the potential bids are presented including some considerations about the participation of the Czechoslovak nuclear industry as a supplier of the reactor for the future power plants. Main technical parameters are listed of PWR units with an output about 1000 MW supplied by Westinghouse EC, ABB -Combustion Engineering and Siemens AG. At present, the bids for new Czechoslovak nuclear power plants are being evaluated. No information on terms of the bids actually coming from foreign companies is used in the article. (Z.S.). 9 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Natural Circulation Characteristics of an Integral Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junli Gou; Suizheng Qiu; Guanghui Su; Dounan Jia

    2006-01-01

    Natural circulation potential is of great importance to the inherent safety of a nuclear reactor. This paper presents a theoretical investigation on the natural circulation characteristics of an integrated pressurized water reactor. Through numerically solved the one-dimensional model, the steady-state single phase conservative equations for the primary circuit and the steady-state two-phase drift-flux conservative equations for the secondary side of the once-through steam generator, the natural circulation characteristics are studied. Based on the preliminary calculation analysis, it is found that natural circulation mass flow rate is proportional to the exponential function of the power, and the value of the exponent is related to working conditions of the steam generator secondary side. The higher height difference between the core center and the steam generator center is favorable to the heat removal capacity of the natural circulation. (authors)

  2. Dominant accident sequences in Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearing, J.F.; Henninger, R.J.; Nassersharif, B.

    1985-04-01

    A set of dominant accident sequences in the Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor was selected using probabilistic risk analysis methods. Because some accident scenarios were similar, a subset of four accident sequences was selected to be analyzed with the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to further our insights into similar types of accidents. The sequences selected were loss-of-feedwater, small-small break loss-of-coolant, loss-of-feedwater-initiated transient without scram, and interfacing systems loss-of-coolant accidents. The normal plant response and the impact of equipment availability and potential operator actions were also examined. Strategies were developed for operator actions not covered in existing emergency operator guidelines and were tested using TRAC simulations to evaluate their effectiveness in preventing core uncovery and maintaining core cooling

  3. Neurocontrol of Pressurized Water Reactors in Load-Follow Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chaung; Shen Chihming

    2000-01-01

    The neurocontrol technique was applied to control a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in load-follow operations. Generalized learning or direct inverse control architecture was adopted in which the neural network was trained off-line to learn the inverse model of the PWR. Two neural network controllers were designed: One provided control rod position, which controlled the axial power distribution, and the other provided the change in boron concentration, which adjusted core total power. An additional feedback controller was designed so that power tracking capability was improved. The time duration between control actions was 15 min; thus, the xenon effect is limited and can be neglected. Therefore, the xenon concentration was not considered as a controller input variable, which simplified controller design. Center target strategy and minimum boron strategy were used to operate the reactor, and the simulation results demonstrated the effectiveness and performance of the proposed controller

  4. Automatic power control for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hah, Yung Joon

    1994-02-01

    During a normal operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the reactivity is controlled by control rods, boron, and the average temperature of the primary coolant. Especially in load follow operation, the reactivity change is induced by changes in power level and effects of xenon concentration. The control of the core power distribution is concerned, mainly, with the axial power distribution which depends on insertion and withdrawal of the control rods resulting in additional reactivity compensation. The utilization of part strength control element assemblies (PSCEAs) is quite appropriate for a control of the power distribution in the case of Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 3 (YGN Unit 3). However, control of the PSCEAs is not automatic, and changes in the boron concentration by dilution/boration are done manually. Thus, manual control of the PSCEAs and the boron concentration require the operator's experience and knowledge for a successful load follow operation. In this thesis, the new concepts have been proposed to adapt for an automatic power control in a PWR. One of the new concepts is the mode K control, another is a fuzzy power control. The system in mode K control implements a heavy-worth bank dedicated to axial shape control, independent of the existing regulating banks. The heavy bank provides a monotonic relationship between its motion and the axial power shape change, which allows automatic control of the axial power distribution. And the mode K enables precise regulation, by using double closed-loop control of the reactor coolant temperature and the axial power difference. Automatic reactor power control permits the nuclear power plant to accommodate the load follow operations, including frequency control, to respond to the grid requirements. The mode K reactor control concepts were tested using simulation responses of a Korean standardized 1000-MWe PWR which is a reference plant for the YGN Unit 3. The simulation results illustrate that the mode K would be

  5. Thermal shield support degradation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Fry, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Damage to the thermal shield support structures of three pressurized water reactors (PWRs) due to flow-induced vibrations was recently discovered during refueling. In two of the reactors, severe damage occurred to the thermal shield, and in one reactor the core support barrel (CSB) was damaged, necessitating extended outages for repairs. In all three reactors, several of the thermal shield supports were either loose, damaged, or missing. The three plants had been in operation for approximately 10 years before the damage was apparent by visual inspection. Because each of the three US PWR manufacturers have experienced thermal shield support degradation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory analyze ex-core neutron detector noise data to determine the feasibility of detecting incipient thermal shield support degradation. Results of the noise data analysis indicate that thermal shield support degradation probably began early in the life of both severely damaged plants. The degradation was characterized by shifts in the resonant frequencies of core internal structures and the appearance of new resonances in the ex-core neutron detector noise. Both the data analyses and the finite element calculations indicate that these changes in resonant frequencies are less than 3 Hz. 11 refs., 16 figs

  6. Current state of research on pressurized water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Jean; Schwarz, Michel; Roubaud, Sebastien; Lavarenne, Caroline; Mattei, Jean-Marie; Rigollet, Laurence; Scotti, Oona; Clement, Christophe; Lancieri, Maria; Gelis, Celine; Jacquemain, Didier; Bentaib, Ahmed; Nahas, Georges; Tarallo, Francois; Guilhem, Gilbert; Cattiaux, Gerard; Durville, Benoit; Mun, Christian; Delaval, Christine; Sollier, Thierry; Stelmaszyk, Jean-Marc; Jeffroy, Francois; Dechy, Nicolas; Chanton, Olivier; Tasset, Daniel; Pichancourt, Isabelle; Barre, Francois; Bruna, Gianni; Evrard, Jean-Michel; Gonzalez, Richard; Loiseau, Olivier; Queniart, Daniel; Vola, Didier; Goue, Georges; Lefevre, Odile

    2018-03-01

    For more than 40 years, IPSN then IRSN has conducted research and development on nuclear safety, specifically concerning pressurized water reactors, which are the reactor type used in France. This publication reports on the progress of this research and development in each area of study - loss-of-coolant accidents, core melt accidents, fires and external hazards, component aging, etc. -, the remaining uncertainties and, in some cases, new measures that should be developed to consolidate the safety of today's reactors and also those of tomorrow. A chapter of this report is also devoted to research into human and organizational factors, and the human and social sciences more generally. All of the work is reviewed in the light of the safety issues raised by feedback from major accidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi, as well as the issues raised by assessments conducted, for example, as part of the ten-year reviews of safety at French nuclear reactors. Finally, through the subjects it discusses, this report illustrates the many partnerships and exchanges forged by IRSN with public, industrial and academic bodies both within Europe and internationally

  7. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-01-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  8. Stability analysis of supercritical-pressure light water-cooled reactor in constant pressure operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhwan, JI; Shirahama, H.; Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic and the thermal-nuclear coupled stabilities of a supercritical pressure light water-cooled reactor. A stability analysis code at supercritical pressure is developed. Using this code, stabilities of full and partial-power reactor operating at supercritical pressure are investigated by the frequency-domain analysis. Two types of SCRs are analyzed; a supercritical light water reactor (SCLWR) and a supercritical water-cooled fast reactor (SCFR). The same stability criteria as Boiling Water Reactor are applied. The thermal-hydraulic stability of SCLWR and SCFR satisfies the criteria with a reasonable orifice loss coefficient. The decay ratio of the thermal-nuclear coupled stability in SCFR is almost zero because of a small coolant density coefficient of the fast reactor. The evaluated decay ratio of the thermal-nuclear coupled stability is 3,41 ∼ 10 -V at 100% power in SCFR and 0,028 at 100% power in SCLWR. The sensitivity is investigated. It is found that the thermal-hydraulic stability is sensitive to the mass flow rate strongly and the thermal-nuclear coupled stability to the coolant density coefficient. The bottom power peak distribution makes the thermal-nuclear stability worse and the thermal-nuclear stability better. (author)

  9. Pressurized water reactor iodine spiking behavior under power transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The most accepted theory explaining the cause of pressurized water reactor iodine spiking is steam formation and condensation in damaged fuel rods. The phase transformation of the primary coolant from water to steam and back again is believed to cause the iodine spiking phenomenon. But due to the complex nature of the phenomenon, a comprehensive model of the behavior has not yet been successfully developed. This paper presents a new model based on an empirical approach, which gives a first-order estimation of the peak iodine spiking magnitude. Based on the proposed iodine spiking model, it is apparent that it is feasible to derive a correlation using the plant operating data base to monitor and control the peak iodine spiking magnitude

  10. Fuzzy power control algorithm for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hah, Y.J.; Lee, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    A fuzzy power control algorithm is presented for automatic reactor power control in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Automatic power shape control is complicated by the use of control rods with a conventional proportional-integral-differential controller because it is highly coupled with reactivity compensation. Thus, manual shape controls are usually employed even for the limited capability needed for load-following operations including frequency control. In an attempt to achieve automatic power shape control without any design modifications to the core, a fuzzy power control algorithm is proposed. For the fuzzy control, the rule base is formulated based on a multiple-input multiple-output system. The minimum operation rule and the center of area method are implemented for the development of the fuzzy algorithm. The fuzzy power control algorithm has been applied to Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 3. The simulation results show that the fuzzy control can be adapted as a practical control strategy for automatic reactor power control of PWRs during the load-following operations

  11. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-01

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fuel rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and economic assessment. The investigation was conducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperature. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasibility issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density

  12. Design and safety of the Sizewell pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W.

    1983-01-01

    The Central Electricity Generating Board propose to build a pressurized water reactor at Sizewell in Suffolk. The PWR Task Force was set up in June 1981 to provide a communications centre for developing firm design proposals for this reactor. These were to follow the Standardized Nuclear Unit Power Plant System designed by Bechtel for the Westinghouse nuclear steam supply system for reactors built in the United States. Changes were required to the design to accommodate, for example, the use of two turbine generators and to satisfy British safety requirements. Differences exist between the British and American licensing procedures. In the UK the statutory responsibility for the safety of a nuclear power station rests unambiguously with the Generating Boards. In the U.S.A. the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues detailed written instructions, which must be followed precisely. Much of the debate on the safety of nuclear power focuses on the risks of big nuclear accidents. It is necessary to explain to the public what, in a balanced perspective, the risks of accidents actually are. The long-term consequences can be presented in terms of reduction in life expectancy, increased chance of cancer or the equivalent pattern of compulsory cigarette smoking. (author)

  13. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  14. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications.

  15. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications

  16. Taipower's reload safety evaluation methodology for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ping-Hue; Yang, Y.S.

    1996-01-01

    For Westinghouse pressurized water reactors (PWRs) such as Taiwan Power Company's (TPC's) Maanshan Units 1 and 2, each of the safety analysis is performed with conservative reload related parameters such that reanalysis is not expected for all subsequent cycles. For each reload cycle design, it is required to perform a reload safety evaluation (RSE) to confirm the validity of the existing safety analysis for fuel cycle changes. The TPC's reload safety evaluation methodology for PWRs is based on 'Core Design and Safety Analysis Package' developed by the TPC and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), and is an important portion of the 'Taipower's Reload Design and Transient Analysis Methodologies for Light Water Reactors'. The Core Management System (CMS) developed by Studsvik of America, the one-dimensional code AXINER developed by TPC, National Tsinghua University and INER, and a modified version of the well-known subchannel core thermal-hydraulic code COBRAIIIC are the major computer codes utilized. Each of the computer models is extensively validated by comparing with measured data and/or vendor's calculational results. Moreover, parallel calculations have been performed for two Maanshan reload cycles to validate the RSE methods. The TPC's in-house RSE tools have been applied to resolve many important plant operational issues and plant improvements, as well as to verify the vendor's fuel and core design data. (author)

  17. Plant life management strategies for pressurized heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kwon, Sang Chul; Choo, Ki Nam; Ahn, Sang Bok; Kuk, Il Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-06-01

    This technical report reviewed aging mechanism of the major components of CANDU 6 reactor such as pressure tubes, calandria tube, end fitting, fuel channel spacer and calandria. Furthermore, the surveillance methodology was described for monitoring and inspection of these core components. Based on the in-reactor performances data such as delayed hydride cracking, leak-before-break, enhanced deformation-creep and growth, the life management of pressure tubes was illustrated in this report. (author). 19 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Application-specific integrated circuit design for a typical pressurized water reactor pressure channel trip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, R.E.; Manges, W.W.; Emery, M.S.; Vendermolen, R.I.; Bhatt, S.

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses the use of application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in nuclear plant safety systems. ASICs have certain advantages over software-based systems because they can be simple enough to be thoroughly tested, and they can be tailored to replace existing equipment. An architecture to replace a pressurized water reactor pressure channel trip is presented. Methods of implementing digital algorithms are also discussed

  19. Computer code for simulating pressurized water reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, A.M.B.

    1978-01-01

    A computer code was developed for the simulation of the steady-state and transient behaviour of the average channel of a Pressurizer Water Reactor core. Point kinetics equations were used with the reactivity calculated for average temperatures in the channel with the fuel and moderator temperature feedbacks. The radial heat conduction equation in the fuel was solved numerically. For calculating the thermodynamic properties of the coolant, the fundamental equations of conservation (mass, energy and momentum) were solved. The gap and clad were treated as a resistance added to the film coefficient. The fuel system equations were decoupled from the coolant equations. The program permitted the changes in the heat transfer correlations and the flow patterns along the coolant channel. Various test were performed to determine the steady-state and transient response employing the PWR core simulator developed, obtaining results with adequate precision. (author)

  20. Code for the core simulation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, M.A.B.

    1978-08-01

    A computer code was developed for the simulation of the steady-state and transient behaviour of the average channel of a Pressurizer Water Reactor core. Point kinetics equations were used with the reactivity calculated for average temperatures in the channel with the fuel and moderator temperature feedbacks. The radial heat conduction equation in the fuel was solved numericaly. For calculating the thermodynamic properties of the coolant, the fundamental equations of conservation (mass, energy and momentum) were solved. The gap and clad were treated as a resistence added to the film coeficient. The fuel system equations were decoupled from the coolant equations. The program permitted the changes in the heat transfer correlations and the flow patterns along the coolant channel. Various test were performed to determine the steady-state and transient response employing the PWR core simulator developed, obtaining results with adequate precision. (Author) [pt

  1. Aging assessment of PWR [Pressurized Water Reactor] Auxiliary Feedwater Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casada, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    In support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a review of Pressurized Water Reactor Auxiliary Feedwater Systems. Two of the objectives of the NPAR Program are to identify failure modes and causes and identify methods to detect and track degradation. In Phase I of the Auxiliary Feedwater System study, a detailed review of system design and operating and surveillance practices at a reference plant is being conducted to determine failure modes and to provide an indication of the ability of current monitoring methods to detect system degradation. The extent to which current practices are contributing to aging and service wear related degradation is also being assessed. This paper provides a description of the study approach, examples of results, and some interim observations and conclusions. 1 fig., 1 tab

  2. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Won Pil; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S.

    2007-02-01

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform the tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. In the first phase of this project (1997.8∼2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished. In the second phase (2002.4∼2005.2), an optimized design of the ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) was established and the construction of the facility was almost completed. In the third phase (2005.3∼2007.2), the construction and commission tests of the ATLAS are to be completed and some first-phase tests are to be conducted

  3. Design and analysis of pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhn, P.E.; Kim, Y.H.

    1979-01-01

    To help develop nuclear engineering technologies in local industry sectors, technical and economical data on pressurized water reactor systems and components have been collected, systematically analyzed and computerized to a certain degree. Codes and standards necessary for engineering design of PWR systems have been surveyed and clarified in terms of NSSS, turbine-generator system and BOP, then again rearranged with respect to quality classes and seismic classes. Some design manuals, criteria and guidelines regarding design, construction, test and operation of PWR plants have also been surveyed and collected. Benchmark cost calculation for the construction of a 900 MWe PWR plant, according to the standard format, was carried out, and computer model on construction costs was improved and updated by considering the local supply of labor and materials. And for the indigeneous development of PWR equipment and materials, such data as delivery schedule and manufacturers of 52 systems and 36,000 components have also been reviewed herein. (author)

  4. Apparatus for localizing disturbances in pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1989-01-01

    The invention according to CS-PS 177386, entitled ''Apparatus for increasing the efficiency and passivity of the functioning of a bubbling-vacuum system for localizing disturbances in nuclear power plants with a pressurized water reactor'', concerns an important area of nuclear power engineering that is being developed in the RGW member countries. The invention solves the problems of increasing the reliability and intensification during the operation of the above very important system for guaranteeing the safety of the standard nuclear power plants of Soviet design. The essence of the invention consists in the installation of a simple passively operating supplementary apparatus. Consequently, the following can be observed in the system: first an improvement and simultaneous increase in the reliability of its function during the critical transition period, which follows the filling of the second space with air from the first space; secondly, elimination of the hitherto unavoidable initiating role of the active sprinkler-condensation device present; thirdly, a more effective performance and subjection of the elements to disintegration of the water flowing from the bubbling condenser into the first space; and fourthly, an enhanced utilization of the heat-conducting ability of the water reservoir of the bubbling condenser. Representatives of the supplementary apparatus are autonomous and local secondary systems of the sprinkler-sprayer without an insert, which spray the water under the effect of gravity. 1 fig

  5. Light Water Reactor-Pressure Vessel Surveillance project computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriman, S.H.

    1980-10-01

    A dedicated process control computer has been implemented for regulating the metallurgical Pressure Vessel Wall Benchmark Facility (PSF) at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The purpose of the PSF is to provide reliable standards and methods by which to judge the radiation damage to reactor pressure vessel specimens. Benchmark data gathered from the PSF will be used to improve and standardize procedures for assessing the remaining safe operating lifetime of aging reactors. The computer system controls the pressure vessel specimen environment in the presence of gamma heating so that in-vessel conditions are simulated. Instrumented irradiation capsules, in which the specimens are housed, contain temperature sensors and electrical heaters. The computer system regulates the amount of power delivered to the electrical heaters based on the temperature distribution within the capsules. Time-temperature profiles are recorded along with reactor conditions for later correlation with specimen metallurgical changes

  6. Modeling and simulation of pressurized water reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    Two kinds of balance of plant (BOP) models of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system are developed in this work - the detailed BOP model and the simple BOP model. The detailed model is used to simulate the normal operational performance of a whole BOP system. The simple model is used to combine with the NSSS model for a whole plant simulation. The trends of the steady state values of the detailed model are correct and the dynamic responses are reasonable. The simple BOP model approach starts the modelling work from the overall point of view. The response of the normalized turbine power and the feedwater inlet temperature to the steam generator of the simple model are compared with those of the detailed model. Both the steady state values and the dynamic responses are close to those of the detailed model. The simple BOP model is found adequate to represent the main performance of the BOP system. The simple balance of plant model was coupled with a NSSS model for a whole plant simulation. The NSSS model consists of the reactor core model, the steam generator model, and the coolant temperature control system. A closed loop whole plant simulation for an electric load perturbation was performed. The results are plausible. The coupling effect between the NSSS system and the BOP system was analyzed. The feedback of the BOP system has little effect on the steam generator performance, while the performance of the BOP system is strongly affected by the steam flow rate from the NSSS

  7. Evolution of general design requirements for french pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gros, G.; Jalouneix, J.; Rollinger, F.

    1988-10-01

    The design of French pressurized water reactors is based first on deterministic principles, using the well-known defense in depth concept. This safety approach, basically reflected current American practice at that time, which consisted notably in designing engineered safeguard systems capable of limiting the consequences of accidents assumed to be credible despite the preventive measures taken. Further reflections have led to complete this approach, resulting in modifications to regulatory practice, mainly related to better practical assimilation of the problems arising during plant unit operation and reactor control after an accident and to the determination to enhance the overall consistency of the safety approach. As regards system redundancy, it should be noted that common cause failures can result in the total loss of a redundant system. System redundancy aspects will be dealt with in Chapter 2. As regards study of design basis accidents, attention was focused on the human intervention stage following automatic activation of protection and safeguard systems. This resulted, for all plant units, in the revision of operating procedures, accompanied by examination of the means required for their implementation. These subjects will be discussed in Chapter 3. Finally, as regards equipment classification, the range of equipment subjected to particular requirements, formerly limited to design basis safety classified equipment, was enlarged to include important for safety equipment. This subject will be dealt with in Chapter 5

  8. High converter pressurized water reactor with heavy water as a coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, Y.; Reyev, D.

    1983-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in water breeder and high converter reactors. The increase in the conversion ratio of these reactors is obtained by hardening the neutron spectrum achieved by tightening the reactor's lattice. Another way of hardening the neutron spectrum is to replace the light water with heavy water. Two pressurized water reactor fuel cycles that use heavy water as a coolant are considered. The first fuel cycle is based on plutonium and depleted uranium, and the second cycle is based on plutonium and enriched uranium. The uranium ore and separative work unit (SWU) requirements are calculated as well as the fuel cycle cost. The savings in uranium ore are about40 and 60% and about40% in SWU for both fuel cycles considered

  9. Enriched uranium cycles in pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzola, A.

    1994-01-01

    A study was made on the substitution of natural uranium with enriched and on plutonium recycle in unmodified PHWRs (pressure vessel reactor). Results clearly show the usefulness of enriched fuel utilisation for both uranium ore consumption (savings of 30% around 1.3% enrichment) and decreasing fuel cycle coasts. This is also due to a better plutonium exploitation during the cycle. On the other hand plutonium recycle in these reactors via MOX-type fuel appears economically unfavourable under any condition

  10. Noise investigations in boiling water and pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaly, G.

    1979-08-01

    The paper begins with the general discussion of the neutron noise measured by in-core and ex-core detectors. The theory of BWR noise is surveyed in detail. After the theoretical survey the physical background of the measuring methods applied in the fluctuation analysis of BWRs is discussed. The section on PWR noise discusses the information content of the neutron, pressure and displacement signals about the vibration of the vessel and its internals. (author)

  11. Probabilistic integrity assessment of pressure tubes in an operating pressurized heavy water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Young-Jin; Park, Heung-Bae [KEPCO E and C, 188 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-870 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Min; Kim, Young-Jin [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Han-Ok [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 34 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon-si 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yoon-Suk, E-mail: yschang@khu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Even though pressure tubes are major components of a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR), only small proportions of pressure tubes are sampled for inspection due to limited inspection time and costs. Since the inspection scope and integrity evaluation have been treated by using a deterministic approach in general, a set of conservative data was used instead of all known information related to in-service degradation mechanisms because of inherent uncertainties in the examination. Recently, in order that pressure tube degradations identified in a sample of inspected pressure tubes are taken into account to address the balance of the uninspected ones in the reactor core, a probabilistic approach has been introduced. In the present paper, probabilistic integrity assessments of PHWR pressure tubes were carried out based on accumulated operating experiences and enhanced technology. Parametric analyses on key variables were conducted, which were periodically measured by in-service inspection program, such as deuterium uptake rate, dimensional change rate of pressure tube and flaw size distribution. Subsequently, a methodology to decide optimum statistical distribution by using a robust method adopting a genetic algorithm was proposed and applied to the most influential variable to verify the reliability of the proposed method. Finally, pros and cons of the alternative distributions comparing with corresponding ones derived from the traditional method as well as technical findings from the statistical assessment were discussed to show applicability to the probabilistic assessment of pressure tubes.

  12. Improved water density feedback model for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casadei, A.L.

    1976-01-01

    An improved water density feedback model has been developed for neutron diffusion calculations of PWR cores. This work addresses spectral effects on few-group cross sections due to water density changes, and water density predictions considering open channel and subcooled boiling effects. An homogenized spectral model was also derived using the unit assembly diffusion method for employment in a coarse mesh 3D diffusion computer program. The spectral and water density evaluation models described were incorporated in a 3D diffusion code, and neutronic calculations for a typical PWR were completed for both nominal and accident conditions. Comparison of neutronic calculations employing the open versus the closed channel model for accident conditions indicates that significant safety margin increases can be obtained if subcooled boiling and open channel effects are considered in accident calculations. This is attributed to effects on both core reactivity and power distribution, which result in increased margin to fuel degradation limits. For nominal operating conditions, negligible differences in core reactivity and power distribution exist since flow redistribution and subcooled voids are not significant at such conditions. The results serve to confirm the conservatism of currently employed closed channel feedback methods in accident analysis, and indicate that the model developed in this work can contribute to show increased safety margins for certain accidents

  13. Reuse of waste water from high pressure water jet decontamination for reactor decommissioning scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Junxian; Li Xin; Hou Huijuan

    2011-01-01

    For recycle and reuse of reactor decommissioning scrap metal by high pressure water jet decontamination, large quantity of radioactive waste water will be generated. To save the cost of radioactive waste water treatment and to reduce the cost of the scrap decontamination, this part of radioactive waste water should be reused. Most of the radioactivities in the decontamination waste water come from the solid particle in the water. Thus to reuse the waste water, the solid particle in the waster should be removed. Different possible treatment technologies have been investigated. By cost benefit analysis the centrifugal separation technology is selected. (authors)

  14. Living PSA issues in France on pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewailly, J.; Deriot, S.; Dubreuil Chambardel, A.; Francois, P.; Magne, L.

    1993-09-01

    Two Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs) carried out in France on 900 and 1300 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor units ended in 1990. These PSAs determined the core damage frequency for all plant operating conditions ranging from cold shutdown for refuelling to full power operation. Since 1990, these PSAs have been used increasingly as tools for applications such as accident precursor analysis, risk-based Technical Specifications, and maintenance optimization. In turn, these applications are used to enhance the initial PSAs. The notion of a ''living'' PSA which can be used and updated is slowly taking form. The accident precursor analysis consists in applying PSA event trees to obtain quick information on the potential consequences of a precursor event and on the corresponding probabilities of occurrence. A feedback on PSAs is provided by comparing them with actual operating incidents. The computation of the allowed outage time during power operation, based on the computerized models of Probabilistic Safety Assessments, requires adjustments: calculation of hourly risk of core damage under different reactor conditions without equipment unavailabilities. The proposed method also turns out to be an aid in determining the safe shutdown condition and procedure. Furthermore, when introducing a sufficient level of detail, PSA reliability models make it possible to compute contributions and to perform sensitivity studies in order to highlight those components for which a maintenance effort should be made. From the experience acquired up to now, there was felt to be a strong need to create guidelines for using PSAs that would simplify their implementation by the experts in charge of determining Technical Specifications, of maintenance programs, etc. who are not generally specialists in PSAs. For this purpose, it is necessary to improve the intelligibility of the models made in order for them to be used and to offer user's guides adapted to each application. Documents

  15. Construction management of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohra, S.A.; Sharma, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru and Dr. Homi J. Bhabha, the visionary architects of Science and Technology of modern India foresaw the imperative need to establish a firm base for indigenous research and development in the field of nuclear electricity generation. The initial phase has primarily focused on the technology development in a systematic and structured manner, which has resulted in establishment of strong engineering, manufacturing and construction base. The nuclear power program started with the setting up of two units of boiling light water type reactors in 1969 for speedy establishment of nuclear technology, safety culture, and development of operation and maintenance manpower. The main aim at that stage was to demonstrate (to ourselves, and indeed to the rest of the world) that India, inspite of being a developing country, with limited industrial infrastructure and low capacity power grids, could successfully assimilate the high technology involved in the safe and economical operation of nuclear power reactors. The selection of a BWR was in contrast to the pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR), which was identified as the flagship for the first stage of India's nuclear power program. The long-term program in three stages utilizes large reserves of thorium in the monazite sands of Kerala beaches in the third stage with first stage comprising of series of PHWR type plants with a base of 10,000 MW. India has at present 14 reactors in operation 12 of these being of PHWR type. The performance of operating units of 2720 MW has improved significantly with an overall capacity factor of about 90% in recent times. The construction work on eight reactor units with installed capacity of 3960 MW (two PHWRs of 540 MW each, four PHWRs of 220 MW each and two VVERs of 1000 MW each) is proceeding on a rapid pace with project schedules of less than 5 years from first pour of concrete. This is being achieved through advanced construction technology and management. Present

  16. Structural integrity of water reactor pressure boundary components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss, F.J.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic fracture toughness was determined as a function of temperature for three-point bend specimens of A533-B, A508-2, and A302-B steels. Crack propagation rates at 288 0 C in a water reactor environment were determined for A533-B and A508-2. Radiation-induced degradation of notch toughness of reactor steels and welds was explored. The ''warm prestress'' occurring in a flawed reactor vessel following a LOCA and operation of ECCS was studied. 25 figures

  17. Improvement in fuel utilization in pressurized heavy water reactors due to increased heavy water purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that in a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR), the reactivity of the reactor and, consequently, the discharge burnup of the fuel depend on the isotopic purity of the heavy water used in the reactor. The optimal purity of heavy water used in PHWRs, in turn, depends on the cost of fabricated uranium fuel and on the incremental cost incurred in improving the heavy water purity. The physics and economics aspects of the desirability of increasing the heavy water purity in PHWRs in India were first examined in 1978. With the cost data available at that time, it was found that improving the heavy water purity from 99.80% to 99.95% was economically attractive. The same problem is reinvestigated with current cost data. Even now, there is sufficient incentive to improve the isotopic purity of heavy water used in PHWRs. Admittedly, the economic advantage that can be derived depends on the cost of the fabricated fuel. Nevertheless, irrespective of the economics, there is also a fairly substantial saving in natural uranium. That the increase in the heavy water purity is to be maintained only in the low-pressure moderator system, and not in the high-pressure coolant system, makes the option of achieving higher fuel burnup with higher heavy water purity feasible

  18. Standard technical specifications for Westinghouse pressurized water reactors (revision issued Fall 1981). Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgilio, M.J.

    1981-11-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors (W-STS) is a generic document prepared by the U.S. NRC for use in the licensing process of current Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors. The W-STS sets forth the Limits, Operating Conditions and other requirements applicable to nuclear reactor facility operation as set forth in Section 50.36 of 10 CFR Part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public

  19. A novel coordinated control for Integrated Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yuxin; Du, Xue; Xia, Genglei; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposed IPWR coordinated control strategy to avoid flow instability of OTSG. • Tuned PID controller parameters by Fuzzy kernel wavelet neural network with kernel trick and adaptive variable step-size. • Transition process exhibit the effectiveness of the novel IPWR control system. - Abstract: Integrated Pressurized Water Reactor (IPWR) has the characteristic of strong coupling, nonlinearity and complicated dynamic performance, which requires high standards of the control strategy and controller design. Most of IPWR systems utilize control strategy of ideal steady-state and PID controller, even though this strategy causes flow instability in the once through steam generator (OTSG) in low load conditions. Besides, the simple form of PID limits the performance developing which could not appropriately satisfy the requirements for quality. Motivated by these drawbacks, this paper proposes an IPWR coordinated control strategy and adopts PID controller to control each subsystem. The control strategy considers the system as a two-level hierarchical control system, and considers coordinating controller and bottom controllers. In the period of controller design, this strategy utilizes PID controller to control each subsystem, and modifies the controller parameters in real time by Fuzzy-KWNN algorithm, which adaptively achieves the system adjustment. Finally, simulation results are presented to exhibit the effectiveness of the proposed IPWR control system

  20. Remerschen nuclear power station with BBR pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    On the basis of many decades of successful cooperation in the electricity supply sector with the German RWE utility, the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg and RWE jointly founded Societe Luxembourgeoise d'Energie Nucleaire S.A. (SENU) in 1974 in which each of the partners holds a fifty percent interest. SENU is responsible for planning, building and operating this nuclear power station. Following an international invitation for bids on the delivery and turnkey construction of a nuclear power station, the consortium of the German companies of Brown, Boveri and Cie. AG (BBC), Babcock - Brown Boveri Reaktor GmbH (BBR) and Hochtief AG (HT) received a letter of intent for the purchase of a 1,300 MW nuclear power station equipped with a pressurized water reactor. The 1,300 MW station of Remerschen will be largely identical with the Muelheim-Kaerlich plant under construction by the same consortium near Coblence on the River Rhine since early 1975. According to present scheduling, the Remerschen nuclear power station could start operation in 1981. (orig.) [de

  1. Numerical study of optimal equilibrium cycles for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahlers, Y.P.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm based on simulated annealing and successive linear programming is applied to solve equilibrium cycle optimization problems for pressurized water reactors. In these problems, the core reload scheme is represented by discrete variables, while the cycle length as well as uranium enrichment and loading of burnable poison in each feed fuel assembly are treated as continuous variables. The enrichments are considered to be distinct in all feed fuel assemblies. The number of batches and their sizes are not fixed and also determined by the algorithm. An important feature of the algorithm is that all the parameters are determined by the solution of one optimization problem including both discrete and continuous variables. To search for the best reload scheme, simulated annealing is used. The optimum cycle length as well as uranium enrichment and loading of burnable poison in each feed fuel assembly are determined for each reload pattern examined using successive linear programming. Numerical results of equilibrium cycle optimization for various values of the effective price of electricity and fuel reprocessing cost are studied

  2. Software to study the control strategy of pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Jose Ricardo de

    2002-01-01

    The computational program, result of this work, is a tool developed for the study of the control of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) constituted by only one coolant loop. The implementation of a user friendly interface for input/output data, makes the program also suitable for training and teaching applications. As design premise, it was considered enough just the modeling of the primary circuit, using as interface with the secondary circuit, a simplified differential equation of the temperature associated with the secondary power. All the incorporated dynamic equations to the model were developed using basic laws of conservation, boundary conditions and hypotheses appropriated to the control study. To arrive to the final model, core thermal and hydraulic characteristics and design data were obtained from of the available bibliography and adapted for a conceptual peculiar design of a small PWR. The whole program and all input/output interfaces were developed using the software Matlab, version 5.L Sub-routines of numeric integration based on the Runge-Kutta 4 method were applied, to solve the set of ordinary differential equations. (author)

  3. Design description of the European pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leverenz, R.

    1999-01-01

    The EPR (the European Pressurized Water Reactor) is an evolutionary PWR developed by Nuclear Power International and its parent companies, Framatome and Siemens, in co-operation with Electricite de France and German Utilities. NPI can rely on the huge experience gained by its parent companies; they have constructed more than 100 nuclear power plants throughout the world. The total installed capacity exceeds 100,000 MW - about 25% of the total world-wide figure. Following the conceptual design phase of the so-called Common Product conducted by NPI, Framatome and Siemens, from 1989 through 1991, Electricite de France (EDF) and several major German utilities decided to merge their own development programmes, - the N4 Plus and REP 2000 projects on the French side and the further development of the KONVOI technology on the German side, - with the NPI project. From that time on, the NPI project became one single common development line for both countries. In parallel, EDF and the German utilities decided to establish, together with other European utilities, specifications that would represent common utility views on the design and performance of future nuclear power plants. These are documented in the European Utility Requirements (EURs). The basic design has been completed in 1997, and in 1998 a design optimization is being carried out with the goal to even increase the economic competitiveness of nuclear power. This paper provides a brief design description of the EPR. (author)

  4. Contributions to the energetical role of advanced pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1984-06-01

    Three articles written by the author in the past two years and all concerned with energy production of the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR) are collated to form this report. The standpoint is made that the APWR using mixed oxide-fuel (about 8% Pusub(fiss) and Usub(depl)) would entail similar capital costs as a PWR, but with conversion rates of 0.85< C<0.95. Given this assumption the analysis shows that the high specific plutonium inventories (being proportional to the conversion ratio in the interested range) result in a strong damping effect on the growth rate, the effective uranium utilization, and on the total nuclear power level. Over one century an APWR strategy is 'far from equilibrium' and to describe this dynamic situation using static APWR data is not appropriate. If nuclear fission energy is to play a substantial and not just a marginal role in providing energy for the future (in the region of 5 - 8 TWsub(el) in 50 years time, corresponding to a share of 20 - 25% of the total world demand), clearly the fast breeder strategy offers the better chance of achieving the goal. (Auth.)

  5. The European Pressurized Water Reactor. A safe and competitive solution for future energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leverenz, R.; Gerhard, L.; Goebel, A.

    2004-01-01

    The European Pressurized Water Reactor - the EPR - is a PWR in the 1600 MW class. Its design is based on experience feedback from several thousand reactors x years of light water reactor operation worldwide, primarily those incorporating the most recent technologies: the French N4 and the German KONVOI reactors. It is an evolutionary design that ensures continuity in the mastery of PWR technology, minimizing the risk for the customer. (author)

  6. French studies and research program in pressurized water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duco, J.

    1986-06-01

    The aim of researches developed now in France on water reactor safety is to obtain means and knowledge allowing to control accidental situations, including severe situations beyond design basis accidents. The main studies and researches concerning water reactors and described in this report are the following ones: core cooling accident and prevention of severe accidents, fuel behavior in accidental situation, behavior of the containment building, fission product transfer and releases in case of accident, problems related to equipment aging, and, methodology of risk analysis and ''human factor'' studies. Most of these studies follow an analytic approach of phenomena [fr

  7. Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction Failure Threshold for Reactivity Initiated Accidents for Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Carl E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Kenneth J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been requested by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the reactivity initiated accident (RIA) tests that have recently been performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) and CABRI (French research reactor) on uranium dioxide (UO2) and mixed uranium and plutonium dioxide (MOX) fuels, and to propose pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) failure thresholds for RIA events. This report discusses how PNNL developed PCMI failure thresholds for RIA based on least squares (LSQ) regression fits to the RIA test data from cold-worked stress relief annealed (CWSRA) and recrystallized annealed (RXA) cladding alloys under pressurized water reactor (PWR) hot zero power (HZP) conditions and boiling water reactor (BWR) cold zero power (CZP) conditions.

  8. Superheated steam annealing of pressurized water reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porowski, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal annealing of an embrittled Reactor Pressure Shell is the only recognized means for recovering material properties lost due to long-term exposure of the reactor walls to radiation. Reduced toughness of the material during operation is a major concern in evaluations of structural integrity of older reactors. Extensive studies performed within programs related to life extension of nuclear plants have confirmed that the thermal treatment of 850 deg. F for 168 hours on irradiated material essentially recovers material properties lost due to neutron exposure. Dry and wet annealing methods have been considered. Wet annealing involves operating the reactor at near design temperatures and pressures. Since the temperature of wet annealing must be limited to vessel design temperature of 650 deg. F, only partial recovery of the lost properties is achieved. Thus dry annealing was selected as an alternative for future development and industrial implementation to extend the safe life of reactors. Dry thermal annealing consists of heating portions of the reactor vessel at a specific temperature for a given period of time using a high temperature heat source. The use of spent fuel assemblies, induction heating and resistance heating elements as well as the circulation of heated fluid were investigated as potential candidate methods. To date the use of resistance heating elements which are lowered into a dry empty reactor was considered to be the preferred method. In-depth research in the United States and practical applications of such a method in Russia have confirmed feasibility of the method. The method of using circulating superheated steam to anneal the vessel at 850 deg. F without complete removal of the reactor internals is described herein. After removing the reactor head and fuel, the core barrel along with the upper and lower core in PWRs is lifted to open an annular space between the reactor shell flange and the core barrel flange. The thermal shield can remain

  9. High conversion ratio plutonium recycle in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edlund, M.C.

    1975-01-01

    The use of Pu light water reactors in such a way as to minimise the depletion of Pu needed for future use, and therefore to reduce projected demands for U ore and U enrichment is envisaged. Fuel utilisation in PWRs could be improved by tightly-packed fuel rod lattices with conversion ratios of 0.8 to 0.9 compared with ratios of about 0.5 in Pu recycle designs using fuel to water volume ratios of currently operating PWRs. A conceptual design for the Babcock and Wilcox Company reactors now in operation is presented and for illustrative purposes thermalhydraulic design considerations and the reactor physics are described. Principle considerations in the mechanical design of the fuel assemblies are the effect of hydraulic forces, thermal expansion, and fission gas release. The impact of high conversion ratio plutionium recycle in separative work and natural U requirements for PWRs likely to be in operation by 1985 are examined. (U.K.)

  10. Corrosion fatigue cracking behavior of Inconel 690 (TT) in secondary water of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Jun; Chen Luyao; Qiu Shaoyu; Chen Yong; Lin Zhenxia; Fu Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    Inconel 690 (TT) is one of the key materials for tubes of steam generators for pressurized water reactors, where it is susceptible to corrosion fatigue cracking. In this paper, the corrosion fatigue cracking behavior of Inconel 690 (TT) was investigated under small scale yielding conditions, in the simulated secondary water of pressurized water reactor. It was observed that the fatigue crack growth rate was accelerated by a maximum factor up to 3 in the simulated secondary water, comparing to that in room temperature air. In addition, it was found that the accelerating effect was influenced by out-of-plane cracking of corrosion fatigue cracks and also correlated with stress intensity factor range, maximum stress intensity factor and stress ratio. (authors)

  11. Fracture analysis of axially cracked pressure tube of pressurized heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, S.; Bhasin, V.; Mahajan, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    Three Dimensional (313) finite element elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for through wall axially cracked thin pressure tubes of 220 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. The analysis was done for Zr-2 and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes operating at 300 degrees C and subjected to 9.5 Mpa internal pressure. Critical crack length was determined based on tearing instability concept. The analysis included the effect of crack face pressure due to the leaking fluid from tube. This effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. The available formulae for calculating J (for axially cracked tubes) do not take into account the effect of crack face pressure. 3D finite element analysis also gives insight into variation of J across the thickness of pressure tube. It was observed that J is highest at the mid-surface of tube. The results have been presented in the form of across the thickness average J value and a peak factor on J. Peak factor on J is ratio of J at mid surface to average J value. Crack opening area for different cracked lengths was calculated from finite element results. The fracture assessment of pressure tubes was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board R-6 method. Ductile tearing was considered

  12. Fracture analysis of axially cracked pressure tube of pressurized heavy water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, S.; Bhasin, V.; Mahajan, S.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Three Dimensional (313) finite element elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for through wall axially cracked thin pressure tubes of 220 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. The analysis was done for Zr-2 and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes operating at 300{degrees}C and subjected to 9.5 Mpa internal pressure. Critical crack length was determined based on tearing instability concept. The analysis included the effect of crack face pressure due to the leaking fluid from tube. This effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. The available formulae for calculating J (for axially cracked tubes) do not take into account the effect of crack face pressure. 3D finite element analysis also gives insight into variation of J across the thickness of pressure tube. It was observed that J is highest at the mid-surface of tube. The results have been presented in the form of across the thickness average J value and a peak factor on J. Peak factor on J is ratio of J at mid surface to average J value. Crack opening area for different cracked lengths was calculated from finite element results. The fracture assessment of pressure tubes was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board R-6 method. Ductile tearing was considered.

  13. Possibilities of tritium removal from waste waters of pressurized water reactors and fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribnikar, S.V.; Pupezin, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    Starting from parameters known for heavy water production processes, a parallel was made with separation of tritium from water. The quantity in common is the total cascade flow. The most efficient processes appear to be hydrogen sulfide, water exchange, hydrogen- and water distillation. Prospects of application of new processes are discussed briefly. Problems concerning detritiation of pressurized water reactors and large fuel reprocessing plants are analyzed. Detritiation of the former should not present problems. With the latter, economical detritiation can be achieved only after some plant flow patterns are changed. (U.S.)

