WorldWideScience

Sample records for water proton relaxation

  1. PMR spectra and proton magnetic relaxation in uranyl nitrate-hexamethylenetetramine-urea-water gel forming system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashman, A.A.; Pronin, I.S.; Brylkina, T.V.; Makarov, V.M.

    1979-01-01

    PMR spectra and proton relaxation in the nitrate-hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA)-urea-water gelling system are studied. According to PMR spectra products of HMTA chemical decomposition, which are supposed to be formed in the gelling process, have not been detected. Effect of hydrogen exchange upon PMR spectra of urea and water in the presence of HMTA and uranyl nitrate is studied. Periods of spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxations of water and HMTA protons in gels on the base of uranyl nitrate are found. Data on relaxation permitted to make qualitative conclusions upon the gel structure and HMTA molecule distribution over ''phases''. Nonproducibility of the results of period measurements in gels is the result of nonproducibility of the gel structure in the course of transformation of liquid solution into gel. Temperature dependences of proton relaxation in the gels are impossible yet to interpret on the basis of temperature behaviour of one correlation period, controlling dipole-dipole nuclear magnetic relaxation, and obeying Arrhenius dependence on the temperature

  2. The water proton spin-lattice relaxation times in virus-infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valensin, G.; Gaggelli, E.; Tiezzi, E.; Valensin, P.E.; Bianchi Bandinelli, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    The water proton spin-lattice relaxation times in HEp-2 cell cultures were determined immediately after 1 h of polio-virus adsorption. The shortening of the water T 1 was closely related to the multiplicity of infection, allowing direct inspections of the virus-cell interaction since the first steps of the infectious cycle. Virus-induced structural and conformational changes of cell constituents were suggested to be detectable by NMR investigation of cell water. (Auth.)

  3. NMR water-proton spin-lattice relaxation time of human red blood cells and red blood cell suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, S.G.; Rosenthal, J.S.; Winston, A.; Stern, A.

    1988-01-01

    NMR water-proton spin-lattice relaxation times were studied as probes of water structure in human red blood cells and red blood cell suspensions. Normal saline had a relaxation time of about 3000 ms while packed red blood cells had a relaxation time of about 500 ms. The relaxation time of a red blood cell suspension at 50% hematocrit was about 750 ms showing that surface charges and polar groups of the red cell membrane effectively structure extracellular water. Incubation of red cells in hypotonic saline increases relaxation time whereas hypertonic saline decreases relaxation time. Relaxation times varied independently of mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration in a sample population. Studies with lysates and resealed membrane ghosts show that hemoglobin is very effective in lowering water-proton relaxation time whereas resealed membrane ghosts in the absence of hemoglobin are less effective than intact red cells. 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 table

  4. Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging of brain tumors at 7 T : The role of tissue water T1 -Relaxation properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khlebnikov, V; Polders, Daniel; Hendrikse, J; Robe, Pierre A.; Voormolen, Eduard H; Luijten, Peter R; Klomp, DWJ; Hoogduin, Hans

    PURPOSE: To provide insight into the effect of water T1 relaxation (T1wat ) on amide proton transfer (APT) contrast in tumors. Three different metrics of APT contrast-magnetization transfer ratio (MTRRex ), relaxation-compensated MTRRex (AREX), and traditional asymmetry (MTRasym )-were compared in

  5. Measurement of solute proton spin-lattice relaxation times in water using the 1,3,3,1 sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, S.S.; Mole, P.A.; Coulson, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    1 H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the N-CH3 proton resonances of phosphocreatine (PCr) and creatine (Cr) in water solutions were obtained using the 1,3,3,1 pulse sequence. These T1 values were equivalent to those obtained in D 2 O and water using either the conventional inversion-recovery experiment or the 1,3,3,1 pulse sequence. Thus, the 1,3,3,1 sequence of proton NMR can provide an independent means along with phosphorous NMR for assess PCr and for the study of the creatine kinase reaction (PCr + ADP in equilibrium ATP + Cr) in aqueous solutions and perhaps in biological preparations

  6. Viscosity of bound water and model of proton relaxation in fine-dispersed substances at the presence of adsorbed paramagnetic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedodeev, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    A microviscosity model of proton relaxation in pure liquids and in solutions of paramagnetic ions is examined. It is shown that the influence of adsorbed paramagnetic centers on proton relaxation in finely dispersed substances is significantly weaker than in solutions. A 'two-phase' relaxation model is used in determining the parameters of the bound liquid (water) using nuclear magnetic resonance data. The relations obtained with the model are used to compute the viscosity of water in clay. The value is of the same order of magnitude as that obtained by other methods

  7. Viscosity of bound water and model of proton relaxation in fine-dispersed substances at the presence of adsorbed paramagnetic ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedodeev, V I

    1975-09-01

    A microviscosity model of proton relaxation in pure liquids and in solutions of paramagnetic ions is examined. It is shown that the influence of adsorbed paramagnetic centers on proton relaxation in finely dispersed substances is significantly weaker than in solutions. A 'two-phase' relaxation model is used in determining the parameters of the bound liquid (water) using nuclear magnetic resonance data. The relations obtained with the model are used to compute the viscosity of water in clay. The value is of the same order of magnitude as that obtained by other methods.

  8. Investigation of proton spin relaxation in water with dispersed silicon nanoparticles for potential magnetic resonance imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargina, Yu. V.; Gongalsky, M. B.; Perepukhov, A. M.; Gippius, A. A.; Minnekhanov, A. A.; Zvereva, E. A.; Maximychev, A. V.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Porous and nonporous silicon (Si) nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by ball-milling of electrochemically etched porous Si layers and crystalline Si wafers were studied as potential agents for enhancement of the proton spin relaxation in aqueous media. While nonporous Si NPs did not significantly influence the spin relaxation, the porous ones resulted in strong shortening of the transverse relaxation times. In order to investigate an effect of the electron spin density in porous Si NPs on the proton spin relaxation, we use thermal annealing of the NPs in vacuum or in air. The transverse relaxation rate of about 0.5 l/(g s) was achieved for microporous Si NPs, which were thermally annealing in vacuum to obtain the electron spin density of the order of 1017 g-1. The transverse relaxation rate was found to be almost proportional to the concentration of porous Si NPs in the range from 0.1 to 20 g/l. The obtained results are discussed in view of possible biomedical applications of Si NPs as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Proton NMR relaxation in hydrous melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, J.; Bacarella, A.L.; Benjamin, B.M.; Brown, L.L.; Girard, C.

