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Sample records for water reactor bwr

  1. Fundamentals of boiling water reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzola, S.

    1982-01-01

    These lectures on fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are a synthesis of known and established concepts. These lectures are intended to be a comprehensive (even though descriptive in nature) presentation, which would give the basis for a fair understanding of power operation, fuel cycle and safety aspects of the boiling water reactor. The fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are oriented to design and operation. In the first lecture general description of BWR is presented, with emphasis on the reactor physics aspects. A survey of methods applied in fuel and core design and operation is presented in the second lecture in order to indicate the main features of the calculational tools. The third and fourth lectures are devoted to review of BWR design bases, reactivity requirements, reactivity and power control, fuel loading patterns. Moreover, operating limits are reviewed, as the actual limits during power operation and constraints for reactor physics analyses (design and operation). The basic elements of core management are also presented. The constraints on control rod movements during the achieving of criticality and low power operation are illustrated in the fifth lecture. Some considerations on plant transient analyses are also presented in the fifth lecture, in order to show the impact between core and fuel performance and plant/system performance. The last (sixth) lecture is devoted to the open vessel testing during the startup of a commercial BWR. A control rod calibration is also illustrated. (author)

  2. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  3. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shoichi

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to remove water not by way of mechanical operation in a reactor core and improve the fuel economy in BWR type reactors. Constitution: A hollow water removing rod of a cross-like profile made of material having a smaller neutron absorption cross section than the moderator is disposed to the water gap for each of unit structures composed of four fuel assemblies, and water is charged and discharged to and from the water removing rod. Water is removed from the water removing rod to decrease the moderators in the water gap to carry out neutron spectrum shift operation from the initial to the medium stage of reactor core cycles. At the final stage of the cycle, airs in the water removing rod are extracted and the moderator is introduced. The moderator is filled and the criticality is maintained with the accumulated nuclear fission materials. The neutron spectrum shift operation can be attained by eliminating hydrothermodynamic instability and using a water removing rod of a simple structure. (Horiuchi, T.)

  4. Auxiliary water supply device for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    In the device of the present invention, a cooling condensation means is disposed to a steam discharge channel of a turbine for driving pumps to directly return condensates to the reactor, so that the temperature of the suppression pool water is not elevated. Namely, the cooling condensation means for discharged steams is disposed to the discharge channel of the turbine. The condensate channel from the cooling condensation means is connected to a sucking side of the turbine driving pump. With such a constitution, when the reactor is isolated from a main steam system, reactor scram is conducted. Although the reactor water level is lowered by the reactor scram, the lowering of the reactor water level is prevented by supplementing cooling water by the turbine driving pump using steams generated in the reactor as a power source. The discharged steams after driving the turbine are cooled and condensated by the cooling condensation means by way of the discharge channel and returned to the reactor again by way of the condensate channel. With such procedures, since the temperature of suppression pool water is not elevated, there is no need to operate other cooling systems. In addition, auxiliary water can be supplied for a long period of time. (I.S.)

  5. Accident sequence analysis for a BWR [Boiling Water Reactor] during low power and shutdown operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, D.W.; Hake, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    Most previous Probabilistic Risk Assessments have excluded consideration of accidents initiated in low power and shutdown modes of operation. A study of the risk associated with operation in low power and shutdown is being performed at Sandia National Laboratories for a US Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). This paper describes the proposed methodology for the analysis of the risk associated with the operation of a BWR during low power and shutdown modes and presents preliminary information resulting from the application of the methodology. 2 refs., 2 tabs

  6. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Ryoichi; Sato, Takashi; Osaki, Masahiko; Hirayama, Fumio; Watabe, Atsushi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively eliminate radioactive substances released upon loss of coolant accidents in BWR type reactors. Constitution: A high pressure gas jetting device having a plurality of small aperture nozzles is provided above a spray nozzle, that is, at the top of a dry well. The jetting device is connected to a vacuum breaker provided in a pressure suppression chamber. Upon loss of coolant accident, coolants are sprayed from the spray nozzle and air or nitrogen is jetted from the gas jetting device as well. Then, the gases in the dry well are disturbed, whereby radioactive iodine at high concentration liable to be accumulated in the dry well is forced downwardly, dissolved in the spray water and eliminated. (Ikeda, J.)

  7. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  8. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauf, M.J.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1979-12-01

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel.

  9. Current status of light water reactor and Hitachi's technical improvements for BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Minoru; Ohki, Arahiko.

    1984-01-01

    Gradual technical improvements in Japan over the years has improved the reliability of light water reactors, and has achieved the highest capacity factor level in the world. Commercial operation of Fukushima 2-2 (1,100 MW) of the Tokyo Electric Power Co. was started in February, 1984, as the first standardized BWR base plant, ushering in a new age of domestic light water reactor technology. The ABWR (1,300 MW class) has been developed as Japan's next generation light water reactor, with construction aimed at the latter half of the 1980's. Hitachi's extensive efforts range from key nuclear equipment to various related robots, directed at improving safety, reliability, and the capacity factor, while reducing radiation exposure. This paper presents an outline of Hitachi's participation in the light water reactor's improvement and standardization, and the current status of our role in the international cooperation plan for the ABWR. (author)

  10. BWR [boiling water reactor] core criticality versus water level during an ATWS [anticipated transient without scram] event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Peng, C.M.; Maly, J.

    1988-01-01

    The BWR [boiling water reactor] emergency procedures guidelines recommend management of core water level to reduce the power generated during an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) event. BWR power level variation has traditionally been calculated in the system codes using a 1-D [one-dimensional] 2-group neutron kinetics model to determine criticality. This methodology used also for calculating criticality of the partially covered BWR cores has, however, never been validated against data. In this paper, the power level versus water level issues in an ATWS severe accident are introduced and the accuracy of the traditional methodology is investigated by comparing with measured data. It is found that the 1-D 2-group treatment is not adequate for accurate predictions of criticality and therefore the system power level for the water level variations that may be encountered in a prototypical ATWS severe accident. It is believed that the current predictions for power level may be too high

  11. BWR type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toru.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain reactor core characteristics with less changes in the excess reactivity due to fuel burnup even when the operation period varies. Constitution: In a BWR type reactor where fuel assemblies containing fuel rods incorporated with burnable poisons are arranged, the fuel assemblies are grouped into first fuel assemblies and second fuel assemblies. Then, the number of fuel rods incorporated with burnable poisons within the first fuel assemblies is made greater than that of the second fuel rods, while the concentration of the burnable poisons in the fuel rods incorporated with the burnable poisons in the first fuel assemblies is made lower than that of the fuel rods incorporated with the burnable poisons in the second fuel assemblies. In the BWR type reactor constituted in this way, the reactor core characteristics can be improved by changing the ratio between the first fuel assemblies and the second fuel assemblies charged to the reactor core, thereby decreasing the changes in the burnup of the excess reactivity. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. PWR and BWR light water reactor systems in the USA and their fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, W.D.

    1977-01-01

    Light water reactor operating experience in the USA can be considered to date from the choice of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) for use in the naval reactor program and the subsequent construction and operation of the nuclear power plant at Shippingport, Pennsylvania in 1957. The development of the boiling water reactor (BWR) in 1954 and its selection for the plant at Dresden, Illinois in 1959 established this concept as the other major reactor type in the US nuclear power program. The subsequent growth profile is presented, leading to 31 PWR's and 23 BWR's currently in operation as well as to plants in the planning and construction phase. A significant operating record has been accumulated concerning the availability of each of these reactor types as determined by: (1) outage for refueling, (2) component reliability, (3) maintenance requirements, and (4) retrofitting required by government regulation. In addition, the use and performance of BWR's and PWR's in meeting system load requirements is discussed. The growing concern regarding possible terrorist activities and other potential threats has resulted in systems and procedures designed to assure effective safeguards at nuclear power installations. Safeguards measures currently in place are described. Environmental effects of operating plants are subject to both radiological and non-radiological monitoring to verify that results are within the limits established in the licensing process. The operating results achieved and the types of modifications that have been required of operating plants by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are reviewed. The PWR and BWR Fuel Cycle is examined in terms of: (1) fuel burnup experience and prospects for improvement, (2) the status and outlook for natural uranium resources, (3) enrichment capacity, (4) reprocessing and recycle, and the interrelationships among the latter three factors. High level waste management currently involving on-site storage of spent fuel is discussed

  13. BWR [boiling-water reactor] and PWR [pressurized-water reactor] off-normal event descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This document chronicles a total of 87 reactor event descriptions for use by operator licensing examiners in the construction of simulator scenarios. Events are organized into four categories: (1) boiling-water reactor abnormal events; (2) boiling-water reactor emergency events; (3) pressurized-water reactor abnormal events; and (4) pressurized-water reactor emergency events. Each event described includes a cover sheet and a progression of operator actions flow chart. The cover sheet contains the following general information: initial plant state, sequence initiator, important plant parameters, major plant systems affected, tolerance ranges, final plant state, and competencies tested. The progression of operator actions flow chart depicts, in a flow chart manner, the representative sequence(s) of expected immediate and subsequent candidate actions, including communications, that can be observed during the event. These descriptions are intended to provide examiners with a reliable, performance-based source of information from which to design simulator scenarios that will provide a valid test of the candidates' ability to safely and competently perform all licensed duties and responsibilities

  14. BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Shigeru.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, control rod drives are disposed in the upper portion of a reactor pressure vessel, and a control rod guide tube is disposed in adjacent with a gas/liquid separator at a same height, as well as a steam separator is disposed in the control rod guide tube. The length of a connection rod can be shortened by so much as the control rod guide tube and the gas/liquid separator overlapping with each other. Since the control rod guide tube and the gas/liquid separator are at the same height, the number of the gas/liquid separators to be disposed is decreased and, accordingly, even if the steam separation performance by the gas/liquid separator is lowered, it can be compensated by the steam separator of the control rod guide tube. In view of the above, since the direction of emergent insertion of the control rod is not against gravitational force but it is downward direction utilizing the gravitational force, reliability for the emergent insertion of the control rod can be further improved. Further, the length of the connection rod can be minimized, thereby enabling to lower the height of the reactor pressure vessel. The construction cost for the nuclear power plant can be reduced. (N.H.)

  15. Simulation of the automatic depressurization system (Ads) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez G, C.; Chavez M, C.

    2012-10-01

    The automatic depressurization system (Ads) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) like part of the emergency cooling systems is designed to liberate the vapor pressure of the reactor vessel, as well as the main vapor lines. At the present time in the Engineering Faculty, UNAM personnel works in the simulation of the Laguna Verde reactor based on the nuclear code RELAP/SCADAP and in the incorporation to the same of the emergency cooling systems. The simulation of the emergency cooling systems began with the inclusion of two hydrodynamic volumes, one source and another drain, and the incorporation of the initiation logic for each emergency system. In this work is defined and designed a simplified model of Ads of the reactor, considering a detail level based on the main elements that compose it. As tool to implement the proposed model, the RELAP code was used. The simulated main functions of Ads are centered in the quick depressurization of the reactor by means of the vapor discharge through the relief/safety valves to the suppression pool, and, in the event of break of the main vapor line, the reduction of the vessel pressure operates for that the cooling systems of the core to low pressure (Lpcs and Lpci) they can begin their operation. (Author)

  16. An advanced frequency-domain code for boiling water reactor (BWR) stability analysis and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrooz, A.

    2008-01-01

    The two-phase flow instability is of interest for the design and operation of many industrial systems such as boiling water reactors (BWRs), chemical reactors, and steam generators. In case of BWRs, the flow instabilities are coupled to the power instabilities via neutronic-thermal hydraulic feedbacks. Since these instabilities produce also local pressure oscillations, the coolant flashing plays a very important role at low pressure. Many frequency-domain codes have been used for two-phase flow stability analysis of thermal hydraulic industrial systems with particular emphasis to BWRs. Some were ignoring the effect of the local pressure, or the effect of 3D power oscillations, and many were not able to deal with the neutronics-thermal hydraulics problems considering the entire core and all its fuel assemblies. The new frequency domain tool uses the best available nuclear, thermal hydraulic, algebraic and control theory methods for simulating BWRs and analyzing their stability in either off-line or on-line fashion. The novel code takes all necessary information from plant files via an interface, solves and integrates, for all reactor fuel assemblies divided into a number of segments, the thermal-hydraulic non-homogenous non-equilibrium coupled linear differential equations, and solves the 3D, two-energy-group diffusion equations for the entire core (with spatial expansion of the neutron fluxes in Legendre polynomials).It is important to note that the neutronics equations written in terms of flux harmonics for a discretized system (nodal-modal equations) generate a set of large sparse matrices. The eigenvalue problem associated to the discretized core statics equations is solved by the implementation of the implicit restarted Arnoldi method (IRAM) with implicit shifted QR mechanism. The results of the steady state are then used for the calculation of the local transfer functions and system transfer matrices. The later are large-dense and complex matrices, (their size

  17. BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shoichi

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To inhibit the lowering of the neutron moderation effect due to voids in the upper portion of the reactor core, thereby flatten the axial power distribution. Constitution: Although it has been proposed to enlarge the diameter at the upper portion of a water rod thereby increasing the moderator in the upper portion, since the water rod situates within the channel box, the increase in the capacity thereof is has certain limit. In the present invention, it is designed such that the volume of the region at the outside of the channel box for the fuel assembly to which non-boiling water in the non-boiling water region can enter is made greater in the upper portion than in the lower portion of the reactor core. Thus, if the moderator density in the upper portion of the reactor core should be decreased due to the generation of the voids, the neutron moderating effect in the upper portion of the reactor core is not lowered as compared with the lower portion of the reactor core and, accordingly, the axial power distribution can be flattening more as compared with that in the conventional nuclear reactors. (Takahashi, M.)

  18. BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shoichi

    1983-01-01

    Purpose : To flatten the radial power distribution in the reactor core thereby improve the thermal performance of the reactor core by making the moderator-fuel ratio of fuel assemblies different depending on their position in the reactor core. Constitution : The volume of fuels disposed in the peripheral area of the reactor core is decreased by the increase of the volume of moderators in fuel assemblies disposed in the peripheral area of the reactor core to thereby make the moderator-fuel volume greater in the peripheral area than that in the central area. The moderator-fuel ratio adjustment is attained by making the number of water rods greater, decreasing the diameter of fuel pellets or decreasing the number of fuel pins in fuel assemblies disposed at the peripheral area of the reactor core as compared with fuel assemblies disposed at the central area of the reactor core. In this way, the infinite multiplication factors of fuels can be increased to thereby improve the reactor core performance. (Aizawa, K.)

  19. Radionuclide buildup in BWR [boiling water reactor] reactor coolant recirculation piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duce, S.W.; Marley, A.W.; Freeman, A.L.

    1989-12-01

    Since the spring of 1985, thermoluminescent dosimeter, dose rate, and gamma spectral data have been acquired on the contamination of boiling water reactor primary coolant recirculation systems as part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission funded study. Data have been gathered for twelve facilities by taking direct measurements and/or obtaining plant and vendor data. The project titled, ''Effectiveness and Safety Aspects of Selected Decontamination Processes'' (October 1983) initially reviewed the application of chemical decontamination processes on primary coolant recirculation system piping. Recontamination of the system following pipe replacement or chemical decontamination was studied as a second thrust of this program. During the course of this study, recontamination measurements were made at eight different commercial boiling water reactors. At four of the reactors the primary coolant recirculation system piping was chemically decontaminated. At the other four the piping was replaced. Vendor data were obtained from two boiling water reactors that had replaced the primary coolant recirculation system piping. Contamination measurements were made at two newly operating boiling water reactors. This report discusses the results of these measurements as they apply to contamination and recontamination of boiling water reactor recirculation piping. 16 refs., 29 figs., 9 tabs

  20. PWR and BWR light water reactor systems in the USA and their fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, W.D.

    1977-01-01

    Light water reactor operating experience in the USA can be considered to date from the choice of the PWR for use in the naval reactor programme and the subsequent construction and operation of the nuclear power plant at Shippingport in 1957. The development of the BWR in 1954 and its selection for the plant at Dresden in 1959 established this concept as the other major reactor type in the US nuclear power programme. The subsequent growth profile is presented. A significant operating record has been accumulated concerning the availability of each of these reactor types. In addition, the use and performance of BWRs and PWRs in meeting system load requirements is discussed. The growing concern regarding possible terrorist activities and other potential threats has resulted in systems and procedures designed to ensure effective safeguards at nuclear power installations; current measures are described. Environmental effects of operating plants are subject to both radiological and non-radiological monitoring. The operating results achieved and the types of modifications that have been required of operating plants by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are reviewed. Both fuel cycles are examined in terms of: fuel burnup experience and prospects for improvement; natural uranium resources; enrichment capacity; reprocessing and recycle; and the interrelationships among the latter three factors. High-level waste management currently involving on-site storage of spent fuel is discussed in terms of available capacity and plans for expansion. The US electric utility industry viewpoint regarding an ultimate programme for waste management is outlined. Finally, the current economics and future cost trends of nuclear power plants are evaluated. (author)

  1. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoyama, Shigeaki; Tanabe, Akira.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a main steam pressure shock absorber for reflecting the effect of the pressure propagation to coolants surface in the reactor core. Constitution: An annular shock absorber having near the water level through holes for water level measurement is provided to the gap between the skirt of a steam separator and a pressure vessel. Pressure waves are made the rapid closure of a main steam check valve. If arrived from the dome to the shock absorber, are mostly reflected to the side of the dome and give no substantial effects on the water surface. If the through holes are made small enough, the effects of pressure waves passing through the holes are negligible if they reach the water surface. (Kawakami, Y.)

  2. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR); Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua hirviente (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes C, P

    2003-07-01

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O{sub 2}; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  3. Panorama of the BWR reactors - Evolution of the concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, C.; Uhrig, E. [AREVA NP GmbH, Safety Engineering Department - PEPS-G (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Nowadays, a fleet of more than 50 boiling water reactors (BWR) are in operation in the world. This article gives a short overview on the developments of nuclear power plants of the BWR type, with a focus on the European builds. It describes the technical bases from the early designs in the fifties, sketches the innovations of the sixties and seventies in the types BWR 69 and 72 (Baulinie 69 and 72) and gives an outlook of a possible next generation BWR. A promising approach in recent BWR developments is the the combination of passive safety systems with established design basis

  4. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes C, P.

    2003-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O 2 ; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of L-grade stainless steels in boiling water reactor (BWR) plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shunichi; Fukuda, Toshihiko; Yamashita, Hironobu

    2004-01-01

    L-grade stainless steels as 316NG, SUS316L and SUS304L have been used for the BWR reactor internals and re-circulation pipes as SCC resistant materials. However, SCC of the L-grade material components were reported recently in many Japanese BWR plants. The detail investigation of the components showed the fabrication process such as welding, machining and surface finishing strongly affected SCC occurrence. In this paper, research results of SCC of L-grade stainless steels, metallurgical investigation of core shrouds and re-circulation pipings, and features of SCC morphology were introduced. Besides, the structural integrity of components with SCC, countermeasures for SCC and future R and D planning were introduced. (author)

  6. Power oscillations in BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa P, G.

    2002-01-01

    One of the main problems in the operation of BWR type reactors is the instability in power that these could present. One type of oscillations and that is the objective of this work is the named density wave, which is attributed to the thermohydraulic processes that take place in the reactor core. From the beginnings of the development of BWR reactors, the stability of these has been an important aspect in their design, due to its possible consequences on the fuel integrity. The reactor core operates in two phase flow conditions and it is observed that under certain power and flow conditions, power instabilities appear. Studying this type of phenomena is complex, due to that a reactor core is constituted approximately by 27,000 fuel bars with different distributions of power and flow. The phenomena that cause the instability in BWR reactors continue being matter of scientific study. In the literature mainly in nuclear subject, it can be observed that exist different methods and approximations for studying this type of phenomena, nevertheless, their results are focused to establish safety limits in the reactor operation, instead of studying in depth of the knowledge about. Also in this line sense of the reactor data analysis, the oscillations characteristic frequencies are obtained for trying to establish if the power is growing or decreasing. In addition to that before mentioned in this paper it is presented a rigorous study applying the volumetric average method, for obtaining the vacuum waves propagation velocities and its possible connection with the power oscillations. (Author)

  7. Feedwater control system in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, Jun-ichi; Oomori, Takashi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the water level control performance in BWR type reactor by regulating the water level set to the reactor depending on the rate of change in the recycling amount of coolant to thereby control the fluctuations in the water level resulted in the reactor within an aimed range even upon significant fluctuations in the recycling flow rate. Constitution: The recycling flow rate of coolant in the reactor is detected and the rate of its change with time is computed to form a rate of change signal. The rate of change signal is inputted to a reactor level setter to amend the actual reactor water level demand signal and regulate the water level set to the reactor water depending on the rate of change in the recycling flow rate. Such a regulation method for the set water level enables to control the water level fluctuation resulted in the reactor within the aimed range even upon the significant fluctuation in the recycling flow rate and improve the water level control performance of the reactor, whereby the operationability for the reactor is improved to enhance the operation rate. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from boiling water reactors (BWR-GALE Code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangart, R.L.; Bell, L.G.; Boegli, J.S.; Burke, W.C.; Lee, J.Y.; Minns, J.L.; Stoddart, P.G.; Weller, R.A.; Collins, J.T.

    1978-12-01

    The calculational procedures described in the report reflect current NRC staff practice. The methods described will be used in the evaluation of applications for construction permits and operating licenses docketed after January 1, 1979, until this NUREG is revised as a result of additional staff review. The BWR-GALE (Boiling Water Reactor Gaseous and Liquid Effluents) Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the release of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents from boiling water reactors (BWRs). The calculations are based on data generated from operating reactors, field tests, laboratory tests, and plant-specific design considerations incorporated to reduce the quantity of radioactive materials that may be released to the environment

  9. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Yoshitaka

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the control rod exchanging frequency by increasing the working life of control rods for ordinary operation with large neutron irradiation dose, to thereby decrease the exposure dose for operators performing exchanging work, as well as decrease the amount of radioactive wastes resulted upon exchange of the control rods. Constitution: Hafnium solid metal is employed as the neutron absorber of control rods for usual operation inserted into and withdrawn from fuel assemblies for the reactor power control over the entire cycle of the ordinary reactor operation and boron carbide powder is employed as the neutron absorber for emergency control rods to be inserted between the fuel assemblies only upon reactor scram or shutdown, whereby the working life of the control rods for ordinary reactor operation with greater neutron irradiation dose can be improved. Accordingly, the control rod exchanging frequency can be reduced to decrease the exposure dose to the operator for conducting the exchanging work. (Yoshihara, H.)

  10. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Katsuhisa; Watanabe, Shigeru.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To simplify the structure of control rod driving systems, as well as improve the safety and maintainability thereof. Constitution: Control-rod-guide tubes are disposed vertically above the reactor core and control-rod drives are disposed further thereabove, by which the control rods are moved upwardly and downwardly from above the reactor core through the guide tubes. Further, a partitioning cylinder is provided between the inner cirumferential wall at the upper portion of a pressure vessel and the control-rod-guide tubes and a gas-liquid separator is disposed to the space between the partitioning cylinder and the pressure vessel wall, to which steams generated in the reactor core are introduced. In such a structure of the reactor, since all of the control rods are inserted or extracted by the control rod drive system from above the reactor core, if the control rod drives or the likes should fail and accidentally drop the control rods, they exert in the direction of suppressing the nuclear reaction, whereby the safety can be improved. (Sekiya, K.)

  11. BWR type reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morooka, Shin-ichi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the internal structure in a reactor by rapidly and efficiently transferring heat generated in a reactor core out of the reactor and eliminating the danger of radiation exposure. Constitution: Steam generated in a pressure vessel is introduced into heat pipe group by inserting the heat pipe group into the steam dome of the pressure vessel. The introduced steam is condensed in the heat pipes to transfer the heat of the steam to the heat pipe group. The transferred heat is transmitted to a heat exchanger provided out of a containment vessel to generate steam to operate a turbine. Thus, it is not necessary to introduce the steam including radioactive substance externally and can remove only the heat so as to carry out the desired purpose. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. BWR reactor management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Kakuji; Kawamura, Atsuo; Yoshioka, Ritsuo; Neda, Toshikatsu.

    1979-01-01

    It is necessary to grasp the delicate state of operation in reactor cores in view of the control of burn-up and power output at the time of the operation management of BWRs. Enormous labor has been required for the collection, processing and evaluation of the data. It is desirable to obtain the safer, more efficient and faster method of operation control by predicting the states in cores including the change of xenon and reflecting them to operation plans as well as by tracing with high accuracy the past burn-up history for a long period. At present, the on-line evaluation of the states in cores is carried out with the process computers attached to respective units, but the amount of data required for core operation management of high degree far exceeds their capacity. From such viewpoints, the research and development on the reactor management system were carried out. The data processing concerning core operation management is performed with newly installed computers utilizing the data from existing process computers, and the operation of reactor cores, the qualitative improvement of management works, labor saving, and fast, efficient operation control are feasible with it. This system was installed in an actual plant in October, 1977. The composition of the system, the prediction of the change in local output distribution accompanying control rod operation, the prediction of the change in the states in cores due to the flow rate of coolant, and the function of collecting plant data are explained. (Kako, I.)

  13. Recent trends in the mitigation of the IGSCC through modifications in the water chemistry of BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz S, A.; Robles, E.F.

    2003-01-01

    During the last years, the Nuclear Power stations had been that to adequate or to modify the parameters and operational conditions, attempting to maintain and to safeguard the integrity and functionality of its components and systems, as well as the personnel safety involved in its operation. In a Boiling water reactor (BWR), the chemical control of the water, constitutes one of the fundamental aspects to get a sure and reliable operation, having as main objectives: (a) The protection of the reactor vessel, of the structural materials of the same one and of the pipes and components of those recirculation systems against the Intergranular stress corrosion phenomena (IGSCC); (b) To guarantee the integrity of the nuclear fuel minimizing the corrosion phenomena in the fuel elements; and (c) The reduction of the operational dose of the personnel involved directly in the operation and maintenance by means of the control of the activated corrosion products. (Author)

  14. Pressure vessel for a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Yoshiharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the retention of low temperature water and also prevent the thermal fatigue of the pressure vessel by making large the curvature radius of a pressure vessel of a feed water sparger fitting portion and accelerating the mixing of low-temperature water at the feed water sparger base and in-pile hot water. Constitution: The curvature radius of the corner of the feed water sparger fitting portion in a pressure vessel is formed largely. In-pile circulating water infiltrates up to the base portion of the feed water sparger to carry outside low-temperature water at the base part, which is mixed with in-pile hot water. Accordingly, low temperature water does not stay at the base portion of the feed water sparger and generation of thermal fatigue in the pressure vessel can be prevented and the safety of the BWR type reactor can be improved. (Yoshino, Y.)

  15. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Osamu.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent cavitations in a recycling pump, as well as improve the safety and a reliability of a pressure vessel. Constitution: A feedwater pipeway is connected to the route between the pressure vessel and the recycling pipe and feedwater from the feedwater pipeway is directly introduced to the recycling pump. The temperature of water flowing into the recycling pump is lowered by the feedwater from the feedwater pipeway to prevent the cavitations. (Yoshino, Y.)

  16. Fuel assemblies for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, Takao.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable effective failed fuel detection by the provision of water rod formed with a connecting section connected to a warmed water feed pipe of a sipping device at the lower portion and with a warmed water jetting port in the lower portion in a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor to thereby carry out rapid sipping. Constitution: Fuel rods and water rods are contained in the channel box of a fuel assembly, and the water rod is provided at its upper portion with a connecting section connected to the warmed water feed pipe of the sipping device and formed at its lower portion with a warmed water jetting port for jetting warmed water fed from the warmed water feed pipe. Upon detection of failed fuels, the reactor operation is shut down and the reactor core is immersed in water. The cover for the reactor container is removed and the cap of the sipping device is inserted to connect the warmed water feed pipe to the connecting section of the water rod. Then, warmed water is fed to the water rod and jetted out from the warmed water jetting port to cause convection and unify the water of the channel box in a short time. Thereafter, specimen is sampled and analyzed for the detection of failed fuels. (Moriyama, K.)

  17. Advances in BWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Mary L.

    2012-09-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) water chemistry control with examples of plant experiences at U.S. designed BWRs. Water chemistry advances provide some of the most effective methods for mitigating materials degradation, reducing fuel performance concerns and lowering radiation fields. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of materials remains a high priority and improved techniques that have been demonstrated in BWRs will be reviewed, specifically hydrogen injection combined with noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) and the newer on-line noble metal application process (OLNC). Hydrogen injection performance, an important part of SCC mitigation, will also be reviewed for the BWR fleet, highlighting system improvements that have enabled earlier injection of hydrogen including the potential for hydrogen injection during plant startup. Water chemistry has been significantly improved by the application of pre-filtration and optimized use of ion exchange resins in the CP (condensate polishing) and reactor water cleanup (RWCU) systems. EPRI has monitored and supported water treatment improvements to meet water chemistry goals as outlined in the EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines, particularly those for SCC mitigation of reactor internals and piping, minimization of fuel risk due to corrosion and crud deposits and chemistry control for radiation field reduction. In recent years, a significant reduction has occurred in feedwater corrosion product input, particularly iron. A large percentage of plants are now reporting <0.1 ppb feedwater iron. The impacts to plant operation and chemistry of lower feedwater iron will be explored. Depleted zinc addition is widely practiced across the fleet and the enhanced focus on radiation reduction continues to emphasize the importance of controlling radiation source term. In addition, shutdown chemistry control is necessary to avoid excessive release of activated corrosion products from fuel

  18. Hydrogen injection device in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Jun-ichi; Kubo, Koji.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the increasing ratio of main steam system dose rate due to N-16 activity due to excess hydrogen injection in the hydrogen injection operation of BWR type reactors. Constitution: There are provided a hydrogen injection mechanism for injecting hydrogen into primary coolants of a BWR type reactor, and a chemical injection device for injecting chemicals such as methanol, which makes nitrogen radioisotopes resulted in the reactor water upon hydrogen injection non-volatile, into the pressure vessel separately from hydrogen. Injected hydrogen and the chemicals are not reacted in the feedwater system, but the reaction proceeds due to the presence of radioactive rays after the injection into the pressure vessel. Then, hydrogen causes re-combination in the downcomer portion to reduce the dissolved oxygen concentration. Meanwhile, about 70 % of the chemicals is supplied by means of a jet pump directly to the reactor core, thereby converting the chemical form of N-16 in the reactor core more oxidative (non-volatile). (Kawakami, Y.)

  19. Level controlling system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joge, Toshio; Higashigawa, Yuichi; Oomori, Takashi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reasonably attain fully automatic water level control in the core of BWR type nuclear power plants. Constitution: A feedwater flow regulation valve for reactor operation and a feedwater flow regulation valve for starting are provided at the outlet of a motor-driven feedwater pump in a feedwater system, and these valves are controlled by a feedwater flow rate controller. While on the other hand, a damp valve for reactor clean up system is controlled either in ''computer'' mode or in ''manual'' mode selected by a master switch, that is, controlled from a computer or the ON-OFF switch of the master switch by way of a valve control analog memory and a turn-over switch. In this way, the water level in the nuclear reactor can be controlled in a fully automatic manner reasonably at the starting up and shutdown of the plant to thereby provide man power saving. (Seki, T.)

  20. Application of reliability techniques to prioritize BWR [boiling water reactor] recirculation loop welds for in-service inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.S.

    1989-12-01

    In January 1988 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Generic Letter 88-01 together with NUREG-0313, Revision 2, ''Technical Report on Material Selection and Processing Guidelines for BWR Coolant Pressure Boundary Piping,'' to implement NRC long-range plans for addressing the problem of stress corrosion cracking in boiling water reactor piping. NUREG-0313 presents guidelines for categorizing BWR pipe welds according to their SCC condition (e.g., presence of known cracks, implementation of measures for mitigating SCC) as well as recommended inspection schedules (e.g., percentage of welds inspected, inspection frequency) for each weld category. NUREG-0313 does not, however, specify individual welds to be inspected. To address this issue, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed two recommended inspection samples for welds in a typical BWR recirculation loop. Using a probabilistic fracture mechanics model, LLNL prioritized loop welds on the basis of estimated leak probabilities. The results of this evaluation indicate that riser welds and bypass welds should be given priority attention over other welds. Larger-diameter welds as a group can be considered of secondary importance compared to riser and bypass welds. A ''blind'' comparison between the probability-based inspection samples and data from actual field inspections indicated that the probabilistic analysis generally captured the welds which the field inspections identified as warranting repair or replacement. Discrepancies between the field data and the analytic results can likely be attributed to simplifying assumptions made in the analysis. The overall agreement between analysis and field experience suggests that reliability techniques -- when combined with historical experience -- represent a sound technical basis on which to define meaningful weld inspection programs. 13 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Standard Technical Specifications for General Electric Boiling Water Reactors (BWR/5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottimore, R.R.

    1980-12-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for General Electric Boiling Water Reactors (GE-STS) is a generic document prepared by the US NRC for use in the licensing process of current General Electric Boiling Water Reactors. The GE-STS sets forth the limits, operating conditions, and other requirements applicable to nuclear reactor facility operation as set forth by Section 50.36 of 10 CFR Part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public. The document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  2. Recent trends in the mitigation of the IGSCC through modifications in the water chemistry of BWR reactors; Tendencias recientes en la mitigacion del IGSCC mediante modificaciones en la quimica del agua de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz S, A.; Robles, E.F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    During the last years, the Nuclear Power stations had been that to adequate or to modify the parameters and operational conditions, attempting to maintain and to safeguard the integrity and functionality of its components and systems, as well as the personnel safety involved in its operation. In a Boiling water reactor (BWR), the chemical control of the water, constitutes one of the fundamental aspects to get a sure and reliable operation, having as main objectives: (a) The protection of the reactor vessel, of the structural materials of the same one and of the pipes and components of those recirculation systems against the Intergranular stress corrosion phenomena (IGSCC); (b) To guarantee the integrity of the nuclear fuel minimizing the corrosion phenomena in the fuel elements; and (c) The reduction of the operational dose of the personnel involved directly in the operation and maintenance by means of the control of the activated corrosion products. (Author)

  3. Method of operating BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable reactor control depending on any demanded loads by performing control by the insertion of control rods in addition to the control by the regulation of the flow rate of the reactor core water at high power operation of a BWR type reactor. Method: The power is reduced at high power operation by decreasing the flow rate of reactor core water from the starting time for the power reduction and the flow rate is maintained after the time at which it reaches the minimum allowable flow rate. Then, the control rod is started to insert from the above time point to reduce the power to an aimed level. Thus, the insufficiency in the reactivity due to the increase in the xenon concentration can be compensated by the withdrawal of the control rods and the excess reactivity due to the decrease in the xenon concentration can be compensated by the insertion of the control rods, whereby the reactor power can be controlled depending on any demanded loads without deviating from the upper or lower limit for the flow rate of the reactor core water. (Moriyama, K.)

  4. Physical characteristics of GE [General Electric] BWR [boiling-water reactor] fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.S.; Notz, K.J.

    1989-06-01

    The physical characteristics of fuel assemblies manufactured by the General Electric Company for boiling-water reactors are classified and described. The classification into assembly types is based on the GE reactor product line, the Characteristics Data Base (CDB) assembly class, and the GE fuel design. Thirty production assembly types are identified. Detailed physical data are presented for each assembly type in an appendix. Descriptions of special (nonstandard) fuels are also reported. 52 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  5. Simulation of decreasing reactor power level with BWR simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwoto; Zuhair; Rivai, Abu Khalid

    2002-01-01

    Study on characteristic of BWR using Desktop PC Based Simulator Program was analysed. This simulator is more efficient and cheaper for analyzing of characteristic and dynamic respond than full scope simulator for decreasing power level of BW. Dynamic responses of BWR reactor was investigated during the power level reduction from 100% FP (Full Power) which is 3926 MWth to 0% FP with 25% steps and 1 % FP/sec rate. The overall results for core flow rate, reactor steam flow, feed-water flow and turbine-generator power show tendency proportional to reduction of reactor power. This results show that reactor power control in BWR could be done by control of re-circulation flow that alter the density of water used as coolant and moderator. Decreasing the re-circulation flow rate will decrease void density which has negative reactivity and also affect the position of control rods

  6. Crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels for pressure boundary components under transient light water reactor operating conditions - CASTOC, Part I: BWR/NWC conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.; Devrient, B.; Roth, A.; Ehrnsten, U.; Ernestova, M.; Zamboch, M.; Foehl, J.; Weissenberg, T.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Lapena, J.

    2004-01-01

    One of the ageing phenomena of pressure boundary components of light water reactors (LWR) is environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC). The project CASTOC (5. Framework Programme of the EU) was launched September 2000 with six European partners and terminated August 2003. It was focused in particular on the EAC behaviour of low-alloy steels (LAS) and to some extent to weld metal, heat affected zone and the influence of an austenitic cladding. The main objective was directed to the clarification of EAC crack growth behaviour/mechanism of LAS in high-temperature water under steady-state power operation (constant load) and transient operating conditions (e.g., start-up/shut-down, transients in water chemistry and load). Autoclave tests were performed with Western and Russian type reactor pressure vessel steels under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) and pressurised water reactor (VVER) conditions. The investigations were performed with fracture mechanics specimens of different sizes and geometries. The applied loading comprised cyclic loads, static loads and load spectra where the static load was periodically interrupted by partial unloading. With regard to water chemistry, the oxygen content (VVER) and impurities of sulphate and chlorides (BWR) were varied beyond allowable limits for continuous operation. The current paper summarises the most important crack growth results obtained under simulated BWR/NWC conditions. The results are discussed in the context of the current crack growth rate curves in the corresponding nuclear codes. (authors)

  7. Crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels for pressure boundary components under transient light water reactor operating conditions - CASTOC, Part I: BWR/NWC conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P. [Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Devrient, B.; Roth, A. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Ehrnsten, U. [VTT Industrial Systems, Espoo (Finland); Ernestova, M.; Zamboch, M. [Nuclear Research Institute, NRI, Rez (Czech Republic); Foehl, J.; Weissenberg, T. [Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt, MPA, Stuttgart (Germany); Gomez-Briceno, D.; Lapena, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    One of the ageing phenomena of pressure boundary components of light water reactors (LWR) is environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC). The project CASTOC (5. Framework Programme of the EU) was launched September 2000 with six European partners and terminated August 2003. It was focused in particular on the EAC behaviour of low-alloy steels (LAS) and to some extent to weld metal, heat affected zone and the influence of an austenitic cladding. The main objective was directed to the clarification of EAC crack growth behaviour/mechanism of LAS in high-temperature water under steady-state power operation (constant load) and transient operating conditions (e.g., start-up/shut-down, transients in water chemistry and load). Autoclave tests were performed with Western and Russian type reactor pressure vessel steels under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) and pressurised water reactor (VVER) conditions. The investigations were performed with fracture mechanics specimens of different sizes and geometries. The applied loading comprised cyclic loads, static loads and load spectra where the static load was periodically interrupted by partial unloading. With regard to water chemistry, the oxygen content (VVER) and impurities of sulphate and chlorides (BWR) were varied beyond allowable limits for continuous operation. The current paper summarises the most important crack growth results obtained under simulated BWR/NWC conditions. The results are discussed in the context of the current crack growth rate curves in the corresponding nuclear codes. (authors)

  8. A real-time BWR [boiling water reactor] stability measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; King, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of a portable, real-time system used for nonperturbational measurements of stability in boiling water reactors. The algorithm used in this system estimates the closed-loop asymptotic decay ratio using only the naturally occurring neutron noise and it is based on the univariate autoregressive methodology

  9. Simulation of the automatic depressurization system (Ads) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP; Simulacion del sistema de despresurizacion automatica (ADS) para un reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR) basado en RELAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez G, C.; Chavez M, C., E-mail: ces.raga@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The automatic depressurization system (Ads) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) like part of the emergency cooling systems is designed to liberate the vapor pressure of the reactor vessel, as well as the main vapor lines. At the present time in the Engineering Faculty, UNAM personnel works in the simulation of the Laguna Verde reactor based on the nuclear code RELAP/SCADAP and in the incorporation to the same of the emergency cooling systems. The simulation of the emergency cooling systems began with the inclusion of two hydrodynamic volumes, one source and another drain, and the incorporation of the initiation logic for each emergency system. In this work is defined and designed a simplified model of Ads of the reactor, considering a detail level based on the main elements that compose it. As tool to implement the proposed model, the RELAP code was used. The simulated main functions of Ads are centered in the quick depressurization of the reactor by means of the vapor discharge through the relief/safety valves to the suppression pool, and, in the event of break of the main vapor line, the reduction of the vessel pressure operates for that the cooling systems of the core to low pressure (Lpcs and Lpci) they can begin their operation. (Author)

  10. Aging assessment of the boiling-water reactor (BWR) standby liquid control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, R.D.; Johnson, A.B.; Buckley, G.D.; Larson, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a Phase I aging assessment of the standby liquid control (SLC) system used in boiling-water reactors. The study was based on detailed reviews of SLC system component and operating experience information obtained from the Nuclear Plant Reliability Database System, the Nuclear Document System, Licensee Event Reports, and other databases. Sources dealing with sodium pentaborate, borates, boric acid, and the effects of environment and corrosion in the SLC system were reviewed to characterize chemical properties and corrosion characteristics of borated solutions. The leading aging degradation concern to date appears to be setpoint drift in relief valves, which has been discovered during routine surveillance and is thought to be caused by mechanical wear. Degradation was also observed in pump seals and internal valves. In general, however, the results of the Phase I study suggest that age-related degradation of SLC systems has not been serious

  11. EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    BWRVIP-190: BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines – 2008 Revision has been revised. The revision committee consisted of U.S. and non-U.S. utilities (members of the BWR Vessel and Internals Protection (BWRVIP) Mitigation Committee), reactor system manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and EPRI and industry experts. The revised document, BWRVIP-190 Revision 1, was completely reformatted into two volumes, with a simplified presentation of water chemistry control, diagnostic and good practice parameters in Volume 1 and the technical bases in Volume 2, to facilitate use. The revision was developed in parallel and in coordination with preparation of the Fuel Reliability Guidelines Revision 1: BWR Fuel Cladding Crud and Corrosion. Guidance is included for plants operating under normal water chemistry (NWC), moderate hydrogen water chemistry (HWC-M), and noble metal application (GE-Hitachi NobleChem™) plus hydrogen injection. Volume 1 includes significant changes to BWR feedwater and reactor water chemistry control parameters to provide increased assurance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation of reactor materials and fuel reliability during all plant conditions, including cold shutdown (≤200°F (93°C)), startup/hot standby (>200°F (93°C) and ≤ 10%) and power operation (>10% power). Action Level values for chloride and sulfate have been tightened to minimize environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of all wetted surfaces, including those not protected by hydrogen injection, with or without noble metals. Chemistry control guidance has been enhanced to minimize shutdown radiation fields by clarifying targets for depleted zinc oxide (DZO) injection while meeting requirements for fuel reliability. Improved tabular presentations of parameter values explicitly indicate levels at which actions are to be taken and required sampling frequencies. Volume 2 provides the technical bases for BWR water chemistry control for control of EAC, flow accelerated corrosion

  12. Boiling water system of nuclear power plants (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martias Nurdin

    1975-01-01

    About 85% of the world electric generators are light water reactors. It shows that LWR is technologically and economically competitive with other generators. The Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is one of the two systems in the LWR group. The techniques of BWR operation in several countries, especially low and moderate power BWR, are presented. The discussion is made in relation with the interconnection problems of electric installation in developing countries, including Indonesia, where the total electric energy installation is low. The high reliability and great flexibility of the operation of a boiling water reactor for a sufficiently long period are also presented. Component standardization for BWR system is discussed to get a better technological and economical performance for further development. (author)

  13. Paired replacement fuel assemblies for BWR-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Kazushige.

    1997-01-01

    There are disposed a large-diameter water rod constituting a non-boiling region at a central portion and paired replacement fuel assemblies for two streams having the same average enrichment degree and different amount of burnable poisons. The paired replacement fuel assemblies comprise a first fuel assembly having a less amount of burnable poisons and a second fuel assembly having a larger amount of burnable poisons. A number of burnable poison-containing fuel rods in adjacent with the large diameter water rod is increased in the second fuel assembly than the first fuel assembly. Then, the poison of the paired replacement fuel assemblies for the BWR type reactor can be annihilated simultaneously at the final stage of the cycle. Accordingly, fuels for a BWR type reactor excellent in economical property and safety and facilitating the design of the replacement reactor core can be obtained. (N.H.)

  14. BWR normal water chemistry guidelines: 1986 revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) have experienced stress corrosion cracking in the reactor cooling system piping resulting in adverse impacts on plant availability and personnel radiation exposure. The BWR Owners Group and EPRI have sponsored a major research and development program to provide remedies for this stress corrosion cracking problem. This work shows that the likelihood of cracking depends on the plant's water chemistry performance (environment) as well as on material condition and stress level. Plant experience and other research demonstrate that water quality also affects fuel performance and radiation field buildup in BWRs. This report,''BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1986 Revision,'' presents suggested generic water chemistry specifications, justifies the proposed water chemistry limits, suggests responses to out-of-specification water chemistry, discusses available chemical analysis methods as well as data management and surveillance schemes, and details the management philosophy required to successfully implement a water chemistry control program. An appendix contains recommendations for water quality of auxiliary systems. 73 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs

  15. Primary coolant system of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Hidefumi; Takahashi, Masanori; Aoki, Yasuko

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a water quality control system for preventing corrosion and for extending working life of structural materials of a BWR-type reactor. Namely, a sensor group 1 and a sensor group 2 are disposed at different positions such as in a feedwater system, a recycling system, main steam pipes, and a pressure vessel, respectively. Each sensor group can record and generate alarms independently. The sensor group 1 for usual monitoring is connected to a calculation device by way of a switch to confirm that the monitored values are within a proper range by the injection of a water quality moderating agent. The sensor group 2 is caused to stand alone or connected with the calculation device by way of a switch optionally. When abnormality should occur in the sensor group 1, the sensor group 2 determines the limit for the increase/decrease of controlling amount of the moderating agent at a portion where the conditions are changed to the most severe direction by using data base. The moderating agent is injected and controlled based on the controlling amount. The system of the present invention can optionally cope with a new sensor and determination for new water quality standards. Then the evaluation/control accuracy of the entire system can be improved while covering up the errors of each sensor. (I.S.)

  16. The BWR [Boiling Water Reactor] Emergency Operating Procedures Tracking System (EOPTS): Evaluation by control-room operating crews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurgin, A.J.; Orvis, D.D.; Spurgin, J.P.; Luna, C.J.

    1990-05-01

    This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Taiwan Power Company (TPC) and conducted by APG and TPC to perform evaluation of the Emergency Operating Procedures Tracking System (EOPTS). The EOPTS is an expert system employing artificial intelligence techniques developed by EPRI for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants based on emergency operating procedures (EOPs). EOPTS is a computerized decision aid used to assist plant operators in efficient and reliable use of EOPs. The main objective of this project was to evaluate the EOPTS and determine how an operator aid of this type could noticeably improve the response time and the reliability of control room crews to multi-failure scenarios. A secondary objective was to collect data on how crew performance was affected. Experiments results indicate that the EOPTS measurably improves crew performance over crews using the EOP flow charts. Time-comparison measurements indicate that crews using the EOPTS perform required actions more quickly than do those using the flowcharts. The results indicate that crews using the EOPTS are not only faster and more consistent in their actions but make fewer errors. In addition, they have a higher likelihood of recovering from the errors that they do make. Use of the EOPTS in the control room should result in faster termination and mitigation of accidents and reduced risk of power plant operations. Recommendations are made towards possible applications of the EOPTS to operator training and evaluation, and for the applicability of the evaluation methodology developed for this project to the evaluation of similar operator aides. 17 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs

  17. Summary of the OECD/NRC Boiling Water Reactor Turbine Trip Benchmark - Fifth Workshop (BWR-TT5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The reference problem chosen for simulation in a BWR is a Turbine Trip transient, which begins with a sudden Turbine Stop Valve (TSV) closure. The pressure oscillation generated in the main steam piping propagates with relatively little attenuation into the reactor core. The induced core pressure oscillation results in dramatic changes of the core void distribution and fluid flow. The magnitude of the neutron flux transient taking place in the BWR core is strongly affected by the initial rate of pressure rise caused by pressure oscillation and has a strong spatial variation. The correct simulation of the power response to the pressure pulse and subsequent void collapse requires a 3-D core modeling supplemented by 1-D simulation of the remainder of the reactor coolant system. A BWR TT benchmark exercise, based on a well-defined problem with complete set of input specifications and reference experimental data, has been proposed for qualification of the coupled 3-D neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulic system transient codes. Since this kind of transient is a dynamically complex event with reactor variables changing very rapidly, it constitutes a good benchmark problem to test the coupled codes on both levels: neutronics/thermal-hydraulic coupling and core/plant system coupling. Subsequently, the objectives of the proposed benchmark are: comprehensive feedback testing and examination of the capability of coupled codes to analyze complex transients with coupled core/plant interactions by comparison with actual experimental data. The benchmark consists of three separate exercises: Exercise 1 - Power vs. Time Plant System Simulation with Fixed Axial Power Profile Table (Obtained from Experimental Data). Exercise 2 - Coupled 3-D Kinetics/Core Thermal-Hydraulic BC Model and/or 1-D Kinetics Plant System Simulation. Exercise 3 - Best-Estimate Coupled 3-D Core/Thermal-Hydraulic System Modeling. The purpose of this fifth workshop was to discuss the results from Phase III (best

  18. Recycling systems for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Akio; Yamamoto, Fumiaki; Fukumoto, Ryuji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To stabilize the coolant flowing characteristics and reactor core reactivity. Constitution: The recycling system in a BWR type reactor comprises a recycling pump disposed to the outside of a reactor pressure vessel, a ring header connected to the recycling pump through main pipe ways, and a plurality of pipes branched from and connected with the ring header and connected to a plurality of jet pumps within the pressure vessel. Then, by making the diameter for the pipeways of each of the branched pipes different from each other, the effective cross-sectional area is varied to thereby average the coolant flow rate supplied to each of the jet pumps. (Seki, T.)

  19. Leaked water detection device for control rod drive and BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ken.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention can specify a control rod drive causing great amount of water leakage among a large number of control rod drives. Namely, water leaked from the control rod drives is introduced to each of leaked water pipelines. Further, it is introduced from the leaked water pipelines to flow glasses at which leaked water can visually be recognized individually, and then discharged through a drain pipeline. With such procedures, the amount of leaked water from the leaked water pipelines can visually be recognized at the flow glasses. As a result, the control rod drives which cause a great amount of leakage can be specified among large number of control rod drives. Accordingly, an accurate inspection schedule for a shaft-sealing portion of the control rod drives can be formed. The shaft-sealing portion degradated in the sealing property can reliably be inspected and repaired. Purge water can be ensured to improve reliability of the operation of equipments. (I.S.)

  20. Power control system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Yasuo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To control the reactor power so that the power distribution can satisfy the limiting conditions, by regulating the reactor core flow rate while monitoring the power distribution in the reactor core of a BWR type reactor. Constitution: A power distribution monitor determines the power distribution for the entire reactor core based on the data for neutron flux, reactor core thermal power, reactor core flow rate and control rod pattern from the reactor and calculates the linear power density distribution. A power up ratio computing device computes the current linear power density increase ratio. An aimed power up ratio is determined by converting the electrical power up ratio transferred from a load demand input device into the reactor core thermal power up ratio. The present reactor core thermal power up ratio is subtracted from the limiting power up ratio and the difference is sent to an operation amount indicator and the reactor core flow rate is changed in a reactor core flow rate regulator, by which the reactor power is controlled. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. BWR water chemistry impurity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Korhonen, S.; Renstroem, K.; Hofling, C.G.; Rebensdorff, B.

    1990-03-01

    Laboratory studies were made on the effect of water impurities on environmental cracking in simulated BWR water of stainless steel, low alloy steel and nickel-base alloys. Constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests were run in simulated normal water chemistry (NWC), hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), or start-up environment. Sulfate, chloride and copper with chloride added to the water at levels of a fraction of a ppM were found to be extremely deleterious to all kinds of materials except Type 316 NG. Other detrimental impurities were fluoride, silica and some organic acids, although acetic acid was beneficial. Nitrate and carbon dioxide were fairly inoccuous. Corrosion fatigue and constant load tests on compact tension specimens were run in simulated normal BWR water chemistry (NWC) or hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), without impurities or with added sulfate or carbon dioxide. For sensitized Type 304 SS in NWC, 0.1 ppM sulfate increased crack propagation rates in constant load tests by up to a factor of 100, and in fatigue tests up to a factor of 10. Also, cracking in Type 316 nuclear grade SS and Alloy 600 was enhanced, but to a smaller degree. Carbon dioxide was less detrimental than sulfate. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  2. An assessment of BWR [boiling water reactor] Mark-II containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, R.J.; Wagner, K.C.

    1990-07-01

    This report assesses challenges to BWR Mark II containment integrity that could potentially arise from severe accidents. Also assessed are some potential improvements that could prevent core damage or containment failure, or could mitigate the consequences of such failure by reducing the release of fission products to the environment. These challenges and improvements are analyzed via a limited quantitative risk/benefit analysis of a generic BWR/4 reactor with Mark II containment. Point estimate frequencies of the dominant core damage sequences are obtained and simple containment event trees are constructed to evaluate the response of the containment to these severe accident sequences. The resulting containment release modes are then binned into source term release categories, which provide inputs to the consequence analysis. The output of the consequences analysis is used to construct an overall base case risk profile. Potential improvements and sensitivities are evaluated by modifying the event tree spilt fractions, thus generating a revised risk profile. Several important sensitivity cases are examined to evaluate the impact of phenomenological uncertainties on the final results. 75 refs., 25 figs., 65 tabs

  3. Summary of the OECD/NRC Boiling Water Reactor Turbine Trip Benchmark - Fourth Workshop (BWR-TT4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The reference problem chosen for simulation in a BWR is a Turbine Trip transient, which begins with a sudden Turbine Stop Valve (TSV) closure. The pressure oscillation generated in the main steam piping propagates with relatively little attenuation into the reactor core. The induced core pressure oscillation results in dramatic changes of the core void distribution and fluid flow. The magnitude of the neutron flux transient taking place in the BWR core is strongly affected by the initial rate of pressure rise caused by pressure oscillation and has a strong spatial variation. The correct simulation of the power response to the pressure pulse and subsequent void collapse requires a 3-D core modeling supplemented by 1-D simulation of the remainder of the reactor coolant system. A BWR TT benchmark exercise, based on a well-defined problem with complete set of input specifications and reference experimental data, has been proposed for qualification of the coupled 3-D neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulic system transient codes. Since this kind of transient is a dynamically complex event with reactor variables changing very rapidly, it constitutes a good benchmark problem to test the coupled codes on both levels: neutronics/thermal-hydraulic coupling and core/plant system coupling. Subsequently, the objectives of the proposed benchmark are: comprehensive feedback testing and examination of the capability of coupled codes to analyze complex transients with coupled core/plant interactions by comparison with actual experimental data. The benchmark consists of three separate exercises: Exercise 1 - Power vs. Time Plant System Simulation with Fixed Axial Power Profile Table (Obtained from Experimental Data). Exercise 2 - Coupled 3-D Kinetics/Core Thermal-Hydraulic BC Model and/or 1-D Kinetics Plant System Simulation. Exercise 3 - Best-Estimate Coupled 3-D Core/Thermal-Hydraulic System Modeling. The purpose of this fourth workshop was to present and discuss final results of

  4. Recent BWR fuel management reactor physics advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, R.L.; Congdon, S.P.; Crawford, B.W.; Kang, C.M.; Martin, C.L.; Reese, A.P.; Savoia, P.J.; Specker, S.R.; Welchly, R.