  14. Core construction in a pressure tube type heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto; Aoki, Katsutada.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To replace a centrally positioned fuel assembly of a fuel assembly unit with a reactor controlling machinery to decrease a distance between the fuel assemblies thereby saving use of heavy water and enhancing economy. Structure: A centrally positioned fuel assembly of a fuel assembly unit, which is composed of a plurality of fuel assemblies orderly arranged in lattice fashion, is replaced with a reactor controlling members such as control rods, poison tubes and the like to provide an arrangement of lattice-free type fuel assembly, thus reducing the pitch as small as possible. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. Pressure tube type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komada, Masaoki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the safety of pressure tube type reactors by providing an additional ECCS system to an ordinary ECCS system and injecting heavy water in the reactor core tank into pressure tubes upon fractures of the tubes. Constitution: Upon fractures of pressure tubes, reduction of the pressure in the fractured tubes to the atmospheric pressure in confirmed and the electromagnetic valve is operated to completely isolate the pressure tubes from the fractured portion. Then, the heavy water in the reactor core tank flows into and spontaneously recycles through the pressure tubes to cool the fuels in the tube to prevent their meltdown. By additionally providing the separate ECCS system to the ordinary ECCS system, fuels can be cooled upon loss of coolant accidents to improve the safety of the reactors. (Moriyama, K.)

  16. Extended fuel cycle operation for pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestri, G.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear steam turbine power plant system having an arrangement therein for extended fuel cycle operation is described. The power plant includes a turbine connected at its inlet to a source of motive fluid having a predetermined pressure associated therewith. The turbine has also connected thereto an extraction conduit which extracts steam from a predetermined location therein for use in an associated apparatus. A bypass conduit is provided between a point upstream of the inlet and the extraction conduit. A flow control device is provided within the bypass conduit and opens when the pressure of the motive steam supply drops beneath the predetermined pressure as a result of reactivity loss within the nuclear reactor. Opening of the bypass conduit provides flow to the associated apparatus and at the same time provides an increased flow orifice to maintain fluid flow rate at a predetermined level

  17. Material and water chemistry for a ferritic reactor coolant system in pressure water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieding, L.

    1979-04-01

    The use of unplated, low-alloy steels in a boric acid controlled PWR is not considered possible without changing the water conditions during the start-up and shut-down periods of the reactor. The significant pH reduction of the water due to boric acid during these periods most probably leads to damage of the magnetite protective layers followed by selective corrosion. As this highly important process has not been sufficiently evaluated with respect to our specific application problem, more detailed information will be necessary. KWU test facilities provide a means of performing such tests. In order to avoid corrosion attack during the above operating conditions, an inhibition of the water with 7 Li-borate is recommended which, however, will amount to approx. DM 60.000,-- per period of use. (orig.) [de

  18. The development of reactor vessel internal heavy forging for 1000 MW pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhifeng; Chen Yongbo; Ding Xiuping; Zhang Lingfang

    2012-01-01

    This Paper introduced the development of Reactor Vessel Internal (RVI) heavy forgings for 1000 MW Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant, analyzed the manufacture difficulties and technical countermeasures. The testing result of the product indicated that the performance of RVI heavy forgings manufactured by Shanghai Heavy Machinery Plant Ld. (SHMP) is outstanding and entirely satisfy the technical requirements for RVI product. (authors)

  19. More recent developments for the ultrasonic testing of light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiger, H.; Engl, G.

    1976-01-01

    The development of an ultrasonic testing method for the inspection from the outside of the areas close to the cladding of the spherical fields of holes of light water reactor pressure vessels is described

  20. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Daniel J.; Schrader, Kenneth J.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  1. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commerical electric power cost studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139-MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume includes in addition to the foreword and summary, the plant description and the detailed cost estimate

  2. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description.

  3. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description

  4. High conversion pressurized water reactor with boiling channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margulis, M., E-mail: maratm@post.bgu.ac.il [The Unit of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shwageraus, E., E-mail: es607@cam.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, CB2 1PZ Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Conceptual design of partially boiling PWR core was proposed and studied. • Self-sustainable Th–{sup 233}U fuel cycle was utilized in this study. • Seed-blanket fuel assembly lattice optimization was performed. • A coupled Monte Carlo, fuel depletion and thermal-hydraulics studies were carried out. • Thermal–hydraulic analysis assured that the design matches imposed safety constraints. - Abstract: Parametric studies have been performed on a seed-blanket Th–{sup 233}U fuel configuration in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) with boiling channels to achieve high conversion ratio. Previous studies on seed-blanket concepts suggested substantial reduction in the core power density is needed in order to operate under nominal PWR system conditions. Boiling flow regime in the seed region allows more heat to be removed for a given coolant mass flow rate, which in turn, may potentially allow increasing the power density of the core. In addition, reduced moderation improves the breeding performance. A two-dimensional design optimization study was carried out with BOXER and SERPENT codes in order to determine the most attractive fuel assembly configuration that would ensure breeding. Effects of various parameters, such as void fraction, blanket fuel form, number of seed pins and their dimensions, on the conversion ratio were examined. The obtained results, for which the power density was set to be 104 W/cm{sup 3}, created a map of potentially feasible designs. It was found that several options have the potential to achieve end of life fissile inventory ratio above unity, which implies potential feasibility of a self-sustainable Thorium fuel cycle in PWRs without significant reduction in the core power density. Finally, a preliminary three-dimensional coupled neutronic and thermal–hydraulic analysis for a single seed-blanket fuel assembly was performed. The results indicate that axial void distribution changes drastically with burnup. Therefore

  5. Additional Stress And Fracture Mechanics Analyses Of Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  6. Noise analysis method for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of pressurized water reactors: Neural network calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.R. Jr.; Adams, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    A neural network was trained with data for the frequency response function between in-core neutron noise and core-exit thermocouple noise in a pressurized water reactor, with the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) as target. The trained network was subsequently used to predict the MTC at other points in the same fuel cycle. Results support use of the method for operating pressurized water reactors provided noise data can be accumulated for several fuel cycles to provide a training base

  7. Application of linearized model to the stability analysis of the pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Haipeng; Huang Xiaojin; Zhang Liangju

    2008-01-01

    A Linear Time-Invariant model of the Pressurized Water Reactor is formulated through the linearization of the nonlinear model. The model simulation results show that the linearized model agrees well with the nonlinear model under small perturbation. Based upon the Lyapunov's First Method, the linearized model is applied to the stability analysis of the Pressurized Water Reactor. The calculation results show that the methodology of linearization to stability analysis is conveniently feasible. (authors)

  8. Detection of gaseous heavy water leakage points in CANDU 6 pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, T-K.; Jung, S-H.

    1996-01-01

    During reactor operation, the heavy water filled primary coolant system in a CANDU 6 Pressurized Heavy Water (PHWR) may leak through routine operations of the plant via components, mechanical joints, and during inadvertent operations etc. Early detection of leak points is therefore important to maintain plant safety and economy. There are many independent systems to monitor and recover heavy water leakage in a CANDU 6 PHWR. Methodology for early detection based on operating experience from these systems, is investigated in this paper. In addition, the four symptoms of D 2 O leakage, the associated process for clarifying and verifying the leakage, and the probable points of leakage are discussed. (author)

  9. Pressure tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Fujino, Michihira.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To equalize heavy water flow distribution by providing a nozzle for externally injecting heavy water from a vibration preventive plate to the upper portion to feed the heavy water in a pressure tube reactor and swallowing up heavy water in a calandria tank to supply the heavy water to the reactor core above the vibration preventive plate. Constitution: A moderator injection nozzle is mounted on the inner wall of a calandria tank. Heavy water is externally injected above the vibration preventive plate, and heavy water in the calandria tank is swallowed up to supply the heavy water to the core reactor above the vibration preventive plate. Therefore, the heavy water flow distribution can be equalized over the entire reactor core, and the distribution of neutron absorber dissolved in the heavy water is equalized. (Yoshihara, H.)

  10. Innovative Control concepts for German pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzozowski, Raphael; Kuhn, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Controlling reactor power without any manual support is becoming more and more important. The READIG project (READIG = Reactor Instrumentation and Digital Control) power control system installed in unit 2 of the Philippsburg nuclear power station (KKP 2) requires no manual intervention except for specific strategy criteria settings. It was even possible to eliminate the power distribution set points. With minor adaptations, this concept can be applied in other PWR plants as well. KKP 2 is a PWR plant with particularly sophisticated core charges; as a consequence, the I and C systems were adapted accordingly. The increase in integral reactor power and the low-leakage core charges are the main reasons for lower limiting margins, especially in peak limiting. The standard control concept was supplemented in such a way that a more precise fine control concept for power distribution in the full-load regime is achieved. The READIG project fully utilizes the possibilities offered by digital TXS Technology, which is why use is also made of physical parameterization. The new power distribution control concept has these advantages: - Operation at small peak-/DNB-reactor output limitation margins. - Stable control without manual intervention also in load cycles and in the frequency control mode. - Simplified operation due to omission of the power distribution set point. - Reduction to zero of the frequency of L-bank steps at constant power with superimposed frequency control mode. - Reduction to zero of the frequency of D-bank steps at constant power with superimposed frequency control mode. - Lower quantities of demineralized water to be fed at constant power with superimposed frequency control mode (±1%). (orig.)

  11. Development of design technology for an advanced pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Soo; Chang, Won Pyo; Park, Koon Chul

    1991-07-01

    The objective of the project is to localize technology for the improvement of the reactor coolant system through a multidimensional thermal-hydraulic analysis for the steam generator and the pressurizer. Flow distribution analysis has been done for the YGN 3/4 steam generators when steady-state output conditions were varied in the ranges such as 100, 75, 50, and 25 using three-dimensional ATHOS 3 code. The results of the thermal-hydraulic analysis have been used for flow-induced vibration analysis for the YGN 3/4 steam generators. ATHOS 3 code has been modified for YGN 3/4 steam generator tube lane region using the cartesian geometry and the local porosity in the boundaries of the two adjacent cells. Stability ratio for the tube vibration has been calculated the modified ATHOS 3 and ANSYS code. A sensitivity study for the pressurizer volume change has been analyzed using LTC code which is for the performance analysis to predict an optimistic pressurizer volume. (Author)

  12. Materials characterization for advanced pressurized water reactors: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, E.A.; Gage, G.

    1994-01-01

    A compilation and overview is presented of the experimental techniques available for characterization of the microstructural changes induced by neutron irradiation of PWR pressure vessel steels, and directed towards monitoring of embrittlement processes by examination of surveillance samples from advanced reactor systems. The microstructural features of significance include copper precipitation, dislocation loop and/or microvoid matrix damage and grain boundary solute segregation. The techniques of transmission electron microscopy, field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy, small angle neutron scattering, positron annihilation and field-ion microscopy have all developed to a degree of sophistication such that they are capable of providing detailed microstructural information in these areas, and afford considerable insight into embrittlement processes when used in combination. (author)

  13. Simulation of pressurized water reactor in accidental state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakir, E.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop the 1300 MWe 4 loops 'PWR' simulator called 'SATRAPE', witch the adopted physics modelisation allows a simplified neutronic calculation, and focus essentially on the reactor thermal hydraulic behavior in the case of the following accidents: - Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). - Steam Generator Tube Failure (SGTF). - Steam Line Break (SLB). In case of the 'LOCA' or 'SLB' accident, this modelisation enables the calculation of the pressure and the temperature in the containment building, and also the debit of the released dose in this latter in case of the 'LOCA' accident. The adopted models are relatively simple so as to allow an explicit resolve. In SATRAPE, two graphical interfaces enables to launch orders, whereas the other permits to visualize, the principal state variables of installations. The results obtained show a very good consistency with the envisaged commonly scenario at the time of the considered accidents. 33 refs., 52 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  14. Diagnostic system for primary circuits of pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, J.; Majer, J.

    1983-01-01

    The diagnostic system monitors the reactor, the main circulating pipe, the main circulating pump, the main shut-off valve, the steam generator and the pressurizer. Diagnostic signals are obtained from the sensors designed for operation measurements and from sensors for special diagnostic purposes. The following operations are carried out: detection of dangerous dynamic stress of components, detection of damage to functional surfaces of components, detection of occurrence and propagation of defects in component materials, detection of loose particles and foreign bodies, detection of coolant leakage, detection of coolant boiling in the core and detection of impermissible non-homogeneities of fields of physical quantities in the core. The diagnostic system comprises: monitoring, classification of properly investigated effects, periodical tracing and long-term tracing. The operational diagnostics system developed by the SKODA Concern consists of a vibration monitoring system, a spectral analysis system and a central evaluation system. (M.D.)

  15. Supercritical-pressure, once-through cycle light water cooled reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop new reactor concepts for the innovation of light water reactors (LWR) and fast reactors. Concept of the once-through coolant cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor was developed. Major aspects of reactor design and safety were analysed by the computer codes which were developed by ourselves. It includes core design of thermal and fast reactors, plant system, safety criteria, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control, start up and stability. High enthalpy rise as supercritical boiler was achieved by evaluating the cladding temperature directly during transients. Fundamental safety principle of the reactor is monitoring coolant flow rate instead of water level of LWR. The reactor system is compact and simple because of high specific enthalpy of supercritical water and the once-through cycle. The major components are similar to those of LWR and supercritical thermal plant. Their temperature are within the experiences in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. The reactor is compatible with tight fuel lattice fast reactor because of the high head pumps and low coolant flow rate. The power rating of the fast reactor is higher than the that of thermal reactor because of the high power density. (author)

  16. Taipower's transient analysis methodology for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Pinghue

    1998-01-01

    The methodology presented in this paper is a part of the 'Taipower's Reload Design and Transient Analysis Methodologies for Light Water Reactors' developed by the Taiwan Power Company (TPC) and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research. This methodology utilizes four computer codes developed or sponsored by Electric Power Research institute: system transient analysis code RETRAN-02, core thermal-hydraulic analysis code COBRAIIIC, three-dimensional spatial kinetics code ARROTTA, and fuel rod evaluation code FREY. Each of the computer codes was extensively validated. Analysis methods and modeling techniques were conservatively established for each application using a systematic evaluation with the assistance of sensitivity studies. The qualification results and analysis methods were documented in detail in TPC topical reports. The topical reports for COBRAIIIC, ARROTTA. and FREY have been reviewed and approved by the Atomic Energy Council (ABC). TPC 's in-house transient methodology have been successfully applied to provide valuable support for many operational issues and plant improvements for TPC's Maanshan Units I and 2. Major applications include the removal of the resistance temperature detector bypass system, the relaxation of the hot-full-power moderator temperature coefficient design criteria imposed by the ROCAEC due to a concern on Anticipated Transient Without Scram, the reduction of boron injection tank concentration and the elimination of the heat tracing, and the reduction of' reactor coolant system flow. (author)

  17. Analysis of severe accidents in pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    Certain very low probability plant states that are beyond design basis accident conditions and which may arise owing to multiple failures of safety systems leading to significant core degradation may jeopardize the integrity of many or all the barriers to the release of radioactive material. Such event sequences are called severe accidents. It is required in the IAEA Safety Requirements publication on Safety of the Nuclear Power Plants: Design, that consideration be given to severe accident sequences, using a combination of engineering judgement and probabilistic methods, to determine those sequences for which reasonably practicable preventive or mitigatory measures can be identified. Acceptable measures need not involve the application of conservative engineering practices used in setting and evaluating design basis accidents, but rather should be based on realistic or best estimate assumptions, methods and analytical criteria. Recently, the IAEA developed a Safety Report on Approaches and Tools for Severe Accident Analysis. This publication provides a description of factors important to severe accident analysis, an overview of severe accident phenomena and the current status in their modelling, categorization of available computer codes, and differences in approaches for various applications of severe accident analysis. The report covers both the in- and ex-vessel phases of severe accidents. The publication is consistent with the IAEA Safety Report on Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants and can be considered as a complementary report specifically devoted to the analysis of severe accidents. Although the report does not explicitly differentiate among various reactor types, it has been written essentially on the basis of available knowledge and databases developed for light water reactors. Therefore its application is mostly oriented towards PWRs and BWRs and, to a more limited extent, they can be only used as preliminary guidance for other types of reactors

  18. Conceptual mechanical design for a pressure-tube type supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yetisir, M.; Diamond, W.; Leung, L.K.H.; Martin, D.; Duffey, R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a conceptual mechanical design for a heavy-water-moderated pressure-tube supercritical water (SCW) reactor, which has evolved from the well-established CANDU nuclear reactor. As in the current designs, the pressure-tube SCW reactor uses a calandria vessel and, as a result, many of today's technologies (such as the shutdown safety systems) can readily be adopted with small changes. Because the proposed concept uses a low-pressure moderator, it does not require a pressure vessel that is subject to the full SCW pressure and temperature conditions. The proposed design uses batch refueling and hence, the reactor core is orientated vertically. Significant simplifications result in the design with the elimination of on line fuelling systems, fuel channel end fittings and fuel channel closure seals and thus utilize the best features of Light Water Reactor (LWR) and Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) technologies. The safety goal is based on achieving a passive 'no core melt' configuration for the channels and core, so the mechanical features and systems directly reflect this desired attribute. (author)

  19. Conceptual mechanical design for a pressure-tube type supercritical water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yetisir, M.; Diamond, W.; Leung, L.K.H.; Martin, D.; Duffey, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual mechanical design for a heavy-water-moderated pressure-tube supercritical water (SCW) reactor, which has evolved from the well-established CANDU nuclear reactor. As in the current designs, the pressure-tube SCW reactor uses a calandria vessel and, as a result, many of today's technologies (such as the shutdown safety systems) can readily be adopted with small changes. Because the proposed concept uses a low-pressure moderator, it does not require a pressure vessel that is subject to the full SCW pressure and temperature conditions. The proposed design uses batch refueling and hence, the reactor core is orientated vertically. Significant simplifications result in the design with the elimination of on line fuelling systems, fuel channel end fittings and fuel channel closure seals and thus utilize the best features of Light Water Reactor (LWR) and Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) technologies. The safety goal is based on achieving a passive 'no core melt' configuration for the channels and core, so the mechanical features and systems directly reflect this desired attribute. (author)

  20. RELAP5-3D Code for Supercritical-Pressure Light-Water-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemke, Richard Allan; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Schultz, Richard Raphael

    2003-04-01

    The RELAP5-3D computer program has been improved for analysis of supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors. Several code modifications were implemented to correct code execution failures. Changes were made to the steam table generation, steam table interpolation, metastable states, interfacial heat transfer coefficients, and transport properties (viscosity and thermal conductivity). The code modifications now allow the code to run slow transients above the critical pressure as well as blowdown transients (modified Edwards pipe and modified existing pressurized water reactor model) that pass near the critical point.

  1. CFD simulation analysis and validation for CPR1000 pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mingqian; Ran Xiaobing; Liu Yanwu; Yu Xiaolei; Zhu Mingli

    2013-01-01

    Background: With the rapid growth in the non-nuclear area for industrial use of Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) which has been accompanied by dramatically enhanced computing power, the application of CFD methods to problems relating to Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) is rapidly accelerating. Existing research data have shown that CFD methods could predict accurately the pressure field and the flow repartition in reactor lower plenum. But simulations for the full domain of the reactor have not been reported so far. Purpose: The aim is to determine the capabilities of the codes to model accurately the physical phenomena which occur in the full reactor vessel. Methods: The flow field of the CPR1000 reactor which is associated with a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) is simulated by using ANSYS CFX. The pressure loss in reactor pressure vessel, the hydraulic loads of guide tubes and support columns, and the bypass flow of head dome were obtained by calculations for the full domain of the reactor. The results were validated by comparing with the determined reference value of the operating nuclear plant (LingAo nuclear plant), and the transient simulation was conducted in order to better understand the flow in reactor pressure vessel. Results: It was shown that the predicted pressure loss with CFD code was slightly different with the determined value (10% relative deviation for the total pressure loss), the hydraulic loads were less than the determined value with maximum relative deviation 50%, and bypass flow of head dome was approximately the same with determined value. Conclusion: This analysis practice predicts accurately the physical phenomena which occur in the full reactor vessel, and can be taken as a guidance for the nuclear plant design development and improve our understanding of reactor flow phenomena. (authors)

  2. Licensing assessment of the Candu Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. Preliminary safety information document. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    ERDA has requested United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) to evaluate the design of the Canadian natural uranium fueled, heavy water moderated (CANDU) nuclear reactor power plant to assess its conformance with the licensing criteria and guidelines of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) for light water reactors. This assessment was used to identify cost significant items of nonconformance and to provide a basis for developing a detailed cost estimate for a 1140 MWe, 3-loop Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) located at the Middletown, USA Site

  3. Instrumenting a pressure suppression experiment for a MK I boiling water reactor: another measurements engineering challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shay, W.M.; Brough, W.G.; Miller, T.B.

    1977-01-01

    A scale test facility of a pressure suppression system from a boiling water reactor was instrumented with seven types of transducers to obtain high-accuracy experimental data during a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident. The instrumentation verified the analysis of the dynamic loading of the pressure suppression system

  4. Fibre optic sensors in pressurized water reactor alternators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favennec, J.M.; Piguet, M.

    1994-01-01

    Measurement in the electrical engine environment (alternator, transformer...) is identified as one of the two main applications of fibre optic sensors within EDF; the other application niche is the monitoring of civil works (dams, containment building of nuclear reactors...). At the EDF Research and Development Division, temperature and vibration fibre optic sensors were evaluated by the Metrology Service, since their use is under consideration for alternator monitoring. For alternator stator thermal monitoring, the BERTIN company developed a fibre optic sensor network. The optic coding technique is based on broadband source spectral modulation; the sensors are interrogated sequentially by electronic commutation. For alternator stator vibration monitoring, a fibre optic accelerometer was developed in the frame of a manufacturers and universities consortium supported by the French Research and Technology Ministry. The accelerometer is of cantilever beam type and its networking is possible by chromatic multiplexing. The Metrology Service evaluated these temperature and vibration sensors in order to verify their metrological characteristics (bias error, hysteresis, repeatability, resolution, noise, amplitude linearity, response time, frequency response, etc.) and to test their behaviour in harsh alternator environmental conditions (pressure, vibrations and temperature). Ageing and accidental condition resistance tests were also carried out. Temperature sensor test results were very satisfactory. An eight-sensor BERTIN prototype was installed on the Tricastin 1 alternator during the september 1993 nuclear station periodic stop. On the contrary, the accelerometers presented deficient metrological characteristics (shorter span than foreseen, low repeatability...). They need some improvements and could not be installed on alternators. (authors). 5 refs., 8 figs

  5. Depletion optimization of lumped burnable poisons in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodah, Z.H.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques were developed to construct a set of basic poison depletion curves which deplete in a monotonical manner. These curves were combined to match a required optimized depletion profile by utilizing either linear or non-linear programming methods. Three computer codes, LEOPARD, XSDRN, and EXTERMINATOR-2 were used in the analyses. A depletion routine was developed and incorporated into the XSDRN code to allow the depletion of fuel, fission products, and burnable poisons. The Three Mile Island Unit-1 reactor core was used in this work as a typical PWR core. Two fundamental burnable poison rod designs were studied. They are a solid cylindrical poison rod and an annular cylindrical poison rod with water filling the central region.These two designs have either a uniform mixture of burnable poisons or lumped spheroids of burnable poisons in the poison region. Boron and gadolinium are the two burnable poisons which were investigated in this project. Thermal self-shielding factor calculations for solid and annular poison rods were conducted. Also expressions for overall thermal self-shielding factors for one or more than one size group of poison spheroids inside solid and annular poison rods were derived and studied. Poison spheroids deplete at a slower rate than the poison mixture because each spheroid exhibits some self-shielding effects of its own. The larger the spheroid, the higher the self-shielding effects due to the increase in poison concentration

  6. Light water reactor pressure isolation valve performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neely, H.H.; Jeanmougin, N.M.; Corugedo, J.J.

    1990-07-01

    The Light Water Reactor Valve Performance Testing Program was initiated by the NRC to evaluate leakage as an indication of valve condition, provide input to Section XI of the ASME Code, evaluate emission monitoring for condition and degradation and in-service inspection techniques. Six typical check and gate valves were purchased for testing at typical plant conditions (550F at 2250 psig) for an assumed number of cycles for a 40-year plant lifetime. Tests revealed that there were variances between the test results and the present statement of the Code; however, the testing was not conclusive. The life cycle tests showed that high tech acoustic emission can be utilized to trend small leaks, that specific motor signature measurement on gate valves can trend and indicate potential failure, and that in-service inspection techniques for check valves was shown to be both feasible and an excellent preventive maintenance indicator. Life cycle testing performed here did not cause large valve leakage typical of some plant operation. Other testing is required to fully understand the implication of these results and the required program to fully implement them. (author)

  7. Pipe rupture hardware minimization in pressurized water reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.K.; Szyslowski, J.J.; Chexal, V.; Norris, D.M.; Goldstein, N.A.; Beaudoin, B.; Quinones, D.; Server, W.

    1987-01-01

    For much of the high energy piping in light water reactor systems, fracture mechanics calculations can be used to assure pipe failure resistance, thus allowing the elimination of excessive rupture restraint hardware both inside and outside containment. These calculations use the concept of leak-before-break (LBB) and include part-through-wall flaw fatigue crack propagation, through-wall flaw detectable leakage, and through-wall flaw stability analyses. Performing these analyses not only reduces initial construction, future maintenance, and radiation exposure costs, but the overall safety and integrity of the plant are improved since much more is known about the piping and its capabilities than would be the case had the analyses not been performed. This paper presents the LBB methodology applied at Beaver Valley Power Station - Unit 2 (BVPS-2); the application for two specific lines, one inside containment (stainless steel) and the other outside containment (ferritic steel), is shown in a generic sense using a simple parametric matrix. The overall results for BVPS-2 indicate that pipe rupture hardware is not necessary for stainless steel lines inside containment greater than or equal to 6-in (152 mm) nominal pipe size that have passed a screening criteria designed to eliminate potential problem systems (such as the feedwater system). Similarly, some ferritic steel lines as small as 3-in (76 mm) diameter (outside containment) can qualify for pipe rupture hardware elimination

  8. Performance of materials in the component cooling water systems of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    The component cooling water (CCW) system provides cooling water to several important loads throughout the plant under all operating conditions. An aging assessment CCW systems in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) was conducted as part of Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program (NPAR) instituted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper presents some of the results on the performances of materials in respect of their application in CCW Systems. All the CCW system failures reported to the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) from January 1988 to June 1990 were reviewed; it is concluded that three of the main contributors to CCW system failures are valves, pumps, and heat exchangers. This study identified the modes and causes of failure for these components; most of the causes for the aging-related failures could be related to the performance of materials. Also, in this paper the materials used for these components are reviewed, and there aging mechanisms under CCW system conditions are discussed

  9. Development of design technology for advanced pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Si Hwan; Chang, Moon Hee; Lee, Jong Chul

    1991-08-01

    In order to investigate the feasibility of the domestic passive reactor development, the analysis and evaluation on the development status, technical characteristics, and the safety and economy for the overseas passive reactors were carried out based on the vendor's information. Also the domestic nuclear technology basis was surveyed. The analysis and evaluation of the development status and technical characteristics were performed mainly for the AP-600 developed by Westing house and the SIR of UKAEA. The new design concepts and system characteristics have been evaluated by utilizing EPRI Utility Requirement Documents and Lahmeyer evaluation criteria. Based on this evaluation the recommendable design concepts in each major system were selected. The feasibility for the domestic passive reactor development has focused on the safety, technology and economy aspects, and on the applicability of the existing domestic technology to the design of the passive reactor. And the development plan for the domestic passive reactor was recommended in a step by step way. (Author)

  10. Elements of Design Consideration of Once-Through Cycle, Supercritical-Pressure Light Water Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiaki Oka; Sei-ichi Koshizuka; Yuki Ishiwatari; Akifumi Yamaji

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes elements of design consideration of supercritical-pressure, light water cooled reactors as well as the status and prospects of the research and development. It summarizes the results of the conceptual design study at the University of Tokyo from 1989. The research and development started in Japan, Europe and USA. The major advantages of the reactors are 1. Compact reactor and turbines due to high specific enthalpy of supercritical water 2.Simple plant system because of the once-through coolant cycle 3.Use of the experience of LWR and fossil-fired power plants. The temperatures of the major components such as reactor pressure vessel, coolant pipes, pumps and turbines are within the experience, in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. 4.Similarity to LWR safety design and criteria, but no burnout phenomenon 5.Potential cost reduction due to smaller material expenditure and short construction period 6.The smallest reactor not in power rating, but in plant sizes. 7.High-thermal efficiency and low coolant flow rate because of high enthalpy rise. 8.Water cooled reactors potentially free from SCC (stress corrosion cracking) problems. 9.Compatibility of tight-fuel-lattice fast reactor core due to small coolant flow rate, potentially easy shift to fast breeder reactor without changing coolant technology. 10.Potential of producing energy products such as hydrogen and high quality hydro carbons. (authors)

  11. Reflooding phase after loss of coolant of an advanced pressurized water reactor with high conversion ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, S.

    1984-01-01

    The emergency core cooling behaviour of an advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR) during the reflooding phase of the LOCA with double-ended break is analysed and compared to a common pressurized water reactor (PWR). The code FLUT-BS, its models and correlations are explained in detail and have been verified by numerous PWR-reflood experiments with large parameter range. The influence of core-design on ECC-behaviour as well as the influences of initial and boundary values are examined. The results show the essential differences of ECC-behaviour between PWR and APWR. (orig.) [de

  12. Franco-German nuclear cooperation: from the 'common product' to the first European pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignon, D.

    1999-01-01

    It has now been 10 years since Framatome and Siemens decided to collaborate on the design and sales of an advanced nuclear power plant (NPP) model based on pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Originally called the 'common product', this model was renamed the European pressurized water reactor when Electricite de France (EDF) and the German electric utilities joined this cooperative development effort in 1992. Since the beginning, this cooperation has been formalized in the framework of an agreement that led to the founding of a joint and equally owned subsidiary, Nucler Power International (NPI), which is reponsible for leading the development of the new model and later handling its export sales

  13. The OPERA loop in the OSIRIS reactor core. Pressurized-water irradiation device to study Advanced Reactor Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucot, M.; Roche, M.

    1986-09-01

    This loop is designed to allow fuel qualification test, i.d. to allow irradiation of representative parts fuel assemblies operating in thermohydraulic and chemical conditions representative of these of present pressurized water reactors or in development. This paper presents the aims of the installation, the general design and the main specifications with a brief detailed description [fr

  14. Cable condition monitoring in a pressurized water reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hussaini, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Oconee Nuclear Station is the first nuclear plant designed, engineered and constructed by Duke Power Company. Even though the accelerated aging method was available to determine the life expectancy of the cable used in the reactor building, no natural aging data was available at that time. In order to be able to verify the condition of the reactor building cable over the life of the plant, an on-going cable monitoring plan was instituted. Various types of cable were selected to be monitored, and they were installed in cable life evaluation circuits in the reactor building. At five year intervals over the life of the plant, cable samples would be removed from these cable life evaluation circuits and tested to determine the effects of the reactor building environment on the integrity of the cable. A review of the cable life evaluation circuits and the results of the evaluation program to date is presented

  15. Interfacing systems LOCA (loss-of-coolant accidents): Pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoki, G.; Kohut, P.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    1989-02-01

    This report summarizes a study performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Reactor and Plant Safety Issues Branch, Division of Reactor and Plant Systems, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This study was requested by the NRC in order to provide a technical basis for the resolution of Generic Issue 105 ''Interfacing LOCA at LWRs.'' This report deals with pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A parallel report was also accomplished for boiling water reactors. This study focuses on three representative PWRs and extrapolates the plant-specific findings for their generic applicability. In addition, a generic analysis was performed to investigate the cost-benefit aspects of imposing a testing program that would require some minimum level of leak testing of the pressure isolation valves on plants that presently have no such requirements. 28 refs., 31 figs., 64 tabs

  16. Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR [pressurized-water-reactor] plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    Recent pressure-vessel surveillance data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) indicate an embrittlement fluence-rate effect that is applicable to the evaluation of the integrity of light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel supports. A preliminary evaluation using the HFIR data indicated increases in the nil ductility transition temperature at 32 effective full-power years (EFPY) of 100 to 130/degree/C for pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) vessel supports located in the cavity at midheight of the core. This result indicated a potential problem with regard to life expectancy. However, an accurate assessment required a detailed, specific-plant, fracture-mechanics analysis. After a survey and cursory evaluation of all LWR plants, two PWR plants that appeared to have a potential problem were selected. Results of the analyses indicate minimum critical flaw sizes small enough to be of concern before 32 EFPY. 24 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Flooding of a large, passive, pressure-tube light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejzlar, P.; Todreas, N.E.; Driscoll, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    A reactor concept has been developed which can survive loss of coolant accidents without scram and without replenishing primary coolant inventory, while maintaining safe temperature limits on the fuel and pressure tubes. The proposed concept is a pressure tube type reactor of similar design to CANDU reactors, but differing in three key aspects. First, a solid SiC-coated graphite fuel matrix is used in place of fuel pin bundles to enable the dissipation of decay heat from the fuel in the absence of primary coolant. Second, the heavy water coolant in the pressure tubes is replaced by light water, which also serves as the moderator. Finally, the calandria tank, surrounded by a graphite reflector, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator, and this normally-voided calandria is connected to a light water heat sink. The cover gas displaces the light water from the calandria during normal operation, while during loss of coolant or loss of heat sink accidents it allows passive calandria flooding. Calandria flooding also provides redundant and diverse reactor shutdown. This paper describes the thermal hydraulic characteristics of the passively initiated, gravity driven calandria flooding process. Flooding the calandria space with light water is a unique and very important feature of the proposed pressure-tube light water reactor (PTLWR) concept. The flooding of the top row of fuel channels must be accomplished fast enough so that in the total loss of coolant, none of the critical components of the fuel channel, i.e. the pressure tube, the calandria tube, the matrix and the fuel, exceed their design limits. The flooding process has been modeled and shown to be rapid enough to maintain all components within their design limits. (orig.)

  18. Thermal-Hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactor core by using single heated channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactor as a basis of reactor safety has a very important role in reactor design and control. The thermal-hydraulic analysis provides input data to the reactor-physics analysis, whereas the latter gives information about the distribution of heat sources, which is needed to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study single heated channel model as a very fast model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of pressurized water reactor core has been developed. For verifying the results of this model, we used RELAP5 code as US nuclear regulatory approved thermal hydraulics code. The results of developed single heated channel model have been checked with RELAP5 results for WWER-1000. This comparison shows the capability of single heated channel model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of reactor core.

  19. Fuzzy logic control of steam generator water level in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuan, C.C.; Lin, C.; Hsu, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a fuzzy logic controller is applied to control the steam generator water level in a pressurized water reactor. The method does not require a detailed mathematical mode of the object to be controlled. The design is based on a set of linguistic rules that were adopted from the human operator's experience. After off-line fuzzy computation, the controller is a lookup table, and thus, real-time control is achieved. Shrink-and-swell phenomena are considered in the linguistic rules, and the simulation results show that their effect is dramatically reduced. The performance of the control system can also be improved by changing the input and output scaling factors, which is convenient for on-line tuning

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of equipment materials in domestic pressurized water reactors and the relevant safety management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Haitao

    2015-01-01

    International and domestic research and project state about stress corrosion cracking of nuclear equipments and materials (including austenitic stainless steel and nickel based alloys) in pressurized water reactor are discussed, and suggestions on how to prevent, mitigate ana deal with the stress corrosion cracking issues in domestic reactors are given in this paper based on real case analysis and study ondomestic nuclear equipment and material stress corrosion cracking failure. (author)

  1. Development and design of control rod drive mechanisms for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leme, Francisco Louzano

    2003-01-01

    The Control Rod Drive Mechanisms (CRDM) for a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) are equipment, integrated to the reactor pressure vessel, incorporating mechanical and electrical components designed to move and position the control rods to guarantee the control of power and shutdown of the nuclear reactor, during normal operation, either in emergency or accidental situations. The type of CRDM used in PWR reactors, whose detailed individual description will be presented in this monograph are the Roller-Nut and Magnetic-Jack. The environment, where the CRDM performs its above presented operational functions, includes direct contact with the fluid used as coolant peculiar to the interior of the reactor, and its associated chemical characteristics, the radiation field next to the reactor core, and also the temperature and pressure in the reactor pressure vessel. So the importance of the CRDM design requirements related to its safety functions are emphasized. Finally, some aspects related to the mechanical and structural design of CRDM of a case study, considering the CRDM for a PWR from the experimental nuclear plant to be applied by CTMSP (Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo), are pointed out. The design and development of these equipment (author)

  2. Advances made in French safety studies on pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelce, J.

    1979-01-01

    The programme of French safety studies on reactors is supposed to be known in its main outlines. A few recent results, obtained in different fields are presented. They concern the safety margins evaluation, the contamination transfer and the effect of external aggressions

  3. Kinetics of Pressurized Water Reactors with Hot or Cold Moderators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norinder, O

    1960-11-15

    The set of neutron kinetic equations developed in this report permits the use of long integration steps during stepwise integration. Thermal relations which describe the transfer of heat from fuel to coolant are derived. The influence upon the kinetic behavior of the reactor of a number of parameters is studied. A comparison of the kinetic properties of the hot and cold moderators is given.

  4. Remote-controlled television for locating leaking tubes in pressurized-water reactor steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormault, P.; Denis, J.

    1978-01-01

    The Scarabee system is designed for observation of the tubes in water boxes of pressurized-water reactor nuclear-power-station steam generators. It consists essentially of a camera and a projector used as a marker, both of which swivel freely. The whole unit is housed in a water-tight container which can easily be decontaminated. Remote control of camera and marker movement is carried out from a console. (author)

  5. Startup of a high-temperature reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical-pressure light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Tin Tin; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The startup schemes of high-temperature reactors cooled and moderated by supercritical pressure light water (SCLWR-H) with square lattice and descending flow type water rods are studied by thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study, two kinds of startup systems are investigated. In the constant pressure startup system, the reactor starts at a supercritical pressure. A flash tank and pressure reducing valves are necessary. The flash tank is designed so that the moisture content in the steam is less than 0.1%. In sliding pressure startup system, the reactor starts at a subcritical pressure. A steam-water separator and a drain tank are required for two-phase flow at startup. The separator is designed by referring to the water separator used in supercritical fossil-fired power plants. The maximum cladding surface temperature during the power-raising phase of startup is restricted not to exceed the rated value of 620degC. The minimum feedwater flow rate is 25% for constant pressure startup and 35% for sliding pressure startup system. It is found that both constant pressure startup system and sliding pressure startup system are feasible in SCLWR-H from the thermal hydraulic point of view. The core outlet temperature as high as 500degC can be achieved in the present design of SCLWR-H. Since the feedwater flow rate of SCLWR-H (1190 kg/s) is lower than that of the previous SCR designs the weight of the component required for startup is reduced. The sliding pressure startup system is better than constant pressure startup system in order to reduce the required component weight (and hence material expenditure) and to simplify the startup plant system. (author)

  6. Description of the containment for a stationary pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermani, S.

    1986-01-01

    The function of the containment is to prevent the inadvertent release of radioactive fission products from the reactor coolant system to the atmosphere and to provide biological shielding during both normal and accident operation. Basically three different containment concepts 1) the dry containment, 2) the subatmospheric containment, and 3) the ice condenser containment, have been developed, based on how the accident energy release from the reactor coolant system is controlled. The containment structure can be either 1) reinforced concrets with inside liner, 2) prestressed concrete with inside, or 3) full steel cylinder or steel sphere with separate concrete shield. The size of the containment is largely dictated by the required net free volume, that satisfies the energy release criteria due to the design basic accident. The design and construction methods applied to this structure guarantee that the containment will carry out its safety function. This was proven by the Three Mile Island accident. (author)

  7. Method for fuel element leak detection in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, U.

    1983-01-01

    The method is aimed at detecting fuel element leaks during reactor operation. It is based on neutron flux measurements at many points in the core, using at least two detectors at a time. The detectors must be arranged in the direction of the coolant flow. Values obtained from periodic measurements are compared with threshold values. The location of fuel element leaks is determined from those values exceeding the threshold of individual detectors

  8. 78 FR 64027 - Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Pressurized-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... comments were received. A companion guide, DG-1277, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0129] Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling... (RG), 1.79, ``Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Pressurized-Water Reactors...

  9. Pump selection and application in a pressurized water reactor electric generating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitch, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Various pump applications utilized in a nuclear pressurized water reactor electric generating plant are described. Emphasis is on pumps installed in the auxiliary systems of the primary nuclear steam supply system. Hydraulic and mechanical details, the ASME Code (Nuclear Design), materials, mechanical seals, shaft design, seismic qualification, and testing are addressed

  10. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Nesbitt, Loyd B.

    1997-01-01

    A system for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs.

  11. In-reactor oxidation of zircaloy-4 under low water vapor pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin K.; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330 and 370 °C). Data from these tests will be used to support the fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr-4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex-reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

  12. In-reactor oxidation of zircaloy-4 under low water vapor pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin K.; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330 and 370 ℃). Data from these tests will be used to support the fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr- 4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex-reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

  13. Sensor response monitoring in pressurized water reactors using time series modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyaya, B.R.; Kerlin, T.W.

    1978-01-01

    Random data analysis in nuclear power reactors for purposes of process surveillance, pattern recognition and monitoring of temperature, pressure, flow and neutron sensors has gained increasing attention in view of their potential for helping to ensure safe plant operation. In this study, application of autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) time series modeling for monitoring temperature sensor response characteristrics is presented. The ARMA model is used to estimate the step and ramp response of the sensors and the related time constant and ramp delay time. The ARMA parameters are estimated by a two-stage algorithm in the spectral domain. Results of sensor testing for an operating pressurized water reactor are presented. 16 refs

  14. Application of the regulations on pressurized components or light water reactor primary coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelemy, F.; Menjon, G.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the philosophy and the provisions of the Order of 26 February 1974 concerning application of the regulations on pressurized components for light water reactor steam supply systems. The aim is to show how these regulations which differ from other regulations on pressurized components and is more detailed on many points, is applied in practice in France in the various stages of the design, construction and operation of PWRs. (NEA) [fr

  15. On-off controller for installation to test the pressurized water reactor material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zauq, M.H.

    1982-05-01

    This report describes the design of an ON-OFF controller based on the 6800 microprocessor in its assembly language and its interfacing with its environment (sensors, periphery, etc). The controller is meant to control the temperature and the pressure inside an experimental chamber in which the material under test is placed. The ''Design basis accident'' conditions (e.g., LOCA) for a pressurized water reactor are simulated in the experimental chamber [fr

  16. Mark I 1/5-scale boiling water reactor pressure suppresion experiment quick-look report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, W.; Collins, E.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report is intended as a ''quick-look'' report summarizing the experimental results obtained from pressure suppression experiment numbers 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3 that were performed on the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's 1/5-scale boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark I pressure suppression experimental facility on April 26, 1977. A brief description of the general nature of the tests and a summary of the actual tests that were performed are given

  17. Effect of pressurized water reactor environment on fatigue crack propagation, including hole times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamford, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental program being conducted to investigate the effects of pressurized water reactor environment on the fatigue crack growth rate of pressure vessel steels. Tests were conducted on precracked WOL type specimens under load controlled conditions. The effects of R ratio, loading rates, and loading wave form are evaluated, and the results are compared for both forging and plate material, as well as weldments

  18. The European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR). State of the art after the preliminary design phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouteille, F.; Schneider, D.

    2002-01-01

    The European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) is an evolutionary development of the pressurized water reactor product lines built by Framatome and Siemens in France and Germany. Under the technical leadership of both nuclear power plant suppliers (now merged in Framatome ANP, a joint venture of AREVA and Siemens) the future-oriented plant concepts was developed in close cooperation with German and French utilities and in compliance with the European Utility Requirements. The EPR has safety features with which even extremely improbable, beyond design-basis events can be controlled and their effects can be limited to such an extent that no emergency response actions need be taken outside of the immediate plant site. This also means that safety systems prevent containment failure even in the improbable case of a core melt. This was confirmed by the French and German reactor safety authorities. The selected high thermal output also insures the economic viability of the innovative reactor concept, so that the power generation costs which can be achieved with the EPR will be absolutely competitive with those of fossil energy carriers. Framatome ANP has thus developed a pressurized water reactor ready for offer at the right time, which can completely fulfill the most rigorous requirements in terms of nuclear safety and economy. (Author)

  19. High temperature and high performance light water cooled reactors operating at supercritical pressure, research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.; Katsumura, Y.; Yamada, K.; Shiga, S.; Moriya, K.; Yoshida, S.; Takahashi, H.