    1976-01-01

    Pulse and continuous wave NMR measurements are reported for protons in hydrous melts of calcium nitrate at temperatures between -4 and 120 0 C. Although measured in different temperature ranges, spin-lattice (T 1 ) and spin-spin (T 2 ) relaxation times appear to be nearly equal to each other and proportional to the self-diffusion coefficients of solute metal cations such as Cd 2+ . At temperatures near 50 0 C, mean Arrhenius coefficients Δ H/sub T 1 / (kcal/mol) are 7.9, 7.3, and 4.8, respectively, for melts containing 2.8, 4.0, and 8.0 moles of water per mole of calcium nitrate, compared to 4.6 kcal/mol for pure water. Temperature dependence of T 1 and T 2 in Ca(NO 3 ) 2 -2.8 H 2 O between -4 and 120 0 C are non-Arrhenius and can be represented by a Fulcher-type equation with a ''zero mobility temperature'' (T 0 ) of 225 0 K, close to the value of T 0 for solute diffusion, electrical conductance and viscosity. Resolution of the relaxation rates into correlation times for intramolecular (rotational) and intermolecular (translational) diffusional motion is discussed in terms of the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound and more recent models for dipolar relaxation

  10. The freezing of water bonded in the wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain studied by means protons magnetic relaxation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haranczyk, H.; Jasinski, G.; Strzalka, K.

    1994-01-01

    Some biological aspects of water freezing in the wheat grain have been studied using NMR methods. Measuring of the relaxation times for freezing and liquid water shown absence of T 2 ∼100 μs and T 2 ∼1 ms separated components what pointed for some different way of water bonding

  11. Relaxation dynamics and transformation kinetics of deeply supercooled water: Temperature, pressure, doping, and proton/deuteron isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Sonja; Handle, Philip H; Plaga, Lucie J; Stern, Josef N; Seidl, Markus; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Köster, Karsten W; Gainaru, Catalin; Loerting, Thomas; Böhmer, Roland

    2017-07-21

    Above its glass transition, the equilibrated high-density amorphous ice (HDA) transforms to the low-density pendant (LDA). The temperature dependence of the transformation is monitored at ambient pressure using dielectric spectroscopy and at elevated pressures using dilatometry. It is found that near the glass transition temperature of deuterated samples, the transformation kinetics is 300 times slower than the structural relaxation, while for protonated samples, the time scale separation is at least 30 000 and insensitive to doping. The kinetics of the HDA to LDA transformation lacks a proton/deuteron isotope effect, revealing that this process is dominated by the restructuring of the oxygen network. The x-ray diffraction experiments performed on samples at intermediate transition stages reflect a linear combination of the LDA and HDA patterns implying a macroscopic phase separation, instead of a local intermixing of the two amorphous states.

  12. Relaxation dynamics and transformation kinetics of deeply supercooled water: Temperature, pressure, doping, and proton/deuteron isotope effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Sonja; Handle, Philip H.; Plaga, Lucie J.; Stern, Josef N.; Seidl, Markus; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Köster, Karsten W.; Gainaru, Catalin; Loerting, Thomas; Böhmer, Roland

    2017-07-01

    Above its glass transition, the equilibrated high-density amorphous ice (HDA) transforms to the low-density pendant (LDA). The temperature dependence of the transformation is monitored at ambient pressure using dielectric spectroscopy and at elevated pressures using dilatometry. It is found that near the glass transition temperature of deuterated samples, the transformation kinetics is 300 times slower than the structural relaxation, while for protonated samples, the time scale separation is at least 30 000 and insensitive to doping. The kinetics of the HDA to LDA transformation lacks a proton/deuteron isotope effect, revealing that this process is dominated by the restructuring of the oxygen network. The x-ray diffraction experiments performed on samples at intermediate transition stages reflect a linear combination of the LDA and HDA patterns implying a macroscopic phase separation, instead of a local intermixing of the two amorphous states.

  13. Proton conductivity and relaxation properties of chitosan-acetate films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokhorov, E.; Luna-Bárcenas, G.; González-Campos, J.B.; Kovalenko, Yu.; García-Carvajal, Z.Y.; Mota-Morales, J.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Temperature dependence of conductivity, the number of density and proton mobility in chitosan-acetate film. - Highlights: • DD, conductivity, Vogel temperature dependent on the concentration of acetic acid. • Proton conductivity of CS-acetate films interpreted using two Grotthuss mechanisms. • Transformation between two mechanisms observed at the glass transition temperature. - Abstract: The effect of aqueous acetic acid solution concentration during the preparation of chitosan-acetate (CS-acetate) films on the conductivity and relaxation properties were studied by dielectric and FTIR spectroscopies, TGA measurements and X-Ray diffraction. Analyses of the experimental results on the degree of deacetylation, water absorption, conductivity, Vogel temperature and activation energy demonstrate a strong dependence of these parameters on the concentration of the acid acetic solutions from which the films have been obtained. The proton conductivity and relaxation properties of CS-acetate films have been interpreted using two Grotthuss “structural diffusion” and “pack-acid” mechanisms. The transformation between these two mechanisms observed at temperature higher than CS-acetate glass transition temperature is due to an increase in the thermal motion of CS chains, water evaporation, hydrogen bond between water molecules and side groups of CS breaking and formation of new bonds between NH 3 + and acetate ions. Additionally, application of the Rice and Roth model allowed estimating the temperature dependence of proton number and their mobility in CS-acetate films. A systematic interpretation on the appropriate conductivity mechanism will help trigger the design of smart materials used in flexible electronic, solid polymer electrolytes for fuel cells and solid polymer batteries based on CS-acetate films.

  14. A nuclear magnetic relaxation study of hydrogen exchange and water dynamics in aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankhorst, D.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis exchange of water protons in solutions of some weak electrolytes and polyelectrolytes is studied. Also the dynamical behaviour of water molecules in pure water is investigated. For these purposes nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation measurements, in solutions of oxygen-17 enriched water, are interpreted. The exchange rate of the water protons is derived from the contribution of 1 H- 17 O scalar coupling to the proton transverse relaxation rate. This rate is measured by the Carr-Purcell technique. (Auth.)