    1982-01-01

    Improvements in BWR fuel management have been under development to reduce uranium and separative work (SWU) requirements and reduce fuel cycle costs, while also maintaining maximal capacity factors and high fuel reliability. Improved reactor physics methods are playing an increasingly important role in making such advances feasible. The improved design, process computer and analysis methods both increase knowledge of the thermal margins which are available to implement fuel management advance, and improve the capability to reliably and efficiently analyze and design for fuel management advances. Gamma scan measurements of the power distributions of advanced fuel assembly and advanced reactor core designs, and improved in-core instruments also are important contributors to improving 3-d predictive methods and to increasing thermal margins. This paper is an overview of the recent advances in BWR reactor physics fuel management methods, coupled with fuel management and core design advances. The reactor physics measurements which are required to confirm the predictions of performance fo fuel management advances also are summarized

  5. Flow rate control systems for coolants for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yoko; Kato, Naoyoshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase spontaneous recycling flow rate of coolants in BWR type reactors when the water level in the reactor decreases, by communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum. Constitution: An opening is provided to the back plate disposed at the lower end of a reactor core shroud for communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum, and an ON-OFF valve actuated by an operation rod is provided to the opening. When abnormal water level or pressure in the reactor is detected by a level metal or pressure meter, the operation rod is driven to open the ON-OFF valve, whereby coolants fed from a jet pump partially flows through the opening to increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants. This can increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants upon spontaneous recycling operation, thereby maintaining the reactor safety and the fuel soundness. (Moriyama, K.)

  6. Strategies of operation cycles in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, D.; Sendino, F.

    1996-01-01

    The article analyzes the operation cycles in BWR type reactors. The cycle size of operation is the consequence on the optimization process of the costs with the technical characteristics of nuclear fuel and the characteristics of demand and production. The authors analyze the cases of Garona NP and Cofrentes NP, both with BWR reactors. (Author)

  7. Advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, N.; Nakai, H.; Ross, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    In the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) system, steam generated within the nuclear boiler is sent directly to the main turbine. This direct cycle steam delivery system enables the BWR to have a compact power generation building design. Another feature of the BWR is the inherent safety that results from the negative reactivity coefficient of the steam void in the core. Based on the significant construction and operation experience accumulated on the BWR throughout the world, the ABWR was developed to further improve the BWR characteristics and to achieve higher performance goals. The ABWR adopted 'First of a Kind' type technologies to achieve the desired performance improvements. The Reactor Internal Pump (RIP), Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD), Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel (RCCV), three full divisions of Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), integrated digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C), and a high thermal efficiency main steam turbine system were developed and introduced into the ABWR. (author)

  8. Water level measurement uncertainty during BWR instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, R.C.; Derbidge, T.C.; Healzer, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the performance of the water-level measurement system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) during severe instability oscillations which, under some circumstances, can occur during an anticipated transient without SCRAM (ATWS). Test data from a prototypical mock-up of the water-level measurement system was used to refine and calibrate a water-level measurement system model. The model was then used to predict level measurement system response, using as boundary conditions vessel pressures calculated by ppercase RETRAN for an ATWS/instability event.The results of the study indicate that rapid pressure changes in the reactor pressure vessel which cause oscillations in downcomer water level, coupled with differences in instrument line lengths, can produce errors in the sensed water level. Using nominal parameters for the measurement system components, a severe instability transient which produced a 0.2 m peak-to-minimum water-level oscillation in the vessel downcomer was predicted to produce pressure difference equivalent to a 0.7 m level oscillation at the input to the differential pressure transmitter, 0.5 m oscillation at the output of the transmitter, and an oscillation of 0.3 m on the water-level indicator in the control room. The level measurement system error, caused by downcomer water-level oscillations and instrument line length differential, is mitigated by damping both in the differential pressure transmitter used to infer level and in the control room display instrument. ((orig.))

  9. Power generator in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kenji.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to perform stable and dynamic conditioning operation for nuclear fuels in BWR type reactors. Constitution: The conditioning operation for the nuclear fuels is performed by varying the reactor core thermal power in a predetermined pattern by changing the predetermined power changing pattern of generator power, the rising rate of the reactor core thermal power and the upper limit for the rising power of the reactor core thermal power are calculated and the power pattern for the generator is corrected by a power conditioning device such that the upper limit for the thermal power rising rate and the upper limit for the thermal power rising rate are at the predetermined levels. Thus, when the relation between the reactor core thermal power and the generator electrical power is fluctuated, the fluctuation is detected based on the variation in the thermal power rising rate and the limit value for the thermal power rising rate, and the correction is made to the generator power changing pattern so that these values take the predetermined values to thereby perform the stable conditioning operation for the nuclear fuels. (Moriyama, K.)

  10. Hybrid Reactor Simulation and 3-D Information Display of BWR Out-of-Phase Oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Robert; Huang, Zhengyu

    2001-01-01

    The real-time hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability of the Penn State TRIGA reactor has been expanded for boiling water reactor (BWR) out-of-phase behavior. During BWR out-of-phase oscillation half of the core can significantly oscillate out of phase with the other half, while the average power reported by the neutronic instrumentation may show a much lower amplitude for the oscillations. A description of the new HRS is given; three computers are employed to handle all the computations required, including real-time data processing and graph generation. BWR out-of-phase oscillation was successfully simulated. By adjusting the reactivity feedback gains from boiling channels to the TRIGA reactor and to the first harmonic mode power simulation, limit cycle can be generated with both reactor power and the simulated first harmonic power. A 3-D display of spatial power distributions of fundamental mode, first harmonic, and total powers over the reactor cross section is shown

  11. The physico-chemical 131I species in the exhaust air of a boiling water reactor (BWR 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1982-12-01

    In a German boiling water reactor, the physico-chemical 131 I species were determined in the plant exhaust and in the individual exhausts during 12 months. These measurements aimed in particular at determining the percentage and the source of the radiologically decisive elemental 131 I released to the environment. The retention of the 131 I species by iodine filters was also investigated. On an average, 45% of the 131 I discharged with the plant exhaust consisted of elemental iodine. This was largely released with the exhaust from the reactor building and from the turbine building. The other 55% consisted almost entirely of organic I. (orig./HP) [de

  12. The physico-chemical I-131 species in the exhaust air of a boiling water reactor (BWR 5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1984-02-01

    In a German boiling water reactor, the pysico-chemical I-131 species were determined in the plant exhaust and in the individual exhausts during four months. These measurements aimed in particular at determining the percentage and the source of the radiologically decisive elemental I-131 released to the environment. On an average 13% of the I-131 discharged with the plant exhaust consisted of elemental iodine. This was largely released with the exhausts from the reactor building and from the turbine building. The main component was organic-bound I. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Boiling water reactors with uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel. Report 5: Analysis of the reactivity coefficients and the stability of a BWR loaded with MOx fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaziere, C. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires

    2000-01-01

    This report is a part of the project titled 'Boiling Water Reactors With Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide (MOx) Fuel'. The aim of this study is to model the impact of a core loading pattern containing MOx bundles upon the main characteristics of a BWR (reactivity coefficients, stability, etc.). For this purpose, the Core Management System (CMS) codes of Studsvik Scandpower are used. This package is constituted by CASMO-4/TABLES-3/SIMULATE-3. It has been shown in previous reports that these codes are able to accurately represent and model MOx bundles. This report is thus devoted to the study of BWR cores loaded (partially or totally) with MOx bundles. The plutonium quality used is the Pu type 2016 (mostly Pu-239, 56 %, and Pu-240, 26 %), but a variation of the plutonium isotopic vector was also investigated, in case of a partial MOx loading. One notices that the reactivity coefficients do not present significant changes in comparison with a full UOx loading. Nevertheless, two main problems arise: the shutdown margin at BOC is lower than 1 % and the stability to in-phase oscillations is slightly decreased. (The SIMULATE-3 version used for this study does not contain the latest MOx enhancements described in literature, since these code developments have not been provided to the department. Nevertheless, as the nominal average enrichment of the MOx bundles is 5.41 % (total amount of plutonium), which can still be considered as a relatively low enrichment, the accuracy of the CMS codes is acceptable without the use of the MOx improvements for this level of Pu enrichment.

  14. Water level measurement system in reactor pressure vessel of BWR and hydrogen concentration monitoring system for severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Hidehiko; Okazaki, Koki; Shiraishi, Fujio; Kenjyo, Hiroaki; Isoda, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident caused severe accident to lose functions of many instrumentation systems. As a result, many important plant parameters couldn't be monitored. In order to monitor plant parameters in the case of severe accident, new instrumentation systems available in the severe conditions are being developed. Water level in reactor pressure vessel and hydrogen concentration in primary containment vessel are one of the most important parameters. Performance test results about water level measurement sensor and hydrogen sensor in severe environmental conditions are described. (author)

  15. Dynamics of a BWR with inclusion of boiling nonlinearity, clad temperature and void-dependent core power removal: Stability and bifurcation characteristics of advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Dinkar, E-mail: dinkar@iitk.ac.in [Nuclear Engineering and Technology Program, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India); Kalra, Manjeet Singh, E-mail: drmanjeet.singh@dituniversity.edu.in [DIT University, Dehradun 248 009 (India); Wahi, Pankaj, E-mail: wahi@iitk.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Simplified models with inclusion of the clad temperature are considered. • Boiling nonlinearity and core power removal have been modeled. • Method of multiple time scales has been used for nonlinear analysis to get the nature and amplitude of oscillations. • Incorporation of modeling complexities enhances the stability of system. • We find that reactors with higher nominal power are more desirable from the point of view of global stability. - Abstract: We study the effect of including boiling nonlinearity, clad temperature and void-dependent power removal from the primary loop in the mathematical modeling of a boiling water reactor (BWR) on its dynamic characteristics. The advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR) is taken as a case study. Towards this end, we have analyzed two different simplified models with different handling of the clad temperature. Each of these models has the necessary modifications pertaining to boiling nonlinearity and power removal from the primary loop. These simplified models incorporate the neutronics and thermal–hydraulic coupling. The effect of successive changes in the modeling assumptions on the linear stability of the reactor has been studied and we find that incorporation of each of these complexities in the model increases the stable operating region of the reactor. Further, the method of multiple time scales (MMTS) is exploited to carry out the nonlinear analysis with a view to predict the bifurcation characteristics of the reactor. Both subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations are present in each model depending on the choice of operating parameters. These analytical observations from MMTS have been verified against numerical simulations. A parametric study on the effect of changing the nominal reactor power on the regions in the parametric space of void coefficient of reactivity and fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity with sub- and super-critical Hopf bifurcations has been performed for all

  16. Technical report on material selection and processing guidelines for BWR [boiling water reactor] coolant pressure boundary piping: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazelton, W.S.; Koo, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    This report provides the technical bases for the NRC staff's revised recommended methods to control the intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of BWR piping. For piping that does not fully comply with the material selection, testing, and processing guideline combinations of this document, varying degrees of augmented inservice inspection are recommended. This revision also includes guidance and NRC staff recommendations (not requirements) regarding crack evaluation and weld overlay repair methods for long-term operation or for continuing interim operation of plants until a more permanent solution is implemented

  17. Feedwater recycling system in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Yoshiharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reactor safety by preventing thermal stresses and cracks generated in structural materials due to the fluctuations in the temperature for high temperature water - low temperature water mixture near the feedwater nozzle. Method: Feedwater pipes are connected to a pressure vessel not directly but by way of a flow control valve. While the recycled water is circulated from an inlet nozzle to an outlet nozzle through a recycle pump, flow control valve and recycling pipeways, feedwater is fed from the feedwater pipes to the recycling pipeways by way of the flow control valve. More specifically, since the high temperature recycle water and the low temperature recycle water are mixed within the pipeways, the temperature fluctuations resulted from the temperature difference between the recycle water and the feedwater is reduced to prevent thermal fatigue and generation of cracks thereby securing the reactor safety. (Furukawa, Y.)

  18. Applied methods for mitigation of damage by stress corrosion in BWR type reactors; Metodos aplicados para la mitigacion del dano por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez C, R.; Diaz S, A.; Gachuz M, M.; Arganis J, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencia de Materiales, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    The Boiling Water nuclear Reactors (BWR) have presented stress corrosion problems, mainly in components and pipes of the primary system, provoking negative impacts in the performance of energy generator plants, as well as the increasing in the radiation exposure to personnel involucred. This problem has caused development of research programs, which are guided to find solution alternatives for the phenomena control. Among results of greater relevance the control for the reactor water chemistry stands out particularly in the impurities concentration and oxidation of radiolysis products; as well as the supervision in the materials selection and the stresses levels reduction. The present work presents the methods which can be applied to diminish the problems of stress corrosion in BWR reactors. (Author)

  19. Study of the Utilization BWR Type Nuclear Power Reactor for Desalination Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itjeu Karliana; Sumijanto; Dhandhang Purwadi, M.

    2008-01-01

    The needs of fresh water increased by rapid population growth and industrials expansion, but these demands can not be prepared naturally. Following this case, seawater desalination becomes the primer option which can fulfill the need through the nuclear desalination technology. The coupled nuclear power reactor enables to supply thermal energy for auxiliary equipment and pumps operation. The utilization study of power reactor type BWR coupled with desalination process has been performed. The goal of study is to obtain characteristic data of desalted water specification which desalination system coupling with nuclear power plant produced energy for desalination process. The study is carried out by browsing data and information, and comprehensive review of thermal energy correlation between NPP with desalination process installation. According to reviewing are found that the thermal energy and electric power utilization from the nuclear power reactor are enable to remove the seawater to produce desalted water and also to operate auxiliary equipments. The assessment results is VK-300 reactor prototype, BWR type 250 MW(e) power are cogeneration unit can supplied hot steam temperature 285 °C to the extraction turbine to empower 150 MW electric power, and a part of hot steam 130 °C is use to operate desalination process and remind heat is distribute to the municipal and offices at that region. The coupled of VK-300 reactor power type BWR with desalination installation of MED type enable to produce desalted water with high quality distillate. Based on the economic calculation that the VK-300 reactor power of BWR type produced water distillate capacity is 300.000 m 3 /hour with cost US$ 0.58/m 3 . The coupling VK-300 reactor power type BWR with MED desalination plant is competitive economically. (author)

  20. Propagation of cracks by stress corrosion in conditions of BWR type reactor; Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino C, F.J. [ININ, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Fuentes C, P. [ITT, Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: fjmc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    In this work, the obtained results when applying the Hydrogen Chemistry to a test tube type Compact Tension (CT), built in austenitic stainless steel 304l, simulating the conditions to those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa are presented. With the application of this water chemistry, seeks to be proven the diminution of the crack propagation speed. (Author)

  1. Radiation streaming in power reactors. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahti, G.P.; Lee, R.R.; Courtney, J.C. (eds.)

    1979-02-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the 14 papers given at a special session on Radiation Streaming in Power Reactors held on November 15 at the American Nuclear Society 1978 Winter Meeting in Washington, D.C. The papers describe the methods of calculation, the engineering of shields, and the measurement of radiation environments within the containments of light water power reactors. Comparisons of measured and calculated data are used to determine the accuracy of computer predictions of the radiation environment. Specific computational and measurement techniques are described and evaluated. Emphasis is on radiation streaming in the annular region between the reactor vesel and the primary shield and its resultant environment within the primary containment.

  2. Primary cooling system for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Eishi; Takahashi, Masanori; Aoki, Yasuko

    1993-01-01

    The present invention effectively uses information from a plurality of sensors in order to suppress corrosion circumstance of a nuclear reactor. That is, a predetermined general water quality factor at a predetermined position is determined as a standard index. A concentration of a water quality improver is controlled such that the index is within an aimed range. For this purpose, the entire sensor groups disposed in a primary coolant system of a nuclear reactor are divided into a plural systems of sensor groups each disposed on every different positions. Then, a predetermined sensor group (standard sensor group) is connected to a computing device and a data base so that it is always monitored for calculating and estimating the standard index. Only oxidative ingredient in water at the measuring point is noted, and a concentration distribution which agrees with an actually measured value of oxidative ingredients is extracted from data base and used as a correct concentration distribution. With such procedures, reactor water quality can be estimated accurately while compensating erroneous factors of individual sensors. Even when a new sensor is used, it is not necessary to greatly change control logic. (I.S.)

  3. BWR reactor water cleanup system flexible wedge gate isolation valve qualification and high energy flow interruption test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWall, K.G.; Steele, R. Jr.

    1989-10-01

    This report presents the results of research performed to develop technical insights for the NRC effort regarding Generic Issue 87, ''Failure of HPCI Steam Line Without Isolation.'' Volume III of this report contains the data and findings from the original research performed to assess the qualification of the valves and reported in EGG-SSRE-7387, ''Qualification of Valve Assemblies in High Energy BWR Systems Penetrating Containment.'' We present the original work here to complete the documentation trail. The recommendations contained in Volume III of this report resulted in the test program described in Volume I and II. The research began with a survey to characterize the population of normally open containment isolation valves in those process lines that connect to the primary system and penetrate containment. The qualification methodology used by the various manufacturers identified in the survey is reviewed and deficiencies in that methodology are identified. Recommendations for expanding the qualification of valve assemblies for high energy pipe break conditions are presented. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  4. BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1993 Revision, Normal and hydrogen water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlberg, G.; Goddard, C.; Fitzpatrick, S.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of water chemistry control is to extend the operating life of the reactor and rector coolant system, balance-of-plant components, and turbines while simultaneously controlling costs to safeguard the continued economic viability of the nuclear power generation investment. To further this goal an industry committee of chemistry personnel prepared guidelines to identify the benefits, risks, and costs associated with water chemistry in BWRs and to provide a template for an optimized water chemistry program. This document replaces the BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines - 1986 Revision and the BWR Hydrogen Water Chemistry Guidelines -- 1987 Revision. It expands on the previous guidelines documents by covering the economic implications of BWR water chemistry control

  5. Simulation of the aspersion system of the core low pressure (LPCS) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrillo G, O. E.; Chavez M, C.

    2012-10-01

    The present work presents the modeling and simulation of the aspersion system to low pressure of reactor of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde using the nuclear code RELAP/SCDAP. The objective of the emergency systems inside a nuclear reactor is the cooling of the core, nor caring the performance of any other emergency system in the case of an accident design base for coolant loss. To obtain a simulation of the system is necessary to have a model based on their main components, pipes, pumps, valves, etc. This article describes the model for the simulation of the main line and the test line for the HPCS. At the moment we have the simulation of the reactor vessel and their systems associated to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, this work will allow to associate the emergency system model LPCS to the vessel model. The simulation of the vessel and the emergency systems will allow knowing the behavior of the reactor in the stage of the coolant loos, giving the possibility to analyze diverse scenarios. The general model will provide an auxiliary tool for the training in classroom and at distance in the operation of nuclear power plants. (Author)

  6. Coolant cleanup system for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Araki, Hidefumi.

    1993-01-01

    The cleanup system of the present invention removes impurity ions and floating materials accumulated in a reactor during evaporation of coolants in the nuclear reactor. That is, coolants pass pipelines from a pressure vessel using pressure difference between a high pressure in the pressure vessel and a low pressure at the upstream of a condensate filtration/desalting device of a condensate/feed water system as a driving source, during which cations and floating materials are removed in a high temperature filtration/desalting device and coolants flow into the condensate/feedwater system. Impurities containing anions are removed here by the condensates filtration/desalting device. Then, they return to the pressure vessel while pressurized and heated by a condensate pump, a feed water pump and a feed water heater. At least pumps, a heat exchanger for heating, a filtration/desalting device for removing anions and pipelines connecting them used exclusively for the coolant cleanup system are no more necessary. (I.S.)

  7. Neutron dosimetry. Environmental monitoring in a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavera D, L.; Camacho L, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The measurements carried out on reactor dosimetry are applied mainly to the study on the effects of the radiation in 108 materials of the reactor; little is on the environmental dosimetry outside of the primary container of BWR reactors. In this work the application of a neutron spectrometer formed by plastic detectors of nuclear traces manufactured in the ININ, for the environmental monitoring in penetrations around the primary container of the unit I of the Laguna Verde central is presented. The neutron monitoring carries out with purposes of radiological protection, during the operational tests of the reactor. (Author)

  8. Super critical water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2005-01-01

    Water is used as a calori-porter and moderator in the most major nuclear centers which are actually in function. In the pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR), water is maintained under critical point of water (21 bar, 374 Centigrade) which limits the efficiency of thermodynamic cycle of energy conversion (yield gain of about 33%) Crossing the critical point, one can then use s upercritical water , the obtained pressure and temperature allow a significant yield gains. In addition, the supercritical water offers important properties. Particularly there is no more possible coexistence between vapor and liquid. Therefore, we don't have more boiling problem, one of the phenomena which limits the specific power of PWR and BWR. Since 1950s, the reactor of supercritical water was the subject of studies more or less detailed but neglected. From the early 1990s, this type of conception benefits of some additional interests. Therefore, in the international term G eneration IV , the supercritical water reactors had been considered as one of the big options for study as Generation IV reactors. In the CEA, an active city has engaged from 1930 with the participation to a European program: The HPWR (High Performance Light Water Reactor). In this contest, the R and D studies are focused on the fields of neutrons, thermodynamic and materials. The CEA intends to pursue a limited effort of R and D in this field, in the framework of international cooperation, preferring the study of versions of rapid spectrum. (author)

  9. Applied methods for mitigation of damage by stress corrosion in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez C, R.; Diaz S, A.; Gachuz M, M.; Arganis J, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Boiling Water nuclear Reactors (BWR) have presented stress corrosion problems, mainly in components and pipes of the primary system, provoking negative impacts in the performance of energy generator plants, as well as the increasing in the radiation exposure to personnel involucred. This problem has caused development of research programs, which are guided to find solution alternatives for the phenomena control. Among results of greater relevance the control for the reactor water chemistry stands out particularly in the impurities concentration and oxidation of radiolysis products; as well as the supervision in the materials selection and the stresses levels reduction. The present work presents the methods which can be applied to diminish the problems of stress corrosion in BWR reactors. (Author)

  10. Neutron dosimetry. Environmental monitoring in a BWR type reactor; Dosimetria de neutrones. Monitoreo ambiental en un reactor del tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavera D, L; Camacho L, M E

    1991-01-15

    The measurements carried out on reactor dosimetry are applied mainly to the study on the effects of the radiation in 108 materials of the reactor; little is on the environmental dosimetry outside of the primary container of BWR reactors. In this work the application of a neutron spectrometer formed by plastic detectors of nuclear traces manufactured in the ININ, for the environmental monitoring in penetrations around the primary container of the unit I of the Laguna Verde central is presented. The neutron monitoring carries out with purposes of radiological protection, during the operational tests of the reactor. (Author)

  11. The design and use of proficiency based BWR reactor maintenance and refuelling training mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the ABB experience with the design and use of boiling water reactor training facilities. The training programs were developed and implemented in cooperation with the nuclear utilities. ABB operates two facilities, the ABB ATOM Light Water Reactor Service Center located in Vasteras, Sweden, and the ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Operations BWR Training Center located in Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA. The focus of the training centers are reactor maintenance and refueling activities plus the capability to develop and qualify tools, procedures and repair techniques

  12. Propagation of cracks by stress corrosion in conditions of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino C, F.J.; Fuentes C, P.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the obtained results when applying the Hydrogen Chemistry to a test tube type Compact Tension (CT), built in austenitic stainless steel 304l, simulating the conditions to those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa are presented. With the application of this water chemistry, seeks to be proven the diminution of the crack propagation speed. (Author)

  13. Mitigation strategies of intergranular corrosion in systems of reactors of water boiling (BWR). Combined action of the chemistry of the hydrogen and the oxygen; Estrategias de mitigacion de la corrosion intergranular en sistemas de reactores de agua en ebullicion (BWR). Accion combinada de la quimica del hidrogeno y del oxigeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdugo, M.

    2015-07-01

    Inter-Granular Stress Corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in austenitic stainless steel and in austenitic nickel-based alloys has been the subject of many studies the aim of which was to resolve one of the main problems faced by BWR nuclear power plants since the 1960s. This corrosion phenomenon is the result of the combined action of three factors: sensitization of the material, high local stresses and an aggressive medium. This paper deals with these factors separately and analyzes the oxidative chemistry of BWR reactors (aggressivity of the medium) as one the main causes if IGSCC. (Author)

  14. Fuel assemblies for use in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirukawa, Koji.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To moderate the peak configuration of the burnup degree change curve for the infinite multiplication factor by applying an improvement to the arrangement of fuel rods. Constitution: In a fuel assembly for a BWR type reactor comprising a plurality of fuel rods and water rods arranged in a square lattice, fuel rods containing burnable poisons are arranged at four corners at the second and the third layers from the outside of the square lattice arrangement. Among them, the Cd poison effect in the burnable poison incorporated fuel rods disposed at the second layer is somewhat greater at the initial burning stage and then rapidly decreased along with burning. While on the other hand, the poison effect of the burnable poison-incorporated fuel rods at the third layer is smaller than that at the second layer at the initial burning stage and the reduction in the poison effect due to burning is somewhat more moderate. Since these fuel rods are in adjacent with each other, they interfere to each other and also provide an effect of moderating the burning of the burnable poisons. (Takahashi, M.)

  15. Two-loop feed water control system in BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Takashi; Watanabe, Takao; Hirose, Masao.

    1982-01-01

    In the process of the start-up and shutdown of BWR plants, the operation of changing over feed pumps corresponding to plant output is performed. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the automatic changeover system for feed pumps, which minimizes the variation of water level in reactors and is easy to operate. The three-element control system with the water level in reactors, the flow rate of main steam and the flow rate of feed water as the input is mainly applied, but long time is required for the changeover of feed pumps. The two-loop feed control system can control simultaneously two pumps being changed over, therefore it is suitable to the automatic changeover control system for feed pumps. Also it is excellent for the control of the recirculating valves of feed pumps. The control characteristics of the two-loop feed water control system against the external disturbance which causes the variation of water level in reactors were examined. The results of analysis by simulation are reported. The features of the two-loop feed water control system, the method of simulation and the evaluation of the two-loop feed water control system are described. Its connection with a digital feed water recirculation control system is expected. (Kako, I.)

  16. Damage by radiation in structural materials of BWR reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, E.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E.

    2002-01-01

    The structural materials which are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors undergo degradation in their mechanical properties mainly due to the damage produced by the fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. The mechanisms of neutron damage in this type of materials are experimentally studied, through the irradiation of vessel steel in experimental reactors for a quickly ageing. Alternately the neutron damage through steel irradiation with heavy ions is simulated. In this work the first results of the damage induced by irradiation of a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor are shown. The irradiation was performed with fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10 18 n/cm 2 ) in the TRIGA Mark III Salazar reactor and separately with Ni +3 ions in a Tandetrom accelerator (E= 4.8 MeV and an ion flux rank of 0.1 to 53 ions/A 2 ). (Author)

  17. Studies of fragileness in steels of vessels of BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, E.F.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E.

    2003-01-01

    The structural materials with those that are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors, suffer degradation in its mechanical properties mainly to the damage taken place by the fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. Its are experimentally studied those mechanisms of neutron damage in this material type, by means of the irradiation of steel vessel in experimental reactors to age them quickly. Alternatively it is simulated the neutron damage by means of irradiation of steel with heavy ions. In this work those are shown first results of the damage induced by irradiation from a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor. The irradiation was carried out with fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10 18 n/cm 2 ) in the TRIGA MARK lll reactor and separately with Ni +3 ions in a Tandetrom accelerator, E = 4.8 MeV and range of the ionic flow of 0.1 to 53 iones/A 2 . (Author)

  18. Power controlling method for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kenji.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable reactor operation exactly following after an aimed curve in the high power resuming and maintaining period without failures in cladding tubes. Method: Upon recovery of the reactor power to a high power level after changing the reactor power from the high power to the low power level, control rod is operated under such conditions that the linear power density after operation of the control rod does not exceed the PC envelope in the low power period, and the core flow rate is coordinated to the control rod operation. The linear power density can be suppressed within an allowable linear power density by the above operation during high power resuming and maintaining period and, as the result, PCI failures can be prevented. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Studies of fragileness in steels of vessels of BWR reactors; Estudios de fragilizacion en aceros de vasija de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, E.F.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The structural materials with those that are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors, suffer degradation in its mechanical properties mainly to the damage taken place by the fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. Its are experimentally studied those mechanisms of neutron damage in this material type, by means of the irradiation of steel vessel in experimental reactors to age them quickly. Alternatively it is simulated the neutron damage by means of irradiation of steel with heavy ions. In this work those are shown first results of the damage induced by irradiation from a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor. The irradiation was carried out with fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}) in the TRIGA MARK lll reactor and separately with Ni{sup +3} ions in a Tandetrom accelerator, E = 4.8 MeV and range of the ionic flow of 0.1 to 53 iones/A{sup 2}. (Author)

  20. Operation control equipment for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Masayuki; Takeda, Renzo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the temperature balance in a feedwater heater by obtaining the objective value of a feedwater enthalpy upon calculation of respective measured values and controlling the opening or closing of an extraction valve so that the objective value may coincide with the measured value, thereby averaging the axial power distribution. Constitution: A plurality of stages of extraction lines are connected to a turbine, and extraction valves are respectively provided at the lines. By calculating the measured values of ractor pressure, reactor core flow rate, vapor flow rate and reactor core inlet enthalpy determined to predetermined value using heat balance the objective feedwater enthalpy is obtained, is fed as an extraction valve opening or closing signal from a control equipment, the extraction stages of the turbine extraction are altered in accordance with this signal, and the feedwater enthalpy is controlled. (Sekiya, K.)

  1. Core arrangement in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Masayuki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the number of fuel assemblies whose locations are to be changed upon fuel exchange, as well as unify the power distribution in the core by arranging, in a chess board configuration, a plurality pattern of unit reactor lattices each containing fuel assemblies of different burnup degrees in orthogonal positions to each other. Constitution: A first pattern of unit reactor lattice is formed by disposing fuel assemblies of burnup degree 1 and fuel assemblies of burnup degree 3 at orthogonal positions to each other. A second pattern of unit reactor lattice is formed by disposing fuel assemblies of burnup degree 2 and fuel assemblies of burnup degree 1 at orthogonal positions to each other. The unit lattices each in such a dispositions are arranged in a chess board arrangement. Since, the fuel assemblies of the burnup degree 1 in the first pattern unit lattices proceed to the burnup degree 2 and the fuel assemblies of the burnup degree 2 in the second pattern unit lattices proceed to the burnup degree 3 up to the fuel exchange stage, fuel exchange and movement have only to be made, not for those fuel assemblies, but for another half of the fuel assemblies. (Kawakami, Y.)

  2. BWR type reactor and its operating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuji, Niro.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To regulate the control rod extraction operation such that an assumed control rod drop accident, if should occur, may not lead to further serious accidents, as well as enable to improve the working life of the control rod. Method: A plurality of control rods disposed among a plurality of fuel assemblies constituting the reactor core for suppressing the reactor core reactivity are divided into two groups depending on the descending speed, and the number of rods with a faster descending speed is set to less than 1/4 of the total number of the control rods. Then, the control rods are arranged such that those rods of the faster descending speed may be set every one another in any of the vertical, lateral and orthogonal directions. Further, it is always judged as to the possibility of extracting the control rods with the faster descending speed by a fast control rod extraction judging circuit to issue a signal to a control rod extraction inhibition circuit, so that the extraction operation for the control rods with the faster descending speed is started after all of the control rods with the slow descending speed have been extracted. Accordingly, if a control rod dropping accident should occur, abrupt power change can be avoided to thereby minimize the development of the accident. (Horiuchi, T.)

  3. Corrosion failure of a BWR embedded reactor containment liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegemar, B.

    2006-01-01

    Following sixteen fuel cycles, leakage through a BWR embedded reactor containment liner (carbon steel) was discovered. Leakage was located at a penetration for electrical conductors as a result of penetrating corrosion attack. During construction, porous cement structures and air pockets/cavities were formed due to erroneous injection of grout. Corrosion attacks on the CS steel liner were located at the relatively small, active surfaces in contact with the porous cement structure. The corrosion mechanism was supposed to be anodic dissolution of the steel liner in areas with insufficient passivation. The penetrations were restored according to original design requirements. (author)

  4. Thermalydraulic processes in the reactor coolant system of a BWR under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) incorporate many unique structural features that make their expected response under severe accident conditions very different from that predicted in the case of pressurized water reactor accident sequences. Automatic main steam isolation valve (MIV) closure as the vessel water level approaches the top of the core would cause reactor vessel isolation while automatic recirculation pump trip would limit the in-vessel flows to those characteristic of natural circulation (as disturbed by vessel relief valve actuation). This paper provides a discussion of the BWR control blade, channel box, core plate, control rod guide tube, and reactor vessel safety relief valve (SRV) configuration and the effects of these structural components upon thermal hydraulic processes within the reactor vessel under severe accident conditions. The dominant BWR severe accident sequences as determined by probabilistic risk assessment are described and the expected timing of events for the unmitigated short-term station blackout severe accident sequence at the Peach Bottom atomic power station is presented

  5. Fuel assembly for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shigeru.

    1993-01-01

    In the fuel assembly of the present invention, a means for mounting and securing short fuel rods is improved. Not only long fuel rods but also short fuel rods are disposed in channel of the fuel assembly to improve reactor safety. The short fuel rods are supported by a screw means only at the lower end plug. The present invention prevents the support for the short fuel rod from being unreliable due to the slack of the screw by the pressure of inflowing coolants. That is, coolant abutting portions such as protrusions or concave grooves are disposed at a portion in the channel box where coolants flowing from the lower tie plate, as an uprising stream, cause collision. With such a constitution, a component caused by the pressure of the flowing coolants is formed. The component acts as a rotational moment in the direction of screwing the male threads of the short fuel rod into the end plug screw hole. Accordingly, the screw is not slackened, and the short fuel rods are mounted and secured certainly. (I.S.)

  6. Fuel assembly for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto

    1990-01-01

    Various considerations are applied to fuel rods for improving the fuel burnup degree. If a gap between the fuel rods is changed, this varies the easiness for the flow of coolants depending on places, to reduce the thermal margin. Then, it is noted for the distribution of stresses generated due to the difference of water pressure caused by the difference of water streams between the inside and the outside of a channel box, and composite value, of stresses upon occurrence of earthquakes, neutron irradiation and a channel creep phenomenon caused by the stresses of due to the water pressure difference described above, the thickness of the channel box is increased in the upstream and decreased toward the downstream. Further, fuel spacers at the position where the thickness of the channel box is changed are spaced apart from the channel box so as not to brought into contact with the channel box. This can contribute to the reduction of coolants pressure loss, improvement of critical power and improvement of reactivity, as well as remarkably moderate local stresses applied from the fuel spacers to the channel box due to horizontal vibrations upon occurrence of earthquakes to improve the integrity of fuel assembly. (N.H.)

  7. ECP measurements in the BWR-1 water loop relative to water composition changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kus, P.; Vsolak, R.; Kysela, J., E-mail: ksp@ujv.cz [Nuclear Research Inst. Rez plc, Husinec - Rez (Czech Republic); Hanawa, S.; Nakamura, T.; Uchida, S., E-mail: hanawa.satoshi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the usage of ECP sensors in nuclear power plants. ECP sensors were tested using the LVR-15 reactor at the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (NRI) in the Czech Republic. The experiment took place on the BWR-1 loop, which was designed for investigating the behaviour of structural materials and radioactivity transport under BWR conditions. The BWR-1 loop facilitates irradiation experiments within a wide range of operating parameters (max. pressure of 10 MPa, max. temperature of 573 K and a neutron flux of 1.0* 10{sup 18} n/m{sup 2}s). This study involves the measurement of electrochemical potential (ECP). Corrosion potential is the main parameter for monitoring of water composition changes in nuclear power plants (NPP). The electrochemical potentials of stainless steel were measured under high temperatures in a test loop (BWR-1) under different water composition conditions. Total neutron flux was ∼10{sup -3} to ∼10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}s (>0.1 MeV) at a temperature of 560K, neutral pH, and water resistivity of 18.2 MOhm. ECP sensor response related to changes in water composition was monitored. Switching from NWC (normal water conditions) to HWC (hydrogen water conditions) was controlled using oxygen dosage. Water chemistry was monitored approx. 50 meters from the active channel. The active channel temperature was maintained within a range of 543 - 561 K from the start of irradiation for the entire duration of the experiment. A total of 24 reference electrodes composed of platinum (Pt), silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) and a zircon membrane containing silver oxide (Ag{sub 2}O) powder were installed inside the active channel of the LVR-15 test reactor. The active channel (Field tube) was divided into four zones, with each zone containing six sensors. A mathematical radiolysis code model was created in cooperation with the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. (author)

  8. Emergency condensator for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubakai, Yoichi; Narumi, Yuichi; Sakata, Yuji.

    1992-01-01

    An emergency condensator is constituted with heat transfer pipes, a steam chamber, an upper pipe plate, a lower pipe plate and a condensate chamber. The upper pipe plate is secured by supports, and a steam pipe is connected to the upper pipe plate. A condensate pipeline and a incondensible gas vent pipe are disposed to the condensate chamber. Taking thermal expansion of the steam pipes and thermal expansion of the heat transfer pipes into consideration, the heat transfer pipe is made as an L-shaped pipe having a vertical portion and a horizontal portion so as to absorb each of the thermal expansion smoothly. The L-shaped heat transfer pipes are constituted as a bundle of pipes having the end portions thereof secured to the upper pipe plate and the lower pipe plate. The emergency condensator is disposed in a emergency condensator pool chamber. Cooling water in contact with the outer side of the L-shaped heat transfer pipes is the pool water in the pool chamber, and the condensator chamber is disposed in concrete walls of the pool chamber. With such a constitution, stress due to thermal expansion of the heat transfer pipes is mitigated, and heat transfer performance, earth quake resistance and maintenancability are improved. (I.N.)

  9. The BWR Stability Issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to supply general information about Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) stability. The main concerned topics are: phenomenological aspects, experimental database, modelling features and capabilities, numerical models, three-dimensional modelling, BWR system performance during stability, stability monitoring and licensing aspects.

  10. Analysis of a main steam isolation valve closure anticipated transient without scram in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, T.J.; Pan, C.; Chen, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) could be a major accident sequence with possible core melt and containment damage in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The behavior of a BWR/6 during a main stream isolation valve closure ATWS is investigated using the best-estimate computer program, RETRAN-02. The effects of both makeup coolant and boron injection on the reactor behavior are studied. It is found that the BWR/6 behaves similarly to the BWR/2 and BWR/4

  11. Simulation of the injection system of cooling water to low pressure (Lpci) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado C, R. A.; Lopez S, E.; Chavez M, C.

    2012-10-01

    The present article describes the modeling and simulation of the Injection System of Cooling Water to Low Pressure (Lpci) for the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Is very important to be able to predict the behavior of the nuclear plant in the case of an emergency stop, and while nearer to the reality are the results of a simulation, better is the safety protocol that can be devised. In the Engineering Faculty of the UNAM at the present is had logical models of the safety systems, but due to the nature of the same, these simulations do not provide of the quantity of enough information to be able to reproduce with more accuracy the behavior of the Lpci in the case of a severe accident. For this reason, the RELAP code was used for the flows modeling, components and structures of heat transfers in relation to the system Lpci. The modeling of the components is carried out with base on technical information of the nuclear plant and the results will be corroborated with information in reference documents as the Rasp (the Reactor analysis support package) and the Fsar (Final safety analysis report) for the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  12. BWR chemistry control status: a summary of industry chemistry status relative to the BWR water chemistry guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, S.E.; Giannelli, J.F.; Jarvis, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    The EPRI Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Water Chemistry Guidelines were revised and issued in October 2008. The 2008 Revision of the Guidelines continues to focus on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), which can limit the service life of susceptible materials and components exposed to water chemistry environments. The 2008 Revision also places increased emphasis on fuel performance and meeting the industry goal of zero fuel failures by 2010. As an industry consensus document, the Guidelines were created to provide proactive water chemistry control strategies for mitigating IGSCC, maintaining fuel integrity and controlling radiation fields. The Guidelines provide a technically-based framework for an effective BWR water chemistry program. This paper provides an overview of industry experience relative to the Guidelines. Over the past few years, many BWR units have implemented noble metal chemical application technologies either during plant hot or cold shutdown or at normal power operating conditions. This paper explores plant experience with optimized water chemistry, implementation of various additive chemistries such as noble metal application and zinc addition, and compliance with the Guidelines recommendations. Depleted zinc oxide addition has been broadly applied across the BWR fleet since the 1980s. The guidance for zinc addition has been revised in the Guidelines to reflect concerns with fuel performance. While zinc addition is a successful method for shutdown dose rate control, concerns still exist for high zinc deposition on fuel surfaces, especially when feedwater iron is elevated and as fuel cores are being driven to provide maximum power output over longer fuel cycles. Recent plant experience has shown that the utilization of online noble metal application and continued zinc addition may provide additional benefits for radiation control. Dose rate experiences at plants utilizing the online noble metal application technology and zinc addition

  13. BWR chemistry control status: a summary of industry chemistry status relative to the BWR water chemistry guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, S.E., E-mail: sgarcia@epri.com [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, California (United States); Giannelli, J.F.; Jarvis, M.L., E-mail: jgiannelli@finetech.com [Finetech, Inc., Parsippany, NJ (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The EPRI Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Water Chemistry Guidelines were revised and issued in October 2008. The 2008 Revision of the Guidelines continues to focus on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), which can limit the service life of susceptible materials and components exposed to water chemistry environments. The 2008 Revision also places increased emphasis on fuel performance and meeting the industry goal of zero fuel failures by 2010. As an industry consensus document, the Guidelines were created to provide proactive water chemistry control strategies for mitigating IGSCC, maintaining fuel integrity and controlling radiation fields. The Guidelines provide a technically-based framework for an effective BWR water chemistry program. This paper provides an overview of industry experience relative to the Guidelines. Over the past few years, many BWR units have implemented noble metal chemical application technologies either during plant hot or cold shutdown or at normal power operating conditions. This paper explores plant experience with optimized water chemistry, implementation of various additive chemistries such as noble metal application and zinc addition, and compliance with the Guidelines recommendations. Depleted zinc oxide addition has been broadly applied across the BWR fleet since the 1980s. The guidance for zinc addition has been revised in the Guidelines to reflect concerns with fuel performance. While zinc addition is a successful method for shutdown dose rate control, concerns still exist for high zinc deposition on fuel surfaces, especially when feedwater iron is elevated and as fuel cores are being driven to provide maximum power output over longer fuel cycles. Recent plant experience has shown that the utilization of online noble metal application and continued zinc addition may provide additional benefits for radiation control. Dose rate experiences at plants utilizing the online noble metal application technology and zinc addition

  14. Artificial intelligence applied to fuel management in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz S, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    In this work two techniques of artificial intelligence, neural networks and genetic algorithms were applied to a practical problem of nuclear fuel management; the determination of the optimal fuel reload for a BWR type reactor. This is an important problem in the design of the operation cycle of the reactor. As a result of the application of these techniques, comparable or even better reloads proposals than those given by expert companies in the subject were obtained. Additionally, two other simpler problems in reactor physics were solved: the determination of the axial power profile and the prediction of the value of some variables of interest at the end of the operation cycle of the reactor. Neural networks and genetic algorithms have been applied to solve many problems of engineering because of their versatility but they have been rarely used in the area of fuel management. The results obtained in this thesis indicates the convenience of undertaking further work on this area and suggest the application of these techniques of artificial intelligence to the solution of other problems in nuclear reactor physics. (Author)

  15. Reactor water sampling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor water sampling device for sampling reactor water in an in-core monitor (neutron measuring tube) housing in a BWR type reactor. The upper end portion of a drain pipe of the reactor water sampling device is attached detachably to an in-core monitor flange. A push-up rod is inserted in the drain pipe vertically movably. A sampling vessel and a vacuum pump are connected to the lower end of the drain pipe. A vacuum pump is operated to depressurize the inside of the device and move the push-up rod upwardly. Reactor water in the in-core monitor housing flows between the drain pipe and the push-up rod and flows into the sampling vessel. With such a constitution, reactor water in the in-core monitor housing can be sampled rapidly with neither opening the lid of the reactor pressure vessel nor being in contact with air. Accordingly, operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (I.N.)

  16. Calculation device for fuel power history in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakagami, Masaharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable calculations for power history and various variants of power change in the power history of fuels in a BWR type reactor or the like. Constitution: The outputs of the process computation for the nuclear reactor by a process computer are stored and the reactor core power distribution is judged from the calculated values for the reactor core power distribution based on the stored data. Data such as for thermal power, core flow rate, control rod position and power distribution are recorded where the changes in the power distribution exceed a predetermined amount, and data such as for thermal power and core flow rate are recorded where the changes are within the level of the predetermined amount, as effective data excluding unnecessary data. Accordingly, the recorded data are taken out as required and the fuel power history and the various variants in the fuel power are calculated and determined in a calculation device for fuel power history and variants for fuel power fluctuation. (Furukawa, Y.)

  17. Identification of the reduced order models of a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez S, A.

    2004-01-01

    The present work has as objective to analyze the relative stability of a BWR type reactor. It is analyzed that so adaptive it turns out to identify the parameters of a model of reduced order so that this it reproduces a condition of given uncertainty. This will take of a real fact happened in the La Salle plant under certain operation conditions of power and flow of coolant. The parametric identification is carried out by means of an algorithm of recursive least square and an Output Error model (Output Error), measuring the output power of the reactor when the instability is present, and considering that it is produced by a change in the reactivity of the system in the same way that a sign of type step. Also it is carried out an analytic comparison of the relative stability, analyzing two types of answers: the original answer of the uncertainty of the reactor vs. the obtained response identifying the parameters of the model of reduced order, reaching the conclusion that it is very viable to adapt a model of reduced order to study the stability of a reactor, under the only condition to consider that the dynamics of the reactivity is of step type. (Author)

  18. Singular system analysis of the Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) readings of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) in an unstable event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginestar Peiro, D.; Verdu, G.; Miro, R.

    2006-01-01

    Singular system analysis is a successful technique to separate oscillating components from a given signal. A methodology is proposed to apply this technique to the signals obtained from the LPRMs of a boiling water reactor core and extract the contributions of the in-phase oscillation and the out-of-phase oscillations from the LPRM readings during an unstable event. This methodology has been validated with synthetic signals and simulations of in-phase and out-of-phase oscillations of the Leibstadt reactor. Finally, one case of Ringhals I Stability Benchmark has been analysed. (author)

  19. Identification of the reduced order models of a BWR reactor; Identificacion de modelos de orden reducido de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez S, A. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: augusto@correo.unam.mx

    2004-07-01

    The present work has as objective to analyze the relative stability of a BWR type reactor. It is analyzed that so adaptive it turns out to identify the parameters of a model of reduced order so that this it reproduces a condition of given uncertainty. This will take of a real fact happened in the La Salle plant under certain operation conditions of power and flow of coolant. The parametric identification is carried out by means of an algorithm of recursive least square and an Output Error model (Output Error), measuring the output power of the reactor when the instability is present, and considering that it is produced by a change in the reactivity of the system in the same way that a sign of type step. Also it is carried out an analytic comparison of the relative stability, analyzing two types of answers: the original answer of the uncertainty of the reactor vs. the obtained response identifying the parameters of the model of reduced order, reaching the conclusion that it is very viable to adapt a model of reduced order to study the stability of a reactor, under the only condition to consider that the dynamics of the reactivity is of step type. (Author)

  20. Analysis CFD for the hydrogen transport in the primary containment of a BWR; Analisis CFD para el transporte de hidrogeno en la contencion primaria de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez P, D. A.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Edificio 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: guerreroazteca_69@hotmail.com [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    This study presents a qualitative and quantitative comparison among the CFD GASFLOW and OpenFOAM codes which are related with the phenomenon of hydrogen transport and other gases in the primary containment of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). GASFLOW is a commercial license code that is well validated and that was developed in Germany for the analysis of the gases transport in containments of nuclear reactors. On the other hand, OpenFOAM is an open source code that offers several evaluation solvers for different types of phenomena; in this case, the solver reacting-Foam is used to analyze the hydrogen transport inside the primary containment of the BWR. The results that offer the solver reacting-Foam of OpenFOAM are evaluated in the hydrogen transport calculation and the results are compared with those of the program of commercial license GASFLOW to see if is viable the use of the open source code in the case of the hydrogen transport in the primary containment of a BWR. Of the obtained results so much quantitative as qualitative some differences were identified between both codes, the differences (with a percentage of maximum error of 4%) in the quantitative results are small and they are considered acceptable for this analysis type, also, these differences are attributed mainly to the used transport models, considering that OpenFOAM uses a homogeneous model and GASFLOW uses a heterogeneous model. (Author)

  1. Evaluation of the radial design of fuel cells in an operation cycle of a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez C, J.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2003-01-01

    This work is continuation of one previous in the one that the application of the optimization technique called Tabu search to the radial design of fuel cells of boiling water reactors (BWR, Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The objective function used in the optimization process only include neutron parameters (k-infinite and peak of radial power) considering the cell at infinite media. It was obtained to reduce the cell average enrichment completing the characteristics of reactivity of an original cell. The objective of the present work is to validate the objective function that was used for the radial design of the fuel cell (test cell), analyzing the operation of a one cycle of the reactor in which fuels have been fresh recharged that contain an axial area with the nuclear database of the cell designed instead of the original cell. For it is simulated it with Cm-Presto the cycle 10 of the reactor operation of the Unit 1 of the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde (U1-CNLV). For the cycle evaluation its were applied so much the simulation with the Haling strategy, as the simulation of the one cycle with control rod patterns and they were evaluated the energy generation and several power limits and reactivity that are used as design parameters in fuel reloads of BWR reactors. The results at level of an operation cycle of the reactor, show that the objective function used in the optimization and radial design of the cell is adequate and that it can induce to one good use of the fuel. (Author)

  2. Localized corrosion problems in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coriou, Henri.

    1977-01-01

    Main localized etching on the structure materials of water reactors are studied: stress corrosion on stainless steel 304 (B.W.R), stress corrosion, 'wall thinning' and denting of Inconel 600 vapor generator tubes (P.W.R.). Some mechanisms are examined and practical exemples in reactors are described. Various possible cures are presented [fr

  3. Reactor power control device in BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, Tsuneo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for controlling reactor power based on a start-up/shut down program in a BWR type reactor, as well as for detecting deviation, if occurs, of the power from the start-up/shut down program, to control a recycling flow rate control system or control rod drive mechanisms. Namely, a power instruction section successively executes the start-up/shut down program and controls the coolant recycling system and the control rod driving mechanisms to control the power. A current state monitoring and calculation section receives a process amount, calculates parameters showing the plant state, compares/monitors them with predetermined values, detecting the deviation, if occurs, of the plant state from the start-up/shut down program, and prevents output of a power increase control signal which leads to power increase. A forecasting and monitoring/calculation section forecasts and calculates the plant state when not yet executed steps of the start-up/shut down program are performed, stops the execution of the start-up/shut down program in the next step in a case of forecasting that the results of the calculation will deviate from the start-up/shut down program. (I.S.)

  4. Design of a redundant meteorological station for a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, R.; Celis del Angel, L.; Bucio, F.; Rivero, T.; Palacios, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this work the design of a meteorological station for a reactor type BWR is proposed. Two independent channels of data acquisition that allow him to have a bigger readiness is exposed. It is incorporate sensors without mobile parts to measure speed, wind direction and pluvial precipitation. It also counts, with sensors of global solar radiation, net radiation, barometric pressure, relative humidity and ambient temperature; with them they are possible to be calculated, moreover, other variables as temperature differential, dew point and atmospheric stability. The sensors are placed on a tower to different heights and send their information (each second) to a local registration system, the one which in turn, it remits the data to the monitoring office so that a computer is linked with the system, display and management the information in real time and automatic way. The redundant structure allows that in the event of maintenance the data acquisition is not interrupted, even if the information is transferred to another place. In all the station sections it is used protocols of standard communication to allow that a great quantity of devices can be connected without major problem. The above-mentioned would allow to the operators in the control room to have reliable information during the whole time of the reactor operation. (Author)

  5. Reactor water chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Tarapur Atomic Power Station - 1 and 2 (TAPS) is a twin unit Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) built in 1960's and operating presently at 160MWe. TAPS -1 and 2 are one of the vintage reactors operating in the world and belongs to earlier generation of BWRs has completed 40 years of successful, commercial and safe operation. In 1980s, both the reactors were de-rated from 660MWth to 530MWth due to leaks in the Secondary Steam Generators (SSGs). In BWR the feed water acts as the primary coolant which dissipates the fission heat and thermalises the fast neutrons generated in the core due to nuclear fission reaction and under goes boiling in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) to produce steam. Under the high reactor temperature and pressure, RPV and the primary system materials are highly susceptible to corrosion. In order to avoid local concentration of the chemicals in the RPV of BWR, chemical additives are not recommended for corrosion prevention of the system materials. So to prevent corrosion of the RPV and the primary system materials, corrosion resistant materials like stainless steel (of grade SS304, SS304L and SS316LN) is used as the structural material for most of the primary system components. In case of feed water system, main pipe lines are of carbon steel and the heater shell materials are of carbon steel lined with SS whereas the feed water heater tubes are of SS-304. In addition to the choice of materials, another equally important factor for corrosion prevention and corrosion mitigation of the system materials is maintaining highly pure water quality and strict water chemistry regime for both the feed water and the primary coolant, during operation and shutdown of the reactor. This also helps in controlled migration of corrosion product to and from the reactor core and to reduce radiation field build up across the primary system materials. Experience in this field over four decades added to the incorporation of modern techniques in detection of low

  6. A neutronic assessment of the new Spherical Cermets Fuel concept for the BWR-PB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchrif, A.; Chetaine, A.; Amsil, H.; Bounakhla, M.