    2003-01-01

    The concept of supercritical-pressure, once-through coolant cycle nuclear power plant (SCR) was developed at the University of Tokyo. The research and development (R and D) started worldwide. This paper summarized the conceptual design and R and D in Japan. The big advantage of the SCR concept is that the temperatures of major components such as reactor pressure vessel, control rod drive mechanisms, containments, coolant pumps, main steam piping and turbines are within the temperatures of the components of LWR and supercritical fossil fired power plants (FPP) in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. The experience of these components of LWR and supercritical fossil fired power plants will be fully utilized for SCR. The high temperature, supercritical-pressure light water reactor is the logical evolution of LWR. Boiling evolved from circular boilers, water tube boilers and once-through boilers. It is the reactor version of the once-through boiler. The development from LWR to SCR follows the history of boilers. The goal of the R and D should be the capital cost reduction that cannot be achieved by the improvement of LWR. The reactor can be used for hydrogen production either by catalysis and chemical decomposition of low quality hydrocarbons in supercritical water. The reactor is compatible with tight lattice fast core for breeders due to low outlet coolant density, small coolant flow rate and high head coolant pumps

  20. Component failures at pressurized water reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisinger, M.F.

    1980-10-01

    Objectives of this study were to identify those systems having major impact on safety and availability (i.e. to identify those systems and components whose failures have historically caused the greatest number of challenges to the reactor protective systems and which have resulted in greatest loss of electric generation time). These problems were identified for engineering solutions and recommendations made for areas and programs where research and development should be concentrated. The program was conducted in three major phases: Data Analysis, Engineering Evaluation, Cost Benefit Analysis

  1. Common safety approach for future pressurized water reactors in France and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queniart, D.; Gros, G.

    1994-01-01

    In France and Germany all major activities related to future pressurized water reactors are now proceeding in a coordinated way among the two countries. This holds for utilities and industry in the development of a joint PWR project, the ''European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR)'' by Electricite de France (EDF), German utilities, Nuclear Power International (NPI), Framatome and Siemens as well as for the technical safety objectives for future evolutionary reactors on the basis of a common safety approach adopted by the safety authorities of both countries for plants to operate form the beginning of the next century. The proposed paper covers this common development of a safety approach and particular technical safety objectives. (authors). 5 refs. 1 fig

  2. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided

  3. Topic 1. Steels for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Brynda, J.; Kepka, M.; Barackova, L.; Vacek, M.; Havel, S.; Cukr, B.; Protiva, K.; Petrman, I.; Tvrdy, M.; Hyspecka, L.; Mazanec, K.; Kupca, L.; Brezina, M.

    1980-01-01

    Part 1 of the Proceedings consists of papers on the criteria for the selection and comparison of the properties of steel for pressure vessels and on the metallurgy of the said steels, the selection of suitable material for internal tubing systems, the manufacture of high-alloy steels for WWER components, the mechanical and metallurgical properties of steel 22K for WWER 440 pressure components, and of steel 10MnNi2Mo for the WWER primary coolant circuit, and the metallographic assessment of steel 0Kh18N10T. (J.P.)

  4. Optimal reload and depletion method for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    A new method has been developed to automatically reload and deplete a PWR so that both the enriched inventory requirements during the reactor cycle and the cost of reloading the core are minimized. This is achieved through four stepwise optimization calculations: 1) determination of the minimum fuel requirement for an equivalent three-region core model, 2) optimal selection and allocation of fuel requirement for an equivalent three-region core model, 2) optimal selection and allocation of fuel assemblies for each of the three regions to minimize the cost of the fresh reload fuel, 3) optimal placement of fuel assemblies to conserve regionwise optimal conditions and 4) optimal control through poison management to deplete individual fuel assemblies to maximize EOC k/sub eff/. Optimizing the fuel cost of reloading and depleting a PWR reactor cycle requires solutions to two separate optimization calculations. One of these minimizes the enriched fuel inventory in the core by optimizing the EOC k/sub eff/. The other minimizes the cost of the fresh reload cost. Both of these optimization calculations have now been combined to provide a new method for performing an automatic optimal reload of PWR's. The new method differs from previous methods in that the optimization process performs all tasks required to reload and deplete a PWR

  5. Once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S. [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab

    2001-07-01

    Concept of once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors was developed. The research covered major aspects of conceptual design such as cores of thermal and fast reactors, plant system and heat balance, safety system and criteria, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control and start-up. The advantages of the reactor lie in the compactness of the plant from high specific enthalpy of supercritical water, the simplicity of the once-through cycle and the experiences of major component technologies which are based on supercritical fossil-fired power plants and LWRs. The operating temperatures of the major components are within the experience in spite of high coolant outlet temperature. The once-through cycle is compatible with the tight fuel lattice fast reactor because of high head pumps and small coolant flow rate. (author)

  6. Once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2001-01-01

    Concept of once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors was developed. The research covered major aspects of conceptual design such as cores of thermal and fast reactors, plant system and heat balance, safety system and criteria, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control and start-up. The advantages of the reactor lie in the compactness of the plant from high specific enthalpy of supercritical water, the simplicity of the once-through cycle and the experiences of major component technologies which are based on supercritical fossil-fired power plants and LWRs. The operating temperatures of the major components are within the experience in spite of high coolant outlet temperature. The once-through cycle is compatible with the tight fuel lattice fast reactor because of high head pumps and small coolant flow rate. (author)

  7. Assessment of Loss-of-Coolant Effect on Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Young; Park, Joo Hwan; Kim, Bong Ghi

    2009-01-01

    A CANDU reactor is a heavy-water-moderated, natural uranium fuelled reactor with a pressure tube. The reactor contains a horizontal cylindrical vessel (calandria) and each pressure tube is isolated from the heavy-water moderator in a calandria. This allows the moderator system to be operated of a high-pressure and of a high-temperature coolant in pressure tube. This causes the pressurized liquid coolant in the channel to void and therefore give rise to a reactivity transient in the event of a break or fault in the coolant circuit. In particular, all CANDU reactors are well known to have a positive void reactivity coefficient and thus this phenomenon may lead to a positive feedback, which can cause a large power pulse. We assess the loss-of-coolant effect by coolant void reactivity versus fuel burnup, four factor parameters for fresh fuel and equilibrium fuel, reactivity change due to the change of coolant density and reactivity change in the case of half- and full-core coolant

  8. Evaluation of denatured thorium fuel cycles in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzie, R.A.; Rec, J.R.; Terney, A.N.

    1977-01-01

    A developing national energy policy that is based in part on a substantial expansion of the LWR-based electrical generating capacity with deferment of the LMFBR has prompted a re-evaluation of our nuclear fuel resources and their utilization. The ancillary policy of minimizing nuclear weapons proliferation through diversion of bred fissile material has left in doubt the viability of fuel recycling as a means of extending these fuel resources. A substantial, government-sponsored effort is in progress to examine alternate fuel cycles and advanced reactor concepts which can lead to improved resource utilization while minimizing proliferation potential. This paper evaluates several improved fuel cycles for use in current design PWRs and develops selected scenarios for their use within the framework of the safeguarded Nuclear Energy Center (NEC) concept

  9. Performance of Fragema fuel in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, A.; Ravier, G.; Ballot, B.

    1986-06-01

    FRAGEMA fuel operating experience in power reactors is very extensive. Performance over a range of power and burnup levels for various operating conditions is quite satisfactory. However significant development programs are presently in progress to further extend our knowledge under increasingly severe operating conditions. In particular, upcoming data acquisition programs (1985-1988) will cover site and hot cell measurements on Gd poison rods, 4.5 % overenriched fuel rods over four operating cycles, 17 x 17 AFA fuel assemblies. For these products the same surveillance strategy as the one used for the standard assembly has been adopted, in order to continuously provide more data which can be used to upgrade design models and pave the way for the development of future products

  10. Mechanics of structures and maintenance of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutin, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Electricite de France nowadays has in operation 34 units of 900 MW and 17 units of 1300 MW of PWR. Since the first unit was run, this means that more than 350 reactor-years have been performed, to which should be added the experience already gained on fossil fuel or natural uranium plants. This enabled EDF to build its own philosophy and a strategy for maintenance that are best suited for the specific requirements of the hardware with which the actual nuclear boilers are made-up. This philosophy and strategy rest upon an analysis which calls widely for the mechanics of structures, to such an extent that major decisions concerning maintenance depend on the ability that one has for resolving problems within the scope of that discipline

  11. Integrated main coolant pumps for pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, R.

    1975-01-01

    The efficiency of an integrated main coolant pump for PWR's is increased. For this purpose, the pump is installed eccentric relative to the vertical axis of the U-type steam generator in the three-section HP chamber in such a way that its impeller wheel and the shell of the latter penetrate into the outlet chamber. The axis of the pump lies in the vertical plane of symmetry of the outlet chamber of the steam generator. The suction tube is arranged in the outlet chamber. To allow it to be installed, it is manufactured out of several parts. The diffusor tube, which is also made of several components, is attached to the horizontal separation plate between the outlet chamber and the pressure chamber so as to penetrate into it. To improve the outflow conditions at the diffusor tube, a plowshare-shaped baffle shield is installed between the diffusor tube and the HP chamber. Moreover, in order to improve the outflow conditions from the pump and from the pressure chamber, the outflow opening of the pressure chamber is put into the cylindrical shell of the HP chamber. In this way, the tensioning anchor is located between the pump and the outlet opening. (DG/RF) [de

  12. A parametric thermohydraulic study an advanced pressurized light water reactor with a tight fuel rod lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Hame, W.

    1982-12-01

    A parametric thermohydraulic study for an Advanced Pressurized Light Water Reactor (APWR) with a tight fuel rod lattice has been performed. The APWR improves the uranium utilisation. The APWR core should be placed in a modern German PWR plant. Within this study about 200 different reactors have been calculated. The tightening of the fuel rod lattice implies a decrease of the net electrical output of the plant, which is greater for the heterogeneous reactor than for the homogeneous reactor. APWR cores mean higher core pressure drops and higher water velocities in the core region. The cores tend to be shorter and the number of fuel rods to be higher than for the PWR. At the higher fuel rod pitch to diameter ratios (p/d) the DNB limitation is more stringent than the limitation on the fuel rod linear rating given by the necessity of reflooding after a reactor accident. The contrary is true for the lower p/d ratios. Subcooled boiling in the highest rated coolant channels occurs for the most of the calculated reactors. (orig.) [de

  13. Bounding analysis of containment of high pressure melt ejection in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additon, S.L.; Fontana, M.H.; Carter, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the loadings on containment due to direct containment heating (DCH) as a result of high pressure melt ejection (HPME) in advanced light water reactors (ALWR) which were estimated using conservative, bounding analyses. The purpose of the analyses was to scope the magnitude of the possible loadings and to indicate the performance needed from potential mitigation methods, such as a cavity configuration that limits energy transfer to the upper containment volume. Analyses were performed for three cases which examined the effect of availability of high pressure reactor coolant system water at the time of reactor vessel melt through and the effect of preflooding of the reactor cavity. The amount of core ejected from the vessel was varied from 100% to 0% for all cases. Results indicate that all amounts of core debris dispersal could be accommodated by the containment for the case where the reactor cavity was preflooded. For the worst case, all the energy from in-vessel hydrogen generation and combustion plus that from 45% of the entire molten core would be required to equilibrate with the containment upper volume in order to reach containment failure pressure

  14. Safety of pressurized water reactors: problems and corresponding studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogne, F.

    1976-01-01

    The author recalls the safety problems subject to researches in the CEA, either because of their importance or because studies made abroad were not sufficiently developed or were classified or in order to acquire an independent judgement when safety is concerned. Those problems and studies are submitted referring to the 3 existing shields between man and dangerous materials: fuel element can, thermal shield, (pressure vessel and pipes), biological shield of which the behaviour is studied in connection with outside aggressions such as earthquakes, plane crashes, chemical explosions.. [fr

  15. Neutron evaluation of burnable poison insertion in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Rochkhudson Batista de

    2013-01-01

    The development of this work was to match the 'Burn-up Credit Criticality Benchmark - Phase II-D - PWR-UO 2 Assembly Study of Control Rod Effects on Spent Fuel Composition' (case 15), which was modeled using the code MCNP5 and SCALE 6.0. The results of the infinite multiplication factor (k inf ) were compared with those obtained by international institutions. Later we performed in this same benchmark, a sensitivity analysis using SCALE 6.0. Thus, we tested several changes in case 15 of Benchmark, such as insertion of different percentages of burnable poison, changing the number and positions of the rods. In all cases were analyzed, comparisons and discussions about the results. The same methodology was applied to the reactor core of the Nuclear Plant in Brazil, Angra II, initially to evaluate its behavior when subjected to a variation in the percentage of burnable poison and then, introduce changes also in the enrichment of nuclear fuel, doing the appropriate comparisons of results. Considering results and experience gained, the Department of Nuclear Engineering, is prepared to control analysis of reactivity with the use of different types of burnable poisons under the code SCALE 6.0 through its various modules. (author)

  16. Rupture hardware minimization in pressurized water reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.K.; Ski, J.J.; Chexal, V.; Norris, D.M.; Goldstein, N.A.; Beaudoin, B.F.; Quinones, D.F.; Server, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    For much of the high-energy piping in light reactor systems, fracture mechanics calculations can be used to assure pipe failure resistance, thus allowing the elimination of excessive rupture restraint hardware both inside and outside containment. These calculations use the concept of leak-before-break (LBB) and include part-through-wall flaw fatigue crack propagation, through-wall flaw detectable leakage, and through-wall flaw stability analyses. Performing these analyses not only reduces initial construction, future maintenance, and radiation exposure costs, but also improves the overall safety and integrity of the plant since much more is known about the piping and its capabilities than would be the case had the analyses not been performed. This paper presents the LBB methodology applied a Beaver Valley Power Station- Unit 2 (BVPS-2); the application for two specific lines, one inside containment (stainless steel) and the other outside containment (ferrutic steel), is shown in a generic sense using a simple parametric matrix. The overall results for BVPS-2 indicate that pipe rupture hardware is not necessary for stainless steel lines inside containment greater than or equal to 6-in. (152-mm) nominal pipe size that have passed a screening criteria designed to eliminate potential problem systems (such as the feedwater system). Similarly, some ferritic steel line as small as 3-in. (76-mm) diameter (outside containment) can qualify for pipe rupture hardware elemination

  17. Stochastic model to monitor mechanical vibrations in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of using neutron flux and core-exit temperature signals in PWRs for estimating core coolant flow velocity has been demonstrated using normal operational data from both the LOFT reactor and a commerical PWR. The LOFT analysis further showed that the core coolant velocity can be accurately monitored for various flow rates using the linear phase-frequency relationship in the frequency range 0.1 to 2 Hz. The development of the technique for monitoring core coolant velocity in PWRs provides a valuable alternative for flow measurement. Theoretical studies of core heat transfer in PWRs showed that the fluctuating heat sources have a dominating effect on the core-exit temperature compared to fluctuations of the coolant flow rate and core inlet coolant temperature. In the present analysis a detailed distributed parameter model of a PWR core was developed with the purpose of studying the following aspects of core coolant flow rate measurement: the mechanisms causing linear phase relationship between neutron flux and coolant temperature signals due to various perturbation sources; the effect of axial flux shape on the phase slope (or estimated transit delay time); and the relationship between transit delay time and effective distance of temperature noise propagation to maintain the flow velocity invariant

  18. Analysis of pressurized water reactor accidents in reactivity disturbances. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinka, I.

    1978-01-01

    The logic structure of program FATRAP is described. The time course of reactivity temporal and spatial distributions of neutron flux density and power, characteristic temperatures of the individual reactor zones and the heat flux density from cladding to the coolant can be obtained as the main results. The basic program funcitons were tested for a point and a one-dimensional model. In the basic test the absorption rod was removed uncontrollably at a preset speed for 0.5 s with the reactivity feedback operative. A second test simulated the action of the accident protection system with a delay of 0.1 s started when the 7500 MW power had been obtained. The last test consisted in simulating a start-up accident with an initial power of 2.25 MW. For the said chosen accident models reactivity feedback is responsible for the formation of the appropriate power peak while the accident protection attendance alone can considerably reduce temperatures during the process. (J.F.)

  19. Modelling Pressurized Water Reactor cores in terms of porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricciardi, G.; Collard, B.; Ricciardi, G.; Bellizzi, S.; Cochelin, B.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a tractable model of a nuclear reactor core taking the complexity of the structure (including its nonlinear behaviour) and fluid flow coupling into account. The mechanical behaviour modelling includes the dynamics of both the fuel assemblies and the fluid. Each rod bundle is modelled in the form of a deformable porous medium; then, the velocity field of the fluid and the displacement field of the structure are defined over the whole domain. The fluid and the structure are first modelled separately, before being linked together. The equations of motion for the structure are obtained using a Lagrangian approach and, to be able to link up the fluid and the structure, the equations of motion for the fluid are obtained using an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian approach. The finite element method is applied to spatially discretize the equations. Simulations are performed to analyse the effects of the characteristics of the fluid and of the structure. Finally, the model is validated with a test involving two fuel assemblies, showing good agreement with the experimental data. (authors)

  20. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, P.R.

    1994-12-27

    A boiling water reactor is described having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit. 4 figures.

  1. The emergency response guidelines for the Westinghouse pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekens, J.P.; Bastien, R.; Prokopovich, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Three Mile Island accident has demonstrated that the guidance provided for mitigating the consequences of design basis accidents could be inadequate when multiple incidents, failures or errors occur during or after the accident. Westinghouse and the Westinghouse Owners Group have developed new Emergency Response Guidelines (E.R.G.). The E.R.G. are composed of two independent sets of procedures and of a systematic tool to continuously evaluate the plant safety throughout the response to an accident. a) The Optimal Recovery Guidelines are entered each time the reactor is tripped or the Emergency Core Cooling System is actuated. An immediate verification of the automatic protective actuations is performed and the accident diagnosis process is initiated. When nature of the accident is identified, the operator is transferred to the applicable recovery procedure and subprocedures. A permanent rediagnosis is performed throughout the application of the optimal Recovery Guidelines and cross connections are provided to the adequate procedure if an error in diagnosis is identified. b) Early in the course of the accident, the operating staff initiates monitoring of the Critical Safety Functions. These are defined as the set of functions ensuring the integrity of the physical barriers against radioactivity release. The review of these functions is peformed continuously through a cyclic application of the status trees. c) The Function Restoration Guidelines are entered when the Critical Safety Function monitoring identifies a challenge to one of the functions. Depending on the severity of the challenge, the transfer to a Function Restoration Guideline can be immediate for a severe challenge or delayed for a minor challenge. Those guidelines are independent of the scenario of the accident, but only based on plant parameters and equipment availability

  2. Proposal for Dual Pressurized Light Water Reactor Unit Producing 2000 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung Min; Noh, Sang Woo; Suh, Kune Yull

    2009-01-01

    The Dual Unit Optimizer 2000 MWe (DUO2000) is put forward as a new design concept for large power nuclear plants to cope with economic and safety challenges facing the 21 st century green and sustainable energy industry. DUO2000 is home to two nuclear steam supply systems (NSSSs) of the Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MWe (OPR1000)-like pressurized water reactor (PWR) in single containment so as to double the capacity of the plant. The idea behind DUO may as well be extended to combining any number of NSSSs of PWRs or pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), or even boiling water reactors (BWRs). Once proven in water reactors, the technology may even be expanded to gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and molten salt cooled reactors. With its in-vessel retention external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) as severe accident management strategy, DUO can not only put the single most querulous PWR safety issue to an end, but also pave the way to very promising large power capacity while dispensing with the huge redesigning cost for Generation III+ nuclear systems. Five prototypes are presented for the DUO2000, and their respective advantages and drawbacks are considered. The strengths include, but are not necessarily limited to, reducing the cost of construction by decreasing the number of containment buildings from two to one, minimizing the cost of NSSS and control systems by sharing between the dual units, and lessening the maintenance cost by uniting the NSSS, just to name the few. The latent threats are discussed as well

  3. Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-01-01

    700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

  4. The status of improved pressurized heavy water reactor development - A new option for PHWR -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Tae Keun; Yeo, Ji Won

    1996-03-01

    Currently, the 900 MWe class Improved Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR), which is a type of CANDU reactor based on the systems and components of operating CANDU plants, is under development. The improved PHWR has a 480 fuel channel calandria, uses 37 element natural uranium fuel bundles and has a single unit containment. Adaptation of a steel-lined containment structure and improved containment isolation systems permit a reduced exclusion area boundary (EAB) compared to the existing larger capacity CANDU reactors (Darlington, Bruce B). The improved PHWR buildings are arranged to achieve minimum spacing between reactor units. Plant safety and economy are increased through various design changes based on the operating experience of existing CANDU plants. 4 refs. (Author)

  5. Core design of a high breeding fast reactor cooled by supercritical pressure light water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Someya, Takayuki, E-mail: russell@ruri.waseda.jp; Yamaji, Akifumi

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Core design concept of supercritical light water cooled fast breeding reactor is developed. • Compound system doubling time (CSDT) is applied for considering an appropriate target of breeding performance. • Breeding performance is improved by reducing fuel rod diameter of the seed assembly. • Core pressure loss is reduced by enlarging the coolant channel area of the seed assembly. - Abstract: A high breeding fast reactor core concept, cooled by supercritical pressure light water has been developed with fully-coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics core calculations, which takes into account the influence of core pressure loss to the core neutronics characteristics. Design target of the breeding performance has been determined to be compound system doubling time (CSDT) of less than 50 years, by referring to the relationship of energy consumption and economic growth rate of advanced countries such as the G7 member countries. Based on the past design study of supercritical water cooled fast breeder reactor (Super FBR) with the concept of tightly packed fuel assembly (TPFA), further improvement of breeding performance and reduction of core pressure loss are investigated by considering different fuel rod diameters and coolant channel geometries. The sensitivities of CSDT and the core pressure loss with respect to major core design parameters have been clarified. The developed Super FBR design concept achieves fissile plutonium surviving ratio (FPSR) of 1.028, compound system doubling time (CSDT) of 38 years and pressure loss of 1.02 MPa with positive density reactivity (negative void reactivity). The short CSDT indicates high breeding performance, which may enable installation of the reactors at a rate comparable to energy growth rate of developed countries such as G7 member countries.

  6. Advanced development and operating experience with a canned motor pump under pressurized water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, H.; Reymann, A.; Seibig, B.; Reinecker, H.

    1988-01-01

    At the research reactor FRG-2, Geesthacht, an irradiation device is in operation for testing defective light-water-reactor (LWR) test fuel rods under pressurized water reactor conditions (320 0 C, 160 bar). The requirements to the canned motor pump for cooling water circulation: medium: Demineralized water, operating temperature 320 0 C, operating pressure 155 bar, radiation field of the reactor, integration in the irradiation capsule, helium leak rate -6 mbar.dm 3 .s -1 , minimum working life 3000 hours, were high and caused difficulties in the acquisition of this component. First test runs with supplied pumps showed that the desired working life could not be achieved. The results of the development steps, the test runs, and the performance in service show that for our range of applications, the best combination of materials for the radial bearings is silicon-infiltrated SiC (8% free Si) against the same material. These bearings allowed a good working life for the pump to be achieved. (orig./GL) [de

  7. Topics to be covered in safety analysis reports for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors or boiling water reactors in the F.R.G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, H.A.G.

    1977-01-01

    This manual aims at defining the standards to be used in Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants with Pressurized Water Reactors or Boiling Water Reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany. The topics to be covered are: Information about the site (geographic situation, settlement, industrial and military facilities, transport and communications, meteorological conditions, geological, hydrological and seismic conditions, radiological background), description of the power plant (building structures, safety vessel, reactor core, cooling system, ventilation systems, steam power plant, electrical facilities, systems for measurement and control), indication of operation (commissioning, operation, safety measures, radiation monitoring, organization), incident analysis (reactivity incidents, loss-of-coolant incidents, external impacts). (HP) [de

  8. A computer program for accident calculations of a standard pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keutner, H.

    1979-01-01

    In this computer program the dynamic of a standard pressurized water reactor should be realized by both circulation loops with all important components. All important phenomena are taken into consideration, which appear for calculation of disturbances in order to state a realistic process for some minutes after a disturbance or a desired change of condition. In order to optimize the computer time simplifications are introduced in the statement of a differential-algebraic equalization system such that all important effects are taken into consideration. The model analysis starts from the heat production of the fuel rod via cladding material to the cooling medium water and considers the delay time from the core to the steam generator. Alternations of the cooling medium pressure as well as the different temperatures in the primary loop influence the pressuring system - the pressurizer - which is realized by a water and a steam zone with saturated and superheated steam respectively saturated and undercooled water with injection, heating and blow-down devices. The bilance of the steam generator to the secondary loop realizes the process engineering devices. Thereby the control regulation of the steam pressure and the reactor performance is realized. (orig.) [de

  9. Possibilities of crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) measurement under boiling and pressurized water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehling, W.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture mechanics investigations carried out so far in laboratory conditions cover only part of the material stresses, as effects which occur in nuclear powerstations, in particular, such as corrosion and radioactive radiation are largely left out of account. Therefore experiments including these effects were recently carried out in autoclaves, test rigs simulating reactors (HRD experimental plant) and in experimental reactors. An important parameter of experimental fracture mechanics is the measurement of crack opening displacement (COD). The crack opening is measured with socalled clip gauges (transmitters based on strain gauges, which convert mechanical deformation of springs into electrical signals) on standard samples in the laboratory. It was therefore sensible to use these high temperature strain gauges (HTD) for the development of a measuring system for travel for pressurized water and boiling water reactor conditions. (orig.) [de

  10. Optimal control of load-following operations in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Fuyu; Zhou Dawei

    2000-01-01

    According to the optimal control theory, the problem of load-following operation in a pressurized water reactor is formulated as a nonlinear-quadratic optimal control problem. One-dimensional core model is adopted. A successful optimization algorithm DDPSR is proposed to solving the obtained problem. The research results show that the DDPSR can converge with a long time interval and needs very small iteration number and computing time, and the practical reactor can be fairly operated in an optimal load-following manner and axial offset satisfies the required value from beginning to end. Control characters of boron concentration are discussed specially

  11. Analysis of an ultrasonic level device for in-core Pressurized Water Reactor coolant detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    A rigorous semi-empirical approach was undertaken to model the response of an ultrasonic level device (ULD) for application to in-core coolant detection in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). An equation is derived for the torsional wave velocity v/sub t phi/ in the ULD. Existing data reduction techniques were analyzed and compared to results from use of the derived equation. Both methods yield liquid level measurements with errors of approx. 5%. A sensitivity study on probe performance at reactor conditions predicts reduced level responsivity from data at lower temperatures

  12. Analysis of French (Paluel) pressurized water reactor design differences compared to current US PWR designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    To understand better the regulatory approaches to reactor safety in foreign countries, the staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commisssion has reviewed design information on the Paluel nuclear power plant, one of the current standard 1300-MWe plant operating in France. This report provides the staff's evaluation of major design differences between this standardized French plant and current US pressurized water reactor plants, as well as insights concerning French regulatory practices. The staff identified approximately 25 design differences, and an analysis of the safety significance of each of these design features is presented, along with an assessment comparing the relative safety benefit of each

  13. Plutonium and minor actinides recycle in equilibrium fuel cycles of pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waris, A.; Sekimoto, H. [Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A study on plutonium and minor actinides (MA) recycle in equilibrium fuel cycles of pressurized water reactors (PWR) has been performed. The calculation results showed that the enrichment and the required amount of natural uranium decrease significantly with increasing number of confined plutonium and MA when uranium is discharged from the reactor. However, when uranium is totally confined, the enrichment becomes extremely high. The recycle of plutonium and MA together with discharging uranium can reduce the radio-toxicity of discharged heavy metal (HM) waste to become less than that of loaded uranium. (author)

  14. Biodosimetric analysis of medium pressure UV disinfection reactor treating unfiltered surface water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinan, B.E.; Craik, S.A.; Smith, D.W.; Belosevic, M.

    2002-01-01

    Many small and medium-sized communities use chlorination of surface water as their sole treatment of potable water. Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection may offer these communities a cost effective treatment option for protection against pathogens not readily inactivated by chlorine. The effectiveness of UV reactors for microorganism reduction, however, is sensitive to UV dose delivery, which is in turn influenced by water quality characteristics. The effectiveness of a Calgon Carbon Inc. Sentinel medium-pressure UV reactor for microorganism reduction was determined using biodosimetry with two non-pathogenic indicator organisms - MS2 phage and Bacillus subtilis. Testing was conducted using low turbidity (<0.5 NTU) lake water characterized by relatively high absorbance in the UV range (UVT of approx. 87 to 88% at 254 nm). The efficiency of UV dose delivery in the reactor was determined for various operating conditions by calculating the normalized reductive equivalent irradiance (REI). With a single lamp in operation, the normalized REI measured with B. subtilis increased significantly when the flow rate through the reactor was increased from 380 L/min to 1140 L/min. This increase in reactor efficiency was believed to be due to improved reactor hydrodynamics and axial mixing that accompanied the higher flow rates. In contrast, treatment efficiency based on biodosimetry with MS2 phage was found to decrease with increasing flow rate when a single lamp was in operation. In general, treatment efficiency was greater when more than one adjacent lamp was in operation, suggesting that the influence of flow short-circuiting with single lamp operation. Differences between the outcomes observed with the two indicator microorganisms were not resolved, however, it was concluded that reactor efficiency was sensitive to both water flow rate and the number of adjacent lamps that were in operation. (author)

  15. Physical model of lean suppression pressure oscillation phenomena: steam condensation in the light water reactor pressure suppression system (PSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, E.W.; Holman, G.S.; Aust, E.; Schwan, H.; Vollbrandt, J.

    1980-01-01

    Using the results of large scale multivent tests conducted by GKSS, a physical model of chugging is developed. The unique combination of accurate digital data and cinematic data has provided the derivation of a detailed, quantified correlation between the dynamic physical variables and the associated two-phase thermo-hydraulic phenomena occurring during lean suppression (chugging) phases of the loss-of-coolant accident in a boiling water reactor pressure suppression system

  16. Moderator feedback effects in two-dimensional nodal methods for pressurized water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downar, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    A method was developed for incorporating moderator feedback effects in two-dimensional nodal codes used for pressurized water reactor (PWR) neutronic analysis. Equations for the assembly average quality and density are developed in terms of the assembly power calculated in two dimensions. The method is validated with a Westinghouse PWR using the Electric Power Research Institute code SIMULATE-E. Results show a several percent improvement is achieved in the two-dimensional power distribution prediction compared to methods without moderator feedback

  17. Common safety approach for future pressurized water reactors in France and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, W.; Jahns, A.; Queniart, D.; Gros, G.

    1995-01-01

    In France and Germany all major activities related to future pressurized water reactors are now proceeding in a coordinated way among the two countries. The proposed paper covers this common development of a safety approach and particular technical safety objectives. The main topics of this document are presented in this paper, together with a rationale for the approach and the recommended technical principles. (K.A.). 5 refs., 1 fig

  18. Ion irradiation studies of the origins of pressurized water reactor fuel assembly deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hengstler-Eger, Rosmarie Martina

    2012-01-01

    The presented thesis studies ion irradiation damage in Zr-based alloys for pressurized water reactors to explain the origins of unexpectedly high fuel assembly growth in some plants. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the effects of temperature, dose, hydrogen content of the alloy and tensile stress. A clear correlation between the stress orientation towards the crystal lattice and the density of the dislocation loops which are responsible for increased growth was found.

  19. RELAP5 - a new tool for pressurized water reactor safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perneczky, L.

    1988-11-01

    The RELAP type pressurized water reactor safety system codes are used world wide for the loss of coolant accident analyses. In this paper the RELAP5, the advanced generation of the code family is presented. The relationship to RELAP4/mod6 version is discussed. The capability of the RELAP5/mod1-EUR version for small, medium and large break LOCA is investigated based on international user experience. (author) 30 refs

  20. Loss-of-Fluid Test findings in pressurized water reactor core's thermal-hydraulic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core's thermal-hydraulic behavior findings from experiments performed at the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The potential impact of these findings on the safety and economics of PWR's generation of electricity is also discussed. Reviews of eight important findings in the core's physical behavior and in experimental methods are presented with supporting evidence

  1. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of a closure head penetration in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, D.R.; Schwirian, R.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    ALLOY 600 has been used typically for penetrations through the closure head in pressurized water reactors because of its thermal compatibility with carbon steel, superior resistance to chloride attack and higher strength than the austenitic stainless steels. Recent plant operating experience with this alloy has indicated that this material may be susceptible to degradation. One of the major parameters relating to degradation of the head penetrations are the operational temperatures and stress levels in the penetration.

  2. Multi-dimensional fluid-structure interactions in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, J.K.; Hirt, C.W.; Stein, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    Sudden loss of coolant in a pressurized water reactor due to failure of a coolant pipe would result in flashing of the coolant accompanied by the propagation of a rarefaction wave into the downcomer. A computer program that simultaneously calculates the behavior of the coolant and the accompanying motion of the core support barrel which is considered as a three-dimensional shell with both membrane and bending stresses is discussed

  3. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Station Blackout Caused by External Flooding Using the RISMC Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Prescott, Steven [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates. In order to evaluate the impact of these factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insight to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This report focuses, in particular, on the application of a RISMC detailed demonstration case study for an emergent issue using the RAVEN and RELAP-7 tools. This case study looks at the impact of a couple of challenges to a hypothetical pressurized water reactor, including: (1) a power uprate, (2) a potential loss of off-site power followed by the possible loss of all diesel generators (i.e., a station black-out event), (3) and earthquake induces station-blackout, and (4) a potential earthquake induced tsunami flood. The analysis is performed by using a set of codes: a thermal-hydraulic code (RELAP-7), a flooding simulation tool (NEUTRINO) and a stochastic analysis tool (RAVEN) – these are currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory.

  4. Investigation of coolant mixture in pressurized water reactors at the Rossendorf mixing test facility ROCOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, G.; Hoehne, T.; Prasser, H.M.; Richter, K.; Weiss, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    During the so-called boron dilution or cold water transients at pressurized water reactors too weakly borated water or too cold water, respectively, might enter the reactor core. This results in the insertion of positive reactivity and possibly leads to a power excursion. If the source of unborated or subcooled water is not located in all coolant loops but in selected ones only, the amount of reactivity insertion depends on the coolant mixing in the downcomer and lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Such asymmetric disturbances of the coolant temperature or boron concentration might e.g. be the result of a failure of the chemical and volume control system (CVCS) or of a main steam line break (MSLB) that does only affect selected steam generators (SG). For the analysis of boron dilution or MSLB accidents coupled neutron kinetics/thermo-hydraulic system codes have been used. To take into account coolant mixing phenomena in these codes in a realistic manner, analytical mixing models might be included. These models must be simple and fast running on the one hand, but must well describe the real mixing conditions on the other hand. (orig.)

  5. Design of an additional heat sink based on natural circulation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischengruber, Kurt; Solanilla, Roberto; Fernandez, Ricardo; Blumenkrantz, Arnaldo; Castano, Jorge

    1989-01-01

    Residual heat removal through the steam generators in Nuclear Power Plant with pressurized water reactors (PWR) or pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR in pressured vessel or pressured tube types) requires the maintenance of the steam generator inventory and the availability of and appropriate heat sink, which are based on the operability of the steam generators feedwater system. This paper describes the conceptual design of an assured heat removal system which includes only passive elements and is based on natural circulation. The system can supplement the original systems of the plant. The new system includes a condenser/boiler heat exchanger to condense the steam produced in the steam generator, transferring the heat to the water of an open pool at atmospheric pressure. The condensed steam flows back to the steam generators by natural circulation effects. The performance of an Atucha type PHWR nuclear power station with and without the proposed system is calculated in an emergency power case for the first 5000 seconds after the incident. The analysis shows that the proposed system offers the possibility to cool-down the plant to a low energy state during several hours and avoids the repeated actuation of the primary and secondary system safety valves. (Author) [es

  6. Pressure tube reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natori, Hisahide.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the electrical power generation efficiency in a pressure tube reactor in which coolants and moderators are separated by feedwater heating with heat generated in heavy water and by decreasing the amount of steams to be extracted from the turbine. Constitution: A heat exchanger and a heavy water cooler are additionally provided to a conventional pressure tube reactor. The heat exchanger is disposed at the pre-stage of a low pressure feedwater heater series. High temperature heavy water heated in the core is passed through the primary side of the exchanger, while feedwater is passed through the secondary side. The cooler is disposed on the downstream of the heat exchanger in the flowing direction of the heavy water, in which heavy water from the heat exchanger is passed through the primary side and the auxiliary equipment cooling water is sent to the secondary side thereof. Accordingly, since extraction of heating steams is no more necessary, the steam can be used for the rotation of the turbine, and the electrical power generation efficiency can be improved. (Seki, T.)

  7. Station black out concurrent with PORV failure using a Generic Pressurized Water Reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubair, Muhammad; Ababneh, Ahmad; Ishag, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •SBO accident simulation by using a GPWR simulator. •Normal SBO, and SBO with additional failure of Pilot Operated Relief Valve. •The research results will provide help in future for better understanding of accidents in APR 1400 reactors. -- Abstract: Station Black Out (SBO) is an accident situation that refers to the total loss of offsite power, along with the unavailability of onsite power, which results from the failure of all Diesel Generators (DG). Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) spans a number of methods that include modeling of event-trees and simulation of accidents scenarios, aimed to quantify risk and ensure safety in nuclear power plants. PSA also deals with prediction of future accidents and calculation of failure probabilities that has been done in this study. A SBO accident was simulated using a Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (GPWR) simulator from KEYMASTER™. The accident scenario consists of two stages; the first stage belongs to normal SBO, in second stage SBO accident with additional failure of Pilot Operated Relief Valve (PORV) opens and it stuck open has been considered for the pressurizer. A comparison of the two stages was made by plotting variables on the same graph. The research has been carried out to analyze the hot and cold leg temperatures, Steam Generator (SG) pressure, SG Narrow Range (NR) level, SG water-level-percentage (PCT), Pressurizer pressure, Fuel Temperature, and containment pressure. Simulation results suggest that failure in closing PORV has negligible impact on hot and cold leg temperatures, results in an overall less pressure in SGs, but higher pressure in the pressurizer. Additionally, containment pressure did not exceed the maximum approved pressure of 8.7 kg/cm 2 , but was approaching the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor’s (APR-1400) design pressure of 4.218 kg/cm 2 . Finally, nuclear fuel temperature exceeded Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) limit of 726.7 °C for both scenarios. The

  8. General empirical model for 60Co generation in pressurized water reactors with continuous refueling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urrutia, G.A.; Blesa, M.A.; Fernandez-Prini, R.; Maroto, A.J.G.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified model is presented that permits one to calculate the average activity on the fuel elements of a reactor that operates under continuous refueling, based on the assumption of crud interchange between fuel element surface and coolant in the form of particulate material only and using the crud specific activity as an empirical parameter determined in plant. The net activity flux from core to out-of-core components is then calculated in the form of parametric curves depending on crud specific activity and rate of particulate release from fuel surface. In pressure vessel reactors, contribution to out-ofcore radionuclide inventory arising in the release of activated materials from core components must be taken into account. The contribution from in situ activation of core components is calculated from the rates of release and the specific activities corresponding to the exposed surface of the component (calculated in a straightforward way on the basis of core geometry and neutron fluxes). The rates of release can be taken from the literature, or in the case of cobalt-rich alloys, can be calculated from experimentally determined cobalt contents of structural components and crud. For pressure vessel reactors operating under continuous refueling, activation of deposited crud and release of activated materials are compared; the latter, in certain cases, may represent a sizable (and even the largest) fraction of the total cobalt activity. It is proposed that the ratio of activities of 59 Fe to 54 Mn may be used as a diagnostic tool for in situ activation of structural materials; available data indicate ratios close to unity for pressure tube heavy water reactors (no in situ activation) and ratios around 4 to 10 for pressure vessel, heavy water reactors

  9. Development of neutron irradiation embrittlement correlation of reactor pressure vessel materials of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soneda, Naoki; Dohi, Kenji; Nomoto, Akiyoshi; Nishida, Kenji; Ishino, Shiori

    2007-01-01

    A large amount of surveillance data of the RPV embrittlement of the Japanese light water reactors have been compiled since the current Japanese embrittlement correlation has been issued in 1991. Understanding on the mechanisms of the embrittlement has also been greatly improved based on both experimental and theoretical studies. CRIEPI and the Japanese electric power utilities have started research project to develop a new embrittlement correlation method, where extensive study of the microstructural analyses of the surveillance specimens irradiated in the Japanese commercial reactors has been conducted. The new findings obtained from the experimental study are that the formation of solute-atom clusters with little or no copper is responsible for the embrittlement in low-copper materials, and that the flux effect exists especially in high-copper materials and this is supported by the difference in the microstructure of the high-copper materials irradiated at different fluxes. Based on these new findings, a new embrittlement correlation method is formulated using rate equations. The new methods has higher prediction capability than the current Japanese embrittlement correlation in terms of smaller standard deviation as well as smaller mean value of the prediction error. (author)

  10. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  11. Comparison of ASME pressure–temperature limits on the fracture probability for a pressurized water reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Hsoung-Wei; Huang, Chin-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • P-T limits based on ASME K_I_a curve, K_I_C curve and RI method are presented. • Probabilistic and deterministic methods are used to evaluate P-T limits on RPV. • The feasibility of substituting P-T curves with more operational is demonstrated. • Warm-prestressing effect is critical in determining the fracture probability. - Abstract: The ASME Code Section XI-Appendix G defines the normal reactor startup (heat-up) and shut-down (cool-down) operation limits according to the fracture toughness requirement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials. This paper investigates the effects of different pressure-temperature limit operations on structural integrity of a Taiwan domestic pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressure vessel. Three kinds of pressure-temperature limits based on different fracture toughness requirements – the K_I_a fracture toughness curve of ASME Section XI-Appendix G before 1998 editions, the K_I_C fracture toughness curve of ASME Section XI-Appendix G after 2001 editions, and the risk-informed revision method supplemented in ASME Section XI-Appendix G after 2013 editions, respectively, are established as the loading conditions. A series of probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses for the RPV are conducted employing ORNL’s FAVOR code considering various radiation embrittlement levels under these pressure-temperature limit conditions. It is found that the pressure-temperature operation limits which provide more operational flexibility may lead to higher fracture risks to the RPV. The cladding-induced shallow surface breaking flaws are the most critical and dominate the fracture probability of the RPV under pressure-temperature limit transients. Present study provides a risk-informed reference for the operation safety and regulation viewpoint of PWRs in Taiwan.

  12. Chaotic behavior of water column oscillator simulating pressure balanced injection system in passive safety reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Y.; Madarame, H.; Okamoto, K.