  15. Thermal- and pH-Dependent Size Variable Radical Nanoparticles and Its Water Proton Relaxivity for Metal-Free MRI Functional Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Kosuke; Murayama, Shuhei; Araki, Takeru; Aoki, Ichio; Karasawa, Satoru

    2016-09-16

    For development of the metal-free MRI contrast agents, we prepared the supra-molecular organic radical, TEMPO-UBD, carrying TEMPO radical, as well as the urea, alkyl group, and phenyl ring, which demonstrate self-assembly behaviors using noncovalent bonds in an aqueous solution. In addition, TEMPO-UBD has the tertiary amine and the oligoethylene glycol chains (OEGs) for the function of pH and thermal responsiveness. By dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy imaging, the resulting self-assembly was seen to form the spherical nanoparticles 10-150 nm in size. On heating, interestingly, the nanoparticles showed a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) behavior having two-step variation. This double-LCST behavior is the first such example among the supra-molecules. To evaluate of the ability as MRI contrast agents, the values of proton ((1)H) longitudinal relaxivity (r1) were determined using MRI apparatus. In conditions below and above CAC at pH 7.0, the distinguishable r1 values were estimated to be 0.17 and 0.21 mM(-1) s(1), indicating the suppression of fast tumbling motion of TEMPO moiety in a nanoparticle. Furthermore, r1 values became larger in the order of pH 7.0 > 9.0 > 5.0. Those thermal and pH dependencies indicated the possibility of metal-fee MRI functional contrast agents in the future.

  16. Dielectric Relaxation of Water: Theory and Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, Narayan Prasad; Paudyal, Harihar; Johri, Manoj

    2010-06-01

    We have studied the hydrogen bond dynamics and methods for evaluation of probability and relaxation time for hydrogen bond network. Further, dielectric relaxation time has been calculated by using a diagonalization procedure by obtaining eigen values (inverse of relaxation time) of a master equation framed on the basis of Fokker-Planck equations. Microwave cavity spectrometer has been described to make measurements of relaxation time. Slater's perturbation equations are given for the analysis of the data. A comparison of theoretical and experimental data shows that there is a need for improvements in the theoretical model and experimental techniques to provide exact information about structural properties of water. (author)

  17. The effect of polymer coatings on proton transverse relaxivities of aqueous suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, Matthew R J; House, Michael J; Woodward, Robert C; St Pierre, Timothy G; Huffstetler, Phillip P; Miles, William C; Goff, Jonathon D; Davis, Richey M; Riffle, Judy S

    2011-01-01

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are good candidates for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their high magnetic susceptibilities. Here we investigate 19 polyether-coated magnetite nanoparticle systems comprising three series. All systems were synthesized from the same batch of magnetite nanoparticles. A different polyether was used for each series. Each series comprised systems with systematically varied polyether loadings per particle. A highly significant (p < 0.0001) linear correlation (r = 0.956) was found between the proton relaxivity and the intensity-weighted average diameter measured by dynamic light scattering in the 19 particle systems studied. The intensity-weighted average diameter measured by dynamic light scattering is sensitive to small number fractions of larger particles/aggregates. We conclude that the primary effect leading to differences in proton relaxivity between systems arises from the small degree of aggregation within the samples, which appears to be determined by the nature of the polymer and, for one system, the degree of polymer loading of the particles. For the polyether coatings used in this study, any changes in relaxivity from differences in water exclusion or diffusion rates caused by the polymer are minor in comparison with the changes in relaxivity resulting from variations in the degree of aggregation.

  18. The effect of polymer coatings on proton transverse relaxivities of aqueous suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Matthew R J; House, Michael J; Woodward, Robert C; St Pierre, Timothy G [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Huffstetler, Phillip P; Miles, William C; Goff, Jonathon D; Davis, Richey M; Riffle, Judy S, E-mail: stpierre@physics.uwa.edu.au [Macromolecules and Interfaces Institute, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2011-08-12

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are good candidates for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their high magnetic susceptibilities. Here we investigate 19 polyether-coated magnetite nanoparticle systems comprising three series. All systems were synthesized from the same batch of magnetite nanoparticles. A different polyether was used for each series. Each series comprised systems with systematically varied polyether loadings per particle. A highly significant (p < 0.0001) linear correlation (r = 0.956) was found between the proton relaxivity and the intensity-weighted average diameter measured by dynamic light scattering in the 19 particle systems studied. The intensity-weighted average diameter measured by dynamic light scattering is sensitive to small number fractions of larger particles/aggregates. We conclude that the primary effect leading to differences in proton relaxivity between systems arises from the small degree of aggregation within the samples, which appears to be determined by the nature of the polymer and, for one system, the degree of polymer loading of the particles. For the polyether coatings used in this study, any changes in relaxivity from differences in water exclusion or diffusion rates caused by the polymer are minor in comparison with the changes in relaxivity resulting from variations in the degree of aggregation.

  19. What's new in the proton transfer reaction from pyranine to water? A femtosecond study of the proton transfer dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, C.; Gustavsson, T.; Tran-Thi, T.-H.

    1996-01-01

    The proton transfer from excited pyranine to water is studied by the femtosecond fluorescence upconversion technique. It is shown for the first time that the proton transfer reaction in water proceeds by three successive steps: the solvent cage relaxation, the specific solute-solvent hydrogen-bond formation and finally the ion pair dissociation/diffusion

  20. The freezing of water bonded in the wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain studied by means protons magnetic relaxation method; Zamarzanie wody zwiazanej w ziarnach pszenicy (Triticum aestivum L.) badane metoda relaksacji magnetycznej dla protonow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haranczyk, H.; Jasinski, G. [Inst. Fizyki, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland); Strzalka, K. [Inst. Biologii Molekularnej, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Some biological aspects of water freezing in the wheat grain have been studied using NMR methods. Measuring of the relaxation times for freezing and liquid water shown absence of T{sub 2}{approx}100 {mu}s and T{sub 2}{approx}1 ms separated components what pointed for some different way of water bonding. 7 refs, 12 figs, 2 tabs.

  1. Proton NMR relaxivity of blood samples in the presence of some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coroiu, I.; Darabont, Al.; Bogdan, M.