    2010-01-01

    The tri-structural-isotopic (TRISO) fuel directly cooled by boiling light water is used in the boiling water reactor with pebble-bed coated particles (BWR-PB). At the lower coolant temperature, the TRISO fuel particles demonstrate an unacceptable irradiation swelling in the silicon carbide coating layer during a fuel cycle. So, the objectives of this paper, on the one hand is to evaluate some neutronic parameters of a new fuel concept, Spherical Cermets Fuel (SCF), for a BWR-PB reactor. On the other hand, to assess the fact of SCF fuel concept on the fuel assembly lifetime and the burn-up characteristic. All the parameters as well as Infinite Multiplication Factor, Spectrum Index, Instantaneous Conversion Ratio and Neutron Energy Spectrum was calculated then compared for the TRISO and the SCF fuel concept. It can be seen from the assessment of fuel assembly burn-up characteristics that the normalised neutron spectra of all the assembly's parts pointed out a thermal spectrum for the SCF fuel assembly's parts than the TRISO one. The SCF fuel element increase the assembly life time about 6.1 EFPY corresponding 8000 MWd/t. So, the fuel assembly can be operated for a reasonably long period without outside refuelling. The difference in the assembly lifetime might leads to SCF fuel concept adopted, because the geometry and concept of TRISO fuel particles are wholly different to SCF ones. (author)

  7. Generic aging management programs for license renewal of BWR reactor coolant systems components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  8. Generic Aging Management Programs for License Renewal of BWR Reactor Coolant System Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  9. BWR 90: The ABB advanced BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced fight water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and the total power generation costs have been low. In the development of BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to the reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher dim that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Thus, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The work is scheduled for completion in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with the 'evolutionary' design BWR 90+. The primary design goal is to develop the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is

  10. CFD Simulation of rigid venting of the containment of a BWR-5 Mark-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo G, I. F.; Vazquez B, A. K.; Velazquez E, L.; Tijerina S, F.; Tapia M, R.

    2016-09-01

    In conditions of prolonged loss of external energy or a severe accident, venting to the atmosphere is an alternative to prevent overpressure and release of fission products from the primary containment of a nuclear reactor. Due to the importance of flow determination through rigid vents, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is proposed to verify the capacity of rigid vents in the primary containment of a boiling water reactor (BWR) under different operating conditions (pressure, temperature and compositions of the fluids). The model predicts and provides detailed information on variables such as mass flow and velocity of the venting gases. In the proposed model the primary containment gas is vented to the atmosphere via rigid vents (pipes) from the dry and wet pit. Is assumed that the container is pressurized because is in a defined scenario, and at one point the venting is open and the gas released into the atmosphere. The objective is to characterize the flow and validate the CFD model for the overpressure conditions that occur in an accident such as a LOCA, Sbo, etc. The model is implemented with Ansys-Fluent general-purpose CFD software based on the geometry of the venting ducts of the containment of a BWR. The model is developed three-dimensional and resolves at steady state for compressible flow and includes the effects of the turbulence represented by the Reynolds stress model. The CFD results are compared with the values of a one-dimensional and isentropic model for compressible flow. The relative similarity of results leads to the conclusion that the proposed CFD model can help to predict the rigid venting capacity of the containment of a BWR, however more information is required for full validation of the proposed model. (Author)

  11. Ultrasonic phased array examination of circumferential weld joint in reactor pressure vessel of BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanekar, Paritosh, E-mail: pnanekar@barc.gov.in [Quality Assurance Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Jothilakshmi, N. [Quality Assurance Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Phased array technique developed for weld joint inspection in BWR pressure vessel. • Simulation studies were carried out for conventional and phased array probe. • Conventional ultrasonic test shows in-adequate weld coverage and poor resolution. • Focused sound beam in phased array results in good resolution and sensitivity. • Ultrasonic phased array technique is validated on mock-up with reference defects. - Abstract: The weld joints in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are required to be examined periodically for assurance of structural integrity. Ultrasonic phased array examination technique has been developed in authors’ laboratory for inspection of the top flange to shell circumferential weld joint in RPV of BWRs, which are in operation in India since the late 1960s. The development involved detailed simulation studies for computation of focal laws followed by validation on mock-up. The paper brings out the limitations of the conventional ultrasonic technique and how this can be overcome by the phased array approach for the weld joint under consideration. The phased array technique was successfully employed for field examination of this weld joint in RPV during the re-fuelling outage.

  12. Simulation of the aspersion system of the core at high pressure (HPCS) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas O, D.; Chavez M, C.

    2012-10-01

    A high-priority topic for the nuclear industry is the safety, consequently a nuclear power plant should have the emergency systems of cooling of the core (ECCS), designed exclusively to enter in operation in the event of an accident with coolant loss, including the design base accident. The objective of the aspersion system of the core at high pressure (HPCS) is to provide in an autonomous way the cooling to the core maintaining for if same the coolant inventory even when a small break is presented that does not allow the depressurization of the reactor and also avoiding excessive temperatures that affect the shielding of the fuel. The present work describes the development of the model and the simulation of the HPCS using the RELAP/SCDAP code. During the process simulation, for the setting in march of the system HPCS in an accident with coolant loss is necessary to implement the main components of the system taking into account what unites them, the main pump, the filled pump, the suction and injection valves, pipes and its water sources that can be condensed storage tanks and the suppression pool. The simulation of this system will complement the model with which counts the Analysis Laboratory in Nuclear Reactors Engineering of the UNAM regarding to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde which does not have a detailed simulation of the emergency cooling systems. (Author)

  13. Prediction of the stability of BWR reactors during the start-up process; Prediccion de la estabilidad de reactores BWR durante el proceso de arranque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz E, J.A.; Castillo D, R. [ININ, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Blazquez M, J.B. [Centro de Investigaciones Energetics, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Av Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are susceptible of uncertainties of power when they are operated to low flows of coolant (W) and high powers (P), being presented this situation mainly in the start-up process. The start-up process could be made but sure if the operator knew the value of the stability index Decay reason (Dr) before going up power and therefore to guarantee the stability. The power and the flow are constantly measures, the index Dr could also be considered its value in real time. The index Dr depends on the power, flow and many other values, such as, the distribution of the flow axial and radial neutronic, the temperature of the feeding water, the fraction of holes and other thermohydraulic and nuclear parameters. A simple relationship of Dr is derived leaving of the pattern reduced of March-Leuba, where three independent variables are had that are the power, the flow and a parameter that it contains the rest of the phenomenology, that is to say all the other quantities that affect the value of Dr. This relationship developed work presently and verified its prediction with data of start-up of commercial reactors could be used for the design of a practical procedure practice of start-up, what would support to the operator to prevent this type of events of uncertainty. (Author)

  14. BWR water chemistry guidelines and PWR primary water chemistry guidelines in Japan – Purpose and technical background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka, E-mail: kawamuh@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Hirano, Hideo [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Katsumura, Yousuke [University of Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, Shunsuke [Tohoku University (Japan); Mizuno, Takayuki [Mie University (Japan); Kitajima, Hideaki; Tsuzuki, Yasuo [Japan Nuclear Safety Institute (Japan); Terachi, Takumi [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc. (Japan); Nagase, Makoto; Usui, Naoshi [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan); Takagi, Junichi; Urata, Hidehiro [Toshiba Corporation (Japan); Shoda, Yasuhiko; Nishimura, Takao [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, Ltd. (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Framework of BWR/PWR water chemistry Guidelines in Japan are presented. • Guideline necessity, definitions, philosophy and technical background are mentioned. • Some guideline settings for control parameters and recommendations are explaines. • Chemistry strategy is also mentioned. - Abstract: After 40 years of light water reactor (LWR) operations in Japan, the sustainable development of water chemistry technologies has aimed to ensure the highest coolant system component integrity and fuel reliability performance for maintaining LWRs in the world; additionally, it aimed to achieve an excellent dose rate reduction. Although reasonable control and diagnostic parameters are utilized by each boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) owner, it is recognized that specific values are not shared among everyone involved. To ensure the reliability of BWR and PWR operation and maintenance, relevant members of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) decided to establish guidelines for water chemistry. The Japanese BWR and PWR water chemistry guidelines provide strategies to improve material and fuel reliability performance as well as to reduce dosing rates. The guidelines also provide reasonable “control values”, “diagnostic values” and “action levels” for multiple parameters, and they stipulate responses when these levels are exceeded. Specifically, “conditioning parameters” are adopted in the Japanese PWR primary water chemistry guidelines. Good practices for operational conditions are also discussed with reference to long-term experience. This paper presents the purpose, technical background and framework of the preliminary water chemistry guidelines for Japanese BWRs and PWRs. It is expected that the guidelines will be helpful as an introduction to achieve safety and reliability during operations.

  15. Estimating boiling water reactor decommissioning costs. A user's manual for the BWR Cost Estimating Computer Program (CECP) software: Draft report for comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierschbach, M.C.

    1994-12-01

    With the issuance of the Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), nuclear power plant licensees are required to submit to the U.S. Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. This user's manual and the accompanying Cost Estimating Computer Program (CECP) software provide a cost-calculating methodology to the NRC staff that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals. The CECP, designed to be used on a personal computer, provides estimates for the cost of decommissioning BWR power stations to the point of license termination. Such cost estimates include component, piping, and equipment removal costs; packaging costs; decontamination costs; transportation costs; burial costs; and manpower costs. In addition to costs, the CECP also calculates burial volumes, person-hours, crew-hours, and exposure person-hours associated with decommissioning

  16. Solution of a benchmark set problems for BWR and PWR reactors with UO2 and MOX fuels using CASMO-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez F, M.A.; Valle G, E. del; Alonso V, G.

    2007-01-01

    In this work some of the results for a group of benchmark problems of light water reactors that allow to study the physics of the fuels of these reactors are presented. These benchmark problems were proposed by Akio Yamamoto and collaborators in 2002 and they include two fuel types; uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) and mixed oxides (MOX). The range of problems that its cover embraces three different configurations: unitary cell for a fuel bar, fuel assemble of PWR and fuel assemble of BWR what allows to carry out an understanding analysis of the problems related with the fuel performance of new generation in light water reactors with high burnt. Also these benchmark problems help to understand the fuel administration in core of a BWR like of a PWR. The calculations were carried out with CMS (of their initials in English Core Management Software), particularly with CASMO-4 that is a code designed to carry out analysis of fuels burnt of fuel bars cells as well as fuel assemblies as much for PWR as for BWR and that it is part in turn of the CMS code. (Author)

  17. Design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel for BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia V, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    In the present thesis, the modifications made to the axial optimization system based on Tabu Search (BT) for the axial design of BWR fuel type are presented, developed previously in the Nuclear Engineering Group of the UNAM Engineering Faculty. With the modifications what is mainly looked is to consider the particular characteristics of the mechanical design of the GE12 fuel type, used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central (CNLV) and that it considers the fuel bars of partial longitude. The information obtained in this thesis will allow to plan nuclear fuel reloads with the best conditions to operate in a certain cycle guaranteeing a better yield and use in the fuel burnt, additionally people in charge in the reload planning will be favored with the changes carried out to the system for the design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel, which facilitate their handling and it reduces their execution time. This thesis this developed in five chapters that are understood in the following way in general: Chapter 1: It approaches the basic concepts of the nuclear energy, it describes the physical and chemical composition of the atoms as well as that of the uranium isotopes, the handling of the uranium isotope by means of the nuclear fission until arriving to the operation of the nuclear reactors. Chapter 2: The nuclear fuel cycle is described, the methods for its extraction, its conversion and its enrichment to arrive to the stages of the nuclear fuel management used in the reactors are described. Beginning by the radial design, the axial design and the core design of the nuclear reactor related with the fuel assemblies design. Chapter 3: the optimization methods of nuclear fuel previously used are exposed among those that are: the genetic algorithms method, the search methods based on heuristic rules and the application of the tabu search method, which was used for the development of this thesis. Chapter 4: In this part the used methodology to the

  18. Prevention device for rapid reactor core shutdown in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Yuji; Karatsu, Hiroyuki.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To surely prevent rapid shutdown of a nuclear reactor upon partial load interruption due to rapid increase in the system frequency. Constitution: If a partial load interruption greater than the sum of the turbine by-pass valve capacity and the load setting bias portion is applied in a BWR type power plant, the amount of main steams issued from the reactor is decreased, the thermal input/output balance of the reactor is lost, the reactor pressure is increased, the void is collapsed, the neutron fluxes are increased and the reactor power rises to generate rapid reactor shutdown. In view of the above, the turbine speed signal is compared with a speed setting value in a recycling flowrate control device and the recycling pump is controlled to decrease the recycling flowrate in order to compensate the increase in the neutron fluxes accompanying the reactor power up. In this way, transient changes in the reactor core pressure and the neutron fluxes are kept within a setting point for the rapid reactor shutdown operation thereby enabling to continue the plant operation. (Horiuchi, T.)

  19. Emergency core cooling system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Yoji

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly recover the water level in the reactor upon occurrence of slight leakages in the reactor coolant pressure boundary, by promoting the depressurization in the reactor to thereby rapidly increase the high pressure core spray flow rate. Constitution: Upon occurrence of reactor water level reduction, a reactor isolation cooling system and a high pressure core spray system are actuated to start the injection of coolants into a reactor pressure vessel. In this case, if the isolation cooling system is failed to decrease the flow rate in a return pipeway, flow rate indicators show a lower value as compared with a predetermined value. The control device detects it and further confirms the rotation of a high pressure spray pump to open a valve. By the above operation, coolants pumped by the high pressure spray pump is flown by way of a communication pipeway to the return pipeway and sprayed from the top of the pressure vessel. This allows the vapors on the water surface in the pressure vessel to be cooled rapidly and increases the depressurization effects. (Horiuchi, T.)

  20. Boiling water reactor life extension monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancavage, P.

    1991-01-01

    In 1991 the average age of GE-supplied Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) reached 15 years. The distribution of BWR ages range from three years to 31 years. Several of these plants have active life extension programmes, the most notable of which is the Monticello plant in Minnesota which is the leading BWR plant for license renewal in the United States. The reactor pressure vessel and its internals form the heart of the boiling water reactor (BWR) power plant. Monitoring the condition of the vessel as it operates provides a continuous report on the structural integrity of the vessel and internals. Monitors for fatigue, stress corrosion and neutron effects can confirm safety margins and predict residual life. Every BWR already incorporates facilities to track the key aging mechanisms of fatigue, stress corrosion and neutron embrittlement. Fatigue is measured by counting the cycles experienced by the pressure vessel. Stress corrosion is gauged by periodic measurements of primary water conductivity and neutron embrittlement is tracked by testing surveillance samples. The drawbacks of these historical procedures are that they are time consuming, they lag the current operation, and they give no overall picture of structural integrity. GE has developed an integrated vessel fitness monitoring system to fill the gaps in the historical, piecemetal monitoring of the BWR vessel and internals and to support plant life extension. (author)

  1. Investigation of decreasing reactor coolant inventory as a mechanism to reduce power during a BWR ATWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, C.E.; Chexal, V.K.; Layman, W.; Hentzen, R.D.; Gose, G.C.

    1985-01-01

    A best-estimate analysis was performed to evaluate the technique of intentionally reducing reactor coolant inventory in order to reduce power during a BWR ATWS event. The ATWS was initiated by closure of the main steam isolation valves. The analysis was performed with the RETRAN-02 computer code utilizing the one-dimensional kinetics option. The one-dimensional cross sections were developed using the SIMULATE-E and SIMTRAN-E computer codes. The MSIV closure transient provides some of the more severe conditions following a postulated failure to scram. In this transient, the only mechanism for removing energy from the vessel is through the safety relief valve system which results in a heating up of the suppression pool fluid. Consequently, the reactor power must be reduced so that the suppression pool temperature limits are not exceeded. Under the proposed emergency procedure guidelines for the ATWS event, the reactor vessel water level will be lowered to reduce system power. This analysis evaluated the dynamic response of the system as the water level was lowered to the top of active fuel evaluation. Correlating the system power and flow patterns to water level was of particular interest in the analysis. Under natural circulating conditions, the system flows, core power, and pressure responses are extremely tightly coupled and the analysis results proved to be very sensitive to the modeling of downcomer, upper plenum, and core regions

  2. Development of the radiation models of a BWR type reactor and it facility in the SUN-RAH; Desarrollo de modelos de radiacion de un reactor tipo BWR y su instalacion en el SUN-RAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron A, I. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: isbarron@yahoo.com.mx

    2005-07-01

    This work about generation models, transport in processes and radioactive contamination of areas of a BWR central, is an amplification to the project developed in the UNAM to have a support tool in subjects or electric generation courses. It is planned about the implementation of models of radiation generation in a BWR type reactor for complement the functions developed in the University Simulator of Nucleo electric- Boiling water reactor (SUN-RAH) which it has been implemented in Simulink of MatLab and it has a model for the dynamics of one nucleo electric central that presents the main characteristics of the reactor vessel, the recirculation system, steam lines, turbines, generator, condensers and feeding water, defined by the main processes that intervene in the generation of energy of these plants. By this way the radiation monitoring systems for area and process, operate simultaneously with the processes of energy generation, with that is possible to observe the changes that present with respect to the operation conditions of the plant, and likewise to appreciate the radiation transport process through the components of the reactor, steam lines and turbines, for different operation conditions and possible faults that they could be presented during the reactor operation. (Author)

  3. Repair and preventive maintenance technology for BWR reactor internals and piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsubo, Tooru; Itou, Takashi; Sakashita, Akihiro

    2009-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of welding portion has found in many domestic and foreign BWR reactor internals and Primary Loop Recirculation piping. Also, repair and preventive maintenance technologies for SCC has been developed and/or adopted to BWRs in recent years. This paper introduces the sample of these technologies, such as seal-welding for SCC on BWR reactor internals, preventive maintenance technology for PLR piping such as Corrosion Resistant Cladding, Internal Polishing and Induction Heating Stress Improvement. These technologies are introduced on 'E-Journal of Advanced Maintenance', which is an international journal on a exclusive website of Japan Society of Maintenology. (author)

  4. Coolant make-up device for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a coolant make-up device, an opening of a pressure equalizing pipeline in a pressure vessel is disposed in coolants above a reactor core and below a usual fluctuation range of a reactor vessel water level. Further, a float check valve is disposed to the pressure equalizing pipeline for preventing coolants in the pressure vessel flowing into the pipeline. If the water level in the pressure vessel is lowered than the setting position for the float check valve, the float drops by its own weight to open the opening of the pressure equalizing pipeline. Then, steams in the pressure vessel are flown into the pipeline, to equalize the pressure between a coolant storage tank and the pressure vessel of the reactor. Coolants in the coolant storage tank is injected to the pressure vessel by way of the water injection pipeline due to the difference of the pressure head between the water level in the coolants storage tank and the water level in the pressure vessel. If the coolants are lowered than the setting position for the float check value, the float check valve does not close unless the water level is recovered to the setting position for the float valve and, accordingly, the coolant make-up is continued. (N.H.)

  5. Development of the radiation models of a BWR type reactor and it facility in the SUN-RAH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barron A, I.

    2005-01-01

    This work about generation models, transport in processes and radioactive contamination of areas of a BWR central, is an amplification to the project developed in the UNAM to have a support tool in subjects or electric generation courses. It is planned about the implementation of models of radiation generation in a BWR type reactor for complement the functions developed in the University Simulator of Nucleo electric- Boiling water reactor (SUN-RAH) which it has been implemented in Simulink of MatLab and it has a model for the dynamics of one nucleo electric central that presents the main characteristics of the reactor vessel, the recirculation system, steam lines, turbines, generator, condensers and feeding water, defined by the main processes that intervene in the generation of energy of these plants. By this way the radiation monitoring systems for area and process, operate simultaneously with the processes of energy generation, with that is possible to observe the changes that present with respect to the operation conditions of the plant, and likewise to appreciate the radiation transport process through the components of the reactor, steam lines and turbines, for different operation conditions and possible faults that they could be presented during the reactor operation. (Author)

  6. Development of water chemistry diagnosis system for BWR primary loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Makoto; Asakura, Yamato; Sakagami, Masaharu; Uchida, Shunsuke; Ohsumi, Katsumi.

    1988-01-01

    The prototype of a water chemistry diagnosis system for BWR primary loop has been developed. Its purposes are improvement of water chemistry control and reduction of the work burden on plant chemistry personnel. It has three main features as follows. (1) Intensifying the observation of water chemistry conditions by variable sampling intervals based on the on-line measured data. (2) Early detection of water chemistry data trends using a second order regression curve which is calculated from the measured data, and then searching the cause of anomaly if anything (3) Diagnosis of Fe concentration in feedwater using model simulations, in order to lower the radiation level in the primary system. (author)

  7. Identification of process dynamics. Stability monitoring in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamsson, P.; Hallgren, P.

    1991-06-01

    Identification of process dynamics is used for stability monitoring in nuclear reactors (Boiling Water Reactor). This report treats the problem of estimating a damping factor and a resonance frequency from the neutron flux as measured in the reactor. A new parametric online method for identification is derived and presented, and is shown to meet the requirements of stability monitoring. The technique for estimating the process parameters is based on a recursive lattice filter algorithm. The problem of time varying parameters and offset, as well as offline experiments and signal processing are treated. All parts are implemented in a realtime program, using the language C. In comparison with earlier identifications, the new way of estimating the damping factor is shown to work well. Estimates of both the damping factor and the resonance frequency show a stable and reliable behavior. Future development and improvements are also indicated. (au)

  8. A model for oxidizing species concentrations in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, B.; Chexal, B.; Pathania, R.; Chun, J.; Ballinger, R.; Abdollahian, D.

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate and control the intergranular stress corrosion cracking of boiling water reactor (BWR) vessel internal components requires knowledge of the concentration of oxidizing species that affects the electrochemical potentials in various regions of a BWR. In a BWR flow circuit, as water flows through the radiation field, the radiolysis process and chemical reactions lead to the production of species such as oxygen, hydrogen, and hydrogen peroxide. Since chemistry measurements are difficult inside BWRs, analytical tools have been developed by Ruiz and Lin, Ibe and Uchida and Chun and Ballinger for estimating the concentration of species that provide the necessary input for water chemistry control and material protection

  9. Boron concentration evolution in the temporary curtains of a BWR reactor. Burcur code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano Aguado, M.; Perlado Martin, J.M.; Minguez Torres, E.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical model and the user's guide of the code Burcur is included. This code analyzes the burnable poison concentration of the temporary curtains as a function of time, for BWR reactors of the 7 x 7 design. The computing time being reasonably short, the number of burnup steps is as high as necessary.(author) [es

  10. Damage by radiation in structural materials of BWR reactor vessels; Dano por radiacion en materiales estructurales de vasijas de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, E.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E. [Departamento de Sintesis y Caracterizacion de Materiales, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The structural materials which are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors undergo degradation in their mechanical properties mainly due to the damage produced by the fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. The mechanisms of neutron damage in this type of materials are experimentally studied, through the irradiation of vessel steel in experimental reactors for a quickly ageing. Alternately the neutron damage through steel irradiation with heavy ions is simulated. In this work the first results of the damage induced by irradiation of a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor are shown. The irradiation was performed with fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}) in the TRIGA Mark III Salazar reactor and separately with Ni{sup +3} ions in a Tandetrom accelerator (E= 4.8 MeV and an ion flux rank of 0.1 to 53 ions/A{sup 2}). (Author)

  11. Prediction of the stability of BWR reactors during the start-up process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz E, J.A.; Castillo D, R.; Blazquez M, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    The Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are susceptible of uncertainties of power when they are operated to low flows of coolant (W) and high powers (P), being presented this situation mainly in the start-up process. The start-up process could be made but sure if the operator knew the value of the stability index Decay reason (Dr) before going up power and therefore to guarantee the stability. The power and the flow are constantly measures, the index Dr could also be considered its value in real time. The index Dr depends on the power, flow and many other values, such as, the distribution of the flow axial and radial neutronic, the temperature of the feeding water, the fraction of holes and other thermohydraulic and nuclear parameters. A simple relationship of Dr is derived leaving of the pattern reduced of March-Leuba, where three independent variables are had that are the power, the flow and a parameter that it contains the rest of the phenomenology, that is to say all the other quantities that affect the value of Dr. This relationship developed work presently and verified its prediction with data of start-up of commercial reactors could be used for the design of a practical procedure practice of start-up, what would support to the operator to prevent this type of events of uncertainty. (Author)

  12. Modelling perspectives on radiation chemistry in BWR reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Eishi

    1991-01-01

    Development of a full-system boiling water reactor core model started in 1982. The model included a two-region reactor core, one with and one without boiling. Key design parameters consider variable dose rates in a three-layer liquid downcomer. Dose rates in the core and downcomer include both generation and recombination reactions of species. Agreement is good between calculations and experimental data of oxygen concentration as a function of hydrogen concentration for different bubble sizes. Oxygen concentration is reduced in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) by increasing bubble size. The multilayer model follows the oxygen data better than a single-layered model at high concentrations of hydrogen. Key reactions are reduced to five radiolysis reactions and four decomposition reactions for hydrogen peroxide. Calculations by the DOT 3 code showed dose rates from neutrons and gamma rays in various parts of the core. Concentrations of oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and hydrogen were calculated by the model as a function of time from core inlet. Similar calculations for NWC and HWC were made as a function of height from core inlet both in the boiling channel an the bypass channel. Finally the model was applied to calculate the oxygen plus half the hydrogen peroxide concentrations as a function of hydrogen concentration to compare with data from five plants. Power density distribution with core height was given for an early stage and an end stage of a cycle. Increases of dose rates in the turbine for seven plants were shown as a function of increased hydrogen concentration in the reactor water

  13. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  14. Water chemistry experiences in a Japanese BWR during preoperational test period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, K.; Maeda, K.; Nakamura, M.

    1994-01-01

    The interest in organic impurities intrusion into the BWR's coolant has been increased in recent years. Organic impurities can be measured as total organic carbons (TOC) by using commercial TOC measuring instruments. The corrosive impurities such as sulfates and chlorides, produced by decomposition of the TOC, will enhance the crack growth rate of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the reactor cooling system. During the preoperational test period, the reactor water quality changed remarkably by TOC intrusion. The TOC intrusion was monitored by measuring main steam conductivity. It is appeared that the main steam conductivity measurement is one of the effective and reliable techniques to detect the TOC intrusion into the reactor. (authors). 4 figs., 5 refs

  15. Outline of advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshio Matsuo

    1987-01-01

    The ABWR (Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) is based on construction and operational experience in Japan, USA and Europe. It was developed jointly by the BWR supplieres, General Electric, Hitachi, and Toshiba, as the next generation BWR for Japan. The Tokyo Electric Power Co. provided leadership and guidance in developing the ABWR, and in combination with five other Japanese electric power companies. The major objectives in developing the ABWR are: 1. Enhanced plant operability, maneuverability and daily load-following capability; 2. Increased plant safety and operating margins; 3. Improved plant availability and capacity factor; 4. Reduced occupational radiation exposure; 5. Reduced radwaste volume, and 6. Reduced plant capital and operating costs. (Liu)

  16. Study on reactor vessel replacement (RVR) for 1100 MW class BWR plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, J.; Kawamura, S.; Aoki, M.; Mori, T.

    2001-01-01

    Plant Life Management (PLM) is being studied in Japan, and reactor vessel replacement (RVR) is being considered as one option. Since reactor internals, except for reusable parts, and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are replaced, the RVR provides an effective technology for extending the service life of nuclear power plants substantially. At ICONE 7, we reported on the technical viability of the RVR for BWR4-type 800 MWe class plants. This time, we rationalized the RVR method through a study for BWR5-type 1100 MWe class plants to reduce the RVR duration and evaluated the technical viability and the economic efficiency of the method. In addition, we discuss how to dispose of the RPV to complete a scenario of the process from the RVR to its final disposal. (author)

  17. Evaluation of the radial design of fuel cells in an operation cycle of a BWR reactor; Evaluacion del diseno radial de celdas de combustible en un ciclo de operacion de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez C, J.; Martin del Campo M, C. [Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: jgco@ver.megared.net.mx

    2003-07-01

    This work is continuation of one previous in the one that the application of the optimization technique called Tabu search to the radial design of fuel cells of boiling water reactors (BWR, Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The objective function used in the optimization process only include neutron parameters (k-infinite and peak of radial power) considering the cell at infinite media. It was obtained to reduce the cell average enrichment completing the characteristics of reactivity of an original cell. The objective of the present work is to validate the objective function that was used for the radial design of the fuel cell (test cell), analyzing the operation of a one cycle of the reactor in which fuels have been fresh recharged that contain an axial area with the nuclear database of the cell designed instead of the original cell. For it is simulated it with Cm-Presto the cycle 10 of the reactor operation of the Unit 1 of the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde (U1-CNLV). For the cycle evaluation its were applied so much the simulation with the Haling strategy, as the simulation of the one cycle with control rod patterns and they were evaluated the energy generation and several power limits and reactivity that are used as design parameters in fuel reloads of BWR reactors. The results at level of an operation cycle of the reactor, show that the objective function used in the optimization and radial design of the cell is adequate and that it can induce to one good use of the fuel. (Author)

  18. Fuel loading method to exchangeable reactor core of BWR type reactor and its core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koguchi, Kazushige.

    1995-01-01

    In a fuel loading method for an exchangeable reactor core of a BWR type reactor, at least two kinds of fresh fuel assemblies having different reactivities between axial upper and lower portions are preliminarily prepared, and upon taking out fuel assemblies of advanced combustion and loading the fresh fuel assemblies dispersingly, they are disposed so as to attain a predetermined axial power distribution in the reactor. At least two kinds of fresh fuel assemblies have a content of burnable poisons different between the axial upper portion and lower portions. In addition, reactivity characteristics are made different at a region higher than the central boundary and a region lower than the central boundary which is set within a range of about 6/24 to 16/24 from the lower portion of the fuel effective length. There can be attained axial power distribution as desired such as easy optimization of the axial power distribution, high flexibility, and flexible flattening of the power distribution, and it requires no special change in view of the design and has a good economical property. (N.H.)

  19. Compact modular BWR (CM-BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennern, Larry; Boardman, Charles; Carroll, Douglas G.; Hida, Takahiko

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary assessment has shown that a small 350 MWe BWR reactor can be placed within a close fitting steel containment vessel that is 7.1 meters inside diameter. This allows the technology and manufacturing capability currently used to fabricate large ABWR reactor vessels to be used to provide a factory fabricated containment vessel for a 350 MWe BWR. When a close fitted steel containment is combined with a passive closed loop isolation condenser system and a natural circulating reactor system that contains a large water inventory, primary system leaks cannot uncover the core. This eliminates many of the safety systems needed in response to a LOCA that are common to large, conventional plant designs including. Emergency Core Flooding, Automatic Depressurization System, Active Residual Heat Removal, Safety Related Auxiliary Cooling, Safety Related Diesel Generators, Hydrogen Re-Combiners, Ex-vessel Core Retention and Cooling. By fabricating the containment in a factory and eliminating most of the conventional safety systems, the construction schedule is shortened and the capital cost reduced to levels that would not otherwise be possible for a relatively small modular BWR. This makes the CM-BWR a candidate for applications where smaller incremental power additions are desired relative to a large ALWR or where the local infrastructure is not able to accommodate a conventional ALWR plant rated at 1350 MWe or more. This paper presents a preliminary design description of a Compact Modular BWR (CM-BWR) whose design features dramatically reduce the size and cost of the reactor building and associated safety systems. (author)

  20. Reactor water spontaneous circulation structure in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazumi

    1998-01-01

    The gap between the inner wall of a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor and a reactor core shroud forms a down comer in which reactor water flows downwardly. A feedwater jacket to which feedwater at low temperature is supplied is disposed at the outer circumference of the pressure vessel just below a gas/water separator. The reactor water at the outer circumferential portion just below the air/water separator is cooled by the feedwater jacket, and the feedwater after cooling is supplied to the feedwater entrance disposed below the feedwater jacket by way of a feedwater introduction line to supply the feedwater to the lower portion of the down comer. This can cool the reactor water in the down comer to increase the reactor water density in the down comer thereby forming strong downward flows and promote the recycling of the reactor water as a whole. With such procedures, the reactor water can be recycled stably only by the difference of the specific gravity of the reactor water without using an internal pump. In addition, the increase of the height of the pressure vessel can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  1. Simulation of the injection system of cooling water to low pressure (Lpci) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP; Simulacion del sistema de inyeccion de agua de refrigeracion a baja presion (LPCI) para un reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR) basado en RELAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado C, R. A.; Lopez S, E.; Chavez M, C., E-mail: renedelgado2015@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The present article describes the modeling and simulation of the Injection System of Cooling Water to Low Pressure (Lpci) for the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Is very important to be able to predict the behavior of the nuclear plant in the case of an emergency stop, and while nearer to the reality are the results of a simulation, better is the safety protocol that can be devised. In the Engineering Faculty of the UNAM at the present is had logical models of the safety systems, but due to the nature of the same, these simulations do not provide of the quantity of enough information to be able to reproduce with more accuracy the behavior of the Lpci in the case of a severe accident. For this reason, the RELAP code was used for the flows modeling, components and structures of heat transfers in relation to the system Lpci. The modeling of the components is carried out with base on technical information of the nuclear plant and the results will be corroborated with information in reference documents as the Rasp (the Reactor analysis support package) and the Fsar (Final safety analysis report) for the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  2. Calculation of limit cycle amplitudes in commercial boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Perez, R.B.; Cacuci, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the dynamic behavior of a boiling water reactor (BWR) in the nonlinear region corresponding to linearly unstable conditions. A nonlinear model of a typical BWR was developed. The equations underlying this model represent a one-dimensional void reactivity feedback, point kinetics with a single delayed neutron group, fuel behavior, and recirculation loop dynamics (described by a single-node integral momentum equation)

  3. Overview of activities for the reduction of dose rates in Swiss boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Schenker, E.

    1993-01-01

    Since March 1990, zinc has been added to the reactor water of the boiling water reactor (BWR) Leibstadt (KKL) and, since January 1991, iron has been added to the BWR Muehleberg (KKM). These changes in reactor water chemistry were accompanied by a comprehensive R+D programme. This paper covers three selected topics: a) the statistical analysis of KKL reactor water data before and after zinc addition; b) the analysis of the KKL reactor water during the 1991 annual shutdown; c) laboratory autoclave tests to clarify the role of water additives on the cobalt deposition on austenitic steel surfaces. (author) 2 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Core followup studies of the Tarapur Reactors with the three dimensional BWR simulator COMTEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, S. R.; Jagannathan, V.; Mohanakrishnan, P.; Srinivasan, K. R.; Rastogi, B. P.

    1976-07-01

    Both the units of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station started operation in the year 1969. Since then, these units have completed three cycles. For efficient operation and fuel management of these reactors, a three dimensional BWR simulator COMETG has been developed. The reactors are closely being followed using the simulator. The detailed analyses for cycle 3/4 operation of both the units are described in the paper. The results show very good agreement between calculated and measured values. It is concluded that reactor core behaviour could be predicted in a satisfactory manner with the core simulator COMETG.

  5. BWR Steam Dryer Alternating Stress Assessment Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morante, R. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hambric, S. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ziada, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report presents an overview of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) steam dryer design; the fatigue cracking failures that occurred at the Quad Cities (QC) plants and their root causes; a history of BWR Extended Power Uprates (EPUs) in the USA; and a discussion of steam dryer modifications/replacements, alternating stress mechanisms on steam dryers, and structural integrity evaluations (static and alternating stress).

  6. Updating of the costs of the nuclear fuels of the equilibrium reloading of the A BWR and EPR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega C, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    In the last two and a half years, the price of the uranium in the market spot has ascended of US$20.00 dollars by lb U 3O 8 in January, 2005 to a maximum of US$137.00 dollars by Ib U 3 O 8 by the middle of 2007. At the moment this price has been stabilized in US$90.00 dollars by Ib U 3 O 8 such for the market spot, like for the long term contracts. In this work the reasons of this increment are analyzed, as well as their impact in the fuel prices of the balance recharge of the advanced reactors of boiling water (A BWR) and of the advanced water at pressure reactors (EPR). (Author)

  7. Control in fabrication of PWR and BWR type reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorskij, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    Both destructive and non-destructive testing methods now in use in fabrication of BWR and PWR type reactor fuel elements at foreign plants are reviewed. Technological procedures applied in fabrication of fuel elements and fuel assemblies are described. Major attention is paid to radiographic, ultrasonic, metallographic, visual and autoclavic testings. A correspondence of the methods applied to the ASTM standards is discussed. The most part of the countries are concluded the apply similar testing methods enabling one to reliably evaluate the quality of primary materials and fabricated fuel elements and thus meeting the demands to contemporary PWR and BWR type reactor fuel elements. Practically all fuel element and pipe fabrication plants in Western Europe, Asia and America use the ASTM standards as the basis for the quality contr [ru

  8. Multi-physical developments for safety related investigations of low moderated boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenker, Markus Thomas

    2014-12-19

    The main objective of this dissertation is the development and optimization of a low moderated boiling water reactor (BWR) core with improved fuel utilization to be incorporated in a Gen II BWR nuclear power plant. The assessment of the new core design is done by comparing it with a full MOX BWR core design regarding neutron physical and thermal-hydraulic design and safety criteria (e.g. inherent reactivity coefficients) and different sustainability parameters (e.g. conversion ratio).

  9. Multi-physical Developments for Safety Related Investigations of Low Moderated Boiling Water Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Schlenker, Markus Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this dissertation is the development and optimization of a low moderated boiling water reactor (BWR) core with improved fuel utilization to be incorporated in a Gen II BWR nuclear power plant. The assessment of the new core design is done by comparing it with a full MOX BWR core design regarding neutron physical and thermal-hydraulic design and safety criteria (e.g. inherent reactivity coefficients) and different sustainability parameters (e.g. conversion ratio).

  10. Fracture assessment of a main reactor coolant pump in a BWR with encountered defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickstad, B [Swedish Plant Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1988-12-31

    This document presents a case-study fracture assessment in BWR type reactor components. A cast stainless steel presenting defects due to thermal is studied. The stress analysis performed by aid of a finite element technique shows that a Leak Before Break situation could be expected. Nevertheless, it may be concluded that the cross section of the pump where the defect area was located can withstand very deep cracks before the risk of failure becomes unacceptable. (TEC).

  11. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  12. Experimental simulation of the water cooling of corium spread over the floor of a BWR containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morage, F.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Podowski, M.Z. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with an experimental investigation of the cooling effect of water collected on the surface of corium released onto the floor of a BWR drywell. In the present experiments, the actual reactor materials were replaced by simulant materials. Specifically, the results are shown for Freon-11 film boiling over liquid Wood`s metal spread above a solid porous surface through which argon gas was injected. An analysis of the obtained experimental data revealed that the actual film boiling heat transfer between a molten pool of corium and the water above the pool should be more efficient than predicted by using standard correlations for boiling over solid surfaces. This effect will be further augmented by the gas released due to the ablation of concrete floor beneath the corium and percolating towards its upper surface and into through the water layer above.

  13. CFD Simulation of rigid venting of the containment of a BWR-5 Mark-II reactor; Simulacion CFD de los venteos rigidos de la contencion de un reactor BWR-5 Mark-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo G, I. F.; Vazquez B, A. K.; Velazquez E, L. [Instituto Nacional de Electricidad y Energias Limpias, Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Tijerina S, F.; Tapia M, R., E-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx [CFE, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Federal Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, 91476 Municipio Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    In conditions of prolonged loss of external energy or a severe accident, venting to the atmosphere is an alternative to prevent overpressure and release of fission products from the primary containment of a nuclear reactor. Due to the importance of flow determination through rigid vents, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is proposed to verify the capacity of rigid vents in the primary containment of a boiling water reactor (BWR) under different operating conditions (pressure, temperature and compositions of the fluids). The model predicts and provides detailed information on variables such as mass flow and velocity of the venting gases. In the proposed model the primary containment gas is vented to the atmosphere via rigid vents (pipes) from the dry and wet pit. Is assumed that the container is pressurized because is in a defined scenario, and at one point the venting is open and the gas released into the atmosphere. The objective is to characterize the flow and validate the CFD model for the overpressure conditions that occur in an accident such as a LOCA, Sbo, etc. The model is implemented with Ansys-Fluent general-purpose CFD software based on the geometry of the venting ducts of the containment of a BWR. The model is developed three-dimensional and resolves at steady state for compressible flow and includes the effects of the turbulence represented by the Reynolds stress model. The CFD results are compared with the values of a one-dimensional and isentropic model for compressible flow. The relative similarity of results leads to the conclusion that the proposed CFD model can help to predict the rigid venting capacity of the containment of a BWR, however more information is required for full validation of the proposed model. (Author)

  14. Radionuclide inventory calculation in VVER and BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhaddane, A.; Farkas, F.; Slugen, V.; Ackermann, L.; Schienbein, M.

    2014-01-01

    The paper shows different aspects in the radionuclide inventory determination. Precise determination of the neutron flux distribution, presented for a BRW reactor, is vital for the activation calculations. The precision can be improved utilizing variance reduction methods as importance treatment, weight windows etc. Direct calculation of the radionuclide inventory via Monte Carlo code is presented for a VVER reactor. Burn-up option utilized in this calculation appears to be proper for reactor internal components. However, it will not be probably effective outside the reactor core. Further calculations in this area are required to support the forth-set findings. (authors)

  15. Future directions in boiling water reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, D.R.; Hucik, S.A.; Duncan, J.D.; Sweeney, J.I.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is being developed by an international team of BWR manufacturers to respond to worldwide utility needs in the 1990's. Major objectives of the ABWR program are design simplification; improved safety and reliability; reduced construction, fuel and operating costs; improved maneuver-ability; and reduced occupational exposure and radwaste. The ABWR incorporates the best proven features from BWR designs in Europe, Japan and the United States and application of leading edge technology. Key features of the ABWR are internal recirculation pumps; fine-motion, electrohydraulic control rod drives; digital control and instrumentation; multiplexed, fiber optic cabling netwoek; pressure suppression containment with horizontal vents; cylindrical reinforced concrete containment; structural integration of the containment and reactor building; severe accident capability; state-of-the-art fuel; advanced trubine/generator with 52'' last stage buckets; and advanced radwaste technology. The ABWR is ready for lead plant application in Japan, where it is being developed as the next generation Japan standard BWR under the guidance and leadership of The Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. and a group of Japanese BWR utilities. In the United States it is being adapted to the needs of US utilities through the Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced LWR Requirements Program, and is being reviewed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for certification as a preapproved US standard BWR under the US Department of Energy's ALWR Design Verification Program. These cooperative Japanese and US programs are expected to establish the ABWR as a world class BWR for the 1990's...... (author)

  16. Development of new irradiation facility for BWR safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Yuji; Magome, Hirokatsu; Iida, Kazuhiro; Hanawa, Hiroshi; Ohmi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    In JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), about the irradiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel and the stress corrosion cracking of reactor core composition apparatus concerning the long-term use of the light water reactor (BWR), in order to check the influence of the temperature, pressure, and water quality, etc on BWR condition. The water environmental control facility which performs irradiation assisted stress corrosion-cracking (IASCC) evaluation under BWR irradiation environment was fabricated in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor). This report is described the outline of manufacture of the water environmental control facility for doing an irradiation test using the saturation temperature capsule after JMTR re-operation. (author)

  17. TRAC-BD1: transient reactor analysis code for boiling-water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spore, J.W.; Weaver, W.L.; Shumway, R.W.; Giles, M.M.; Phillips, R.E.; Mohr, C.M.; Singer, G.L.; Aguilar, F.; Fischer, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) version of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to provide an advanced best-estimate predictive capability for the analysis of postulated accidents in BWRs. The TRAC-BD1 program provides the Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis capability for BWRs and for many BWR related thermal hydraulic experimental facilities. This code features a three-dimensional treatment of the BWR pressure vessel; a detailed model of a BWR fuel bundle including multirod, multibundle, radiation heat transfer, leakage path modeling capability, flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment, reflood tracking capability for both falling films and bottom flood quench fronts, and consistent treatment of the entire accident sequence. The BWR component models in TRAC-BD1 are described and comparisons with data presented. Application of the code to a BWR6 LOCA is also presented

  18. Simulation of hydrogen deflagration and detonation in a BWR reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, M.; Silde, A.; Lindholm, I.; Huhtanen, R.; Sjoevall, H.

    2002-01-01

    A systematic study was carried out to investigate the hydrogen behaviour in a BWR reactor building during a severe accident. BWR core contains a large amount of Zircaloy and the containment is relatively small. Because containment leakage cannot be totally excluded, hydrogen can build up in the reactor building, where the atmosphere is normal air. The objective of the work was to investigate, whether hydrogen can form flammable and detonable mixtures in the reactor building, evaluate the possibility of onset of detonation and assess the pressure loads under detonation conditions. The safety concern is, whether the hydrogen in the reactor building can detonate and whether the external detonation can jeopardize the containment integrity. The analysis indicated that the possibility of flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in the reactor building could not be ruled out in case of a 20 mm 2 leakage from the containment. The detonation analyses indicated that maximum pressure spike of about 7 MPa was observed in the reactor building room selected for the analysis

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Cacuci, D.G.; Perez, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Recent stability tests in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) have indicated that these reactors can exhibit the special nonlinear behavior of following a closed trajectory called limit cycle. The existence of a limit cycle corresponds to an oscillation of fixed amplitude and period. During these tests, such oscillations had their amplitudes limited to about +- 15% of the operating power. Since limit cycles are fairly insensitive to parameter variations, it is possible to operate a BWR under conditions that sustain a limit cycle (of fixed amplitude and period) over a finite range of reactor parameters

  20. Connected analysis nuclear-thermo-hydraulic of parallel channels of a BWR reactor using distributed computation; Analisis acoplado nuclear-termohidraulico de canales paralelos de un reactor BWR empleando computacion distribuida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Gonzalez, Rina Margarita

    2007-07-15

    developed work only concentrates in the reactor core, but taking advantage of the modularity that PVM offers, it is possible to add component such as separators and steam dryers, lines of steam and feed water to obtain a model of a complete closed circuit. The applications concentrate mainly in the training of personnel in the phenomenology of the BWR, and as an investigation tool in the study of the dynamics of BWR reactors. The oscillations out of phase study presents challenges at the moment as are the explanation of the variation of the neutral line with time, non azimuthal but axial oscillations out of phase, etc. So far a first model oriented in this direction is at hand. [Spanish] Este trabajo consiste en la integracion de tres modelos desarrollados previamente los cuales se encuentran ampliamente descritos en la literatura: modelo del canal termohidraulico, modelo de la neutronica modal y el modelo de los lazos de recirculacion. La herramienta utilizada para este acoplamiento de modelos es el sistema PVM, Parallel Virtual Machine, que permitio paralelizar el modelo mediante el concepto de computacion distribuida. La finalidad de hacer este acoplamiento de modelos es la de obtener una herramienta mas completa que represente mejor la configuracion real y la fenomenologia del nucleo de un reactor BWR, obteniendo asi mejores resultados. Ademas mantener la flexibilidad de mejorar el modelo resultante en cualquier momento, ya que los modelos muy complejos o sofisticados resultan dificiles de mejorar siendo imposible modificar las ecuaciones que utilizan y pueden incluir variables que no son de importancia primaria en el problema tratado o que enmascaren relaciones entre variables debido al exceso de resultados. Tambien el mantener la flexibilidad de agregar modelos de componentes o sistemas del reactor BWR, todo esto dependiendo de las necesidades del modelado. Se eligio a la planta sueca Ringhals para caracterizar el modelo acoplado resultante por contar con un Benchmark

  1. BWR 90 and BWR 90+: Two advanced BWR design generations from ABB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced light water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and total power generation costs have been low. When developing the BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to a reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher than that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Hence, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The review work was completed in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with an 'evolutionary' design called BWR 90+, which aims at developing the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is performed by ABB Atom

  2. Artificial intelligence applied to fuel management in BWR type reactors; Inteligencia artificial aplicada a la administracion de combustible en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz S, J.J

    1998-10-01

    In this work two techniques of artificial intelligence, neural networks and genetic algorithms were applied to a practical problem of nuclear fuel management; the determination of the optimal fuel reload for a BWR type reactor. This is an important problem in the design of the operation cycle of the reactor. As a result of the application of these techniques, comparable or even better reloads proposals than those given by expert companies in the subject were obtained. Additionally, two other simpler problems in reactor physics were solved: the determination of the axial power profile and the prediction of the value of some variables of interest at the end of the operation cycle of the reactor. Neural networks and genetic algorithms have been applied to solve many problems of engineering because of their versatility but they have been rarely used in the area of fuel management. The results obtained in this thesis indicates the convenience of undertaking further work on this area and suggest the application of these techniques of artificial intelligence to the solution of other problems in nuclear reactor physics. (Author)

  3. Water chemistry in boiling water reactors - A Leibstadt-specific overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarott, F.-A.

    2005-01-01

    The boiling water reactor (BWR) consists of two main water circuits: the water-steam cycle and the main cooling water system. In the introduction, the goals and tasks of the BWR plant chemistry are described. The most important objectives are the prevention of system degradation by corrosion and the minimisation of radiation fields. Then a short description of the BWR operation principle, including the water steam cycle, the transport of various impurities by the steam, removing impurities from the condensate, the reactor water clean-up system, the balance of plant and the main cooling water system, is given. Subsequently, the focus is set on the water-steam cycle chemistry. In order to fulfil the somewhat contradictory requirements, the chemical parameters must be well balanced. This is achieved by the water chemistry control method called 'normal water chemistry'. Other additional methods are used for the solution to different problems. The 'zinc addition method' is applied to reduce high radiation levels around the recirculation loops. The 'hydrogen water chemistry method' and the 'noble metal chemical addition method' are used to protect the reactor core components and piping made of stainless steel against stress corrosion cracking. This phenomenon has been observed for about 40 years and is partly due to the strong oxidising conditions in the BWR water. Both mitigation methods are used by the majority of the BWR plants all over the world (including the two Swiss NPPs Muehleberg and Leibstadt). (author)

  4. Boiling-Water Reactor internals aging degradation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of an aging assessment study for boiling water reactor (BWR) internals. Major stressors for BWR internals are related to unsteady hydrodynamic forces generated by the primary coolant flow in the reactor vessel. Welding and cold-working, dissolved oxygen and impurities in the coolant, applied loads and exposures to fast neutron fluxes are other important stressors. Based on results of a component failure information survey, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fatigue are identified as the two major aging-related degradation mechanisms for BWR internals. Significant reported failures include SCC in jet-pump holddown beams, in-core neutron flux monitor dry tubes and core spray spargers. Fatigue failures were detected in feedwater spargers. The implementation of a plant Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) program is considered as a promising method for controlling SCC problems in BWR. More operating data are needed to evaluate its effectiveness for internal components. Long-term fast neutron irradiation effects and high-cycle fatigue in a corrosive environment are uncertainty factors in the aging assessment process. BWR internals are examined by visual inspections and the method is access limited. The presence of a large water gap and an absence of ex-core neutron flux monitors may handicap the use of advanced inspection methods, such as neutron noise vibration measurements, for BWR

  5. Recycling flow rate control device in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Tadashi; Koda, Yasushi

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the recycling pump speed if the pressure variation width and the variation ratio in the nuclear reactor exceed predetermined values, to thereby avoid the shutdown of the plant. Constitution: There has been proposed a method of monitoring the neutron flux increase thereby avoiding unnecessary plant shutdown, but it involves a problems of reactor scram depending on the state of the plant and the set values. In view of the above, in the plant using internal pumps put under the thyristor control and having high response to recycling flow rate, the reactor pressure is monitored and the speed of the internal pump is rapidly reduced when the pressure variation width and variation ratio exceed predetermined values to reduce the reactor power and avoid the plant shutdown. This can reduce the possibility of unnecessary power reduction due to neutron flux noises or the possibility of plant shutdown under low power conditions. Further, since the reactor operation can be continued without stopping the recycling pump, the operation upon recovery can be made rapid. (Horiuchi, T.)

  6. Device for detecting neutron flux in nuclear reactor. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessho, Y; Nishizawa, Y

    1976-07-30

    The object of the invention is to ensure accuracy in the operation of the nuclear reactor by reducing the difference that results between the readings of a Traversing Incore Probe (TIP) and a Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) when the neutron flux distribution undergoes a change. In an apparatus for detecting neutrons in a nuclear reactor, an LPRM sensor comprising a layer containing a substance capable of nuclear fission, a section filled with argon gas and a collector is constructed so as to surround a TIP within a TIP guide tube at the height of the reactor axis. In this way, the LPRM detects the average value of neutron distribution in the region surrounding the TIP, so that no great difference between the readings of both the sensors is produced even if the neutron flux distribution is changed.

  7. Simulation of the aspersion system of the core at high pressure (HPCS) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP; Simulacion del sistema de aspersion del nucleo alta presion (HPCS) para un reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR) basado en RELAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas O, D.; Chavez M, C., E-mail: danmirnyi@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    A high-priority topic for the nuclear industry is the safety, consequently a nuclear power plant should have the emergency systems of cooling of the core (ECCS), designed exclusively to enter in operation in the event of an accident with coolant loss, including the design base accident. The objective of the aspersion system of the core at high pressure (HPCS) is to provide in an autonomous way the cooling to the core maintaining for if same the coolant inventory even when a small break is presented that does not allow the depressurization of the reactor and also avoiding excessive temperatures that affect the shielding of the fuel. The present work describes the development of the model and the simulation of the HPCS using the RELAP/SCDAP code. During the process simulation, for the setting in march of the system HPCS in an accident with coolant loss is necessary to implement the main components of the system taking into account what unites them, the main pump, the filled pump, the suction and injection valves, pipes and its water sources that can be condensed storage tanks and the suppression pool. The simulation of this system will complement the model with which counts the Analysis Laboratory in Nuclear Reactors Engineering of the UNAM regarding to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde which does not have a detailed simulation of the emergency cooling systems. (Author)

  8. Water chemistry control practices and data of the European BWR fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellwag, B.; Laendner, A.; Weiss, S.; Huettner, F.