    2001-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) proposed a passive safety reactor called the System-integrated Pressurized Water Reactor (SPWR). In a loss of coolant accident, the Pressurizing Line (PL) and the Injection Line (IL) are passively opened. Vapor generated by residual heat pushes down the water level in the Reactor Vessel (RV). When the level is lower than the inlet of the PL, the vapor is ejected into the Containment Vessel (CV) through the PL. Then boronized water in the CV is injected into the RV through the IL by the static head. In an experiment using a simple apparatus, gas ejection and water injection were found to occur alternately under certain conditions. The gas ejection interval was observed to fluctuate considerably. Though stochastic noise affected the interval, the experimental results suggested that the large fluctuation was produced by an inherent character in the system. A set of piecewise linear differential equations was derived to describe the experimental result. The large fluctuation was reproduced in the analytical solution. Thus it was shown to occur even in a deterministic system without any source of stochastic noise. Though the derived equations simulated the experiment well, they had ten independent parameters governing the behavior of the solution. There appeared chaotic features and bifurcation, but the analytical model was too complicated to examine the features and mechanism of bifurcation. In this study, a new simple model is proposed which consists of a set of piecewise linear ordinary differential equations with only four independent parameters. (authors)

  13. RELAP5 analyses of overcooling transients in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolander, M.A.; Fletcher, C.D.; Ogden, D.M.; Stitt, B.D.; Waterman, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    In support of the Pressurized Thermal Shock Integration Study sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has performed analyses of overcooling transients using the RELAP5/MOD1.5 computer code. These analyses were performed for Oconee Plants 1 and 3, which are pressurized water reactors of Babcock and Wilcox lowered-loop design. Results of the RELAP5 analyses are presented, including a comparison with plant data. The capabilities and limitations of the RELAP5/MOD1.5 computer code in analyzing integral plant transients are examined. These analyses require detailed thermal-hydraulic and control system computer models

  14. RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic analyses of overcooling sequences in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolander, M.A.; Fletcher, C.D.; Davis, C.B.; Kullberg, C.M.; Stitt, B.D.; Waterman, M.E.; Burtt, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    In support of the Pressurized Thermal Shock Integration Study, sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has performed analyses of overcooling transients using the RELAP5/MOD1.6 and MOD2.0 computer codes. These analyses were performed for the H.B. Robinson Unit 2 pressurized water reactor, which is a Westinghouse 3-loop design plant. Results of the RELAP5 analyses are presented. The capabilities of the RELAP5 computer code as a tool for analyzing integral plant transients requiring a detailed plant model, including complex trip logic and major control systems, are examined

  15. Instrumenting a pressure suppression experiment for a Mark I boiling water reactor: another measurements engineering challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shay, W.M.; Brough, W.G.; Miller, T.B.

    1978-01-01

    A 1 / 5 -scale test facility of a pressure-suppression system from a Mark I boiling water reactor was instrumented with seven types of transducers to obtain high-accuracy, dynamic loading data during a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident. A total of 27 air tests have been completed with an average of 175 transducers recorded for each test. An end-to-end calibration of the total measurement system was run to establish accuracy of the data. The instrumentation verified the analysis of the dynamic loading of the pressure-suppression system

  16. Modeling of hydrogen stratification in a pressurized water reactor containment with the contain computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.; Skerlavaj, A.; Parzer, I.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen distribution during a severe accident in a nuclear power plant with a two-loop Westinghouse-type pressurized water reactor was simulated with the CONTAIN computer code. The accidents is initiated by a large-break loss-of-coolant accident which is nit successfully mitigated by the action of the emergency core cooling system. Cases with and without successful actuation of spray systems and fan coolers were considered. The simulations predicted hydrogen stratification within the containment main compartment with intensive hydrogen mixing in the containment dome region. Pressure and temperature responses were analyzed as well.(author)

  17. Estabilishing requirements for the next generation of pressurized water reactors--reducing the uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernock, W.P.; Corcoran, W.R.; Rasin, W.H.; Stahlkopf, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute is managing a major effort to establish requirements for the next generation of U.S. light water reactors. This effort is the vital first step in preserving the viability of the nuclear option to contribute to meet U.S. national electric power capacity needs in the next century. Combustion Engineering, Inc. and Duke Power Company formed a team to participate in the EPRI program which is guided by a Utility Steering committee consisting of experienced utility technical executives. A major thrust of the program is to reduce the uncertainties which would be faced by the utility executives in choosing the nuclear option. The uncertainties to be reduced include those related to safety, economic, operational, and regulatory aspects of advanced light water reactors. This paper overviews the Requirements Document program as it relates to the U.S. Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) effort in reducing these uncertainties and reports the status of efforts to establish requirements for the next generation of pressurized water reactors. It concentrates on progress made in reducing the uncertainties which would deter selection of the nuclear option for contributing to U.S. national electric power capacity needs in the next century and updates previous reports in the same area. (author)

  18. Sensor fault analysis using decision theory and data-driven modeling of pressurized water reactor subsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyaya, B.R.; Skorska, M.

    1984-01-01

    Instrument fault detection and estimation is important for process surveillance, control, and safety functions of a power plant. The method incorporates the dual-hypotheses decision procedure and system characterization using data-driven time-domain models of signals representing the system. The multivariate models can be developed on-line and can be adapted to changing system conditions. For the method to be effective, specific subsystems of pressurized water reactors were considered, and signal selection was made such that a strong causal relationship exists among the measured variables. The technique is applied to the reactor core subsystem of the loss-of-fluid test reactor using in-core neutron detector and core-exit thermocouple signals. Thermocouple anomalies such as bias error, noise error, and slow drift in the sensor are detected and estimated using appropriate measurement models

  19. Characteristics and economy of the European reactor of pressurized water (EPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz V, J.; Ramirez S, J.R.; Palacios H, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The high current costs of the fossil fuels, have propitiated that the industries of electric power generation in the world reconsider the nuclear option as medium of generation. In Europe, the more recently contracted nuclear power plant is that of Olkiluoto-III in Finland that waits it enters in operation at the end of 2009. The reactor that will be installed in this power plant will be a prototype of pressurized water reactor of the companies AREVA and EDF. In this work they are described the reactor EPR and the major components of the nuclear power plant as well as the main characteristics of safety and the flexibility of the operation of the EPR. The supposed costs reported in different sources of information are also described and calculated with information provided by the manufacturer company. (Author)

  20. Development of out-of-core concepts for a supercritical-water, pressure-tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, W.T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the Generation IV programs at Chalk River Laboratories has as its prime focus the development of out-of-core concepts for the SuperCritical Water (SCW) pressure tube reactor under development in Canada. A number of technical issues associated with the interface of out-of-core components and the pressure tubes of a SCW pressure tube reactor are being investigated. This article focuses on several aspects of out-of-core components and layouts, building upon concepts that have been developed during the past few years. The efforts are strongly focused on concepts for a fuel channel that can be fabricated with the tight lattice pitch (typically 230 to 250 mm) that may be required for some applications such as utilization of a thorium fuel cycle. It is not practical to adapt concepts with a tight lattice pitch while using the thicker materials required for the higher temperatures and pressures required for supercritical operation. A change in lattice pitch or configuration is required to accommodate the component size increases. This presentation will cover a number of new concepts developed to produce feeders and end fittings for the harsh conditions of a SCW pressure tube reactor. These components are then developed into conceptual models of a Gen IV pressure tube reactor mounted in both horizontal and vertical orientations. Full 3-D solid models of both concepts will be demonstrated as well as a 1/10th-scale model of one face of a horizontal concept that has been built from components made with a 3-D printer. (author)

  1. Safety analysis of a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled and moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Y.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2002-01-01

    A safety analysis code for a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled reactor (SCLWR-H) with water rods cooled by descending flow, SPRAT-DOWN, is developed. The hottest channel, a water rod, down comer, upper and lower plenums, feed pumps, etc. are modeled as junction of nodes. Partial of the feed water flows downward from the upper dome of the reactor pressure vessel to the water rods. The accidents analyzed here are total loss of feed water flow, feed water pump seizure, and control rods ejection. All the accidents satisfy the criteria. The accident event at which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is total loss of feedwater flow. The transients analyzed here are loss of feed water heating, inadvertent start-up of an auxiliary water supply system, partial loss of feed water flow, loss of offsite power, loss of load, and abnormal withdrawal of control rods. All the transients satisfied the criteria. The transient event for which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is control rod withdrawal at normal operation. The behavior of loss of load transient is different from that of BWR. The power does not increase because loss of flow occurs and the density change is small. The sensitivities of the system behavior to various parameters during transients and accidents are analyzed. The parameters having strong influence are the capacity of the auxiliary water supply system, the coast down time of the main feed water pumps, and the time delay of the main feed water pumps trip. The control rod reactivity also has strong influence. (authors)

  2. Research and development of the supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The concept of high temperature reactor cooled by light water (SCR) has been developed at the University of Tokyo since 1989. Major elements of reactor conceptual design and safety were studied. It includes fuel rod design, core design of thermal and fast reactors, plant heat balance, safety design, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control, start-up and stability. The big advantage of the SCR concept is that the temperatures of major components such as reactor pressure vessel, control rod drive mechanisms, containments, coolant pumps, main steam piping and turbines are within the temperatures of the components of LWR and supercritical FPP in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. The experience of these components of LWR and supercritical fossil Fired Power Plants (FPP) will be fully utilized for SCR. Although the concept was developed at the University of Tokyo mostly with our own funds and resources, four funding was/is provided for the research in Japan so far. Those are TEPCO studies with Japanese vendors in 1994 and 1995. JSPS (Monbusho) funding of pulse radiolysis of supercritical water to the University of Tokyo, Japanese-NERI program of METI to Toshiba team on thermal hydraulics, corrosion and plant system and Japanese-NERI program of MEXT on water chemistry to the University of Tokyo. The concept was taken as the reference of HPLWR study in Europe with funding of EU in 2000 and 2001. The concept was evaluated in the Generation 4 reactor program in USA. It was selected as only one water-cooled Generation 4 reactor. This paper describes the overview of the conceptual design at the University of Tokyo and R and D in the world

  3. Study on primary coolant system depressurization effect factor in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Duan; Cao Xuewu

    2006-01-01

    The progression of high-pressure core melting severe accident induced by very small break loss of coolant accident plus the loss of main feed water and auxiliary feed water failure is studied, and the entry condition and modes of primary cooling system depressurization during the severe accident are also estimated. The results show that the temperature below 650 degree C is preferable depressurization input temperature allowing recovery of core cooling, and the available and effective way to depressurize reactor cooling system and to arrest very small break loss of coolant accident sequences is activating pressurizer relief valves initially, then restoring the auxiliary feedwater and opening the steam generator relief valves. It can adequately reduce the primary pressure and keep the capacity loop of long-term core cooling. (authors)

  4. Mark I 1/5-scale boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment facility report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altes, R.G.; Pitts, J.H.; Ingraham, R.F.; Collins, E.K.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-01-01

    An accurate Mark I 1 / 5 -scale, boiling water reactor (BWR), pressure suppression facility was designed and constructed at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) in 11 months. Twenty-seven air tests using the facility are described. Cost was minimized by utilizing equipment borrowed from other LLL programs. The total value of borrowed equipment exceeded the program's budget of $2,020,000. Substantial flexibility in the facility was used to permit independent variation in the drywell pressure-time history, initial pressure in the drywell and toroidal wetwells, initial toroidal wetwell water level and downcomer length, vent line flow resistance, and vent line flow asymmetry. The two- and three-dimensional sectors of the toroidal wetwell provided significant data

  5. Study on severe accident induced by large break loss of coolant accident for pressureized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Longfei; Zhang Dafa; Wang Shaoming

    2007-01-01

    Using the best estimate computer code SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 and taking US Westinghouse corporation Surry nuclear power plant as the reference object, a typical three-loop pressurized water reactor severe accident calculation model was established and 25 cm large break loss of coolant accident (LBLOCA) in cold and hot leg of primary loop induced core melt accident was analyzed. The calculated results show that core melt progression is fast and most of the core material melt and relocated to the lower plenum. The lower head of reactor pressure vessel failed at an early time and the cold leg break is more severe than the hot leg break in primary loop during LBLOCA. (authors)

  6. Numerical simulation of large systems: application to a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallec, Michele.

    1981-10-01

    This note describes the design of a pressurized water reactor power plant simulator using a minicomputer. It contains the description of the models used to simulate the dynamic behavior of the various components of the nuclear power station (i.e. the reactor core, two steam generators, the pressurizer and the control systems associated with them); the algorithms used to integrate the resulting system of algebraic differential equations; the solution of problems associated with the use of a mini-computer; the control deck outlay designed and the variables shown on it to the user; and finally the description of tests made to validate the models used and the results obtained for various transients using plant signal is presented. These results are compared to corresponding plant signals and outputs of other, already existing models [fr

  7. Thermo hydraulic analysis of narrow channel effect in supercritical-pressure light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Tao; Chen Juan; Cheng Wanxu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Detailed thermal analysis with different narrow gaps between fuel rods is given. ► Special characteristics of narrow channels effect on heat transfer in supercritical pressure are shown. ► Reasonable size selection of gaps between fuel rods is proposed for SCWR. - Abstract: The size of the gap between fuel rods has important effects on flow and heat transfer in a supercritical-pressure light water reactor. Based on thermal analysis at different coolant flow rates, the reasonable value range of gap size between fuel rods is obtained, for which the maximum cladding temperature safety limits and installation technology are comprehensively considered. Firstly, for a given design flow rate of coolant, thermal hydraulic analysis of supercritical pressure light water reactor with different gap sizes is provided by changing the fuel rod pitch only. The results show that, by means of reducing the gap size between fuel rods, the heat transfer coefficients between coolant and fuel rod, as well as the heat transfer coefficient between coolant and water rod, would both increase noticeably. Furthermore, the maximum cladding temperature will significantly decrease when the moderator temperature is decreased but coolant temperature remains essentially constant. Meanwhile, the reduction in the maximum cladding temperature in the inner assemblies is much larger than that in the outer assemblies. In addition, the maximum cladding temperature could be further reduced by means of increasing coolant flow rate for each gap size. Finally, the characteristics of narrow channels effect are proposed, and the maximum allowable gap between fuel rods is obtained by making full use of the enhancing narrow channels effect on heat transfer, and concurrently considering installation. This could provide a theoretical reference for supercritical-pressure light water reactor design optimization, in which the effects of gap size and flow rate on heat transfer are both considered.

  8. Heat exchanging tube behaviour in steam generators of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, D.; Oertel, K.

    1979-01-01

    Based on a comprehensive failure statistics, materials corrosion chemistry and thermohydraulics problems of the tubings of steam generators are considered. A historical review of failures in the tubings of steam generators in pressurized water reactors reflects the often successless measures by designers, manufacturers and operating organizations for preventing failures, especially with regard to materials selection and water regime. It is stated that laboratory tests could not give sufficient information about safe and stable operation of nuclear steam generators unless real constructive, hydrodynamic, thermodynamical and chemical conditions of operation had been taken into account. (author)

  9. Pressurized water reactor monitoring. Study of detection, diagnostic and estimation (least squares and filtering) methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillet, M.

    1986-07-01

    This thesis presents a study for the surveillance of the Primary circuit water inventory of a pressurized water reactor. A reference model is developed for the development of an automatic system ensuring detection and real-time diagnostic. The methods to our application are statistical tests and adapted a pattern recognition method. The estimation of the detected anomalies is treated by the least square fit method, and by filtering. A new projected optimization method with superlinear convergence is developed in this framework, and a segmented linearization of the model is introduced, in view of a multiple filtering. 46 refs [fr

  10. Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E.; Galperin, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

  11. Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - I: DUPIC Fuel Fabrication Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok; Ko, Won Il; Yang, Myung Seung

    2001-01-01

    A preliminary conceptual design of a Direct Use of spent Pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel In Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel fabrication plant was studied, which annually converts spent PWR fuel of 400 tonnes heavy element (HE) into CANDU fuel. The capital and operating costs were estimated from the viewpoint of conceptual design. Assuming that the annual discount rate is 5% during the construction (5 yr) and operation period (40 yr) and contingency is 25% of the capital cost, the levelized unit cost (LUC) of DUPIC fuel fabrication was estimated to be 616 $/kg HE, which is mostly governed by annual operation and maintenance costs that correspond to 63% of LUC. Among the operation and maintenance cost components being considered, the waste disposal cost has the dominant effect on LUC (∼49%). From sensitivity analyses of production capacity, discount rate, and contingency, it was found that the production capacity of the plant is the major parameter that affects the LUC

  12. Risk contribution from low power and shutdown of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.L.; Pratt, W.T.

    1997-01-01

    During 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (a pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (a boiling water reactor), were selected for study by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, respectively. The program objectives included assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences, and other qualitative and quantitative results with full power accidents as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope included a Level 3 PRA for traditional internal events and a Level 1 PRA on fire, flooding, and seismically induced core damage sequences. 12 refs., 7 tabs

  13. Safety aspects of using gadolinium as burnable poison in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenberg, C.; Bonet, H.; Charlier, A.; Motte, F.

    1979-01-01

    Within the framework of an experimental program on the behavior of gadolinium in light water reactors (LWRs), the BR3 power plant, a small 11-MW(electric) pressurized water reactor, was operated successfully with a core containing 5% Gd 2 O 3 -UO 2 rods. The core reached an average burnup increase of 22,000 MWd/tM, corresponding to 500 effective full-power days in a single cycle. These results were used to extrapolate the consequences on safety of extending such a control policy to large LWRs. In this context, the following factors were investigated: impact on the design, reactivity control and core behavior operated with lower and more constant boric acid concentration, environmental impact, fuel handling, etc

  14. Secondary-side feed-and-bleed effectiveness in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annunziato, A.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis is presented of physical phenomena occurring during secondary-side feed-and-bleed, which is being considered as an accident management procedure for pressurized water reactors. Problem areas related to the reliability of this procedure are identified and discussed. Secondary-side feed-and-bleed, as examined in the LOBI (which is the Light Water Reactor Off-Normal Behavior Investigation) integral system test facility, was not successful because of a delay in the secondary-side heat removal caused by the release of stored heat from the steam generator downcomer wall. Countercurrent flow limiting in the hot leg was another major phenomenon that can influence the effectiveness of this procedure. The discussion of the experimental results is complemented by relevant calculations by RELAP5/MOD3. In general, it was found that the effectiveness of the feed-and-bleed procedure is maximized if the number of steam generators used to implement it is reduced

  15. Assessing information needs and instrument availability for a pressurized water reactor during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Duane J. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)); Arcieri, William C. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)); Ward, Leonard W. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States))

    1994-07-01

    A five-step methodology was developed to evaluate information needs for nuclear power plants under accident conditions and the availability of plant instrumentation during severe accidents. Step 1 examines the credible accidents and their relationships to plant safety functions. Step 2 determines the information that personnel involved in accident management will need to understand plant behavior. Step 3 determines the capability of the instrumentation to function properly under severe accident conditions. Step 4 determines the conditions expected during the identified severe accidents. Step 5 compares the instrument capabilities and severe accident conditions, to evaluate the availability of the instrumentation to supply needed plant information. This methodology was applied to a pressurized water reactor with a large dry containment and the results are presented. A companion article describes application of the methodology to a boiling water reactor with a Mark I containment. ((orig.))

  16. Assessing information needs and instrument availability for a pressurized water reactor during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, Duane J.; Arcieri, William C.; Ward, Leonard W.

    1994-01-01

    A five-step methodology was developed to evaluate information needs for nuclear power plants under accident conditions and the availability of plant instrumentation during severe accidents. Step 1 examines the credible accidents and their relationships to plant safety functions. Step 2 determines the information that personnel involved in accident management will need to understand plant behavior. Step 3 determines the capability of the instrumentation to function properly under severe accident conditions. Step 4 determines the conditions expected during the identified severe accidents. Step 5 compares the instrument capabilities and severe accident conditions, to evaluate the availability of the instrumentation to supply needed plant information. This methodology was applied to a pressurized water reactor with a large dry containment and the results are presented. A companion article describes application of the methodology to a boiling water reactor with a Mark I containment. ((orig.))

  17. Development status and application prospect of supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Manchang; Wang Mingli

    2006-01-01

    The Supercritical-pressure Light Water Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is selected by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) as one of the six Generation IV nuclear systems that will be developed in the future, and it is an innovative design based on the existing technologies used in LWR and supercritical coal-fired plants. Technically, SCWR may be based on the design, construction and operation experiences in existing PWR and supercritical coal-fired plants, which means that there is no insolvable technology difficulties. Since PWR technology will be adopted in the near term and medium term projects in China, and considering the sustainable development of the technology, it is an inevitable choice to research and develop the nuclear system of supercritical light water cooled reactor. (authors)

  18. A flooding induced station blackout analysis for a pressurized water reactor using the RISMC toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven; Smith, Curtis; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: the RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., component/system activation) and to perform statistical analyses. In our case, the simulation of the flooding is performed by using an advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics code called NEUTRINO. The obtained results allow the user to investigate and quantify the impact of timing and sequencing of events on system safety. The impact of power uprate is determined in terms of both core damage probability and safety margins

  19. Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Light, Glenn [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

    2012-09-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

  20. Automatic optimized reload and depletion method for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, D.H.; Levene, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    A new method has been developed to automatically reload and deplete a pressurized water reactor (PWR) so that both the enriched inventory requirements during the reactor cycle and the cost of reloading the core are minimized. This is achieved through four stepwise optimization calculations: (a) determination of the minimum fuel requirement for an equivalent three-region core model, (b) optimal selection and allocation of fuel assemblies for each of the three regions to minimize the reload cost, (c) optimal placement of fuel assemblies to conserve regionwise optimal conditions, and (d) optimal control through poison management to deplete individual fuel assemblies to maximize end-of-cycle k /SUB eff/ . The new method differs from previous methods in that the optimization process automatically performs all tasks required to reload and deplete a PWR. In addition, the previous work that developed optimization methods principally for the initial reactor cycle was modified to handle subsequent cycles with fuel assemblies having burnup at beginning of cycle. Application of the method to the fourth reactor cycle at Three Mile Island Unit 1 has shown that both the enrichment and the number of fresh reload fuel assemblies can be decreased and fully amortized fuel assemblies can be reused to minimize the fuel cost of the reactor

  1. Possibility of a pressurized water reactor concept with highly inherent heat removal following capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, Fumimasa; Murao, Yoshio

    1995-01-01

    If the core power inherently follows change in heat removal rate from the primary coolant system within small thermal expansion of the coolant which can be absorbed in a practical size of pressurizer, reactor systems may have more safety and load following capability. In order to know possibility and necessary conditions of a concept on reactor core and primary coolant system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) with such 'highly inherent heat removal following capability', transient analyses on an ordinary two-loop PWR have been performed for a transient due to 50% change in heat removal with the RETRAN-02 code. The possibility of a PWR concept with the highly inherent heat removal following capability has been demonstrated under the conditions of the absolute value of ratio of the coolant density reactivity coefficient to the Doppler reactivity coefficient more than 10x10 3 kg·cm 3 which is two to three times larger than that at beginning of cycle (BOC) in an ordinary PWR and realized by elimination of the chemical shim, the 12% lower average linear heat generation rate of 17.9 kW/m, and the 1.5 times larger pressurizer volume than those of the ordinary PWR. (author)

  2. Simulation of small break loss of coolant accident in pressurized water reactor (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abass, N. M. N.

    2012-02-01

    A major safety concern in pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) design is the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA),in which a break in the primary coolant circuit leads to depressurization, boiling of the coolant, consequent reduced cooling of the reactor core, and , unless remedial measures are taken, overheating of the fuel rods. This concern has led to the development of several simulators for safety analysis. This study demonstrates how the passive and active safety systems in conventional and advanced PWR behave during the small break loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA). The consequences of SBOLOCA have been simulated using IAEA Generic pressurized Water Reactor Simulator (GPWRS) and personal Computer Transient analyzer (PCTRAN) . The results were presented and discussed. The study has confirmed the major safety advantage of passive plants versus conventional PWRs is that the passive safety systems provide long-term core cooling and decay heat removal without the need for operator actions and without reliance on active safety-related system. (Author)

  3. Comparison and analysis on transient characteristics of integral pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guoxu; Xie, Heng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Two IPWR Relap5 models with different PSS design were developed. • Postulated SBO and SBLOCA were analyzed. • PRHRS in primary PSS design showed stable performance under different scenarios. • Secondary PRHRS design faced flow instability. - Abstract: In the present work, the similarities and differences of representative IPWRs (integral pressurized water reactor) are studied, and two typical reactor design schemes are summarized. To get a comprehensive understanding of their transient characteristics, SBO (station blackout) and SBLOCA (small break LOCA) are simulated and analyzed respectively by using Relap5/Mod3.2. The calculation results show that, both designs are effective in keeping reactor safe. However, the transient features of the two designs show significant differences. In the primary side passive safety system (PSS) connection design, PRHRS (passive residual heat removal system) shows a roughly congruent performance in removing residual heat under various accidents. While in secondary side PSS connection design, the capability of PRHRS is closely related to primary coolant circulation condition. In SBLOCA analysis, different design approach shows different primary coolant water inventory change trend. And primary PSS connection design could potentially keep reactor core well covered for a longer time.

  4. Non-Proliferative, Thorium-Based, Core and Fuel Cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todosow, M.; Raitses, G.; Galperin, A.

    2009-01-01

    Two of the major barriers to the expansion of worldwide adoption of nuclear power are related to proliferation potential of the nuclear fuel cycle and issues associated with the final disposal of spent fuel. The Radkowsky Thorium Fuel (RTF) concept proposed by Professor A. Radkowsky offers a partial solution to these problems. The main idea of the concept is the utilization of the seed-blanket unit (SBU) fuel assembly geometry which is a direct replacement for a 'conventional' assembly in either a Russian pressurized water reactor (VVER-1000) or a Western pressurized water reactor (PWR). The seed-blanket fuel assembly consists of a fissile (U) zone, known as seed, and a fertile (Th) zone known as blanket. The separation of fissile and fertile allows separate fuel management schemes for the thorium part of the fuel (a subcritical 'blanket') and the 'driving' part of the core (a supercritical 'seed'). The design objective for the blanket is an efficient generation and in-situ fissioning of the U233 isotope, while the design objective for the seed is to supply neutrons to the blanket in a most economic way, i.e. with minimal investment of natural uranium. The introduction of thorium as a fertile component in the nuclear fuel cycle significantly reduces the quantity of plutonium production and modifies its isotopic composition, reducing the overall proliferation potential of the fuel cycle. Thorium based spent fuel also contains fewer higher actinides, hence reducing the long-term radioactivity of the spent fuel. The analyses show that the RTF core can satisfy the requirements of fuel cycle length, and the safety margins of conventional pressurized water reactors. The coefficients of reactivity are comparable to currently operating VVER's/PWR's. The major feature of the RTF cycle is related to the total amount of spent fuel discharged for each cycle from the reactor core. The fuel management scheme adopted for RTF core designs allows a significant decrease in the

  5. Knowledge base expert system control of spatial xenon oscillations in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alten, S.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear reactor operators are required to pay special attention to spatial xenon oscillations during the load-follow operation of pressurized water reactors. They are expected to observe the axial offset of the core, and to estimate the correct time and amount of necessary control action based on heuristic rules given in axial xenon oscillations are knowledge intensive, and heuristic in nature. An expert system, ACES (Axial offset Control using Expert Systems) is developed to implement a heuristic constant axial offset control procedure to aid reactor operators in increasing the plant reliability by reducing the human error component of the failure probability. ACES is written in a production system language, OPS5, based on the forward chaining algorithm. It samples reactor data with a certain time interval in terms of measurable parameters, such as the power, period, and the axial offset of the core. It then processes the core status utilizing a set of equations which are used in a back of the envelope calculations by domain experts. Heuristic rules of ACES identify the control variable to be used among the full and part length control rods and boron concentration, while a knowledge base is used to determine the amount of control. ACES is designed as a set of generic rules to avoid reducing the system into a set of patterns. Instead ACES evaluates the system, determines the necessary corrective actions in terms of reactivity insertion, and provides this reactivity insertion using the control variables. The amount of control action is determined using a knowledge base which consists of the differential rod worth curves, and the boron reactivity worth of a given reactor. Having the reactor dependent parameters in its knowledge base, ACES is applicable to an arbitrary reactor for axial offset control purposes

  6. SCALE-4 analysis of pressurized water reactor critical configurations. Volume 1: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1995-03-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit is to be taken for the reduced reactivity of burned or spent fuel relative to its original fresh composition, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods used in determining such reactivity worth against spent fuel reactivity measurements. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using critical configurations from commercial pressurized water reactors (PWR). The analysis methodology utilized for all calculations in this report is based on the modules and data associated with the SCALE-4 code system. Each of the five volumes comprising this report provides an overview of the methodology applied. Subsequent volumes also describe in detail the approach taken in performing criticality calculations for these PWR configurations: Volume 2 describes criticality calculations for the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Unit 2 reactor for Cycle 3; Volume 3 documents the analysis of Virginia Power's Surry Unit 1 reactor for the Cycle 2 core; Volume 4 documents the calculations performed based on GPU Nuclear Corporation's Three Mile Island Unit 1 Cycle 5 core; and, lastly, Volume 5 describes the analysis of Virginia Power's North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5 core. Each of the reactor-specific volumes provides the details of calculations performed to determine the effective multiplication factor for each reactor core for one or more critical configurations using the SCALE-4 system; these results are summarized in this volume. Differences between the core designs and their possible impact on the criticality calculations are also discussed. Finally, results are presented for additional analyses performed to verify that solutions were sufficiently converged

  7. Application of leak-before-break criteria to pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roege, P.; Day, B.; Beckjord, E.; Golay, M.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of consequential damage to safety-related systems or components after postulated pipe breaks in Light Water Reactors has led to the installation of pipe restraints capable of withstanding the loads in such an accident. These restraints are a significant part of initial capital cost, and because of their size and location, impede plant maintenance. The Piping Review Committee of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has concluded that, subject to fulfillment of certain criteria, the pipe restraints for pressurized water reactor main coolant piping are not necessary, because the failure mode of this piping is such that it will leak before it will break, and the leakage of reactor coolant is large enough to detect. In this study, we examine the piping systems of a 4-loop 1,150 MWe pressurized water reactor, determining the crack size that would be stable from a fracture mechanics point of view, and the range of leak rates that would ensue. We then consider the sensitivity of conventional leak detection systems, and find that pipe sizes down to 45 cm in diameter would meet the leak-before-break criteria. Improvements in the sensitivity of conventional leak detectors would extend this range down to pipe sizes down to the range of 20 - 45 cm in diameter. The development of local leak detection systems which would respond to leaks in compartments or confined areas would make it possible to apply the criteria to sizes as low as 10 - 20 cm in diameter, which appear to be the limit of the net cost savings of eliminating pipe restraints and adding additional leak detection instrumentation. Extending the leak-before-break concept into this smallest pipe range may require improved precision in crack definition, flow modeling, and leak detection. Better detection of leaks may also require use of new detection methods coupled to novel approaches to piping system design. (J.P.N.)

  8. Evaluation of an accident management strategy of emergency water injection using fire engines in a typical pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soo Yong; Ahn, Kwang Il

    2015-01-01

    Following the Fukushima accident, a special safety inspection was conducted in Korea. The inspection results show that Korean nuclear power plants have no imminent risk for expected maximum potential earthquake or coastal flooding. However long- and short-term safety improvements do need to be implemented. One of the measures to increase the mitigation capability during a prolonged station blackout (SBO) accident is installing injection flow paths to provide emergency cooling water of external sources using fire engines to the steam generators or reactor cooling systems. This paper illustrates an evaluation of the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire trucks during a potential extended SBO accident in a 1,000 MWe pressurized water reactor. With regard to the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire engines, the strategies are judged to be very feasible for a long-term SBO, but are not likely to be effective for a short-term SBO

  9. Evaluation of an accident management strategy of emergency water injection using fire engines in a typical pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo Yong; Ahn, Kwang Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Following the Fukushima accident, a special safety inspection was conducted in Korea. The inspection results show that Korean nuclear power plants have no imminent risk for expected maximum potential earthquake or coastal flooding. However long- and short-term safety improvements do need to be implemented. One of the measures to increase the mitigation capability during a prolonged station blackout (SBO) accident is installing injection flow paths to provide emergency cooling water of external sources using fire engines to the steam generators or reactor cooling systems. This paper illustrates an evaluation of the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire trucks during a potential extended SBO accident in a 1,000 MWe pressurized water reactor. With regard to the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire engines, the strategies are judged to be very feasible for a long-term SBO, but are not likely to be effective for a short-term SBO.

  10. Detection and characterization of flaws in segments of light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in segments cut from light water reactor )LWR) pressure vessels as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Heavy-Section Steel Technology (H SST) Program. Segments from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel and the Pilgrim Unit 2 Vessel were purchased from salvage dealers. Hope Creek was a boiling water reactor (BWR) design and Pilgrim was a pressurized water reactor (PWR) design. Neither were ever placed in service. Objectives were to evaluate these LWR segments for flaws with ultrasonic and liquid penetrant techniques. Both objectives were successfully completed. One significant indication was detected in a Hope Creek seam weld by ultrasonic techniques and characterized by further analyses terminating with destructive correlation. This indication [with a through-wall dimension of ∼6 mm (∼0.24 in.)] was detected in only 3 m (10 ft) of weldment and offers extremely limited data when compared to the extent of welding even in a single pressure vessel. However, the detection and confirmation of the flaw in the arbitrarily selected sections implies the Marshall report estimates (and others) are nonconservative for such small flaws. No significant indications were detected in the Pilgrim material by ultrasonic techniques. Unfortunately, the Pilgrim segments contained relatively little weldment; thus, we limited our ultrasonic examinations to the cladding and subcladding regions. Fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection of the cladding surfaces for both LWR segments detected no significant indications [i.e., for a total of approximately 6.8 m 2 (72 ft 2 ) of cladding surface]. (author)

  11. Solid-state track recorder neutron dosimetry in light water reactor pressure vessel surveillance mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.; Preston, C.C.

    1984-09-01

    Solid-State Track Recorder (SSTR) measurements of neutron-induced fission rates have been made in several pressure vessel mockup facilities as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program (LWR-PV-SDIP). The results of extensive physics-dosimetry measurements made at the Pool Critical Assembly (PCA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN are summarized. Included are 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np and 232 Th fission rates in the PCA 12/13, 8/7, and 4/12 SSC configurations. Additional low power measurements have been made in an engineering mockup at the VENUS critical assembly at CEN-SCK, Mol, Belgium. 237 Np and 238 U fission rates were made at selected locations in the VENUS mockup, which models the in-core and near-core regions of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Absolute core power measurements were made at VENUS by exposing solid-state track recorders (SSTRs) to polished fuel pellets within in-core fuel pins. 8 references, 4 figures, 10 tables

  12. Integrity of pressurized water electronuclear reactor vessels. The case of French reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document aims at identifying elements related to design, manufacturing and control during operation of reactor vessels of the French electronuclear fleet, and more precisely as far as vessel ferrule is concerned. It briefly describes the typical design and elements of most of French PWR vessels with respect to the reactor type (900 MWe, 1300 MWe, 1450 MWe, EPR). It recalls some measures regarding design (for embrittlement assessment) and manufacturing processes (forging operations for shell fabrication, coatings). It discusses the different manufacturing defects which have been noticed (under the coatings, due to hydrogen, and intergranular loss of cohesion due to re-heating). It more particularly comments defects noticed on a Belgium power station reactor in Doel, defects due to hydrogen and some other defects noticed in the French reactor fleet. It presents the different types of control which are performed on vessel shells during operation

  13. Preliminary Study on the High Efficiency Supercritical Pressure Water-Cooled Reactor for Electricity Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yoon Yeong; Park, Jong Kyun; Cho, Bong Hyun and others

    2006-01-15

    This research has been performed to introduce a concept of supercritical pressure water cooled reactor(SCWR) in Korea The area of research includes core conceptual design, evaluation of candidate fuel, fluid systems conceptual design with mechanical consideration, preparation of safety analysis code, and construction of supercritical pressure heat transfer test facility, SPHINX, and preliminary test. As a result of the research, a set of tools for the reactor core design has been developed and the conceptual core design with solid moderator was proposed. The direct thermodynamic cycle has been studied to find a optimum design. The safety analysis code has also been adapted to supercritical pressure condition. A supercritical pressure CO2 heat transfer test facility has been constructed and preliminary test proved the facility works as expected. The result of this project will be good basis for the participation in the international collaboration under GIF GEN-IV program and next 5-year mid and long term nuclear research program of MOST. The heat transfer test loop, SPHINX, completed as a result of this project may be used for the power cycle study as well as further heat transfer study for the various geometries.

  14. Instrumentation availability for a pressurized water reactor with a large dry containment during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcieri, W.C.; Hanson, D.J.

    1991-03-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Accident Management Research Program, the availability of instruments to supply accident management information during a broad range of severe accidents is evaluated for a pressurized water reactor with a large dry containment. Results from this evaluation include the following: (a) identification of plant conditions that would impact instrument performance and information needs during severe accidents, (b) definition of envelopes of parameters that would be important in assessing the performance of plant instrumentation for a broad range of severe accident sequences, and (c) assessment of the availability of plant instrumentation during severe accidents. 16 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Apparatus for inspecting and repairing a pressurized-water reactor's steam generator heat exchanger tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, O.; Roettger, H.; Kasti, H.; Hagen, H.G.

    1976-01-01

    Described is an apparatus provided for use with a pressurized-water reactor' steam generator having a manifold chamber enclosing the bottom side of a horizontal tube sheet having holes therethrough in which are mounted the tubes of a heat exchanger tube bundle. The manifold chamber has a manhole giving access to the tube's bottom side to permit internal inspection or repair of the tubes by registration of an end of a flexible guide conduit with the tube sheet holes and through which a flexible carrier can be guided for insertion via these holes in the tube sheet and through the tubes extending from the tube sheet's other side

  16. Standard technical specifications for Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactors. Revision 4. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgilio, M.J.

    1980-10-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Babcock and Wilcox Pressurized Water Reactors (BandW-STS) is a generic document prepared by the U.S. NRC for use in the licensing process. The BandW-STS provide applicants with model specifications to be used in formulation plant-specific technical specifications required by 10 CFR Part 50, Section 50.36, which set forth the specific characteristics of the facility and the conditions for its operation that are required to provide adequate protection to the health and safety of the public. This document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  17. Application of a neural network to control a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.; Ku, C.C.; Lee, C.S.

    1993-01-01

    A neural network has been trained to control a pressurized water reactor. The inputs of the training pattern are the plant signals, and the outputs are the control rod actions. The training patterns are some kind of lookup table of control action. The table is designed by the heuristic method, which is based on the designer's knowledge of the controlled system and the operation experience. This method has two advantages: The controller's performance does not depend on the mathematical model of the plant, and the controller could be a nonlinear one. The advantages of using neural networks to implement the controller are to save computing time and overcome partial hardware failure

  18. Analysis of a small break loss-of-coolant accident of pressurized water reactor by APROS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Falahi, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Haennine, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Porkholm, K. [IVO International, Ltd., Vantaa (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the capability of APROS (Advanced PROcess Simulator) code to simulate the real plant thermal-hydraulic transient of a Small Break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) of Loss-Of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The LOFT is a scaled model of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). This work is a part of a larger validation of the APROS thermal-hydraulic models. The results of SBLOCA transient calculated by APROS showed a reasonable agreement with the measured data.

  19. Neutron multiplication and shielding problems in pressurized water reactor spent fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, C.; Blum, P.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate the degree of accuracy of computational methods used in the shield design of spent fuel shipping casks, comparisons have been made between biological dose-rate calculations and measurements at the surface of a cask carrying three pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies. Neutron dose-rate measurements made with the fuel-carrying region successively wet and dry are also used to derive an experimental value of the k/sub eff/ of the wet fuel assemblies. Results obtained by this method are shown to be consistent with criticality calculations, taking into account fuel depletion

  20. Two-phase coolant pump model of pressurized light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.A. dos; Freitas, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase coolant pump model of pressurized light water nuclear reactors is an important point for the loss of primary coolant accident analysis. The homologous curves set up the complete performance of the pump and are input for accidents analysis thermal-hydraulic codes. This work propose a mathematical model able to predict the two-phase homologous curves where it was incorporated geometric and operational pump condition. The results were compared with the experimental tests data from literature and it has showed a good agreement. (author)

  1. Data list of nuclear power plants of pressurized-water reactor type in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Fumio; Harayama, Yasuo

    1981-08-01

    This report has collected and compiled the data concerning performances, equipments and installations for nuclear power plants of the pressurized-water reactor type in Japan. The data used in the report are based on informations that were collected before December in 1980. The report is edited by modifing changes of the data appeared after publication of 1979 edition (JAERI-M 8947), and extending the data-package to cover new plants proposed thereafter. All data have been processed and tabulated with a computer program FREP, which has been developed as an exclusive use of data processing. (author)

  2. Environment sensitive cracking in pressure boundary materials of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanninen, H.; Aho-Mantila, I.; Torronen, K.

    1987-08-01

    A review of the various forms of environment sensitive cracking in pressure boundary materials of light water reactors is presented. The available methods and the most promising future possibilities of preventive maintenance to counteract the environmental degradation are evaluated. Environment sensitive cracking is considered from the metallurgical, mechanical and environmental point of view. The main emphasis is on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels and high strength Ni-base alloys as well as on corrosion fatigue of low alloy and stainless steels. Additionally, some general ideas on how to predict, reduce, monitor or eliminate environment sensitive cracking in service are presented

  3. Investigations on the retention of 131I by an iodine filter of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.; Gerlach, K.

    1983-09-01

    The retention of 131 I by an equipment room exhaust filter of a German pressurized water reactor was determined by various methods to particularly obtain reliable results. Moreover, investigations were performed to clarify the reason for aging of the carbon contained in the iodine filter mentioned. The actual retention of the organic 131 I, corresponding to a value of 99.9%, was limited by 131 I in the form of penetrating iodine compounds. It was lower than the retention of CH 3 131 I under layout conditions by more than one order of magnitude. The aging was essentially caused by the adsorption of low-volatile organic compounds. (orig.) [de

  4. Investigations on the retention of I-131 by an iodine filter of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.; Gerlach, K.

    1984-01-01

    The retention of I-131 by an equipment room exhaust filter of a German pressurized water reactor was determined by various methods to particularly obtain reliable results. Moreover, investigations were performed to clarify the reason for aging of the carbon contained in the iodine filter mentioned. The actual retention of the organic I-131, corresponding to a value of 99.9%, was limited by I-131 in the form of penetrating iodine compounds. It was lower than the retention of CH 3 I-131 under layout conditions by more than one order of magnitude. The aging was essentially caused by the adsorption of low-volatile organic compounds. (orig.) [de

  5. Expandable antivibration bar for heat transfer tubes of a pressurized water reactor steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleman, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    An expandable antivibration bar for use in stabilizing the U-bend portion of heat transfer tubes in a pressurized water reactor steam generator comprises two adjustable rods connected together by an arcuate connector. The two adjustable rods preferably comprise two mating rod sections having complementary angular sliding surfaces thereon, with means provided to move the rod sections relative to each other along the sliding surfaces so as to expand the rods from a first mated cross-sectional width to a second larger cross-sectional width. The ends of the rod sections have means for aligning the two rod sections and maintaining them in alignment during expansion. (author)

  6. Materialistic Aspects of Raising Resource of Pressurized Water Reactors for Low-Power Nuclear Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshin, A.M.; Muratov, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    The opportunity of using ships reactors for low-power nuclear plants is considered. Some aspects of working constructional materials on cases of water-water reactors of ships nuclear units are considered. Advantages of raising resource of ships reactors are shown

  7. Incineration of actinide targets in a pressurized water reactor spin project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puill, A.; Bergeron, J.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) with uranium fuel to limit the inventory growth of minor actinides (237 neptunium, and americium) produced by the French nuclear powerplants is studied. Targets containing an actinide oxide mixed to an inert matrix are loaded in some reactors. After being irradiated along with the fuel, the target is specially reprocessed. The remaining actinide and the plutonium which is produced, added to fresh actinide, are recycled in new targets. The radiotoxicity balance, with and without incineration, is examined considering that only the losses coming from the target reprocessing treated as waste. A scenario arbitrarily based on 18 years of operation results in a reduction of the radiotoxicity of the waste by a factor between 10 and 20, depending on the actinide considered. 6 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  8. Power level effects on thorium-based fuels in pressure-tube heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromley, B.P.; Edwards, G.W.R., E-mail: blair.bromley@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Sambavalingam, P. [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Lattice and core physics modeling and calculations have been performed to quantify the impact of power/flux levels on the reactivity and achievable burnup for 35-element fuel bundles made with Pu/Th or U-233/Th. The fissile content in these bundles has been adjusted to produce on the order of 20 MWd/kg burnup in homogeneous cores in a 700 MWe-class pressure-tube heavy water reactor, operating on a once-through thorium cycle. Results demonstrate that the impact of the power/flux level is modest for Pu/Th fuels but significant for U-233/Th fuels. In particular, high power/flux reduces the breeding and burnup potential of U-233/Th fuels. Thus, there may be an incentive to operate reactors with U-233/Th fuels at a lower power density or to develop alternative refueling schemes that will lower the time-average specific power, thereby increasing burnup.(author)

  9. Pressurized water reactor in-core nuclear fuel management by tabu search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Natasha J.; Parks, Geoffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a tabu search implementation for PWR reload core design. • We conduct computational experiments to find optimal parameter values. • We test the performance of the algorithm on two representative PWR geometries. • We compare this performance with that given by established optimization methods. • Our tabu search implementation outperforms these methods in all cases. - Abstract: Optimization of the arrangement of fuel assemblies and burnable poisons when reloading pressurized water reactors has, in the past, been performed with many different algorithms in an attempt to make reactors more economic and fuel efficient. The use of the tabu search algorithm in tackling reload core design problems is investigated further here after limited, but promising, previous investigations. The performance of the tabu search implementation developed was compared with established genetic algorithm and simulated annealing optimization routines. Tabu search outperformed these existing programs for a number of different objective functions on two different representative core geometries

  10. Best-estimate methodology for analysis of anticipated transients without scram in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebollo, L.