    1999-01-01

    The use of some new compounds in MRI tissue and blood characterisation based on nuclear spin relaxation time measurements cannot be sustained until the molecular sources of these variations are understood. Tissues and blood are complex molecular systems with complex NMR properties. A better comprehension of the molecular basis of relaxation offers the possibility to predict the changes expected for a given pathology. The purpose of this contribution is to evidence the different relaxation characteristics of some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds in the presence and absence of the blood and to give a possible explanation about the molecular processes that cause occurrence of changes. Some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds such as: Gd-CIT (gadolinium citrate), Dy-DTPA (DTPA-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid), iron oxide - gadolinium oxide (or dysprosium oxide)- dextran complexes were prepared. The longitudinal T 1 -1 and transverse T 2 -1 'relaxation rates' measurements have been carried out as a function of molar concentrations. All measurements have been made at room temperature (about 25 deg.C) and the proton Larmor frequency ν o = 90 MHz. The pulsed NMR spectrometer utilised was a commercial Bruker SXP4/100 spectrometer. Transverse relaxation rate measurements have been made using the Carr-Purcell method, while longitudinal relaxation rate measurements using the inversion recovery pulse sequence, 180 angle-τ-90 angle. The accuracy was about 2-3% for the longitudinal relaxation rates and about 5-7% for the transverse relaxation rates. R 1 and R 2 relaxivities, in mM -1 s -1 were determined from the least square determination of the slopes of plots 1/T 1,2 versus compound molar concentration, using at least five independent measurements at several concentrations between 0 and 2 mM. Increased R 2 relaxivity observed for dysprosium compounds in the blood presence can be explained by PRE effect. The largest gain in R 2 relaxivity seems to imply a noncovalent

  2. Detection of early gamma-postirradiation effects in murine spleen by proton NMR relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrowska, G; Lewa, C J; Ramee, M P; Husson, F; De Certaines, J D

    2001-01-01

    It was our aim to evaluate the potential of proton relaxation times for the early detection of radiation-induced spleen changes. Female Swiss mice were irradiated with doses ranging from 0.05 Gy to 4 Gy. The body weight, the spleen weight and the spleen water content of single animals were determined. Measurements of longitudinal (T1) and transversal (T2) proton relaxation times of the spleen samples were performed in a 0.47 T spectrometer. Histological examinations of the control and irradiated organs were performed. NMR measurements during the first five days after irradiation showed that total body gamma-irradiation with doses from 1.5 Gy to 4 Gy results in decreasing T1 of the murine spleen. Significant shortening in T2 was observed for the spleen of animals irradiated with a dose of 4 Gy. Histological examinations demonstrated subnormal architecture in slices derived from animals irradiated with 2 Gy and 4 Gy. The fluctuations of the spleen T1 and T2 of irradiated mice are correlated with relative spleen weight and can be used to estimate radiation induced changes in this organ.

  3. Proton relaxation relationships of human and animal tissues in vitro. Changes due to autolysis and fixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grodd, W.; Schmitt, W.G.H.

    1983-01-01

    The results of measurements of proton relaxation times of various tissues from rats, pigs and humans are reported; these were obtained by a resonance spectroscope at 20 MHz and 40 0 C. There were specific differences in both relaxation times (T 1 and T 2 ) of the liver and spleen. There was a difference of more than 150 ms in the longitudinal relaxation time between grey and white cerebral tissue. Autolytic changes show an increase in both relaxation times. Fixation produced a reduction in T 1 only. The significance of these findings for NMR tomography is discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. Vibrational Energy Relaxation in Water-Acetonitrile Mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, Dan; Yeremenko, Sergey; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nelson, Keith A.; Okada, Tadashi; Silvestri, Sandro De

    2004-01-01

    IR pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study the effect of hydrogen bonding on the vibrational energy relaxation pathways. Hydrogen bonding accelerates the population relaxation from 12ps in diluted acetonitrile solution to 700fs in bulk water.

  5. Studies of a nitroxide radical by EPR in monocrystal: interaction of protons and electronic relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.

    1986-01-01

    The ESR spectra of a nitroxide radical, 4-hydroxi-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TANOL II), introduced as impurity in a diamagnetic host, 4-hydroxi-2,6,6-tetramethylpiperedine (I), were investigated. The use of deuterated radical, 4-hydroxi-2,2,6,6 tetramethylpiperidine-d sub(17) -1, oxyl (PD-TANOL, III) improved the resolution of ESR spectra for most of orientations of magnetic field. The proton interqactions in the neighbourhood of magnetic group N-O were studied and superpyresfine tensors for two strongly coupled protons were determined. In order to study the influence of protons on electronic relaxation of radicals, the relaxation times T sub(1) and T sub(2) were estimated in the temperature range-160 sup(0)C - 25 sup(0)C for several orientations, and comparing data for protonated and deuterated radicals II and III, using the continuous wave saturation method. (author)

  6. The State of Water in Proton Conducting Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allcock, Harry R.; Benesi, Alan; Macdonald, Digby D.

    2010-08-27

    The research carried out under grant No. DE-FG02-07ER46371, "The State of Water in Proton Conducting Membranes", during the period June 1, 2008 - May 31, 2010 was comprised of three related parts. These are: 1. An examination of the state of water in classical proton conduction membranes with the use of deuterium T1 NMR spectroscopy (Allcock and Benesi groups). 2. A dielectric relaxation examination of the behavior of water in classical ionomer membranes (Macdonald program). 3. Attempts to synthesize new proton-conduction polymers and membranes derived from the polyphosphazene system. (Allcock program) All three are closely related, crucial aspects of the design and development of new and improved polymer electrolyte fuel cell membranes on which the future of fuel cell technology for portable applications depends.

  7. Local mechanical stress relaxation of Gunn diodes irradiated by protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradoboev, A V; Tesleva, E P

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the work is studying the impact of Gunn diodes thermocompression bonding conditions upon their resistance to being radiated with protons of various energies. It was established that the tough conditions of Gunn diodes thermocompression bonding results in local mechanic stresses introduced into the active layer of the device, reduction of electron mobility because of the faults introduction and, subsequently, to reduction of operating current, power of UHF generation, percentage of qualitative units production and general reduction of production efficiency of the devices with required characteristics. Irradiation of Gunn diodes produced under the tough conditions of thermocompression bonding with protons which energy is (40–60) MeV with an absorbed dose of (1–6)·10 2 Gy does not practically reduce the radiation resistance of Gunn diodes produced with application of the given technique. This technique can be recommended for all semiconductor devices on the base of GaAs, which parameters depend significantly upon the mobility of the electrons, to increase the efficiency of production. (paper)

  8. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T 1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T 1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  9. Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers. Proton spin-lattice relaxation times of skeletal muscles on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, K.; Nakano, I. (Shimoshizu National Hospital, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Neurology); Fukuda, N.; Ikehira, H.; Tateno, Y. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Clinical Research); Aoki, Y. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    By means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1 values) of the skeletal muscles were measured in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) carriers and normal controls. The bound water fraction (BWF) was calculated from the T1 values obtained, according to the fast proton diffusion model. In the DMD carriers, T1 values of the gluteus maximus and quadriceps femoris muscles were significantly higher, and BWFs of these muscles were significantly lower than in normal control. Degenerative muscular changes accompanied by interstitial edema were presumed responsible for this abnormality. No correlation was observed between the muscle T1 and serum creatine kinase values. The present study showed that MRI could be a useful method for studying the dynamic state of water in both normal and pathological skeletal muscles. Its possible utility for DMD carrier detection was discussed briefly. (orig.).