    2010-01-01

    Nineteen BWR plants are in operation in Europe, nine built by ASEA Atom, six by Siemens KWU and four by General Electric. This paper gives an overview of water chemistry operation practices and parameters of the European BWR plants. General design characteristics of the plants are described. Chemistry control strategies and underlying water chemistry guidelines are summarized. Chemistry data are presented and discussed with regard to plant design characteristics. The paper is based on a contract of the European BWR Forum with AREVA on a chemistry sourcebook for member plants. The survey of chemistry data was conducted for the years 2002 to 2008. (author)

  9. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Soppet, W.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in high water reactors during the six months from April 1991 through September 1991. Topics that have been investigated during this period include (1) fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of low-alloy steel used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels; (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water on SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS; and (3) radiation-induced segregation (RIS) and irradiation-assisted SCC of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence. Fatigue data were obtained on medium-S-content A533-Gr B and A106-Gr B steels in high-purity (HP) deoxygenated water, in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) water, and in air. Crack-growth-rates (CGRs) of composite specimens of A533-Gr B/Inconel-182/Inconel-600 (plated with nickel) and homogeneous specimens of A533-Gr B were determined under small- amplitude cyclic loading in HP water with ∼ 300 ppb dissolved oxygen. CGR tests on sensitized Type 304 SS indicate that low chromate concentrations in BWR water (25--35 ppb) may actually have a beneficial effect on SCC if the sulfate concentration is below a critical level. Microchemical and microstructural changes in HP and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and slow-strain,rate- tensile tests were conducts on tubular specimens in air and in simulated BWR water at 289 degrees C

  10. The World's Reactors no. 70 - Forsmark 3, BWR-75

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    A large pull-out wall chart is presented showing a coloured cut-away diagram of the Forsmark 3 station. It is accompanied by 2 small sketches one showing the layout of station buildings and the other the inside of the reactor vessel. Parameters are listed. (U.K.)

  11. Study on vertical seismic response model of BWR-type reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, T.; Motohashi, S.; Izumi, M.; Iizuka, S.

    1993-01-01

    A study on advanced seismic design for LWR has been carried out by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) of Japan. As a part of the study, it has been investigated to construct an accurate analytical model of reactor buildings for a seismic response analysis, which can reasonably represent dynamic characteristics of the building. In Japan, vibration models of reactor buildings for horizontal ground motion have been studied and examined through many simulation analyses for forced vibration tests and earthquake observations of actual buildings. And now it is possible to establish a reliable horizontal vibration model on the basis of multi-lumped mass and spring model. However, vertical vibration models have not been so much studied as horizontal models, due to less observed data for vertical motions. In this paper, the vertical seismic response models of a BWR-type reactor building including soil-structure interaction effect are numerically studied, by comparing the dynamic characteristics of (1) three dimensional finite element model, (2) multi-stick lumped mass model with a flexible base-mat, (3) multi-stick lumped mass model with a rigid base-mat and (4) single-stick lumped mass model. In particular, the BWR-type reactor building has the long span truss roof which is considered to be one of the critical members to vertical excitation. The modelings of the roof trusses are also studied

  12. Chemistry in water reactors: operating experience and new developments. 2 volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    These proceedings of the International conference on chemistry in water reactors (Operating experience and new developments), Volume 1, are divided into 8 sessions bearing on: (session 1) Primary coolant activity, corrosion products (5 conferences), (session 2) Dose reduction (4 conferences), (session 3) New developments (4 conferences), poster session: Primary coolant chemistry (16 posters), (session 4) Decontamination (5 conferences), poster session (2 posters), (session 5) BWR-Operating experience (3 conferences), (session 6) BWR-Modelling of operating experience (4 conferences), (session 7) BWR-Basic studies (4 conferences), (session 8) BWR-New technologies (3 conferences)

  13. A review of boiling water reactor water chemistry: Science, technology, and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, M.J.

    1989-02-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) water chemistry (science, technology, and performance) has been reviewed with an emphasis on the relationships between BWR water quality and corrosion fuel performance, and radiation buildup. A comparison of Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.56, the Boiling Water Reactor Owners Group (BWROG) Water Chemistry Guidelines, and Plant Technical Specifications showed that the BWROG Guidelines are more stringent than the NRC Regulatory Guide, which is almost identical to Plant Technical Specifications. Plant performance with respect to BWR water chemistry has shown dramatic improvements in recent years. Up until 1979 BWRs experienced an average of 3.0 water chemistry incidents per reactor-year. Since 1979 the water chemistry technical specifications have been violated an average of only 0.2 times per reactor-year, with the most recent data from 1986-1987 showing only 0.05 violations per reactor-year. The data clearly demonstrate the industry-wide commitment to improving water quality in BWRs. In addition to improving water quality, domestic BWRs are beginning to switch to hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), a remedy for intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Three domestic BWRs are presently operating on HWC, and fourteen more have either performed HWC mini tests or are in various stages of HWC implementation. This report includes a detailed review of HWC science and technology as well as areas in which further research on BWR chemistry may be needed. 43 refs., 30 figs., 8 tabs

  14. Chemistry in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H.P.; Norring, K.

    1994-01-01

    The international conference Chemistry in Water Reactors was arranged in Nice 24-27/04/1994 by the French Nuclear Energy Society. Examples of technical program areas were primary chemistry, operational experience, fundamental studies and new technology. Furthermore there were sessions about radiation field build-up, hydrogen chemistry, electro-chemistry, condensate polishing, decontamination and chemical cleaning. The conference gave the impression that there are some areas that are going to be more important than others during the next few years to come. Cladding integrity: Professor Ishigure from Japan emphasized that cladding integrity is a subject of great concern, especially with respect to waterside corrosion, deposition and release of crud. Chemistry control: The control of the iron/nickel concentration quotient seems to be not as important as previously considered. The future operation of a nuclear power plant is going to require a better control of the water chemistry than achievable today. One example of this is solubility control via regulation in BWR. Trends in USA: means an increasing use of hydrogen, minimization of SCC/IASCC, minimization of radiation fields by thorough chemistry control, guarding fuel integrity by minimization of cladding corrosion and minimization of flow assisted corrosion. Stellite replacement: The search for replacement materials will continue. Secondary side crevice chemistry: Modeling and practical studies are required to increase knowledge about the crevice chemistry and how it develops under plant operation conditions. Inhibitors: Inhibitors for IGSCC and IGA as well for the primary- (zinc) as for the secondary side (Ti) should be studied. The effects and mode of operation of the inhibitors should be documented. Chemical cleaning: of heat transfer surfaces will be an important subject. Prophylactic cleaning at regular intervals could be one mode of operation

  15. Application of the MOVE algorithm for the identification of reduced order models of a core of a BWR type reactor; Aplicacion del algoritmo MOVE para la identificacion de modelos de orden reducido del nucleo de un reactor tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victoria R, M.A.; Morales S, J.B. [UNAM, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: angelvr@gmail.com

    2005-07-01

    Presently work is applied the modified algorithm of the ellipsoid of optimal volume (MOVE) to a reduced order model of 5 differential equations of the core of a boiling water reactor (BWR) with the purpose of estimating the parameters that model the dynamics. The viability is analyzed of carrying out an analysis that calculates the global dynamic parameters that determine the stability of the system and the uncertainty of the estimate. The modified algorithm of the ellipsoid of optimal volume (MOVE), is a method applied to the parametric identification of systems, in particular to the estimate of groups of parameters (PSE for their initials in English). It is looked for to obtain the ellipsoid of smaller volume that guarantees to contain the real value of the parameters of the model. The PSE MOVE is a recursive identification method that can manage the sign of noise and to ponder it, the ellipsoid represents an advantage due to its easy mathematical handling in the computer, the results that surrender are very useful for the design of Robust Control since to smaller volume of the ellipsoid, better is in general the performance of the system to control. The comparison with other methods presented in the literature to estimate the reason of decline (DR) of a BWR is presented. (Author)

  16. Pressurized water reactor inspection procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, D.; Mueller, G.; Otte, H.J.; Roth, W.

    1998-01-01

    Inspections of the reactor pressure vessels of pressurized water reactors (PWR) so far used to be carried out with different central mast manipulators. For technical reasons, parallel inspections of two manipulators alongside work on the refueling cavity, so as to reduce the time spent on the critical path in a revision outage, are not possible. Efforts made to minimize the inspection time required with one manipulator have been successful, but their effects are limited. Major reductions in inspection time can be achieved only if inspections are run with two manipulators in parallel. The decentralized manipulator built by GEC Alsthom Energie and so far emmployed in boiling water reactors in the USA, Spain, Switzerland and Japan allows two systems to be used in parallel, thus reducing the time required for standard inspection of a pressure vessel from some six days to three days. These savings of approximately three days are made possible without any compromises in terms of positioning by rail-bound systems. During inspection, the reactor refueling cavity is available for other revision work without any restrictions. The manipulator can be used equally well for inspecting standard PWR, PWR with a thermal shield, for inspecting the land between in-core instrumentation nozzles, BWR with and without jet pumps (complementary inspection), and for inspecting core support shrouds. (orig.) [de

  17. Experiences with monitoring and control of microbiological growth in the standby service water system of a BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisson, P.S.; Whitaker, J.M.; Neilson, H.L.; Mayne, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    In 1989, the Unites States Nuclear Regulatory Commission formally recognized the potential for nuclear accidents resulting from microbiological causes. Such causes range from loss of heat transfer due to microbiological fouling, to loss of system integrity caused by microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). As a result of these potential problems, monitoring, mitigation, and control procedures must be developed by all regulated plants. In developing a control and mitigation strategy for the standby service water system of a boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant, numerous monitoring techniques were employed to evaluate effectiveness. This paper describes the monitoring techniques that were evaluated, and those that ultimately proved to be effective

  18. New lineup of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Kiyoshi; Oshima, Koichiro; Kitsukawa, Keisuke

    2007-01-01

    Toshiba is promoting technical studies for upcoming nuclear power plants based on its large accumulation of experience in boiling water reactor (BWR) design, manufacturing, construction, and maintenance. Our goal is to achieve higher reliability, lower life-cycle costs, and better competitiveness for nuclear power plants compared with other energy sources. In addition, we are developing a new light water reactor (LWR) lineup featuring the safest and most economical LWRs in the world as next-generation reactors almost at new construction and replacement in the Japanese and international markets expected to start from the 2020s. We are committed not only to developing BWRs with the world's highest performance but also to participating in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) market, taking advantage of the synergistic effect of both Toshiba's and Westinghouse's experience. (author)

  19. Water level monitoring device in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kiyohide; Otake, Tomohiro.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the water level in a pressure vessel of BWR type nuclear reactors at high accuracy by improving the compensation functions. Constitution: In the conventional water level monitor in a nuclear reactor, if the pressure vessel is displaced by the change of the pressure in the reactor or the temperature of the reactor water, the relative level of the reference water head in a condensation vessel is changed to cause deviation between the actual water level and the indicated water level to reduce the monitoring accuracy. According to the invention, means for detecting the position of the reference water head and means for detection the position in the condensation vessel are disposed to the pressure vessel. Then, relative positional change between the condensation vessel and the reference water head is calculated based on detection sinals from both of the means. The water level is compensated and calculated by water level calculation means based on the relative positional change, water level signals from the level gage and the pressure signals from the pressure gage. As a result, if the pressure vessel is displaced due to the change of the temperature or pressure, it is possible to measure the reactor water level accurately thereby remakably improve the reliability for the water level control in the nuclear reactor. (Horiuchi, T.)

  20. Gas/liquid separator for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soma, Naoshi; Akimoto, Seiichi; Yokoyama, Iwao.

    1993-01-01

    A two phase gas/liquid flow generated at a heating portion of a nuclear reactor is swirled by inlet vanes. The phase gas/liquid flow uprises as a vortex flow in a vortex cylinder, and a liquid phase of a high density gathers at the outer circumference of the vortex cylinder. The liquid phase gathered at the outer circumference is collected at the inlet of a discharge flow channel which protrude into the vortex cylinder and in a three-step structure, and introduced into a recycling liquid phase passing through the discharge flow channel for liquid phase. There is provided a structure that separated liquid collected at the lowermost state in the inlet of the three-step discharge flow channel inlet descends in the discharge flow channel, then uprises in an uprising flow channel and is introduced into the recycling liquid phase by way of a discharge flow channel exit. The height of the discharge flow channel exit is determined equal to that of a liquid level of the recycling liquid phase during rated operation of the reactor. Accordingly, even in a case where the liquid level in the recycling liquid phase is lowered, the liquid level of the uprising flow channel is kept equal to that during rated operation. (I.N.)

  1. Analysis of the integrity of the pressure vessel of the BWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Luna, O.

    1982-01-01

    The presssure vessel of a BWR type reactor was monitored for cracking during alternating events of its in-service life. The monitoring was to determine criticality of fractures catastrophic fractures and the velocity of fracture propagation. Detected cracks were evaluated as specified in ASME code section XI, of a minimum wall thickness of 2.5% crack growths were compared a) of 1/10 of the critical maximum size and b) at in-service inspection intervals according to ASME recommendations to be established at the Laguna Verde nuclear plant. Finally conclusions are made and discussed. (author)

  2. Application of the MOVE algorithm for the identification of reduced order models of a core of a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria R, M.A.; Morales S, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Presently work is applied the modified algorithm of the ellipsoid of optimal volume (MOVE) to a reduced order model of 5 differential equations of the core of a boiling water reactor (BWR) with the purpose of estimating the parameters that model the dynamics. The viability is analyzed of carrying out an analysis that calculates the global dynamic parameters that determine the stability of the system and the uncertainty of the estimate. The modified algorithm of the ellipsoid of optimal volume (MOVE), is a method applied to the parametric identification of systems, in particular to the estimate of groups of parameters (PSE for their initials in English). It is looked for to obtain the ellipsoid of smaller volume that guarantees to contain the real value of the parameters of the model. The PSE MOVE is a recursive identification method that can manage the sign of noise and to ponder it, the ellipsoid represents an advantage due to its easy mathematical handling in the computer, the results that surrender are very useful for the design of Robust Control since to smaller volume of the ellipsoid, better is in general the performance of the system to control. The comparison with other methods presented in the literature to estimate the reason of decline (DR) of a BWR is presented. (Author)

  3. Constructional features of an integrated centrifugal pump in BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.D.; Schneider, W.

    1981-01-01

    The pump construction described here has been produced as a prototype and tested at full load. From trial runs with hot and cold water, important operating data were obtained, e.g. throughput, lift, vibrations, loads on the radial bearings, cooling water temperatures, etc. (orig./GL) [de

  4. Evaluation of the cracking by stress corrosion in nuclear reactor environments type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganis J, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was studied in sensitized, solution annealed 304 steel, and in 304-L welded with a heat treatment that simulated the radiation induced segregation, by the slow strain rate test technique, in a similar environment of a boiling water reactor (BWR), 288 C, 8 MPa, low conductivity and a electrochemical corrosion potential near 200 mV. vs. standard hydrogen electrode (She). The electrochemical noise technique was used for the detection of the initiation and propagation of the cracking. The steels were characterized by metallographic studies with optical and scanning electronic microscopy and by the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation of single loop and double loop. In all the cases, the steels present delta ferrite. The slow strain rate tests showed that the 304 steel in the solution annealed condition is susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC), such as in a normalized condition showed granulated. In the sensitized condition the steel showed intergranular stress corrosion cracking, followed by a transition to TGSCC. The electrochemical noise time series showed that is possible associated different time sequences to different modes of cracking and that is possible detect sequentially cracking events, it is means, one after other, supported by the fractographic studies by scanning electron microscopy. The parameter that can distinguish between the different modes of cracking is the re passivation rate, obtained by the current decay rate -n- in the current transients. This is due that the re passivation rate is a function of the microstructure and the sensitization. Other statistic parameters like the localized index, Kurtosis, Skew, produce results that are related with mixed corrosion. (Author)

  5. Water chemistry experience following an extensive power up-rate in Oskarshamn 3 BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegemar, Boerje; Nilsson, Jimmy; Lejon Johan; Bergfors, Asa; Arnberg, Bo

    2012-09-01

    The Swedish Oskarshamn 3 BWR plant, operated by OKG, was first connected to the grid in 1985. The plant has been power up-rated in two steps; from the original design, 3020 MWth, to 3300 MWth (109%, 1989) and recently to 3900 MWth (129%, 2009). Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB (former ASEA-Atom, OEM of the plant) was rewarded a major contract in the recently implemented up-rating project, the PULS project. The PULS project is quite unique since no operating experience has to date been reported from a similar major power up-rate in a BWR plant. Water chemistry experience from the first period of operation following the implementation of the PULS project is reported and discussed in the paper. Reported chemistry and radiochemistry measurements in feedwater (FW) and reactor water (RW) include corrosion products, activated corrosion products, dissolved oxygen and impurities like chloride, sulfate etc. Furthermore, a comparison of water quality prior to implementation of the PULS project is included. Several process systems have been modified, one of them being the condensate cleanup system (CCU), a Pre-coat filter system. The design criteria for the CCU system include the filter run-lengths, pressure drop before back-washing and requirements on water chemistry quality. The paper describes in some detail the CCU system modifications being implemented in order to fulfil the design criterion. CCU cleanup efficiency, operating temperature and influence of hydrogen peroxide on the CCU resin are all important issues being covered in the paper. As for the latter, it is well known that oxygen and hydrogen peroxide (from radiolysis in the core region) might cause partial deterioration of CCU standard cation resin resulting in increased RW sulfate concentrations. This aspect is covered in the paper as well. The reactor water cleanup system (RWCU) in Oskarshamn 3 consists of deep bed ion exchange filters (mixed bed filter). The purpose of RWCU is to maintain a low level of

  6. Method of operating control rods for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Toshihisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the danger such as fuel element failures due to rapid power increase and form a control rod pattern for obtaining a required power level in a relatively short time. Method: Control rods are disposed so as to vertically enter into and retract from the central region of each four fuel assemblies adjacent to each other respectively. Upon operation of the control rods, every other control rods in the lateral and longitudinal directions among the entire control rods that are inserted completely are extracted completely at the lower flow limit of coolants. Then, the control rods completely inserted are divided into groups inserted deeply and groups inserted less deeply. The less deeply inserted groups are extracted just before the excess of thermal limit value successively in the lower flow limit of the coolants and then the deeply inserted groups are extracted successively till a predetermined power level in the same manner. Therefore, the coolant flow to the reactor core is increased and the power level is raised. (Furukawa, Y.)

  7. Fuel assembly for use in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Yuzo.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To attain the reduction of neutron irradiation amount to control rods by the improvement in the reactor shutdown margin and the improvement of the control rod worth, by enhancing the arrangement of burnable poisons. Constitution: The number of burnable poison-incorporated fuel rods present in the outer two rows along the sides in adjacent with a control rod among the square lattice arrangement in a fuel assembly is decreased to less than 1/4 for that of total burnable poison-incorporated fuel rods, while the remaining burnable posion-incorporated fuel rods are arranged in the region other than above (that is, those regions not nearer to the control rod). Thus, even if a sufficient number of burnable poison to prolong the controlling effect for the reactivity with the burnable contents as the fuel assembly are disposed, only the burnable poison -incorporated fuel rods by the number less than 1/4 for that of the total burnable poison-incorporated fuel rods are present near the control rod of the fuel assembly. Accordingly, the control rod worth at the initial stage of the burning is increased at both high and normal temperatures. (Kawakami, Y.)

  8. Treatment of core components from nuclear power plants with PWR and BWR reactors - 16043

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viermann, Joerg; Friske, Andreas; Radzuweit, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    During operation of a Nuclear Power Plant components inside the RPV get irradiated. Irradiation has an effect on physical properties of these components. Some components have to be replaced after certain neutron doses or respectively after a certain operating time of the plant. Such components are for instance water channels and control rods from Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) or control elements, poisoning elements and flow restrictors from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). Most of these components are stored in the fuel pool for a certain time after replacement. Then they have to be packaged for further treatment or for disposal. More than 25 years ago GNS developed a system for disposal of irradiated core components which was based on a waste container suitable for transport, storage and disposal of Intermediate Level Waste (ILW), the so-called MOSAIK R cask. The MOSAIK R family of casks is subject of a separate presentation at the ICEM 09 conference. Besides the MOSAIK R cask the treatment system developed by GNS comprised underwater shears to cut the components to size as well as different types of equipment to handle the components, the shears and the MOSAIK R casks in the fuel pool. Over a decade of experience it showed that this system although effective needed improvement for BWR plants where many water channels and control rods had to be replaced after a certain operating time. Because of the large numbers of components the time period needed to cut the components in the pool had a too big influence on other operational work like rearranging of fuel assemblies in the pool. The system was therefore further developed and again a suitable cask was the heart of the solution. GNS developed the type MOSAIK R 80 T, a cask that is capable to ship the unsegmented components with a length of approx. 4.5 m from the Power plants to an external treatment centre. This treatment centre consisting of a hot cell installation with a scrap shear, super-compactor and a heavy

  9. Cladding tube of fuel rod for a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hitoshi; Fujie, Kunio; Kuwahara, Heikichi; Hirai, Tadamasa; Kakizaki, Kimio.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To form a cladding tube wall with tunnels in communication with the exterior through a number of small-diameter openings to rapidly disperse a large quantity of heat thereby providing high density of the fuel rod. Structure: Tunnels adjacent to each other are provided under the skin in contact with cooling liquid of a cladding tube, and a number of openings through which said tunnels and the periphery of the cladding tube are placed in communication are formed, said openings each having its section smaller than that of said tunnel. With this arrangement, the cooling water entered the tunnel through some of small diameter openings absorbs heat of the fuel rod to be vaporized, which is flown out into the cooling water through the other small diameter openings and formed into vapor bubbles which move up for release of heat. (Taniai, N.)

  10. Filtering device for primary coolant circuits in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Fumio; Yamamoto, Tetsuo.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a filtering device with a large filtering area and requiring less space. Constitution: A condensate inlet for introducing condensates to be filtered of primary coolant circuits, a filtrate exit, a backwash water exit and a bent tube are disposed to a container, and a plurality of hollow thread membrane modules are suspended in the container. The condensates are caused to flow through the condensate inlet, filtered through the hollow thread membrane and then discharged from the filtrate exit. When the filtering treatment is proceeded to some extent, since solid contents captured in the hollow thread membranes are accumulated, a differential pressure is produced between the condensate inlet and the filtrate exit. When the differential pressure reaches a predetermined value, the backwash is conducted to discharge the liquid cleaning wastes through the backwash exit. The bent tube disposed to the container body is used for water and air draining. The hollow thread membranes are formed with porous resin such as of polyethylene. (Kawakami, Y.)

  11. Fuel design with low peak of local power for BWR reactors with increased nominal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perusquia C, R.; Montes, J.L.; Hernandez, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Castillo, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Federal Commission of Electricity recently announcement the beginning of the works related with the increase of the power to 120% of the original nominal one in the Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) of the Laguna Verde Central (CLV): In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) are carried out studies of the impact on the design of the recharge of derived fuel of this increase. One of the main effects of the power increase type that it is promoting, is the increment of the flow of generated vapor, what takes, to a bigger fraction of vacuum in the core presenting increased values of the maximum fraction to the limit, so much of the ratio of lineal heat generation (XFLPD) as of the ratio of critic power (MFLCPR). In the made studies, it is found that these fractions rise lineally with the increase of the nominal power. Considering that the reactors of the CLV at the moment operate to 105% of the original nominal power, it would imply an increment of the order of 13.35% in the XFLPD and in the MFLCPR operating to a nominal power of 120% of the original one. This would propitiate bigger problems to design appropriately the fuel cycle and the necessity, almost unavoidable, of to resort to a fuel assembly type more advanced for the recharges of the cores. As option, in the ININ the feasibility of continuing using the same type of it fuel assembles that one has come using recently in the CLV, the type GE12 is analyzed. To achieve it was outlined to diminish the peak factor of local power (LPPF) of the power cells that compose the fuel recharge in 13.35%. It was started of a fuel design previously used in the recharge of the unit 1 cycle 12 and it was re-design to use it in the recharge design of the cycle 13 of the unit 1, considering an increase to 120% of the original power and the same requirements of cycle extension. For the re-design of the fuel assembly cell it was used the PreDiCeldas computer program developed in the ININ. It was able to diminish the LPPF

  12. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program BWR High-Fluence Material Project: Assessment of the Role of High-Fluence on the Efficiency of HWC Mitigation on SCC Crack Growth Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastien Teysseyre

    2014-04-01

    As nuclear power plants age, the increasing neutron fluence experienced by stainless steels components affects the materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking and fracture toughness. The purpose of this report is to identify any new issues that are expected to rise as boiling water reactor power plants reach the end of their initial life and to propose a path forward to study such issues. It has been identified that the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry mitigation technology may decrease as fluence increases for high-stress intensity factors. This report summarizes the data available to support this hypothesis and describes a program plan to determine the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry as a function of the stress intensity factor applied and fluence. This program plan includes acquisition of irradiated materials, generation of material via irradiation in a test reactor, and description of the test plan. This plan offers three approaches, each with an estimated timetable and budget.

  13. Analysis of water hammer in control rod drive systems of boiling water reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safwat, H.H.; Arastu, A.H.; Lau, S.

    1983-01-01

    The method of characteristics is applied to analyze water hammer in BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) Control Rod Drive (CRD) Systems following fast opening of scram valves. The modelling of the CRD mechanism is presented. Numerical predictions are compared to experimental data. (author)

  14. Boiling water reactor simulator. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and workshop material and sponsors workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 21 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2002). Course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor (PWR) simulator developed by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated, Canada, is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 22 'Pressurized Water Reactor Simulator' (2003). This report consists of course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor (BWR) simulator. Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated, developed the simulator and prepared this report for the IAEA

  15. Simulation of the aspersion system of the core low pressure (LPCS) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP; Simulacion del sistema de aspersion del nucleo a baja presion (LPCS) para un reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR) basado en RELAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Membrillo G, O. E.; Chavez M, C., E-mail: garzo1012@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The present work presents the modeling and simulation of the aspersion system to low pressure of reactor of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde using the nuclear code RELAP/SCDAP. The objective of the emergency systems inside a nuclear reactor is the cooling of the core, nor caring the performance of any other emergency system in the case of an accident design base for coolant loss. To obtain a simulation of the system is necessary to have a model based on their main components, pipes, pumps, valves, etc. This article describes the model for the simulation of the main line and the test line for the HPCS. At the moment we have the simulation of the reactor vessel and their systems associated to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, this work will allow to associate the emergency system model LPCS to the vessel model. The simulation of the vessel and the emergency systems will allow knowing the behavior of the reactor in the stage of the coolant loos, giving the possibility to analyze diverse scenarios. The general model will provide an auxiliary tool for the training in classroom and at distance in the operation of nuclear power plants. (Author)

  16. Structural integrity and management of aging in internal components of BWR reactors; Integridad estructural y manejo del envejecimiento en componentes internos de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arganis J, C.R. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Km 36.5 Carretera Mexico, Toluca Salazar Edo. de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: craj@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    Presently work the bases to apply structural integrity and the handling of the aging of internal components of the pressure vessel of boiling water reactors of water are revised and is carried out an example of structural integrity in the horizontal welding H4 of the encircling one of the core of a reactor, taking data reported in the literature. It is also revised what is required to carry out the handling program or conduct of the aging (AMP). (Author)

  17. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  18. Development of internal CRD for next generation BWR-endurance and robustness tests of ball-bearing materials in high-pressure and high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji Goto; Shuichi Ohmori; Michitsugu Mori; Shohei Kawano; Tadashi Narabayashi; Shinichi Ishizato

    2005-01-01

    An internal CRD using a heatproof ceramics insulated coil is under development to be a competitive and higher performance as Next- Generation BWR. In the case of the 1700MWe next generation BWR, adapting the internal CRDs, the reactor pressure vessel is almost equivalent to that of 1356 MWe ABWR. The endurance and robustness tests were examined in order to confirm the durability of the bearing for the internal CRD. The durability of the ball bearing for the internal CRD was performed in the high-pressure and high-temperature reactor water of current BWR conditions. The experimental results confirmed the durability of rotational numbers for the operation length of 60 years. We added the cruds into water to confirm the robustness of the ball bearing. The test results also showed good robustness even in high-density crud conditions, compared with the current BWR. This program is conducted as one of the selected offers for the advertised technical developments of the Institute of Applied Energy founded by METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) of Japan. (authors)

  19. A practical methodology of radiological protection for the reduction of hot particles in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez G, G.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this work, in general form, is to describe a practical method for reduction of hot particles generated as consequence of the operational activities of BWR nuclear reactors. This methodology provides a description of the localizations and/or probable activities of finding particles highly radioactive denominated hot particles. For this purpose it was developed a strategy based on the decontamination lineaments, as well as the manipulation, gathering, registration, contention, documentation, control and final disposition of the hot particles. In addition, some recommendations are reiterated and alternative, in order to gathering the hot particles in a dynamic way given to the activities of the personal occupationally exposed in highly radioactive areas. The structure of the methodology of hot particles is supported in the radiological controls based on the Code of Federal Regulation 10 CFR 20 as well as the applicable regulatory documents. It provides an idea based on administrative controls of radiological protection, in order to suggesting the responsibilities and necessary directing for the control of the hot particles required in nuclear plants of the BWR type. (author)

  20. Review of boiling water reactor small break loss of coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gururaj, P.M.; Dua, S.S.; Rao, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the analytical and the experimental work performed by the General Electric Company to determine the performance of boiling water reactors (BWR) following postulated small break accidents (SBA). This review paper addresses the following issues: (1) the response of the BWR following small loss of inventory events; (2) methods of analysis and their justification; (3) necessity, if any, of operator action and the length of time available in which such action can be performed; and (4) operator interface following the SBA event. The results from these SBA studies for different BWR product lines show that even with the multiple system failures assumed, the BWR can successfully withstand an SBA. For a typical BWR/6, it takes the failure of 13 water delivery pumps to cause any significant core heatup. The only operator actions determined to be necessary are simple ones and ample time is available to the operator to perform these actions, if needed

  1. Method of estimating thermal power distribution of core of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To accurately and rapidly predict the thermal power of the core of a BWR they reactor at load follow-up operating time. Method: A parameter value corrected from a correction coefficient deciding unit and a xenon density distribution value predicted and calculated from a xenon density distributor are inputted to a thermal power distribution predicting devise, the status amount such as coolant flow rate or the like predetermined at this and next high power operating times is substituted for physical model to predict and calculate the thermal power distribution. The status amount of a nuclear reactor at the time of operating in previous high power corresponding to the next high power operation to be predicted is read from the status amount of the reactor stored in time series manner is a reactor core status memory, and the physical model used in the prediction and calculation of the thermal power distribution at the time of next high power operation is corrected. (Sikiya, K.)

  2. Comparison of results for burning with BWR reactors CASMO and SCALE 6.2 (TRITON / NEWT); Comparacion de los resultados de quemado para reactores BWR con CASMO y SCALE 6.2 (TRITON/NEWT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesado, C.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we compare the results from two codes burned, CASMO and SCALE 6.2 (TRITON). To do this, is simulated all segments corresponding to a boiling water reactor (BWR) using both codes. In addition, to account for different working points, simulations changing the instantaneous variables, these are repeated: void fractions (6 points), fuel temperature (6 points) and control rods (two points), with a total of 72 possible combinations of different instantaneous variables for each segment. After all simulations are completed for each segment, we can reorder the obtained cross sections, as SCALE CASMO both, to create a library of compositions nemtab format. This format is accepted by the neutronic code of nodal diffusion, PARCS v2.7. Finally compares the results obtained with PARCS and with the SIMULATE3 -SIMTAB methodology to level of full reactor. Also, we have made use of the KENO-VI and MCDANCOFF modules belonging to SCALE. The first is a Monte Carlo transport code with which you can validate the value of the multiplier, the second has been used to obtain values of Dancoff factor and increase the accuracy of model SCALE. (Author)

  3. High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) work conducted for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 milestone THM.CFD.P13.03: High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulation. High fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) was conducted to investigate the applicability and robustness performance of BWR closures. As a preliminary study, a CFD model with simplified Ferrule spacer grid geometry of NUPEC BWR Full-size Fine-mesh Bundle Test (BFBT) benchmark has been implemented. Performance of multiphase segregated solver with baseline boiling closures has been evaluated. Although the mean values of void fraction and exit quality of CFD result for BFBT case 4101-61 agreed with experimental data, the local void distribution was not predicted accurately. The mesh quality was one of the critical factors to obtain converged result. The stability and robustness of the simulation was mainly affected by the mesh quality, combination of BWR closure models. In addition, the CFD modeling of fully-detailed spacer grid geometry with mixing vane is necessary for improving the accuracy of CFD simulation.

  4. Decay ratio estimation in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.; Runkel, J.

    1990-11-01

    The well known decay ratio (DR) from stability analysis of boiling water reactors (BWR) is estimated from the impulse response function which was evaluated using a simplified univariate autoregression method. This simplified DR called modified DR (mDR) was applied on neutron noise measurements carried out during five fuel cycles of a 1300 MWe PWR. Results show that this fast evaluation method can be used for monitoring of the growing oscillation of the neutron flux during the fuel cycles which is a major concern of utilities in PWRs, thus it can be used for estimating safety margins. (author) 17 refs.; 10 figs

  5. Experiences in stability testing of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Otaduy, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize experiences with boiling water reactor (BWR) stability testing using noise analysis techniques. These techniques have been studied over an extended period of time, but it has been only recently that they have been well established and generally accepted. This paper contains first a review of the problem of BWR neutronic stability, focusing on its physical causes and its effects on reactor operation. The paper also describes the main techniques used to quantify, from noise measurements, the reactor's stability in terms of a decay ratio. Finally, the main results and experiences obtained from the stability tests performed at the Dresden and the Browns Ferry reactors using noise analysis techniques are summarized

  6. BWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kosuke.

    1991-01-01

    In a BWR type nuclear power plant in which reactor water in a reactor pressure vessel can be drained to a waste processing system by way of reactor recycling pipeways and remaining heat removal system pipeways, a pressurized air supply device is disposed for supplying air for pressurizing reactor water to the inside of the reactor pressure vessel by way of an upper head. With such a constitution, since the pressurized air sent from the pressurized air supply device above the reactor pressure vessel for the reactor water discharging pressure upon draining, the water draining pressure is increased compared with a conventional case and, accordingly, the amount of drained water is not reduced even in the latter half of draining. Accordingly, the draining efficiency can be improved and only a relatively short period of time is required till the completion of the draining, which can improve safety and save labors. (T.M.)

  7. BWR internals life assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, M.L.; Stancavage, P.P.

    1988-01-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) internal components play an important role in power plant life extension. Many important internals were not designed for easy removal and changes in material properties and local environmental effects due to high radiation makes stress corrosion cracking more likely and more difficult to correct. Over the past several years, operating experience has shown that inspection, monitoring and refurbishment can be accomplished for internal structures with existing technology. In addition, mitigation techniques which address the causes of degradation are available to assure that life extension targets can be met. This paper describes the many considerations and aspects when evaluating life extension for reactor vessel internals

  8. Approximation model of three-dimensional power distribution in boiling water reactor using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2001-01-01

    Fast and accurate prediction of three-dimensional (3D) power distribution is essential in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The prediction method of 3D power distribution in BWR is developed using the neural network. Application of the neural network starts with selecting the learning algorithm. In the proposed method, we use the learning algorithms based on a class of Quasi-Newton optimization techniques called Self-Scaling Variable Metric (SSVM) methods. Prediction studies were done for a core of actual BWR plant with octant symmetry. Compared to classical Quasi-Newton methods, it is shown that the SSVM method reduces the number of iterations in the learning mode. The results of prediction demonstrate that the neural network can predict 3D power distribution of BWR reasonably well. The proposed method will be very useful for BWR loading pattern optimization problems where 3D power distribution for a huge number of loading patterns (LPs) must be performed. (author)

  9. Development of a methodology of analysis of instabilities in BWR reactors; Desarrollo de una metodologia de analisis de inestabilidades en reactores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Fenoll, M.; Abarca, A.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.; Verdu, G.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology of analysis of the reactors instabilities of BWR type. This methodology covers of modal analysis of the point operation techniques of signal analysis and simulation of transients, through 3D Coupled RELAP5/PARCSv2.7 code.

  10. Advanced boiling water reactors for the 90's and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, A.S.; Sawyer, C.D.; Qurik, J.F.; McCandless, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses how the advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) is being developed by an international team of BWR manufacturers to respond to worldwide utility needs in the 1990s. Major objectives of the ABWR program are design simplification; improved safety and reliability; reduced construction, fuel and operating costs; improved maneuverability and reduced occupational exposure and radwaste. International cooperative efforts are also under way aimed at development of a simplified BWR employing natural circulation and passive safety systems. The SBWR conceptual design is complete. This BWR concept shows technical and economic promise. The SBWR program is aimed at providing a U.S. NRC certified design in an investor-ready state by 1995. With its short construction schedule, the 600 MWe SBWR will provide an option for commercial operation worldwide by the mid-to-late 1990s

  11. Update on materials performance and electrochemistry in hydrogen water chemistry at Dresden-2 BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indig, M.E.; Weber, J.E.; Davis, R.B.; Gordon, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies performed in 1982 indicated that if sufficient hydrogen was injected into the Dresden-2 BWR, IGSCC of sensitized austenitic stainless steel was mitigated. The present series of experiments were aimed at verification of the above finding, determining how much time off hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) could be tolerated and how HWC affected pre-existing cracks

  12. Comparative analysis of results between CASMO, MCNP and Serpent for a suite of Benchmark problems on BWR reactors; Analisis comparativo de resultados entre CASMO, MCNP y SERPENT para una suite de problemas Benchmark en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xolocostli M, J. V.; Vargas E, S.; Gomez T, A. M. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Reyes F, M. del C.; Del Valle G, E., E-mail: vicente.xolocostli@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, UP - Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edif. 9, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper a comparison is made in analyzing the suite of Benchmark problems for reactors type BWR between CASMO-4, MCNP6 and Serpent code. The Benchmark problem consists of two different geometries: a fuel cell of a pin and assembly type BWR. To facilitate the study of reactors physics in the fuel pin their nuclear characteristics are provided to detail, such as burnt dependence, the reactivity of selected nuclide, etc. With respect to the fuel assembly, the presented results are regarding to infinite multiplication factor for burning different steps and different vacuum conditions. Making the analysis of this set of Benchmark problems provides comprehensive test problems for the next fuels generation of BWR reactors with high extended burned. It is important to note that when making this comparison the purpose is to validate the methodologies used in modeling for different operating conditions, if the case is of other BWR assembly. The results will be within a range with some uncertainty, considering that does not depend on code that is used. Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN (Mexico) has accumulated some experience in using Serpent, due to the potential of this code over other commercial codes such as CASMO and MCNP. The obtained results for the infinite multiplication factor are encouraging and motivate the studies to continue with the generation of the X S of a core to a next step a respective nuclear data library is constructed and this can be used by codes developed as part of the development project of the Mexican Analysis Platform of Nuclear Reactors AZTLAN. (Author)

  13. Materials technologies of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begley, R.

    1984-01-01

    Satisfactory materials performance is a key element in achieving reliable operation of light water reactors. Outstanding performance under rigorous operational conditions has been exhibited by pressure boundary components, core internals, fuel cladding, and other critical components of these systems. Corrosion and stress corrosion phenomena have, however, had an impact on plant availability, most notably relating to pipe cracking in BWR systems and steam generator corrosion in PWR systems. These experiences have stimulated extensive development activities by the nuclear industry in improved NDE techniques, investigation of corrosion phenomena, as well as improved materials and repair processes. This paper reviews key materials performance aspects of light water reactors with particular emphasis on the progress which has been made in modeling of corrosion phenomena, control of the plant operating environment, advanced material development, and application of sophisticated repair procedures. Implementation of this technology provides the basis for improved plant availability

  14. Passive systems for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinolfi, R.; Noviello, L.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews the most original concepts that have been considered in Italy for the back-fitting of the nuclear power plants in order to reduce the probability and the importance of the release to the environment in case of a core melt. With reference either to BWR or PWR, passive concepts have been considered for back-fitting in the following areas: pump seals damage prevention and ECCS passive operation; reactor passive depressurization; molten reactor core passive cooling; metal containment passive water cooling through a water tank located at high level; containment isolation improvement through a sealing system; containment leaks control and limitation of environmental release. In addition some considerations will be made on the protection against external events introduced from the beginning on the PUN design either on building and equipment lay-out either on structure design. (author). 5 figs

  15. WRAP: a water reactor analysis package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.M.

    1977-06-01

    The modular computational system known as the Water Reactor Analysis Package (WRAP) has been developed at the Savannah River Laboratory. WRAP is essentially a reprogrammed version of the RELAP4 computer code with an extensively restructured input format, a dynamic dimensioning capability and additional computational capabilities such as an automatic steady-state option for pressurized water reactors and an automatic restart capability with provision for renodalization. The report describes the capabilities of WRAP at its current stage of development. The addition of new capabilities (e.g., a BWR steady-state capability), the inclusion of improved models (e.g., models in RELAP4/M0D8) and the development of improved numerical techniques to reduce execution time are being planned at this time

  16. Safety aspects of water chemistry in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The goals of the water chemistry control programmes are to maximize operational safety and the availability and operating life of primary system components, to maximize fuel integrity, and to control radiation buildup. To achieve these goals an effective corporate policy should be developed and implemented. Essential management responsibilities are: Recognizing of the long-term benefits of avoiding or minimizing: a) system corrosion; b) fuel failure; and c) radiation buildup. The following control or diagnostic parameters are suitable performance indicators: for PWR primary coolant circuits: pH of reactor water (by operating temperature); Concentration of chlorides in reactor water; Hydrogen (or oxygen) in reactor water. For PWR secondary coolant circuits: pH in feedwater; Cation productivity in steam generator blowdown; Iron concentration in feedwater; Oxygen concentration in condensate. And BWR coolant circuits: Conductivity of reactor water; Concentration of chlorides in reactor water; Iron concentration in feedwater; Copper concentration in feedwater. The present document represents a review of the developments in some Member States on how to implement a reasonable water chemistry programme and how to assess its effectiveness through numerical indicators. 12 figs, 20 tabs

  17. Comparative analysis of results between CASMO, MCNP and Serpent for a suite of Benchmark problems on BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xolocostli M, J. V.; Vargas E, S.; Gomez T, A. M.; Reyes F, M. del C.; Del Valle G, E.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper a comparison is made in analyzing the suite of Benchmark problems for reactors type BWR between CASMO-4, MCNP6 and Serpent code. The Benchmark problem consists of two different geometries: a fuel cell of a pin and assembly type BWR. To facilitate the study of reactors physics in the fuel pin their nuclear characteristics are provided to detail, such as burnt dependence, the reactivity of selected nuclide, etc. With respect to the fuel assembly, the presented results are regarding to infinite multiplication factor for burning different steps and different vacuum conditions. Making the analysis of this set of Benchmark problems provides comprehensive test problems for the next fuels generation of BWR reactors with high extended burned. It is important to note that when making this comparison the purpose is to validate the methodologies used in modeling for different operating conditions, if the case is of other BWR assembly. The results will be within a range with some uncertainty, considering that does not depend on code that is used. Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN (Mexico) has accumulated some experience in using Serpent, due to the potential of this code over other commercial codes such as CASMO and MCNP. The obtained results for the infinite multiplication factor are encouraging and motivate the studies to continue with the generation of the X S of a core to a next step a respective nuclear data library is constructed and this can be used by codes developed as part of the development project of the Mexican Analysis Platform of Nuclear Reactors AZTLAN. (Author)

  18. Twenty-fifth water reactor safety information meeting: Proceedings. Volume 1: Plenary sessions; Pressure vessel research; BWR strainer blockage and other generic safety issues; Environmentally assisted degradation of LWR components; Update on severe accident code improvements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteleone, S.

    1998-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the conference. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Japan, Norway, and Russia. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. This volume contains the following information: (1) plenary sessions; (2) pressure vessel research; (3) BWR strainer blockage and other generic safety issues; (4) environmentally assisted degradation of LWR components; and (5) update on severe accident code improvements and applications. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  19. Twenty-fifth water reactor safety information meeting: Proceedings. Volume 1: Plenary sessions; Pressure vessel research; BWR strainer blockage and other generic safety issues; Environmentally assisted degradation of LWR components; Update on severe accident code improvements and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1998-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the conference. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Japan, Norway, and Russia. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. This volume contains the following information: (1) plenary sessions; (2) pressure vessel research; (3) BWR strainer blockage and other generic safety issues; (4) environmentally assisted degradation of LWR components; and (5) update on severe accident code improvements and applications. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Evaluation of leachable behavior from ion exchange resins effects of organic impurities on BWR water chemistry. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Hiroo; Nishimura, Yusaku; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Uchida, Shunsuke; Matsui, Tsuneo

    1999-01-01

    The elution rate of leachables from ion exchange resin, which is used in condensate demineralizers and is one of several major sources of organic compounds in BWR cooling water, was measured. Properties of the leachables and elution rate depended on the kind of ion exchange resin and the years of use. The organic compounds elution rate of cation exchange resin was constant for 5 years and the molecular weight of these leachables was low. After 5 years, the elution rate increased and leachables consisted of organic compounds of high molecular weights of several thousand. The elution rate of anion exchange resin decreased yearly. The difference in the elution behavior was attributed to a dependence on oxidation degradation promoted by transition metal catalysis. The cation exchange resin included absorbed transition metal, while the anion exchange resin did not. An empirical formula showing the time dependence of the elution rate of organic compounds was derived. The formula was judged to be appropriate based on simulations of an actual BWR plant and comparisons of impurity concentrations with actual reactor water data. (author)

  1. Supercritical Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Latge, C.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the 6 concepts selected for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. SCWR is a new concept, it is an attempt to optimize boiling water reactors by using the main advantages of supercritical water: only liquid phase and a high calorific capacity. The SCWR requires very high temperatures (over 375 C degrees) and very high pressures (over 22.1 MPa) to operate which allows a high conversion yield (44% instead of 33% for a PWR). Low volumes of coolant are necessary which makes the neutron spectrum shift towards higher energies and it is then possible to consider fast reactors operating with supercritical water. The main drawbacks of supercritical water is the necessity to use very high pressures which has important constraints on the reactor design, its physical properties (density, calorific capacity) that vary strongly with temperatures and pressures and its very high corrosiveness. The feasibility of the concept is not yet assured in terms of adequate materials that resist to corrosion, reactor stability, reactor safety, and reactor behaviour in accidental situations. (A.C.)

  2. Pressurised water reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnie, S.; Lamonby, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is described with respect to the procedure for a unit start-up. The systems details and numerical data are for a four loop PWR station of the design proposed for Sizewell-'B', United Kingdom. A description is given of: the initial conditions, filling the reactor coolant system (RCS), heat-up and pressurisation of the RCS, secondary system preparations, reactor start-up, and reactivity control at power. (UK)

  3. BWR fuel performance under advanced water chemistry conditions – a delicate journey towards zero fuel failures – a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hettiarachchi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) have undergone a variety of chemistry evolutions over the past few decades as a result of the need to control stress corrosion cracking of reactor internals, radiation fields and personnel exposure. Some of the advanced chemistry changes include hydrogen addition, zinc addition, iron reduction using better filtration technologies, and more recently noble metal chemical addition to many of the modern day operating BWRs. These water chemistry evolutions have resulted in changes in the crud distribution on fuel cladding material, Co-60 levels and the Rod oxide thickness (ROXI) measurements using the conventional eddy current techniques. A limited number of Post-Irradiation Examinations (PIE) of fuel rods that exhibited elevated oxide thickness using eddy current techniques showed that the actual oxide thickness by metallography is much lower. The difference in these observations is attributed to the changing magnetic properties of the crud affecting the rod oxide thickness measurement by the eddy current technique. This paper will review and summarize the BWR fuel cladding performance under these advanced and improved water chemistry conditions and how these changes have affected the goal to reach zero fuel failures. The paper will also provide a brief summary of some of the results of hot cell PIE, results of crud composition evaluation, crud spallation, oxide thickness measurements, hydrogen content in the cladding and some fuel failure observations. (author) Key Words: Boiling Water Reactor, Fuel Performance, Hydrogen Addition, Zinc Addition, Noble Metal Chemical Addition, Zero Leakers

  4. Calculation system for physical analysis of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouveret, F.

    2001-01-01

    Although Boiling Water Reactors generate a quarter of worldwide nuclear electricity, they have been only little studied in France. A certain interest now shows up for these reactors. So, the aim of the work presented here is to contribute to determine a core calculation methodology with CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) codes. Vapour production in the reactor core involves great differences in technological options from pressurised water reactor. We analyse main physical phenomena for BWR and offer solutions taking them into account. BWR fuel assembly heterogeneity causes steep thermal flux gradients. The two dimensional collision probability method with exact boundary conditions makes possible to calculate accurately the flux in BWR fuel assemblies using the APOLLO-2 lattice code but induces a very long calculation time. So, we determine a new methodology based on a two-level flux calculation. Void fraction variations in assemblies involve big spectrum changes that we have to consider in core calculation. We suggest to use a void history parameter to generate cross-sections libraries for core calculation. The core calculation code has also to calculate the depletion of main isotopes concentrations. A core calculation associating neutronics and thermal-hydraulic codes lays stress on points we still have to study out. The most important of them is to take into account the control blade in the different calculation stages. (author)

  5. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In the field of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics computation there is a need to enhance scientific knowledge in order to develop advanced modelling techniques for new nuclear technologies and concepts as well as for current applications. Recently developed 'best-estimate' computer code systems for modelling 3-D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients in nuclear cores and for coupling core phenomena and system dynamics (PWR, BWR, VVER) need to be compared against each other and validated against results from experiments. International benchmark studies have been set up for this purpose. The present report is the second in a series of four and summarises the results of the first benchmark exercise, which identifies the key parameters and important issues concerning the thermalhydraulic system modelling of the transient, with specified core average axial power distribution and fission power time transient history. The transient addressed is a turbine trip in a boiling water reactor, involving pressurization events in which the coupling between core phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. In addition, the data made available from experiments carried out at the Peach Bottom 2 reactor (a GE-designed BWR/4) make the present benchmark particularly valuable. (author)

  6. Power distribution effects on boiling water reactor stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiano, B.; March-Leuba, J.

    1989-01-01

    The work presented in this paper deals with the effects of spatial power distributions on the stability of boiling water reactors (BWRs). It is shown that a conservative power distribution exists for which the stability is minimal. These results are relevant because they imply that bounding stability calculations are possible and, thus, a worst-possible scenario may be defined for a particular BWR geometry. These bounding calculations may, then, be used to determine the maximum expected limit-cycle peak powers

  7. Structural integrity and management of aging in internal components of BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganis J, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    Presently work the bases to apply structural integrity and the handling of the aging of internal components of the pressure vessel of boiling water reactors of water are revised and is carried out an example of structural integrity in the horizontal welding H4 of the encircling one of the core of a reactor, taking data reported in the literature. It is also revised what is required to carry out the handling program or conduct of the aging (AMP). (Author)

  8. BWR zinc addition Sourcebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Alfred J.

    2014-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) have been injecting zinc into the primary coolant via the reactor feedwater system for over 25 years for the purpose of controlling primary system radiation fields. The BWR zinc injection process has evolved since the initial application at the Hope Creek Nuclear Station in 1986. Key transitions were from the original natural zinc oxide (NZO) to depleted zinc oxide (DZO), and from active zinc injection of a powdered zinc oxide slurry (pumped systems) to passive injection systems (zinc pellet beds). Zinc addition has continued through various chemistry regimes changes, from normal water chemistry (NWC) to hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) and HWC with noble metals (NobleChem™) for mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of reactor internals and primary system piping. While past reports published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) document specific industry experience related to these topics, the Zinc Sourcebook was prepared to consolidate all of the experience gained over the past 25 years. The Zinc Sourcebook will benefit experienced BWR Chemistry, Operations, Radiation Protection and Engineering personnel as well as new people entering the nuclear power industry. While all North American BWRs implement feedwater zinc injection, a number of other BWRs do not inject zinc. This Sourcebook will also be a valuable resource to plants considering the benefits of zinc addition process implementation, and to gain insights on industry experience related to zinc process control and best practices. This paper presents some of the highlights from the Sourcebook. (author)

  9. Inherently safe light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ise, Takeharu

    1987-01-01

    Today's large nuclear power reactors of world-wise use have been designed based on the philosophy. It seems that recent less electricity demand rates, higher capital cost and the TMI accident let us acknowledge relative small and simplified nuclear plants with safer features, and that Chernobyl accident in 1983 underlines the needs of intrinsic and passive safety characteristics. In such background, several inherently safe reactor concepts have been presented abroad and domestically. First describing 'Can inherently safe reactors be designed,' then I introduce representative reactor concepts of inherently safe LWRs advocated abroad so far. All of these innovative reactors employ intrinsic and passive features in their design, as follows: (1) PIUS, an acronym for Process Inherent Ultimate Safety, or an integral PWR with passive heat sink and passive shutdown mechanism, advocated by ASEA-ATOM of Sweden. (2) MAP(Minimum Attention Plant), or a self-pressurized, natural circulation integral PWR, promoted by CE Inc. of the U.S. (3) TPS(TRIGA Power System), or a compact PWR with passive heat sink and inherent fuel characteristics of large prompt temperature coefficient, prompted by GA Technologies Inc. of the U.S. (4) PIUS-BWR, or an inherently safe BWR employing passively actuated fluid valves, in competition with PIUS, prompted by ORNL of the U.S. Then, I will describe the domestic trends in Japan and the innovative inherently safe LWRs presented domestically so far. (author)

  10. Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in light water reactors (LWRs) are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or SCC cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Similar cracking has also occurred in upper shell-to-transition cone girth welds in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator vessels. Another concern is failure of reactor-core internal components after accumulation of relatively high fluence, which has occurred in both BWRs and PWRs. Research during the past year focused on (1) fatigue and SCC of ferritic steels used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels, (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated BWR water in SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS, and (3) irradiation-assisted SCC in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs. Failure after accumulation of relatively high fluence has been attributed to radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of elements such as Si, P, Ni, and Cr. This document provides a summary of research progress in these areas

  11. Stability analysis of a recycling circuit of a BWR type reactor. Theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas H, J.G.; Espinosa P, G.; Gonzalez M, V.M.