    1993-01-01

    Union Fenosa, a utility company in Spain, has performed research on pressurized water reactor (PWR) safety with respect to the development of a best-estimate methodology for the analysis of anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), i.e., those anticipated transients for which failure of the reactor protection system is postulated. A scientific and technical approach is adopted with respect to the ATWS phenomenon as it affects a PWR, specifically the Zorita nuclear power plant, a single-loop Westinghouse-designed PWR in Spain. In this respect, an ATWS sequence analysis methodology based on published codes that is generically applicable to any PWR is proposed, which covers all the anticipated phenomena and defines the applicable acceptance criteria. The areas contemplated are cell neutron analysis, core thermal hydraulics, and plant dynamics, which are developed, qualified, and plant dynamics, which are developed, qualified, and validated by comparison with reference calculations and measurements obtained from integral or separate-effects tests

  11. Practice and trends in nuclear fuel licensing in France (pressurized water reactor fuels)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roudier, S.; Badel, D.; Beraha, R.; Champ, M.; Tricot, N.; Tran Dai, P.

    1994-01-01

    The activities of governmental French authorities responsible for safety of nuclear installations are outlined. The main bodies involved in nuclear safety are: the CSSIN (High Council for Nuclear Safety and Information), CINB (Inter-ministerial Commission for Basic Nuclear Installations) and DSIN (Nuclear Installations Safety Directorate). A brief review of the main fuel licensing issues supported by DSIN is given, which includes: 1) formal regularity procedure ensuring the safety of nuclear installations and especially the pressurized water reactors; 2) guidelines for nuclear design and manufacturing requirements related to safety and 3) safety goals and associated limits. The fuel safety documents for reloading as well as the research and development programmes in the field of technical safety are also described. The ongoing experiments in CABRI reactor, aimed at determining the high burnup fuel behaviour under reactivity initiated accidents until 65 GW d/Mt U, are one of these programs

  12. SACI - O: A code for the analysis of transients in a pressurized water reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resende Lobo, A.A. de; Soares, P.A.

    1979-03-01

    The SACI-O digital computer code consists basically of a pressurized water reactor core model. It is useful in the analysis of fast reactivity transients shorter than the loop transit time. The program can also be used for evaluating the core behaviour, during other transients, when the inlet coolant conditions are known. SACI-O uses point model neutron kinetics taking into account moderator and fuel reactivity effects, and fission products decay. The neutronic and thermal-hydraulic equations are solved for an average fuel pin described by a single axial node. To perform a more detailed calculation, the modeling of another cooling channel, which can be divided into axial segments, is included in the program. The reactor trip system is also partially simulated. (Author) [pt

  13. Survey of natural-circulation cooling in U.S. pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyack, B.E.

    1985-01-01

    Literature describing natural circulation analyses, experiments, and plant operation have been obtained from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, reactor vendors, utility-sponsored research groups, utilities, national laboratories, and foreign sources. These have been reviewed and significant results and conclusions identified. Three modes of natural-circulation cooling are covered: single phase, two-phase, and reflux condensation. Single-phase natural circulation is amply verified by plant operational data, test data from scaled experimental facilities, and analysis with assessed computer codes. Ample evidence also exists that two-phase natural circulation can successfully cool pressurized water reactors. This mode occurs during certain events such as small-break loss-of-coolant accidents. The data base for reflux condensation is primarily from tests in scaled experimental facilities. There are no plant operational data and only limited assessment of thermal-hydraulic systems codes has been performed. Further work is needed before this mode of natural circulation can be confidently used

  14. Iterative solution to the optimal poison management problem in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletti, J.P.; Levine, S.H.; Lewis, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    A new method for solving the optimal poison management problem for a multiregion pressurized water reactor has been developed. The optimization objective is to maximize the end-of-cycle core excess reactivity for any given beginning-of-cycle fuel loading. The problem is treated as an optimal control problem with the region burnup and control absorber concentrations acting as the state and control variables, respectively. Constraints are placed on the power peaking, soluble boron concentration, and control absorber concentrations. The solution method consists of successive relinearizations of the system equations resulting in a sequence of nonlinear programming problems whose solutions converge to the desired optimal control solution. Application of the method to several test problems based on a simplified three-region reactor suggests a bang-bang optimal control strategy with the peak power location switching between the inner and outer regions of the core and the critical soluble boron concentration as low as possible throughout the cycle

  15. Application of advanced irradiation analysis methods to light water reactor pressure vessel test and surveillance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, R.; Dudey, N.; McElroy, W.; Wullaert, R.; Fabry, A.

    1977-01-01

    Inaccurate characterization and inappropriate application of neutron irradiation exposure variables contribute a substantial amount of uncertainty to embrittlement analysis of light water reactor pressure vessels. Damage analysis involves characterization of the irradiation environment (dosimetry), correlation of test and surveillance metallurgical and dosimetry data, and projection of such data to service conditions. Errors in available test and surveillance dosimetry data are estimated to contribute a factor of approximately 2 to the data scatter. Non-physical (empirical) correlation procedures and the need to extrapolate to the vessel may add further error. Substantial reductions in these uncertainties in future programs can be obtained from a more complete application of available damage analysis tools which have been developed for the fast reactor program. An approach to reducing embrittlement analysis errors is described, and specific examples of potential applications are given. The approach is based on damage analysis techniques validated and calibrated in benchmark environments

  16. Power level effects on thorium-based fuels in pressure-tube heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromley, B.P.; Edwards, G.W.R.; Sambavalingam, P.

    2016-01-01

    Lattice and core physics modeling and calculations have been performed to quantify the impact of power/flux levels on the reactivity and achievable burnup for 35-element fuel bundles made with Pu/Th or U-233/Th. The fissile content in these bundles has been adjusted to produce on the order of 20 MWd/kg burnup in homogeneous cores in a 700 MWe-class pressure-tube heavy water reactor, operating on a once-through thorium cycle. Results demonstrate that the impact of the power/flux level is modest for Pu/Th fuels but significant for U-233/Th fuels. In particular, high power/flux reduces the breeding and burnup potential of U-233/Th fuels. Thus, there may be an incentive to operate reactors with U-233/Th fuels at a lower power density or to develop alternative refueling schemes that will lower the time-average specific power, thereby increasing burnup.(author)

  17. Practice and trends in nuclear fuel licensing in France (pressurized water reactor fuels)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudier, S [Direction de la Surete des Installations Nucleaires, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Badel, D; Beraha, R [Direction Regionale de l` Industrie, de la Recherche et de l` Environnement Rhone-Alpes, Lyon (France); Champ, M; Tricot, N; Tran Dai, P [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1994-12-31

    The activities of governmental French authorities responsible for safety of nuclear installations are outlined. The main bodies involved in nuclear safety are: the CSSIN (High Council for Nuclear Safety and Information), CINB (Inter-ministerial Commission for Basic Nuclear Installations) and DSIN (Nuclear Installations Safety Directorate). A brief review of the main fuel licensing issues supported by DSIN is given, which includes: (1) formal regularity procedure ensuring the safety of nuclear installations and especially the pressurized water reactors; (2) guidelines for nuclear design and manufacturing requirements related to safety and (3) safety goals and associated limits. The fuel safety documents for reloading as well as the research and development programmes in the field of technical safety are also described. The ongoing experiments in CABRI reactor, aimed at determining the high burnup fuel behaviour under reactivity initiated accidents until 65 GW d/Mt U, are one of these programs.

  18. Performance of self-powered neutron detectors in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, H.D.; Bozarch, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    A typical Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactor (PWR) contains 364 rhodium self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) and 52 background detectors. The detectors are inserted into the reactor core in 52 dry, multidetector assemblies. Each assembly contains seven SPNDs and one background detector. By mid-1977, eight B and W PWRs, each fitted with SPNDs, were in operation. Many of the SPNDs have operated successfully for more than four years. This paper describes the operational performance of the SPNDs and special tests conducted to improve that performance. Topics included are (1) insulation performance versus neutron dose to the SPND, (2) background signals in the leadwire region of the SPND, and (3) depletion of the SPND emitter versus absorbed neutron dose

  19. Solid State Track Recorder fission rate measurements in low power light water reactor pressure vessel mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Kellogg, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    The results of extensive SSTR measurements made at the Pool Critical Assembly (PCA) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been reported previously. Measurements were made at key locations in PCA which is an idealized mockup of the water gap, thermal shield, pressure vessel geometry of a light water reactor. Recently, additional SSTR fission rate measurements have been carried out for 237-Np, 238-U, and 235-U in key locations in the NESTOR Shielding and Dosimetry Improvement Program (NESDIP) mockup facility located at Winfrith, England. NESDIP is a replica of the PCA facility, and comparisons will be made between PCA and NESDIP measurements. The results of measurements made at the engineering mockup at the VENUS critical assembly at CEN/SCK, Mol, Belgium will also be reported. Measurements were made at selected radial and azimuthal locations in VENUS, which models the in-core and near-core regions of a pressurized water reactor. Comparisons of absolute SSTR fission rates with absolute fission rates made with the Mol miniature fission chamber will be reported. Absolute fission rate comparisons have also been made between the NBS fission chamber, radiometric fission foils, and SSTRs, and these results will be summarized

  20. Optical modeling of nickel-base alloys oxidized in pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clair, A. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Foucault, M.; Calonne, O. [Areva ANP, Centre Technique Departement Corrosion-Chimie, 30 Bd de l' industrie, BP 181, 71205 Le Creusot (France); Finot, E., E-mail: Eric.Finot@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France)

    2012-10-01

    The knowledge of the aging process involved in the primary water of pressurized water reactor entails investigating a mixed growth mechanism in the corrosion of nickel-base alloys. A mixed growth induces an anionic inner oxide and a cationic diffusion parallel to a dissolution-precipitation process forms the outer zone. The in situ monitoring of the oxidation kinetics requires the modeling of the oxide layer stratification with the full knowledge of the optical constants related to each component. Here, we report the dielectric constants of the alloys 600 and 690 measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry and fitted to a Drude-Lorentz model. A robust optical stratification model was determined using focused ion beam cross-section of thin foils examined by transmission electron microscopy. Dielectric constants of the inner oxide layer depleted in chromium were assimilated to those of the nickel thin film. The optical constants of both the spinels and extern layer were determined. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopic ellipsometry of Ni-base alloy oxidation in pressurized water reactor Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurements of the dielectric constants of the alloys Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical simulation of the mixed oxidation process using a three stack model Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scattered crystallites cationic outer layer; linear Ni-gradient bottom layer Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the refractive index of the spinel and the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers.

  1. Modified fuel assembly design for pressurized water reactors with improved fuel utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.; Ronen, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A method for reactivity control through variation of the moderator content in the reactor core was proposed. The main idea is to adjust the amount of water in the core from a low value at beginning of cycle to a high value at end of cycle, so as to compensate for fissile material burnup and buildup of fission products. The possible implementation of this idea may be carried out by introducing a number of hollow tubes into the fuel assembly between the fuel rods. Then variation of the moderator content in the core may be managed through a change of the water level in these tubes. cated a potential savings in the fuel cycle requirements and costs. Preliminary steady-state thermal-hydraulic calculations indicate the possibility of implementing the proposed method in the existing pressurized water reactor plants. Feasibility of the proposed design may be finally established after rigorous thermal hydraulics as well as safety analysis calculations. Furthermore, there is need to elaborate the mechanical design of the pressure vessel internals together with cost benefit analysis

  2. Robust feedback-linearization control for axial power distribution in pressurized water reactors during load-following operation

    OpenAIRE

    M. Zaidabadi nejad; G.R. Ansarifar

    2018-01-01

    Improved load-following capability is one of the most important technical tasks of a pressurized water reactor. Controlling the nuclear reactor core during load-following operation leads to some difficulties. These difficulties mainly arise from nuclear reactor core limitations in local power peaking: the core is subjected to sharp and large variation of local power density during transients. Axial offset (AO) is the parameter usually used to represent the core power peaking. One of the impor...

  3. Application of Genetic Algorithm methodologies in fuel bundle burnup optimization of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayalal, M.L.; Ramachandran, Suja; Rathakrishnan, S.; Satya Murty, S.A.V.; Sai Baba, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study and compare Genetic Algorithms (GA) in the fuel bundle burnup optimization of an Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) of 220 MWe. • Two Genetic Algorithm methodologies namely, Penalty Functions based GA and Multi Objective GA are considered. • For the selected problem, Multi Objective GA performs better than Penalty Functions based GA. • In the present study, Multi Objective GA outperforms Penalty Functions based GA in convergence speed and better diversity in solutions. - Abstract: The work carried out as a part of application and comparison of GA techniques in nuclear reactor environment is presented in the study. The nuclear fuel management optimization problem selected for the study aims at arriving appropriate reference discharge burnup values for the two burnup zones of 220 MWe Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) core. Two Genetic Algorithm methodologies namely, Penalty Functions based GA and Multi Objective GA are applied in this study. The study reveals, for the selected problem of PHWR fuel bundle burnup optimization, Multi Objective GA is more suitable than Penalty Functions based GA in the two aspects considered: by way of producing diverse feasible solutions and the convergence speed being better, i.e. it is capable of generating more number of feasible solutions, from earlier generations. It is observed that for the selected problem, the Multi Objective GA is 25.0% faster than Penalty Functions based GA with respect to CPU time, for generating 80% of the population with feasible solutions. When average computational time of fixed generations are considered, Penalty Functions based GA is 44.5% faster than Multi Objective GA. In the overall performance, the convergence speed of Multi Objective GA surpasses the computational time advantage of Penalty Functions based GA. The ability of Multi Objective GA in producing more diverse feasible solutions is a desired feature of the problem selected, that helps the

  4. Hydrogen behavior in a large-dry pressurized water reactor containment building during a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu Wensheng; Chen Hungpei; Hung Zhenyu; Lin Huichen

    2014-01-01

    Following severe accidents in nuclear power plants, large quantities of hydrogen may be generated after core degradation. If the hydrogen is transported from the reactor vessel into the containment building, an explosion might occur, which might threaten the integrity of the building; this can ultimately cause the release of radioactive materials. During the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in 2011, the primary containment structures remained intact but contaminated fragments broke off the secondary containment structures, which disrupted mitigation activities and triggered subsequent explosions. Therefore, the ability to predict the behavior of hydrogen after severe accidents may facilitate the development of effective nuclear reactor accident management procedures. The present study investigated the behavior of hydrogen in a large-dry pressurized water reactor (PWR). The amount of hydrogen produced was calculated using the Modular Accident Analysis Program. The hydrogen transport behavior and the effect of the explosion on the PWR containment building were simulated using the Flame Acceleration Simulator. The simulation results showed that the average hydrogen volume fraction is approximately 7% in the containment building and that the average temperature is 330 K. The maximum predicted pressure load after ignition is 2.55 bar, which does not endanger the structural integrity of the containment building. The results of this investigation indicate that the hydrogen mitigation system should be arranged on both the upper and lower parts of the containment building to reduce the impact of an explosion. (author)

  5. Neutron-gamma flux and dose calculations in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovchenko, Mariya; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Burn, Kenneth W.; Console Camprini, Patrizio; Duhamel, Isabelle; Peron, Arthur

    2017-09-01

    The present work deals with Monte Carlo simulations, aiming to determine the neutron and gamma responses outside the vessel and in the basemat of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The model is based on the Tihange-I Belgian nuclear reactor. With a large set of information and measurements available, this reactor has the advantage to be easily modelled and allows validation based on the experimental measurements. Power distribution calculations were therefore performed with the MCNP code at IRSN and compared to the available in-core measurements. Results showed a good agreement between calculated and measured values over the whole core. In this paper, the methods and hypotheses used for the particle transport simulation from the fission distribution in the core to the detectors outside the vessel of the reactor are also summarized. The results of the simulations are presented including the neutron and gamma doses and flux energy spectra. MCNP6 computational results comparing JEFF3.1 and ENDF-B/VII.1 nuclear data evaluations and sensitivity of the results to some model parameters are presented.

  6. Neutron-gamma flux and dose calculations in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brovchenko Mariya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with Monte Carlo simulations, aiming to determine the neutron and gamma responses outside the vessel and in the basemat of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR. The model is based on the Tihange-I Belgian nuclear reactor. With a large set of information and measurements available, this reactor has the advantage to be easily modelled and allows validation based on the experimental measurements. Power distribution calculations were therefore performed with the MCNP code at IRSN and compared to the available in-core measurements. Results showed a good agreement between calculated and measured values over the whole core. In this paper, the methods and hypotheses used for the particle transport simulation from the fission distribution in the core to the detectors outside the vessel of the reactor are also summarized. The results of the simulations are presented including the neutron and gamma doses and flux energy spectra. MCNP6 computational results comparing JEFF3.1 and ENDF-B/VII.1 nuclear data evaluations and sensitivity of the results to some model parameters are presented.

  7. Iterative solution to the optimal control of depletion problem in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletti, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for determining the optimal time and spatial dependence of control absorbers in the core of a pressurized water reactor over a single refueling cycle. The reactor is modeled in two dimensions with many regions using two-group diffusion theory. The problem is formulated as an optimal control problem with the cycle length fixed and the initial reactor state known. Constraints are placed on the regionwise normalized powers, control absorber concentrations, and the critical soluble boron concentration of the core. The cost functional contains two terms which may be used individually or together. One term maximizes the end-of-cycle (EOC) critical soluble boron concentration, and the other minimizes the norm of the distance between the actual and a target EOC burnup distribution. Results are given for several test problems which are based on a three-region model of the Three Mile Island Unit 1 reactor. The resulting optimal control strategies are bang-bang and lead to EOC states with the power peaking at its maximum and no control absorbers remaining in the core. Throughout the cycle the core soluble boron concentration is zero

  8. Stochastic estimation approach for the evaluation of thermal-hydraulic parameters in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    A method based on the extended Kalman filter is developed for the estimation of the core coolant mass flow rate in pressurized water reactors. The need for flow calibration can be avoided by a direct estimation of this parameter. A reduced-order neutronic and thermal-hydraulic model is developed for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor. The neutron detector and core-exit coolant temperature signals from the LOFT reactor are used as measurements in the parameter estimation algorithm. The estimation sensitivity to model uncertainties was evaluated using the ambiguity function analysis. This also provides a lower bound on the measurement sample size necessary to achieve a certain estimation accuracy. A sequential technique was developed to minimize the computational effort needed to discretize the continuous time equations, and thus achieve faster convergence to the true parameter value. The performance of the stochastic approximation method was first evaluated using simulated random data, and then applied to the estimation of coolant flow rate using the operational data from the LOFT reactor at 100 and 65% flow rate conditions

  9. Microstructural characteristics of PWR [pressurized water reactor] spent fuel relative to its leaching behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1986-01-01

    Microstructural, compositional and thermochemical properties of spent nuclear fuel are discussed relative to its potential performance as a high-level waste form under proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project tuff repository conditions. Pressurized water reactor spent fuel specimens with various artificially induced cladding defects were leach tested in deionized water and in a reference tuff groundwater under ambient hot cell air and temperature conditions. Greater fractional actinide release was observed with bare fuel than with clad fuel leached through a cladding defect. Congruent actinide release and preferential release of cesium and technetium were observed in both water types. Selected summary radionuclide release data are presented and correlated to pre- and post-test microstructural characterization data

  10. In-service inspections of the reactor cooling system of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuerste, W.; Hohnerlein, G.; Werden, B.

    1982-01-01

    In order to guarantee constant safety of the components of the reactor cooling system, regular in-service inspections are carried out after commissioning of the nuclear power plant. This contribution is concerned with the components of the reactor cooling system, referring to the legal requirements, safety-related purposes and scope of the in-service inspections during the entire period of operation of a nuclear power plant. Reports are made with respect to type, examination intervals, examination technique, results and future development. The functional tests which are carried out within the scope of the in-service inspections are not part of this contribution. (orig.) [de

  11. Study and modeling of fluctuating fluid forces exerted on fuel rods in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, Saptarshi

    2016-01-01

    Flow-induced vibrations in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core can cause fretting wear in the fuel rods. Due to friction, wear occurs at the contact locations between the spacer grid and the fuel rod. This could compromise the first safety barrier of the nuclear reactor by damaging the fuel rod cladding. In order to ensure the integrity of the cladding, it is necessary to know the random fluctuating forces acting on the rods. However, the spectra for these fluid forces are not well known. The goal of this PhD thesis was to use simple geometrical elements to check the reproducibility of realistic pressurized water reactor spacer grids. As a first step, large eddy simulations were performed on a concentric annular pipe for different mesh refinements using the CFD code Trio CFD (previously Trio U) developed by CEA. A mesh sensitivity study was performed to obtain an acceptable mesh for reproducing standard literature results. This information on mesh resolution was used when carrying out simulations using various geometric obstacles inside the pipe, namely, mixing vanes, circular spacer grid and a combination of square spacer grid with mixing vanes. The last of the three configurations is the closest to a realistic PWR fuel assembly. Structured mesh was generated for the annular pipe case and circular grid case. An innovative hybrid mesh was used for the two remaining cases of the mixing vanes and the square grid: keeping unstructured mesh around the obstacles and structured mesh in the rest of the domain. The inner wall of the domain was representative of the fuel rod cladding. Both hydraulic and wall pressure characteristics were analyzed for each case. The results for the square grid case were found to be an approximate combination of the mixing vane case and circular grid case. Simulation results were compared with experiments performed at CEA Cadarache. Some preliminary comparisons were also made with classical semi-empirical models. (author) [fr

  12. Derivation of Elastic Stress Concentration Factor Equations for Debris Fretting Flaws in Pressure Tubes of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Oh, Young Jin

    2014-01-01

    If volumetric flaws such as bearing pad fretting flaws and debris fretting flaws are detected in the pressure tubes of pressurized heavy water reactors during in-service inspection, the initiation of fatigue cracks and delayed hydrogen cracking from the detected volumetric flaws shall be assessed by using elastic stress concentration factors in accordance with CSA N285.8-05. The CSA N285.8-05 presents only an approximate formula based on linear elastic fracture mechanics for the debris fretting flaw. In this study, an engineering formula considering the geometric characteristics of the debris fretting flaw in detail was derived using two-dimensional finite element analysis and Kinectrics, Inc.'s engineering procedure with slight modifications. Comparing the application results obtained using the derived formula with the three-dimensional finite element analysis results, it is found that the results obtained using the derived formula agree well with the results of the finite element analysis

  13. Stress analyses for reactor pressure vessels by the example of a product line '69 boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mkrtchyan, Lilit; Schau, Henry [TUEV SUED Energietechnik GmbH, Mannheim (Germany). Abt. Strukturverhalten; Wolf, Werner; Holzer, Wieland [TUEV SUED Industrie Service GmbH, Muenchen (Germany). Abt. Behaelter und Turbosatz; Wernicke, Robert; Trieglaff, Ralf [TUEV NORD SysTec GmbH und Co. KG, Hamburg (Germany). Abt. Festigkeit und Konstruktion

    2011-08-15

    The reactor pressure vessels (RPV) of boiling water reactors (BWR) belonging to the product line '69 have unusually designed heads. The spherical cap-shaped bottom head of the vessel is welded directly to the support flange of the lower shell course. This unusual construction has led repeatedly to controversial discussions concerning the limits and admissibility of stress intensities arising in the junction of the bottom head to the cylindrical shell. In the present paper, stress analyses for the design conditions are performed with the finite element method in order to determine and categorize the occurring stresses. The procedure of stress classification in accordance with the guidelines of German KTA 3201.2 and Section III of the ASME Code (Subsection NB) is described and subsequently demonstrated by the example of a typical BWR vessel. The accomplished investigations yield allowable stress intensities in the considered area. Additionally, limit load analyses are carried out to verify the obtained results. Complementary studies, performed for a torispherical head, prove that the determined maximum peak stresses in the junction between the bottom head and the cylindrical shell are not unusual also for pressure vessels with regular bottom head constructions. (orig.)

  14. Stress analyses for reactor pressure vessels by the example of a product line '69 boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkrtchyan, Lilit; Schau, Henry; Wolf, Werner; Holzer, Wieland; Wernicke, Robert; Trieglaff, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessels (RPV) of boiling water reactors (BWR) belonging to the product line '69 have unusually designed heads. The spherical cap-shaped bottom head of the vessel is welded directly to the support flange of the lower shell course. This unusual construction has led repeatedly to controversial discussions concerning the limits and admissibility of stress intensities arising in the junction of the bottom head to the cylindrical shell. In the present paper, stress analyses for the design conditions are performed with the finite element method in order to determine and categorize the occurring stresses. The procedure of stress classification in accordance with the guidelines of German KTA 3201.2 and Section III of the ASME Code (Subsection NB) is described and subsequently demonstrated by the example of a typical BWR vessel. The accomplished investigations yield allowable stress intensities in the considered area. Additionally, limit load analyses are carried out to verify the obtained results. Complementary studies, performed for a torispherical head, prove that the determined maximum peak stresses in the junction between the bottom head and the cylindrical shell are not unusual also for pressure vessels with regular bottom head constructions. (orig.)

  15. Condensation effects in a pressurizer scaled from a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.; Shaw, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents results from an experimental investigation of phenomena associated with pressurizer auxiliary spray during an abnormal plant transient in a commercial PWR. If normal pressurizer spray is unavailable (main coolant pumps are off) or the pressurizer power operated relief valve cannot be used during abnormal transients, pressurizer auxiliary spray can be used to reduce primary system pressure. Results from both transient integral experiments involving pressurizer auxiliary spray during tube rupture and separate effects spray experiments are presented. The experimental investigation was conducted in the Semiscale MOD-2B facility. Phenomenon of interest that occurred in the pressurizer during the pressurized auxiliary spray was desuperheating of the pressurizer steam space and quenching of metal walls followed by dropwise condensation of the pressurizer steam. The data from both the transient integral experiments and the separate effects experiments are compared to RELAP5 computer calculations and the capability of existing models in the code is discussed

  16. Design of a supercritical water-cooled reactor. Pressure vessel and internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Kai

    2008-08-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a light water reactor with supercritical steam conditions which has been investigated within the 5th Framework Program of the European Commission. Due to the supercritical pressure of 25 MPa, water, used as moderator and as coolant, flows as a single phase through the core and can be directly fed to the turbine. Using the technology of coal fired power plants with supercritical steam conditions, the heat-up in the core is done in several steps to achieve the targeted high steam outlet temperature of 500.C without exceeding available cladding material limits. Based on a first design of a fuel assembly cluster for a HPLWR with a single pass core, the surrounding internals and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are dimensioned for the first time, following the safety standards of the nuclear safety standards commission in Germany. Furthermore, this design is extended to the incorporation of core arrangements with two and three passes. The design of the internals and the RPV are verified using mechanical or, in the case of large thermal deformations, combined mechanical and thermal stress analyses. Additionally, a passive safety component for the feedwater inlet of the RPV of the HPLWR is designed. Its purpose is the reduction of the mass flow rate in case of a LOCA for a feedwater line break until further steps are executed. Starting with a simple vortex diode, several steps are executed to enhance the performance of the diode and adapt it to this application. Then, this first design is further optimized using combined 1D and 3D flow analyses. Parametric studies determine the performance and characteristic for changing mass flow rates for this backflow limiter. (orig.)

  17. Pressurized water reactor fuel performance problems connected with fuel cladding corrosion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrevski, I.; Zaharieva, N.

    2008-01-01

    Generally, Pressurized Water Reactor (WWER, PWR) Fuel Element Performance is connected with fuel cladding corrosion and crud deposition processes. By transient to extended fuel cycles in nuclear power reactors, aiming to achieve higher burnup and better fuel utilization, the role of these processes increases significantly. This evolution modifies the chemical and electrochemical conditions in the reactor primary system, including change of fuel claddings' environment. The higher duty cores are always attended with increased boiling (sub-cooled nucleate boiling) mainly on the feed fuel assemblies. This boiling process on fuel cladding surfaces can cause different consequences on fuel element cladding's environment characteristics. In the case of boiling at the cladding surfaces without or with some cover of corrosion product deposition, the behavior of gases dissolved in water phase is strongly influenced by the vapor generation. The increase of vapor partial pressure will reduce the partial pressures of dissolved gases and will cause their stripping out. By these circumstances the concentrations of dissolved gases in cladding wall water layer can dramatically decrease, including also the case by which all dissolved gases to be stripped out. On the other hand it is known that the hydrogen is added to primary coolant in order to avoid the production of oxidants by radiolysis of water. It is clear that if boiling strips out dissolved hydrogen, the creation of oxidizing conditions at the cladding surfaces will be favored. In this case the local production of oxidants will be a result from local processes of water radiolysis, by which not only both oxygen (O 2 ) and hydrogen (H 2 ) but also hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) will be produced. While these hydrogen and oxygen will be stripped out preferentially by boiling, the bigger part of hydrogen peroxide will remain in wall water phase and will act as the most important factor for creation of oxidizing conditions in fuel

  18. Analysis of loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldaschl, H.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors -Quantification of the influence of leak size, control assembly worth, boron concentration and initial power by a dynamic operations criterion. Neutronic and thermohydraulic behaviour of a pressurized water reactor during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is mainly influenced by -change of fuel temperature, -void in the primary coolant. They cause a local stabilization of power density, that means that also in the case of small leaks local void is the main stabilization effect. As a consequence the increase of fuel temperature remains very small even under extremely hypothetical assumptions: small leak, positive reactivity feedback (positive coolant temperature coefficient, negative density coefficient) at the beginning of the accident and all control assemblies getting stuck. Restrictions which have been valid up to now for permitted start-up conditions to fulfill inherent safety requirements can be lossened substantially by a dynamic operations criterion. Burnable poisons for compensation of reactivity theorefore can be omitted. (orig.)

  19. Estimation of costs for fabrication of pressurized-water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judkins, R.R.; Olsen, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    To provide a reference case on which to base cost estimates of the several fuel cycles to be considered, the facility, equipment, and operating requirements for the fabrication of fuel for current-design pressurized-water reactors were examined. From an analysis of these requirements, the capital and operating costs of a plant with a capacity of two metric tons of heavy metal per day (MTHM/day) were estimated. In a cash flow analysis, the lifetime of the plant was assumed to be 20 y, and the income from the sale of nuclear fuel assemblies over this period was equated to the total capital and operating expenses of the plant, including a specified 15% return on investment. In this way a levelized unit price for the fuel was obtained. The effects of inflation were not considered since the purpose of these estimates and the determination of unit price was to permit comparison of different types of fuels. The capital costs of the fuel fabrication plant were estimated at $32 million for the facility--land, site preparation, building--and $34 million for equipment. Annual operating costs including labor, management, materials, and utilities were estimated to be $36.5 million. From these estimates, the unit price for fabricating the fuel for the reference pressurized-water reactor was determined to be $138/kg of heavy metal or $63,600 per fuel assembly

  20. Sloshing of water in annular pressure-suppression pool of boiling water reactors under earthquake ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Godden, W.G.; Scalise, D.T.

    1979-10-01

    This report presents an analytical investigation of the sloshing response of water in annular-circular as well as simple-circular tanks under horizontal earthquake ground motions, and the results are verified with tests. This study was motivated because of the use of annular tanks for pressure-suppression pools in Boiling Water Reactors. Such a pressure-suppression pool would typically have 80 ft and 120 ft inside and outside diameters and a water depth of 20 ft. The analysis was based upon potential flow theory and a computer program was written to obtain time-history plots of sloshing displacements of water and the dynamic pressures. Tests were carried out on 1/80th and 1/15th scale models under sinusoidal as well as simulated earthquake ground motions. Tests and analytical results regarding the natural frequencies, surface water displacements, and dynamic pressures were compared and a good agreement was found for relatively small displacements. The computer program gave satisfactory results as long as the maximum water surface displacements were less than 30 in., which is roughly the value obtained under full intensity of El Centro earthquake

  1. Mechanical behaviour of the reactor vessel support of a pressurized water reactor: tests and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolvin, M.; L'huby, Y.; Quillico, J.J.; Humbert, J.M.; Thomas, J.P.; Hugenschmitt, R.

    1985-08-01

    The PWR reactor vessel is supported by a steel ring laying on the reactor pit. This support has to ensure a good behaviour of the vessel in the event of accidental conditions (earthquake and pipe rupture). A new evolution of the evaluation methods of the applied forces has shown a significant increase in the design loads used until now. In order to take into account these new forces, we carried out a test on a representative mock-up of the vessel support (scale 1/6). This test was performed by CEA, EDF and FRAMATOME. Several static equivalent forces were applied on the experimental mock-up. Displacements and strains were simultaneously recorded. The results of the test have enabled to justify the design of the pit and the ring, to show up a wide safety margin until the collapse of the structures and to check our hypothesis about the transmission of the forces between the ring and the pit

  2. TRANP - a computer code for digital simulation of steady - state and transient behavior of a pressurizer water reactor primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalhoub, E.S.

    1980-09-01

    A digital computer code TRANP was developed to simulate the steady-state and transient behavior of a pressurizer water reactor primary circuit. The development of this code was based on the combining of three codes already developed for the simulation of a PWR core, a pressurizer, a steam generator and a main coolant pump, representing the primary circuit components. (Author) [pt

  3. Neutron transport. Physics and calculation of nuclear reactors with applications to pressurized water reactors and fast neutron reactors. 2 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussac, J.; Reuss, P.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the main physical bases of neutron theory and nuclear reactor calculation. 1) Interactions of neutrons with matter and basic principles of neutron transport; 2) Neutron transport in homogeneous medium and the neutron field: kinetic behaviour, slowing-down, resonance absorption, diffusion equation, processing methods; 3) Theory of a reactor constituted with homogeneous zones: critical condition, kinetics, separation of variables, calculation and neutron balance of the fundamental mode, one-group and multigroup theories; 4) Study of heterogeneous cell lattices: fast fission factor, resonance absorption, thermal output factor, diffusion coefficient, computer codes; 5) Operation and control of reactors: perturbation theory, reactivity, fuel properties evolution, poisoning by fission products, calculation of a reactor and fuel management; 6) Study of some types of reactors: PWR and fast breeder reactors, the main reactor types of the present French program [fr

  4. Earthquake resistance of residual heat removed (RHR) pump for pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uga, Takeo; Shiraki, K.; Honma, T.; Matsubayashi, H.; Inazuka, H.

    1980-01-01

    The present paper deals with the earthquake resistance of the residual heat removed (RHR) pump of single stage double volute type, which is one of the structurally simplest pumps used for pressurized water reactors (PWR). The results of the study can be summarized as follows: (1) Any trouble which can give effect on the functions of the pump at earthquake does not become a problem so long as each part of the pump is of aseismatically rigid structure. (2) Aseismatic tolerance test in the pump's operating condition has shown that the earthquake resistance of the pump at its location has a tolerance about five times the dynamic design acceleration. (3) The pump is provided with an impeller-casing wear ring at the pressure boundary between the suction side pressure and discharge side pressure. This wear ring acts as an underwater bearing when the pump is in operation, and improves the vibration characteristics, particularly damping ratio, of the pump shaft to a great extent to make the pump more aseismatic. (4) In the evaluation of the underwater bearing characteristics of the wear ring, the evaluation accuracy of the vibration characteristics of the pump shaft can be improved by taking into consideration the pressure loss in the wear ring part from the head of the single stage of the pump due to the rotation of the impeller. (author)

  5. A modified firefly algorithm applied to the nuclear reload problem of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Iona Maghali Santos de; Schirru, Roberto, E-mail: ioliveira@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: schirru@lmp.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Reload Problem (NRRP) is an issue of great importance and concern in nuclear engineering. It is the problem related with the periodic operation of replacing part of the fuel of a nuclear reactor. Traditionally, this procedure occurs after a period of operation called a cycle, or whenever the nuclear power plant is unable to continue operating at its nominal power. Studied for more than 40 years, the NRRP still remains a challenge for many optimization techniques due to its multiple objectives concerning economics, safety and reactor physics calculations. Characteristics such as non-linearity, multimodality and high dimensionality also make the NRRP a very complex optimization problem. In broad terms, it aims at getting the best arrangement of fuel in the nuclear reactor core that leads to a maximization of the operating time. The primary goal is to design fuel loading patterns (LPs) so that the core produces the required energy output in an economical way, without violating safety limits. Since multiple feasible solutions can be obtained to this problem, judicious optimization is required in order to identify the most economical among them. In this sense, this paper presents a new contribution in this area and introduces a modified firefly algorithm (FA) to perform LPs optimization for a pressurized water reactor. Based on the original FA introduced by Xin-She Yang in 2008, the proposed methodology seems to be very promising as an optimizer to the NRRP. The experiments performed and the comparisons with some well known best performing algorithms from the literature, confirm this statement. (author)

  6. A modified firefly algorithm applied to the nuclear reload problem of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Iona Maghali Santos de; Schirru, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Reload Problem (NRRP) is an issue of great importance and concern in nuclear engineering. It is the problem related with the periodic operation of replacing part of the fuel of a nuclear reactor. Traditionally, this procedure occurs after a period of operation called a cycle, or whenever the nuclear power plant is unable to continue operating at its nominal power. Studied for more than 40 years, the NRRP still remains a challenge for many optimization techniques due to its multiple objectives concerning economics, safety and reactor physics calculations. Characteristics such as non-linearity, multimodality and high dimensionality also make the NRRP a very complex optimization problem. In broad terms, it aims at getting the best arrangement of fuel in the nuclear reactor core that leads to a maximization of the operating time. The primary goal is to design fuel loading patterns (LPs) so that the core produces the required energy output in an economical way, without violating safety limits. Since multiple feasible solutions can be obtained to this problem, judicious optimization is required in order to identify the most economical among them. In this sense, this paper presents a new contribution in this area and introduces a modified firefly algorithm (FA) to perform LPs optimization for a pressurized water reactor. Based on the original FA introduced by Xin-She Yang in 2008, the proposed methodology seems to be very promising as an optimizer to the NRRP. The experiments performed and the comparisons with some well known best performing algorithms from the literature, confirm this statement. (author)

  7. Reactor pressure vessel status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.; Wichman, K.; Elliot, B.

    1994-12-01

    This report gives a brief description of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), followed by a discussion of the radiation embrittlement of RPV beltline materials and the two indicators for measuring embrittlement, the end-of-license (EOL) reference temperature and the EOL upper-shelf energy. It also summarizes the GL 92-01 effort and presents, for all 37 boiling water reactor plants and 74 pressurized water reactor plants in the United States, the current status of compliance with regulatory requirements related to ensuring RPV integrity. The staff has evaluated the material data needed to predict neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel beltline materials. These data will be stored in a computer database entitled the reactor vessel integrity database (RVID). This database will be updated annually to reflect the changes made by the licensees in future submittals and will be used by the NRC staff to assess the issues related to vessel structural integrity

  8. Supercritical Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Latge, C.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the 6 concepts selected for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. SCWR is a new concept, it is an attempt to optimize boiling water reactors by using the main advantages of supercritical water: only liquid phase and a high calorific capacity. The SCWR requires very high temperatures (over 375 C degrees) and very high pressures (over 22.1 MPa) to operate which allows a high conversion yield (44% instead of 33% for a PWR). Low volumes of coolant are necessary which makes the neutron spectrum shift towards higher energies and it is then possible to consider fast reactors operating with supercritical water. The main drawbacks of supercritical water is the necessity to use very high pressures which has important constraints on the reactor design, its physical properties (density, calorific capacity) that vary strongly with temperatures and pressures and its very high corrosiveness. The feasibility of the concept is not yet assured in terms of adequate materials that resist to corrosion, reactor stability, reactor safety, and reactor behaviour in accidental situations. (A.C.)

  9. Scram characteristics of the control rods of a pressurized water reactor under seismic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Katsuhisa; Shinohara, Yoshikazu; Nakatogawa, Tetsuto; Nanbu, Kiyoshi; Nomura, Tomonori.

    1987-01-01

    Control rod drop verification experiments of a pressurized water reactor under seismic conditions are performed to confirm the insertion function of control rods into a core. To evaluate these tests, computer simulations are performed. A fuel assembly, control rods, guide tube and other associated structures are immersed in a water tank, and shaken by four hydraulic shakers. The scram time of control rods under seismic conditions was measured, and confirmed to meet the scram function. Moreover, vibrational response characteristics of core structures and dropping behavior of control rods in consideration of collisions are calculated by using a finite difference method. The behavior of the dropping control rods and the scram time obtained by the computer simulation show a very good agreement with the verification experimental results. (author)

  10. Acoustic emission technique for leak detection in an end shield of a pressurized heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyanasundaram, P.; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the successful application of the Acoustic Emission Technique (AET) for detection and location of leak paths present on the inaccessible side of an end shield of a Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The methodology was based on the fact that air and water leak AE signals have different characteristic features. Baseline data was generated from a sound end-shield of a PHWR for characterizing the background noise. A mock up end-shield system with saw cut leak paths was used to verify the validity of the methodology. It was found that air leak signals under pressurisation (as low as 3 psi) could be detected by frequency domain analysis. Signals due to air leaks from various locations of a defective end-shield were acquired and analysed. It was possible to detect and locate leak paths. Presence of detected leak paths were further confirmed by alternate test. (orig.)

  11. Pressurised water reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnie, S.; Lamonby, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is described with respect to the procedure for a unit start-up. The systems details and numerical data are for a four loop PWR station of the design proposed for Sizewell-'B', United Kingdom. A description is given of: the initial conditions, filling the reactor coolant system (RCS), heat-up and pressurisation of the RCS, secondary system preparations, reactor start-up, and reactivity control at power. (UK)

  12. A critical heat flux correlation for advanced pressurized light water reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Hame, W.