  10. Calorimetric and relaxation properties of xylitol-water mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, Khalid; Sjöström, Johan; Jansson, Helén; Swenson, Jan

    2012-03-01

    We present the first broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) and differential scanning calorimetry study of supercooled xylitol-water mixtures in the whole concentration range and in wide frequency (10-2-106 Hz) and temperature (120-365 K) ranges. The calorimetric glass transition, Tg, decreases from 247 K for pure xylitol to about 181 K at a water concentration of approximately 37 wt. %. At water concentrations in the range 29-35 wt. % a plentiful calorimetric behaviour is observed. In addition to the glass transition, almost simultaneous crystallization and melting events occurring around 230-240 K. At higher water concentrations ice is formed during cooling and the glass transition temperature increases to a steady value of about 200 K for all higher water concentrations. This Tg corresponds to an unfrozen xylitol-water solution containing 20 wt. % water. In addition to the true glass transition we also observed a glass transition-like feature at 220 K for all the ice containing samples. However, this feature is more likely due to ice dissolution [A. Inaba and O. Andersson, Thermochim. Acta, 461, 44 (2007)]. In the case of the BDS measurements the presence of water clearly has an effect on both the cooperative α-relaxation and the secondary β-relaxation. The α-relaxation shows a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence and becomes faster with increasing concentration of water. The fragility of the solutions, determined by the temperature dependence of the α-relaxation close to the dynamic glass transition, decreases with increasing water content up to about 26 wt. % water, where ice starts to form. This decrease in fragility with increasing water content is most likely caused by the increasing density of hydrogen bonds, forming a network-like structure in the deeply supercooled regime. The intensity of the secondary β-relaxation of xylitol decreases noticeably already at a water content of 2 wt. %, and at a water content above 5 wt. % it has been replaced by a

  11. In-vivo measurement of proton relaxation time (T1 and T2) in paediatric brain by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumura, Michio

    1986-01-01

    The clinical application of MRI led to the detailed imaging of the three-dimentional structure of the brain. Thus, significant information has been obtained with respect to the diagnosis of various diseases, rating severity, evaluation of curative effects, etc. On the other hand, the proportion of the comparative length of the relaxation time to the signal intensity of the images (especially the Spin-Echo image) was not necessarily linear. Consquently, the evaluation of severity was not easy to make. However, if we can obtain T 1 and T 2 precisely as the parameters costituting the images, it will be possible to overcome the above-mentioned difficulties. Further, the usefulness of MRI in activities such as determining the water metabolism of the brain is expected to increase even more. By means of VISTA-MR (0.15 Tesla, resistive magnet ; Picker International Co.) we measured the proton relaxation time (spin-lattice relaxation time (T 1 ) and spin-spin relaxation time (T 2 )) of various intracerebral lesions in paediatric cases. As the control group, 43 children, 4 adolescents and 6 adults were used. The T 1 and T 2 in the normal infantile cases prolonged significantly as compared with adult case. Thereafter, they become shortened by aging. In the age of two or three years, they reach the normal level of adult case. In the cases of degenerative disease, brain tumor, and cerebral contusion, the remarkable prolongation of both T 1 and T 2 , compared with normal value of the same age was observed. In the cases of brain atrophy and epilepsy, T 1 and T 2 were slightly short or within normal value of the same age. In the cases of intracerebral hemorrhage, T 1 was shortened. The in-vivo proton relaxation time obtained by MRI have various limits, but they can be a noninvasive and useful index in evaluation of severity or curative effects in various cerebral diseases. (author)

  12. TU-EF-BRA-02: Longitudinal Proton Spin Relaxation and T1-Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemen, L.

    2015-01-01

    NMR, and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient - Anthony Wolbarst Net Voxel Magnetization, m(x,t). T1-MRI; The MRI Device - Lisa Lemen ‘Classical’ NMR; FID Imaging in 1D via k-Space - Nathan Yanasak Spin-Echo; S-E/Spin Warp in a 2D Slice - Ronald Price Magnetic resonance imaging not only reveals the structural, anatomic details of the body, as does CT, but also it can provide information on the physiological status and pathologies of its tissues, like nuclear medicine. It can display high-quality slice and 3D images of organs and vessels viewed from any perspective, with resolution better than 1 mm. MRI is perhaps most extraordinary and notable for the plethora of ways in which it can create unique forms of image contrast, reflective of fundamentally different biophysical phenomena. As with ultrasound, there is no risk from ionizing radiation to the patient or staff, since no X-rays or radioactive nuclei are involved. Instead, MRI harnesses magnetic fields and radio waves to probe the stable nuclei of the ordinary hydrogen atoms (isolated protons) occurring in water and lipid molecules within and around cells. MRI consists, in essence, of creating spatial maps of the electromagnetic environments around these hydrogen nuclei. Spatial variations in the proton milieus can be related to clinical differences in the biochemical and physiological properties and conditions of the associated tissues. Imaging of proton density (PD), and of the tissue proton spin relaxation times known as T1 and T2, all can reveal important clinical information, but they do so with approaches so dissimilar from one another that each is chosen for only certain clinical situations. T1 and T2 in a voxel are determined by different aspects of the rotations and other motions of the water and lipid molecules involved, as constrained by the local biophysical surroundings within and between its cells – and they, in turn, depend on the type of tissue and its state of health. Three other common

  13. TU-EF-BRA-02: Longitudinal Proton Spin Relaxation and T1-Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemen, L. [Univ Cincinnati (United States)