    2000-01-01

    The Technology, Regulation and Services Management of the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards financed and in coordinate form with the I.P.H. Department of the Metropolitan Autonomous-Iztapalapa University developed the present project with the purpose of studying the effect of the recycling system on the linear stability of a BWR reactor whose reference central is the Laguna Verde power station. The present project forms part of a work series focused to the linear stability of the nuclear reactor of the Unit 1 at Laguna Verde power station. The components of the recycling system considered for the study of stability are the recycling external circuit (recycling pumps, valves) and the internal circuit (downcomer, jet pumps, lower full, driers, separators). The mathematical model is obtained applying mass balances and movement quantity in each one of the mentioned circuits. With respect to the nucleus model two regions are considered, the first one is made of a flow in one phase and the second one of a flow in two phases. For modelling the biphasic region it is considered homogenous flow. Generally it is studied the system behavior in the frequency domain starting from the transfer function applied to four operational states which correspond to the lower stability zone in the map power-flow of the Unit 1 of Laguna Verde power station. The Nyquist diagrams corresponding to each state as well as their characteristic frequency were determined. The results show that exists a very clear dependence of the power-flow relation on the stability of the system. It was found that the boiling length is an important parameter for the linear stability of the system. The obtained results show that the characteristic frequencies in unstability zones are similar to the reported data of the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde power station in the event of power oscillations carried out in January 1995. (Author)

  12. Reactor power automatically controlling method and device for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Akira; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Tanigawa, Naoshi.

    1997-01-01

    For an automatic control for a reactor power, when a deviation exceeds a predetermined value, the aimed value is kept at a predetermined value, and when the deviation is decreased to less than the predetermined value, the aimed value is increased from the predetermined value again. Alternatively, when a reactor power variation coefficient is decreased to less than a predetermine value, an aimed value is maintained at a predetermined value, and when the variation coefficient exceeds the predetermined value, the aimed value is increased. When the reactor power variation coefficient exceeds a first determined value, an aimed value is increased to a predetermined variation coefficient, and when the variation coefficient is decreased to less than the first determined value and also when the deviation between the aimed value and an actual reactor power exceeds a second determined value, the aimed value is maintained at a constant value. When the deviation is increased or when the reactor power variation coefficient is decreased, since the aimed value is maintained at predetermined value without increasing the aimed value, the deviation is not increased excessively thereby enabling to avoid excessive overshoot. (N.H.)

  13. Design of a mixed recharge with MOX assemblies of greater relation of moderation for a BWR reactor; Diseno de una recarga mixta con ensambles MOX de mayor relacion de moderacion para un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jrrs@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    The study of the fuel of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium (MOX) it has been topic of investigation in many countries of the world and those are even discussed in many places the benefits of reprocessing the spent fuel to extract the plutonium created during the irradiation of the fuel in the nuclear power reactors. At the moment those reactors that have been loaded partially with MOX fuel, are mainly of the type PWR where a mature technology has been achieved in some countries like they are France, Belgium and England, however the experience with reactors of the type BWR is more limited and it is continued studying the best way to introduce this type of fuel in BWRs, one of the main problems to introduce MOX in reactors BWR is the neutronic design of the same one, existing different concepts to introduce the plutonium in the assemblies of fuel and one of them is the one of increasing the relationship of moderation of the assemble. In this work a MOX fuel assemble design is presented and the obtained results so far in the ININ. These results indicate that the investigated concept has some exploitable advantages in the use of the MOX fuel. (Author)

  14. Assessment of RELAP5/Mod3 system thermal hydraulic code using power test data of a BWR6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.; Chiang, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    The power test data of Kuosheng Nuclear Power Plant were used to assess RELAP5/Mod3 system thermal hydraulic analysis code. The plant employed a General Electric designed Boiling Water Reactor (BWR6) with rated power of 2894 MWth. The purpose of the assessment is to verify the validity of the plant specific RELAP5/Mod3 input deck for transient analysis. The power tests considered in the assessment were 100% power generator load rejection, the closure of main steam isolation valves (MSIVs) at 96% power, and the trip of recirculation pumps at 68% power. The major parameters compared in the assessment were steam dome pressure, steam flow rate, core flow rate, and downcomer water level. The comparisons of the system responses predicted by the code and the power test data were reasonable which demonstrated the capabilities of the code and the validity of the input deck. However, it was also identified that the separator model of the code may cause energy imbalance problem in the transient calculation. In the assessment, the steam separators were modeled using time-dependent junctions. In the approach, a complete separation of steam and water was predicted. The system responses predicted by RELAP5/Mod3 code were also compared with those from the calculations of RETRAN code. When these results were compared with the power test data, the predictions of the RETRAN code were better than those of RELAP5/Mod3. In the simulation of 100% power generator load rejection, it was believed that the difference in the steam separator model of these two codes was one of the reason of the difference in the prediction of power test data. The predictions of RELAP/Mod3 code can also be improved by the incorporation of one-dimensional kinetic model. There was also some margin for the improvement of the input related to the feedwater control system. (author)

  15. Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dgiby Macdonald; Mirna Urquidi-Macdonald; John Mahaffy; Amit Jain Han Sang Kim; Vishisht Gupta; Jonathan Pitt

    2006-01-01

    This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or ''radiation fields'' around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry

  16. Simulation of the flow obstruction of a jet pump in a BWR reactor with the code RELAP/SCDAPSIM; Simulacion de la obstruccion de flujo de una bomba jet en un reactor BWR con el codigo RELAP/SCDAPSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas V, J.; Filio L, C., E-mail: jaime.cardenas@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose M. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This work simulates the flow obstruction of a jet pump in one of the recirculation loops of a nuclear power plant with a reactor of type BWR at 100% of operating power, in order to analyze the behavior of the total flow of the refrigerant passing through the reactor core, the total flow in each recirculation loop of the reactor, together with the 10 jet pumps of each loop. The behavior of the power and the reactivity insertion due to the change of the refrigerant flow pattern is also analyzed. The simulation was carried out using the RELAP/SCDAPSIM version 3.5 code, using a reactor model with 10 jet pumps in each recirculation loop and a core consisting of 6 radial zones and 25 axial zones. The scenario postulates the flow obstruction in a jet pump in a recirculation loop A when the reactor operates at 100% rated power, causing a change in the total flow of refrigerant in the reactor core, leading to a decrease in power. Once the reactor conditions are established to its new power, the operator tries to recover the nominal power using the flow control valve of the recirculation loop A, opening stepwise as a strategy to safely recover the reactor power. In this analysis is assumed that the intention of the nuclear plant operator is to maintain the operation of the reactor during the established cycle. (Author)

  17. Seismic evaluation of BWR spent fuel storage racks using actual damping by vibration test in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Hiroto; Iwakura, Shigeyoshi; Imaoka, Tetsuo; Okumura, Kazue; Orita, Syuichi; Namita, Yoshio

    2010-01-01

    Damping value for BWR spent fuel storage racks has been used 1 percent damping, which is applied to welded steel structures in air as defined JEAG4601. However, it is considered that the actual damping is higher than that of the above mentioned, because of its underwater installation. This report shows the actual damping value of the Check Arrayed Rack by vibration test in water and Evaluation by the analysis of rack using actual damping. (author)

  18. Design of a mixed recharge with MOX assemblies of greater relation of moderation for a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J.

    2004-01-01

    The study of the fuel of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium (MOX) it has been topic of investigation in many countries of the world and those are even discussed in many places the benefits of reprocessing the spent fuel to extract the plutonium created during the irradiation of the fuel in the nuclear power reactors. At the moment those reactors that have been loaded partially with MOX fuel, are mainly of the type PWR where a mature technology has been achieved in some countries like they are France, Belgium and England, however the experience with reactors of the type BWR is more limited and it is continued studying the best way to introduce this type of fuel in BWRs, one of the main problems to introduce MOX in reactors BWR is the neutronic design of the same one, existing different concepts to introduce the plutonium in the assemblies of fuel and one of them is the one of increasing the relationship of moderation of the assemble. In this work a MOX fuel assemble design is presented and the obtained results so far in the ININ. These results indicate that the investigated concept has some exploitable advantages in the use of the MOX fuel. (Author)

  19. GPE-BWR and the containment venting and filtering issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, J.; Santiago, J. de

    1988-01-01

    The Spanish Boiling Water Reactor Owner's Group (GPE-BWR) is formed by three utilities, owning four units: Santa Maria de Garona (46 MWe, BWR3, Mark I containment), Cofrentes (975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) and Valdecaballeros (2x975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) - all of the reactors having been supplied by General Electric. One of the GPE-BWR's several committees is the Safety and Licensing Committee, which follows up the evolution of severe accident topics and particularly the containment venting and filtering issue. In September 1987, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), the Spanish Regulatory Body, asked the GPE-BWR to define its position on the installation of a containment venting system. The GPE-BWR created a Working Group which presented a Report on Containment Venting to the CSN in January 1987 gathered from: the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); some US utilities; and several European countries, especially France, Germany and Sweden. CSN's review of the containment venting Report and the Action Plan proposed by the GPE-BWR finished in April 1988. The conclusion of the Report and the proposed Action Plan take into account the US NRC's identified open items on severe accidents and the R and D programs scheduled to close these items

  20. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I

  1. Analysis of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in an A BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escorcia O, D.; Salazar S, E.

    2016-09-01

    The present work aims to recreate the accident occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan on March 11, 2011, making use of an academic simulator of forced circulation of the A BWR reactor provided by the IAEA to know the scope of this simulator. The simulator was developed and distributed by the IAEA for academic purposes and contains the characteristics and general elements of this reactor to be able to simulate transients and failures of different types, allowing also to observe the general behavior of the reactor, as well as several phenomena and present systems in the same. Is an educational tool of great value, but it does not have a scope that allows the training of plant operators. To recreate the conditions of the Fukushima accident in the simulator, we first have to know what events led to this accident, as well as the actions taken by operators and managers to reduce the consequences of this accident; and the sequence of events that occurred during the course of the accident. Differences in the nuclear power plant behavior are observed and interpreted throughout the simulation, since the Fukushima plant technology and the simulator technology are not the same, although they have several elements in common. The Fukushima plant had an event that by far exceeded the design basis, which triggered in an accident that occurred in the first place by a total loss of power supply, followed by the loss of cooling systems, causing a level too high in temperature, melting the core and damaging the containment accordingly, allowing the escape of hydrogen and radioactive material. As a result of the simulation, was determined that the scope of the IAEA academic simulator reaches the entrance of the emergency equipment, so is able to simulate almost all the events occurred at the time of the earthquake and the arrival of the tsunami in the nuclear power plant of Fukushima Daiichi. However, due to its characteristics, is not able to simulate later

  2. Review of international solutions to NEACRP benchmark BWR lattice cell problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsall, M.J.

    1977-12-01

    This paper summarises international solutions to a set of BWR benchmark problems. The problems, posed as an activity sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Agency Committee on Reactor Physics, were as follows: 9-pin supercell with central burnable poison pin, mini-BWR with 4 pin-cells and water gaps and control rod cruciform, full 7 x 7 pin BWR lattice cell with differential U 235 enrichment, and full 8 x 8 pin BWR lattice cell with water-hole, Pu-loading, burnable poison, and homogenised cruciform control rod. Solutions have been contributed by Denmark, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK. (author)

  3. Simulation of the flow obstruction of a jet pump in a BWR reactor with the code RELAP/SCDAPSIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas V, J.; Filio L, C.

    2016-09-01

    This work simulates the flow obstruction of a jet pump in one of the recirculation loops of a nuclear power plant with a reactor of type BWR at 100% of operating power, in order to analyze the behavior of the total flow of the refrigerant passing through the reactor core, the total flow in each recirculation loop of the reactor, together with the 10 jet pumps of each loop. The behavior of the power and the reactivity insertion due to the change of the refrigerant flow pattern is also analyzed. The simulation was carried out using the RELAP/SCDAPSIM version 3.5 code, using a reactor model with 10 jet pumps in each recirculation loop and a core consisting of 6 radial zones and 25 axial zones. The scenario postulates the flow obstruction in a jet pump in a recirculation loop A when the reactor operates at 100% rated power, causing a change in the total flow of refrigerant in the reactor core, leading to a decrease in power. Once the reactor conditions are established to its new power, the operator tries to recover the nominal power using the flow control valve of the recirculation loop A, opening stepwise as a strategy to safely recover the reactor power. In this analysis is assumed that the intention of the nuclear plant operator is to maintain the operation of the reactor during the established cycle. (Author)

  4. Updating of the costs of the nuclear fuels of the equilibrium reloading of the A BWR and EPR reactors; Actualizacion de los costos de combustible nuclear de la recarga de equilibrio de los reactores ABWR y EPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega C, R.F. [FI-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: rortega@fi-b.unam.mx

    2008-07-01

    In the last two and a half years, the price of the uranium in the market spot has ascended of US$20.00 dollars by lb U{sub 3O}8 in January, 2005 to a maximum of US$137.00 dollars by Ib U{sub 3}O{sub 8} by the middle of 2007. At the moment this price has been stabilized in US$90.00 dollars by Ib U{sub 3}O{sub 8} such for the market spot, like for the long term contracts. In this work the reasons of this increment are analyzed, as well as their impact in the fuel prices of the balance recharge of the advanced reactors of boiling water (A BWR) and of the advanced water at pressure reactors (EPR). (Author)

  5. LWR [Light Water Reactor] power plant simulations using the AD10 and AD100 systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Chien, C.J.; Jang, J.Y.; Lin, H.C.; Mallen, A.N.; Wang, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    Boiling (BWR) and Pressurized (PWR) Water Reactor Power Plants are being simulated at BNL with the AD10 and AD100 Peripheral Processor Systems. The AD10 system has been used for BWR simulations since 1984 for safety analyses, emergency training and optimization studies. BWR simulation capabilities have been implemented recently on the AD100 system and PWR simulation capabilities are currently being developed under the auspices of international cooperation. Modeling and simulation methods are presented with emphasis on the simulation of the Nuclear Steam Supply System. Results are presented for BWR simulation and performance characteristics are compared of the AD10 and AD100 systems. It will be shown that the AD100 simulates two times faster than two AD10 processors operating in parallel and that the computing capacity of one AD100 (with FMU processor) is twice as large as that of two AD10 processors. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. Investigation of boiling water reactor stability and limit-cycle amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiano, B.; March-Leuba, J.A.; Euler, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Galerkin's method has been applied to a boiling water reactor (BWR) dynamics model consisting of the point kinetics equations, which describe the neutronics, and a feedback transfer function, which describes the thermal hydraulics. The result is a low-order approximate solution describing BWR behavior during small-amplitude limit-cycle oscillations. The approximate solution has been used to obtain a stability condition, show that the average reactor power must increase during limit-cycle oscillations, and qualitatively determine how changes in transfer function values affect the limit-cycle amplitude. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Technical Basis for Water Chemistry Control of IGSCC in Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Barry; Garcia, Susan

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) operate with very high purity water. However, even the utilization of near theoretical conductivity water cannot prevent intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized stainless steel, wrought nickel alloys and nickel weld metals under oxygenated conditions. IGSCC can be further accelerated by the presence of certain impurities dissolved in the coolant. The goal of this paper is to present the technical basis for controlling various impurities under both oxygenated, i.e., normal water chemistry (NWC) and deoxygenated, i.e., hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) conditions for mitigation of IGSCC. More specifically, the effects of typical BWR ionic impurities (e.g., sulfate, chloride, nitrate, borate, phosphate, etc.) on IGSCC propensities in both NWC and HWC environments will be discussed. The technical basis for zinc addition to the BWR coolant will also provided along with an in-plant example of the most severe water chemistry transient to date.

  8. Feasibility study on the thorium fueled boiling water breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PetrusTakaki, N.

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of (Th,U)O 2 fueled, boiling water breeder reactor based on conventional BWR technology has been studied. In order to determine the potential use of water cooled thorium reactor as a competitive breeder, this study evaluated criticality, breeding and void reactivity coefficient in response to changes made in MFR and fissile enrichments. The result of the study shows that while using light water as moderator, low moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR=0.5), it was possible to breed fissile fuel in negative void reactivity condition. However the burnup value was lower than the value of the current LWR. On the other hand, heavy water cooled reactor shows relatively wider feasible breeding region, which lead into possibility of designing a core having better neutronic and economic performance than light water with negative void reactivity coefficient. (authors)

  9. General Electric's training program for BWR chemists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, R.N.; Lim, W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the General Electric boiling water reactor chemistry training program from 1959 to the present. The original intention of this program was to provide practical hands on type training in radiochemistry to BWR chemistry supervisors with fossil station experience. This emphasis on radiochemistry has not changed through the years, but the training has expanded to include the high purity water chemistry of the BWR and has been modified to include new commission requirements, engineering developments and advanced instrumentation. Student and instructor qualifications are discussed and a description of the spin off courses for chemistry technicians and refresher training is presented

  10. Development of a computer program of fast calculation for the pre design of advanced nuclear fuel 10 x 10 for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perusquia, R.; Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) a methodology is developed to optimize the design of cells 10x10 of assemble fuels for reactors of water in boil or BWR. It was proposed a lineal calculation formula based on a coefficients matrix (of the change reason of the relative power due to changes in the enrichment of U-235) for estimate the relative powers by pin of a cell. With this it was developed the computer program of fast calculation named PreDiCeldas. The one which by means of a simple search algorithm allows to minimize the relative power peak maximum of cell or LPPF. This is achieved varying the distribution of U-235 inside the cell, maintaining in turn fixed its average enrichment. The accuracy in the estimation of the relative powers for pin is of the order from 1.9% when comparing it with results of the 'best estimate' HELIOS code. With the PreDiCeldas it was possible, at one minimum time of calculation, to re-design a reference cell diminishing the LPPF, to the beginning of the life, of 1.44 to a value of 1.31. With the cell design with low LPPF is sought to even design cycles but extensive that those reached at the moment in the BWR of the Laguna Verde Central. (Author)

  11. Suppression device for the reactor water level lowering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuga, Hajime; Kasuga, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the lowering in the reactor water level so as to avoid unnecessary actuation of ECCS upon generation of transient changes which forecasts the lowering of the reactor water level in a BWR type reactor. Constitution: There are provided a water level suppression signal generator for generating a water level suppression signal upon generation of a transient change signal which forecasts the water level lowering in a nuclear reactor and a recycling flow rate controller that applies a recycling flow rate control signal to a recycling pump drive motor by the water level lowering suppression signal. The velocity of the recycling pump is controlled by a reactor scram signal by way of the water level lowering suppresion signal generator and a recycling flow rate controller. Then, the recycling reactor core flow rate is decreased and the void amount in the reactor is transiently increased where the water level tends to increase. Accordingly, the water level lowering by the scram is moderated by the increasing tendency of the water level. (Ikeda, J.)

  12. RELAP4/MOD5: a computer program for transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors and related systems. User's manual. Volume I. RELAP4/MOD5 description. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    RELAP4 is a computer program written in FORTRAN IV for the digital computer analysis of nuclear reactors and related systems. It is primarily applied in the study of system transient response to postulated perturbations such as coolant loop rupture, circulation pump failure, power excursions, etc. The program was written to be used for water-cooled (PWR and BWR) reactors and can be used for scale models such as LOFT and SEMISCALE. Additional versatility extends its usefulness to related applications, such as ice condenser and containment subcompartment analysis. Specific options are available for reflood (FLOOD) analysis and for the NRC Evaluation Model.

  13. Application of expert system to evaluating reactor water cleanup system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Katsuji; Nakamura, Masahiro; Nagasawa, Katsumi; Fushiki, Sumiyuki.

    1991-01-01

    Expert systems employing artificial intelligence (AI) have been developed for finding and elucidating causes of anomalies and malfunctions, presenting pertinent recommendation for countermeasures and for making precautionary diagnosis. On the other hand, further improvements in reliabilities for chemical control are required to promote BWR plant reliability and advancement. Especially, it is necessary to maintain the reactor water purity in high quality to minimize stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in primary cooling system, fuel performance degradation and radiation buildup. The reactor water quality is controlled by the reactor water cleanup (RWCU) system. So, it is very important to maintain the RWCU performance, in order to keep good reactor water quality. This paper describes an expert system used for evaluating RWCU system performance in BWR plants. (author)

  14. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

  15. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a cooling water intake collector for a nuclear reactor. It includes multiple sub-collectors extending out in a generally parallel manner to each other, each one having a first end and a second one separated along their length, and multiple water outlets for connecting each one to a corresponding pressure tube of the reactor. A first end tube and a second one connect the sub-collector tubes together to their first and second ends respectively. It also includes multiple collector tubes extending transversely by crossing over the sub-collector tubes and separated from each other in the direction of these tubes. Each collector tubes has a water intake for connecting to a water pump and multiple connecting tubes separated over its length and connecting each one to the corresponding sub-collector [fr

  16. Radiotoxicity study of a boiling water reactor core design based on a thorium-uranium fuel concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez C, A.; Espinosa P, G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The innovative design of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using the thorium-uranium (blanket-seed) concept in the same integrated fuel assembly is presented in this paper. The lattice design uses the thorium conversion capability to 233 U in a BWR spectrum. A core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of one effective full power year in a standard BWR. A comparison of the toxicity of the spent fuel showed that toxicity is lower in the thorium cycle than other commercial fuels as UO 2 and MOX (uranium and plutonium) in case of the one-through cycle for LWR. (Author)

  17. Fuel design with low peak of local power for BWR reactors with increased nominal power; Diseno de un combustible con bajo pico de potencia local para reactores BWR con potencia nominal aumentada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perusquia C, R.; Montes, J.L.; Hernandez, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Castillo, A. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mrpc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The Federal Commission of Electricity recently announcement the beginning of the works related with the increase of the power to 120% of the original nominal one in the Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) of the Laguna Verde Central (CLV): In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) are carried out studies of the impact on the design of the recharge of derived fuel of this increase. One of the main effects of the power increase type that it is promoting, is the increment of the flow of generated vapor, what takes, to a bigger fraction of vacuum in the core presenting increased values of the maximum fraction to the limit, so much of the ratio of lineal heat generation (XFLPD) as of the ratio of critic power (MFLCPR). In the made studies, it is found that these fractions rise lineally with the increase of the nominal power. Considering that the reactors of the CLV at the moment operate to 105% of the original nominal power, it would imply an increment of the order of 13.35% in the XFLPD and in the MFLCPR operating to a nominal power of 120% of the original one. This would propitiate bigger problems to design appropriately the fuel cycle and the necessity, almost unavoidable, of to resort to a fuel assembly type more advanced for the recharges of the cores. As option, in the ININ the feasibility of continuing using the same type of it fuel assembles that one has come using recently in the CLV, the type GE12 is analyzed. To achieve it was outlined to diminish the peak factor of local power (LPPF) of the power cells that compose the fuel recharge in 13.35%. It was started of a fuel design previously used in the recharge of the unit 1 cycle 12 and it was re-design to use it in the recharge design of the cycle 13 of the unit 1, considering an increase to 120% of the original power and the same requirements of cycle extension. For the re-design of the fuel assembly cell it was used the PreDiCeldas computer program developed in the ININ. It was able to diminish the LPPF

  18. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Park, J.Y.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) during the six months from October 1992 to March 1993. Fatigue and EAC of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (1) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels. (2) EAC of cast stainless steels (SSs), (3) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence, and (4) EAC of low-alloy steels. Fatigue tests were conducted on medium-sulfur-content A106-Gr B piping and A533-Gr B pressure vessel steels in simulated PWR water and in air. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of cast austenitic SSs in the as-received and thermally aged conditions and chromium-nickel-plated A533-Gr B steel in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) water at 289 degrees C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for ferritic steels in oxygenated water and correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

  19. Determination of the neutron fluence in the welding of the 'Core shroud' of the BWR reactor core; Determinacion de la fluencia neutronica en las soldaduras del 'core shroud' del nucleo de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucatero, M A; Xolocostli M, J V; Gomez T, A M; Palacios H, J C [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    With the purpose of defining the inspection frequency, in function of the embrittlement of the materials that compose the welding of the 'Core Shroud' or encircling of the core of a BWR type reactor, is necessary to know the neutron fluence received for this welding. In the work the calculated values of neutron fluence accumulated maxim (E > 1 MeV) during the first 8 operation cycles of the reactor are presented. The calculations were carried out according to the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.190, making use of the DORT code, which solves the transport equation in discreet ordinate in two dimensions (xy, r{theta}, and rz). The results in 3D were obtained applying the Synthesis method according to the guide before mentioned. Results are presented for the horizontal welding H3, H4, and H5, showing the corresponding curves to the fluence accumulated to the cycle 8 and a projection for the cycle 14 is presented. (Author)

  20. Analysis of a main steam isolation value closure anticipated transient without scram in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, T.J.; Pan, C.; Chen, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) could be a major accident sequence with possible core melt and containment damage in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The behavior of a BWR/6 during a main steam isolation valve closure ATWS is investigated using the best-estimate computer program, RETRAN-02. The effects of both makeup coolant and boron injection on the reactor behavior are studied. It is found that the BWR/6 behaves similarly to the BWR/2 and BWR/4. Without boron injection and makeup coolant, the reactor loses its coolant inventory very quickly and the reactor power drops rapidly to ∼ 16% of rated power due to negative void reactivity. With coolant makeup from the high-pressure core spray and the reactor core isolation cooling systems, the rector reaches a quasi-steady-state condition after an initially rapidly changing transient. The dome pressure, downcomer water level, and core power oscillate around a mean value; the average core power is ∼ 15%, which is approximately equal to the power needed to heat and evaporate the subcooled makeup coolant. Lower boron concentrations in the core tend to complicate reactor behavior due to the combination of two competing phenomena: the negative boron reactivity and the positive reactivity caused by a void collapse

  1. Non-linearity consideration when analyzing reactor noise statistical characteristics. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kebadze, B V; Adamovski, L A

    1975-06-01

    Statistical characteristics of boiling water reactor noise in the vicinity of stability threshold are studied. The reactor is considered as a non-linear system affected by random perturbations. To solve a non-linear problem the principle of statistical linearization is used. It is shown that the halfwidth of resonance peak in neutron power noise spectrum density as well as the reciprocal of noise dispersion, which are used in predicting a stable operation theshold, are different from zero both within and beyond the stability boundary the determination of which was based on linear criteria.

  2. Stability monitoring of a natural-circulation-cooled boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for monitoring the stability of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are discussed. Surveillance of BWR stability is of importance as problems were encountered in several large reactors. Moreover, surveying stability allows plant owners to operate at high power with acceptable stability margins. The results of experiments performed on the Dodewaard BWR (the Netherlands) are reported. This type reactor is cooled by natural circulation, a cooling principle that is also being considered for new reactor designs. The stability of this reactor was studied both with deterministic methods and by noise analysis. Three types of stability are distinguished and were investigated separately: reactor-kinetic stability, thermal-hydraulic stability and total-plant stability. It is shown that the Dodewaard reactor has very large stability margins. A simple yet reliable stability criterion is introduced. It can be derived on-line from thhe noise signal of ex-vessel neutron detectors during normal operation. The sensitivity of neutron detectors to in-core flux perturbations - reflected in the field-of-view of the detector - was calculated in order to insure proper stability surveillance. A novel technique is presented which enables the determination of variations of the in-core coolant velocity by noise correlation. The velocity measured was interpreted on the basis of experiments performed on the air/water flow in a model of a BWR coolant channel. It appeared from this analysis that the velocity measured was much higher than the volume-averaged water and air velocities and the volumetric flux. The applicability of the above-mentioned technique to monitoring of local channel-flow stability was tested. It was observed that stability effects on the coolant velocity are masked by other effects originating from the local flow pattern. Experimental and theoretical studies show a shorter effective fuel time constant in a BWR than was assumed. (author). 118 refs.; 73 figs.; 21 tabs

  3. Technical report on operating experience with boiling water reactor offgas systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, R.; Barrett, L.; Grimes, B.; Eisenhut, D.

    1978-03-01

    Over 100 reactor years of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) operating experience have been accumulated since the first commercial operation of BWRs. A number of incidents have occurred involving the ''offgas'' of these Boiling Water Reactors. This report describes the generation and processing of ''offgas'' in Boiling Water Reactors, the safety considerations regarding systems processing the ''offgas'', operating experience involving ignitions or explosions of ''offgas'' and possible measures to reduce the likelihood of future ignitions or explosions and to mitigate the consequences of such incidents should they occur

  4. Systems design of direct-cycle supercritical-water-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Jevremovic, Tatjana; Okano, Yashushi

    1995-01-01

    The system design of a direct-cycle supercritical-water-cooled fast reactor is presented. The supercritical water does not exhibit a change of phase. the recirculation system, steam separator, and dryer of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are unnecessary. Roughly speaking, the reactor pressure vessel and control rods are similar to those of a pressurized water reactor, the containment and emergency core cooling system are similar to a BWR, and the balance of plant is similar to a supercritical-pressure fossil-fired power plant (FPP). the electric power of the fast converter is 1,508 MW(electric). The number of coolant loops is only two because of the high coolant enthalpy. Containment volume is much reduced. The thermal efficiency is improved 24% over a BWR. The coolant void reactivity is negative by placing thin zirconium-hydride layers between seeds and blankets. The power costs would be much reduced compared with those of a light water reactor (LWR) and a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor. The concept is based on the huge amount of experience with the water coolant technology of LWRs and FPPs. The oxidation of stainless steel cladding is avoided by adopting a much lower coolant temperature than that of the FPP

  5. Progress in design study on reduced-moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Kugo, Teruhiko; Shimada, Shoichiro; Shirakawa, Toshihisa; Iwamura, Takamichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takeda, Renzo [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yokoyama, Tsugio [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Hibi, Koki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Wada, Shigeyuki [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor which aims at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. These characteristics can be achieved by the high conversion ratio from {sup 238}U to {sup 239}Pu resulted from the higher neutron energy spectrum in comparison to conventional light water reactors. Considering the extension of LWR utilization, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started the research on it in 1997 and then started a collaboration in the conceptual design study with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) in 1998, under technical cooperation with three Japanese reactor vendors. In the core design study of the RMWR, negative void reactivity coefficient is required from a viewpoint of safety as well as establishing hard neutron spectrum. In order to achieve the above trade-off characteristics simultaneously, several basic core design ideas should be combined, such as a tight-lattice fuel assembly, a flat core, a blanket effect, a streaming effect and so on. Up to now, five core concepts have been created for the RMWR as follows: a high conversion BWR type core with high void fraction and super-flat core, a long operation cycle BWR type core using void tube assembly, a high conversion BWR type core without blankets, a high conversion PWR type core using heavy water as a coolant, and a PWR type core for plutonium multi-recycle using seed-blanket type fuel assemblies. Detailed feasibility studies for the RMWR have been continued on core design study. The present report summarizes the recent progress in the design study for the RMWR. (author)

  6. Water chemistry control and decontamination experience with TEPCO BWR`s and the measures planned for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, N.; Miyamaru, K. [Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The new TEPCO BWR`s are capable of having the occupational radiation exposure controlled successfully at a low level by selecting low cobalt steel, using corrosion-resistant steel, employing dual condensate polishing systems, and controlling Ni/Fe ratio during operation. The occupational radiation exposure of the old BWR`s, on the other hand, remains high though reduced substantially through the use of low cobalt replacement steel and the partial addition of a filter in the condensate polishing system. Currently under review is the overall decontamination procedure for the old BWR`s to find out to measures needed to reduce the amount of crud that is and has been carried over into the nuclear reactor. The current status of decontamination is reported below.

  7. Alternative water injection device to reactor equipment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Masahiro.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention injects water to the reactor and the reactor container continuously for a long period of time for preventing occurrence of a severe accident in a BWR type reactor and maintaining the integrity of the reactor container even if the accident should occur. Namely, diesel-driven pumps disposed near heat exchangers of a reactor after-heat removing system (RHR) are operated before the reactor is damaged by the after heat to cause reactor melting. A sucking valve disposed to a pump sucking pipeline connecting a secondary pipeline of the RHR heat exchanger and the diesel driving pump is opened. A discharge valve disposed to a pump discharge pipeline connecting a primary pipeline of the RHR heat exchanger and the diesel driving pump is opened. With such procedures, sea water is introduced from a sea water taking port through the top end of the secondary pipeline of the RHR heat exchanger and water is injected into the inside of the pressure vessel or the reactor container by way of the primary pipeline of the RHR heat exchanger. As a result, the reactor core is prevented from melting even upon occurrence of a severe accident. (I.S.)

  8. Predicted effect of power uprating on the water chemistry of commercial boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Wang, Mei-Ya; Chu, Charles F.; Chang Ching

    2009-01-01

    The approach of power uprating has been adopted by operators of light water reactors in the past few decades in order to increase the power generation efficiency of nuclear reactors. The power uprate strategy is apparently applicable to the three nuclear reactors in Taiwan as well. When choosing among the three types of power uprating, measurement uncertainty, stretch power uprating, and extended power uprating, a deliberate and thorough evaluation is required before a final decision and an optimal selection can be made. One practical way of increasing the reactor power is to deliberately adjust the fuel loading pattern and the control rod pattern and thus to avoid replacing the primary coolant pump with a new one of larger capacity. The power density of the reactor will increase with increasing power, but the mass flow rate in the primary coolant circuit (PCC) of a light water reactor will slightly increase (usually by less than 5 %) or even remain unchanged. Accordingly, an uprated power would induce higher neutron and gamma photon dose rates in the reactor coolant but have a minor or no effect on the mass flow rate of the primary coolant. The radiolysis product concentrations and the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) values differ largely in the PCC of a boiling water reactor (BWR). It is very difficult to measure the water chemistry data directly at various locations of an actual reactor. Thus the impact of power uprating on the water chemistry of a BWR operating under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) can only be theoretically evaluated through computer modelling. In this study, the DEMACE computer code was modified to investigate the impact of power uprating on the water chemistry under a fixed mass flow rate in the primary coolant circuit of a BWR/6 type plant. Simulations were carried out for hydrogen concentrations in feedwater ranging from 0.0 to 2.0 mg . kg -1 and for power levels ranging from 100 % to 120 %. The responses of water chemistry and ECP

  9. Genusa Bepu methodologies for the safety analysis of BWRs; Metodologias Bepu de Genusa para el analisis de seguridad de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, M.; Garcia, J.; Goodson, C.; Ibarra, L.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the BEPU methodologies developed by General Electric-Hitachi (GEH) for the evaluation of the BWR reactor safety analysis based on the TRACG best-estimate code. These methodologies are applicable to a wide range of events, operational transients (AOO), anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and instability events; to different BWR types operating commercially. General Electric (GE( designs and other vendors, including Generation III+ESBWR; to the new operation strategies, and to all types of BWR fuel. Their application achieves, among other benefits, a better understanding of the overall plant response and an improvement in margins to the operating limits; thus, the increase of flexibility in reactor operation and reduction in generation costs. (Author)

  10. Neutron activation analysis and activity in the vessel steel of a BWR reactor for their study without radiological risks in microscopy and spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moranchel, M.; Garcia B, A.; Longoria G, L. C.

    2012-01-01

    The vessel material of nuclear reactors is subject to irradiation damage induced by the bombardment of neutrons coming from the reactor core. Neutrons are classified as fast and thermal, which produce different effects. Fast neutrons cause damage to the material by dislocation or displacement of atoms in the crystal structure, while the effect of thermal neutrons is a nuclear transmutation that can significantly change the properties of the material. The type and intensity of damage is based on the characteristics of the material, the flow of neutrons and the modes of neutrons interaction with the atomic structures of the material, among others. This work, alluding to nuclear transmutation, makes an analysis of neutron activation of all isotopes in a steel boiling water nuclear reactor (BWR) vessel. An analytical expression is obtained in order to model activity of steel, on the basis of the weight percentage of its atomic components. Its activity is theoretically estimated in a witness sample of the same material as that of the vessel, placed within the nuclear reactor since the beginning of its commercial operation in April 1995, up to August 2010. It was theoretically determined that the witness sample, with a 0.56 g mass (1 x 1 x 0.07 cm 3 dimensions or equivalent) does not present a radiological risks during the stage of preparation, observation and analysis of it in electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction equipment s. The theoretical results were checked experimentally by measuring the activity of the sample by means of gamma spectrometry, measurement of the exposure levels around the sample, as well as the induced level to whole body and limbs, using thermo-luminescent dosimetry (TLD). As a result of the theoretical analysis, new chemical elements are predicted, as a result of the activation phenomena and radioactive decay, whose presence can be a fundamental factor of change in the properties of the vessel. This work is a preamble to the investigation of

  11. Synergistic failure of BWR internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A. G.; Chang, T.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shrouds and other reactor internals important to safety are experiencing intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has followed the problem, and as part of its investigations, contracted with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to conduct a risk assessment. The overall project objective is to assess the potential consequences and risks associated with the failure of IGSCC-susceptible BWR vessel internals, with specific consideration given to potential cascading and common mode effects. An initial phase has been completed in which background material was gathered and evaluated, and potential accident sequences were identified. A second phase is underway to perform a simplified, quantitative probabilistic risk assessment on a representative high-power BWR/4. Results of the initial study conducted on the jet pumps show that any cascading failures would not result in a significant increase in the core damage frequency. The methodology is currently being extended to other major reactor internals components

  12. Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction Failure Threshold for Reactivity Initiated Accidents for Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Carl E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Kenneth J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been requested by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the reactivity initiated accident (RIA) tests that have recently been performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) and CABRI (French research reactor) on uranium dioxide (UO2) and mixed uranium and plutonium dioxide (MOX) fuels, and to propose pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) failure thresholds for RIA events. This report discusses how PNNL developed PCMI failure thresholds for RIA based on least squares (LSQ) regression fits to the RIA test data from cold-worked stress relief annealed (CWSRA) and recrystallized annealed (RXA) cladding alloys under pressurized water reactor (PWR) hot zero power (HZP) conditions and boiling water reactor (BWR) cold zero power (CZP) conditions.

  13. SCALE-4 Analysis of LaSalle Unit 1 BWR Commercial Reactor Critical Configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauld, I.C.

    2000-01-01

    Five commercial reactor criticals (CRCs) for the LaSalle Unit 1 boiling-water reactor have been analyzed using KENO V.a, the Monte Carlo criticality code of the SCALE 4 code system. The irradiated fuel assembly isotopics for the criticality analyses were provided by the Waste Package Design team at the Yucca Mountain Project in the US, who performed the depletion calculations using the SAS2H sequence of SCALE 4. The reactor critical measurements involved two beginning-of-cycle and three middle-of-cycle configurations. The CRCs involved relatively low-cycle burnups, and therefore contained a relatively high gadolinium poison content in the reactor assemblies. This report summarizes the data and methods used in analyzing the critical configurations and assesses the sensitivity of the results to some of the modeling approximations used to represent the gadolinium poison distribution within the assemblies. The KENO V.a calculations, performed using the SCALE 44GROUPNDF5 ENDF/B-V cross-section library, yield predicted k eff values within about 1% Δk/k relative to reactor measurements for the five CRCs using general 8-pin and 9-pin heterogeneous gadolinium poison pin assembly models

  14. Water chemistry and radiation buildup at the Commonwealth Edison Company LaSalle-1 BWR. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earls, C.E.; Blok, J.

    1986-09-01

    This report presents the results of a comprehensive study of the water quality and radiation buildup at the LaSalle County Unit 2 boiling warer reactor (BWR). The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of corrosion product inputs from the forward pumped heater drains on overall water quality. Since the drains are pumped into the feedwater line without filtration or demineralization, corrosion products in these streams will directly add to the impurity levels of the final feedwater. At LaSalle, the forward pumped heater drains contributed less to the feedwater impurities, on average, than the effluent of the condensate demineralizer. The feedwater quality at LaSalle was generally in the ''acceptable'' range. Nevertheless, significant water chemistry improvements, especially in reducing the corrosion product spikes associated with power or flow transients, is highly desirable for this plant. Such improvements should begin with a more consistent quality of demineralizer operation. Quantitative gamma scans of the primary system piping at LaSalle 2 were carried out in the course of the water chemistry study. Although the cumulative operational exposure of the plant was relatively limited at the time this study was carried out, the radiation buildup rate did appear to be rapid (in fact, among the most rapid) compared to other similar BWRs

  15. Needs of nuclear data for advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Hitachi has been developing medium sized ABWRs as a power source that features flexibility to meet various market needs, such as minimizing capital risks, providing a timely return on capital investments, etc. Basic design concepts of the medium sized ABWRs are 1) using the current ABWR design which has accumulated favorable construction and operation histories as a starting point; 2) utilizing standard BWR fuels which have been fabricated by proven technology; 3) achieving a rationalized design by suitably utilizing key components developed for large sized reactors. Development of the medium sized ABWRs has proceeded in a systematic, stepwise manner. The first step was to design an output scale for the 600MWe class reactor (ABWR-600), and the next step was to develop an uprating concept to extend this output scale to the 900MWe class reactor (ABWR-900) based on the rationalized technology of the ABWR-600 for further cost savings. In addition, Hitachi and MHI developed an ultra small reactor, 'Package-Reactor'. About the nuclear data, for the purpose of verification of the nuclear analysis method of BWR for mixed oxide (MOX) cores, UO 2 and MOX fuel critical experiments EPICURE and MISTRAL were analyzed using nuclear design codes HINES and CERES with ENDF/B nuclear data file. The critical keffs of the absorber worth experiments, the water hole worth experiments and the 2D void worth experiments agreed with those of the reference experiments within about 0.1%Δk. The root mean square differences of radial power distributions between calculation and measurement were almost less than 2.0%. The calculated reactivity worth values of the absorbers, the water hole and the 2D void agreed with the measured values within nearly experimental uncertainties. These results indicate that the nuclear analysis method of BWR in the present paper give the same accuracy for the UO 2 cores and the MOX cores. (author)

  16. Determination of the neutron fluence in the welding of the 'Core shroud' of the BWR reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Xolocostli M, J.V.; Gomez T, A.M.; Palacios H, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    With the purpose of defining the inspection frequency, in function of the embrittlement of the materials that compose the welding of the 'Core Shroud' or encircling of the core of a BWR type reactor, is necessary to know the neutron fluence received for this welding. In the work the calculated values of neutron fluence accumulated maxim (E > 1 MeV) during the first 8 operation cycles of the reactor are presented. The calculations were carried out according to the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.190, making use of the DORT code, which solves the transport equation in discreet ordinate in two dimensions (xy, rΘ, and rz). The results in 3D were obtained applying the Synthesis method according to the guide before mentioned. Results are presented for the horizontal welding H3, H4, and H5, showing the corresponding curves to the fluence accumulated to the cycle 8 and a projection for the cycle 14 is presented. (Author)

  17. WATER BOILER REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1960-11-22

    As its name implies, this reactor utilizes an aqueous solution of a fissionable element salt, and is also conventional in that it contains a heat exchanger cooling coil immersed in the fuel. Its novelty lies in the utilization of a cylindrical reactor vessel to provide a critical region having a large and constant interface with a supernatant vapor region, and the use of a hollow sleeve coolant member suspended from the cover assembly in coaxial relation with the reactor vessel. Cool water is circulated inside this hollow coolant member, and a gap between its outer wall and the reactor vessel is used to carry off radiolytic gases for recombination in an external catalyst chamber. The central passage of the coolant member defines a reflux condenser passage into which the externally recombined gases are returned and condensed. The large and constant interface between fuel solution and vapor region prevents the formation of large bubbles and minimizes the amount of fuel salt carried off by water vapor, thus making possible higher flux densities, specific powers and power densities.

  18. Determination of stresses caused by fluctuation of acoustic load in the steam dryers of a BWR; Determinacion de esfuerzos originados por fluctuacion de carga acustica en los secadores de vapor de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centeno P, J.; Quezada G, S.; Prieto G, A.; Vazquez R, A.; Espinosa P, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Nunez C, A., E-mail: javcuami26@hotmail.com [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose Ma. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The extended power up-rate (EPU) in a nuclear power plant cause various problems in BWR components also in the steam system. This due to increased steam flow generated in the reactor and is conveyed to the turbine by the four main steam lines (MSL). One of the most serious problems is the generation of acoustic pressure loads in the metal structure of the steam dryer which eventually leads to fatigue failure and even the appearance of cracks, and in turn it causes loose parts that are entrained by the steam and transported in the MSL. This problem is due to the fluctuation of load acoustics caused by the union of the safety or relief valves (SRV) with the MSL, spreading through these to reach the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) where the effect of resonance of the acoustic wave is amplified and impacts directly in the supporting structure of the steam dryer, skirt and the panels where the mixture liquid-steam is dried, by centrifugation effect and runoff of liquid water. Efforts in the steam dryer operating conditions of EPU for two cases will be analyzed in this work, the first is before the installation of Acoustic Side Branch (ASB), and in the second case we consider the installation of said ASB in the standpipes of SRV. The analysis was performed with numerical experiments on a platform for computational fluid dynamics with virtual geometries previously designed based on the actual components of the reactor and steam system. The model to study is delimited by the top of the RPV, the steam dryer and a section of each of the four MSL with ten standpipes of SRV. With the obtained data and considering the mechanical-structural properties of the steam dryer material, we can evaluate the mechanical resistance to impacts by acoustic pressure load and its possible deformation or cracking. (Author)

  19. Variation of the effectiveness of hydrogen water chemistry in a boiling water reactor during power coastdown operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh Tsungkuang; Wang Meiya; Chu, Charles F.; Chang Ching

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model was adapted to evaluate the impact of power coastdown on the water chemistry of a commercial boiling water reactor (BWR) in this work. In principle, the power density of a nuclear reactor upon a power level decrease would immediately be lowered, followed by water chemistry variations due to reduced radiolysis of water and extended coolant residence times in the core and near-core regions. It is currently a common practice for a commercial BWR to adopt hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for corrosion mitigation. The optimal feedwater hydrogen concentration may be different after a power coastdown is implemented in a BWR. A computer code DEMACE was used in the current study to investigate the impact of various power coastdown levels on major radiolytic species concentrations and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) behavior of components in the primary coolant circuit of a domestic reactor operating under either normal water chemistry or HWC. Our analyses indicated that under a rated core flow rate the chemical species concentrations and the ECP did not vary monotonously with decreases in reactor power level at a fixed feedwater hydrogen concentration. In particular, ECP variations basically followed the patterns of hydrogen peroxide in the select regions and exhibited high values at power level of 90% for Reactor X. (author)

  20. The pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor technology has reached a maturity that has engendered a new surge of innovation, which in turn, has led to significant advances in the technology. These advances, characterized by bold thinking but conservative execution, are resulting in nuclear plant designs which offer significant performance and safety improvements. This paper describes the innovations which are being designed into mainstream PWR technology as well as the desings which are resulting from such innovations. (author)

  1. Control of water chemistry in operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riess, R.

    1997-01-01

    Water chemistry plays a major role in fuel cladding corrosion and hydriding. Although a full understanding of all mechanisms involved in cladding corrosion does not exist, controlling the water chemistry has achieved quite some progress in recent years. As an example, in PWRs the activity transport is controlled by operating the coolant under higher pH-values (i.e. the ''modified'' B/Li-Chemistry). On the other hand, the lithium concentration is limited to a maximum value of 2 ppm in order to avoid an acceleration of the fuel cladding corrosion. In BWR plants, for example, the industry has learned on how to limit the copper concentration in the feedwater in order to limit CILC (Copper Induced Localized Corrosion) on the fuel cladding. However, economic pressures are leading to more rigorous operating conditions in power reactors. Fuel burnups are to be increased, higher efficiencies are to be achieved, by running at higher temperatures, plant lifetimes are to be extended. In summary, this paper will describe the state of the art in controlling water chemistry in operating reactors and it will give an outlook on potential problems that will arise when going to more severe operating conditions. (author). 3 figs, 6 tabs

  2. Control of water chemistry in operating reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, R [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Water chemistry plays a major role in fuel cladding corrosion and hydriding. Although a full understanding of all mechanisms involved in cladding corrosion does not exist, controlling the water chemistry has achieved quite some progress in recent years. As an example, in PWRs the activity transport is controlled by operating the coolant under higher pH-values (i.e. the ``modified`` B/Li-Chemistry). On the other hand, the lithium concentration is limited to a maximum value of 2 ppm in order to avoid an acceleration of the fuel cladding corrosion. In BWR plants, for example, the industry has learned on how to limit the copper concentration in the feedwater in order to limit CILC (Copper Induced Localized Corrosion) on the fuel cladding. However, economic pressures are leading to more rigorous operating conditions in power reactors. Fuel burnups are to be increased, higher efficiencies are to be achieved, by running at higher temperatures, plant lifetimes are to be extended. In summary, this paper will describe the state of the art in controlling water chemistry in operating reactors and it will give an outlook on potential problems that will arise when going to more severe operating conditions. (author). 3 figs, 6 tabs.

  3. Simulation in 3 dimensions of a cycle 18 months for an BWR type reactor using the Nod3D program; Simulacion en 3 dimensiones de un ciclo de 18 meses para un reactor BWR usando el programa Nod3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, N.; Alonso, G. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: nhm@nuclear.inin.mx; Valle, E. del [IPN, ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The development of own codes that you/they allow the simulation in 3 dimensions of the nucleus of a reactor and be of easy maintenance, without the consequent payment of expensive use licenses, it can be a factor that propitiates the technological independence. In the Department of Nuclear Engineering (DIN) of the Superior School of Physics and Mathematics (ESFM) of the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) a denominated program Nod3D has been developed with the one that one can simulate the operation of a reactor BWR in 3 dimensions calculating the effective multiplication factor (kJJ3, as well as the distribution of the flow neutronic and of the axial and radial profiles of the power, inside a means of well-known characteristics solving the equations of diffusion of neutrons numerically in stationary state and geometry XYZ using the mathematical nodal method RTN0 (Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec of index zero). One of the limitations of the program Nod3D is that it doesn't allow to consider the burnt of the fuel in an independent way considering feedback, this makes it in an implicit way considering the effective sections in each step of burnt and these sections are obtained of the code Core Master LEND. However even given this limitation, the results obtained in the simulation of a cycle of typical operation of a reactor of the type BWR are similar to those reported by the code Core Master LENDS. The results of the keJ - that were obtained with the program Nod3D they were compared with the results of the code Core Master LEND, presenting a difference smaller than 0.2% (200 pcm), and in the case of the axial profile of power, the maxim differs it was of 2.5%. (Author)

  4. A practical methodology of radiological protection for the reduction of hot particles in BWR type reactors; Una metodologia practica de proteccion radiologica para la reduccion de particulas calientes en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez G, G [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Gerencia del Proyecto Nucleoelectrico Laguna Verde, Disciplina de Fisica Aplicada (Mexico)

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this work, in general form, is to describe a practical method for reduction of hot particles generated as consequence of the operational activities of BWR nuclear reactors. This methodology provides a description of the localizations and/or probable activities of finding particles highly radioactive denominated hot particles. For this purpose it was developed a strategy based on the decontamination lineaments, as well as the manipulation, gathering, registration, contention, documentation, control and final disposition of the hot particles. In addition, some recommendations are reiterated and alternative, in order to gathering the hot particles in a dynamic way given to the activities of the personal occupationally exposed in highly radioactive areas. The structure of the methodology of hot particles is supported in the radiological controls based on the Code of Federal Regulation 10 CFR 20 as well as the applicable regulatory documents. It provides an idea based on administrative controls of radiological protection, in order to suggesting the responsibilities and necessary directing for the control of the hot particles required in nuclear plants of the BWR type. (author)

  5. Reactor water level control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramatsu, Yohei.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the rapid response of the waterlevel control converting a reactor water level signal into a non-linear type, when the water level is near to a set value, to stabilize the water level reducting correlatively the reactor water level variation signal to stabilize greatly from the set value, and increasing the variation signal. Constitution: A main vapor flow quality transmitter detects the vapor flow generated in a reactor and introduced into a turbine. A feed water flow transmitter detects the quantity of a feed water flow from the turbine to the reactor, this detected value is sent to an addition operating apparatus. On the other hand, the power signal of the reactor water level transmitter is sent to the addition operating apparatus through a non-linear water level signal converter. The addition operation apparatus generates a signal for requesting the feed water flow quantity from both signals. Upon this occasion, the reactor water level signal converter makes small the reactor water level variation when the reactor level is close the set value, and when the water level deviates greatly from the set value, the reactor water level variation is made large thereby to improve the rapid response of the reactor coater level control. (Yoshino, Y.)

  6. Critical discharge of initially subcooled water through slits. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos, C N; Schrock, V E

    1983-09-01

    This report describes an experimental investigation into the critical flow of initially subcooled water through rectangular slits. The study of such flows is relevant to the prediction of leak flow rates from cracks in piping, or pressure vessels, which contain sufficient enthalpy that vaporization will occur if they are allowed to expand to the ambient pressure. Two new analytical models, which allow for the generation of a metastable liquid phase, are developed. Experimental results are compared with the predictions of both these new models and with a Fanno Homogeneous Equilibrium Model.

  7. Boiling water reactor modeling capabilities of MMS-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.S.; Abdollahian, D.A.; Elias, E.; Shak, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    During the development period for the Modular Modeling System (MMS) library modules, the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) has been the last major component to be addressed. The BWRX module includes models of the reactor core, reactor vessel, and recirculation loop. A pre-release version was made available for utility use in September 1983. Since that time a number of changes have been incorporated in BWRX to (1) improve running time for most transient events of interest, (2) extend its capability to include certain events of interest in reactor safety analysis, and (3) incorporate a variety of improvements to the module interfaces and user input formats. The purposes of this study were to briefly review the module structure and physical models, to point the differences between the MMS-02 BWRX module and the BWRX version previously available in the TESTREV1 library, to provide guidelines for choosing among the various user options, and to present some representative results

  8. The use of ferritic materials in light water reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of ferritic materials in LWR power plant components. The two principal types of LWR systems, the boiling water reactor (BWR) and the pressurized water reactor (PWR) are described. The evolution of the construction materials, including plates and forgings, is presented. The fabrication process for both reactors constructed with plates and forgings are described in detail. Typical mechanical properties of the reactor vessel materials are presented. Finally, one critical issue radiation embrittlement dealing with ferritic materials is discussed. This has been one of the major issues regarding the use of ferritic material in the construction of LWR pressure vessels

  9. BWR vessel and internals project (BWRVIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilanin, W.J.; Dyle, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) inspections indicate that Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) is a significant technical issue for some BWR internals. IN response, the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) was formed by an associated of domestic and international utilities which own and operate BWRs. The project is identifying or developing generic, cost-effective strategies for managing degradation of reactor internals from which each utility can select the alternative most appropriate for their plant. The Electric Power Research Institute manages the technical program, implementing the utility defined programs. The BWRVIP is organized into four technical tasks: Assessment, Inspection, Repair and Mitigation. An Integration task coordinates the work. The goal of the Assessment task is to develop methodologies for evaluation of vessel and internal components in support of decisions for operation, inspection, mitigation or repair. The goal of the Inspection task is to develop and assess effective and predictable inspection techniques which can be used to determine the condition of BWR vessel and internals that are potentially susceptible to service-related SCC degradation. The goal of the Repair task is to assure the availability of cost-effective repair/replacement alternatives. The goal of the Mitigation task is to develop and demonstrate countermeasures for SCC degradation. This paper summarizes the BWRVIP approach for addressing BWR internals SCC degradation and illustrates how utilities are utilizing BWRVIP products to successfully manage the effect of SCC on core shrouds

  10. Fuel gases generation in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in a nuclear power plant with reactor type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaices, M.; Salaices, E.; Ovando, R.; Esquivias, J.