    1982-05-01

    Many CHF-correlations have been developed for water cooled rod clusters representing typical PWR or BWR fuel element geometries with relative wide rod lattices. However the fuel elements of an Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR) have a tight fuel rod lattice, in view of increasing the fuel utilization. It was therefore decided to produce a new CHF-correlation valid for rod bundles with tight lattices. The already available WSC-2 correlation was chosen as a basis. The geometry dependent parameters of this correlation were determined again with the method of the root mean square fitting from the experimental data of the CHF-tests performed in the frame of the Light Water Breeder Reactor programme at the Bettis Laboratory. These tests include triangular array rod bundles with very tight lattices. Furthermore the effect of spiral spacer ribs was investigated on the basis of experimental data from the Columbia University. Application of the new CHF-correlation to conditions typical for an APWR shows that the predicted critical heat fluxes are much smaller than those calculated with the usual PWR-CHF-correlations, but they are higher than those predicted by the B+W-VPI+SU correlation. (orig.) [de

  13. Sloshing of water in torus pressure-suppression pool of boiling water reactors under earthquake ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Godden, W.G.; Scalise, D.T.

    1978-08-01

    This report presents an analytical and experimental investigation into the sloshing of water in torus tanks under horizontal earthquake ground motions. This study was motivated because of the use of torus tanks for pressure-suppression pools in Boiling Water Reactors. Such a pressure-suppression pool would typically have 80 ft and 140 ft inside and outside diameters, a 30 ft diameter section, and a water depth of 15 ft. A general finite element analysis was developed for all axisymmetric tanks and a computer program was written to obtain time-history plots of sloshing displacements of water and dynamic pressures. Tests were carried out on a 1/60th scale model under sinusoidal as well as simulated earthquake ground motions. Tests and analytical results regarding natural frequencies, surface water displacements, and dynamic pressures were compared and a good agreement was found within the range of displacements studied. The computer program gave satisfactory results within a maximum range of sloshing displacements in the full-size prototype of 30 in. which is greater than the value obtained under the full intensity of the El Centro earthquake (N-S component 1940). The range of linear behavior was studied experimentally by subjecting the torus model to increasing intensities of the El Centro earthquake

  14. Implementation of an expert system for xenon spatial control in pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    Control of the axial xenon oscillations is a knowledge- and experience-intensive activity for reactor operators. To aid reactor operators in the control of axial xenon oscillations, an advisory expert system was developed. A rule-based expert system shell, INSIGHT2+, was used to build the expert system which was interfaced with a microcomputer-based core control model of a pressurized-water reactor, graphic engine, and data base. A core control model described by one-group diffusion theory with moderator temperature and xenon feedbacks was used to develop heuristic control rules and to test the system. Full- and part-length control rods, boron concentration, and coolant inlet temperature were considered as control variables of the core control model. This expert system consists of a search space: the set of possible power level and power shape patterns. The search space was made by combining the following core state variables: the sign of relative power and axial offset (AO) error, sign of the rate of change of power level and AO, and magnitude of relative power and AO error

  15. A computer program for calculation of the fuel cycle in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solanilla, R.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of the FUCEFURE program is two-fold: first, it is designed to solve the problem of nuclear fuel cycle cost in one pressurized light water reactor calculation. The code was developed primarily for comparative and sensitivity studies. The program contains simple correlations between exposure and available depletion data used to predict the uranium and plutonium content of the fuel as a function of the fuel initial enrichment. Second, it has been devised to evaluate the nuclear fuel demand associated with an expanding nuclear power system. Evaluation can be carried out at any time and stage in the fuel cycle. The program can calculate the natural uranium and separate work requirements of any final and tails enrichment. It also can determine the nuclear power share of each reactor in the system when a decision has been made about the long-term nuclear power installations to be used and the types of PWR and fast breeder reactor characteristics to be involved in them. (author)

  16. On the sensitivity of HCPWR [high conversion pressurized water reactors] microcell calculations to geometrical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbaffoni, Maria; Abbate, Maximo; Patino, Nestor

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear reactor microcell calculations are, normally, carried out using simplified geometrical models which do not include the total number of homogeneous zones actually present. Regarding the particular case of High Conversion Pressurized Water Reactors (HCPWR), the revision of this approximation has been done to determine the sensitivity of its neutronic parameters to the use of these models. The study was performed comparing multiplication factors, reaction rates and neutron spectra, obtained using different geometrical treatments for a HCPWR typical microcell. From the results, it can be asserted that, if only two zones should be used in the calculation, the model which dilutes the clad into the moderator gives best results for the neutron fluxes, but the model that mix it with the fuel is better for k-infinite and reaction rate values. Considering the significance of these parameters on the physical behaviour of the reactor, the last one is recommended for cell calculations. Even if there is a slight difference between the cells considered, some results of this work were also compared with those of the NEACRP HCLWR benchmark with good agreement, so it can be concluded that the methodology here used for data processing and calculations is applicable to HCR's cell studies. (Author)

  17. Self-adjointness of the fast flux in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Most computer codes for the analysis of systems transients rely on a simplified representation of the active core, typically employing either a one-dimensional or a point kinetics model. The collapsing of neutronics data from multidimensional steady-state calculations normally employs flux/flux-adjoint weighting. The multidimensional calculations, however, usually are performed only for the forward problem, not the adjoint. The collapsing methodologies employed in generating the neutronics input for transient codes typically construct adjoint fluxes from the assumption that the fast flux is self-adjoint. Until now, no further verification of this assumption has been undertaken for thermal reactors. As part of the verification effort for EPRI's reactor analysis support package, the validity of this assumption now has been investigated for a modern pressurized water reactor (PWR). The PDQ-7 code was employed to perform two-group fine-mesh forward and adjoint calculations for a two-dimensional representation of Zion Unit 2 at beginning of life, based on the standard PWR ARMP model. It has been verified that the fast flux is very nearly self-adjoint in a PWR. However, a significant error can arise during the subsequent construction of the thermal adjoint flux unless allowance is made for the difference between the forward and adjoint thermal buckling terms. When such a difference is included, the thermal adjoint flux can be estimated very accurately

  18. Nonlinear control for core power of pressurized water nuclear reactors using constant axial offset strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Ansarifar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important operations in nuclear power plants is load following, in which an imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These oscillations must be maintained within acceptable limits otherwise the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded xenon oscillation is considered to be a constraint for the load following operation. In this paper, the design of a sliding mode control (SMC, which is a robust nonlinear controller, is presented. SMC is a means to control pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR power for the load following operation problem in a way that ensures xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. The proposed controller uses constant axial offset (AO strategy to ensure xenon oscillations remain bounded. The constant AO is a robust state constraint for the load following problem. The reactor core is simulated based on the two-point nuclear reactor model with a three delayed neutron groups. The stability analysis is given by means of the Lyapunov approach, thus the control system is guaranteed to be stable within a large range. The employed method is easy to implement in practical applications and moreover, the SMC exhibits the desired dynamic properties during the entire output-tracking process independent of perturbations. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller in terms of performance, robustness, and stability. Results show that the proposed controller for the load following operation is so effective that the xenon oscillations are kept bounded in the given region.

  19. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.I.; Konzek, G.J.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1978-05-01

    Safety and cost information was developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a large [1175 MW(e)] pressurized water reactor (PWR) power station. Two approaches to decommissioning, Immediate Dismantlement and Safe Storage with Deferred Dismantlement, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. Immediate Dismantlement was estimated to require about six years to complete, including two years of planning and preparation prior to final reactor shutdown, at a cost of $42 million, and accumulated occupational radiation dose, excluding transport operations, of about 1200 man-rem. Preparations for Safe Storage were estimated to require about three years to complete, including 1 1 / 2 years for planning and preparation prior to final reactor shutdown, at a cost of $13 million and an accumulated occupational radiation dose of about 420 man-rem. The cost of continuing care during the Safe Storage period was estimated to be about $80 thousand annually. Accumulated occupational radiation dose during the Safe Storage period was estimated to range from about 10 man-rem for the first 10 years to about 14 man-rem after 30 years or more. The cost of decommissioning by Safe Storage with Deferred Dismantlement was estimated to be slightly higher than Immediate Dismantlement. Cost reductions resulting from reduced volumes of radioactive material for disposal, due to the decay of the radioactive containments during the deferment period, are offset by the accumulated costs of surveillance and maintenance during the Safe Storage period

  20. Simulation of corrosion product activity in pressurized water reactors under flow rate transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, Anwar M.; Mirza, Nasir M.; Mir, Imran

    1998-01-01

    Simulation of coolant activation due to corrosion products and impurities in a typical pressurized water reactor has been done under flow rate transients. Employing time dependent production and losses of corrosion products in the primary coolant path an approach has been developed to calculate the coolant specific activity. Results for 24 Na, 56 Mn, 59 Fe, 60 Co and 99Mo show that the specific activity in primary loop approaches equilibrium value under normal operating conditions fairly rapidly. Predominant corrosion product activity is due to Mn-56. Parametric studies at full power for various ramp decreases in flow rate show initial decline in the activity and then a gradual rise to relatively higher saturation values. The minimum value and the time taken to reach the minima are strong functions of the slope of linear decrease in flow rate. In the second part flow rate coastdown was allowed to occur at different flow half-times. The reactor scram was initiated at 90% of the normal flow rate. The results show that the specific activity decreases and the rate of decrease depends on pump half time and the reactor scram conditions

  1. Effects of nickel on irradiation embrittlement of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    This TECDOC was developed under the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) entitled Effects of Nickel on Irradiation Embrittlement of Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels. This CRP is the sixth in a series of CRPs to determine the influence of the mechanism and quantify the influence of nickel content on the deterioration of irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels of the Ni-Cr-Mo-V or Mn-Ni-Cr-Mo types. The scientific scope of the programme includes procurement of materials, determination of mechanical properties, irradiation and testing of specimens in power and/or test reactors, and microstructural characterization. Eleven institutes from eight different countries and the European Union participated in this CRP and six institutes conducted the irradiation experiments of the CRP materials. In addition to the irradiation and testing of those materials, irradiation experiments of various national steels were also conducted. Moreover, some institutes performed microstructural investigations of both the CRP materials and national steels. This TECDOC presents and discusses all the results obtained and the analyses performed under the CRP. The results analysed are clear in showing the significantly higher radiation sensitivity of high nickel weld metal (1.7 wt%) compared with the lower nickel base metal (1.2 wt%). These results are supported by other similar results in the literature for both WWER-1000 RPV materials, pressurized water reactor (PWR) type materials, and model alloys. Regardless of the increased sensitivity of WWER-1000 high nickel weld metal (1.7 wt%), the transition temperature shift for the WWER-1000 RPV design fluence is still below the curve predicted by the Russian code (standard for strength calculations of components and piping in NPPs - PNAE G 7-002-86). For higher fluence, no data were available and the results should not be extrapolated. Although manganese content was not incorporated directly in this CRP

  2. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Station Blackout caused by external flooding using the RISMC toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates. In order to evaluate the impacts of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization project aims to provide insights to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This paper focuses on the impacts of power uprate on the safety margin of a boiling water reactor for a flooding induced station black-out event. Analysis is performed by using a combination of thermal-hydraulic codes and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory, i.e. RAVEN. We employed both classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. Results obtained give a detailed investigation of the issues associated with a plant power uprate including the effects of station black-out accident scenarios. We were able to quantify how the timing of specific events was impacted by a higher nominal reactor core power. Such safety insights can provide useful information to the decision makers to perform risk informed margins management.

  3. Collector feedwater supply and stability of the power distribution in a pressurized-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnikov, V.I.; Kosolapov, S.V.; Kramerov, A.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    It is necessary to determine how the collector feedwater supply affects the disposition of the stability limits and the instability period for the power distribution in such a reactor. The main reason for the fluctuations in feedwater flow rate were shown by additional calculations with the general power regulator switched out to be due to instability on the fundamental in the neutron distribution. The power-level fluctuations are due to oscillation of the feed valve in the level regulator, and consequently to oscillations in the feedwater flow rate. If collector feed is to be employed, it is desirable to improve the response of the pressure control system for the separator drum, because under certain emergency conditions there will be a considerable fall in pressure in the separator drum. The deviation from saturation for the water in the separator drum tube is less in the second method than it is in the first, so the cavitation margin in the principal pumps may be reduced somewhat. Calculations show that this reduction will not occur if the time constant of the turbine synchronizer is about 10 sec. Also, the dynamic characteristics of the nuclear power station in these modes of feedwater supply are appreciably influenced by the parameters of the pressure-control system and the water-level control for the separator drum

  4. Optimization of core reload design for low leakage fuel management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.

    1986-01-01

    A new method was developed to optimize pressurized water reactor core reload design for low leakage fuel management, a strategy recently adopted by most utilities to extend cycle length and mitigate pressurized thermal shock concerns. The method consists of a two-stage optimization process which provides the maximum cycle length for a given fresh fuel loading subject to power peaking constraints. In the first stage, a best fuel arrangement is determined at the end of cycle in the absence of burnable poisons. A direct search method is employed in conjunction with a constant power, Haling depletion. In the second stage, the core control poison requirements are determined using a linear programming technique. The solution provides the fresh fuel burnable poison loading required to meet core power peaking constraints. An accurate method of explicitly modeling burnable absorbers was developed for this purpose. The design method developed here was implemented in a currently recognized fuel licensing code, SIMULATE, that was adapted to the CYBER-205 computer. This methodology was applied to core reload design of cycles 9 and 10 for the Commonwealth Edison Zion, Unit-1 Reactor. The results showed that the optimum loading pattern for cycle 9 yielded almost a 9% increase in the cycle length while reducing core vessel fluence by 30% compared with the reference design used by Commonwealth Edison

  5. Super critical water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2005-01-01

    Water is used as a calori-porter and moderator in the most major nuclear centers which are actually in function. In the pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR), water is maintained under critical point of water (21 bar, 374 Centigrade) which limits the efficiency of thermodynamic cycle of energy conversion (yield gain of about 33%) Crossing the critical point, one can then use s upercritical water , the obtained pressure and temperature allow a significant yield gains. In addition, the supercritical water offers important properties. Particularly there is no more possible coexistence between vapor and liquid. Therefore, we don't have more boiling problem, one of the phenomena which limits the specific power of PWR and BWR. Since 1950s, the reactor of supercritical water was the subject of studies more or less detailed but neglected. From the early 1990s, this type of conception benefits of some additional interests. Therefore, in the international term G eneration IV , the supercritical water reactors had been considered as one of the big options for study as Generation IV reactors. In the CEA, an active city has engaged from 1930 with the participation to a European program: The HPWR (High Performance Light Water Reactor). In this contest, the R and D studies are focused on the fields of neutrons, thermodynamic and materials. The CEA intends to pursue a limited effort of R and D in this field, in the framework of international cooperation, preferring the study of versions of rapid spectrum. (author)

  6. Ethanolamine properties and use for feedwater pH control: A pressurized water reactor case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeling, D.L.; Polidoroff, C.T.; Cortese, S.; Cushner, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    Ethanolamine (ETA) as a feedwater pH control additive has been recently used to minimize corrosion of secondary water components in the nuclear power industry pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The use of ETA is compared with ammonia. Relative volatility effects on various parts of the system are analyzed and chemistry changes are presented. Materials of construction and the use of existing plant equipment for ETA service are discussed. Properties of ETA as well as safety, storage and handling issues are compared with ammonia. Health d aquatic toxicity are reviewed. warnings, safety, handling guidelines, biodegradability an Diablo Canyon Power Plant used ammonia for pH control from 1985 until a change over to ETA in 1993/1994. Full flow condensate polishers that are required to protect the plant from saltwater cooling incursions limit the amount of pH additive. Iron levels in the secondary water systems are compared before and after changing to ETA and replacement of corrosion-susceptible piping. Iron reduction benefits are assessed along with other effects on the feedwater nozzles, low pressure turbine, polisher resin capacity and polisher regeneration system

  7. A Mixed-Oxide Assembly Design for Rapid Disposition of Weapons Plutonium in Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Gustavo; Adams, Marvin L.

    2002-01-01

    We have created a new mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel assembly design for standard pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Design goals were to maximize the plutonium throughput while introducing the lowest perturbation possible to the control and safety systems of the reactor. Our assembly design, which we call MIX-33, offers some advantages for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium; it increases the disposition rate by 8% while increasing the worth of control material, compared to a previous Westinghouse design. The MIX-33 design is based upon two ideas: the use of both uranium and plutonium fuel pins in the same assembly, and the addition of water holes in the assembly. The main result of this paper is that both of these ideas are effective at increasing Pu throughput and increasing the worth of control material. With this new design, according to our analyses, we can transition smoothly from a full low-enriched-uranium (LEU) core to a full MIX-33 core while meeting the operational and safety requirements of a standard PWR. Given an interruption of the MOX supply, we can transition smoothly back to full LEU while meeting safety margins and using standard LEU assemblies with uniform pinwise enrichment distribution. If the MOX supply is interrupted for only one cycle, the transition back to a full MIX-33 core is not as smooth; high peaking could cause power to be derated by a few percent for a few weeks at the beginning of one transition cycle

  8. Industrial experience with the construction of pressurized-water reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leny, J.-C.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1969, the switch to light-water reactors as the basis of the French nuclear programme has led to the development of an industrial infrastructure for the manufacture of pressurized-water reactor equipment. Since the massive power plant construction programme was approved in 1974, an integrated PWR industry has been built up around and in conjunction with Framatome. The experience gathered relates to the series production of thirty-four 900 MW(e) units and eighteen 1300 MW(e) units, and it is unique. From the industrial point of view, the high rate of construction of identical equipment items has made it possible to streamline production and establish a fully integrated and complete team of constructors and sub-contractors supervised by a likewise highly integrated and comprehensive organization responsible for regulating quality. At the research and development level, the effort to improve knowledge of the product has gradually led to mastery of a French technology and to further developments proceeding therefrom. Standardized, repeated production has given rise to consistent quality, better component reliability and safer plant operation as well as reduced construction time and lower manufacturing costs. However, difficulties have inevitably had to be overcome with respect to the setting up of teams maintaining schedules and mastering the techniques used, and this has required time and money. The remarkable quality, reliability and safety of the products has led to export orders and to good co-operation with local industry in the importing countries. (author)

  9. A reverse depletion method for pressurized water reactor core reload design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downar, T.J.; Kin, Y.J.

    1986-01-01

    Low-leakage fuel management is currently practiced in over half of all pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores. The large numbers of burnable poison pins used to control the power peaking at the in-board fresh fuel positions have introduced an additional complexity to the core reload design problem. In addition to determining the best location of each assembly in the core, the designer must concurrently determine the distribution of burnable poison pins in the fresh fuel. A new method for performing core design more suitable for low-leakage fuel management is reported. A procedure was developed that uses the wellknown ''Haling depletion'' to achieve an end-of-cycle (EOC) core state where the assembly pattern is configured in the absence of all control poison. This effectively separates the assembly assignment and burnable poison distribution problems. Once an acceptable pattern at EOC is configured, the burnable and soluble poison required to control the power and core excess reactivity are solved for as unknown variables while depleting the cycle in reverse from the EOC exposure distribution to the beginning of cycle. The methods developed were implemented in an approved light water reactor licensing code to ensure the validity of the results obtained and provided for the maximum utility to PWR core reload design

  10. An evaluation of the deployment of AIROX-recycled fuel in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahshan, S.N.; McGeehan, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical evaluation is made of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) in-core performance of recycled light water reactor fuel that has been Atomics International reduction oxidation (AIROX) reprocessed and reenriched with fissile materials. The neutronics performance is shown to lie within the neutronics performance of existing high-performance and high-burnup fuels. Three AIROX-recycled fuels are compared with a high-burnup virgin fuel and an equivalent mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. The AIROX-recycled fuel neutronics performance lies consistently between the virgin and the MOX fuel for both the pin power peaking and the reactivity response characteristics in PWRs. Among the attractive features of AIROX-recycled fuel is that it can optimize fissile and fertile fuel use, minimize final fuel disposal impact on the environment, and provide energy in the process of denaturing weapons-grade fissile materials. The fuel material performance may be anticipated from high-burnup virgin fuel and from MOX fuel performance. Recommendations for lead rod testing and for optimization of the AIROX-processing and resintering techniques are made

  11. Modeling of a Flooding Induced Station Blackout for a Pressurized Water Reactor Using the RISMC Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven R; Smith, Curtis L; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua J; Kinoshita, Robert A

    2011-07-01

    In the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach we want to understand not just the frequency of an event like core damage, but how close we are (or are not) to key safety-related events and how might we increase our safety margins. The RISMC Pathway uses the probabilistic margin approach to quantify impacts to reliability and safety by coupling both probabilistic (via stochastic simulation) and mechanistic (via physics models) approaches. This coupling takes place through the interchange of physical parameters and operational or accident scenarios. In this paper we apply the RISMC approach to evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., system activation) and to perform statistical analyses (e.g., run multiple RELAP-7 simulations where sequencing/timing of events have been changed according to a set of stochastic distributions). By using the RISMC toolkit, we can evaluate how power uprate affects the system recovery measures needed to avoid core damage after the PWR lost all available AC power by a tsunami induced flooding. The simulation of the actual flooding is performed by using a smooth particle hydrodynamics code: NEUTRINO.

  12. Zinc corrosion after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors – Physicochemical effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryk, Holger, E-mail: h.kryk@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Hoffmann, Wolfgang [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Kästner, Wolfgang; Alt, Sören; Seeliger, André; Renger, Stefan [Hochschule Zittau/Görlitz, Institute of Process Technology, Process Automation and Measuring Technology, Theodor-Körner-Allee 16, D-02763 Zittau (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Physicochemical effects due to post-LOCA zinc corrosion in PWR were elucidated. • Decreasing solubility of corrosion products with increasing temperature was found. • Solid corrosion products may be deposited on hot surfaces and/or within hot-spots. • Corrosion products precipitating from coolant were identified as zinc borates. • Depending on coolant temperature, different types of zinc borate are formed. - Abstract: Within the framework of the reactor safety research, generic experimental investigations were carried out aiming at the physicochemical background of possible zinc corrosion product formation, which may occur inside the reactor pressure vessel during the sump circulation operation after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors. The contact of the boric acid containing coolant with hot-dip galvanized steel containment internals causes corrosion of the corresponding materials resulting in dissolution of the zinc coat. A retrograde solubility of zinc corrosion products with increasing temperature was observed during batch experiments of zinc corrosion in boric acid containing coolants. Thus, the formation and deposition of solid corrosion products cannot be ruled out if the coolant containing dissolved zinc is heated up during its recirculation into hot regions within the emergency cooling circuit (e.g. hot-spots in the core). Corrosion experiments at a lab-scale test facility, which included formation of corrosion products at a single heated cladding tube, proved that dissolved zinc, formed at low temperatures in boric acid solution by zinc corrosion, turns into solid deposits of zinc borates when contacting heated zircaloy surfaces during the heating of the coolant. Moreover, the temperature of formation influences the chemical composition of the zinc borates and thus the deposition and mobilization behavior of the products.

  13. Zinc corrosion after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors – Physicochemical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryk, Holger; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Kästner, Wolfgang; Alt, Sören; Seeliger, André; Renger, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Physicochemical effects due to post-LOCA zinc corrosion in PWR were elucidated. • Decreasing solubility of corrosion products with increasing temperature was found. • Solid corrosion products may be deposited on hot surfaces and/or within hot-spots. • Corrosion products precipitating from coolant were identified as zinc borates. • Depending on coolant temperature, different types of zinc borate are formed. - Abstract: Within the framework of the reactor safety research, generic experimental investigations were carried out aiming at the physicochemical background of possible zinc corrosion product formation, which may occur inside the reactor pressure vessel during the sump circulation operation after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors. The contact of the boric acid containing coolant with hot-dip galvanized steel containment internals causes corrosion of the corresponding materials resulting in dissolution of the zinc coat. A retrograde solubility of zinc corrosion products with increasing temperature was observed during batch experiments of zinc corrosion in boric acid containing coolants. Thus, the formation and deposition of solid corrosion products cannot be ruled out if the coolant containing dissolved zinc is heated up during its recirculation into hot regions within the emergency cooling circuit (e.g. hot-spots in the core). Corrosion experiments at a lab-scale test facility, which included formation of corrosion products at a single heated cladding tube, proved that dissolved zinc, formed at low temperatures in boric acid solution by zinc corrosion, turns into solid deposits of zinc borates when contacting heated zircaloy surfaces during the heating of the coolant. Moreover, the temperature of formation influences the chemical composition of the zinc borates and thus the deposition and mobilization behavior of the products

  14. Reactor pressure vessel support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butti, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    A link and pin support system provides the primary vertical and lateral support for a nuclear reactor pressure vessel without restricting thermally induced radial and vertical expansion and contraction. (Auth.)

  15. Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances around the reactor pressure vessel bottom of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Ibe, Eishi; Nakata, Kiyatomo; Fuse, Motomasa; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Takashima, Yoshie

    1995-01-01

    Many efforts to preserve the structural integrity of major piping, components, and structures in a boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling system have been directed toward avoiding intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Application of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) to moderate corrosive circumstances is a promising approach to preserve the structural integrity during extended lifetimes of BWRs. The benefits of HWC application are (a) avoiding the occurrence of IGSCC on structural materials around the bottom of the crack growth rate, even if microcracks are present on the structural materials. Several disadvantage caused by HWC are evaluated to develop suitable countermeasures prior to HWC application. The advantages and disadvantages of HWC are quantitatively evaluated base on both BWR plant data and laboratory data shown in unclassified publications. Their trade-offs are discussed, and suitable applications of HWC are described. It is concluded that an optimal amount of Hydrogen injected into the feedwater can moderate corrosive circumstances, in the region to be preserved, without serious disadvantages. The conclusions have been drawn by combining experimental and theoretical results. Experiments in BWR plants -- e.g., direct measurements of electrochemical corrosion potential and crack growth rate at the RPV bottom -- are planned that would collect data to support the theoretical considerations

  16. Reactor pressure vessel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foehl, J.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 2, the general principles of reactor pressure vessel design are elaborated. Crack and fracture initiation and propagation are treated in some detail

  17. Gray mode control or a device with added manoeuvrability: a new fine control system for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilmin, J.

    1983-01-01

    The present fine control system for pressurized water reactors (the so-called ''A'' mode) cannot meet the requirements of a variable output in all respects. For this reason specialists are now developing a new fine control system, called gray mode control which is better suited to rapid load variations. The basic principles for control of pressurized water reactors are summarized and, then gray mode control or the device with added manoeuvrability is described. The series of tests carried out in 1981 and 1982 on stage 3 of the Tricastin power station are analyzed and the satisfactory results obtained are presented [fr

  18. Reliability analysis of protection system of advanced pressurized water reactor - APR 1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varde, P. V.; Choi, J. G.; Lee, D. Y.; Han, J. B.

    2003-04-01

    Reliability analysis was carried out for the protection system of the Korean Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor - APR 1400. The main focus of this study was the reliability analysis of digital protection system, however, towards giving an integrated statement of complete protection reliability an attempt has been made to include the shutdown devices and other related aspects based on the information available to date. The sensitivity analysis has been carried out for the critical components / functions in the system. Other aspects like importance analysis and human error reliability for the critical human actions form part of this work. The framework provided by this study and the results obtained shows that this analysis has potential to be utilized as part of risk informed approach for future design / regulatory applications

  19. Pressure drop characteristics in tight-lattice bundles for reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Hidesada; Kureta, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Akimoto, Hajime

    2004-01-01

    The reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) consists of several distinctive structures; a triangular tight-lattice configuration and a double-flat core. In order to design the RMWR core from the point of view of thermal-hydraulics, an evaluation method on pressure drop characteristics in the rod bundles at the tight-lattice configuration is required. In this study, calculated results by the Martinelli-Nelson's and Hancox's correlations were compared with experimental results in 4 x 5 rod bundles and seven-rod bundles. Consequently, the friction loss in two-phase flows becomes smaller at the tight-lattice configuration with the hydraulic diameter less than about 3 mm. This reason is due to the difference of the configuration between the multi-rod bundle and the circular tube and due to the effect of the small hydraulic diameter on the two-phase multiplier. (author)

  20. Parametric studies for the nuclear design of high-conversion pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axmann, J.; Oldekop, W.

    1987-01-01

    Undermoderated high-conversion pressurized water reactors with steel canning tubes offer the possibility of high burnup together with a comparatively low consumption of fissionable material; however, they require a relatively large inventory of fissionable material. The effects of different fuel compositions upon the specific consumption of fissionable material are investigated for a fixed burnup and moderator-to-fuel volume ratios varying between 0.5 and 2.0. Moreover, the required inventory of fissionable material is determined and the influence on the costs of electric power generation is shown. Further investigations deal with the neutron-physical effects of decreasing fuel rod diameters and the influence of differing steel additives. It appears that the parasitic neutron absorption by alloying constituents depends on the moderation level in a non-uniform manner and that the contribution of the fissionable material to the electric power generation costs is rather independent of the moderator-to-fuel volume ratio. (orig.) [de

  1. The potential for expert system support in solving the pressurized water reactor fuel shuffling problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothleder, B.M.; Poetschat, G.R.; Faught, W.S.; Eich, V.J.

    1988-01-01

    The fuel shuffling problem is posed by the need to reposition partially burned assemblies to achieve minimum X-Y pin power peaks reload cycles of pressurized water reactors. This problem is a classic artificial intelligence (AI) problem and is highly suitable for AI expert system solution assistance, in contrast to the conventional solution, which ultimately depends solely on trial and error. Such a fuel shuffling assistant would significantly reduce engineering and computer execution time for conventional loading patterns and, much more importantly, even more significantly for low-leakage loading patterns. A successful hardware/software demonstrator has been introduced, paving the way for development of a broadly expert system program. Such a program, upon incorporating the recently developed technique perverse depletion, would provide a directed path for solving the low-leakage problem

  2. Pressurized water reactor system model for control system design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, K.F.; Cain, J.T.

    1975-01-01

    Satisfactory operation of present generation Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Nuclear Power systems requires that several independent and interactive control systems be designed. Since it is not practical to use an actual PWR system as a design tool, a mathematical model of the system must be developed as a design and analysis tool. The model presented has been developed to be used as an aid in applying optimal control theory to design and implement new control systems for PWR plants. To be applicable, the model developed must represent the PWR system in its normal operating range. For safety analysis the operating conditions of the system are usually abnormal and, therefore, the system modeling requirements are different from those for control system design and analysis

  3. Numerical study on coolant flow distribution at the core inlet for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin; Peng, Min Jun; Xia, Genglei; Lv, Xing; Li, Ren [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2017-02-15

    When an integral pressurized water reactor is operated under low power conditions, once-through steam generator group operation strategy is applied. However, group operation strategy will cause nonuniform coolant flow distribution at the core inlet and lower plenum. To help coolant flow mix more uniformly, a flow mixing chamber (FMC) has been designed. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics methods have been used to investigate the coolant distribution by the effect of FMC. Velocity and temperature characteristics under different low power conditions and optimized FMC configuration have been analyzed. The results illustrate that the FMC can help improve the nonuniform coolant temperature distribution at the core inlet effectively; at the same time, the FMC will induce more resistance in the downcomer and lower plenum.

  4. Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design

  5. Implementation of a pressurized water reactor simulator for teaching on a mini-computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallec, Michele.

    1982-06-01

    This paper presents the design of a pressurized water reactor power plant simulator using a mini-computer. This simulator is oriented towards teaching. It operates real-time simulations and many parameters can be changed by the student during execution of the digital code. First, a state variable model of the dynamic behavior of the plant is derived from the physical laws. The second part presents the problems associated with the use of a mini-computer for the resolution of a large differential system, notably the problems of memory-space availability, execution time and numerical integration. Finally, it contains the description of the control deck outlay used to interfer with the digital code, and of the the conditions that can be changed during an excution [fr

  6. Pressurized water reactor monitoring. Study of detection, diagnostic and estimation methods (least error squares and filtering)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillet, M.

    1986-07-01

    This thesis presents a study for the surveillance of the ''primary coolant circuit inventory monitoring'' of a pressurized water reactor. A reference model is developed in view of an automatic system ensuring detection and diagnostic in real time. The methods used for the present application are statistical tests and a method related to pattern recognition. The estimation of failures detected, difficult owing to the non-linearity of the problem, is treated by the least error squares method of the predictor or corrector type, and by filtering. It is in this frame that a new optimized method with superlinear convergence is developed, and that a segmented linearization of the model is introduced, in view of a multiple filtering [fr

  7. Taiwan Power Company's power distribution analysis and fuel thermal margin verification methods for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    Taiwan Power Company's (TPC's) power distribution analysis and fuel thermal margin verification methods for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are examined. The TPC and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research started a joint 5-yr project in 1989 to establish independent capabilities to perform reload design and transient analysis utilizing state-of-the-art computer programs. As part of the effort, these methods were developed to allow TPC to independently perform verifications of the local power density and departure from nucleate boiling design bases, which are required by the reload safety evaluation for the Maanshan PWR plant. The computer codes utilized were extensively validated for the intended applications. Sample calculations were performed for up to six reload cycles of the Maanshan plant, and the results were found to be quite consistent with the vendor's calculational results

  8. Investigation and evaluation of cracking incidents in piping in pressurized water reactors. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of known cracking incidents in pressurized water reactor plants. Several instances of cracking in feedwater piping in 1979, together with reported cases of stress corrosion cracking at Three Mile Island Unit 1, led to the establishment of the third Pipe Crack Study Group. Major differences between the scope of the third PCSG and the previous two are: (1) the emphasis given to systems safety implications of cracking, and (2) the consideration given all cracking mechanisms known to affect PWR piping, including the failure of small lines in secondary safety systems. The present PCSG reviewed existing information on cracking of PWR pipe systems, either contained in written records of collected from meetings in the United States, and made recommendations in response to the PCSG charter questions and to othe major items that may be considered to either reduce the potential for cracking or to improve licensing bases

  9. Evaluation of cracking in steam generator feedwater piping in pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.

    1981-05-01

    Cracking in feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to steam generators in 15 pressurized water reactor plants. Sections with cracks from nine plants are examined with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Using transmission electron microscopy, fatigue striations are observed on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a cyclic stress value of 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses and it is concluded that the overriding factor in the cracking problem was the presence of such undocumented cyclic loads

  10. Optimization of core reload design for low-leakage fuel management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.; Downar, T.J.; Sesonske, A.

    1987-01-01

    A method was developed to optimize pressurized water reactor low-leakage core reload designs that features the decoupling and sequential optimization of the fuel arrangement and control problems. The two-stage optimization process provides the maximum cycle length for a given fresh fuel loading subject to power peaking constraints. In the first stage, a best fuel arrangement is determined at the end of cycle (EOC) in the absence of all control poisons by employing a direct search method. The constant power, Haling depletion is used to provide the cycle length and EOC power peaking for each candidate core fuel arrangement. In the second stage, the core control poison requirements to meet the core peaking constraints throughout the cycle are determined using an approximate nonlinear programming technique

  11. Steam-generator-tube-rupture transients for pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobranich, D.; Henninger, R.J.; DeMuth, N.S.

    1982-01-01

    Steam generator tube ruptures with and without concurrent main-steam-line break are investigated for pressurized water reactors supplied by the major US vendors. The goal of these analyses is to provide thermodynamic and flow conditions for the determination of iodine transport to the environment and to provide an evaluation of the adequacy of the plant safety systems and operating procedures for controlling these transients. The automatic safety systems of the plant were found to be adequate for the mitigation of these transients. Emergency injection system flows equilibrated with the leakage flows and prevented core uncovery. Sufficient time was afforded by the plant safety systems for the operators to identify the problem and to take appropriate measures

  12. Evaluation of a dilute chemical decontaminant for pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Mathur, P.K.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a dilute chemical decontamination formulation based on ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, oxalic acid, and citric acid is evaluated for its efficacy in removing oxide layers in a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). An ion exchange system that is specifically suited for fission product-dominated contamination in a PHWR is suggested for the reagent regeneration stage of the decontamination process. An attempt has been made to understand the redeposition behavior of various isotopes during the decontamination process. The polarographic method of identifying the species formed in the dissolution process is explained. Electrochemical measurements are employed to follow the course of oxide removal during the dissolution process. Scanning electron micrographs of metal coupons before and after the dissolution process exemplify the involvement of base metal in the formation of a ferrous oxalate layer. Material compatibility tests between the decontaminant and carbon steel, Monel-400, and Zircaloy-2 are reported

  13. MCCI study for Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor under hypothetical accident condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Vishnu; Mukhopadhyay, Deb; Chatterjee, B.; Singh, R.K.; Vaze, K.K.

    2011-01-01

    In case of severe core damage accident in Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR), large amount of molten corium is expected to come out into the calandria vault due to failure of calandria vessel. Molten corium at high temperature is sufficient to decompose and ablate concrete. Such attack could fail CV by basement penetration. Since containment is ultimate barrier for activity release. The Molten Core Concrete Interaction (MCCI) of the resulting pool of debris with the concrete has been identified as an important part of the accident sequence. MCCI Analysis has been carried out for PHWR for a hypothetical accident condition where total core material is considered to be relocated in calandria vault. Concrete ablation rate in vertical and radial direction is evaluated for rectangular geometry using MEDICIS module of ASTEC Code. Amount of gases released during MCCI is also evaluated. (author)

  14. Light-water-reactor pressure-vessel surveillance dosimetry using solid-state track recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.; Preston, C.C.

    1983-07-01

    The accumulation of neutron dose by the pressure vessel of an operating nuclear power plant results in damage in the form of steel embrittlement. In order to ascertain the safe operating lifetime of the reactor pressure vessel, dosimetric measurements must be made to evaluate the neutron dose to the pressure vessel and relate this dose to the cumulative radiation damage. Advanced dosimetry techniques are being evaluated for surveillance of operating reactors. Solid-state track recorder (SSTR) techniques are included among these advanced dosimetry techniques. Described herein are low neutron fluence calibration and standardization measurements that are being carried out in pressure vessel mockup benchmark neutron fields in the USA, Belgium, and England. In addition, high fluence SSTR dosimetry capsules have been irradiated with metallurgical specimens in a pressure vessel mockup facility. The design and deployment of advances SSTR dosimetry capsules in operating power reactors are also described

  15. Cycle studies: material balance estimation in the domain of pressurized water and boiling water reactors. Experimental qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabert, Christine

    1994-01-01

    This study is concerned with the physics of the fuel cycle the aim being to develop and make recommendations concerning schemes for calculating the neutronics of light water reactor fuel cycles. A preliminary study carried out using the old fuel cycle calculation scheme APOLLO1- KAFKA and the library SERMA79 has shown that for the compositions of totally dissolved assemblies from Pressurized Water Reactors (type 17*17) and also for the first time, for Boiling Water Reactor assemblies (type 8*8), the differences between calculation and measurement are large and must be reduced. The integration of the APOLLO2 neutronics code into the fuel cycle calculation scheme improves the results because it can model the situation more precisely. A comparison between APOLLO1 and APOLLO2 using the same options, demonstrated the consistency of the two methods for PWR and BWR geometries. Following this comparison, we developed an optimised scheme for PWR applications using the library CEA86 and the code APOLLO2. Depending on whether the information required is the detailed distribution of the composition of the irradiated fuel or the average composition (estimation of the total material balance of the fuel assembly), the physics options recommended are different. We show that the use of APOLLO2 and the library CEA86 improves the results and especially the estimation of the Pu 239 content. Concerning the Boiling Water Reactor, we have highlighted the need to treat several axial sections of the fuel assembly (variation of the void-fraction, heterogeneity of composition). A scheme using Sn transport theory, permits one to obtain a better coherence between the consumption of U 235 , the production of plutonium and burnup, and a better estimation of the material balance. (author) [fr

  16. The max–min ant system and tabu search for pressurized water reactor loading pattern design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chaung; Chen, Ying-Hsiu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An automatic loading pattern design tool for a pressurized water reactor is developed. • The design method consists of max–min ant system and tabu search. • The heuristic rules are developed to generate the candidates for tabu search. • The initial solution of tabu search is provided by max–min ant system. • The new algorithm shows very satisfactory results compared to the old one. - Abstract: An automatic loading pattern (LP) design tool for a pressurized water reactor is developed. The design procedure consists of two steps: first, a LP is generated using max–min ant system (MMAS) and then tabu search (TS) is adopted to search the satisfactory LP. The MMAS is previously developed and the TS process is newly-developed. The heuristic rules are implemented to generate the candidate LP in TS process. The heuristic rules are comprised of two kinds of action, i.e., a single swap in the location of two fuel assemblies and rotation of fuel assembly. Since developed TS process is a local search algorithm, it is efficient for the minor change of LP. It means that a proper initial LP should be provided by the first step, i.e., by MMAS. The design requirements such as hot channel factor, the hot zero power moderator temperature coefficient, and cycle length are formulated in the objective function. The results show that the developed tool can obtain the satisfactory LP and dramatically reduce the computation time compared with previous tool using ant system alone

  17. Reactor pressure tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, H.; Scholz, M.; Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    In a reactor pressure tank for a nuclear reactor, self-locking hooks engage a steel ring disposed over the removable cover of the steel vessel. The hooks exert force upon the cover to maintain the cover in a closed position during operation of the reactor pressure tank. The force upon the removal cover is partly the result of the increasing temperature and thermal expansion of the steel vessel during operation. The steel vessel is surrounded by a reinforced-concrete tank. (U.S.)

  18. Pressure loadings of Soviet-designed VVER [Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactor] reactor release mitigation structures from large-break LOCAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Horak, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    Analyses have been carried out of the pressurization of the accident release mitigation structures of Soviet-designed VVER (Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactor) pressurized water reactors following large-break loss-of-coolant accidents. Specific VVER systems for which calculations were performed are the VVER-440 model V230, VVER-440 model V213, and VVER-1000 model V320. Descriptions of the designs of these and other VVER models are contained in the report DOE/NE-0084. The principal objective of the current analyses is to calculate the time dependent pressure loadings inside the accident localization or containment structures immediately following the double-ended guillotine rupture of a primary coolant pipe. In addition, the pressures are compared with the results of calculations of the response of the structures to overpressure. Primary coolant system thermal hydraulic conditions and the fluid conditions at the break location were calculated with the RETRAN-02 Mod2 computer code (Agee, 1984). Pressures and temperatures inside the building accident release mitigation structures were obtained from the PACER (Pressurization Accompanying Coolant Escape from Ruptures) multicompartment containment analysis code developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The analyses were carried out using best estimate models and conditions rather than conservative, bounding-type assumptions. In particular, condensation upon structure and equipment was calculated using correlations based upon analyses of the HDR, Marviken, and Battelle Frankfurt containment loading experiments. The intercompartment flow rates incorporate an effective discharge coefficient and liquid droplet carryover fraction given by expressions of Schwan determined from analyses of the Battelle Frankfurt and Marviken tests. 5 refs., 4 figs

  19. Multi-stage-flash desalination plants of relative small performance with integrated pressurized water reactors as a nuclear heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, G.; Peltzer, M.

    1977-01-01

    In the Krupp-GKSS joint study MINIPLEX the requirements for seawater-desalination plants with a performance in the range of 10 000 to 80 000 m 3 distillate per day heated by a nuclear reactor are investigated. The reactor concept is similar to the Integrated Pressurized Water Reactor (IPWR) of the nuclear ship OTTO HAHN. The design study shows that IPWR systems have specific advantages up to 200 MWth compared to other reactor types at least being adapted for single- and dual-purpose desalination plants. The calculated costs of the desalinated water show that due to fuel cost advantages of reactors small and medium nuclear desalination plants are economically competetive with oil-fired plants since the steep rise of oil price in autumn 1973. (author)

  20. Reactor pressure boundary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Chi, S. H.; Lee, B. S.

    2002-04-01

    With a long-term operation of nuclear power plants, the component materials are degraded under severe reactor conditions such as neutron irradiation, high temperature, high pressure and corrosive environment. It is necessary to establish the reliable and practical technologies for improving and developing the component materials and for evaluating the mechanical properties. Especially, it is very important to investigate the technologies for reactor pressure boundary materials such as reactor vessel and pipings in accordance with their critical roles. Therefore, this study was focused on developing and advancing the microstructural/micro-mechanical evaluation technologies, and on evaluating the neutron irradiation characteristics and radiation effects analysis technology of the reactor pressure boundary materials, and also on establishing a basis of nuclear material property database

  1. Robust observer based control for axial offset in pressurized-water nuclear reactors based on the multipoint reactor model using Lyapunov approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaidabadinejad, Majid; Ansarifar, Gholam Reza [Isfahan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-11-15

    In nuclear reactor imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These fluctuations must be maintained bounded within allowable limits. Otherwise, the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded these oscillations is considered to be a restriction for the load following operation. Also, in order to design the nuclear reactor control systems, poisons concentrations, especially xenon must be accessible. But, physical measurement of these parameters is impossible. In this paper, for the first time, in order to estimate the axial xenon oscillations and ensures these oscillations are kept bounded within allowable limits during load-following operation, a robust observer based nonlinear control based on multipoint kinetics reactor model for pressurized-water nuclear reactors is presented. The reactor core is simulated based on the multi-point nuclear reactor model (neutronic and thermal-hydraulic). Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed observer based controller for the load-following operation.