    2015-06-15

    NMR, and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient - Anthony Wolbarst Net Voxel Magnetization, m(x,t). T1-MRI; The MRI Device - Lisa Lemen ‘Classical’ NMR; FID Imaging in 1D via k-Space - Nathan Yanasak Spin-Echo; S-E/Spin Warp in a 2D Slice - Ronald Price Magnetic resonance imaging not only reveals the structural, anatomic details of the body, as does CT, but also it can provide information on the physiological status and pathologies of its tissues, like nuclear medicine. It can display high-quality slice and 3D images of organs and vessels viewed from any perspective, with resolution better than 1 mm. MRI is perhaps most extraordinary and notable for the plethora of ways in which it can create unique forms of image contrast, reflective of fundamentally different biophysical phenomena. As with ultrasound, there is no risk from ionizing radiation to the patient or staff, since no X-rays or radioactive nuclei are involved. Instead, MRI harnesses magnetic fields and radio waves to probe the stable nuclei of the ordinary hydrogen atoms (isolated protons) occurring in water and lipid molecules within and around cells. MRI consists, in essence, of creating spatial maps of the electromagnetic environments around these hydrogen nuclei. Spatial variations in the proton milieus can be related to clinical differences in the biochemical and physiological properties and conditions of the associated tissues. Imaging of proton density (PD), and of the tissue proton spin relaxation times known as T1 and T2, all can reveal important clinical information, but they do so with approaches so dissimilar from one another that each is chosen for only certain clinical situations. T1 and T2 in a voxel are determined by different aspects of the rotations and other motions of the water and lipid molecules involved, as constrained by the local biophysical surroundings within and between its cells – and they, in turn, depend on the type of tissue and its state of health. Three other common

  14. Temperature dependence of relaxation times in proton components of fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Kagayaki; Iwabuchi, Taku; Saito, Kensuke; Obara, Makoto; Honda, Masatoshi; Imai, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    We examined the temperature dependence of relaxation times in proton components of fatty acids in various samples in vitro at 11 tesla as a standard calibration data for quantitative temperature imaging of fat. The spin-lattice relaxation time, T 1 , of both the methylene (CH 2 ) chain and terminal methyl (CH 3 ) was linearly related to temperature (r>0.98, P 2 signal for calibration and observed the signal with 18% of CH 3 to estimate temperature. These findings suggested that separating the fatty acid components would significantly improve accuracy in quantitative thermometry for fat. Use of the T 1 of CH 2 seems promising in terms of reliability and reproducibility in measuring temperature of fat. (author)

  15. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by C-13 CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, M. A. S.; Yilmaz, A.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2009-01-01

    the chemical shift titration experiments, and the CPMG derived exchange rates agree with those obtained previously from N-15 backbone relaxation measurements. Compared to measurements of backbone nuclei, C-13(epsilon 1) dispersion provides a more direct method to monitor interchanging protonation states...... or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the C-13(epsilon 1) dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains...

  16. Kinetics of proton migration in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hanning; Voth, Gregory A; Agmon, Noam

    2010-01-14

    We have utilized multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB3) simulations of protonated liquid water to calculate the relative mean-square displacement (MSD) and the history-independent time correlation function, c(t), of the hydrated proton center of excess charge (CEC) with respect to the water molecule on which it has initially resided. The MSD is nonlinear for the first 15 ps, suggesting that the relative diffusion coefficient increases from a small value, D(0), at short separations to its larger bulk value, D(infinity), at large separations. With the ensuing distance-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(r), the time dependence of both the MSD and c(t) agrees quantitatively with the solution of a diffusion equation for reversible geminate recombination. This suggests that the relative motion of the CEC is not independent from the nearby water molecules, in agreement with theoretical and experimental observations that large water clusters participate in the mechanism of proton mobility.

  17. The effects of bone on proton NMR relaxation times of surrounding liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C. A.; Genant, H. K.; Dunham, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary attempts by our group at UCSF to assess fat content of vertebral marrow in the lumbar spine using relaxation time information demonstrated that the presence of trabecular bone affects relaxation times. The objective of this work was a thorough study of the effects of bone on NMR relaxation characteristics of surrounding liquids. Trabecular bone from autopsy specimens was ground up and sifted into a series of powders with graded densities ranging from 0.3 gm/cc to 0.8 gm/cc. Each powder was placed first in n-saline and then in cottonseed oil. With spectroscopy, spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) and effective spin-spin relaxation times (T2*) were measured for each liquid in each bone powder. As bone density and surface to volume ratio increased, T1 decreased faster for saline than for oil. T2* decreased significantly for both water and oil as the surface to volume ratio increased. It was concluded that effects of water on T1 could be explained by a surface interaction at the bone/liquid interface, which restricted rotational and translational motion of nearby molecules. The T1s of oil were not affected since oil molecules are nonpolar, do not participate in significant intermolecular hydrogen bonding, and therefore would not be expected to interact strongly with the bone surface. Effects on T2* could be explained by local magnetic field inhomogeneities created by discontinuous magnetic susceptibility near the bone surface. These preliminary results suggest that water in contact with trabecular bone in vivo will exhibit shortened relaxation times.

  18. Determination of Proton Relaxivities of Mn(II, Cu(II and Cr(III added to Solutions of Serum Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yilmaz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Relaxometric studies are still of scientific interest due to their use in medicine and biology. In this study, proton T1 and T2 relaxivities of Mn(II, Cu(II and Cr(III in water were determined in the presence and absence of various proteins (albumin, α-globulin, γ-globulin, lysozyme, fibrinogen. The 1/T1 and 1/T2 in all solutions are linearly proportional to the concentration of the paramagnetic ions. Mn(II has the great influence to alter relaxations in all protein solutions, while Cu(II and Cr(III have a poor influence on the relaxations. In addition, Mn(II and Cu(II are bound to each protein, but Cr(III is not bound to any protein.

  19. Hydration water dynamics in biopolymers from NMR relaxation in the rotating frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blicharska, Barbara; Peemoeller, Hartwig; Witek, Magdalena

    2010-12-01

    Assuming dipole-dipole interaction as the dominant relaxation mechanism of protons of water molecules adsorbed onto macromolecule (biopolymer) surfaces we have been able to model the dependences of relaxation rates on temperature and frequency. For adsorbed water molecules the correlation times are of the order of 10(-5)s, for which the dispersion region of spin-lattice relaxation rates in the rotating frame R(1)(ρ)=1/T(1)(ρ) appears over a range of easily accessible B(1) values. Measurements of T(1)(ρ) at constant temperature and different B(1) values then give the "dispersion profiles" for biopolymers. Fitting a theoretical relaxation model to these profiles allows for the estimation of correlation times. This way of obtaining the correlation time is easier and faster than approaches involving measurements of the temperature dependence of R(1)=1/T(1). The T(1)(ρ) dispersion approach, as a tool for molecular dynamics study, has been demonstrated for several hydrated biopolymer systems including crystalline cellulose, starch of different origins (potato, corn, oat, wheat), paper (modern, old) and lyophilized proteins (albumin, lysozyme). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of structural relaxation in the dielectric response of water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Kisliuk, Alexander; Solokov, Alexei P.