    2011-11-01

    During an accident design base of coolant loos, the hydrogen gas can accumulate inside the primary contention as a result of several generation mechanisms among those that are: 1) the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant, 2) the metals corrosion for the solutions used in the emergency cooling and dew of the contention, and 3) the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency. In this work the contribution of each generation mechanism to the hydrogen total in the primary contention is analyzed, considering typical inventories of zirconium, zinc, aluminum and fission products in balance cycle of a reactor type BWR. In the analysis the distribution model of fission products and hydrogen production proposed in the regulator guide 1.7, Rev. 2 of the US NRC was used. The results indicate that the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation at the end of a period of 24 hours of initiate the accident is the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency continued by the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding with the reactor coolant, and lastly the aluminum and zinc oxidation present in the primary contention. However, the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant is the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation in the first moments after the accident. This study constitutes the first part of the general analysis of the generation, transport and control of fuel gases in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in BWRs. (Author)

  11. Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Shimada, Shoichiro

    1999-11-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor which aims at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. These characteristics can be achieved by the high conversion ratio from 238 U to 239 Pu resulted from the higher neutron energy spectrum in comparison to conventional light water reactors. Considering the extension of LWR utilization, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started the research on it in 1997 and then started a collaboration in the conceptual design study with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPCO) in 1998. In the core design study of the RMWR, negative void reactivity coefficient is required from a viewpoint of safety as well as establishing hard neutron spectrum. In order to achieve the above trade-off characteristics simultaneously, several basic core design ideas should be combined, such as a tight lattice fuel assembly, a flat core, a blanket effect, a streaming effect and so on. Up to now, five core concepts have been created for the RMWR as follows: a high conversion BWR with high void fraction and super-flat core, a long operation cycle BWR using void channels, a high conversion BWR without blankets, a high conversion PWR using heavy water as a coolant, and a PWR for plutonium multi-recycle using seed-blanket type fuel assemblies. The present report summarizes the objectives, domestic and international trends, principles and characteristics, core conceptual designs and future R and D plans of the RMWR. (J.P.N.)

  12. Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Shimada, Shoichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1999-11-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor which aims at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. These characteristics can be achieved by the high conversion ratio from {sup 238}U to {sup 239}Pu resulted from the higher neutron energy spectrum in comparison to conventional light water reactors. Considering the extension of LWR utilization, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started the research on it in 1997 and then started a collaboration in the conceptual design study with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPCO) in 1998. In the core design study of the RMWR, negative void reactivity coefficient is required from a viewpoint of safety as well as establishing hard neutron spectrum. In order to achieve the above trade-off characteristics simultaneously, several basic core design ideas should be combined, such as a tight lattice fuel assembly, a flat core, a blanket effect, a streaming effect and so on. Up to now, five core concepts have been created for the RMWR as follows: a high conversion BWR with high void fraction and super-flat core, a long operation cycle BWR using void channels, a high conversion BWR without blankets, a high conversion PWR using heavy water as a coolant, and a PWR for plutonium multi-recycle using seed-blanket type fuel assemblies. The present report summarizes the objectives, domestic and international trends, principles and characteristics, core conceptual designs and future R and D plans of the RMWR. (J.P.N.)

  13. Comparison of the corrosion potential for stainless steel measured in-plant and in laboratory during BWR normal water chemistry conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molander, A.; Pein, K.; Tarkpea, P.; Takagi, Junichi; Karlberg, G.; Gott, K.

    1998-01-01

    To obtain reliable crack growth rate date for stainless steel in BWR environments careful laboratory simulation of the environmental conditions is necessary. In the plant the BWR normal water chemistry environment contains hydrogen peroxide, oxygen and hydrogen. However, in crack growth rate experiments in laboratories, the environment is normally simulated by adding 200 ppb oxygen to the high temperature water. Thus, as hydrogen peroxide is a more powerful oxidant than oxygen, it is to be expected that a lower corrosion potential will be measured in the laboratory than in the plant. To resolve this issue this work has been performed. In-plant and laboratory measurements have often been performed with somewhat different equipment, due to the special requirements concerning in-plant measurements. In this work such differences have been avoided and two identical sets of equipment for electrochemical measurements were built and used for measurements in-plant in a Swedish BWR and in high purity water in the laboratory. The host plant was Barsebaeck 1. Corrosion potential monitoring in-plant was performed under both NWC (Normal Water Chemistry) and HWC (Hydrogen Water Chemistry) conditions. This paper is, however, focused on NWC conditions. This is due to the fact, that the total crack growth obtained during a reactor cycle, can be determined by NWC conditions, even for plants running with HWC due to periodic stops in the hydrogen addition for turbine inspections or failure of the dosage or hydrogen production equipment. Thus, crack growth data for NWC is of great importance both for BWRs operating with HWC and NWC. Measurements in-plant and in the laboratory were performed during additions of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide to the autoclave systems. The corrosion potentials were compared for various conditions in the autoclaves, as well as versus in-plant in-pipe corrosion potentials. (J.P.N.)

  14. Simulation in 3 dimensions of a cycle 18 months for an BWR type reactor using the Nod3D program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, N.; Alonso, G.; Valle, E. del

    2004-01-01

    The development of own codes that you/they allow the simulation in 3 dimensions of the nucleus of a reactor and be of easy maintenance, without the consequent payment of expensive use licenses, it can be a factor that propitiates the technological independence. In the Department of Nuclear Engineering (DIN) of the Superior School of Physics and Mathematics (ESFM) of the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) a denominated program Nod3D has been developed with the one that one can simulate the operation of a reactor BWR in 3 dimensions calculating the effective multiplication factor (kJJ3, as well as the distribution of the flow neutronic and of the axial and radial profiles of the power, inside a means of well-known characteristics solving the equations of diffusion of neutrons numerically in stationary state and geometry XYZ using the mathematical nodal method RTN0 (Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec of index zero). One of the limitations of the program Nod3D is that it doesn't allow to consider the burnt of the fuel in an independent way considering feedback, this makes it in an implicit way considering the effective sections in each step of burnt and these sections are obtained of the code Core Master LEND. However even given this limitation, the results obtained in the simulation of a cycle of typical operation of a reactor of the type BWR are similar to those reported by the code Core Master LENDS. The results of the keJ - that were obtained with the program Nod3D they were compared with the results of the code Core Master LEND, presenting a difference smaller than 0.2% (200 pcm), and in the case of the axial profile of power, the maxim differs it was of 2.5%. (Author)

  15. Pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, S.H.

    1983-03-01

    An overview of the pressurized-water reactor (PWR) pressure boundary problems is presented. Specifically exempted will be discussions of problems with pumps, valves and steam generators on the basis that they will be covered in other papers. Pressure boundary reliability is examined in the context of real or perceived problems occurring over the past 5 to 6 years since the last IAEA Reliability Symposium. Issues explicitly covered will include the status of the pressurized thermal-shock problem, reliability of inservice inspections with emphasis on examination of the region immediately under the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) cladding, history of piping failures with emphasis on failure modes and mechanisms. Since nondestructive examination is the topic of one session, discussion will be limited to results rather than techniques

  16. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1990-12-01

    Topics that have been investigated during this year include (1) SCC of A533-Gr B steel used in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels, (2) fatigue of Type 316NG SS, and (3) SCC of Type 347 and CF-3 cast duplex stainless steels in simulated BWR water. Crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests were performed on a composite A533-Gr B/Inconel-182 specimen in which the stress corrosion crack in the Inconel-182 weld metal penetrated and grew into the A533-Gr B steel. CGR tests were also conducted on conventional (unplated) and nickel- or gold-plated A533-Gr B specimens to provide insight into whether the nature of the surface layer on the low-alloy steel, either oxide corrosion products or a noble metal, influences the overall SCC process. CGR data on the A533-Gr B specimens were compared with the fatigue crack reference curves in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, Appendix A. Fatigue tests were conducted on Type 316NG SS in air and simulated BWR water at low strain ranges and frequencies to better establish margins in the ASME Code Section III Fatigue Design Curves. CGR tests were also conducted on specimens of Type 347 SS with different heat-treatment conditions, and a specimen of CF-3 cast stainless steel with a ferrite content of 15.6%. The results were compared with previous data on another heat of Type 347 SS, which was very resistant to SCC, and a CF-3M steel with a ferrite content of 5%. 37 refs., 15 figs., 8 tabs

  17. Experimental and analytical studies for a BWR nuclear reactor building. Evaluation of soil-structure interaction behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, N.; Tsushima, Y.

    1975-01-01

    This paper evaluates the spatial characteristics of dynamic properties, especially soil-structure interaction behaviour, of the BWR nuclear building by experimental and analytical studies. It is well known that the damping effects in soil-structure interaction are remarkable on the building with short periods by the dissipation of vibrational energy to the soil. The authors have previously reported an analytical method for estimating the damping effects the properties of which are characterized as follows: 1) The complex damping is used, because the so-called structural damping may be more suitable for estimating the damping effects of an elastic structure. 2) H. Tajimi's theory is used for estimating the dynamical soil-foundation stiffness with the dissipation of vibrational energy on the elastic half-space soil. In this paper, an approximate explanation is presented in regard to the more developmental mathematical method for estimating the damping effects than the above-mentioned previous method, which is 'Modes Superposition Method for Multi-Degrees of Freedom System' with the constant complex stiffness showing the structural damping effects and the dynamical soil-foundation stiffness approximated by the linear or quadratic functions of the eigenvalues. An approximate explanation is presented in regard to the experimental results of the No. 1 reactor building (BWR) of Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, The Chubu Electric Power Co., Ltd. (Auth.)

  18. Modern technology applied in the advanced BWR (ABWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hucik, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) represents the next generation of light water reactors (LWR) to be introduced into commercial operation in the 1990's. The ABWR is the result of the continuing evolution of the BWR, incorporating state-of-the-art technology and improvements based on worldwide experience, and extensive design and test and development programs. This paper discusses how the ABWR development objective focused on an optimized selection of advanced technologies and proven BWR technologies. A technical evaluation of the ABWR shows its superiority in terms of performance characteristics and economics relative to current LWR designs

  19. Complete BWR--EM LOCA analysis using the WRAP--EM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmeyer, R.R.; Gregory, M.V.; Buckner, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    The Water Reactor Analysis Package, Evaluation Model (WRAP--EM), provides a complete analysis of postulated loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA's) in light--water nuclear power reactors. The system is being developed at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) for use by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to interpret and evaluate reactor vendor, evaluation model (EM) analyses. The initial version of the WRAP--EM system for analysis of boiling water reactors (BWR's) is operational. To demonstrate the complete capability of the WRAP--BWR--EM system, a LOCA analysis has been performed for the Hope Creek Plant

  20. Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation methods development for BWR/PWR reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruitt, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation addresses the Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP) perspective on the primary forces driving methods development in the nuclear industry. These forces are fuel design, computational environment and industry requirement evolution. The first segment of the discussion presents the SNP experience base. SNP develops, manufactures and licenses both BWR and PWR reload fuel. A review of this experience base highlights the accelerating rate at which new fuel designs are being introduced into the nuclear industry. The application of advanced BWR lattice geometries provides an example of fuel design trends. The second aspect of the presentation is the rapid evolution of the computing environment. The final subject in the presentation is the impact of industry requirements on code or methods development

  1. MCTP, a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of a fuel rod of BWR type reactors (Neutron part); MCTP, un codigo para el analisis termo-mecanico de una barra combustible de reactores tipo BWR (Parte Neutronica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez L, H; Ortiz V, J [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of the fuel rods of the BWR type reactors of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde is developed. The code solves the diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates with several energy groups. The code, likewise, calculates the temperature distribution and power distribution in those fuel rods. The code is denominated Multi groups With Temperatures and Power (MCTP). In the code, the energy with which the fission neutrons are emitted it is divided in six groups. They are also considered the produced perturbations by the changes in the temperatures of the materials that constitute the fuel rods, the content of fission products, the uranium consumption and in its case the gadolinium, as well as the plutonium production. In this work there are present preliminary results obtained with the code, using data of operation of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  2. Boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckardt, B.; Queiser, H.

    1986-01-01

    On BWR's, the turbine condenser is connected to a waste gas system with redundancy, which has the following in sequence in each of two parallel circuits: a steam jet pump, a valve, a recombiner with steam heating, a condenser and a gas outlet. Steam and air are fed in a ratio of 1:10 or more between the valve and the recombiner. A steam jet pump is used for this purpose. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Reactor water injection facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1997-05-02

    A steam turbine and an electric generator are connected by way of a speed convertor. The speed convertor is controlled so that the number of rotation of the electric generator is constant irrespective of the speed change of the steam turbine. A shaft coupler is disposed between the turbine and the electric generator or between the turbine and a water injection pump. With such a constitution, the steam turbine and the electric generator are connected by way of the speed convertor, and since the number of revolution of the electric generator is controlled to be constant, the change of the number of rotation of the turbine can be controlled irrespective of the change of the number of rotation of the electric generator. Accordingly, the flow rate of the injection water from the water injection pump to a reactor pressure vessel can be controlled freely thereby enabling to supply stable electric power. (T.M.)

  4. Spectral shift rod for the boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokomizo, O.; Kashiwai, S.; Nishida, K.; Orii, A.; Yamashita, J.; Mochida, T.

    1993-01-01

    A Boiling Water Reactor core concept has been proposed using a new fuel component called spectral shift rod (SSR). The SSR is a new type of water rod in which a water level is formed during core operation. The water level can be controlled by the core recirculation flow rate. By using SSRs, the reactor can be operated with all control rods withdrawn through the operation cycle as well as that a much larger natural uranium saving is possible due to spectral shift operation than in current BWRs. The steady state and transient characteristics of the SSRs have been examined by experiments and analyses to certify the feasibility. In a reference design, a four times larger spectral shift width as for the current BWR has been obtained. (orig.)

  5. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWR) (NUREG-1123) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog and Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations (NUREG-1121) will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55. The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at boiling water reactors. Each K/A statement has been rated for its importance to the safe operation of the plant in a manner ensuring personnel and public health and safety. The BWR K/A Catalog is organized into five major sections: Plant-wide Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Function, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. The BWR Catalog represents a modification of the form and content of the K/A Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Pressurized Water Reactors (NUREG-1122). First, categories of knowledge and ability statements have been redefined. Second, the scope of the definition of emergency and abnormal plant evolutions has been revised in line with a symptom-based approach. Third, K/As related to the operational applications of theory have been incorporated into the delineations for both plant systems and emergency and abnormal plant evolutions, while K/As pertaining to theory fundamental to plant operation have been delineated in a separate theory section. Finally, the components section has been revised

  6. Requirements for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, F.

    2009-01-01

    The EUR (European Utilities Requirements) is an organization founded in 1991 whose aim was to write down the European specifications and requirements for the future reactors of third generation. EUR gathers most of the nuclear power producers of Europe. The EUR document has been built on the large and varied experience of EUR members and can be used to elaborate invitations to tender for nuclear projects. 4000 requirements only for the nuclear part of the plant are listed, among which we have: -) the probability of core meltdown for a reactor must be less than 10 -6 per year, -) the service life of every component that is not replaceable must be 60 years, -) the capacity of the spent fuel pool must be sufficient to store 10-15 years of production without clearing out. The EUR document is both open and complete: every topic has been considered, it does not favor any type of reactor but can ban any technology that is too risky or has an unfavourable feedback experience. The assessment of the conformity with the EUR document of 7 reactor projects (BWR 90/, EPR, EP1000, SWR1000, ABWR, AP1000 and VVER-AES-92) has already be made. (A.C.)

  7. Development of next BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Kumiaki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Utena, Shunsuke

    1995-01-01

    It is expected that BWR power generation will be main nuclear power generation for long period hereafter, and in the ABWRs being constructed at present, the safety, reliability, operation performance, economical efficiency and so on are further heightend as compared with conventional BWRs. On the other hand, in order to cope with future social change, the move to develop the next reactor type following ABWRs was begun already by the cooperation of electirc power companies and plant manufacturers. Hitachi Ltd. has advanced eagerly the development of new light water reactors. Also the objective of BWR power generation hereafter is to heighten the safety, reliability, operation performance and economical efficiency, and the development has been advanced, aiming at bearing the main roles of nuclear power generation. At present, ABWRs are under construction as No. 6 and 7 plants in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. In order to let ABWRs take root, the further improvement of economy by the standardization, the rationalization by revising the specification and the improvement of machinery and equipment is necessary. As the needs of the development of next generation BWRs, the increase of power output, the heightening of safety and economical efficiency are discussed. The concept of the next generation BWR plant aiming at the start of operation around 2010 is shown. (K.I.)

  8. Development of next BWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Kumiaki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Utena, Shunsuke [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Works

    1995-04-01

    It is expected that BWR power generation will be main nuclear power generation for long period hereafter, and in the ABWRs being constructed at present, the safety, reliability, operation performance, economical efficiency and so on are further heightend as compared with conventional BWRs. On the other hand, in order to cope with future social change, the move to develop the next reactor type following ABWRs was begun already by the cooperation of electirc power companies and plant manufacturers. Hitachi Ltd. has advanced eagerly the development of new light water reactors. Also the objective of BWR power generation hereafter is to heighten the safety, reliability, operation performance and economical efficiency, and the development has been advanced, aiming at bearing the main roles of nuclear power generation. At present, ABWRs are under construction as No. 6 and 7 plants in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. In order to let ABWRs take root, the further improvement of economy by the standardization, the rationalization by revising the specification and the improvement of machinery and equipment is necessary. As the needs of the development of next generation BWRs, the increase of power output, the heightening of safety and economical efficiency are discussed. The concept of the next generation BWR plant aiming at the start of operation around 2010 is shown. (K.I.).

  9. Variation of the Effectiveness of Hydrogen Water Chemistry in a Boiling Water Reactor during Startup Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Wang, Mei-Ya

    2012-09-01

    For mitigating intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in an operating boiling water reactor (BWR), the technology of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) aiming at coolant chemistry improvement has been adopted worldwide. However, the hydrogen injection system employed in this technology was designed to operate only at power levels greater than 30% of the rated power or at coolant temperatures of greater than 450 deg. F. This system is usually in an idle and standby mode during a startup operation. The coolant in a BWR during a cold shutdown normally contains a relatively high level of dissolved oxygen from intrusion of atmospheric air. Accordingly, the structural materials in the primary coolant circuit (PCC) of a BWR could be exposed to a strongly oxidizing environment for a short period of time during a subsequent startup operation. At some plants, the feasibility of hydrogen water chemistry during startup operations has been studied, and its effectiveness on suppressing SCC initiation was evaluated. It is technically difficult to directly procure water chemistry data at various locations of an operating reactor. Accordingly, the impact of startup operation on water chemistry in the PCC of a BWR operating under normal water chemistry (NWC) or HWC can only be theoretically evaluated through computer modelling. In this study, a well-developed computer code DEMACE was used to investigate the variations in redox species concentration and in electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) of components in the PCC of a domestic BWR during startup operations in the presence of HWC. Simulations were carried out for [H2] FW s ranging from 0.0 to 2.0 parts per million (ppm) and for power levels ranging from 2.5% to 11.3% during startup operations. Our analyses indicated that for power levels with steam generation in the core, a higher power level would tend to promote a more oxidizing coolant environment for the structural components and therefore lead to less HWC

  10. BWR emergency procedure guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, J.S.; Karner, E.F.; Stratman, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter describes plans for dealing with reactor accidents developed by the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Owners' Group in response to post-Three Mile Island US NRC requirements. The devised Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs), applicable to all BWRs, are symptom-based rather than event-based. According to the EPGs, the operator does not need to identify what event is occurring in the plant in order to decide what action to take, but need only observe the symptoms (values and trends of key control parameters) which exist and take appropriate action to control these symptoms. The original objective was to provide reactor operator guidance in responding to a small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), but subsequent revisions have included other types of reactor accidents. Topics considered include the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) control guideline, the primary containment control guideline, the secondary containment control guideline, the radioactivity release control guideline, multiple failures vs. the design basis, safe limits vs. technical specifications, the technical status, licensing, and implementation. The EPGs are based upon maintaining both adequate core cooling and primary containment integrity

  11. Analysis of multidimensional and countercurrent effects in a BWR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Dix, G.E.; Alamgir, M.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of parallel enclosed channels in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides opportunities for multiple flow regimes in cocurrent and countercurrent flow under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. To address and understand these phenomena, an integrated experimental and analytical study has been conducted. The primary experimental facility was the steam sector test facility (SSFT), which simulated a full scale 30deg sector of a BWR/6 reactor vessel. Both steady-state separate effects tests an integral transients with vessel vlowdown and refill were performed. The presence of multidimensional and parallel-channel effects was found to be very beneficial to BWR LOCA performance. The best estimate TRAC-BWR computer code was extended as part of this study by incorporation of a phenomenological upper plenum mixing model. TRAC-BWR was applied to the analysis of these full scale experiments. Excellent predictions of phenomena and experimental trends were achieved. (orig.)

  12. Simplified distributed parameters BWR dynamic model for transient and stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto; Nunez-Carrera, Alejandro; Vazquez-Rodriguez, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a simplified model to perform transient and linear stability analysis for a typical boiling water reactor (BWR). The simplified transient model was based in lumped and distributed parameters approximations, which includes vessel dome and the downcomer, recirculation loops, neutron process, fuel pin temperature distribution, lower and upper plenums reactor core and pressure and level controls. The stability was determined by studying the linearized versions of the equations representing the BWR system in the frequency domain. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the wide application of the simplified BWR model. We concluded that this simplified model describes properly the dynamic of a BWR and can be used for safety analysis or as a first approach in the design of an advanced BWR

  13. Operating data monitoring and fatigue evaluation systems and findings for boiling water reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, O.; Kanazawa, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Tani, M.

    1995-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is one of the most critical components of a boiling water reactor (BWR) when utilities think about plant life extension (PLEX). Design stress analysis sometimes reports very high fatigue usage factors for such portions of RPVs as stud bolt, feedwater nozzle and support skirt.In order to evaluate design margin and to eliminate excessive conservatism in this design analysis to pave the way for PLEX, Japanese BWR utilities jointly with BWR manufacturers in Japan established a programme (1) to acquire plant operational data on line for specific parameters used in stress analysis, (2) to evaluate margin in the design using measured plant data best estimate boundary conditions for stress analysis, and (3) to establish a simplified fatigue analysis method for BWR RPV.A plant data acquisition system, named OPEDAS, has been developed and installed in Tokyo Electric Power Company's 1100MWe BWR at its Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant. Best estimate stress analysis using measured in-plant data has been carried out and the results show considerable margin in fatigue usage factor over the design. A simplified fatigue analysis method using in-plant data has been developed with the Green's function, although some limitations have been identified for its use. ((orig.))

  14. MCTP, a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of a fuel rod of BWR type reactors (Neutron part)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez L, H.; Ortiz V, J.

    2003-01-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of the fuel rods of the BWR type reactors of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde is developed. The code solves the diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates with several energy groups. The code, likewise, calculates the temperature distribution and power distribution in those fuel rods. The code is denominated Multi groups With Temperatures and Power (MCTP). In the code, the energy with which the fission neutrons are emitted it is divided in six groups. They are also considered the produced perturbations by the changes in the temperatures of the materials that constitute the fuel rods, the content of fission products, the uranium consumption and in its case the gadolinium, as well as the plutonium production. In this work there are present preliminary results obtained with the code, using data of operation of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  15. Plutonium isotopic composition of high burnup spent fuel discharged from light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Yoshihiro; Okubo, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Pu isotopic composition of fuel affects FBR core nuclear characteristics very much. → Spent fuel compositions of next generation LWRs with burnup of 70 GWd/t were obtained. → Pu isotopic composition and amount in the spent fuel with 70 GWd/t were evaluated. → Spectral shift rods of high burnup BWR increases the fissile Pu fraction of spent fuel. → Wide fuel rod pitch of high burnup PWR lowers the fissile Pu fraction of spent fuel. - Abstract: The isotopic composition and amount of plutonium (Pu) in spent fuel from a high burnup boiling water reactor (HB-BWR) and a high burnup pressurized water reactor (HB-PWR), each with an average discharge burnup of 70 GWd/t, were estimated, in order to evaluate fast breeder reactor (FBR) fuel composition in the transition period from LWRs to FBRs. The HB-BWR employs spectral shift rods and the neutron spectrum is shifted through the operation cycle. The weight fraction of fissile plutonium (Puf) isotopes to the total plutonium in HB-BWR spent fuel after 5 years cooling is 62%, which is larger than that of conventional BWRs with average burnup of 45 GWd/t, because of the spectral shift operation. The amount of Pu produced in the HB-BWR is also larger than that produced in a conventional BWR. The HB-PWR uses a wider pitch 17 x 17 fuel rod assembly to optimize neutron slowing down. The Puf fraction of HB-PWR spent fuel after 5 years cooling is 56%, which is smaller than that of conventional PWRs with average burnup of 49 GWd/t, mainly because of the wider pitch. The amount of Pu produced in the HB-PWR is also smaller than that in conventional PWRs.

  16. Digital control application for the advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennern, L.E.; Pearson, T.; Wills, H.D.; Swire Rhodes, L.; Pearson, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is a 1300 MWe class Nuclear Power Plant whose design studies and demonstration tests are being performed by the three manufacturers, General Electric, Toshiba and Hitachi, under requirement specifications from the Tokyo Electric Power Company. The goals are to apply new technology to the BWR in order to achieve enhanced operational efficiencies, improved safety measures and cost reductions. In the plant instrumentation and control areas, traditional analog control equipment and wire cables will be replaced by distributed digital microprocessor based control units communicating with each other and the control room over fiber optic multiplexed data buses

  17. Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances around the reactor pressure vessel bottom of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Ibe, Eishi; Nakata, Kiyatomo; Fuse, Motomasa; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Takashima, Yoshie

    1995-01-01

    Many efforts to preserve the structural integrity of major piping, components, and structures in a boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling system have been directed toward avoiding intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Application of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) to moderate corrosive circumstances is a promising approach to preserve the structural integrity during extended lifetimes of BWRs. The benefits of HWC application are (a) avoiding the occurrence of IGSCC on structural materials around the bottom of the crack growth rate, even if microcracks are present on the structural materials. Several disadvantage caused by HWC are evaluated to develop suitable countermeasures prior to HWC application. The advantages and disadvantages of HWC are quantitatively evaluated base on both BWR plant data and laboratory data shown in unclassified publications. Their trade-offs are discussed, and suitable applications of HWC are described. It is concluded that an optimal amount of Hydrogen injected into the feedwater can moderate corrosive circumstances, in the region to be preserved, without serious disadvantages. The conclusions have been drawn by combining experimental and theoretical results. Experiments in BWR plants -- e.g., direct measurements of electrochemical corrosion potential and crack growth rate at the RPV bottom -- are planned that would collect data to support the theoretical considerations

  18. Application of TRAC-BD1/MOD1 to a BWR/4 feedwater control failure ATWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouhani, S.Z.; Giles, M.M.; Mohr, C.M. Jr.; Weaver, W.L. III.

    1984-01-01

    This paper begins with a short description of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code for Boiling Water Reactors (TRAC-BWR), briefly mentioning some of its main features such as specific BWR models and input structure. Next, an input model of a BWR/4 is described, and, the assumptions used in performing an analysis of the loss of a feedwater controller without scram are listed. The important features of the calculated trends in flows, pressure, reactivity, and power are shown graphically and commented in the text. A comparison of some of the main predicted trends with the calculated results from a similar study by General Electric is also presented

  19. Experimental and analytical studies for a BWR nuclear reactor building evaluation of soil-structure interaction behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, N.; Tsushima, Y.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the spatial characteristics of dynamic properties, especially soil-structure interaction behavior, or the BWR nuclear reactor building by experimental and analytical studies. An analytical method (SMIRT-1 Paper K 2/4) for estimating the damping effects is reported. The complex damping is used, because the so-called structural damping may be more suitable for estimating the damping effects of an elastic structure. H. Tajimi's theory is used for estimating the dynamical soil-foundation stiffness with the dissipation of vibrational energy on the elastic half-space soil. An approximate explanation is presented in regard to the more developmental mathematical method for estimating the damping effects than the above-mentioned previous method, which is 'Modes Superposition Method for Multi-Degrees of Freedom System' with the constant complex stiffness showing the structural damping effects and the dynamical soil-foundation stiffness approximated by the linear or quadratic functions of the eigenvalues. Next, an approximate explanation is presented in regard to the experimental results of the No.1 reactor building (BWR) of Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, The Chubu Electric Power Co., Ltd. The regression analyses of the experimental resonance curves by one degree system show that the critical damping ratio is larger than the 0.10 used in the design for the fundamental natural period. It is attempted to simulate the experimental results by the above-mentioned method. The simulated model is a fourty-eight degrees of freedom spring mass system because of the eight masses for the eight floors including the base foundation and the six degrees of freedom for a mass

  20. Reactor water level control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utagawa, Kazuyuki.

    1993-01-01

    A device of the present invention can effectively control fluctuation of a reactor water level upon power change by reactor core flow rate control operation. That is, (1) a feedback control section calculates a feedwater flow rate control amount based on a deviation between a set value of a reactor water level and a reactor water level signal. (2) a feed forward control section forecasts steam flow rate change based on a reactor core flow rate signal or a signal determining the reactor core flow rate, to calculate a feedwater flow rate control amount which off sets the steam flow rate change. Then, the sum of the output signal from the process (1) and the output signal from the process (2) is determined as a final feedwater flow rate control signal. With such procedures, it is possible to forecast the steam flow rate change accompanying the reactor core flow rate control operation, thereby enabling to conduct preceding feedwater flow rate control operation which off sets the reactor water level fluctuation based on the steam flow rate change. Further, a reactor water level deviated from the forecast can be controlled by feedback control. Accordingly, reactor water level fluctuation upon power exchange due to the reactor core flow rate control operation can rapidly be suppressed. (I.S.)

  1. Outline of the advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hucik, S.A.; Imaoka, T.; Minematsu, A.; Takashima, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The fundamental design of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) was completed in December 1985. This design represents the next generation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) to be introduced into commercial operation in the 1990s. The ABWR is the result of the continuing evolution of the BWR, incorporating state-of-the-art technologies and many new improvements based on an extensive accumulation of world-wide experience through design, construction and operation of BWRs. The ABWR development program was initiated in 1978, with subsequent design and test and development programs started in 1981. Most of the development and verification tests of the new features have been completed. The ABWR development objective focused on an optimized selection of advanced technologies and proven BWR technologies. The ABWR objectives were specific improvements such as operating and safety margins, enhanced availability and capacity factor, and reduced occupational exposure while at the same time achieving significant cost reduction in both capital and operating costs. The ABWR is characterized by an improved NSSS including ten internal recirculation pumps, fine motion electric-hydraulic control rod drives, optimized safety and auxiliary systems, advanced control and instrumentation systems, improved turbine-generator with moisture/separator reheater with plant output increased to 1350 MWe, and an integrated reinforced concrete containment vessel and compact Reactor and Turbine Building design. The turbine system also included improvements in the Turbine-Generator, feedwater/heater system, and condensate treatment systems. The radwaste system was also optimized taking advantage of the plant design improvements and advances in radwaste technology. The ABWR is a truly optimal design which utilizes advanced technologies, capabilities, performance improvements, and yet provides an economic advantage. (author)

  2. Study on core design for reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Tsutomu

    2002-01-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a water-cooled reactor with the harder neutron spectrum comparing with the LWR, resulting from low neutron moderation due to reduced water volume fraction. Based on the difference from the spectrum from the LWR, the conversion from U-238 to Pu-239 is promoted and the new cores preferable to effective utilization of uranium resource can be possible Design study of the RMWR core started in 1997 and new four core concepts (three BWR cores and one PWR core) are recently evaluated in terms of control rod worths, plutonium multiple recycle, high burnup and void coefficient. Comparative evaluations show needed incorporation of control rod programming and simplified PUREX process as well as development of new fuel cans for high burnup of 100 GW-d/t. Final choice of design specifications will be made at the next step aiming at realization of the RMWR. (T. Tanaka)

  3. Study on core design for reduced-moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Tsutomu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a water-cooled reactor with the harder neutron spectrum comparing with the LWR, resulting from low neutron moderation due to reduced water volume fraction. Based on the difference from the spectrum from the LWR, the conversion from U-238 to Pu-239 is promoted and the new cores preferable to effective utilization of uranium resource can be possible Design study of the RMWR core started in 1997 and new four core concepts (three BWR cores and one PWR core) are recently evaluated in terms of control rod worths, plutonium multiple recycle, high burnup and void coefficient. Comparative evaluations show needed incorporation of control rod programming and simplified PUREX process as well as development of new fuel cans for high burnup of 100 GW-d/t. Final choice of design specifications will be made at the next step aiming at realization of the RMWR. (T. Tanaka)

  4. BWR condensate filtration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.A.; Pasricha, A.; Rekart, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Poor removal of particulate corrosion products (especially iron) from condensate is one of the major problems in BWR systems. The presence of activated corrosion products creates ''hot spots'' and increases piping dose rates. Also, fuel efficiency is reduced and the risk of fuel failure is increased by the deposit of corrosion products on the fuel. Because of these concerns, current EPRI guidelines call for a maximum of 2 ppb of iron in the reactor feedwater with a level of 0.5 ppb being especially desirable. It has become clear that conventional deep bed resins are incapable of meeting these levels. While installation of prefilter systems is an option, it would be more economical for plants with naked deep beds to find an improved bead resin for use in existing systems. BWR condensate filtration technologies are being tested on a condensate side stream at Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station. After two years of testing, hollow fiber filters (HFF) and fiber matrix filters (FMF), and low crosslink cation resin, all provide acceptable results. The results are presented for pressure drop, filtration efficiency, and water quality measurements. The costs are compared for backwashable non-precoat HFF and FMF. Results are also presented for full deep bed vessel tests of the low crosslink cation resin

  5. Boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Kotaro; Ishida, Masayoshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To connect a feedwater pipe to a recycling pipe line, the recycling pipe line being made smaller in diameter, thereby minimizing loss of coolant resulting from rupture of the pipe and improving safety against trouble of coolant loss. Structure: A feedwater pipe is directly connected to a recycling pipe line before a booster pump, and a mixture of recycling water and feedwater is increased in pressure by the booster pump, after which it is introduced into a jet pump in the form of water for driving the jet pump to suck surrounding water causing it to be flown into the core. In accordance with the abovementioned structure, since the flow of feedwater can be used as a part of water for driving the jet pump, the flow within the recycling pipe line may be decreased so that the recycling pipe line can be made smaller in diameter to reduce the flow of coolant in the reactor, which flows out when the pipe is ruptured. (Furukawa, Y.)

  6. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report July 1996 - December 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gavenda, D.J.

    1997-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from July 1996 to December 1996. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS, (c) EAC of Alloy 600, and (d) characterization of residual stresses in welds of boiling water reactor (BWR) core shrouds by numerical models. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated BWR water at 288 C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from a low-carbon content heat of Alloy 600 in high-purity oxygenated water at 289 C. Residual stresses and stress intensity factors were calculated for BWR core shroud welds

  7. Age-related degradation of boiling water reactor vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Shah, V.N.

    1992-01-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory performed an assessment of the aging of the reactor internals in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and identified the unresolved technical issues related to the degradation of these components. The overall life-limiting mechanism is intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking, fatigue, and thermal aging embrittlement are other potential degradation mechanisms. Several failures in BWR internals have been caused by a combination of factors such as environment, high residual or preload stresses, and flow-induced vibration. The ASME Code Section XI in-service inspection requirements are insufficient for detecting aging-related degradation at many locations in reactor internals. Many of the potential locations for IGSCC or fatigue are not accessible for inspection. (orig.)

  8. Design and analysis on super-critical water cooled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki

    2005-01-01

    The Super-Critical Water Cooled Power Reactors (SCPR) is cooled by 25 MPa supercritical water of 280degC at reactor inlet and greater than 500degC at reactor outlet and directly connected with turbine/generators with high energy conversion efficiency. This corresponds to the deletion of recirculation system and steam-water separation system of BWR type reactors or of pressurizer and steam generator of PWR type reactors. In addition to the design study of the university of Tokyo, technology development of the SCPR for practical use has started under the collaboration of industry and academia since 2000. Mockup single tube and bundle tests for heat transfer/fluid flow characteristics of the design have been conducted with 3D heat transfer analysis. Materials compatible with coolant conditions for fuel cans and reactor internals are also assessed. Overall evaluation of the reactor concept is under way. (T. Tanaka)

  9. Study and characterization of noble metal deposits on similar rusty surfaces to those of the reactor U-1 type BWR of nuclear power station of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores S, V. H.

    2011-01-01

    In the present investigation work, were determined the parameters to simulate the conditions of internal oxidation reactor circulation pipes of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz. We used 304l stainless steel cylinders with two faces prepared with abrasive paper of No. 600, with the finality to obtain similar surface to the internal circulation piping nuclear reactor. Oxides was formed within an autoclave (Autoclave MEX-02 unit B), which is a device that simulates the working conditions of the nuclear reactor, but without radiation generated by the fission reaction within the reactor. The oxidation conditions were a temperature of 280 C and pressure of 8 MPa, similar conditions to the reactor operating in nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz, Mexico (BWR conditions), with an average conductivity of 4.58 ms / cm and 2352 ppb oxygen to simulate normal water chemistry NWC. Were obtained deposits of noble metal oxides formed on 304l stainless steel samples, in a 250 ml autoclave at a temperature range of 180 to 200 C. The elements that were used to deposit platinum-rhodium (Pt-Rh) with aqueous Na 2 Pt (OH) 6 and Na 3 Rh (NO 2 ) 6 , Silver (Ag) with an aqueous solution of AgNO 3 , zirconium (Zr) with aqueous Zr O (NO 3 ) and ZrO 2 , and zinc (Zn) in aqueous solution of Zn (NO 3 ) 2 under conditions of normal water chemistry. Also there was the oxidation of 304l stainless steel specimens in normal water chemistry with a solution of Zinc (Zn) (NWC + Zn). Oxidation of the specimens in water chemistry with a solution of zinc (Zn + NWC) was prepared in two ways: within the MEX-02 autoclave unit A in a solution of zinc and a flask at constant temperature in zinc solution. The oxides formed and deposits were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, elemental field analysis and X-ray diffraction. By other hand was evaluated the electrochemical behavior of the oxides formed on the surface of 304l stainless steel

  10. E-chem page: A Support System for Remote Diagnosis of Water Quality in Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naohiro Kusumi; Takayasu Kasahara; Kazuhiko Akamine; Kenji Tada; Naoshi Usui; Nobuyuki Oota

    2002-01-01

    It is important to control and maintain water quality for nuclear power plants. Chemical engineers sample and monitor reactor water from various subsystems and analyze the chemical quality as routine operations. With regard to controlling water quality, new technologies have been developed and introduced to improve the water quality from both operation and material viewpoints. To maintain the quality, it is important to support chemical engineers in evaluating the water quality and realizing effective retrieval of stored data and documents. We have developed a remote support system using the Internet to diagnose BWR water quality, which we call e-chem page. The e-chem page integrates distributed data and information in a Web server, and makes it easy to evaluate the data on BWR water chemistry. This system is composed of four functions: data transmission, water quality evaluation, inquiry and history retrieval system, and reference to documents on BWR water chemistry. The developed system is now being evaluated in trial operations by Hitachi, Ltd. and an electric power company. In addition diagnosis technology applying independent component analysis (ICA) is being developed to improve predictive capability of the system. This paper describes the structure and function of the e-chem page and presents results of obtained with the proposed system for the prediction of chemistry conditions in reactor water. (authors)

  11. Neutron activation analysis and activity in the vessel steel of a BWR reactor for their study without radiological risks in microscopy and spectrometry; Analisis de activacion neutronica y actividad en el acero de la vasija de un reactor nuclear tipo BWR para su estudio sin riesgos radiologicos en microscopia y espectrometria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moranchel, M.; Garcia B, A. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Fisica, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Longoria G, L. C., E-mail: mmoranchel@ipn.mx [IAEA, Department of Technical Cooperation, Division for Latin America, Room B1109 Wagramerstrasse 5, PO Box 100, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-01

    The vessel material of nuclear reactors is subject to irradiation damage induced by the bombardment of neutrons coming from the reactor core. Neutrons are classified as fast and thermal, which produce different effects. Fast neutrons cause damage to the material by dislocation or displacement of atoms in the crystal structure, while the effect of thermal neutrons is a nuclear transmutation that can significantly change the properties of the material. The type and intensity of damage is based on the characteristics of the material, the flow of neutrons and the modes of neutrons interaction with the atomic structures of the material, among others. This work, alluding to nuclear transmutation, makes an analysis of neutron activation of all isotopes in a steel boiling water nuclear reactor (BWR) vessel. An analytical expression is obtained in order to model activity of steel, on the basis of the weight percentage of its atomic components. Its activity is theoretically estimated in a witness sample of the same material as that of the vessel, placed within the nuclear reactor since the beginning of its commercial operation in April 1995, up to August 2010. It was theoretically determined that the witness sample, with a 0.56 g mass (1 x 1 x 0.07 cm{sup 3} dimensions or equivalent) does not present a radiological risks during the stage of preparation, observation and analysis of it in electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction equipment s. The theoretical results were checked experimentally by measuring the activity of the sample by means of gamma spectrometry, measurement of the exposure levels around the sample, as well as the induced level to whole body and limbs, using thermo-luminescent dosimetry (TLD). As a result of the theoretical analysis, new chemical elements are predicted, as a result of the activation phenomena and radioactive decay, whose presence can be a fundamental factor of change in the properties of the vessel. This work is a preamble to the

  12. BWR shutdown analyzer using artificial intelligence (AI) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype alarm system for detecting abnormal reactor shutdowns based on artificial intelligence technology is described. The system incorporates knowledge about Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plant design and component behavior, as well as knowledge required to distinguish normal, abnormal, and ATWS accident conditions. The system was developed using a software tool environment for creating knowledge-based applications on a LISP machine. To facilitate prototype implementation and evaluation, a casual simulation of BWR shutdown sequences was developed and interfaced with the alarm system. An intelligent graphics interface for execution and control is described. System performance considerations and general observations relating to artificial intelligence application to nuclear power plant problems are provided

  13. Study on multi-recycle transmutation of LLFP in light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiawan, M.B.; Kitamoto, A.

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of transmutation for long-lived fission products (LLFP) in light water reactors (LWR), i.e. both BWR and PWR, considering the large capture cross-section of FPs in thermal region was evaluated. Calculation results of iodine and technetium transmutation in BWR and PWR suggested an effective use of BWR as compared to PWR. To obtain transmutation fraction [TF] of 30 to 40%, the irradiation period needed for 99 Tc transmutation was estimated as 10 to 15 years, and the period for 129 I transmutation was estimated as 30 to 40 years, respectively. The evaluations bring a new concept of multi-recycle LLFP transmutation using LWR TR (LWR for transmutation)

  14. Steam turbine chemistry in light water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, Robert; Haertel, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Steam turbines in boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants of various manufacturers have been affected by corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking. Steam chemistry has not been a prime focus for related research because the water in nuclear steam generating systems is considered to be of high purity. Steam turbine chemistry however addresses more the problems encountered in fossil fired power plants on all volatile treatment, where corrosive environments can be formed in zones where wet steam is re-evaporated and dries out, or in the phase transition zone, where superheated steam starts to condense in the low-pressure (LP) turbine. In BWR plants the situation is aggravated by the fact that no alkalizing agents are used in the cycle, thus making any anionic impurity immediately acidic. This is illustrated by case studies of pitting corrosion of a 12 % Cr steel gland seal and of flow-oriented corrosion attack on LP turbine blades in the phase transition zone. In PWR plants, volatile alkalizing agents are used that provide some buffering of acidic impurities, but they also produce anionic decomposition products. (orig.)

  15. BWR radiation buildup control with ionic zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marble, W.J.; Wood, C.J.; Leighty, C.E.; Green, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    In 1983 a hypothesis was disclosed which suggested that the presence of ionic zinc in the reactor water of the BWR could reduce radiation buildup. This hypothesis was developed from correlations of plant data, and subsequently, from laboratory experiments which demonstrated clearly that ionic zinc inhibits the corrosion of stainless steel. The benefits of zinc addition have been measured at the Vallecitos Nuclear Center under and EPRI/GE project. Experimentation and analyses have been performed to evaluate the impact of intentional zinc addition on the IGSCC characteristics of primary system materials and on the performance of the nuclear fuel. It has been concluded that no negative effects are expected. The author conclude that the intentional addition of ionic zinc to the BWR reactor water at a concentration of approximately 10 ppb will provide major benefits in controlling the Co-60 buildup on primary system stainless steel surfaces. The intentional addition of zinc is now a qualified technique for use in BWRs

  16. Reactor performance calculations for water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.

    1970-04-01

    The principles of nuclear, thermal and hydraulic performance calculations for water cooled reactors are discussed. The principles are illustrated by describing their implementation in the UKAEA PATRIARCH scheme of computer codes. This material was originally delivered as a course of lectures at the Technical University of Helsinki in Summer of 1969.

  17. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE

  18. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

  19. Pressurized water reactor flow arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; Knapp, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A flow path is provided for cooling the control rods of a pressurized water reactor. According to this scheme, a small amount of cooling water enters the control rod guide tubes from the top and passes downwards through the tubes before rejoining the main coolant flow and passing through the reactor core. (LL)

  20. Parallel channel effects under BWR LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Hatamiya, S.; Murase, M.

    1988-01-01

    Due to parallel channel effects, different flow patterns such as liquid down-flow and gas up-flow appear simultaneously in fuel bundles of a BWR core during postulated LOCAs. Applying the parallel channel effects to the fuel bundle, water drain tubes with a restricted bottom end have been developed in order to mitigate counter-current flow limiting and to increase the falling water flow rate at the upper tie plate. The upper tie plate with water drain tubes is an especially effective means of increasing the safety margin of a reactor with narrow gaps between fuel rods and high steam velocity at the upper tie plate. The characteristics of the water drain tubes have been experimentally investigated using a small-scaled steam-water system simulating a BWR core. Then, their effect on the fuel cladding temperature was evaluated using the LOCA analysis program SAFER. (orig.)

  1. Critical Power Response to Power Oscillations in Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farawila, Yousef M.; Pruitt, Douglas W.

    2003-01-01

    The response of the critical power ratio to boiling water reactor (BWR) power oscillations is essential to the methods and practice of mitigating the effects of unstable density waves. Previous methods for calculating generic critical power response utilized direct time-domain simulations of unstable reactors. In this paper, advances in understanding the nature of the BWR oscillations and critical power phenomena are combined to develop a new method for calculating the critical power response. As the constraint of the reactor state - being at or slightly beyond the instability threshold - is removed, the new method allows the calculation of sensitivities to different operation and design parameters separately, and thus allows tighter safety margins to be used. The sensitivity to flow rate and the resulting oscillation frequency change are given special attention to evaluate the extension of the oscillation 'detect-and-suppress' methods to internal pump plants where the flow rate at natural circulation and oscillation frequency are much lower than jet pump plants

  2. Identification of dose-reduction techniques for BWR and PWR repetitive high-dose jobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    As a result of concern about the apparent increase in collective radiation dose to workers at nuclear power plants, this project will provide information to industry in preplanning for radiation protection during maintenance operations. This study identifies Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) repetitive jobs, and respective collective dose trends and dose reduction techniques. 3 references, 2 tables

  3. Improving the neutronic characteristics of a boiling water reactor by using uranium zirconium hydride fuel instead of uranium dioxide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galahom, Ahmed Abdelghafar [Higher Technological Institute, Ramadan (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    The present work discusses two different models of boiling water reactor (BWR) bundle to compare the neutronic characteristics of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) and uranium zirconium hydride (UZrH{sub 1.6}) fuel. Each bundle consists of four assemblies. The BWR assembly fueled with UO{sub 2} contains 8 × 8 fuel rods while that fueled with UZrH{sub 1.6} contains 9 × 9 fuel rods. The Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport code, based on the Mont Carlo method, is used to design three dimensional models for BWR fuel bundles at typical operating temperatures and pressure conditions. These models are used to determine the multiplication factor, pin-by-pin power distribution, axial power distribution, thermal neutron flux distribution, and axial thermal neutron flux. The moderator and coolant (water) are permitted to boil within the BWR core forming steam bubbles, so it is important to calculate the reactivity effect of voiding at different values. It is found that the hydride fuel bundle design can be simplified by eliminating water rods and replacing the control blade with control rods. UZrH{sub 1.6} fuel improves the performance of the BWR in different ways such as increasing the energy extracted per fuel assembly, reducing the uranium ore, and reducing the plutonium accumulated in the BWR through burnup.

  4. A boiling-water reactor concept for low radiation exposure based on operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koine, Y.; Uchida, S.; Izumiya, M.; Miki, M.

    1983-01-01

    A review of boiling-water reactor (BWR) operating experience indicates the significant role of water chemistry in determining the radiation dose rate contributing to occupational exposure. The major contributor among the radioactive species involved is identified as 60 Co, produced by neutron activation of 59 Co originating from structural materials. Iron crud, a fine solid form of corrosion product in the reactor water, is also shown to enhance the radiation dose rate. A theoretical study, supported by the operating experience and an extensive confirmatory test, led to the computerized analytical model called DR CRUD which is capable of predicting long-term radiation dose buildup. It accounts for the mechanism of radiation buildup through corrosion products such as irons, cobalts and other radioactive elements; their generation, transport, activation, interaction and deposition in the reactor coolant system are simulated. A scoping analysis, using this model as a tool, establishes the base line of the BWR concept for low occupational exposure. The base line consists of a set of target values for an annual exposure of 200 man.rem in an 1100 MW(e) BWR unit. They are the parameters that will be built into the design such as iron and cobalt inputs to the reactor water, and the capability of the reactor and the condensate purification system. Applicable means of technology are identified to meet the targets, ranging from improved water chemistry to the purification technique, optimized material selection and the recommended operational procedure. Extensive test programmes provide specifications of these means for use in BWRs. Combinations of their application are reviewed to define the concept of reduced exposure. Analytical study verifies the effectiveness of the proposed BWR concept in achieving a low radiation dose rate; occupational exposure is reduced to 200 man.rem/a. (author)

  5. Seismic risk assessment of a BWR: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, T.Y.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Wells, J.E.; Johnson, J.J.

    1985-02-01

    The seismic risk methodology developed in the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was demonstrated by its application to the Zion nuclear power plant, a pressurized water reactor (PWR). A detailed model of Zion, including systems analysis models (initiating events, event trees, and fault trees), SSI and structure models, and piping models was developed and analyzed. The SSMRP methodology can equally be applied to a boiling water reactor (BWR). To demonstrate its applicability, to identify fundamental differences in seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR, and to provide a basis of comparison of seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR when analyzed with comparable methodology and assumptions, a seismic risk analysis is being performed on the LaSalle County Station nuclear power plant

  6. Burnup credit feasibility for BWR spent fuel shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Considerable interest in the allowance of reactivity credit for the exposure history of power reactor fuel currently exists. This ''burnup credit'' issue has the potential to greatly reduce risk and cost when applied to the design and certification of spent of fuel casks used for transportation and storage. Analyses 1 have shown the feasibility estimated the risk and economic incentives for allowing burnup credit in pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel shipping cask applications. This paper summarizes the extension of the previous PWR feasibility assessments to boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel. As with the PWR analysis, the purpose was not verification of burnup credit (see ref. 2 for ongoing work in this area) but a reasonable assessment of the feasibility and potential gains from its use in BWR applications. This feasibility analysis aims to apply simple methods that adequately characterize the time-dependent isotopic compositions of typical BWR fuel. An initial analysis objective was to identify a simple and reliable method for characterizing BWR spent fuel. The method includes characterization of a typical pin-cell spectrum, using a one-dimensional (1-D) model of a BWR assembly. The calculated spectrum allows burnup-dependent few-group material constants to be generated. Point depletion methods were then used to obtain the time-varying characteristics of the fuel. These simple methods were validated, where practical, with multidimensional methods. 6 refs., 1 tab

  7. State of the art of second international exercise on benchmarks in BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdu, G.; Munoz-Cobo, J. L.; Palomo, M. J.; Escriva, A.; Ginestar, D.

    1998-01-01

    This is a second in series of Benchmarks based on data from operating Swedish BWRs. The first one concerned measurements made in cycles 14,15 16 and 17 at Ringhals 1 Nuclear Power Plant and addressed predictive power of analytical tools used in BWR stability analysis. Part of the data was disclosed only after participants had provided their results. This work has been published in the report: NEA/NSC/DOC(96)22, November 1996. In this report it was recognised that there is a need for better qualification of the applied noise analysis methods. A follow up Benchmark was thus proposed dedicated to the analysis of time series data and including the evaluation of both global and regional stability of Forsmarks 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Plant. In this second Benchmark have participated Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB,NEA Nuclear Science Committee, CSN Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear and Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering of Polytechnic University of Valencia. (Author)

  8. BWR stability analysis at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1991-01-01

    Following the unexpected, but safely terminated, power and flow oscillations in the LaSalle-2 Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) on March 9, 1988, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Offices of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) and of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) requested that the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) carry out BWR stability analyses, centered around fourteen specific questions. Ten of the fourteen questions address BWR stability issues in general and are dealt with in this paper. The other four questions address local, out-of-phase oscillations and matters of instrumentation; they fall outside the scope of the work reported here. It was the purpose of the work documented in this report to answer ten of the fourteen NRC-stipulated questions. Nine questions are answered by analyzing the LaSalle-2 instability and related BWR transients with the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA) and by performing an uncertainty assessment of the EPA predictions. The tenth question is answered on the basis of first principles. The ten answers are summarized

  9. Using the Hurst's exponent as a monitor and predictor of BWR reactor instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavilan Moreno, Carlos J.