  2. Robust observer based control for axial offset in pressurized-water nuclear reactors based on the multipoint reactor model using Lyapunov approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidabadinejad, Majid; Ansarifar, Gholam Reza

    2017-01-01

    In nuclear reactor imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These fluctuations must be maintained bounded within allowable limits. Otherwise, the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded these oscillations is considered to be a restriction for the load following operation. Also, in order to design the nuclear reactor control systems, poisons concentrations, especially xenon must be accessible. But, physical measurement of these parameters is impossible. In this paper, for the first time, in order to estimate the axial xenon oscillations and ensures these oscillations are kept bounded within allowable limits during load-following operation, a robust observer based nonlinear control based on multipoint kinetics reactor model for pressurized-water nuclear reactors is presented. The reactor core is simulated based on the multi-point nuclear reactor model (neutronic and thermal-hydraulic). Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed observer based controller for the load-following operation.

  3. Status of researches in the field of safety of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Jean; Schwarz, Michel

    2017-01-01

    This collective publication proposes a synthesis of the status of researches performed in the field of safety of pressurized water reactors. They may discuss past, current and projected research works, involved actors, or lessons learned from these works. The authors propose a presentation of some research tools privileged by the IRSN for these researches: the CABRI and PHEBUS reactors, the GALAXIE experimental platform, and some other installations. Then they address researches related to loss-of-coolant accidents (two-phase thermohydraulics, fuel rod behaviour), to reactivity accidents, to accidents related to dewatering of irradiated fuel storage pools, to fires, to extreme aggressions of natural origin (earthquake, extreme flooding), to core fusion accidents (core heating and fusion within the vessel, vessel failure and apron erosion by corium, containment enclosure dynamic loading, release of radioactive products), to the behaviour of nuclear plant important metallic or civil works components and notably to their ageing, to organisational and human factors or more generally to social and human sciences (design of control rooms, safety organisation and management in EDF nuclear plants), and to other issues and research perspectives

  4. Post-accident cleanup and decommissioning of a reference pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.S.; Holter, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a conceptual study to evaluate the technical requirements, costs, and safety impacts of the cleanup and decommissioning of a large pressurized water reactor (PWR) involved in an accident. The costs and occupational doses for post-accident cleanup and decommissioning are estimated to be substantially higher than those for decommissioning following the orderly shutdown of a reactor. A major factor in these cost and occupational dose increases is the high radiation environment that exists in the containment building following an accident which restricts worker access and increases the difficulty of performing certain tasks. Other factors which influence accident cleanup and decommissioning costs are requirements for the design and construction of special tools and equipment, increased requirements for regulatory approvals, and special waste management needs. Radiation doses to the public from routine accident cleanup and decommissioning operations are estimated to be below permissible radiation dose levels in unrestricted areas and within the range of annual doses from normal background. 6 references, 1 figure, 7 tables

  5. Post-accident cleanup and decommissioning of a reference pressurized-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.S.; Holter, G.M.

    1982-10-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a conceptual study to evaluate the technical requirements, costs, and safety impacts of the cleanup and decommissioning of a large pressurized water reactor (PWR) involved in an accident. The costs and occupational doses for post-accident cleanup and dcommissioning are estimated to be substantially higher than those for decommissioning following the orderly shutdown of a reactor. A major factor in these cost and occupational dose increases is the high radiation environment that exists in the containment building following an accident which restricts worker access and increases the difficulty of performing certain tasks. Other factors which influence accident cleanup and decommissioning costs are requirements for the design and construction of special tools and equipment, increased requirements for regulatory approvals, and special waste management needs. Radiation doses to the public from routine accident cleanup and decommissioning operations are estimated to be below permissible radiation dose levels in unrestricted areas and within the range of annual doses from normal background

  6. The NCSU [North Carolina State Univ.] freon PWR [pressurized water reactor] loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caves, J.R.; Doster, J.M.; Miller, G.D.; Wehring, B.W.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear engineering department at North Carolina State University has designed and constructed an operating scale model of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear steam supply system (NSSS). This facility will be used for education, training, and research. The loop uses electric heaters to simulate the reactor core and Freon as the primary and secondary coolant. Viewing ports at various locations in the loop allow the students to visualize flow regimes in normal and off-normal operating conditions. The objective of the design effort was to scale the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a two-loop Westinghouse NSSS. Provisions have been made for the simulation of various abnormal occurrences. The model is instrumented in much the same manner as the actual NSSS. Current research projects using the loop include the development of adaptive expert systems to monitor the performance of the facility, diagnose mechanical faults, and to make recommendations to operators for mitigation of accidents. This involves having thermal-hydraulics and core-physics simulators running faster than real time on a mini-supercomputer, with operating parameters updated by communication with the data acquisition and control computer. Further opportunities for research will be investigated as they arise

  7. Expandable antivibration bar for heat transfer tubes of a pressurized water reactor steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleman, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a pressurized water reactor steam generator having spaced rows of heat transfer tubes through which primary coolant from the reactor flows, the tubes being of a U-shaped design, with the U-bend portions of the U-shaped tubes stabilized by antivibration bars. The improvement described here comprises expandable antivibration bars for stabilizing the U-bend portions of the U-shaped tubes, the expandable bars having a pair of adjustable rods, formed from a pair of rod sections affixed to a connector, one rod section of each of the pair of rod sections having a plurality of protrusions. Each of the protrusions has slidable surfaces thereon. The other rod section of each of the pair of rod sections has indentations, each of the indentations having slidable surfaces thereon complementary to the sliding surfaces of the protrusions, such that the rods are expandable from a first cross-sectional width less than the spacing between two adjacent rows of the tubes, to a second cross-sectional width greater than the first cross-sectional width. The expanded rods are adapted to contact tubes of the two adjacent rows of the tubes

  8. Pressure tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Osamu; Kumasaka, Katsuyuki.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To remove the heat of reactor core using a great amount of moderators at the periphery of the reactor core as coolants. Constitution: Heat of a reactor core is removed by disposing a spontaneous recycling cooling device for cooling moderators in a moderator tank, without using additional power driven equipments. That is, a spontaneous recycling cooling device for cooling the moderators in the moderator tank is disposed. Further, the gap between the inner wall of a pressure tube guide pipe disposed through the vertical direction of a moderator tank and the outer wall of a pressure tube inserted through the guide pipe is made smaller than the rupture distortion caused by the thermal expansion upon overheating of the pressure tube and greater than the minimum gap required for heat shiels between the pressure tube and the pressure tube guide pipe during usual operation. In this way, even if such an accident as can not using a coolant cooling device comprising power driven equipment should occur in the pressure tube type reactor, the rise in the temperature of the reactor core can be retarded to obtain a margin with time. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Evaluation of an accident management strategy of emergency water injection using fire engines in a typical pressurized water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Yong Park

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the Fukushima accident, a special safety inspection was conducted in Korea. The inspection results show that Korean nuclear power plants have no imminent risk for expected maximum potential earthquake or coastal flooding. However long- and short-term safety improvements do need to be implemented. One of the measures to increase the mitigation capability during a prolonged station blackout (SBO accident is installing injection flow paths to provide emergency cooling water of external sources using fire engines to the steam generators or reactor cooling systems. This paper illustrates an evaluation of the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire trucks during a potential extended SBO accident in a 1,000 MWe pressurized water reactor. With regard to the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire engines, the strategies are judged to be very feasible for a long-term SBO, but are not likely to be effective for a short-term SBO.

  10. A Neural-Network-Based Nonlinear Adaptive State-Observer for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Dong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been some severe nuclear accidents such as Three Mile Island (USA, Chernobyl (Ukraine and Fukushima (Japan, nuclear fission energy is still a source of clean energy that can substitute for fossil fuels in a centralized way and in a great amount with commercial availability and economic competitiveness. Since the pressurized water reactor (PWR is the most widely used nuclear fission reactor, its safe, stable and efficient operation is meaningful to the current rebirth of the nuclear fission energy industry. Power-level regulation is an important technique which can deeply affect the operation stability and efficiency of PWRs. Compared with the classical power-level controllers, the advanced power-level regulators could strengthen both the closed-loop stability and control performance by feeding back the internal state-variables. However, not all of the internal state variables of a PWR can be obtained directly by measurements. To implement advanced PWR power-level control law, it is necessary to develop a state-observer to reconstruct the unmeasurable state-variables. Since a PWR is naturally a complex nonlinear system with parameters varying with power-level, fuel burnup, xenon isotope production, control rod worth and etc., it is meaningful to design a nonlinear observer for the PWR with adaptability to system uncertainties. Due to this and the strong learning capability of the multi-layer perceptron (MLP neural network, an MLP-based nonlinear adaptive observer is given for PWRs. Based upon Lyapunov stability theory, it is proved theoretically that this newly-built observer can provide bounded and convergent state-observation. This observer is then applied to the state-observation of a special PWR, i.e., the nuclear heating reactor (NHR, and numerical simulation results not only verify its feasibility but also give the relationship between the observation performance and observer parameters.

  11. Position-dependency of Fuel Pin Homogenization in a Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Woong; Kim, Yonghee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technolgy, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    By considering the multi-physics effects more comprehensively, it is possible to acquire precise local parameters which can result in a more accurate core design and safety assessment. A conventional approach of the multi-physics neutronics calculation for the pressurized water reactor (PWR) is to apply nodal methods. Since the nodal methods are basically based on the use of assembly-wise homogenized parameters, additional pin power reconstruction processes are necessary to obtain local power information. In the past, pin-by-pin core calculation was impractical due to the limited computational hardware capability. With the rapid advancement of computer technology, it is now perhaps quite practical to perform the direct pin-by-pin core calculation. As such, fully heterogeneous transport solvers based on both stochastic and deterministic methods have been developed for the acquisition of exact local parameters. However, the 3-D transport reactor analysis is still challenging because of the very high computational requirement. Position-dependency of the fuel pin homogenized cross sections in a small PWR core has been quantified via comparison of infinite FA and 2-D whole core calculations with the use of high-fidelity MC simulations. It is found that the pin environmental affect is especially obvious in FAs bordering the baffle reflector regions. It is also noted that the downscattering cross section is rather sensitive to the spectrum changes of the pins. It is expected that the pinwise homogenized cross sections need to be corrected somehow for accurate pin-by-pin core calculations in the peripheral region of the reactor core.

  12. Applications of a surveillance and diagnostics methodology using neutron noise from a pressurized-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.T.; Miller, L.F.; Perez, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    Two applications of a noise diagnostic methodology were performed with ex-core neutron detector data from a pressurized-water reactor (PWR). A feedback dynamics model of the neutron power spectral denisty was derived from a low-order whole-plant physical model made stochastic with the Langevin technique. From a functional fit to plant data, the response of the dynamic system to changes in important physical parameters was evaluated by a direct sensitivity analysis. In addition, changes in monitored spectra were related to changes in physical parameters, and detection thresholds using common surveillance discriminants were determined. A resonance model was developed from perturbation theory to give the ex-core neutron detector response for small in-core mechanical motions in terms of a pole-strength factor, a resonance asymmetry (or skewness) factor, a vibration damping factor, and a frequency of vibration. The mechanical motion paramters for several resonances were determined by a functional fit of the model to plant data taken at various times during a fuel cycle and were tracked to determined trends that indicated vibrational changes of reactor internals. In addition, the resonance model gave the ability to separate the resonant components of the power spectral density after the parameters had been identified. As a result, the behavior of several vibration peaks was monitored over a fuel cycle. The noise diagnostic methodology illustrated by these applications can be used in monitoring the condition of the reactor system. Early detection of degraded mechanical components or undesirable operating conditions by using such surveillance and diagnostic techniques would enhance plant safety. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  13. Development and qualification of reference calculation schemes for absorbers in pressured water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc-Tranchant, P.

    2001-01-01

    The general field in which this work takes place is the field of the accuracy improvement of neutronic calculations, required to operate Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) with a better precision and a lower cost. More specifically, this thesis deals with the calculation of the absorber clusters used to control these reactors. The first aim of that work was to define and validate a reference calculation route of such an absorber cluster, based on the deterministic code APOLLO2. This calculation scheme was then to be checked against experimental data. This study of the complex situation of absorber clusters required several intermediate studies, of simpler problems, such as the study of fuel rods lattices and the study of single absorber rods (B4C, AIC, Hafnium) isolated in such lattices. Each one of these different studies led to a particular reference calculation route. All these calculation routes were developed against reference continuous energy Monte-Carlo calculations, carried out with the stochastic code TRIPOLI4. They were then checked against experimental data measured during French experimental programs, undertaken within the EOLE experimental reactor, at the Nuclear Research Center of Cadarache: the MISTRAL experiments for the study of isolated absorber rods and the EPICURE experiments for the study of absorber clusters. This work led to important improvements in the calculation of isolated absorbers and absorber clusters. The reactivity worth of these clusters in particular, can now be obtained with a great accuracy: the discrepancy observed between the calculated and the experimental values is less than 2.5 %, and then slightly lower than the experimental uncertainty. (author)

  14. Applying risk insights in US NRC reviews of integral pressurized water reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, M.A.; Hilsmeier, T.; Kevern, T.A.

    2012-01-01

    In its Staff Requirements Memorandum (SRM) on COMGBJ-10-0004/COMGEA-10-0001, 'Use of Risk Insights to Enhance Safety Focus of Small Modular Reactor Reviews,' dated August 31, 2010 (ML102510405), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) directed the NRC staff to more fully integrate the use of risk insights into pre-application activities and the review of small modular reactor (SMR) applications with near-term focus on integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR) designs. The Commission's objective is to align the review focus and resources with the risk-significant systems, structures, and components (SSCs) and other aspects of the design, that contribute most to safety in order to enhance the efficiency of the review process while still enabling a decision of reasonable assurance of the design's safety. The staff was directed to develop a design-specific, risk-informed review plan for each SMR to address pre-application and application review activities. The NRC staff submitted a response to the Commission which describes its approach for (1) using risk insights, consistent with current regulatory requirements, to assign SSCs to one of a limited set of graded categories, and (2) adjusting the scope and depth of current review plans--where possible--consistent with regulatory requirements and consistent with the applicable graded category. Because the staff's review constitutes an independent audit of the application, the staff may emphasize or de-emphasize particular aspects of its review guidance (i.e., Standard Review Plan), as appropriate and consistent with regulatory requirements, for the application being reviewed. The staff may propose justifications for not performing certain sections of the reviews called for by the applicable review plan. Examples of acceptable variations in the scope of a review can include reduced emphasis on SSC attributes such as reliability, availability, or functional performance when the SSC will be in the scope of a program

  15. Preliminary thermal design of a pressurized water reactor containment for handling severe accident consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, A.M.; Karameldin, A.

    1998-01-01

    A one-dimensional mathematical model has been developed for a 4250 MW(th) Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor containment analysis following a severe accident. The cooling process of the composite containment-steel shell and concrete shield- is achievable by natural circulation of atmospheric air. However, for purpose of gettering higher degrees of safety margin, the present study undertakes two objectives: (1) Installment of a diesel engine-driven air blower to force air through the annular space between the steel shell and concrete shield. The engine can be remotely operated to be effective in case of station blackout. (ii) Fixing longitudinally plate fins on the circumference of the inside and outside containment steel shell. These fins increase the heat transfer areas and hence the rate of heat removal from the containment atmosphere. In view of its importance - from the safety viewpoint - the long term behaviour of the containment which is a quasi-steady state problem, is formulated through a system of coupled nonlinear algebraic equations which describe the thermal-hydraulic and thermodynamic behaviour of the double shell containment. The calculated results revealed the following: (i) the passively air cooled containment can remove maximum heat load of 11.5 MW without failure, (ii) the effect of finned surface in the air passage tends to decrease the containment pressure by 20 to 30%, depending on the heat load, (iii) the effect of condensing fins is negligible for the proposed fin dimensions and material. However, by reducing the fin width, increasing their thickness, doubling their number, and using a higher conductive metal than the steel, it is expected that the containment pressure can be further reduced by 10% or more, (iv) the fins' dimensions and their number must be optimized via maximizing the difference or the ratio between the heat removed and pressure drop to get maximum heat flow rate

  16. Accident tolerant high-pressure helium injection system concept for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massey, Caleb; Miller, James; Vasudevamurthy, Gokul

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Potential helium injection strategy is proposed for LWR accident scenarios. • Multiple injection sites are proposed for current LWR designs. • Proof-of-concept experimentation illustrates potential helium injection benefits. • Computational studies show an increase in pressure vessel blowdown time. • Current LOCA codes have the capability to include helium for feasibility calculations. - Abstract: While the design of advanced accident-tolerant fuels and structural materials continues to remain the primary focus of much research and development pertaining to the integrity of nuclear systems, there is a need for a more immediate, simple, and practical improvement in the severe accident response of current emergency core cooling systems. Current blowdown and reflood methodologies under accident conditions still allow peak cladding temperatures to approach design limits and detrimentally affect the integrity of core components. A high-pressure helium injection concept is presented to enhance accident tolerance by increasing operator response time while maintaining lower peak cladding temperatures under design basis and beyond design basis scenarios. Multiple injection sites are proposed that can be adapted to current light water reactor designs to minimize the need for new infrastructure, and concept feasibility has been investigated through a combination of proof-of-concept experimentation and computational modeling. Proof-of-concept experiments show promising cooling potential using a high-pressure helium injection concept, while the developed choked-flow model shows core depressurization changes with added helium injection. Though the high-pressure helium injection concept shows promise, future research into the evaluation of system feasibility and economics are needed.Classification: L. Safety and risk analysis

  17. Aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Research is being conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify the significant factors related to occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of concrete containments, and to make recommendations on use of risk models in regulatory decisions; (2) provide NRC reviewers a means of establishing current structural capacity margins for steel containments, and concrete containments as limited by liner integrity; and (3) provide recommendations, as appropriate, on information to be requested of licensees for guidance that could be utilized by NRC reviewers in assessing the seriousness of reported incidences of containment degradation. In meeting these objectives research is being conducted in two primary task areas - pressure boundary condition assessment and root-cause resolution practices, and reliability-based condition assessments. Under the first task area a degradation assessment methodology was developed for use in characterizing the in-service condition of metal and concrete containment pressure boundary components and quantifying the amount of damage that is present. An assessment of available destructive and nondestructive techniques for examining steel containments and liners is ongoing. Under the second task area quantitative structural reliability analysis methods are being developed for application to degraded metallic pressure boundaries to provide assurances that they will be able to withstand future extreme loads during the desired service period with a level of reliability that is sufficient for public safety. To date, mathematical models that describe time-dependent changes in steel due to aggressive environmental factors have been identified, and statistical data supporting their use in time-dependent reliability analysis have been summarized

  18. Contribution to descriptions of pressurized water reactors close to Danish territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, T.

    1993-04-01

    This paper is part of a report describing Pressurrized Water Reactors (PWR's) close to Danish territory. The full report is the outcome of a working group formed as part of a continued collaboration between the Department of Electrophysics, DTU, and the Risoe National Laboratory, a collaboration with the purpose of maintaining Danish knowledge on commercial nuclear power plants. The reactor dealt with in this report are the Ringhals, 2, 3 and 4 reactors, situated 50 km south of Goeteborg on the western coast of Sweden, and the reactors in Stade and Brokdorf in the northern part of Germany downstream from Hamburg at the river Elben. This paper deals with the following subjects for all the above mentioned reactors: Reactor core and other vessel components. Reactivity control systems and Fuel and component handling and storage systems. (EG)

  19. Analysis of proposed gamma-ray detection system for the monitoring of core water inventory in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markoff, D.M.

    1987-12-01

    An initial study has been performed of the feasibility of employing an axial array of gamma detectors located outside the pressure vessel to monitor the coolant in a PWR. A one-dimensional transport analysis model is developed for the LOFT research reactor and for a mock-PWR geometry. The gamma detector response to coolant voiding in the core and downcomer has been determined for both geometries. The effects of various conditions (for example, time after shutdown, materials in the transport path, and the relative void fraction in different water regions) on the detector response are studied. The calculational results have been validated by a favorable comparison with LOFT experimental data. Within the limitations and approximations considered in the analysis, the results indicate that the gamma-ray detection scheme is able to unambiguously respond to changes in the coolant inventory within any vessel water region

  20. Pressure tube type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Hiroshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To permit safe and reliable replacement of primary pipes by providing a reactor container so as to surround a pressure pipe, with upper portions of the two separably coupled together, and coupling the pressure pipe and primary piping by joint coupling above and below the reactor container, with the lower coupling joint surrounded by drain receptacle. Structure: At the time of replacement of a pressure pipe, a partition valve is opened to exhaust primary cooling water within pressure pipe and upper and lower portions of the primary piping and replace the decelerator within the reactor container with water of the same quality as that of pool water within an upper shield pool. Thereafter, the entire space above the drain receptacle is filled with pool water by closing a partition valve and opening a water supply valve. Then, upper portion seal cover, pool bottom lid, upper joint and upper portion primary piping are removed, then bolts and nuts are loosened, and the pressure pipe is taken out together with the shield block. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Fatigue life response of ASME SA 106-B steel in pressurized water reactor environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrell, J B [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (USA)

    1989-01-01

    Fatigue strain-life tests were conducted on ASMESA 106-B piping steel base metal and weld metal specimens in 288{sup 0}C (550{sup 0}F) pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments as a function of strain amplitude, strain ratio, notch acuity, and cyclic frequency. Notched base metal specimens tested at 0.017 Hz in 0.001 part per million (ppm) dissolved oxygen environments nearly completely used up the margins of safety of 2 on stress and 20 on cycles incorporated into the ASMA Section III design curve for carbon steels. Tests conducted with smooth base metal and weld metal specimens at 1.0 Hz showed virtually no degradation in cycles to failure when compared to 288{sup 0}C air test results. In all cases, however, the effect of temperature alone reduced the margin of safety offered by the design curve in the low cycle regime for the test specimens. Comparison between the fatigue life results of smooth and notched specimens suggests that fatigue crack initiation is not significantly affected by 0.001 ppm dissolved oxygen, and that most of the observed degradation may be attributed to crack growth acceleration. These results suggest that the ASMA Section III methodology should be reviewed, taking into account the PWR environment variables which degrade the fatigue life of pressure-retaining components. (author).

  2. An estimation of core damage frequency of a pressurized water reactor during mid-loop operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, C.C.; Chen, C.T.; Lee, M.

    2004-01-01

    The core damage frequency during mid-loop operation of a Westinghouse designed 3-loop Pressurizer Water Reactor (PWR) due to loss of Residual Heat Removal (RHR) events was assessed. The assessment considers two types of outages (refueling and drained maintenance), and uses failure data collected specifically for shutdown condition. Event trees were developed for five categories of loss of RHR events. Human actions to mitigate the loss of RHR events was identified and human error probabilities were quantified using HCR and THERP model. The result showed that the core damage frequency due to loss of RHR events during mid-loop operation is 3.1x10 -5 per year. The results also showed that the core damage frequency can be reduced significantly by removing a pressurizer safety valve before entering mid-loop operation. The establishment of reflux cooling, i.e. decay heat removal through steam generator secondary side also plays important role in mitigating the loss of RHR events. (author)

  3. Heat removal tests for pressurized water reactor containment spray by largescale facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoki, Y.; Hashimoto, K.; Kitani, S.; Naritomi, M.; Nishio, G.; Tanaka, M.

    1983-01-01

    Heat removal tests for pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment spray were carried out to investigate effectiveness of the depressurization by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute model containment (7-m diameter, 20 m high, and 708-m 3 volume) with PWR spray nozzles. The depressurization rate is influenced by the spray heat transfer efficiency and the containment wall surface heat transfer coefficient. The overall spray heat transfer efficiency was investigated with respect to spray flow rate, weight ratio of steam/air, and spray height. The spray droplet heat transfer efficiency was investigated whether the overlapping of spray patterns gives effect or not. The effect was not detectable in the range of large value of steam/air, however, it was better in the range of small value of it. The experimental results were compared with the calculated results by computer code CONTEMPT-LT/022. The overall spray heat transfer efficiency was almost 100% in the containment pressure, ranging from 2.5 to 0.9 kg/cm 2 X G, so that the code was useful on the prediction of the thermal hydraulic behavior of containment atmosphere in a PWR accident condition

  4. A feasibility study on feed and bleed for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi-Shung Chen; Shimeck, D.J.; Sullivan, L.H.

    1983-01-01

    By injecting coolant with a high pressure emergency core cooling system, and removing the heated/ vaporized fluid by way of the pressurizer power operated relief valve, primary feed and bleed cooling denotes an operation whereby reactor core cooling is maintained. This paper presents the results from an experimental and analytical study that includes a simplified analysis of mass and energy balances associated with the feed and bleed, examination of test data from the Semiscale system, RELAP5 code analyses of both Semiscale and a four-loop Westinghouse plant, and the primary coolant system behavior for a transient that leads to the need for feed and bleed. Examination of the parameters that govern a stable feed and bleed operation identifies four key parameters such as: core decay heat, cooling water injection capacity, power operated relief valve (PORV) energy removal rate, and PORV mass removal rate. A simplified analytical approach to determining if stable feed and bleed is feasible, has been developed and corroborated by experimental data and computer code calculations. The Semiscale tests have not only provided test data for code assessment, but also have identified the factors influencing the PORV discharge, which is the most variable of the boundary conditions influencing feed and bleed. The RELAP5 computer code has demonstrated the capability of predicting the Semiscale experiments, and when applied to a four-loop Westinghouse plant has indicated that primary feed and bleed is a viable cooling mechanism. This has also been shown by using the simplified analytical method

  5. Fatigue life response of ASME SA 106-B steel in pressurized water reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrell, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Fatigue strain-life tests were conducted on ASMESA 106-B piping steel base metal and weld metal specimens in 288 0 C (550 0 F) pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments as a function of strain amplitude, strain ratio, notch acuity, and cyclic frequency. Notched base metal specimens tested at 0.017 Hz in 0.001 part per million (ppm) dissolved oxygen environments nearly completely used up the margins of safety of 2 on stress and 20 on cycles incorporated into the ASMA Section III design curve for carbon steels. Tests conducted with smooth base metal and weld metal specimens at 1.0 Hz showed virtually no degradation in cycles to failure when compared to 288 0 C air test results. In all cases, however, the effect of temperature alone reduced the margin of safety offered by the design curve in the low cycle regime for the test specimens. Comparison between the fatigue life results of smooth and notched specimens suggests that fatigue crack initiation is not significantly affected by 0.001 ppm dissolved oxygen, and that most of the observed degradation may be attributed to crack growth acceleration. These results suggest that the ASMA Section III methodology should be reviewed, taking into account the PWR environment variables which degrade the fatigue life of pressure-retaining components. (author)

  6. Computer simulation of the hydroelastic response of a pressurized water reactor to a sudden depressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, J.K.; Hirt, C.W.; Stein, L.R.

    1977-03-01

    A computer program is being developed to analyze the response of the core support barrel to a sudden loss of coolant in a pressurized water reactor. This program, SOLA-FLX, combines SOLA-DF, a two-dimensional, two-phase, hydrodynamic code with FLX, a finite-difference code that integrates the Timoshenko equations of elastic shell motion. The programs are coupled so that the shell motion determined by FLX is used as a boundary condition by SOLA. In turn, the pressure determined by SOLA is the forcing term that controls the shell motion. An axisymmetric version was first developed to provide a basis for comparing with a simple set of experiments and to serve as a test case for the more general, unsymmetric version. The unsymmetric version is currently under development. The report describes the hydrodynamic code, the symmetric shell code, the unsymmetric shell code, and the method of coupling. Test problems used to verify the shell codes and coupled codes are also reported. Work is continuing to verify both the symmetric and unsymmetric codes by making comparisons with experimental data and with theoretical test problems

  7. Analytical investigation of a one-dimensional homogenized model for a pressurized water reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benner, J.; Schumann, U.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional homogenized model for dynamic fluid-structure interaction in a pressurized water reactor core is used to study the influence of the virtual density and spacer's stiffness. The model consists of a linear system of partial differential equations for fluid velocity, rod velocity and pressure. For these equations analytical solutions are deduced for boundary conditions prescribing either periodic wall oscillations or linearly growing wall accelerations from rest. The theoretical model for the virtual density is verified by comparison to an experiment. For zero spacer stiffness, purely acoustic oscillations appear. For positive spacer stiffness, additional oscillations arise with relative rod motions. The wavelengths of the latter oscillations are small for weak spacers. Large numerical effort would be required in a more complete three-dimensional core-model to resolve such short wave lengths. In fact in a typical core the spacer's stiffness csub(S) is small in comparison to the fluid bulk modulus K. For csub(s)/K <= 0.1 it might be appropriate to neglect the influence of the spacers. (orig.)

  8. Development of a double containment concept for the European pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costaz, J.L.; Bonhomme, N.; L'Huby, Y.; Sidaner, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the development of a double containment concept for the European Pressurized Water Reactor. Specification of containment leak tightness during severe hazards resulting from core melt scenarios is part of the safety goals defined for the EPR project. These safety goals include retention of molten core, mitigation of hydrogen deflagration or explosion risks and decay heat removal. The main new containment structural design loads which have been defined, including containment pressure and temperature conditions following possible postulated-core melt events, are recalled in the paper. The feasibility of a double containment with a prestressed concrete inner containment taking into account these new design loads but based upon experience gained within the well tested concept of concrete double wall containment used in 1400 MW nuclear power plants which have already been built in France, is presented. The main characteristics of such a prestressed inner containment are described. Limits and further possible optimization for even more severe design loads (including liner option) are indicated. Experimental works including a large scale mock up are already under way. (author). 2 refs., 4 figs

  9. Standard Master Matrix for Light-Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Standards, E706(0)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This master matrix standard describes a series of standard practices, guides, and methods for the prediction of neutron-induced changes in light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel (PV) and support structure steels throughout a pressure vessel's service life (Fig. 1). Some of these are existing ASTM standards, some are ASTM standards that have been modified, and some are proposed ASTM standards. General requirements of content and consistency are discussed in Section 6 . More detailed writers' and users' information, justification, and specific requirements for the nine practices, ten guides, and three methods are provided in Sections 3-5. Referenced documents are discussed in Section 2. The summary-type information that is provided in Sections 3 and 4 is essential for establishing proper understanding and communications between the writers and users of this set of matrix standards. It was extracted from the referenced documents, Section 2 and references (1-106) for use by individual writers and users. 1...

  10. Risk contribution from low power and shutdown of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.L.; Pratt, W.T.

    1997-01-01

    During 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (a pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (a boiling water reactor), were selected for study by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, respectively. The program objectives included assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences, and other qualitative and quantitative results with full power accidents as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope included a Level 3 PRA for traditional internal events and a Level 1 PRA on fire, flooding, and seismically induced core damage sequences. A phased approach was used in Level 1. In Phase 1 the concept of plant operational states (POSs) was developed to provide a better representation of the plant as it transitions from power to non power operation. This included a coarse screening analysis of all POSs to identify vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) potential frequencies of core damage accidents, and to provide a foundation for a detailed Phase 2 analysis. In Phase 2, selected POSs from both Grand Gulf and Surry were chosen for detailed analysis. For Grand Gulf, POS 5 (approximately Cold Shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications) during a refueling outage was selected. For Surry, three POSs representing the time the plant spends in mid loop operation were chosen for analysis. Level 1 and Level 2/3 results from the Surry analyses are presented

  11. Development of plant dynamic analysis code for integrated self-pressurized water reactor (ISPDYN), and comparative study of pressure control methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Yokomura, Takeyoshi; Nabeshima, Kunihiko; Shimazaki, Junya; Shinohara, Yoshikuni.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the development of plant dynamic analysis code (ISPDYN) for integrated self-pressurized water reactor, and comparative study of pressure control methods with this code. ISPDYN is developed for integrated self-pressurized water reactor, one of the trial design by JAERI. In the transient responses, the calculated results by ISPDYN are in good agreement with the DRUCK calculations. In addition, this report presents some sensitivity studies for selected cases. Computing time of this code is very short so as about one fifth of real time. The comparative study of self-pressurized system with forced-pressurized system by this code, for rapid load decrease and increase cases, has provided useful informations. (author)

  12. Environmentally-Assisted Cracking of Low-Alloy Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels under Boiling Water Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S

    2002-02-01

    The present report summarizes the experimental work performed by PSI on the environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels (LAS) in the frame of the RIKORR-project during the period from January 2000 to August 2001. Within this project, the EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, weld filler and weld heat-affected zone materials is investigated under simulated transient and steady-state BWR/NWC power operation conditions. The EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy RPV steels was characterized by slow rising load (SRL) / low-frequency corrosion fatigue (LFCF) and constant load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in oxygenated high-temperature water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200 or 150 C. These tests revealed the following important interim results: Under low-flow and highly oxidizing (ECP >= 100 mV SHE) conditions, the ASME XI 'wet' reference fatigue crack growth curve could be significantly exceeded by cyclic fatigue loading at low frequencies (<0.001 Hz), at high and low load-ratios R, and by ripple loading near to DKth fatigue thresholds. The BWR VIP 60 SCC disposition lines may be significantly or slightly exceeded (even in steels with a low sulphur content) in the case of small load fluctuations at high load ratios (ripple loading) or at intermediate temperatures (200 -250 C) in RPV materials, which show a distinct susceptibility to dynamic strain ageing (DSA). (author)

  13. Heat exchangers in heavy water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    Important features of some major heat exchange components of pressurized heavy water reactors and DHRUVA research reactor are presented. Design considerations and nuclear service classifications are discussed

  14. Power reactor pressure vessel benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    A review is given of the current status of experimental and calculational benchmarks for use in understanding the radiation embrittlement effects in the pressure vessels of operating light water power reactors. The requirements of such benchmarks for application to pressure vessel dosimetry are stated. Recent developments in active and passive neutron detectors sensitive in the ranges of importance to embrittlement studies are summarized and recommendations for improvements in the benchmark are made. (author)

  15. Chooz A, First Pressurized Water Reactor to be Dismantled in France - 13445

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucau, Joseph [Westinghouse Electric Company, 43 rue de l' Industrie, Nivelles (Belgium); Mirabella, C. [Westinghouse Electric France, Orsay (France); Nilsson, Lennart [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, Vaesteraas (Sweden); Kreitman, Paul J. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Lake Bluff, IL 60048 (United States); Obert, Estelle [EDF - DPI - CIDEN, Lyon (France)

    2013-07-01

    Nine commercial nuclear power plants have been permanently shut down in France to date, of which the Chooz A plant underwent an extensive decommissioning and dismantling program. Chooz Nuclear Power Station is located in the municipality of Chooz, Ardennes region, in the northeast part of France. Chooz B1 and B2 are 1,500 megawatt electric (MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) currently in operation. Chooz A, a 305 MWe PWR implanted in two caves within a hill, began operations in 1967 and closed in 1991, and will now become the first PWR in France to be fully dismantled. EDF CIDEN (Engineering Center for Dismantling and Environment) has awarded Westinghouse a contract for the dismantling of its Chooz A reactor vessel (RV). The project began in January 2010. Westinghouse is leading the project in a consortium with Nuvia France. The project scope includes overall project management, conditioning of the reactor vessel (RV) head, RV and RV internals segmentation, reactor nozzle cutting for lifting the RV out of the pit and seal it afterwards, dismantling of the RV thermal insulation, ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) forecast to ensure acceptable doses for the personnel, complementary vacuum cleaner to catch the chips during the segmentation work, needs and facilities, waste characterization and packaging, civil work modifications, licensing documentation. The RV and RV internals will be segmented based on the mechanical cutting technology that Westinghouse applied successfully for more than 13 years. The segmentation activities cover the cutting and packaging plan, tooling design and qualification, personnel training and site implementation. Since Chooz A is located inside two caves, the project will involve waste transportation from the reactor cave through long galleries to the waste buffer area. The project will end after the entire dismantling work is completed, and the waste storage is outside the caves and ready to be shipped either to the ANDRA (French

  16. Coupled thermo-mechanical creep analysis for boiling water reactor pressure vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, Walter; Tran, Chi-Thanh; Kudinov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We consider a severe accident in a BWR with melt pool formation in the lower head. ► We study the influence of pool depth on vessel failure mode with creep analysis. ► There are two modes of failure; ballooning of vessel bottom and a localized creep. ► External vessel cooling can suppress creep and subsequently prevent vessel failure. - Abstract: In this paper we consider a hypothetical severe accident in a Nordic-type boiling water reactor (BWR) at the stage of relocation of molten core materials to the lower head and subsequent debris bed and then melt pool formation. Nordic BWRs rely on reactor cavity flooding as a means for ex-vessel melt coolability and ultimate termination of the accident progression. However, different modes of vessel failure may result in different regimes of melt release from the vessel, which determine initial conditions for melt coolant interaction and eventually coolability of the debris bed. The goal of this study is to define if retention of decay-heated melt inside the reactor pressure vessel is possible and investigate modes of the vessel wall failure otherwise. The mode of failure is contingent upon the ultimate mechanical strength of the vessel structures under given mechanical and thermal loads and applied cooling measures. The influence of pool depth and respective transient thermal loads on the reactor vessel failure mode is studied with coupled thermo-mechanical creep analysis. Efficacy of control rod guide tube (CRGT) cooling and external vessel wall cooling as potential severe accident management measures is investigated. First, only CRGT cooling is considered in simulations revealing two different modes of vessel failure: (i) a ‘ballooning’ of the vessel bottom and (ii) a ‘localized creep’ concentrated within the vicinity of the top surface of the melt pool. Second, possibility of in-vessel retention with CRGT and external vessel cooling is investigated. We found that the external vessel

  17. Methodologies to assess PWSCC susceptibility of primary component Alloy 600 locations in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, G.V.

    1993-01-01

    Methodologies to assess susceptibility to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 component locations in the Primary System of Pressurized Water Reactors are presented. The assessment methodologies are presented. The assessment methodologies are based on Relative Susceptibility Index (RSI) and Cumulative Susceptibility Index (CSI) models utilizing key contributing parameters such as service and residual stresses, yield strength, service temperature, material condition and microstructure, and the accumulated service time. To aid in the development of future inspection plans, a method of ranking of the assessed susceptibilities by 'bench marking' with respect to the susceptibility of a reference location of known PWSCC history of a reference location of known PWSCC history is presented. Means of utilizing the susceptibility ranking results in developing a prioritized inspection plan are discussed. A follow-up investigative plan to the initial inspection is proposed, which includes identification of critical sampling locations, sample extraction, sample investigations and testing to ensure that the potentially highest susceptibility locations are free from near term PWSCC and, further, to provide a basis for established schedules for future inspections. Finally, parametric considerations of the contributing factor are presented to help the utility choose suitable option to mitigate the PWSCC issue while minimizing the impact on continued service

  18. Assessment of pressurized water reactor control rod drive mechanism nozzle cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.; Porter, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    This report surveys the field experience related to cracking of pressurized water reactor (PWR) control rod drive mechanism nozzles (Alloy 600 material); evaluates design, fabrication, and operating conditions for the nozzles in US PWR; and evaluates the safety significance of nozzle cracking. Inspection at 78 overseas and one US PWR has revealed mainly axial cracks in 101 nozzles. The cracking is caused by primary water stress corrosion cracking, which requires the simultaneous presence of high tensile stresses, high operating temperatures, and susceptible microstructure. CRDM nozzle cracking is not a short-term safety issue. An axial crack is not likely to grow above the vessel head to a critical length because the stresses are not high enough to support the growth away from the attachment weld. Primary coolant leaking through an axial crack could cause a short circumferential crack on the outside surface. However, this crack is not likely to propagate through the nozzle wall to cause rupture. Leakage of the primary coolant from a through-wall crack could cause boric acid corrosion of the vessel head and challenge the structural integrity of the head, but it is very unlikely that the accumulated deposits of boric acid crystals resulting from such leakage could remain undetected

  19. Development of a PID-Fuzzy controller in the water level control of a pressurizer of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Thiago S.P.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O.; Vasconcelos, Wagner E., E-mail: thiago.brito86@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br, E-mail: wagner@unicap.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia e Geociencias. Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Universidade Catolica de Pernambuco (UNICAP), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that safety in the operation of nuclear power plants is a primary requirement because a failure of this system can result in serious problems to the environment. A nuclear reactor has several systems that help keep it in normal operation, within safety margins. Many of these systems operate in the control of variable quantities in the primary circuit of a reactor. However, nuclear reactors are nonlinear physical systems, and this introduces a complexity in the control strategies. Among several mechanisms in the thermal-hydraulic system of a reactor that actuate as a controller, the pressurizer is the component responsible for absorbing pressure variations that occur in the primary circuit. This work aims at the development of a PID controller (Proportional Integral Derivative) based on fuzzy logic to operate in a pressurizer of a nuclear Pressurized Water Reactor. A Fuzzy Controller was developed using the process of fuzzification, inference, and defuzzification of the variables of interest to a pressurizer, then this controller was coupled to a PID Controller building a PID Controller, but oriented by Fuzzy logic. Subsequently, the PID-Fuzzy Controller was experimentally validated in a Simulation Plant in which transients like those in a PWR were conducted. The PID parameters were analyzed and adjusted for better responses and results. The results of the validation were also compared to simple controllers (on / off). (author)

  20. Development of a PID-Fuzzy controller in the water level control of a pressurizer of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Thiago S.P.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O.; Vasconcelos, Wagner E.; Universidade Catolica de Pernambuco

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that safety in the operation of nuclear power plants is a primary requirement because a failure of this system can result in serious problems to the environment. A nuclear reactor has several systems that help keep it in normal operation, within safety margins. Many of these systems operate in the control of variable quantities in the primary circuit of a reactor. However, nuclear reactors are nonlinear physical systems, and this introduces a complexity in the control strategies. Among several mechanisms in the thermal-hydraulic system of a reactor that actuate as a controller, the pressurizer is the component responsible for absorbing pressure variations that occur in the primary circuit. This work aims at the development of a PID controller (Proportional Integral Derivative) based on fuzzy logic to operate in a pressurizer of a nuclear Pressurized Water Reactor. A Fuzzy Controller was developed using the process of fuzzification, inference, and defuzzification of the variables of interest to a pressurizer, then this controller was coupled to a PID Controller building a PID Controller, but oriented by Fuzzy logic. Subsequently, the PID-Fuzzy Controller was experimentally validated in a Simulation Plant in which transients like those in a PWR were conducted. The PID parameters were analyzed and adjusted for better responses and results. The results of the validation were also compared to simple controllers (on / off). (author)

  1. Process and device for measuring the level in a reactor pressure vessel of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walleser, A.