    2016-01-01

    One century ago pioneering dielectric results obtained for water and n-alcohols triggered the advent of molecular rotation diffusion theory considered by Debye to describe the primary dielectric absorption in these liquids. Comparing dielectric, viscoelastic, and light scattering results, we...... unambiguously demonstrate that the structural relaxation appears only as a high-frequency shoulder in the dielectric spectra of water. In contrast, the main dielectric peak is related to a supramolecular structure, analogous to the Debye-like peak observed in monoalcohols....

  1. SU-E-I-64: Transverse Relaxation Time in Methylene Protons of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, K-H; Lee, D-W; Choe, B-Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate transverse relaxation time of methylene resonance compared to other lipid resonances. Methods: The examinations were performed using a 3.0 T scanner with a point — resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence. Lipid relaxation time in a lipid phantom filled with canola oil was estimated considering repetition time (TR) as 6000 msec and echo time (TE) as 40 — 550 msec. For in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H — MRS), eight male Sprague — Dawley rats were given free access to a normal - chow (NC) and eight other male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to a high — fat (HF) diet. Both groups drank water ad libitum. T{sub 2} measurements in the rats’ livers were conducted at a fixed TR of 6000 msec and TE of 40 – 220 msec. Exponential curve fitting quality was calculated through the coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}). Results: A chemical analysis of phantom and liver was not performed but a T{sub 2} decay curve was acquired. The T{sub 2} relaxation time of methylene resonance was estimated as follows: NC rats, 37.07 ± 4.32 msec; HF rats, 31.43 ± 1.81 msec (p < 0.05). The extrapolated M0 values were higher in HF rats than in NC rats (p < 0.005). Conclusion: This study of {sup 1}H-MRS led to sufficient spectral resolution and signal — to — noise ratio differences to characterize all observable resonances for yielding T{sub 2} relaxation times of methylene resonance. {sup 1}H — MRS relaxation times may be useful for quantitative characterization of various liver diseases, including fatty liver disease. This study was supported by grant (2012-007883 and 2014R1A2A1A10050270) from the Mid-career Researcher Program through the NRF funded by Ministry of Science. In addition, this study was supported by the Industrial R&D of MOTIE/KEIT (10048997, Development of the core technology for integrated therapy devices based on real-time MRI-guided tumor tracking)

  2. Ultrafast Librational Relaxation of H2O in Liquid Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jakob; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Rey, Rossend

    2013-01-01

    The ultrafast librational (hindered rotational) relaxation of a rotationally excited H2O molecule in pure liquid water is investigated by means of classical nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and a power and work analysis. This analysis allows the mechanism of the energy transfer from...... the excited H2O to its water neighbors, which occurs on a sub-100 fs time scale, to be followed in molecular detail, i.e., to determine which water molecules receive the energy and in which degrees of freedom. It is found that the dominant energy flow is to the four hydrogen-bonded water partners in the first...

  3. Proton exchange membrane water electrolysers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, P.

    2007-01-01

    This work deals with the PEM water electrolysis process. Are successively described: the thermodynamical, kinetic and energetic aspects, the different possible used electrolysis cells, the preparation of the membrane-electrode assembling, the used electrolysers, the annex production equipment, the uses fields and the limits of the process. (O.M.)

  4. Increased CEST specificity for amide and fast-exchanging amine protons using exchange-dependent relaxation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Feng; Xu, Junzhong; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C; Zu, Zhongliang

    2018-02-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging of amides at 3.5 ppm and fast-exchanging amines at 3 ppm provides a unique means to enhance the sensitivity of detection of, for example, proteins/peptides and neurotransmitters, respectively, and hence can provide important information on molecular composition. However, despite the high sensitivity relative to conventional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in practice, CEST often has relatively poor specificity. For example, CEST signals are typically influenced by several confounding effects, including direct water saturation (DS), semi-solid non-specific magnetization transfer (MT), the influence of water relaxation times (T 1w ) and nearby overlapping CEST signals. Although several editing techniques have been developed to increase the specificity by removing DS, semi-solid MT and T 1w influences, it is still challenging to remove overlapping CEST signals from different exchanging sites. For instance, the amide proton transfer (APT) signal could be contaminated by CEST effects from fast-exchanging amines at 3 ppm and intermediate-exchanging amines at 2 ppm. The current work applies an exchange-dependent relaxation rate (R ex ) to address this problem. Simulations demonstrate that: (1) slowly exchanging amides and fast-exchanging amines have distinct dependences on irradiation powers; and (2) R ex serves as a resonance frequency high-pass filter to selectively reduce CEST signals with resonance frequencies closer to water. These characteristics of R ex provide a means to isolate the APT signal from amines. In addition, previous studies have shown that CEST signals from fast-exchanging amines have no distinct features around their resonance frequencies. However, R ex gives Lorentzian lineshapes centered at their resonance frequencies for fast-exchanging amines and thus can significantly increase the specificity of CEST imaging for amides and fast-exchanging amines. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons

  5. Solid state proton spin-lattice relaxation in four structurally related organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, Peter A.; Burbank, Kendra S.; Lau, Matty M.W.; Ree, Jessica N.; Weber, Tracy L.