    2010-01-01

    Since the decade of the 1950s, when the development of boiling water reactor technology began, unstable situations have existed, which involve a high amplitude self-oscillatory process in the reactor's thermal power. As the development progressed and the reactors increased power density, the possibility of instability under certain circumstances increased. Thus, in 1985, Caorso nuclear plant (Italy) reported the first event of this type, and in 1988, such an event was reported at La Salle as well. Since then, multiple instability events have been reported. The danger of these unstable power situations resides in the possibility of exceeding a thermal limit, as expressed in Appendix A of 10FR50. Thus, the need arises to monitor and correct these situations in the industry. The most common way to monitor and control these instability situations involves the use of Decay Ratio (DR) and Resonance Frequency (RF). The use of these parameters is polemical, because their use involves certain simplifications and operations prior to the calculation which question how well they represent the reality. The most important simplifications are those which lead to the interpretation of the power time series as the result of a second order system. With regard to the previous operations, the time series needs to be standardized and filtered. The result is loss of information during prediction, due to the operations, and the results, therefore, lack accuracy. In this paper, the system is considered without simplifications, that is to say that it is treated as dynamic and, as we shall see, chaotic, in the mathematical sense of the term. The series will be used in pure form without manipulations. The parameter used for monitoring and prediction of the core's behaviour will be the Hurst's exponent (H). The concept used for this proposal is that the response of a complex dynamic system depends not only on the last excitation, but on the prior history. The processes and systems are

  10. Next generation light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, Akira

    1992-01-01

    In the countries where the new order of nuclear reactors has ceased, the development of the light water reactors of new type has been discussed, aiming at the revival of nuclear power. Also in Japan, since it is expected that light water reactors continue to be the main power reactor for long period, the technology of light water reactors of next generation has been discussed. For the development of nuclear power, extremely long lead time is required. The light water reactors of next generation now in consideration will continue to be operated till the middle of the next century, therefore, they must take in advance sufficiently the needs of the age. The improvement of the way men and the facilities should be, the simple design, the flexibility to the trend of fuel cycle and so on are required for the light water reactors of next generation. The trend of the development of next generation light water reactors is discussed. The construction of an ABWR was started in September, 1991, as No. 6 plant in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Power Station. (K.I.)

  11. Advanced light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golay, M.W.; Todreas, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental concerns, economics and the earth's finite store of fossil fuels argue for a resuscitation of nuclear power. The authors think improved light-water reactors incorporating passive safety features can be both safe and profitable, but only if attention is paid to economics, effective management and rigorous training methods. The experience of nearly four decades has winnowed out designs for four basic types of reactor: the heavy-water reactor (HWR), the gas-cooled rector (GCR), the liquid-metal-cooled reactor (LMR) and the light-water reactor (LWR). Each design is briefly described before the paper discusses the passive safety features of the AP-600 rector, so-called because it employs an advanced pressurized water design and generates 600 MW of power

  12. Construction of an external electrode for determination of electrochemical corrosion potential in normal operational conditions of an BWR type reactor for hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar T, J.A.; Rivera M, H.; Hernandez C, R.

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of the corrosion processes at high temperature requires of external devices that being capable to resist a temperature of 288 Centigrade and a pressure of 80 Kg/cm 2 , to give stable and reproducible results of some variable and resisting physically and chemically the radiation. The external electrode of Ag/AgCl fulfils all the requirements in the determination of the electrochemical corrosion potential under normal operational conditions of a BWR type reactor in hot cells. (Author)

  13. Experimental investigation of mixing of non-isothermal water streams at BWR operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergagio, Mattia, E-mail: bergagio@kth.se [AlbaNova University Center, Nuclear Reactor Technology Division, Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Anglart, Henryk, E-mail: henryk@kth.se [AlbaNova University Center, Nuclear Reactor Technology Division, Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute of Heat Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, 21/25 Nowowiejska Street, 00-665 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Temperatures are measured in the presence of mixing at BWR operating conditions. • The thermocouple support is moved along a pattern to extend the measurement region. • Uncertainty of 1.58 K for temperatures acquired at 1000 Hz. • Momenta of the hot streams and thermal stratification affect the data examined. • Unconventional spectral analysis is required to further study the data collected. - Abstract: In this experimental investigation, wall surface temperatures have been measured during mixing of three water streams in the annular gap between two coaxial stainless-steel tubes. The inner tube, with an outer diameter of 35 mm and a thickness of 5 mm, holds six K-type, ungrounded thermocouples with a diameter of 0.5 mm, which measured surface temperatures with a sampling rate of either 100 Hz or 1000 Hz. The tube was rotated from 0 to 360° and moved in a range of 387 mm in the axial direction to allow measurements of surface temperatures in the whole mixing region. The outer tube has an inner diameter of 80 mm and a thickness of 10 mm to withstand a water pressure of 9 MPa. A water stream at a temperature of either 333 K or 423 K and a Reynolds number between 1657 and 8410 rose vertically in the annular gap and mixed with two water streams at a temperature of 549 K and a Reynolds number between 3.56 × 10{sup 5} and 7.11 × 10{sup 5}. These two water streams entered the annulus radially on the same axial level, 180° apart. Water pressure was kept at 7.2 MPa. Temperature recordings were performed at five axial and eight azimuthal locations, for each set of boundary conditions. Each recording lasted 120 s to provide reliable data on the variance, intermittency and frequency of the surface temperature time series at hand. Thorough calculations indicate that the uncertainty in the measured temperature is of 1.58 K. The mixing region extends up to 0.2 m downward of the hot inlets. In most cases, measurements indicate non-uniform mixing in the

  14. Power plant design: ESBWR - the latest passive BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, H.; Yadigaroglu, G.; Stoop, P.C.

    1997-01-01

    When General Electric said it would end development of its 670 MWe SBWR (Simplified Boiling Water Reactor), it was not quite the end of the story. Also on the drawing board at the time was the larger ESBWR (standing for either European or Economic Simplified BWR) whose goal was to provide the improved economic performance that the SBWR could not. (UK)

  15. Recent performance experience with US light water reactor self-actuating safety and relief valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, C.G.

    1996-12-01

    Over the past several years, there have been a number of operating reactor events involving performance of primary and secondary safety and relief valves in U.S. Light Water Reactors. There are several different types of safety and relief valves installed for overpressure protection of various safety systems throughout a typical nuclear power plant. The following discussion is limited to those valves in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) and main steam systems of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and in the RCS of boiling water reactors (BWR), all of which are self-actuating having a setpoint controlled by a spring-loaded disk acting against system fluid pressure. The following discussion relates some of the significant recent experience involving operating reactor events or various testing data. Some of the more unusual and interesting operating events or test data involving some of these designs are included, in addition to some involving a number of similar events and those which have generic applicability.

  16. Application of the Synthesis method to the calculations of neutron flow in 3D in the enveloping of a BWR reactor with the DORT code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xolocostli M, J.V.; Gomez T, A.M.; Palacios H, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The surveillance program of the vessel materials of a BWR reactor requires the determination of the neutron flux in 3D in the core enveloping. To carry out these calculations of the neutron flux, the Regulatory Guide 1.190 of the NRC recommends the use of the following codes: MCNP, TORT and DORT. In the case of using the DORT code, the one which solves the transport equation in discreet coordinates and in two dimensions (xy, rθ, and rz), the regulatory guide in reference, requires to make an approach of the flow in three dimensions by means of the call Synthesis Method. It is denominated like this due to that a flow representation in 3D is achieved 'combining' or 'synthesizing' the calculated flows by DORT in rθ, rz and r. In this work the application of the Synthesis Method it is presented, according to the Regulatory Guide 1.190, to determine the 3D flows in a BWR reactor. To achieve the above mentioned it was implemented the Synthesis Method in a computer program developed in the ININ to which is denominated SYNTHESIS. This program applies the synthesis method, and is 'coupled' with the DORT code to determine by this way the neutronic fluxes in 3D on the enveloping of a BWR reactor. (Author)

  17. Fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Mukouhara, Tami; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Nuclear Engineering Research Lab., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    This report introduces the result of a feasibility study of a fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water (SCFR) with once-through cooling system. It is characterized by (1) no need of steam separator, recirculation system, or steam generator, (2) 1/7 of core flow rate compared with BWR or PWR, (3) high temperature and high pressure permits small turbine and high efficiency exceeding 44%, (4) structure and operation of major components are already experienced by LWRs or thermal power plants. Modification such as reducing blanket fuels and increasing seed fuels are made to achieve highly economic utilization of Pu and high power (2 GWe). The following restrictions were satisfied. (1) Maximum linear heat rate 39 kW/m, (2) Maximum surface temperature of Inconel cladding 620degC, (3) Negative void reactivity coefficient, (4) Fast neutron irradiation rate at the inner surface of pressure vessel less than 2.0x10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}. Thus the high power density of 167 MW/m{sup 3} including blanket is thought to contributes economy. The high conversion is attained to be 0.99 Pu fission residual rate by the outer radius of fuel rod of 0.88 mm. The breeding of 1.034 by Pu fission residual rate can be achieved by using briquette (tube-in-shell) type fuel structure. (K. Tsuchihashi)

  18. Characterization of welding of AISI 304l stainless steel similar to the core encircling of a BWR reactor; Caracterizacion de soldaduras de acero inoxidable AISI 304L similares a las de la envolvente del nucleo de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gachuz M, M.E.; Palacios P, F.; Robles P, E.F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    Plates of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304l of 0.0381 m thickness were welded by means of the SMAW process according to that recommended in the Section 9 of the ASME Code, so that it was reproduced the welding process used to assemble the encircling of the core of a BWR/5 reactor similar to that of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric plant, there being generated the necessary documentation for the qualification of the one welding procedure and of the welder. They were characterized so much the one base metal, as the welding cord by means of metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, mechanical essays and fracture mechanics. From the obtained results it highlights the presence of an area affected by the heat of up to 1.5 mm of wide and a value of fracture tenacity (J{sub IC}) to ambient temperature for the base metal of 528 KJ/m{sup 2}, which is diminished by the presence of the welding and by the increment in the temperature of the one essay. Also it was carried out an fractographic analysis of the fracture zone generated by the tenacity essays, what evidence a ductile fracture. The experimental values of resistance and tenacity are important for the study of the structural integrity of the encircling one of the core. (Author)

  19. Introduction to nuclear power reactors and their health physics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brtis, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to: (1) the major systems of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR's) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's), (2) the production and distribution of radiation sources in BWR's and PWR's, (3) the regulatory and functional requirements for nuclear power reactor design from a health physics standpoint, (4) the health physics systems provided to meet such requirements, and (5) a bibliography of documents germane to power reactor health physics design

  20. The heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brudermueller, G.

    1976-01-01

    This is a survey of the development so far of this reactor line which is in operation all over the world in various types (e.g. BHWR, PHWR). MZFR and the CANDU-type reactors are discussed in more detail. (UA) [de

  1. Development of technologies for nuclear reactors of small and medium sized; Desarrollo de Tecnologias para Reactores Nucleares de pequeno y medio tamano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-15

    This meeting include: countries presentations, themes and objectives of the training course, reactor types, design, EPR, APR1400, A P 1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER-1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER 1200, Boiling Water Reactor, A BWR, A BWR -II, ESBUR, Ke ren, AREVA, Heavy Water Reactor, Candu 6, Acr-1000, HWR, Bw, Iris, CAREM NuCcale, Smart, KLT-HOS, Westinghouse small modular Reactor, Gas Cooled Reactors, PBMR, React ores enfriados con metales liquidos, Hs, Prism,Terra Power, Hyper ion, appliance's no electric as de energia, Generation IV Reactors,VHTR, Gas Fast Reactor, Sodium Fast Reactor, Molten salt Reactor, Lfr, Water Cooled Reactor, Technology Assessment Process, Fukushima accident.

  2. Nuclear reactor in deep water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Events during October 1980, when the Indian Point 2 nuclear reactor was flooded by almost 500 000 litres of water from the Hudson river, are traced and the jumble of human errors and equipment failures chronicled. Possible damage which could result from the reactor getting wet and from thermal shock are considered. (U.K.)

  3. Emergency cooling system with hot-water jet pumps for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinsch, A.O.W.

    1977-01-01

    The ECCS for a PWR or BWR uses hot-water jet pumps to remove the thermal energy generated in the reactor vessel and stored in the water. The hot water expands in the nozzle part (Laval nozzle) of the jet pump and sucks in coolant (borated water) coming from a storage tank containing subcooled water. This water is mixing with the hot water/steam mixture from the Laval nozzle. The steam is condensed. The kinetic energy of the water is converted into a pressure increase which is sufficient to feed the water into the reactor vessel. The emergency cooling may further be helped by a jet condenser also operating according to the principle of a jet pump and condensing the steam generated in the reactor vessel. (DG) [de

  4. Diffusion bonded matrix of HGMF applied for BWR condensate water purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda, Fumitaka; Yukawa, Takao; Ito, Kazuyuki.

    1984-01-01

    High Gradient Magnetic Filter (HGMF) applied to the purification of power plant primary water has recently attracted much attention. In the application of HGMF to the water treatment of power plants, especially nuclear power plants, reliabillties of matrix (filtering medium) as well as removal performance for cruds (insoluble corrosion products) are considered to be important factors. To satisfy these factors, a new filtering medium named Diffision Bonded Matrix (DBM) has been developed and the test results are reported. Filtering efficiency and mechanical stiffness of DBM were examined using HGMF pilot test units consisting of 160 mm diameters x 240 mm length filter. The filtering velocity and the magnetic flux density used in this test were 800 m/h 5 kG, respectively. The filtering efficiencies and of 85-100% were obtained for artificial cruds for DBM. The DBM indicated slightly better filtering efficiency than for conventional wool matrix under the same filtering and matrix conditions. The DBM kept its original mechanical properties and very few pieces of fibers were broken off while the conventional wool matrix lost its volume elasticities and the considerable amount of fibers was broken off during the test operation. The results described here demonstrated the applicability of DBM for treatment of BWR primary water by High Gradient Magnetic Filter. (author)

  5. Water quality control device and water quality control method for reactor primary coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yoichi; Ibe, Eishi; Watanabe, Atsushi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is suitable for preventing defects due to corrosion of structural materials in a primary coolant system of a BWR type reactor. Namely, a concentration measuring means measures the concentration of oxidative ingredients contained in a reactor water. A reducing electrode is disposed along a reactor water flow channel in the primary coolant system and reduces the oxidative ingredients. A reducing counter electrode is disposed along the reactor water flow channel in the primary coolant system, and electrically connected to the reducing electrode. The reactor structural materials are used as a reference electrode providing a reference potential to the reducing electrode and the reducing counter electrode. A potential control means controls the potential of the reducing electrode relative to the reference potential based on the signals from the concentration measuring means. A stable reference potential in a region where an effective oxygen concentration is stable can be obtained irrespective of the change of operation conditions by using the reactor structural materials disposed to a boiling region in the reactor core as a reference electrode. As a result, the water quality can be controlled at high accuracy. (I.S.)

  6. Assembly homogenization techniques for light water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Recent progress in development and application of advanced assembly homogenization methods for light water reactor analysis is reviewed. Practical difficulties arising from conventional flux-weighting approximations are discussed and numerical examples given. The mathematical foundations for homogenization methods are outlined. Two methods, Equivalence Theory and Generalized Equivalence Theory which are theoretically capable of eliminating homogenization error are reviewed. Practical means of obtaining approximate homogenized parameters are presented and numerical examples are used to contrast the two methods. Applications of these techniques to PWR baffle/reflector homogenization and BWR bundle homogenization are discussed. Nodal solutions to realistic reactor problems are compared to fine-mesh PDQ calculations, and the accuracy of the advanced homogenization methods is established. Remaining problem areas are investigated, and directions for future research are suggested. (author)

  7. Corrosion problems in boiling water reactors and their remedies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, B.

    1989-01-01

    This article briefly presents current corrosion problems in boiling water reactors and their remedies. The problems are different forms of environmentally assisted cracking, and the remedies are divided into material-, environment-, and stress-related remedies. The list of problems comprises: intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in weld-sensitized stainless steel piping; IGSCC in cold-bent stainless steel piping; irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in stainless alloys; IGSCC in high-strength stainless alloys. A prospective corrosion problem, as judged from literature references, and one which relates to plant life, is corrosion fatigue in pressure vessel steel, since the reactor pressure vessel is the most critical component in the BWR pressure boundary as regards plant safety. (author)

  8. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after core degradation has occurred) of postulated BWR severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for additional assessment. The first is a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertains to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose is to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies have been performed during 1991 under the auspices of the Detailed Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Strategies Program. This paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies and the potential for their success. 33 refs., 9 figs

  9. Stability analysis of a recycling circuit of a BWR type reactor. Theoretical study; Analisis de estabilidad de un circuito de recirculacion de un reactor del tipo BWR. Estudio teorico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas H, J.G.; Espinosa P, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, 09000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gonzalez M, V.M. [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, 04000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The Technology, Regulation and Services Management of the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards financed and in coordinate form with the I.P.H. Department of the Metropolitan Autonomous-Iztapalapa University developed the present project with the purpose of studying the effect of the recycling system on the linear stability of a BWR reactor whose reference central is the Laguna Verde power station. The present project forms part of a work series focused to the linear stability of the nuclear reactor of the Unit 1 at Laguna Verde power station. The components of the recycling system considered for the study of stability are the recycling external circuit (recycling pumps, valves) and the internal circuit (downcomer, jet pumps, lower full, driers, separators). The mathematical model is obtained applying mass balances and movement quantity in each one of the mentioned circuits. With respect to the nucleus model two regions are considered, the first one is made of a flow in one phase and the second one of a flow in two phases. For modelling the biphasic region it is considered homogenous flow. Generally it is studied the system behavior in the frequency domain starting from the transfer function applied to four operational states which correspond to the lower stability zone in the map power-flow of the Unit 1 of Laguna Verde power station. The Nyquist diagrams corresponding to each state as well as their characteristic frequency were determined. The results show that exists a very clear dependence of the power-flow relation on the stability of the system. It was found that the boiling length is an important parameter for the linear stability of the system. The obtained results show that the characteristic frequencies in unstability zones are similar to the reported data of the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde power station in the event of power oscillations carried out in January 1995. (Author)

  10. Fundamentals of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, L.

    1982-01-01

    In many countries, the pressurized water reactor (PWR) is the most widely used, even though it requires enrichment of the uranium to about 3% in U-235 and the moderator-coolant must be maintained at a high pressure, about 2200 pounds per square inch. Our objective in this series of seven lectures is to describe the design and operating characteristics of the PWR system, discuss the reactor physics methods used to evaluate performance, examine the way fuel is consumed and produced, study the instrumentation system, review the physics measurements made during initial startup of the reactor, and outline the administrative aspects of starting up a reactor and operating it safely and effectively

  11. Method of changing the control rod pattern in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kenji.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to change the control rod pattern in a short time with ease, as well as improve the availability factor of the reactor. Method: Control rods other than those being inserted into the reactor core are inserted into the reactor core to reduce the power by the reduction in the reactor core flow rate. Then, the control rod to be operated is operated partially for the change of the control rod pattern to restrict the linear heat rating of the fuels to less than 0.1 kW/ft per one hour to change the control pattern to the aimed control rod pattern. Then, the reactor core flow rate is increased after the pattern exchange for the control rod to increase the power. Since only the control rod operation is performed without adjusting the reactor core flow rate upon change of the control rod pattern, procedures can be made simply in a short time to thereby improve the availability factor of the reactor. (Moriyama, K.)

  12. Mark I 1/5-scale boiling water reactor pressure suppresion experiment quick-look report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, W.; Collins, E.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report is intended as a ''quick-look'' report summarizing the experimental results obtained from pressure suppression experiment numbers 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3 that were performed on the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's 1/5-scale boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark I pressure suppression experimental facility on April 26, 1977. A brief description of the general nature of the tests and a summary of the actual tests that were performed are given

  13. A method of reactor power decrease by 2DOF control system during BWR power oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Katsuo

    1998-09-01

    Occurrence of power oscillation events caused by void feedback effects in BWRs operated at low-flow and high-power condition has been reported. After thoroughly examining these events, BWRs have been equipped with the SRI (Selected Rod Insertion) system to avoid the power oscillation by decreasing the power under such reactor condition. This report presents a power control method for decreasing the reactor power stably by a two degree of freedom (2DOF) control. Performing a numerical simulation by utilizing a simple reactor dynamics model, it is found that the control system designed attains a satisfactory control performance of power decrease from a viewpoint of setting time and oscillation. (author)

  14. Method of controlling the water quality in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Hidefumi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a simple and reliable water quality calculation system and water quality control method based thereon for the entire primary coolant circuits in BWR type reactors. Method: In a method of controlling the water quality of the reactor water by injecting hydrogen into the primary coolant circuits of a nuclear reactor, by utilizing a first linear relationship established between the concentration of oxygen and hydrogen in the main steam system and the concentration of radiolysis products in the reactor core and separators and mixing plenum portions, each of the above-mentioned concentrations is calculated from the concentrations for hydrogen or oxygen. Further, by utilizing the first linear relationship established between the concentrations for the oxygen and hydrogen in the recycling system and the concentration of the radiolysis products in the system from the downcomer to the lower plenum portion, the above-mentioned concentration is calculated from the concentration for oxygen and hydrogen. Then, the hydrogen injection rate into the primary coolant system is determined such that the calculated value takes an aimed value. (Ikeda, J.)

  15. Characterization of welding of AISI 304l stainless steel similar to the core encircling of a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gachuz M, M.E.; Palacios P, F.; Robles P, E.F.

    2003-01-01

    Plates of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304l of 0.0381 m thickness were welded by means of the SMAW process according to that recommended in the Section 9 of the ASME Code, so that it was reproduced the welding process used to assemble the encircling of the core of a BWR/5 reactor similar to that of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric plant, there being generated the necessary documentation for the qualification of the one welding procedure and of the welder. They were characterized so much the one base metal, as the welding cord by means of metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, mechanical essays and fracture mechanics. From the obtained results it highlights the presence of an area affected by the heat of up to 1.5 mm of wide and a value of fracture tenacity (J IC ) to ambient temperature for the base metal of 528 KJ/m 2 , which is diminished by the presence of the welding and by the increment in the temperature of the one essay. Also it was carried out an fractographic analysis of the fracture zone generated by the tenacity essays, what evidence a ductile fracture. The experimental values of resistance and tenacity are important for the study of the structural integrity of the encircling one of the core. (Author)

  16. Pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Design and mode of operation of the main PWR components are described: reactor core, pressure vessel and internals, cooling systems with pumps and steam generators, ancillary systems, and waste processing. (TK) [de

  17. Development of technologies for nuclear reactors of small and medium sized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-08-01

    This meeting include: countries presentations, themes and objectives of the training course, reactor types, design, EPR, APR1400, A P 1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER-1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER 1200, Boiling Water Reactor, A BWR, A BWR -II, ESBUR, Ke ren, AREVA, Heavy Water Reactor, Candu 6, Acr-1000, HWR, Bw, Iris, CAREM NuCcale, Smart, KLT-HOS, Westinghouse small modular Reactor, Gas Cooled Reactors, PBMR, React ores enfriados con metales liquidos, Hs, Prism,Terra Power, Hyper ion, appliance's no electric as de energia, Generation IV Reactors,VHTR, Gas Fast Reactor, Sodium Fast Reactor, Molten salt Reactor, Lfr, Water Cooled Reactor, Technology Assessment Process, Fukushima accident.

  18. Measuring device for water quality at reactor bottom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Hidehiro; Takagi, Jun-ichi

    1995-10-27

    The present invention concerns measurement for water quality at the bottom of a reactor of a BWR type plant, in which reactor water is sampled and analyzed in a state approximate to conditions in a pressure vessel. Based on the result, hydrogen injection amount is controlled during hydrogen injection operation. Namely, a monitor for water quality is disposed to a sampling line in communication with the bottom of a pressure vessel. A water quality monitor is disposed to a drain sampling line in communication with the bottom of the pressure vessel. A corrosion potentiometer is disposed to the pressure sampling line or the drain sampling line. A dissolved oxygen measuring device is disposed to the pressure vessel sampling line or the drain sampling line. With such a constitution, the reactor water can be sampled and analyzed in a state approximate to the conditions in the pressure vessel. In addition, signals from the water quality monitor are inputted to a hydrogen injection amount control device. As a result, the amount of hydrogen injected to primary coolants can be controlled in a state approximate to the conditions in the pressure vessel. (I.S.).

  19. Measuring device for water quality at reactor bottom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Hidehiro; Takagi, Jun-ichi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns measurement for water quality at the bottom of a reactor of a BWR type plant, in which reactor water is sampled and analyzed in a state approximate to conditions in a pressure vessel. Based on the result, hydrogen injection amount is controlled during hydrogen injection operation. Namely, a monitor for water quality is disposed to a sampling line in communication with the bottom of a pressure vessel. A water quality monitor is disposed to a drain sampling line in communication with the bottom of the pressure vessel. A corrosion potentiometer is disposed to the pressure sampling line or the drain sampling line. A dissolved oxygen measuring device is disposed to the pressure vessel sampling line or the drain sampling line. With such a constitution, the reactor water can be sampled and analyzed in a state approximate to the conditions in the pressure vessel. In addition, signals from the water quality monitor are inputted to a hydrogen injection amount control device. As a result, the amount of hydrogen injected to primary coolants can be controlled in a state approximate to the conditions in the pressure vessel. (I.S.)

  20. Water simulation of sodium reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grewal, S.S.; Gluekler, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal hydraulic simulation of a large sodium reactor by a scaled water model is examined. The Richardson Number, friction coefficient and the Peclet Number can be closely matched with the water system at full power and the similarity is retained for buoyancy driven flows. The simulation of thermal-hydraulic conditions in a reactor vessel provided by a scaled water experiment is better than that by a scaled sodium test. Results from a correctly scaled water test can be tentatively extrapolated to a full size sodium system

  1. Development of the BWR Dry Core Initial and Boundary Conditions for the SNL XR2 Experiments; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Boiling Water Reactor Experimental Analysis and Model Development for Severe Accidents (BEAMD) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are: (1) the development of a sound quantitative understanding of boiling water reactor (BWR) core melt progression; this includes control blade and channel box effects, metallic melt relocation and possible blockage formation under severe accident conditions, and (2) provision of BWR melt progression modeling capabilities in SCDAP/RELAP5 (consistent with the BWR experimental data base). This requires the assessment of current modeling of BWR core melt progression against the expanding BWR data base. Emphasis is placed upon data from the BWR tests in the German CORA test facility and from the ex-reactor experiments[Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation in BWRs, as well as upon in-reactor data from the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) DF-4 BWR test (conducted in 1986 at SNL). The BEAMD Program is a derivative of the BWR Severe Accident Technology Programs at ORNL. The ORNL BWR programs have studied postulated severe accidents in BWRs and have developed a set of models specific to boiling water reactor response under severe accident conditions. These models, in an experiment-specific format, have been successfully applied to both pretest and posttest analyses of the DF-4 experiment, and the BWR severe fuel damage (SFD) experiments performed in the CORA facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany, resulting in excellent agreement between model prediction and experiment. The ORNL BWR models have provided for more precise predictions of the conditions in the BWR experiments than were previously available. This has provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena for which the experiments are performed. The experiment-specific models, as used in the ORNL DF-4 and CORA BWR experimental analyses, also provide a basis

  2. Basic philosophy of the safety design of the Toshiba boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the safety design of the Toshiba Boiling Water Reactor (TOSBWR) which was created ∼8 years ago. The design concept is intermediate between conventional boiling water reactors (BWRs) and the advanced BWR (ABWR). It utilizes internal pumps and fine motion control rod drive, but the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) configuration is different from both conventional BWRs and the ABWR. The plant output is 1350 MW (electric). The design is based on two important philosophies: the positive cost reduction philosophy and the constant risk philosophy

  3. Characterization of 14C in Swedish light water reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Asa; Aronsson, Per-Olof; Lundgren, Klas; Stenström, Kristina

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a 4-y investigation of 14C in different waste streams of both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Due to the potential impact of 14C on human health, minimizing waste and releases from the nuclear power industry is of considerable interest. The experimental data and conclusions may be implemented to select appropriate waste management strategies and practices at reactor units and disposal facilities. Organic and inorganic 14C in spent ion exchange resins, process water systems, ejector off-gas and replaced steam generator tubes were analyzed using a recently developed extraction method. Separate analysis of the chemical species is of importance in order to model and predict the fate of 14C within process systems as well as in dose calculations for disposal facilities. By combining the results of this investigation with newly calculated production rates, mass balance assessments were made of the 14C originating from production in the coolant. Of the 14C formed in the coolant of BWRs, 0.6-0.8% was found to be accumulated in the ion exchange resins (core-specific production rate in the coolant of a 2,500 MWth BWR calculated to be 580 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The corresponding value for PWRs was 6-10% (production rate in a 2,775 MWth PWR calculated to be 350 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The 14C released with liquid discharges was found to be insignificant, constituting less than 0.5% of the production in the coolant. The stack releases, routinely measured at the power plants, were found to correspond to 60-155% of the calculated coolant production, with large variations between the BWR units.

  4. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1994-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for the management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after-core degradation has occurred) of postulated boiling water reactor (BWR) severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities, and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for further assessment. The first was a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertained to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose was to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies were performed during 1991 and this paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies, and the potential for their success. ((orig.))

  5. Study and characterization of noble metal deposits on similar rusty surfaces to those of the reactor U-1 type BWR of nuclear power station of Laguna Verde; Estudio y caracterizacion de depositos de metales nobles sobre superficies oxidadas similares a las del reactor de la Central de Laguna Verde (CNLV) U1 del tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores S, V. H.

    2011-07-01

    In the present investigation work, were determined the parameters to simulate the conditions of internal oxidation reactor circulation pipes of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz. We used 304l stainless steel cylinders with two faces prepared with abrasive paper of No. 600, with the finality to obtain similar surface to the internal circulation piping nuclear reactor. Oxides was formed within an autoclave (Autoclave MEX-02 unit B), which is a device that simulates the working conditions of the nuclear reactor, but without radiation generated by the fission reaction within the reactor. The oxidation conditions were a temperature of 280 C and pressure of 8 MPa, similar conditions to the reactor operating in nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz, Mexico (BWR conditions), with an average conductivity of 4.58 ms / cm and 2352 ppb oxygen to simulate normal water chemistry NWC. Were obtained deposits of noble metal oxides formed on 304l stainless steel samples, in a 250 ml autoclave at a temperature range of 180 to 200 C. The elements that were used to deposit platinum-rhodium (Pt-Rh) with aqueous Na{sub 2}Pt (OH){sub 6} and Na{sub 3}Rh (NO{sub 2}){sub 6}, Silver (Ag) with an aqueous solution of AgNO{sub 3}, zirconium (Zr) with aqueous Zr O (NO{sub 3}) and ZrO{sub 2}, and zinc (Zn) in aqueous solution of Zn (NO{sub 3}){sub 2} under conditions of normal water chemistry. Also there was the oxidation of 304l stainless steel specimens in normal water chemistry with a solution of Zinc (Zn) (NWC + Zn). Oxidation of the specimens in water chemistry with a solution of zinc (Zn + NWC) was prepared in two ways: within the MEX-02 autoclave unit A in a solution of zinc and a flask at constant temperature in zinc solution. The oxides formed and deposits were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, elemental field analysis and X-ray diffraction. By other hand was evaluated the electrochemical behavior of the oxides

  6. Neutron flux calculation and fluence in the encircling of the core and vessel of a reactor BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez C, E.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main objectives related to the safety of any nuclear power plant, including the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde is to ensure the structural integrity of reactor pressure vessel. To identify and quantify the damage caused by neutron irradiation in the vessel of any nuclear reactor, it is necessary to know both the neutron flux and the neutron fluence that the vessel has been receiving during its operation lifetime, and that the damage observed by mechanical testing are products of microstructural effects induced by neutron irradiation; therefore, it is important the study and prediction of the neutron flux in order to have a better understanding of the damage that these materials are receiving. The calculation here described uses the DORT code, which solves the neutron transport equation in discrete ordinates in two dimensions (x-y, r-θ and r-z), according to a regulatory guide, it should make an approximation of the neutron flux in three dimensions by the so called synthesis method. It is called in that way because it achieves a representation of 3 Dimensional neutron flux combining or summarizing the fluxes calculated by DORT r-θ, r-z and r. This work presents the application of synthesis method, according to Regulatory Guide 1190, to determine the 3 Dimensional fluxes in internal BWR reactor using three different spatial meshes. The results of the neutron flux and fluence, using three different meshes in the directions r, θ and z were compared with results reported in the literature obtaining a difference not larger than 9.61%, neutron flux reached its maximum, 1.58 E + 12 n/cm 2 s, at a height H 4 (239.07 cm) and angle 32.236 o in the core shroud and 4.00 E + 09 n/cm 2 s at a height H 4 and angle 35.27 o in the inner wall of the reactor vessel, positions that are consistent to within ±10% over the ones reported in the literature. (Author)

  7. Advanced steam cycles for light water reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, R.C.

    1975-07-01

    An appraisal of the potential of adding superheat to improve the overall LWR plant cycle performance is presented. The study assesses the economic and technical problems associated with the addition of approximately 500 0 F of superheat to raise the steam temperature to 1000 0 F. The practicality of adding either nuclear or fossil superheat to LWR's is reviewed. The General Electric Company Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) model 238-732 (BWR/6) is chosen as the LWR starting point for this evaluation. The steam conditions of BWR/6 are representative of LWR's. The results of the fossil superheat portion of the evaluation are considered directly applicable to all LWR's. In spite of the potential of a nuclear superheater to provide a substantial boost to the LWR cycle efficiency, nuclear superheat offers little promise of development at this time. There are difficult technical problems to resolve in the areas of superheat fuel design and emergency core cooling. The absence of a developed high integrity, high temperature fuel for operation in the steam/water environment is fundamental to this conclusion. Fossil superheat offers the potential opportunity to utilize fossil fuel supplies more efficiently than in any other mode of central station power generation presently available. Fossil superheat topping cycles evaluated included atmospheric fluidized beds (AFB), pressurized fluidized beds, pressurized furnaces, conventional furnaces, and combined gas/steam turbine cycles. The use of an AFB is proposed as the preferred superheat furnace. Fossil superheat provides a cycle efficiency improvement for the LWR of two percentage points, reduces heat rejection by 15 percent per kWe generated, increases plant electrical output by 54 percent, and burns coal with an incremental net efficiency of approximately 40 percent. This compares with a net efficiency of 36--37 percent which might be achieved with an all-fluidized bed fossil superheat plant design

  8. The effect of chromate on IGSCC in boiling water reactors - a SSRT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullberg, M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of chromate on IGSCC in Type 304 stainless steel was investigated using the Slow Strain Rate Technique (SSRT). It was found that low concentrations of chromate raises the corrosion potential of SS and causes IGSCC. The effect of chromate was compared to that of the main oxidant in BWRs, hydrogen peroxide. Chromate was found to have less tendency than hydrogen peroxide, at one and the same corrosion potential, to cause IGSCC in SSRT tests. This is interpreted as due to chromate being a better anodic inhibitor than hydrogen peroxide. As a consequence, initiation of IGSCC is slower in the presence of chromate. At least during normal water chemistry, chromate is a secondary oxidant in all of the BWR reactor coolant system. The ECP is then determined by the primary oxidant, hydrogen peroxide. Therefore, the chromate transients which may occur in BWR reactor coolant systems should have no significant effect on IGSCC

  9. Fission product model for lattice calculation of high conversion boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, S.; Yoshida, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    1988-01-01

    A high precision fission product model for boiling water reactor (BWR) lattice calculation was developed, which consists of 45 nuclides to be treated explicitly and one nonsaturating pseudo nuclide. This model is applied to a high conversion BWR lattice calculation code. From a study based on a three-energy-group calculation of fission product poisoning due to full fission products and explicitly treated nuclides, the multigroup capture cross sections and the effective fission yields of the pseudo nuclide are determined, which do not depend on fuel types or reactor operating conditions for a good approximation. Apart from nuclear data uncertainties, the model and the derived pseudo nuclide constants would predict the fission product reactivity within an error of 0.1% Δk at high burnup

  10. Light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drevon, G.

    1983-01-01

    This work gives basic information on light-water reactors which is advanced enough for the reader to become familiar with the essential objectives and aspects of their design, their operation and their insertion in the industrial, economic and human environment. In view of the capital role of electric energy in the modern economy a significant place is given to electron-nuclear power stations, particularly those of the type adopted for the French programme. The work includes sixteen chapters. The first chapter relates the history and presents the various applications of light water reactors. The second refers to the general elementary knowledge of reactor physics. The third chapter deals with the high power light-water nuclear power station and thereby introduces the ensuing chapters which, up to and including chapter 13, are devoted to the components and the various aspects of the operation of power stations, in particular safety and the relationship with the environment. Chapter 14 provides information on the reactors adapted to applications other than the generation of electricity on an industrial scale. Chapter 15 shows the extent of the industrial effort devoted to light-water reactors and chapter 16 indicates the paths along which the present work is preparing the future of these reactors. The various chapters have been written to allow for separate consultation. An index of the main technical terms and a bibliography complete the work [fr

  11. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner's Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section

  12. The predicted effectiveness of noble metal treatment at the Chinshan boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh Tsungkuang; Chu Fang; Chang Ching; Huang Chiashen

    2000-01-01

    The technique of noble metal treatment (NMT) available in a form of noble metal cooling (NMC) or noble metal chemical addition (NMCA), was introduced to enhance effectiveness of hydrogen water chemistry. Since it is technically difficult to gain access to an entire primary heat transport circuit (PHTC) of a BWR and monitor variation on electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), a question whether the NMC technology is indeed effective for lowering the ECP of every location in a BWR is not still well understood at the moment. Then, computer modeling is so far the best tool to help investigate effectiveness of the NMT along PHCT of the BWR. Here was discussed on how the computer model was calibrated by using measured chemistry data obtained from No. 2 unit (BWR) in the Kuosheng Plant. The effect of noble metal treatment coupled with hydrogen water chemistry has been quantitatively molded, on a base of two different sets of ECD enhancement data. It was predicted that No. 1 unit in the Chinshan could be protected by noble metal treatment with lower [H 2 ] FW . In the case of competitive enhancing factors for the ECDs of oxygen reduction, hydrogen peroxide reduction, and hydrogen oxidation reactions, HWC had always to be present for noble metal treatment to be effective for protecting a reactor. Otherwise, according to a model calculation based upon the results from Kim's work, the ECP might instead be increased due to the enhanced reduction reaction rate of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, especially in the near core regions. (G.K.)

  13. Safety analysis of thorium-based fuels in the General Electric Standard BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colby, M.J.; Townsend, D.B.; Kunz, C.L.

    1980-06-01

    A denatured (U-233/Th)O 2 fuel assembly has been designed which is energy equivalent to and hardware interchangeable with a modern boiling water reactor (BWR) reference reload assembly. Relative to the reference UO 2 fuel, the thorium fuel design shows better performance during normal and transient reactor operation for the BWR/6 product line and will meet or exceed current safety and licensing criteria. Power distributions are flattened and thermal operating margins are increased by reduced steam void reactivity coefficients caused by U-233. However, a (U-233/Th)O 2 -fueled BWR will likely have reduced operating flexibility. A (U-235/Th)O 2 -fueled BWR should perform similar to a UO 2 -fueled BWR under all operating conditions. A (Pu/Th)O 2 -fueled BWR may have reduced thermal margins and similar accident response and be less stable than a UO 2 -fueled BWR. The assessment is based on comparisions of point model and infinite lattice predictions of various nuclear reactivity parameters, including void reactivity coefficients, Doppler reactivity coefficients, and control blade worths

  14. Heat exchangers in heavy water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    Important features of some major heat exchange components of pressurized heavy water reactors and DHRUVA research reactor are presented. Design considerations and nuclear service classifications are discussed

  15. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    In the field of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics computation there is a need to enhance scientific knowledge in order to develop advanced modelling techniques for new nuclear technologies and concepts, as well as for current nuclear applications Recently developed 'best-estimate' computer code systems for modelling 3-D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients in nuclear cores and for the coupling of core phenomena and system dynamics (PWR, BWR, VVER) need to be compared against each other and validated against results from experiments. International benchmark studies have been set up for the purpose. The present volume describes the specification of such a benchmark. The transient addressed is a turbine trip (TT) in a BWR involving pressurization events in which the coupling between core phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. In addition, the data made available from experiments carried out at the plant make the present benchmark very valuable. The data used are from events at the Peach Bottom 2 reactor (a GE-designed BWR/4). (authors)

  16. U.S. experience with hydrogen water chemistry in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.L.; Head, R.A.; Indig, M.E.; Ruiz, C.P.; Simpson, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogen water chemistry in boiling water reactors is currently being adopted by many utilities in the U.S., with eleven units having completed preimplementation test programs, four units operating permanently with hydrogen water chemistry, and six other units in the process of installing permanent equipment. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking protection is required for the recirculation piping system and other regions of the BWR systems. The present paper explores progress in predicting and monitoring hydrogen water chemistry response in these areas. Testing has shown that impurities can play an important role in hydrogen water chemistry. Evaluation of their effects are also performed. Both computer modeling and in plant measurements show that each plant will respond uniquely to feedwater hydrogen addition. Thus, each plant has its own unique hydrogen requirement for recirculation system protecion. Furthermore, the modeling, and plant measurements show that different regions of the BWR respond differently to hydrogen injection. Thus, to insure protection of components other than the recirculation systems may require more (or less) hydrogen demand than indicated by the recirculation system measurements. In addition, impurities such as copper can play a significant role in establishing hydrogen demand. (Nogami, K.)

  17. Efficient characterization of fuel depletion in boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.

    1980-01-01

    An efficient fuel depletion method for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies has been developed for fuel cycle analysis. A computer program HISTORY based on this method was designed to carry out accurate and rapid fuel burnup calculation for the fuel assembly. It has been usefully employed to study the depletion characteristics of the fuel assemblies for the preparation of nodal code input data and the fuel management study. The adequacy and the effectiveness of the assessment of this method used in HISTORY were demonstrated by comparing HISTORY results with more detailed CASMO results. The computing cost of HISTORY typically has been less than one dollar for the fuel assembly-level depletion calculations over the full life of the assembly, in contrast to more than $1000 for CASMO. By combining CASMO and HISTORY, a large number of expensive CASMO calculations can be replaced by inexpensive HISTORY. For the depletion calculations via CASMO/HISTORY, CASMO calculations are required only for the reference conditions and just at the beginning of life for other cases such as changes in void fraction, control rod condition and temperature. The simple and inexpensive HISTORY is sufficienty accurate and fast to be used in conjunction with CASMO for fuel cycle analysis and some BWR design calculations

  18. Technical support to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the boiling water reactor blowdown heat transfer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, R.E.

    1976-09-01

    Results are presented of studies conducted by Aerojet Nuclear Company (ANC) in FY 1975 to support the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the boiling water reactor blowdown heat transfer (BWR-BDHT) program. The support provided by ANC is that of an independent assessor of the program to ensure that the data obtained are adequate for verification of analytical models used for predicting reactor response to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. The support included reviews of program plans, objectives, measurements, and actual data. Additional activity included analysis of experimental system performance and evaluation of the RELAP4 computer code as applied to the experiments

  19. Thorium in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, G.

    1984-12-01

    Advanced heavy water reactors can provide energy on a global scale beyond the foreseeable future. Their economic and safety features are promising: 1. The theoretical feasibility of the Self Sufficient Equilibrium Thorium (SSET) concept is confirmed by new calculations. Calculations show that the adjuster rod geometry used in natural uranium CANDU reactors is adequate also for SSET if the absorption in the rods is graded. 2. New fuel bundle designs can permit substantially higher power output from a CANDU reactor. The capital cost for fuel, heavy water and mechanical equipment can thereby be greatly reduced. Progress is possible with the traditional fuel material oxide, but the use of thorium metal gives much larger effects. 3. A promising long range possibility is to use pressure tanks instead of pressure tubes. Heat removal from the core is facilitated. Negative temperature and void coefficients provide inherent safety features. Refuelling under power is no longer needed if control by moderator displacement is used. Reduced quality demand on the fuel permits lower fuel costs. The neutron economy is improved by the absence of pressure and clandria tubes and also by the use of radial and axial blankets. A modular seed blanket design can reduce the Pa losses. The experience from construction of tank designs is good e.g. AAgesta, Attucha. It is now also possible to utilize technology from LWR reactors and the implementation of advanced heavy water reactors would thus be easier than HTR or LMFBR systems. (Author)

  20. Corrosion issues in the BWR and their mitigation for plant life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    Corrosion is a major service life limiting mechanism for both pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs). For the BWR, stress corrosion cracking of piping has been the major source of concern where extensive research has led to a number of qualified remedies and currently > 90% of susceptible welds have been mitigated or replaced. Stress corrosion cracking of reactor internals due to the interaction of irradiation, as discussed elsewhere in this conference, is also a possible life limiting phenomenon. This paper focusses on two corrosion phenomena in the BWR which have only recently been identified as impacting the universal goal of BWR life extension: the general corrosion of containment structures and the erosion-corrosion of carbon steel piping

  1. Crud deposition modeling on BWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucuk, Aylin; Cheng, Bo; Potts, Gerald A.; Shiralkar, Bharat; Morgan, Dave; Epperson, Kenny; Gose, Garry

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of boiling water reactor (BWR) system corrosion products (crud) on operating fuel rods has resulted in performance-limiting conditions in a number of plants. The operational impact of performance-limiting conditions involving crud deposition can be detrimental to a BWR operator, resulting in unplanned or increased frequency of fuel inspections, fuel failure and associated radiological consequences, operational restrictions including core power derate and/or forced shutdowns to remove failed fuel, premature discharge of individual bundles or entire reloads, and/or undesirable core design restrictions. To facilitate improved management of crud-related fuel performance risks, EPRI has developed the CORAL (Crud DepOsition Risk Assessment ModeL) tool. This paper presents a summary of the CORAL elements and benchmarking results. Applications of CORAL as a tool for fuel performance risk assessment are also discussed. (author)

  2. Nuclear fuel activity with minor actinides after their useful life in a BWR; Actividad del combustible nuclear con actinidos menores despues de su vida util en un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez C, E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: eduardo.martinez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    Nuclear fuel used in nuclear power reactors has a life cycle, in which it provides energy, at the end of this cycle is withdrawn from the reactor core. This used fuel is known as spent nuclear fuel, a strong problem with this fuel is that when the fuel was irradiated in a nuclear reactor it leaves with an activity of approximately 1.229 x 10{sup 15} Bq. The aim of the transmutation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel is to reduce the activity of high level waste that must be stored in geological repositories and the lifetime of high level waste; these two achievements would reduce the number of necessary repositories, as well as the duration of storage. The present work is aimed at evaluating the activity of a nuclear fuel in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material, first establishing a reference of actinides production in the standard nuclear fuel of uranium at end of its burning in a BWR, and a fuel rod design containing 6% of actinides in an uranium matrix from the enrichment tails is proposed, then 4 standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by 4 actinide bars to evaluate the production and transmutation of the same, finally the reduction of actinide activity in the fuel is evaluated. (Author)

  3. U.S. Department Of Energy's nuclear engineering education research: highlights of recent and current research-II. 7. Hybrid Reactor Simulation and 3-D Information Display of BWR Out-of-Phase Oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Robert; Huang, Zhengyu

    2001-01-01

    The real-time hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability of the Penn State TRIGA reactor has been recently expanded for BWR out-of-phase behavior. Out-of-phase oscillation is a phenomenon that occurs at BWRs. During this kind of event, half of the core can significantly oscillate out of phase with the other half, while the average power reported by the neutronic instrumentation may show a much lower amplitude for the oscillations. The HRS will be used for development and validation of stability monitoring and control techniques as part of an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Engineering Education and Research grant. The Penn State TRIGA reactor is used to simulate BWR fundamental mode power dynamics. The first harmonic mode power, together with detailed thermal hydraulics of boiling channels of both fundamental mode and first harmonic mode, is simulated digitally in real time with a computer. Simulations of boiling channels provide reactivity feedback to the TRIGA reactor, and the TRIGA reactor's power response is in turn fed into the channel simulations and the first harmonic mode power simulation. The combination of reactor power response and the simulated first harmonic power response with spatial distribution functions thus mimics the stability phenomena actually encountered in BWRs. The digital simulations of the boiling channels are performed by solving conservation equations for different regions in the channel with C-MEX S-functions. A fast three-dimensional (3-D) reactor power display of modal BWR power distribution was implemented using MATLAB graphics capability. Fundamental mode, first harmonic, together with the total power distribution over the reactor cross section, are displayed. Because of the large amount of computation for BWR boiling channel simulation and real-time data processing and graph generation, one computer is not sufficient to handle these jobs in the hybrid reactor simulation environment. A new three-computer setup has been

  4. CIRCUS and DESIRE: Experimental facilities for research on natural-circulation-cooled boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de; Haden, T.H.J.J. van der; Zboray, R.; Manera, A.; Mudde, R.F.

    2002-01-01

    At the Delft University of Technology two thermohydraulic test facilities are being used to study the characteristics of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) with natural circulation core cooling. The focus of the research is on the stability characteristics of the system. DESIRE is a test facility with freon-12 as scaling fluid in which one fuel bundle of a natural-circulation BWR is simulated. The neutronic feedback can be simulated artificially. DESIRE is used to study the stability of the system at nominal and beyond nominal conditions. CIRCUS is a full-height facility with water, consisting of four parallel fuel channels and four parallel bypass channels with a common riser or with parallel riser sections. It is used to study the start-up characteristics of a natural-circulation BWR at low pressures and low power. In this paper a description of both facilities is given and the research items are presented. (author)

  5. Photographic and video techniques used in the 1/5-scale Mark I boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.; Lord, D.

    1978-01-01

    The report provides a description of the techniques and equipment used for the photographic and video recordings of the air test series conducted on the 1/5 scale Mark I boiling water reactor (BWR) pressure suppression experimental facility at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) between March 4, 1977, and May 12, 1977. Lighting and water filtering are discussed in the photographic system section and are also applicable to the video system. The appendices contain information from the photographic and video camera logs

  6. European supercritical water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, T.; Starflinger, J.; Marsault, P.; Bittermann, D.; Maraczy, C.; Laurien, E.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, J.A.; Anglart, H.; Andreani, M.; Ruzickova, M.; Toivonen, A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The HPLWR reactor design is an example of a supercritical water cooled reactor. → Cladding material tests have started but materials are not yet satisfactory. → Numerical heat transfer predictions are promising but need further validation. → The research project is most suited for nuclear education and training. - Abstract: The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), how the European Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor is called, is a pressure vessel type reactor operated with supercritical water at 25 MPa feedwater pressure and 500 o C average core outlet temperature. It is designed and analyzed by a European consortium of 10 partners and 3 active supporters from 8 Euratom member states in the second phase of the HPLWR project. Most emphasis has been laid on a core with a thermal neutron spectrum, consisting of small fuel assemblies in boxes with 40 fuel pins each and a central water box to improve the neutron moderation despite the low coolant density. Peak cladding temperatures of the fuel rods have been minimized by heating up the coolant in three steps with intermediate coolant mixing. The containment design with its safety and residual heat removal systems is based on the latest boiling water reactor concept, but with different passive high pressure coolant injection systems to cause a forced convection through the core. The design concept of the steam cycle is indicating the envisaged efficiency increase to around 44%. Moreover, it provides the constraints to design the components of the balance of the plant. The project is accompanied by numerical studies of heat transfer of supercritical water in fuel assemblies and by material tests of candidate cladding alloys, performed by the consortium and supported by additional tests of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. Besides the scientific and technical progress, the HPLWR project turned out to be most successful in training the young generation of nuclear engineers

  7. BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valtonen, K.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to examine TVO-I oscillation incident, which occured in February 22.1987 and to find out safety implications of oscillations in ATWS incidents. Calculations have been performed with RAMONA-3B and TRAB codes. RAMONA-3B is a BWR transient analysis code with three-dimencional neutron kinetics and nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous thermal hydraulics. TRAB code is a one-dimencional BWR transient code which uses methods similar to RAMONA-3B. The results have shown that both codes are capable of analyzing of the oscillation incidents. Both out-of-phase and in-phase oscillations are possible. If the reactor scram fails (ATWS) during oscillations the severe fuel failures are always possible and the reactor core may exceed the prompt criticality

  8. Decomissioning of nuclear reactors - methods for calculation of radionuclide inventories in contaminated BWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, K.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the study has been to develop and demonstrate calculation models for the prediction of radionuclide inventories in contaminated systems in the Nordic BWRs at the time of decommissioning. Oskarshamn 2 was selected as reference reactor for the study. The study is divided in radionuclide inventories of activated corrosion products, and inventories of fission products and actinides from leaking fuel. The study is restricted to contamination outside the reactor pressure vessel. Inventories of activated corrosion products on primary system surfaces were predicted with the ABB Atom computer code BKM-CRUD. The calculations were performed for an extended operation time up to year 2010 for the nuclides Co60, Co58, Zn65 and Mn54. A special set of calculations were also made covering the non-standard nuclides Fe55, Ni59, No63 and Mo93. ABB Atom has carried out a comprehensive program on shutdown dose rates and activity measurements in delivered BWRs. The resulting data base have been used in the study to derive conversion factors for evaluation of contamination levels in secondary systems from the BKM-CRUD results for primary systems. Fission products and actinides were treated by defining two different fuel leakage scenarios. The first one corresponds to a rather stable situation, with an average leakage rate of 1 'standard pin hole' (i.e. 2 MBq/s Xe133). The second scenario means more severe fuel leakage every 10 years (200 MBq/s Xe133). The radioactive inventories in different part of the plant were calculated by combining the surface areas with the calculated contamination levels in the different systems. The uncertainty in total activity inventory has been estimated to not exceed a factor of 2. The uncertainty in total activity inventory has been to not exceed a factor of 2. The estimated inventories in this study has been compared to the results from other studies, and a reasonable agreement was achieved

  9. The interpretation of neutron noise in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, T.M.; Singh, O.P.

    1985-01-01

    Some qualitative results of neutron noise in a boiling water reactor (BWR) are reported. By using one-group theory, it has been shown that the neutron flux fluctuations caused by a distributed source in space, representative of the coolant boiling noise in BWRs, can be considered as made up of two components: The first one, having a global character, is a quickly varying function of frequency and follows the fundamental mode solution in space; the second, called nonglobal (local), follows the spatial variation of noise-source intensity distribution and is independent of frequency for ω γΣ, this component decreases with increasing frequency. The formulation indicates that the global component is quite sensitive to the neutron multiplication factor of the system and, for the local component, the medium behaves like a nonmultiplying one. The global effect is dominant at lower frequencies in a critical system, and the local effect is dominant at higher fre quencies

  10. The BWR owners' group planning guide for life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.K.; Lehnert, D.F.; Locke, R.K.