    1987-01-01

    The differential pressure is measured between the lower space filled with liquid and a comparison column which is connected to the upper part space filled with steam. From this measurement and the liquid and steam densities in the pressure vessel and in the comparison column and the effects of flow at the pressure sampling positions, the level is determined in an evaluation unit. To determine the densities of liquids and steam, the reactor pressure or the change of pressure with time for transient processes is measured. The density of the comparison column is determined by temperature measurement. The effects of flow are determined by flow measurements. All the measurements are taken to an evaluation unit. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Investigation of temperature fluctuation phenomena in a stratified steam-water two-phase flow in a simulating pressurizer spray pipe of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Koji, E-mail: miyoshi.koj@inss.co.jp; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Ishida, Taisuke; Sugimoto, Katsumi

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Thermal hydraulics phenomena were discussed in a spray pipe of pressurizer. • Temperature fluctuation was investigated in a stratified steam-water two-phase. • Remarkable liquid temperature fluctuations were observed in the liquid layer. • The observed temperature fluctuations were caused by the internal gravity wave. • The temperature fluctuations decreased with increasing dissolved oxygen. - Abstract: Temperature fluctuation phenomena in a stratified steam-water two-phase flow in a horizontal rectangular duct, which simulate a pressurizer spray pipe of a pressurized water reactor, were studied experimentally. Vertical distributions of the temperature and the liquid velocity were measured with water of various dissolved oxygen concentrations. Large liquid temperature fluctuations were observed when the water was deaerated well and dissolved oxygen concentration was around 10 ppb. The large temperature fluctuations were not observed when the oxygen concentration was higher. It was shown that the observed temperature fluctuations were caused by the internal gravity wave since the Richardson numbers were larger than 0.25 and the temperature fluctuation frequencies were around the Brunt-Väisälä frequencies in the present experimental conditions. The temperature fluctuations decreased by the non-condensable gas since the non-condensable gas suppressed the condensation and the temperature difference in the liquid layer was small.

  3. Strategies for plutonium recycle in a system of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaver, D.E.W.

    1976-01-01

    A methodology is developed to allow a utility fuel manager to determine economic strategies for recycling plutonium in a system of light water reactors. One possible plutonium recycle strategy would be self-generated recycle, in which plutonium discharged from a reactor is recycled back to that same reactor as soon as possible. Another possible strategy is to recycle all the plutonium discharged from several reactors into one reactor. Such a strategy might be advantageous if the reactor receiving the plutonium were of a type that utilized plutonium more effectively than other reactors in the system. There are several considerations which affect the economics of recycling a batch of plutonium to one reactor or cycle vs. another, or which would favor a special recycling strategy. Among these are cycle energy, length of time that plutonium is stored prior to recycle, and isotopes of the plutonium. The methodology developed is used to quantitatively illustrate the effect on recycle strategy of these parameters. The problem of choosing the plutonium recycle strategy which results in the minimum fuel cost is formulated as a mathematical programming problem. The objective function for this problem is the total discounted fuel cost for the reactor system over a specified planning period. The savings of an optimal recycle strategy over self-generated recycle would be typically one million dollars per year for a utility with several large PWRs

  4. Reactor water sampling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor water sampling device for sampling reactor water in an in-core monitor (neutron measuring tube) housing in a BWR type reactor. The upper end portion of a drain pipe of the reactor water sampling device is attached detachably to an in-core monitor flange. A push-up rod is inserted in the drain pipe vertically movably. A sampling vessel and a vacuum pump are connected to the lower end of the drain pipe. A vacuum pump is operated to depressurize the inside of the device and move the push-up rod upwardly. Reactor water in the in-core monitor housing flows between the drain pipe and the push-up rod and flows into the sampling vessel. With such a constitution, reactor water in the in-core monitor housing can be sampled rapidly with neither opening the lid of the reactor pressure vessel nor being in contact with air. Accordingly, operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (I.N.)

  5. Photographic and video techniques used in the 1/5-scale Mark I boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.; Lord, D.

    1978-01-01

    The report provides a description of the techniques and equipment used for the photographic and video recordings of the air test series conducted on the 1/5 scale Mark I boiling water reactor (BWR) pressure suppression experimental facility at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) between March 4, 1977, and May 12, 1977. Lighting and water filtering are discussed in the photographic system section and are also applicable to the video system. The appendices contain information from the photographic and video camera logs

  6. A hybrid method for in-core optimization of pressurized water reactor reload core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.G.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this research is the development of an accurate, practical, and robust method for optimization of the design of loading patterns for pressurized water reactors, a nonlinear, non-convex, integer optimization problem. The many logical constraints which may be applied during the design process are modeled herein by a network construction upon which performance objectives and safety constraints from reactor physics calculations are optimized. This thesis presents the synthesis of the strengths of previous algorithms developed for reload design optimization and extension of robustness through development of a hybrid liberated search algorithm. Development of three independent methods for reload design optimization is presented: random direct search for local improvement, liberated search by simulated annealing, and deterministic search for local improvement via successive linear assignment by branch and bound. Comparative application of the methods to a variety of problems is discussed, including an exhaustive enumeration benchmark created to allow comparison of search results to a known global optimum for a large scale problem. While direct search and determinism are shown to be capable of finding improvement, only the liberation of simulated annealing is found to perform robustly in the non-convex design spaces. The hybrid method SHAMAN is presented. The algorithm applies: determinism to shuffle an initial solution for satisfaction of heuristics and symmetry; liberated search through simulated annealing with a bounds cooling constraint treatment; and search bias through relational heuristics for the application of engineering judgment. The accuracy, practicality, and robustness of the SHAMAN algorithm is demonstrated through application to a variety of reload loading pattern optimization problems

  7. Cost-benefit evaluation of containment related engineered safety features of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, S.S.; Bhawal, R.N.; Rustagi, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    The typical containment system for a commercial nuclear reactor uses several engineered safety features to achieve its objective of limiting the release of radioactive fission products to the environment in the event of postulated accident conditions. The design of containment systems and associated features for Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) has undergone progressive improvement in successive projects. In particular, the current design adopted for the Narora Atomic Power Project (NAPP) has seen several notable improvements. The paper reports on a cost-benefit study in respect of three containment related engineered safety features and subsystems of NAPP, viz. (i) secondary containment envelope, (ii) primary containment filtration and pump-back system, and (iii) secondary containment filtration, recirculation and purge system. The effect of each of these systems in reducing the environmental releases of radioactivity following a design basis accident is presented. The corresponding reduction in population exposure and the associated monetary value of this reduction in exposure are also given. The costs of the features and subsystem under consideration are then compared with the monetary value of the exposures saved, as well as other non-quantified benefits, to arrive at conclusions regarding the usefulness of each subsystem. This study clearly establishes for the secondary containment envelope the benefit in terms of reduction in public exposure giving a quantitative justification for the costs involved. In the case of the other two subsystems, which involve relatively low costs, while all benefits have not been quantified, their desirability is justified on qualitative considerations. It is concluded that the engineered safety features adopted in the current containment system design of Indian PHWRs contribute to reducing radiation exposures during accident conditions in accordance with the ALARA ('as low as reasonably achievable') principle

  8. Destruction of plutonium using non-uranium fuels in pressurized water reactor peripheral assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chodak, P. III

    1996-05-01

    This thesis examines and confirms the feasibility of using non-uranium fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) radial blanket to eliminate plutonium of both weapons and civilian origin. In the equilibrium cycle, the periphery of the PWR is loaded with alternating fresh and once burned non-uranium fuel assemblies, with the interior of the core comprised of conventional three batch UO 2 assemblies. Plutonium throughput is such that there is no net plutonium production: production in the interior is offset by destruction in the periphery. Using this approach a 50 MT WGPu inventory could be eliminated in approximately 400 reactor years of operation. Assuming all other existing constraints were removed, the 72 operating US PWRs could disposition 50 MT of WGPu in 5.6 years. Use of a low fissile loading plutonium-erbium inert-oxide-matrix composition in the peripheral assemblies essentially destroys 100% of the 239 Pu and ≥90% total Pu over two 18 month fuel cycles. Core radial power peaking, reactivity vs EFPD profiles and core average reactivity coefficients were found to be comparable to standard PWR values. Hence, minimal impact on reload licensing is anticipated. Examination of potential candidate fuel matrices based on the existing experience base and thermo-physical properties resulted in the recommendation of three inert fuel matrix compositions for further study: zirconia, alumina and TRISO particle fuels. Objective metrics for quantifying the inherent proliferation resistance of plutonium host waste and fuel forms are proposed and were applied to compare the proposed spent WGPu non-uranium fuel to spent WGPu MOX fuels and WGPu borosilicate glass logs. The elimination disposition option spent non-uranium fuel product was found to present significantly greater barriers to proliferation than other plutonium disposal products

  9. A multi-agent design for a pressurized water reactor (P.W.R.) control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aimar-Lichtenberger, M.

    1999-01-01

    This PhD work is in keeping with the complex industrial process control. The starting point is the analysis of control principles in a Pressurized Water Reactor (P.W.R). In order to cope with the limits of the present control procedures, a new control organisation by objectives and means is defined. This functional organisation is based on the state approach and is characterized by the parallel management of control functions to ensure the continuous control of the installation essential variables. With regard to this complex system problematic, we search the most adapted computer modeling. We show that a multi-agent system approach brings an interesting answer to manage the distribution and parallelism of control decisions and tasks. We present a synthetic study of multi-agent systems and their application fields.The choice of a multi-agent approach proceeds with the design of an agent model. This model gains experiences from other applications. This model is implemented in a computer environment which combines the mechanisms of an object language with Prolog. We propose in this frame a multi-agent modeling of the control system where each function is represented by an agent. The agents are structured in a hierarchical organisation and deal with different abstraction levers of the problem. Following a prototype process, the validation is realized by an implementation and by a coupling to a reactor simulator. The essential contributions of an agent approach turn on the mastery of the system complexity, the openness, the robustness and the potentialities of human-machine cooperation. (author)

  10. Destruction of plutonium using non-uranium fuels in pressurized water reactor peripheral assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chodak, III, Paul [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This thesis examines and confirms the feasibility of using non-uranium fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) radial blanket to eliminate plutonium of both weapons and civilian origin. In the equilibrium cycle, the periphery of the PWR is loaded with alternating fresh and once burned non-uranium fuel assemblies, with the interior of the core comprised of conventional three batch UO2 assemblies. Plutonium throughput is such that there is no net plutonium production: production in the interior is offset by destruction in the periphery. Using this approach a 50 MT WGPu inventory could be eliminated in approximately 400 reactor years of operation. Assuming all other existing constraints were removed, the 72 operating US PWRs could disposition 50 MT of WGPu in 5.6 years. Use of a low fissile loading plutonium-erbium inert-oxide-matrix composition in the peripheral assemblies essentially destroys 100% of the 239Pu and ≥90% {sub total}Pu over two 18 month fuel cycles. Core radial power peaking, reactivity vs EFPD profiles and core average reactivity coefficients were found to be comparable to standard PWR values. Hence, minimal impact on reload licensing is anticipated. Examination of potential candidate fuel matrices based on the existing experience base and thermo-physical properties resulted in the recommendation of three inert fuel matrix compositions for further study: zirconia, alumina and TRISO particle fuels. Objective metrics for quantifying the inherent proliferation resistance of plutonium host waste and fuel forms are proposed and were applied to compare the proposed spent WGPu non-uranium fuel to spent WGPu MOX fuels and WGPu borosilicate glass logs. The elimination disposition option spent non-uranium fuel product was found to present significantly greater barriers to proliferation than other plutonium disposal products.

  11. RPV-1: A Virtual Test Reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumel, Stephanie; Van-Duysen, Jean Claude

    2005-01-01

    Many key components in commercial nuclear reactors are subject to neutron irradiation which modifies their mechanical properties. So far, the prediction of the in-service behavior and the lifetime of these components has required irradiations in so-called 'Experimental Test Reactors'. This predominantly empirical approach can now be supplemented by the development of physically based computer tools to simulate irradiation effects numerically. The devising of such tools, also called Virtual Test Reactors (VTRs), started in the framework of the REVE Project (REactor for Virtual Experiments). This project is a joint effort among Europe, the United States and Japan aimed at building VTRs able to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and internal structures of LWRs. The European team has already built a first VTR, called RPV-1, devised for pressure vessel steels. Its inputs and outputs are similar to those of experimental irradiation programs carried out to assess the in-service behavior of reactor pressure vessels. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or convey data. A user friendly Python interface eases the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 is sensitive to its inputs (neutron spectrum, temperature, ...) and provides results in conformity with experimental ones. The iterative improvement of RPV-1 has been started by the comparison of simulation results with the database of the IVAR experimental program led by the University of California Santa Barbara. These first successes led 40 European organizations to start developing RPV-2, an advanced version of RPV-1, as well as INTERN-1, a VTR devised to simulate irradiation effects in stainless steels, in a large effort (the PERFECT project) supported by the European Commission in the framework of the 6th Framework Program

  12. Evaluation of responses to IE Bulletin 82-02: degradation of threaded fasteners in reactor coolant pressure boundary of pressurized-water-reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, W.; Sterner, P.

    1985-05-01

    IE Bulletin 82-02 was issued by the NRC on June 2, 1982, to notify licensees about incidents of severe degradation of threaded fasteners. The bulletin required appropriate action including submittal of information from pressurized water reactors having an operating license. Responses from 41 licensees included their recent experience with degradation of threaded fasteners in primary system components. Data from recent regular inspections of reactor coolant pressure boundary component connections of 6-in. size and larger are compiled for technical evaluation. Statistical analysis is used to determine significant factors related to frequency of leakage incidents in connections, occurrence of degradation of bolts and studs, and the need for bolt replacement. Factors examined include the age of the plant, types of components, use of lubricants and sealants, and differences between plants. The compiled data indicate that, on the average, 10% of the bolted connections show evidence of leaking during an 18-month period. Also, 80% of the connections that show evidence of leakage undergo some degradation of the bolting. Results of the analysis show a significant decrease in the occurrence of bolting degradation events as the age of the plant increases. The data also show that valves are less subject to bolting corrosion. A group of 5 of the 41 plants accounted for about one-half of the reported leakage and corrosion events. The common characteristic found for four of these five plants was the lubricant used. The use of nickel-graphite based lubricants appears to offer a significantly reduced incidence of leakage and corrosion, based on late corrections to the reported data. The data also permit the conclusion that the use of molybdenum-disulfide-based lubricants and graphite-based lubricants results in a significantly increased incidence of leakage and corrosion. Reporting of data on lubricants was of poor quality and detracted from the value of the bulletin responses

  13. Modeling and diagnostic techniques applicable to the analysis of pressure noise in pressurized water reactors and pressure-sensing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullens, J.A.; Thie, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Pressure noise data from a PWR are interpreted by means of a computer-implemented model. The model's parameters, namely hydraulic impedances and noise sources, are either calculated or deduced from fits to data. Its accuracy is encouraging and raises the possibility of diagnostic assistance for nuclear plant monitoring. A number of specific applications of pressure noise in the primary system of a PWR and in a pressure sensing system are suggested

  14. Pressure tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susuki, Akira; Murata, Shigeto; Minato, Akihiko.

    1993-01-01

    In a pressure tube reactor, a reactor core is constituted by arranging more than two units of a minimum unit combination of a moderator sealing pipe containing a calandria tube having moderators there between and a calandria tube and moderators. The upper header and a lower header of the calandria tank containing moderators are communicated by way of the moderator sealing tube. Further, a gravitationally dropping mechanism is disposed for injecting neutron absorbing liquid to a calandria gas injection portion. A ratio between a moderator volume and a fuel volume is defined as a function of the inner diameter of the moderator sealing tube, the outer diameter of the calandria tube and the diameter of fuel pellets, and has no influence to intervals of a pressure tube lattice. The interval of the pressure tube lattice is enlarged without increasing the size of the pressure tube, to improve production efficiency of the reactor and set a coolant void coefficient more negative, thereby enabling to improve self controllability and safety. Further, the reactor scram can be conducted by injecting neutron absorbing liquid. (N.H.)

  15. EPR (European Pressurized Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the EPR (European Pressurized Reactor), a modernised version of PWRs which uses nuclear fission. It indicates to which category it belongs (third generation). It briefly describes its operation: recalls on nuclear fission, electricity production in a nuclear reactor. It presents and comments its characteristics: power, thermal efficiency, redundant systems for safety control, double protective enclosure, expected lifetime, use of MOX fuel, modular design. It discusses economic stakes (expected higher nuclear electricity competitiveness, but high construction costs), and safety challenges (design characteristics, critics by nuclear safety authorities about the safety data processing system). It presents the main involved actors (Areva, EDF) and competitors in the field of advanced reactors (Rosatom with its VVER 1200, General Electric with its ABWR and its ESBWR, Mitsubishi with its APWR, Westinghouse with its AP100) while outlining the importance of certifications and delays to obtain them. After having evoked key data on EPR fuel consumption, it indicates reactors under construction, evokes potential markets and perspectives

  16. Modeling of primary water stress corrosion cracking at control rod drive mechanism nozzles of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Omar Fernandes

    2006-01-01

    One of the main failure mechanisms that cause risks to pressurized water reactors is the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) occurring in alloys. It can occurs, besides another places, at the control reactor displacement mechanism nozzles. It is caused by the joint effect of tensile stress, temperature, susceptible metallurgical microstructure and environmental conditions of the primary water. These cracks can cause accidents that reduce nuclear safety by blocking the rod's displacement and may cause leakage of primary water, reducing the reactor's life. In this work it is proposed a study of the existing models and a modeling proposal to primary water stress corrosion cracking in these nozzles in a nickel based Alloy 600. It is been superposed electrochemical and fracture mechanics models, and validated using experimental and literature data. The experimental data were obtained at CDTN-Brazilian Nuclear Technology Development Center, in a recent installed slow strain rate testing equipment. In the literature it is found a diagram that indicates a thermodynamic condition for the occurrence of some PWSCC sub modes in Alloy 600: it was used potential x pH diagrams (Pourbaix diagrams), for Alloy 600 in high temperature primary water (300 deg C till 350 deg C). Over it, were located the PWSCC sub modes, using experimental data. It was added a third parameter called 'stress corrosion strength fraction'. However, it is possible to superpose to this diagram, other parameters expressing PWSCC initiation or growth kinetics from other models. Here is the proposition of the original contribution of this work: from an original experimental condition of potential versus pH, it was superposed, an empiric-comparative, a semi-empiric-probabilistic, an initiation time, and a strain rate damage models, to quantify respectively the PWSCC susceptibility, the failure time, and in the two lasts, the initiation time of stress corrosion cracking. It was modeling from our

  17. ZOCO VI - a computer code to calculate the time- and space-dependent pressure distribution in full pressure containments of water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfeld, G.

    1974-12-01

    ZOCO VI is a computer code to investigate the time and space dependent pressure distribution in full pressure containment of water cooled nuclear power reactors following a loss-of-coolant accident, which is caused by the rupture of a main coolant or steam line. ZOCO VI is an improved version of the computer code ZOCO V with enlarged description of condensing events. (orig.) [de

  18. Development of a transient identification and classification system to an integral pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronne, Ivan Dionysio

    2009-01-01

    The demand for energy in the modern world is growing, particularly in the developing countries. The nuclear options has been deserving prominence for their qualities of not impacting the environment through emissions of greenhouse gases and nor to demand great areas.. However society requests improvement in the safety of new reactors and the utilities request larger availability of the power plants. The IRIS project of an integral nuclear pressurized water reactor proposes to fulfill those requirements. A system for identification and classification of transients would help to improve the safety and to increase the availability of the IRIS increasing its competitiveness. In order to contribute to the development o such a system it was developed in this work a System for Identification and Classification of Transients - SDICT - capable of monitoring the operation of the reactor and of providing information on its operational state. SICT was developed using the technique of neural networks, more specifically the Self-Organizing Maps. Results of IRIS simulation with RELAP5 code were used to train the neural network of SICT. To demonstrate the correctness of the methodology of using simulations results, whose values have characteristics different from the measured ones, it was made a version of SICT for an experimental installation, the The Circuit no. 1 - CT1. Experiments were run in this test facility and simulations of its operation were done with RELAP5. This CT1 version of SICT was then checked against the simulation and experimental data validating the methodology. As a result of the activities to develop SICT, it is now available for futures studies: the developed application, SICT, a database of experiments in CT1, a validate nodalization of CT1, a database of results of CT1 simulations , a nodalization of the IRIS tested for several normal and abnormal transients and a database with the results of IRIS simulations. Attached to this thesis is a CD with the

  19. An automated optimization of core fuel loading pattern for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Renji

    1988-11-01

    An optimum method was adopted to search for an optimum fuel loading pattern in pressurized water reactors. A radial power peak factor was chosen as the objective function of the optimum loading. The direct search method with shuffling rules is used to find optimum solution. The search for an optimum loading pattern with the smallest radial power peak by exchanging fuel assemblies was made. The search process is divided into two steps. In the first step fresh fuels or high reactivity fuels are arranged which are placed in core interior to have a reasonable fuel loading pattern. To further reduce the radial power peak factor, the second step will be necessary to rearrange the exposed lower reactivity fuel around the assemblies which has the radial power peak. In optimum process 1.5 group coarse mesh diffusion theory or two group nodal Green function diffusion theory is utilized to calculate the two dimensional power distribution after each shuffle. Also, above two methods are combinatively utilized to calculate the state quantity. It is not only true to save CPU time, but also can obtian exact results. Besides above function, the code MSOFEL is used to search critical boron concentration and to predict burn-up. The code has been written with FORTRAN-4. The optimum loading pattern was chosen for OCONEE and QINSHAN nuclear power plants as reference examples. The validity and feasibility of MSOFEL was demonstrated

  20. Review of recent studies on neutron irradiation embrittlement in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Akira; Miyazono, Shohachiro

    1983-06-01

    Recent studies in foreign countries (USA, France, FRG and UK) on neutron irradiation embrittlement have been reviewed. These studies are classified into four areas, such as 1) effect of chemical composition on irradiation embrittlement sensitivity, 2) postirradiation heat treatment for embrittlement relief, 3) fracture toughness evaluation of irradiated materials based on fracture mechanics analysis, and 4) effect of irradiation on fatigue crack propagation behavior. The first area mainly includes the studies related to the effects of copper, phosphorus impurities and nickel alloying and synergistic effect of these components, and furthermore, evaluation of Regulatory Guide 1.99 Rev.l. Studies in the second area show the effects of annealing condition (temperature and time) and metallugical condition on embrittlement relief, and evaluation of periodic annealing in the period of irradiation as a promising method for embrittlement control. Studies in the third area show the correlation between fracture toughness and Cv notch ductility changes with neutron irradiation, and J-R curves of irradiated materials based on the elasto-plastic fracture mechanics. In the forth area, most of studies are investigated in air condition but a few studies in reactor-grade water at high temperature and pressure. (author)

  1. PWR [pressurized water reactor] optimal reload configuration with an intelligent workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greek, K.J.; Robinson, A.H.

    1990-01-01

    In a previous paper, the implementation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) refueling expert system that combined object-oriented programming in Smalltalk and a FORTRAN power calculation to evaluate loading patterns was discussed. The expert system applies heuristics and constraints that lead the search toward an optimal configuration. Its rate of improvement depends on the expertise coded for a search and the loading pattern from where the search begins. Due to its complexity, however, the solution normally cannot be served by a rule-based expert system alone. A knowledge base may take years of development before final acceptance. Also, the human pattern-matching capability to view a two-dimensional power profile, recognize an imbalance, and select an appropriate response has not yet been surpassed by a rule-based system. The user should be given the ability to take control of the search if he believes the solution needs a new direction and should be able to configure a loading pattern and resume the search. This paper introduces the workstation features of Shuffle important to aid the user to manipulate the configuration and retain a record of the solution

  2. A control system for industrial plant (e.g. a pressurized water reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiller, C.R.L.

    1990-01-01

    A control system for an industrial plant eg. a pressurised water nuclear reactor, comprises a plurality of instrument sets and a plurality of logic sets. The instrument sets have a number of sensors which detect parameters (temperature, pressure vibration) of the industrial plant, and have two serial link controllers which supply the output signals from each sensor in the instrument set sequentially to the logic sets via conductors. The logic sets have a number of auto select logic circuits, each of which selects data from the sensors from one of the instrument sets, and a synchroniser ensures that the output signals from the sensors detecting the same parameter are supplied to a voting logic circuit at the same time. The voting logic circuit performs a voting function on the output signals to produce a series of high reliability signals which are converted to parallel high reliability signals by a series to a parallel converter. The high reliability signals are supplied to a fault logic shutdown circuit which controls the operation of shutdown mechanisms for the industrial plant. (author)

  3. Generic risk insights for Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, R.; Taylor, J.; Fresco, A.; Chung, J.

    1990-11-01

    A methodology has been developed to extract generic risk-based information from probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) of Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering (CE) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and apply the insights gained to Westinghouse and Ce plants have not been subjected to a PRA. The available PRAs (five Westinghouse plants and one CE plant) were examined to identify the most probable, i.e., dominant accident sequences at each plant. The goal was to include all sequences which represented at least 80% of core damage frequency. If the same plant specific dominant accident sequence appeared within this boundary in at least two plant PRAs, the sequence was considered to be a representative sequence. Eleven sequences met this definition. From these sequences, the most important component failures and human errors that contributed to each sequence have been prioritized. Guidance is provided to prioritize the representative sequences and modify selected basic events that have been shown to be sensitive to the plant specific design or operating variations of the contributing PRAs. This risk-based guidance can be used for utility and NRC activities including operator training maintenance, design review, and inspections

  4. Stress analysis of pressurized water reactor steam generator tube denting phenomena. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Cipolla, R.C.; Ranjan, G.V.; Derbalian, G.

    1978-07-01

    In some Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) steam generators, a corrosion product has formed on the carbon steel support plate in the crevice between the tube and support plate. The corrosion product occupies more volume than the original metal; the tube-to-support plate crevice volume is thus consumed with corrosion product, and further corrosive action results in a radially inward force on the tube and a radially outward force on the corroding support plate. This has resulted in indentation (''denting'') of the tube, accompanied by occasional cracking. Large in-plane deformation and cracking of support plates has also been observed in the most severely affected plants along with some serious side effects, such as deformation and cracking of inner row tube U-bends caused by support plate movement. Mechanical aspects of the tube denting phenomena have been studied using analytical models. The models used ranged from closed form analytical solutions to state-of-the-art numerical elastic-plastic computer program for moderate strains. It was found that tube dents, such as those observed in operating steam generators, are associated with yielding of both the tubes and support plates. Also studied were the stresses in tube U-bends caused by support plate flow slot deformation

  5. Aging mechanisms in the Westinghouse PWR [Pressurized Water Reactor] Control Rod Drive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Sullivan, K.

    1991-01-01

    An aging assessment of the Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Control Rod System (CRD) has been completed as part of the US NRC's Nuclear Plant Aging Research, (NPAR) Program. This study examined the design, construction, maintenance, and operation of the system to determine its potential for degradation as the plant ages. Selected results from this study are presented in this paper. The operating experience data were evaluated to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. From our evaluation of the data, coupled with an assessment of the materials of construction and the operating environment, we conclude that the Westinghouse CRD system is subject to degradation which, if unchecked, could affect its safety function as a plant ages. Ways to detect and mitigate the effects of aging are included in this paper. The current maintenance for the control rod drive system at fifteen Westinghouse PWRs was obtained through a survey conducted in cooperation with EPRI and NUMARC. The results of the survey indicate that some plants have modified the system, replaced components, or expanded preventive maintenance. Several of these activities have effectively addressed the aging issue. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Thermal-hydraulic and neutronic analysis of pressurized water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    A computational code, named CANAL2, was developed for the simulation of the steady-state and transient behaviour of a Pressurized Water Reactor core. The conservation equations for the control volumes are obtained by area-averaging of the two-fluid model conservation equations and reducing them to the drift-flux model formulation. The resulting equations are aproximated by finite differences and solved by a marching-type numerical scheme. The model takes into account the exchange of mass, momentum and energy between adjacent subchannels of a fuel bundle. Turbulent mixing and diversion crossflow are considered. Correlations are provided for several heat trans and flow regimes and selected according to the local conditons. During transients core power can be evaluated by a point-Kinetics model. Fuel and coolant temperatures are feedback to the neutronics. The heat conduction equation is solved in the fuel using the Crank-Nicolson scheme. Temperature-dependent correlations are provided for the fuel and cladding thermal conductivities. Several runs were made with the code CANAL2 using the available experimental and calculated data in the open literature. Results indicate that CANAL2 is a good calculational tool for the thermal-hydraulics of PWR cores. A few refinements will make the code useful for design. (Author) [pt

  7. Coupling finite elements and reliability methods - application to safety evaluation of pressurized water reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitner, P.; Venturini, V.

    1995-02-01

    When reliability studies are extended form deterministic calculations in mechanics, it is necessary to take into account input parameters variabilities which are linked to the different sources of uncertainty. Integrals must then be calculated to evaluate the failure risk. This can be performed either by simulation methods, or by approximations ones (FORM/SORM). Model in mechanics often require to perform calculation codes. These ones must then be coupled with the reliability calculations. Theses codes can involve large calculation times when they are invoked numerous times during simulations sequences or in complex iterative procedures. Response surface method gives an approximation of the real response from a reduced number of points for which the finite element code is run. Thus, when it is combined with FORM/SORM methods, a coupling can be carried out which gives results in a reasonable calculation time. An application of response surface method to mechanics reliability coupling for a mechanical model which calls for a finite element code is presented. It corresponds to a probabilistic fracture mechanics study of a pressurized water reactor vessel. (authors). 5 refs., 3 figs

  8. Simultaneous loading patterns optimization for two successive cycles of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akio; Sugimura, Erina; Kitamura, Yasunori; Yamane, Yoshihiro

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, simultaneous optimization is carried out for successive two cycles of pressurized water reactors. At first, a simplified problem of the simultaneous optimization was studied by assuming the batch-wise power sharing as independent variable, i.e., batch-wise power sharing was optimized without considering corresponding loading patterns. The optimization of the batch-wise power sharing was carried out for the conventional single cycle, the equilibrium cycle and the two successive (tandem) cycles. The analysis indicated that the tandem cycle optimization well reproduce that of the equilibrium cycle optimization, which is considered as a typical case of the true multicycle optimization. Next, simultaneous optimization of loading patterns for tandem cycles is carried out using the simulated annealing method. Since the design space of the tandem cycles optimization is much larger than that of the conventional single cycle optimization, the optimization condition (i.e., number of calculated patterns) are established through sensitivity study. The optimization results are compared with those obtained by the successive single cycle optimizations and it is clarified that the successive single cycle optimization well reproduces the optimization results obtained by the simultaneous optimization if objective functions are appropriately chosen. The above result will be encouraging for the current in-core optimization method since single cycle optimization is utilized due to limitation of computation time. (author)

  9. AUTOLOAD, an automatic optimal pressurized water reactor reload design system with an expert module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.; Levine, S.H.

    1994-01-01

    An automatic optimal pressurized water reactor (PWR) reload design expert system AUTOLOAD has been developed. It employs two important new techniques. The first is a new loading priority scheme that defines the optimal placement of the fuel in the core that has the maximum end-of-cycle state k eff . The second is a new power-shape-driven progressive iteration method for automatically determining the burnable poison (BP) loading in the fresh fuel assemblies. The Haling power distribution is used in converting the theoretically optimal solution into the practical design, which meets the design constraints for the given fuel assemblies. AUTOLOAD is a combination of C and FORTRAN languages. It requires only the required cycle length, the maximum peak normalized power, the BP type, the number of fresh fuel assemblies, the assembly burnup, and BP histories of the available fuel assemblies as its input. Knowledge-based modules have been built into the expert system computer code to perform all of the tasks involved in reloading a PWR. AUTOLOAD takes only ∼ 30 CPU min on an IBM 3090 600s mainframe to accomplish a practical reload design. A maximum of 12.5% fresh fuel enrichment saving is observed compared with the core used by the utility

  10. Assessment of Field Experience Related to Pressurized Water Reactor Primary System Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Hsu, C.; Atwood, C.L.; Sattison, M.B.; Hartley, R.S.; Shah, V.N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents our assessment of field experience related to pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary system leaks in terms of their number and rates, how aging affects frequency of leak events, the safety significance of such leaks, industry efforts to reduce leaks, and effectiveness of current leak detection systems. We have reviewed the licensee event reports to identify the events that took place during 1985 to the third quarter of 1996, and reviewed related technical literature and visited PWR plants to analyze these events. Our assessment shows that USNRC licensees have taken effective actions to reduce the number of leak events. One main reason for this decreasing trend was the elimination or reportable leakages from valve stem packing after 1991. Our review of leak events related to vibratory fatigue reveals a statistically significant decreasing trend with age (years of operation), but not in calendar time. Our assessment of worldwide data on leakage caused by thermal fatigue cracking is that the fatigue of aging piping is a safety significant issue. Our review of leak events has identified several susceptible sites in piping having high safety significance; but the inspection of some of these sites is not required by the ASME Code. These sites may be included in the risk-informed inspection programs

  11. Assessment of Field Experience Related to Pressurized Water Reactor Primary System Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Vikram Naginbhai; Ware, Arthur Gates; Atwood, Corwin Lee; Sattison, Martin Blaine; Hartley, Robert Scott; Hsu, C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents our assessment of field experience related to pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary system leaks in terms of their number of rates, how aging affects frequency of leak events, the safety significance of such leaks, industry efforts to reduce leaks, and effectiveness of current leak detection systems. We have reviewed the licensee event reports to identify the events that took place during 1985 to the third quarter of 1996, and reviewed related technical literature and visited PWR plants to analyze these events. Our assessment shows that USNRC licensees have taken effective actions to reduce the number of leak events. One main reason for this decreasing trend was the elimination or reportable leakages from valve stem packing after 1991. Our review of leak events related to vibratory fatigue reveals a statistically significant decreasing trend with age (years of operation), but not in calendar time. Our assessment of worldwide data on leakage caused by thermal fatigue cracking is that the fatigue of aging piping is a safety significant issue. Our review of leak events has identified several susceptible sites in piping having high safety significance; but the inspection of some of these sites is not required by the ASME Code. These sites may be included in the risk-informed inspection programs

  12. Multiobjective pressurized water reactor reload core design by nondominated genetic algorithm search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, G.T.

    1996-01-01

    The design of pressurized water reactor reload cores is not only a formidable optimization problem but also, in many instances, a multiobjective problem. A genetic algorithm (GA) designed to perform true multiobjective optimization on such problems is described. Genetic algorithms simulate natural evolution. They differ from most optimization techniques by searching from one group of solutions to another, rather than from one solution to another. New solutions are generated by breeding from existing solutions. By selecting better (in a multiobjective sense) solutions as parents more often, the population can be evolved to reveal the trade-off surface between the competing objectives. An example illustrating the effectiveness of this novel method is presented and analyzed. It is found that in solving a reload design problem the algorithm evaluates a similar number of loading patterns to other state-of-the-art methods, but in the process reveals much more information about the nature of the problem being solved. The actual computational cost incurred depends on the core simulator used; the GA itself is code independent

  13. Not a mystery. Inner containment of the pressurized water reactor (EPR trademark type)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostermann, Dirk; Wienand, Burkhard; Krumb, Christian [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The containment of the advanced pressurized water reactor EPR trademark type is developed on the basis of the French nuclear power plant operational experience and consists of - The reinforced outer containment structure, designed to withstand external hazards (e.g. APC), - The pre-stressed inner containment structure, designed to bear the loads resulting from internal hazards (LOCA), - The steel liner, designed to provide leak tightness resulting from internal hazards. The main advantage of the pre-stressed inner containment design is that the structure remains in linear-elastic behavior during the whole life-time. Even in case of postulated design accidents (LOCA) concrete tensile strains are strongly limited. Due to pre-stressing the concrete structure remains practically free of cracks. Due to pre-stressing the leak tightness ensuring steel liner, embedded into the inner concrete shell, is exposed to more favorable compression loads. In addition to detailed calculations several test programs have been performed to verify and confirm the predicted behavior in normal operation and in accident condition. (orig.)

  14. Development of Abnormal Operating Strategies for Station Blackout in Shutdown Operating Mode in Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Duk-Joo; Lee, Seung-Chan; Sung, Je-Joong; Ha, Sang-Jun [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Su-Hyun [FNC Tech. Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Loss of all AC power is classified as one of multiple failure accident by regulatory guide of Korean accident management program. Therefore we need develop strategies for the abnormal operating procedure both of power operating and shutdown mode. This paper developed abnormal operating guideline for loss of all AC power by analysis of accident scenario in pressurized water reactor. This paper analyzed the loss of ultimate heat sink (LOUHS) in shutdown operating mode and developed the operating strategy of the abnormal procedure. Also we performed the analysis of limiting scenarios that operator actions are not taken in shutdown LOUHS. Therefore, we verified the plant behavior and decided operator action to taken in time in order to protect the fuel of core with safety. From the analysis results of LOUHS, the fuel of core maintained without core uncovery for 73 minutes respectively for opened RCS states after the SBO occurred. Therefore, operator action for the emergency are required to take in 73 minutes for opened RCS state. Strategy is to cooldown by using spent fuel pool cooling system. This method required to change the plant design in some plant. In RCS boundary closed state, first abnormal operating strategy in shutdown LOUHS is first abnormal operating strategy in shutdown LOUHS is to remove the residual heat of core by steam dump flow and auxiliary feedwater of SG.

  15. Control of spatial xenon oscillations in pressurized water reactors via the Kalman filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.; Lin, Y.J.

    1994-01-01

    A direct control method is developed to control the spatial xenon oscillations in pressurized water reactors. The xenon and iodine concentration difference between the top and bottom halves of the core is estimated by using the extended Kalman filter (EKF), which is a closed-loop estimation method. The measurement equation used in the observer is the axial offset measurement equation, which reflects the xenon unbalanced effect on the axial offset. Meanwhile, some of the coefficients of the observer are estimated on-line to reduce estimation error resulting from model error, i.e., simplified xenon and iodine dynamics. Therefore, the estimation can be guaranteed to be accurate, and the success of the estimation does not greatly depend on the accuracy of the observer model. The predicted one-step ahead xenon concentration, by using the EKF, was used to calculate the possible axial offset variation, and then the control rod motion was calculated to compensate for it. The simulation results show that the proposed method successfully controls the xenon oscillations

  16. Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - IV: DUPIC Fuel Cycle Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Yang, Myung Seung

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the economics of the DUPIC fuel cycle using unit costs of fuel cycle components estimated based on conceptual designs. The fuel cycle cost (FCC) was calculated by a deterministic method in which reference values of fuel cycle components are used. The FCC was then analyzed by a Monte Carlo simulation to get the uncertainty of the FCC associated with the unit costs of the fuel cycle components. From the deterministic analysis on the equilibrium fuel cycle model, the DUPIC FCC was estimated to be 6.21 to 6.34 mills/kW.h for DUPIC fuel options, which is a little smaller than that of the once-through FCC by 0.07 to 0.27 mills/kW.h. Considering the uncertainty (0.40 to 0.44 mills/kW.h) of the FCC estimated by the Monte Carlo simulation method, the cost difference between the DUPIC and once-through fuel cycle is negligible. On the other hand, the material balance calculation has shown that the DUPIC fuel cycle can save natural uranium resources by ∼20% and reduce the spent fuel arising by ∼65% compared with the once-through fuel cycle. In conclusion, the DUPIC fuel cycle is comparable with the once-through fuel cycle from the viewpoint of FCC. In the future, it should be important to consider factors such as the environmental benefit owing to natural uranium savings, the capability of reusing spent pressurized water reactor fuel, and the safeguardability of the fuel cycle when deciding on an advanced nuclear fuel cycle option

  17. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) round robin benchmark for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Shin K., E-mail: paengki1@tamu.edu; Hassan, Yassin A.

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The capabilities of steady RANS models were directly assessed for full axial scale experiment. • The importance of mesh and conjugate heat transfer was reaffirmed. • The rod inner-surface temperature was directly compared. • The steady RANS calculations showed a limitation in the prediction of circumferential distribution of the rod surface temperature. - Abstract: This study examined the capabilities and limitations of steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) approach for pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle problems, based on the round robin benchmark of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes against the NESTOR experiment for a 5 × 5 rod bundle with typical split-type mixing vane grids (MVGs). The round robin exercise against the high-fidelity, broad-range (covering multi-spans and entire lateral domain) NESTOR experimental data for both the flow field and the rod temperatures enabled us to obtain important insights into CFD prediction and validation for the split-type MVG PWR rod bundle problem. It was found that the steady RANS turbulence models with wall function could reasonably predict two key variables for a rod bundle problem – grid span pressure loss and the rod surface temperature – once mesh (type, resolution, and configuration) was suitable and conjugate heat transfer was properly considered. However, they over-predicted the magnitude of the circumferential variation of the rod surface temperature and could not capture its peak azimuthal locations for a central rod in the wake of the MVG. These discrepancies in the rod surface temperature were probably because the steady RANS approach could not capture unsteady, large-scale cross-flow fluctuations and qualitative cross-flow pattern change due to the laterally confined test section. Based on this benchmarking study, lessons and recommendations about experimental methods as well as CFD methods were also provided for the future research.

  18. Physical aspects of the Canadian generation IV supercritical water-cooled pressure tube reactor plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudet, M.; Yetisir, M.; Haque, Z. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The form of the containment building is a function of the requirements imposed by various systems. In order to provide sufficient driving force for naturally-circulated emergency cooling systems, as well as providing a gravity-driven core flooding pool function, the Canadian SCWR reactor design relies on elevation differences between the reactor and the safety systems. These elevation differences, the required cooling pool volumes and the optimum layout of safety-related piping are major factors influencing the plant design. As a defence-in-depth, the containment building and safety systems also provide successive barriers to the unplanned release of radioactive materials, while providing a path for heat flow to the ultimate heat sink, the atmosphere. Access to the reactor for refuelling is from the top of the reactor, with water used as shielding during the refuelling operations. The accessibility to the reactor and protection of the environment are additional factors influencing the plant design. This paper describes the physical implementation of the major systems of the Canadian SCWR within the reactor building, and the position of major plant services relative to the reactor building. (author)

  19. Structural integrity of water reactor pressure boundary components. Progress report ending 29 February 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    The report describes progress in the following areas: (a) fatigue crack propagation in reactor pressure vessel steels in an air environment, (b) dynamic fracture toughness of 1-in. (25-mm) and precracked Charpy-V bend specimens under impact loading, (c) postirradiation notch ductility and properties recovery in reactor vessel steels, (d) factors contributing to variable resistance of structural steels to radiation embrittlement, and (e) the initial program plan to investigate the phenomena of warm prestress and plastic net ligament in support of thermal shock studies

  20. Accident sequences evaluation using SFATs for low power and shutdown operation of pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chansoo; Chung, Chang-Hyun; Yang, Huichang

    2004-01-01

    To maintain the level of defense-in-depth safety of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) during LP/SD operation, the qualitative risk evaluation methods such as Safety Function Assessment Trees (SFATs) are required. Therefore SFATs are suggested to assess and manage the PHWR safety in LP/SD. Before this study, safety functions of PHWR were classified into 7 groups; Reactivity Control, Core Cooling, Secondary Heat Removal, Primary Heat Transport Inventory, Essential Electrical Power, Cooling Water, and Containment Integrity. The SFATs for PHWR LP/SD operations were developed along with the Plant Outage Status (POS) variation, and totally 38 SFATs were developed for Wolsung Unit 2. For the verification of SFATs logics developed, top 5 accident sequences those contribute the CDF of PHWR were selected, and plant safety status were evaluated for those accident sequences. Accident sequences such as DCC-4 (Dual Control Computer Failure), CL4-16 (Total Loss of Class IV Power), and FWPV-11 (Loss of Feedwater Supply to SG due to Failure of Pumps/Values) were included. In this research the evaluation of plant safety status by accident sequences using SFATs and the verification of the SFATs were performed. Through the verification of SFAT logics, the enhancements to the internal logics of the SFATs were made, and the dependencies between safety systems and support systems were considered. It is expected the defense-in-depth evaluation model of PHW just as SFATs can be utilized in the configuration risk management program (CRMP) development and improve technical specifications development for Korean PHWRs. (author)