    1991-01-01

    Extending the operating life of a commercial nuclear power plant has been shown to be economically beneficial to both the utility and the electric customer. As such, many utilities are planning and implementing plant life extension (PLEX) programs. A document has been developed which provides guidance to utilities in formulating a PLEX program plant for one or more boiling water reactor (BWR) plants. The guide has been developed by the BWR Owners' Group Plant Life Extension Committee. The principal bases for this guide were the BWR Pilot and Lead Plant Programs. These programs were used as models to develop the 'base plan' described in this guide. By formulating their program plant utilizing the base plan, utilities will be able to maximize the use of existing evaluations and results. The utility planner will build upon the base plan by adding any tasks or features that are unique to their programs. (author)

  11. Indian experience with radionuclide transport, deposition and decontamination in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimhan, S.V.; Das, P.C.; Lawrence, D.A.; Mathur, P.K.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1983-01-01

    The present generation of water-cooled nuclear reactors uses construction materials chosen with utmost care so that minimum corrosion occurs during the life of the reactor. As interaction between the primary coolant and the construction materials is unavoidable, the coolant is chemically treated to achieve maximum compatibility. First measurements of the chemical and radiochemical composition of the crud present on the in-core and out-of-core primary heat transport system surfaces of a pressurized heavy-water-moderated and cooled reactor (PHWR) are given; then experience in India in the development of a low temperature, one-stage decontaminating formulation for chemical decontamination of the radioactive deposits formed on stainless steel surfaces under BWR conditions is discussed. The effect of the magnitude of the transients in parameters such as reactor power, system temperature, dissolved oxygen content in the coolant, etc. on the nature and migration behaviour of primary heat transport system crud in a PHWR is described. Contributions to radioactive sources and insoluble crud from different primary heat transport system materials are identified and correlated with reactor operations in a PHWR. Man-rem problems faced by nuclear reactors, especially during off-line maintenance, stress the need for reducing the deposited radioactive sources from system surfaces which would otherwise be accessible. Laboratory and on-site experimentation was carried out to effect chemical decontamination on the radioactive deposits formed on the stainless steel surfaces under BWR conditions. Both the reducing and oxidizing formulations were subsequently used in a small-scale, in-plant trial in the clean-up system of a BWR. More than 85% of the deposited 60 Co activity was found to have been removed by the oxidizing formulation. Efforts to develop a decontaminating mixture containing a reducing agent with the help of a circulating loop are in progress in the laboratory. (author)

  12. Three-dimensional model of the thermo-hydrodynamic neutron interaction in the core of water reactors (stationary states)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastrangelo, Victor.

    1977-01-01

    A thermo-hydrodynamic neutron interaction model for permanent working conditions is developed in the case of closed circuits (boiling water reactors) and open circuits (pressurized water reactors). Two numerical convergence acceleration methods are then worked out for the resolution of linear problems by successive iterations. A physical study is devoted to the convergence of the thermo-hydrodynamic neutron interaction process. The model developed is applied to the calculation of the power distribution for the core of a 980 MWe BWR-6 type boiling water power station and to the study of normal and accidental working configurations of the pressurized water core of a 900 MWe PWR-CP1 unit [fr

  13. Hydrogen water chemistry for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.L.; Cowan, R.L.; Kass, J.N.; Law, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) is now a practical countermeasure for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility of reactor structural materials in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). The concept, which involves adding hydrogen to the feedwater to suppress the formation of oxidizing species in the reactor, has been extensively studied in both the laboratory and in several operating plants. The Dresden-2 Unit of Commonwealth Edison Company has completed operation for one full 18-month fuel cycle under HWC conditions. The specifications, procedures, equipment, instrumentation and surveillance programs needed for commercial application of the technology are available now. This paper provides a review of the benefits to be obtained, the side affects, and the special operational considerations needed for commercial implementation of HWC. Technological and management ''Lessons Learned'' from work conducted to date are also described

  14. Domestic manufacturing and reliability improvement of reactor water recirculation equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hidekazu; Oi, Masao; Shida, Toichi; Yokomori, Takashi

    1982-01-01

    The reactor coolant recirculation system is one of the important systems to control the reactor output in BWR nuclear power plants. Its components require high reliability and maintainability as well as controllability. For many Japanese nuclear power plants, recirculation pumps, fluid couplings and others have been imported so far. Hitachi Ltd. has established a domestic manufacturing organization through the development and test of these equipment. The fundamental design conditions for these equipment are the improvement of the rate of utilization of plant facility, the capability to follow load, and output power stability. In this paper, the specifications, the investigation of moment of inertia and the design features of recirculation pumps, driving motors and variable frequency power supply systems are described. The paper also reports on the combination test implemented to evaluate the recirculation system. The combination test includes the test using water rheostat for the power source facility and the loading test for a recirculation pump. The application of those system equipment to an actual plant was analyzed and evaluated on a basis of the test data obtained. The result showed that the equipment can achieve the rate of change of reactor power of 30%/min. Those equipment have been employed for No. 2 reactor plant of the Fukushima No. 2 Nuclear Power Station, the Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  15. Boiling water reactor radiation shielded Control Rod Drive Housing Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baversten, B.; Linden, M.J. [ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Operations, Windsor, CT (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The Control Rod Drive (CRD) mechanisms are located in the area below the reactor vessel in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Specifically, these CRDs are located between the bottom of the reactor vessel and above an interlocking structure of steel bars and rods, herein identified as CRD Housing Supports. The CRD Housing Supports are designed to limit the travel of a Control Rod and Control Rod Drive in the event that the CRD vessel attachement went to fail, allowing the CRD to be ejected from the vessel. By limiting the travel of the ejected CRD, the supports prevent a nuclear overpower excursion that could occur as a result of the ejected CRD. The Housing Support structure must be disassembled in order to remove CRDs for replacement or maintenance. The disassembly task can require a significant amount of outage time and personnel radiation exposure dependent on the number and location of the CRDs to be changed out. This paper presents a way to minimize personal radiation exposure through the re-design of the Housing Support structure. The following paragraphs also delineate a method of avoiding the awkward, manual, handling of the structure under the reactor vessel during a CRD change out.

  16. Decay profiles of {beta} and {gamma} for a radionuclide inventory in equilibrium cycle of a BWR type reactor; Perfiles de decaimiento de radiacion {beta} y {gamma} para un inventario de radionuclidos en ciclo de equilibrio de un reactor tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaices, M.; Sandoval, S.; Ovando, R. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas. Gerencia de Energia Nuclear, Av. Reforma 113 Col. Palmira. 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: sal@iie.org.mx

    2007-07-01

    Presently work the {beta} and {gamma} radiation decay profiles for a radionuclides inventory in equilibrium cycle of a BWR type reactor is presented. The profiles are presented in terms of decay in the activity of the total inventory as well as of the chemical groups that conform the inventory. In the obtaining of the radionuclides inventory in equilibrium cycle the ORIGEN2 code, version 1 was used, which simulates fuel burnup cycles and it calculates the evolution of the isotopic composition as a result of the burnt one, irradiation and decay of the nuclear fuel. It can be observed starting from the results that the decrease in the activity for the initial inventory and the different chemical groups that conform it is approximately proportional to the base 10 logarithm of the time for the first 24 hours of having concluded the burnt one. It can also be observed that the chemical groups that contribute in more proportion to the total activity of the inventory are the lanthanides-actinides and the transition metals, with 39% and 28%, respectively. The groups of alkaline earth metals, halogens, metalloids, noble gases and alkaline metals, contribute with percentages that go from the 8 to 5%. The groups that less they contribute to the total activity of the inventory they are the non metals and semi-metals with smaller proportions that 1%. The chemical groups that more contribute to the energy of {beta} and {gamma} radiation its are the transition metals and the lanthanides-actinides with a change in the order of importance at the end of the 24 hours period. The case of the halogens is of relevance for the case of the {gamma} radiation energy due that occupying the very near third site to the dimensions of the two previous groups. Additionally, the decay in the activity for the total inventory and the groups that conform it can be simulated by means of order 6 polynomials or smaller than describe its behavior appropriately. The results presented in this work, coupled

  17. The European pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leny, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The present state of development of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) is outlined. During the so-called harmonization phase, the French and German utilities drew up their common requirements and evaluated the reactor concept developed until then with respect to these requirements. A main result of the harmonization phase was the issue, in September 1993, of the 'EPR Conceptual Safety Feature Review File' to be jointly assessed by the safety authorities in France and Germany. The safety objectives to be met by the EPR are specified in the second part of the paper, and some details of the primary and secondary side safety systems are given. (orig.) [de

  18. Investigation and evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking in piping of light water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    In 1975, a Pipe Cracking Study Group, established by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), reviewed intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Bioling Water Reactors (BWRs) and issued a report. During 1978, IGSCC was reported for the first time in large-diameter piping (> 20 in.) in a BWR in Germany. This discovery, together with the reported questions concerning the interpretation of ultrasonic inspections, led to the activation of a new Pipe Crack Study Group (PCSG) by USNRC. The charter of the new PCSG was expanded: (1) to include review of potential for stress-corrosion cracking in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) as well as BWRs, (2) to examine operating experience in foreign reactors relevant to IGSCC, and (3) to study five specific questions. The PCSG limited the scope of the study to BWR and PWR piping runs and safe ends attached to the reactor pressure vessel. Not considered were components such as the reactor pressure vessel, pumps, valves, steam generators, large steam turbines, etc. Throughout this report, as well as in the title, the safe ends are arbitrarily defined as piping

  19. BWR simulation in a stationary state for the evaluation of fuel cell design; Simulacion de un reactor BWR en estado estacionario para la evaluacion del diseno de celdas de combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes T, J. L.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia del C, R.; Castillo M, A., E-mail: joseluis.montes@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper the simulation of a BWR in order to evaluate the performance of a set of fuel assemblies under stationary state in three dimensions (3-D) is presented. 15 cases selected from a database containing a total of 18225 cases are evaluated. The main selection criteria were based on the results of the design phase of the power cells in two dimensions (2-D) and 3-D initial study. In 2-D studies the parameters that were used to qualify and select the designs were basically the local power peaking factor and neutron multiplication factor of each fuel cell. In the initial 3-D study variables that defined the quality of results, and from which the selection was realized, are the margins to thermal limits of reactor operation and the value of the effective multiplication factor at the end of cycle operation. From the 2-D and 3-D results of the studies described a second 3-D study was realized, where the optimizations of the fuel reload pattern was carried out. The results presented in this paper correspond to this second 3-D study. It was found that the designs of the fuel cell they had a similar behavior to those provided by the fuel supplier of reference BWR. Particularly it noted the impact of reload pattern on the cold shut down margin. An estimate of the operation costs of reference cycle analyzed with each one designed reload batch was also performed. As a result a positive difference (gain) up to 10,347 M/US D was found. (Author)

  20. Simulation of the operational monitoring of a BWR with Simulate-3; Simulacion del seguimiento operacional de un reactor BWR con Simulate-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez F, J. O.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: ace.jo.cu@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    This work was developed in order to describe the methodology for calculating the fuel burned of nuclear power reactors throughout the duration of their operating cycle and for each fuel reload. In other words, simulate and give monitoring to the main operation parameters of sequential way along its operation cycles. For this particular case, the operational monitoring of five consecutive cycles of a reactor was realized using the information reported by their processes computer. The simulation was performed with the Simulate-3 software and the results were compared with those of the process computer. The goal is to get the fuel burned, cycle after cycle for obtain the state conditions of the reactor needed for the fuel reload analyses, stability studies and transients analysis, and the development of a methodology that allows to manage and resolve similar cases for future fuel cycles of the nuclear power plant and explore the various options offered by the simulator. (Author)

  1. Behavior to the fracture of an AISI 304 stainless steel sensitized in BWR reactor conditions (288 degrees Centigrade and 80 Kg/cm2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez C, R.; Diaz S, A.; Garcia R, R.; Aguilar T, A.; Gachuz M, M.; Arganis J, C.; Merino C, J.

    1999-01-01

    It is a knew fact that ductility of a lot of structural alloys can be deteriorated by the environment effect which are exposed, and that their consequent embrittlement can put in doubt the safety of their functioning; such is the case of austenitic stainless steels used in internal components of the BWR type reactors which not only is subjected to the effect combined of the aggressive environment which surround it (pressure, temperature, corrosion potential, conductivity medium, local state of efforts, etc.), but also to the action of present neutron radiation, manifesting microstructural changes which are reflected in the augmentation of its susceptibility to the intergranular cracking, phenomena generally known as IASCC ''Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking''. Once appeared the cracking in the material, the useful life of a component is limited by the rapidity to growth of these cracking, making necessary evaluations which can to predict its behavior, therefore the present work shows the preliminary results for determining the behavior to the fracture of an AISI 304 stainless steel sensitized, in a dynamic recirculation circuit which allows to simulate the operation conditions of a BWR reactor (288 Centigrade and 80 kg/cm 2 ). (Author)

  2. Materials behavior in alternate (hydrogen) water chemistry in the Ringhals-1 boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Cubicciotti, D.; Trolle, M.

    1986-01-01

    In-plant studies on the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized austenitic stainless steel (SS) have been performed at the Swedish Ringhals-1 boiling water reactor (BWR). The studies have covered the present [full-temperature (normal)] water chemistry (PWC) and the alternate (primary) water chemistry (AWC) with hydrogen addition. The test techniques applied were constant extension rate testing (CERT) and electrochemical potential (ECP) measurements. The program was covered by extensive environment monitoring. The results verify earlier laboratory studies which show that sensitized austenitic SS is susceptible to IGSCC in PWC, but not in AWC. Other pressure-bearing BWR construction materials are not adversely affected by AWC. The boundary conditions in Ringhals-1 have been established for an AWC, which is defined as an environment that does not produce IGSCC in sensitized SS. The results are compared with a similar program at Dresden-2, and the points of agreement and discordance in the results are discussed. The relevance of ECP measurements for the control of AWC is discussed

  3. A BWR 24-month cycle analysis using multicycle techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel cycle design analyses have become increasingly challenging in the past several years. As utilities continue to seek improved capacity factors, reduced power generation costs, and reduced outage costs, longer cycle lengths and fuel design optimization become important considerations. Accurate multicycle analysis techniques are necessary to determine the viability of fuel designs and cycle operating strategies to meet reactor operating requirements, e.g., meet thermal and reactivity margin constraints, while minimizing overall fuel cycle costs. Siemens Power Corporation (SPC), Nuclear Division, has successfully employed multi-cycle analysis techniques with realistic rodded cycle depletions to demonstrate equilibrium fuel cycle performance in 24-month cycles. Analyses have been performed by a BWR/5 reactor, at both rated and uprated power conditions

  4. Parametric tests of the effects of water chemistry impurities on corrosion of Zr-alloys under simulated BWR condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, S; Ito, K [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co. Ltd., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Lin, C C [GE Nucklear Energy (United States); Cheng, B [Electric Power Research Inst. (United States); Ikeda, T [Toshiba Corp. (Japan); Oguma, M [Hitachi, Ltd (Japan); Takei, T [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Vitanza, C; Karlsen, T M [Institutt for Energiteknikk, Halden (Norway). OECD Halden Reaktor Projekt

    1997-02-01

    The Halden BWR corrosion test loop was constructed to evaluate the impact of water chemistry variables, heat flux and boiling condition on corrosion performance of Zr-alloys in a simulated BWR environment. The loop consists of two in-core rigs, one for testing fuel rod segments and the other for evaluating water chemistry variables utilizing four miniautoclaves. Ten coupon specimens are enclosed in each miniautoclave. The Zr-alloys for the test include Zircaloy-2 having different nodular corrosion resistance and five new alloys. The first and second of the six irradiation tests planned in this program were completed. Post-irradiation examination of those test specimens have shown that the test loop is capable of producing nodular corrosion on the fuel rod cladding tested under the reference chemistry condition. The miniautoclave tests showed that nodular corrosion could be formed without flux and boiling under some water chemistry conditions and the new alloys, generally, had higher corrosion resistance than the Zircaloy in high oxygen environments. (author). 5 refs, 4 figs, 5 tabs.

  5. Decay profiles of β and γ for a radionuclide inventory in equilibrium cycle of a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaices, M.; Sandoval, S.; Ovando, R.

    2007-01-01

    Presently work the β and γ radiation decay profiles for a radionuclides inventory in equilibrium cycle of a BWR type reactor is presented. The profiles are presented in terms of decay in the activity of the total inventory as well as of the chemical groups that conform the inventory. In the obtaining of the radionuclides inventory in equilibrium cycle the ORIGEN2 code, version 1 was used, which simulates fuel burnup cycles and it calculates the evolution of the isotopic composition as a result of the burnt one, irradiation and decay of the nuclear fuel. It can be observed starting from the results that the decrease in the activity for the initial inventory and the different chemical groups that conform it is approximately proportional to the base 10 logarithm of the time for the first 24 hours of having concluded the burnt one. It can also be observed that the chemical groups that contribute in more proportion to the total activity of the inventory are the lanthanides-actinides and the transition metals, with 39% and 28%, respectively. The groups of alkaline earth metals, halogens, metalloids, noble gases and alkaline metals, contribute with percentages that go from the 8 to 5%. The groups that less they contribute to the total activity of the inventory they are the non metals and semi-metals with smaller proportions that 1%. The chemical groups that more contribute to the energy of β and γ radiation its are the transition metals and the lanthanides-actinides with a change in the order of importance at the end of the 24 hours period. The case of the halogens is of relevance for the case of the γ radiation energy due that occupying the very near third site to the dimensions of the two previous groups. Additionally, the decay in the activity for the total inventory and the groups that conform it can be simulated by means of order 6 polynomials or smaller than describe its behavior appropriately. The results presented in this work, coupled to a distribution model

  6. Final air test results for the 1/5-scale Mark I boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, E.K.; Lai, W.

    1977-01-01

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a boiling-water reactor (BWR) power plant has never occurred. However, because this type of accident is particularly severe, it is used as a principal basis for design. During a hypothetical LOCA in a Mark I BWR, air followed by steam is injected from a drywell into a toroidal wetwell about half-filled with water. A series of consistent, versatile, and accurate air-water tests simulating LOCA conditions was completed in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory 1/5-Scale Mark I BWR Pressure Suppression Experimental Facility. Results from this test series were used to quantify the vertical loading function and to study the associated fluid dynamic phenomena. Detailed histories of vertical loads on the wetwell are shown. In particular, variations of hydrodynamic-generated vertical loads with changes in drywell pressurization rate, downcomer submergence, and the vent-line loss coefficient are established. Initial drywell overpressure, which partially preclears the downcomers of water, substantially reduces the peak vertical loads. Scaling relationships, developed from dimensional analysis and verified by bench-top experiments, allow the 1/5-scale results to be applied to a full-scale BWR power plant. This analysis leads to dimensionless groupings which are invariant. These groupongs show that if water is used as the working fluid, the magnitude of the forces in a scaled facility is reduced by the cube of the scale factor; the time when these forces occur is reduced by the square root of the scale factor

  7. Calculation of the neutron flux and fluence in the covering of the nucleus and the vessel of a BWR; Calculo del flujo neutronico y fluencia en la envolvente del nucleo y la vasija de un reactor nuclear BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez C, E.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Longoria G, L. C., E-mail: evalle@esfm.ipn.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    One of the main objectives related with the safety in any nuclear power plant, including the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, is to guarantee the structural integrity of the pressure vessel of the reactor. To identify and quantifying the damage caused be neutron irradiation in the vessel of any nuclear reactor, is necessary to know as much the neutron flux as the fluence that it has been receiving during their time of operation life, since the observables damages by means of tests mechanics are products of micro-structural effects, induced by neutron irradiation, therefore, is important the study and prediction of the neutron flux to have a better knowledge of the damage that are receiving these materials. In our calculation the code DORT was used, which solves the transport equation in discreet coordinates and in two dimensions (x-y, r-{theta} and r-z), in accord to the regulator guide, it requires to make and approach of the neutron flux in three dimensions by means of the Synthesis Method. Whit this method is possible to achieve a representation of the flux in 3D combining or synthesizing the calculated fluxes by DORT code in r-{theta}, r-z and r. In this work the application of the Synthesis Method is presented, according to the Regulator Guide 1.190, to determine the fluxes 3D in the interns of a BWR using three different space meshes. (Author)

  8. The safety of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershagen, B.

    1986-04-01

    The book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The central part of the book is devoted to methods and results of safety analysis. Some significant events are described, notably the Three Mile Island accident. The book concludes with a chapter on the PIUS principle of inherent reactor safety as applied to the SECURE type of reactor developed in Sweden. (G.B.)

  9. Assessment of the Prony's method for BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier; Castillo-Duran, Rogelio; Palacios-Hernandez, Javier C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This paper describes a method to determine the degree of stability of a BWR. → Performance comparison between Prony's and common AR techniques is presented. → Benchmark data and actual BWR transient data are used for comparison. → DR and f results are presented and discussed. → The Prony's method is shown to be a robust technique for BWR stability. - Abstract: It is known that Boiling Water Reactors are susceptible to present power oscillations in regions of high power and low coolant flow, in the power-flow operational map. It is possible to fall in one of such instability regions during reactor startup, since both power and coolant flow are being increased but not proportionally. One other possibility for falling into those areas is the occurrence of a trip of recirculation pumps. Stability monitoring in such cases can be difficult, because the amount or quality of power signal data required for calculation of the stability key parameters may not be enough to provide reliable results in an adequate time range. In this work, the Prony's Method is presented as one complementary alternative to determine the degree of stability of a BWR, through time series data. This analysis method can provide information about decay ratio and oscillation frequency from power signals obtained during transient events. However, so far not many applications in Boiling Water Reactors operation have been reported and supported to establish the scope of using such analysis for actual transient events. This work presents first a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results obtained by Prony's method and those results obtained by the participants of the Forsmark 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactor Stability Benchmark using diverse techniques. Then, a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results is performed for four real BWR transient event data, using Prony's method and two other techniques based on an autoregressive modeling. The four

  10. A decision support system for maintenance management of a boiling-water reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, J.H.; Ray, A.; Levin, S.

    1996-01-01

    This article reports the concept and development of a prototype expert system to serve as a decision support tool for maintenance of boiling-water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The code of the expert system makes use of the database derived from the two BWR units operated by the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company in Berwick, Pennsylvania. The operations and maintenance information from a large number of plant equipment and sub-systems that must be available for emergency conditions and in the event of an accident is stored in the database of the expert system. The ultimate goal of this decision support tool is to identify the relevant Technical Specifications and management rules for shutting down any one of the plant sub-systems or removing a component from service to support maintenance. 6 refs., 7 figs

  11. Boiling water reactor containment modeling and analysis at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, E.E. III; Wilson, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Under the auspices of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, severe accidents are being studied at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The boiling water reactor (BWR) studies have focused on postulated anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) accidents which might contribute to severe core damage or containment failure. A summary of the containment studies is presented in the context of the analytical tools (codes) used, typical transient simulation results and the need for prototypical containment data. All of these are related to current and future analytical capabilities. It is shown that torus temperatures during the ATWS depart from limiting conditions for BWR T-quencher operation, outside of which stable steam condensation has not been proven

  12. NDE and fracture mechanics evaluation of bottom-head weld indications in a BWR reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickstad, B [Swedish Plant Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1988-12-31

    This document deals with the Non Destructive Examination (NDE) and the fracture mechanics evaluation of bottom head welds in a BWR. The NDE equipment is presented, together with the geometry of evaluated flaw regions. After the fracture mechanics evaluation, it appeared that the plant results fulfilled the usual conditions, and the plant was allowed to operate one more year. (TEC).

  13. New design procedure development of future reactor critical power estimation. (1) Practical design-by-analysis method for BWR critical power design correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Mitsutake, Toru

    2007-01-01

    For present BWR fuels, the full mock-up thermal-hydraulic test, such as the critical power measurement test, pressure drop measurement test and so on, has been needed. However, the full mock-up test required the high costs and large-scale test facility. At present, there are only a few test facilities to perform the full mock-up thermal-hydraulic test in the world. Moreover, for future BWR, the bundle size tends to be larger, because of reducing the plant construction costs and minimizing the routine check period. For instance, AB1600, improved ABWR, was proposed from Toshiba, whose bundle size was 1.2 times larger than the conventional BWR fuel size. It is too expensive and far from realistic to perform the full mock-up thermal-hydraulic test for such a large size fuel bundle. The new design procedure is required to realize the large scale bundle design development, especially for the future reactor. Therefore, the new design procedure, Practical Design-by-Analysis (PDBA) method, has been developed. This new procedure consists of the partial mock-up test and numerical analysis. At present, the subchannel analysis method based on three-fluid two-phase flow model only is a realistic choice. Firstly, the partial mock-up test is performed, for instance, the 1/4 partial mock-up bundle. Then, the first-step critical power correlation coefficients are evaluated with the measured data. The input data, such as the spacer effect model coefficient, on the subchannel analysis are also estimated with the data. Next, the radial power effect on the critical power of the full-bundle size was estimated with the subchannel analysis. Finally, the critical power correlation is modified by the subchannel analysis results. In the present study, the critical power correlation of the conventional 8x8 BWR fuel was developed with the PDBA method by 4x4 partial mock-up tests and the subchannel analysis code. The accuracy of the estimated critical power was 3.8%. The several themes remain to

  14. A non-linear reduced order methodology applicable to boiling water reactor stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prill, Dennis Paul

    2013-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic coupling between power, flow rate and density, intensified by neutronics feedback are the main drivers of boiling water reactor (BWR) stability behavior. High-power low-flow conditions in connection with unfavorable power distributions can lead the BWR system into unstable regions where power oscillations can be triggered. This important threat to operational safety requires careful analysis for proper understanding. Analyzing an exhaustive parameter space of the non-linear BWR system becomes feasible with methodologies based on reduced order models (ROMs), saving computational cost and improving the physical understanding. Presently within reactor dynamics, no general and automatic prediction of high-dimensional ROMs based on detailed BWR models are available. In this thesis a systematic self-contained model order reduction (MOR) technique is derived which is applicable for several classes of dynamical problems, and in particular to BWRs of any degree of details. Expert knowledge can be given by operational, experimental or numerical transient data and is transfered into an optimal basis function representation. The methodology is mostly automated and provides the framework for the reduction of various different systems of any level of complexity. Only little effort is necessary to attain a reduced version within this self-written code which is based on coupling of sophisticated commercial software. The methodology reduces a complex system in a grid-free manner to a small system able to capture even non-linear dynamics. It is based on an optimal choice of basis functions given by the so-called proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). Required steps to achieve reliable and numerical stable ROM are given by a distinct calibration road-map. In validation and verification steps, a wide spectrum of representative test examples is systematically studied regarding a later BWR application. The first example is non-linear and has a dispersive character

  15. Automated procedure for selection of optimal refueling policies for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, B.I.; Zolotar, B.; Weisman, J.

    1979-01-01

    An automated procedure determining a minimum cost refueling policy has been developed for light water reactors. The procedure is an extension of the equilibrium core approach previously devised for pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Use of 1 1/2-group theory has improved the accuracy of the nuclear model and eliminated tedious fitting of albedos. A simple heuristic algorithm for locating a good starting policy has materially reduced PWR computing time. Inclusion of void effects and use of the Haling principle for axial flux calculations extended the nuclear model to boiling water reactors (BWRs). A good initial estimate of the refueling policy is obtained by recognizing that a nearly uniform distribution of reactivity provides low-power peaking. The initial estimate is improved upon by interchanging groups of four assemblies and is subsequently refined by interchanging individual assemblies. The method yields very favorable results, is simpler than previously proposed BWR fuel optimization schemes, and retains power cost as the objective function

  16. Feasibility assessment of burnup credit in the criticality analysis of shipping casks with boiling water reactor spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-08-01

    Considerable interest in the allowance of reactivity credit for the exposure history of power reactor fuel currently exists. This ''burnup credit'' issue has the potential to greatly reduce risk and cost when applied to the design and certification of spent fuel casks used for transportation and storage. Recently, analyses have demonstrated the technical feasibility and estimated the risk and economic incentives for allowing burnup credit in pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel shipping cask applications. This report summarizes the extension of the previous PWR technical feasibility assessment to boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel. This feasibility analysis aims to apply simple methods that adequately characterize the time-dependent isotopic compositions of typical BWR fuel. An initial analysis objective was to identify a simple and reliable method for characterizing BWR spent fuel. Two different aspects of fuel characterization were considered:l first, the generation of burn- up dependent material interaction probabilities; second, the prediction of material inventories over time (depletion). After characterizing the spent fuel at various stages of exposure and decay, three dimensional (3-D) models for an infinite array of assemblies and, in several cases, infinite arrays of assemblies in a typical shipping cask basket were analyzed. Results for assemblies without a basket provide reactivity control requirements as a function of burnup and decay, while results including the basket allow assessment of typical basket configurations to provide sufficient reactivity control for spent BWR fuel. Resulting basket worths and reactivity trends over time are then evaluated to determine whether burnup credit is needed and feasible in BWR applications

  17. Hydrogen peroxide and radiation water chemistry of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, E.; Watanabe, A.; Endo, M.; Takahashi, M.; Karasawa, H.

    1991-01-01

    G-values and rate constants at elevated temperature are reviewed and updated for computer simulation of water radiolysis in BWRs. Quantitative relationship between g-values of H 2 and OH was found out to govern numerically the radiolytic environment in the BWR primary system. Thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was measured in stagnant water in a quartz cell and the rate constant was determined at 2.4 x 10 -7 s -1 with the activation energy of 53.3 kJ/mol. Behaviors of hydrogen peroxide under HWC simulated with updated variables were consistent with plant observation at Forsmark 1 and 2. The most likely decomposition scheme of hydrogen peroxide at surface was identified as H 2 O 2 → H + HO 2 . Based on the surface decomposition process, actual level of hydrogen peroxide was estimated at 200-400 ppb under NWC condition from measured at BWR sampling stations. The estimation was consistent with the numerical simulation of BWR water radiolysis with updated variables. (author)

  18. Optimization of Boiling Water Reactor Loading Pattern Using Two-Stage Genetic Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2002-01-01

    A new two-stage optimization method based on genetic algorithms (GAs) using an if-then heuristic rule was developed to generate optimized boiling water reactor (BWR) loading patterns (LPs). In the first stage, the LP is optimized using an improved GA operator. In the second stage, an exposure-dependent control rod pattern (CRP) is sought using GA with an if-then heuristic rule. The procedure of the improved GA is based on deterministic operators that consist of crossover, mutation, and selection. The handling of the encoding technique and constraint conditions by that GA reflects the peculiar characteristics of the BWR. In addition, strategies such as elitism and self-reproduction are effectively used in order to improve the search speed. The LP evaluations were performed with a three-dimensional diffusion code that coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic models. Strong axial heterogeneities and constraints dependent on three dimensions have always necessitated the use of three-dimensional core simulators for BWRs, so that optimization of computational efficiency is required. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated by successfully generating LPs for an actual BWR plant in two phases. One phase is only LP optimization applying the Haling technique. The other phase is an LP optimization that considers the CRP during reactor operation. In test calculations, candidates that shuffled fresh and burned fuel assemblies within a reasonable computation time were obtained

  19. Artificial neural networks versus conventional methods for boiling water reactor stability monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    1995-01-01

    The application of an artificial neural network (ANN) for boiling water reactor (BWR) stability monitoring was studied. A three-layer perceptron was trained on synthetic autocorrelation functions to estimate the decay ratio and the resonance frequency from measured neutron noise. Training of the ANN was improved by adding noise to the training patterns and by applying nonconventional error definitions in the generalized delta rule. The performance of the developed ANN was compared with those of conventional stability monitoring techniques. Explicit care was taken for generating unbiased test data. It is found that the trained ANN is capable of monitoring the stability of the Dodewaard BWR for four specific cases. By comparing properties such as the false alarm ratio, the alarm failure ratio, and the average time to alarm, it is shown that it performs worse than model-based methods in stability monitoring of exact second-order systems but that it is more robust (better resistant to corruptions of the input data and to deviations of the system at issue from an exact second-order system) than other methods. The latter explains its good performance on the Dodewaard BWR and is promising for the application of an ANN for stability monitoring of other reactors and for other operating conditions

  20. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  1. Advances in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Advances in Heavy Water Reactors was organized by the IAEA in the framework of the activities of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) and hosted by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Sixty-five participants from nine countries (Canada, Czech Republic, India, German, Japan, Republic of Korea, Pakistan, Romania and USA) and the IAEA attended the TCM. Thirty-four papers were presented and discussed in five sessions. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. All recommendations which were addressed by the participants of the Technical Committee meeting to the IWGATWR have been submitted to the 5th IWGATWR meeting in September 1993. They were reviewed and used as input for the preparation of the IAEA programme in the area of advanced water cooled reactors. This TCM was mainly oriented towards advances in HWRs and on projects which are now in the design process and under discussion. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Study on thermal performance and margins of BWR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stosic, Zoran

    1999-01-01

    This paper contributes to developing a methodology of predicting and analyzing thermal performance and margins of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies under conditions of reaching high quality Boiling Crisis and subsequent post-dryout thermal hydraulics causing temperature excursion of fuel cladding. Operational margins against dryout and potential for increasing fuel performance with appropriate benefits are discussed. The philosophy of modeling with its special topics are demonstrated on the HECHAN (HEated CHannel ANalyzer) model as the state-of-art for thermal-hydraulics analysis of BWR fuel assemblies in pre- and post-dryout two-phase flow regimes. The scope of further work either being or has to be performed concerning implementation of new physical aspects, including domain extension of HECHAN model applications to the Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs), is discussed. Finally, a comprehensive overview of the literature dealing with development of the model is given. (author)

  3. Level 2 PRA for a German BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassen, F.; Rapp, W.; Tietsch, W.; Roess, P.

    2007-01-01

    A concept for a Level 2 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (L2 PRA) for a German Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) has been developed taking into account the role of L2 PRA within the German regulatory landscape. According to this concept, a plant specific evaluation of the severe accident phenomenology as well as analyses of the accident progression for the severe accident scenarios has been performed. Furthermore a plant specific MELCOR 1.8.6 model has been developed and special MELCOR source term calculations have been performed for the different release paths. This paper will present examples from the different areas described above. (author)

  4. Novel modular natural circulation BWR design and safety evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Shi, Shanbin; Yang, Won Sik; Wu, Zeyun; Rassame, Somboon; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Introduction of BWR-type natural circulation small modular reactor preliminary design (NMR-50). • Design of long fuel cycle length for the NMR-50. • Design of double passive safety systems for the NMR-50. • RELAP5 analyses of design basis accidents for the NMR-50. - Abstract: The Purdue NMR (Novel Modular Reactor) represents a BWR-type small modular reactor with a significantly reduced reactor pressure vessel (RPV) height. Specifically, it has one third the height of a conventional BWR RPV with an electrical output of 50 MWe. The preliminary design of the NMR-50 including reactor, fuel cycle, and safety systems is described and discussed. The improved neutronics design of the NMR-50 extends the fuel cycle length up to 10 years. The NMR-50 is designed with double passive engineering safety system, which is intended to withstand a prolonged station black out with loss of ultimate heat sink accident such as experienced at Fukushima. In order to evaluate the safety features of the NMR-50, two representative design basis accidents, i.e. main steam line break (MSLB) and bottom drain line break (BDLB), are simulated by using the best-estimate thermal–hydraulic code RELAP5. The RPV water inventory, containment pressure, and the performance of engineering safety systems are investigated for about 33 h after the initiation of the accidents

  5. A study on the feasibility of minor actinides in BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Waris; Budiono

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary study on the feasibility of actinides minor (MA) recycling without mixing them with plutonium in boiling water reactor (BWR) has been carried out. The results show that increasing of fissile MA content in mixed oxide fuel (MOX) and/or reducing void fraction can enlarge the effective multiplication factor at the beginning of cycle, but the reactor still can not obtain its criticality condition. Furthermore, dropping the void fraction results in higher reactivity swing and therefore plummeting the safety factor of the reactor. (author)

  6. LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, R.F.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-09-17

    A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods held in a geometrical arrangement between end caps of the tubes. The end caps are apertured to permit passage of the coolant water through the tubes and the fuel elements are aluminum clad to prevent corrosion. The tubes are hexagonally arranged in the center of the tank providing an amulus between the core and tank wall which is filled with water to serve as a reflector. In use, the entire pit and tank are filled with water in which is circulated during operation by coming in at the bottom of the tank, passing upwardly through the grid member and fuel tubes and carried off near the top of the pit, thereby picking up the heat generated by the fuel elements during the fission thereof. With this particular design the light water coolant can also be used as the moderator when the uranium is enriched by fissionable isotope to an abundance of U/sup 235/ between 0.78% and 2%.

  7. Tritium in liquid phase in a BWR-5 like Laguna Verde; Tritio en fase liquida en un BWR-5 como Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijerina S, F.; Vargas A, A.; Cardenas J, J., E-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Subgerencia de Ingenieria, Carretera Veracruz-Medellin Km 7.5, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In boiling water reactors (BWR), the tritium (H{sub 3}) takes place mainly as a result of ternary fissions in the nuclear reactors, of those which 75% are in gaseous form and 25% in liquid form. In the liquid phase, the tritium is transported to the pipes of the primary coolant toward condensed tanks or tanks of drainage excesses of radioactive equipment, located in external areas of a BWR, as well as to the processes of radioactive wastes to be able to be directed to the liquid effluents. For that reason, is necessary to know the possible routes of the transport and processes of the tritium in a BWR to control this radioisotope in the site of the event of leaks in equipment s and buried pipes, avoiding that emigrates toward underground flowing and an impact to the environment and to the people in general. (Author)

  8. Predicted Variations of Water Chemistry in the Primary Coolant Circuit of a Supercritical Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Wang, Mei-Ya; Liu, Hong-Ming; Lee, Min

    2012-09-01

    except for the core channel and the upper plenum. The [O 2 ] at the lower water rod was higher than that at the middle water rod due to the decomposition of H 2 O 2 . The lower plenum exhibited a high [O 2 ] simply because the [O 2 ] in the lower water rod region was higher. In the core channel region, the [H 2 O 2 ] slowly increased as the coolant moved upward, and it turned into a drastic increase as the coolant became supercritical. Although the [H 2 ] in all selected regions was higher than that in a commercial boiling water reactor (BWR), the [H 2 O 2 ] and [O 2 ] were even higher those in a BWR. In summary, it was predicted that the coolant environment in an SCWR could be highly oxidizing, and the structural components would therefore suffer from a more serious corrosion problem than those in a commercial BWR. (authors)

  9. CECP, Decommissioning Costs for PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierschbach, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The Cost Estimating Computer Program CECP, designed for use on an IBM personal computer or equivalent, was developed for estimating the cost of decommissioning boiling water reactor (BWR) and light-water reactor (PWR) power stations to the point of license termination. 2 - Method of solution: Cost estimates include component, piping, and equipment removal costs; packaging costs; decontamination costs; transportation costs; burial volume and costs; and manpower staffing costs. Using equipment and consumables costs and inventory data supplied by the user, CECP calculates unit cost factors and then combines these factors with transportation and burial cost algorithms to produce a complete report of decommissioning costs. In addition to costs, CECP also calculates person-hours, crew-hours, and exposure person-hours associated with decommissioning. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program is designed for a specific waste charge structure. The waste cost data structure cannot handle intermediate waste handlers or changes in the charge rate structures. The decommissioning of a reactor can be divided into 5 periods. 200 different items for special equipment costs are possible. The maximum amount for each special equipment item is 99,999,999$. You can support data for 10 buildings, 100 components each; ESTS1071/01: There are 65 components for 28 systems available to specify the contaminated systems costs (BWR). ESTS1071/02: There are 75 components for 25 systems available to specify the contaminated systems costs (PWR)

  10. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C.; Arai, K.; Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  11. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Arai, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  12. Alternative cooling water flow path for RHR heat exchanger and its effect on containment response during extended station blackout for Chinshan BWR-4 plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuann, Yng-Ruey, E-mail: ryyuann@iner.gov.tw

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Motivating alternative RHR heat exchanger tube-side flow path and determining required capacity. • Calculate NSSS and containment response during 24-h SBO for Chinshan BWR-4 plant. • RETRAN and GOTHIC models are developed for NSSS and containment, respectively. • Safety relief valve blowdown flow and energy to drywell are generated by RETRAN. • Analyses are performed with and without reactor depressurization, respectively. - Abstract: The extended Station Blackout (SBO) of 24 h has been analyzed with respect to the containment response, in particular the suppression pool temperature response, for the Chinshan BWR-4 plant of MARK-I containment. The Chinshan plant, owned by Taiwan Power Company, has twin units with rated core thermal power of 1840 MW each. The analysis is aimed at determining the required alternative cooling water flow capacity for the residual heat removal (RHR) heat exchanger when its tube-side sea water cooling flow path is blocked, due to some reason such as earthquake or tsunami, and is switched to the alternative raw water source. Energy will be dissipated to the suppression pool through safety relief valves (SRVs) of the main steam lines during SBO. The RETRAN model is used to calculate the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) response and generate the SRV blowdown conditions, including SRV pressure, enthalpy, and mass flow rate. These conditions are then used as the time-dependent boundary conditions for the GOTHIC code to calculate the containment pressure and temperature response. The shaft seals of the two recirculation pumps are conservatively assumed to fail due to loss of seal cooling and a total leakage flow rate of 36 gpm to the drywell is included in the GOTHIC model. Based on the given SRV blowdown conditions, the GOTHIC containment calculation is performed several times, through the adjustment of the heat transfer rate of the RHR heat exchanger, until the criterion that the maximum suppression pool temperature

  13. Development of NUFREQ-N, an analytical model for the stability analysis of nuclear coupled density-wave oscillations in boiling water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    A state-of-the-art one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic model has been developed to be used for the linear analysis of nuclear-coupled density-wave oscillations in a boiling water nuclear reactor (BWR). The model accounts for phasic slip, distributed spacers, subcooled boiling, space/time-dependent power distributions and distributed heated wall dynamics. In addition to a parallel channel stability analysis, a detailed model was derived for the BWR loop analysis of both the natural and forced circulation modes of operation. In its final form, this model constitutes a multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) linear system, which features a general nodal neutron kinetics model. Kinetics parameters for use in the kinetics model have been obtained by utilizing self-consistent nodal data and power distributions. The stability characteristics of a typical BWR/4 has been investigated with the Nyquist criterion. The computer implementation of this mode, NUFREQ-N, was used for the parametric study of a typical BWR/4 and comparison were made with existing in-core and out-of-core data. Also, NUFREQ-N was used to analyze the expected stability characteristics of a typical BWR/4. The parametric results revealed important factors influencing BWR stability margin. It was found that NUFREQ-N generally agreed well with out-of-core data. This was especially true for the predicted power-to-flow transfer function, which is the most important transfer function in thermal-hydraulic stability analysis

  14. Reactor process water (PW) piping inspections, 1984--1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhart, W.S.; Elder, J.B.; Sprayberry, R.E.; Vande Kamp, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    In July 1983, the NRC ordered the shutdown of five boiling water reactors (BWR's) because of concerns about reliability of ultrasonic examination for detecting intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). These concerns arose because of leaking piping at Niagara Mohawk's Nine Mile Point which was attributed to IGSCC. The leaks were detected shortly after completion of ultrasonic examinations of the piping. At that time, the Dupont plant manager at Savannah River (SR) directed that investigations be performed to determine if similar problems could exist in SR reactors. Investigation determined that all conditions believed necessary for the initiation and propagation of IGSCC in austenitic stainless steel exist in SR reactor process water (PW) systems. Sensitized, high carbon, austenitic stainless steel, a high purity water system with high levels of dissolved oxygen, and the residual stresses associated with welding during construction combine to provide the necessary conditions. A periodic UT inspection program is now in place to monitor the condition of the reactor PW piping systems. The program is patterned after NRC NUREG 0313, i.e., welds are placed in categories based on their history. Welds in upgraded or replacement piping are examined on a standard schedule (at least every five years) while welds with evidence of IGSCC, evaluated as acceptable for service, are inspected at every extended outage (15 to 18 months). This includes all welds in PW systems three inches in diameter and above. Welds are replaced when MSCC exceeds the replacement criteria of more than twenty percent of pipe circumference of fifty percent of through-wall depth. In the future, we intend to perform flow sizing with automated UT techniques in addition to manual sizing to provide more information for comparison with future examinations

  15. Feed water control device in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okutani, Tetsuro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent substantial fluctuations of the water level in a nuclear reactor and always keep a constant standard level under any operation condition. Constitution: When the causes for fluctuating the reactor water level is resulted, a certain amount of correction signal is added to a level deviation signal for the difference between the reactor standard level and the actual reactor water level to control the flow rate of the feed water pump depending on the addition signal. If reactor scram should occur, for instance, a level correction signal changing stepwise depending on a scram signal is outputted and added to the level deviation signal. As the result, the flow rate of feed water sent into the reactor just after the scram is increased, whereby the lowering in the reactor water level upon scram can be decreased as compared with the case where no such level compensation signal is inputted. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Advanced methods for BWR transient and stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A; Wehle, F; Opel, S; Velten, R [AREVA, AREVA NP, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The design of advanced Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies and cores is governed by the basic requirement of safe, reliable and flexible reactor operation with optimal fuel utilization. AREVA NP's comprehensive steady state and transient BWR methodology allows the designer to respond quickly and effectively to customer needs. AREVA NP uses S-RELAP5/RAMONA as the appropriate methodology for the representation of the entire plant. The 3D neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics code has been developed for the prediction of system, fuel and core behavior and provides additional margins for normal operation and transients. Of major importance is the extensive validation of the methodology. The validation is based on measurements at AREVA NP's test facilities, and comparison of the predictions with a great wealth of measured data gathered from BWR plants during many years of operation. Three of the main fields of interest are stability analysis, operational transients and reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs). The introduced 3D methodology for operational transients shows significant margin regarding the operational limit of critical power ratio, which has been approved by the German licensing authority. Regarding BWR stability a large number of measurements at different plants under various conditions have been performed and successfully post-calculated with RAMONA. This is the basis of reliable pre-calculations of the locations of regional and core-wide stability boundaries. (authors)

  17. Advanced methods for BWR transient and stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, A.; Wehle, F.; Opel, S.; Velten, R.

    2008-01-01

    The design of advanced Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies and cores is governed by the basic requirement of safe, reliable and flexible reactor operation with optimal fuel utilization. AREVA NP's comprehensive steady state and transient BWR methodology allows the designer to respond quickly and effectively to customer needs. AREVA NP uses S-RELAP5/RAMONA as the appropriate methodology for the representation of the entire plant. The 3D neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics code has been developed for the prediction of system, fuel and core behavior and provides additional margins for normal operation and transients. Of major importance is the extensive validation of the methodology. The validation is based on measurements at AREVA NP's test facilities, and comparison of the predictions with a great wealth of measured data gathered from BWR plants during many years of operation. Three of the main fields of interest are stability analysis, operational transients and reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs). The introduced 3D methodology for operational transients shows significant margin regarding the operational limit of critical power ratio, which has been approved by the German licensing authority. Regarding BWR stability a large number of measurements at different plants under various conditions have been performed and successfully post-calculated with RAMONA. This is the basis of reliable pre-calculations of the locations of regional and core-wide stability boundaries. (authors)

  18. Water treatment process for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwan, M.A.; Khattab, M.S.; Hanna, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    Water treatment for purification is very important in reactor cooling systems as well as in many industrial applications. Since impurities in water are main source of problems, it is necessary to achieve and maintain high purity of water before utilization in reactor cooling systems. The present work investigate water treatment process for nuclear reactor utilization. Analysis of output water chemistry proved that demineralizing process is an appropriate method. Extensive experiments were conducted to determine economical concentration of the regenerates to obtain the optimum quantity of pure water which reached to 15 cubic meter instead of 10 cubic-meter per regeneration. Running cost is consequently decreased by about 30 %. output water chemistry agree with the recommended specifications for reactor utilization. The radionuclides produced in the primary cooling water due to reactor operation are determined. It is found that 70% of radioactive contaminants are retained by purification through resin of reactor filter. Decontamination factor and filter efficiency are also determined.5 fig., 3 tab

  19. Design of an equilibrium nucleus of a BWR type reactor based in a Thorium-Uranium fuel; Diseno de un nucleo de equilibrio de un reactor tipo BWR basado en un combustible de Torio-Uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, J.L.; Nunez C, A. [Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Facultad de Ingenieria-UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In this work the design of the reactor nucleus of boiling water using fuel of thorium-uranium is presented. Starting from an integral concept based in a type cover-seed assemble is carried out the design of an equilibrium reload for the nucleus of a reactor like that of the Laguna Verde Central and its are analyzed some of the main design variables like the cycle length, the reload fraction, the burnt fuel, the vacuum distribution, the generation of lineal heat, the margin of shutdown, as well as a first estimation of the fuel cost. The results show that it is feasible to obtain an equilibrium reload, comparable to those that are carried out in the Laguna Verde reactors, with a good behavior of those analyzed variables. The cost of the equilibrium reload designed with the thorium-uranium fuel is approximately 2% high that the uranium reload producing the same energy. It is concluded that it is convenient to include burnable poisons, type gadolinium, in the fuel with the end of improving the reload design, the fuel costs and the margin of shutdown. (Author)

  20. BWR level estimation using Kalman Filtering approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, G.; Divakaruni, S.M.; Meyer, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Work is in progress on development of a system for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) vessel level validation and failure detection. The levels validated include the liquid level both inside and outside the core shroud. This work is a major part of a larger effort to develop a complete system for BWR signal validation. The demonstration plant is the Oyster Creek BWR. Liquid level inside the core shroud is not directly measured during full power operation. This level must be validated using measurements of other quantities and analytic models. Given the available sensors, analytic models for level that are based on mass and energy balances can contain open integrators. When such a model is driven by noisy measurements, the model predicted level will deviate from the true level over time. To validate the level properly and to avoid false alarms, the open integrator must be stabilized. In addition, plant parameters will change slowly with time. The respective model must either account for these plant changes or be insensitive to them to avoid false alarms and maintain sensitivity to true failures of level instrumentation. Problems are addressed here by combining the extended Kalman Filter and Parity Space Decision/Estimator. The open integrator is stabilized by integrating from the validated estimate at the beginning of each sampling interval, rather than from the model predicted value. The model is adapted to slow plant/sensor changes by updating model parameters on-line

  1. Benchmarking lattice physics data and methods for boiling water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciapouti, R.J.; Edenius, M.; Harris, D.R.; Hebert, M.J.; Kapitz, D.M.; Pilat, E.E.; VerPlanck, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the work reported was to verify the adequacy of lattice physics modeling for the analysis of the Vermont Yankee BWR using a multigroup, two-dimensional transport theory code. The BWR lattice physics methods have been benchmarked against reactor physics experiments, higher order calculations, and actual operating data

  2. Water treatment process for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwan, M.A.; Khattab, M.S.; Hanna, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Water treatment for purification is very important in reactor cooling systems as well as in many industrial applications. Since impurities in water are main source of problems, it is necessary to achieve and maintain high purity of water before utilization in reactor cooling systems. The present work investigates water treatment process for nuclear reactor utilization. Analysis of outwater chemistry proved that demineralizing process is an appropriate method. Extensive experiments were conducted to determine economical concentration of the regenerants to obtain the optimum quantity of pure water which reached to 15 cubic-meter instead of 10 cubic-meter per regeneration. Running cost is consequently decreased by about 30%. Output water chemistry agrees with the recommended specifications for reactor utilization. The radionuclides produced in the primary cooling water due to reactor operation are determined. It is found that 70% of radioactive contaminants are retained by purification through resin of reactor filter. Decontamination factor and filter efficiency are also determined

  3. Study of instabilities in phase by using the tool {sup D}ynamics{sup :} analysis of the evolution space temporary of the waves of density in channels of reactors BWR; Estudio de las Inestabilidades en Fase Mediante la Herramienta Dinamics: analisis de la Evolucion Espacio Temporal de las Ondas de Densidad en Canales de Reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobo, J. L.; Escriva, R.; Merino, R.; Melara, J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the basics of Dynamics V2 to code It allows calculations of stability for oscillations in phase in BWR reactors in the time domain. The equations of the model are exposed and is the integration of the equations. The model can be used in a large number of nodes thrust for the calculations to an acceptable computational cost, it has simplified dynamics of recirculation loop and the code has been incorporated the Oscillation in phase boundary conditions. The code incorporates the equations of boiling sub-cooled which allows to make more realistic calculations as well as subroutines to calculate the subroutines-based properties of the MATPRO and ASME.

  4. Detailed pressure drop measurements in single-and two-phase adiabatic air-water turbulent flows in realistic BWR fuel assembly geometry with spacer grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caraghiaur, Diana; Frid, Wiktor; Tillmark, Nils

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, advance numerical simulation tools based on CFD methods have been increasingly used in various multi-phase flow applications. One of these is two-phase flow in fuel assemblies of Boiling Water Reactors. The important and often missing aspect of this development is validation of CFD codes against proper experimental data. The purpose of the current paper is to present detailed pressure measurements over a spacer grid in low pressure adiabatic single- and bubbly two-phase flow, which will be used to further develop a CFD code for BWR fuel bundle analysis. The experiments have been carried out in a n asymmetric 24-rod sub-bundle, representing one quarter of a Westinghouse SVEA-96 nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Single-phase flow measurements have been performed at superficial velocities between 0.90-4.50 m/s and in the two-phase flow, which was simulated by air-water mixture, measurements have been performed at void fractions ranging from 4 to 12% and liquid superficial velocity of 4.50 m/s. In order to increase the number of measuring points, five pressure taps were drilled in one of the rods, which was easily moved vertically by a traversing system, covering most of the points in axial direction. Any of the rods in the bundle could be substitute by the pressure sensing rod and the measurements were made for five pressure taps facing-angles. A detailed pressure distribution comparison between single- and two-phase flows for different sub-channel positions and different flow conditions was performed over one of the spacers. In addition, single-phase pressure drop measurements in the upper part of the test section comprising two spacer grids have been carried out. (author)

  5. Coupled thermohydraulic-neutronic instabilities in boiling water nuclear reactors: a review of the state of the art