    2003-01-01

    We report and interpret the temperature dependence of the proton spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50 and 22.5 MHz in four polycrystalline solids composed of structurally related molecules: 2-ethylanthracene, 2-t-butylanthracene, 2-ethylanthraquinone, and 2-t-butylanthraquinone. We have been unable to grow single crystals and therefore do not know the crystal structures. Hence, we use the NMR relaxometry data to make predictions about the solid state structures. As expected, we are able to conclude that the ethyl groups do not reorient in the solid state but that the t-butyl groups do. The anthraquinones have a ''simpler'' structure than the anthracenes. The best dynamical models suggest that there is a unique crystallographic site for the t-butyl groups in 2-t-butylanthraquinone and two sites, each with half the molecules, for the ethyl groups in 2-ethylanthraquinone. There are also two sites in 2-ethylanthracene, but with unequal weights, suggesting four sites in the unit cell with lower symmetry than the two anthraquinones. Finally, the observed relaxation rate data in 2-t-butylanthracene is very complex and its interpretation demonstrates the uniqueness problem that arises in interpreting relaxometry data without the knowledge of the crystal structure

  6. Relaxation of axially confined 400 GeV/c protons to planar channeling in a bent crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandiera, L.; Mazzolari, A.; Bagli, E.; Germogli, G.; Guidi, V.; Sytov, A.; Kirillin, I.V.; Shul'ga, N.F.; Berra, A.; Lietti, D.; Prest, M.; De Salvador, D.; Vallazza, E.

    2016-01-01

    An investigation on the mechanism of relaxation of axially confined 400 GeV/c protons to planar channeling in a bent crystal was carried out at the extracted line H8 from CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. The experimental results were critically compared to computer simulations, showing a good agreement. We identified a necessary condition for the exploitation of axial confinement or its relaxation for particle beam manipulation in high-energy accelerators. We introduce the idea of using a short bent crystal, aligned with one of its main axis to the beam direction, as a beam steerer or a beam splitter with adjustable intensity in the field of particle accelerators. In particular, in the latter case, a complete relaxation from axial confinement to planar channeling takes place, resulting in beam splitting into the two strongest skew planar channels. (orig.)

  7. Relaxation of axially confined 400 GeV/c protons to planar channeling in a bent crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandiera, L.; Mazzolari, A.; Bagli, E.; Germogli, G.; Guidi, V. [Universita di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica, Ferrara (Italy); INFN, Ferrara (Italy); Sytov, A. [Universita di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica, Ferrara (Italy); Belarusian State University, Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Minsk (Belarus); INFN, Ferrara (Italy); Kirillin, I.V. [National Science Center ' ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' ' , Akhiezer Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kharkov (Ukraine); Shul' ga, N.F. [National Science Center ' ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' ' , Akhiezer Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kharkov (Ukraine); V.N. Karazin Kharkov National University, Kharkov (Ukraine); Berra, A.; Lietti, D.; Prest, M. [Universita dell' Insubria, Como (Italy); INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); De Salvador, D. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Padua (Italy); Vallazza, E. [INFN Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    An investigation on the mechanism of relaxation of axially confined 400 GeV/c protons to planar channeling in a bent crystal was carried out at the extracted line H8 from CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. The experimental results were critically compared to computer simulations, showing a good agreement. We identified a necessary condition for the exploitation of axial confinement or its relaxation for particle beam manipulation in high-energy accelerators. We introduce the idea of using a short bent crystal, aligned with one of its main axis to the beam direction, as a beam steerer or a beam splitter with adjustable intensity in the field of particle accelerators. In particular, in the latter case, a complete relaxation from axial confinement to planar channeling takes place, resulting in beam splitting into the two strongest skew planar channels. (orig.)

  8. Ultrasonic relaxation studies associated with n-octylamine-heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kor, S.K.; Singh, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic absorption measurements have been carried out in lyotropic liquid crystalline system n-octylamine/heavy water in the frequency range 5-65 MHz and at temperatures 30 degC and 37 degC at different concentrations of heavy water in octylamine. Velocity has been measured using interferometric technique at 2 MHz at different concentrations of heavy water. Ultrasonic absorption coefficients at different concentrations in the concentration range 0.3-0.9 m.f. heavy water have been found to show a maxima in the absorption curve at critical concentration (∼0.85 m.f. heavy water). This peak has been found to shift towards lower concentrations of heavy water at higher frequencies. Results have been analysed and it has been found that single relaxation process takes place around 30 MHz and this has been attributed to aggregation of octylamine and heavy water molecules. (author). 8 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Preliminary study for differential diagnosis of intracranial tumors using in vivo quantitative proton MR spectroscopy with correction for T2 relaxation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Shiigai, Masanari; Shibata, Yasushi; Takada, Kenta; Masumoto, Tomohiko; Anno, Izumi; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The intent of this study was to differentiate intracranial tumors using the metabolite concentrations obtained by quantification with correction for T2 relaxation time, and to analyze whether the spectrum peak was generated by the existence of metabolites in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Methods: All proton MRS studies were performed on a clinical 1.5T MR system. 7 normal volunteers and 57 patients (gliomas, metastases, meningiomas, acoustic neuromas, and pituitary adenomas) underwent single voxel proton MRS with different echo times (TE: 68, 136, 272 ms) for T2 correction of signal derived from metabolites and tissue water. With tissue water employed as an internal reference, the concentrations of metabolite (i.e. N-acetylaspartate (NAA), total creatine (t-Cr) and choline-containing compounds (Cho)) were calculated. Moreover, proton MRS data of previously published typical literatures were critically reviewed and compared with our data. Results: Extramedullary tumors were characterized by absence of NAA compared with intramedullary tumors. High-grade glioma differed from low-grade glioma by lower t-Cr concentrations. Metastasis differed from cystic glioblastoma by higher Cho concentrations, lower t-Cr concentrations, an absence of NAA, and a prominent Lipids peak. Based on these results and review of previous reports, we suggest a clinical pathway for the differentiation of intracranial tumors. Conclusion: The metabolite concentrations obtained by quantification with correction for T2 relaxation time, and to analyze whether the spectrum peak was generated by the existence of metabolites in proton MRS is useful for the diagnosis of the intracranial tumors

  10. Oxygen-17 relaxation in aqueous agarose gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablett, S.; Lillford, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation of oxygen-17 in H 2 17 O enriched agarose gels shows that existing explanations of water behaviour are oversimplified. Satisfactory models must include at least three proton phases, two of which involve water molecules. (Auth.)

  11. Stabilities of protonated water-ammonia clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundén, A. E. K.; Støchkel, K.; Hvelplund, P.; Brøndsted Nielsen, S.; Dynefors, B.; Hansen, K.

    2018-05-01

    Branching ratios of water and ammonia evaporation have been measured for spontaneous evaporation from protonated mixed clusters H+(H2O)n(NH3)m in the size range 0 ≤ n ≤ 11 and 0 ≤ m ≤ 7. Mixed clusters evaporate water except for clusters containing six or more ammonia molecules, indicating the formation of a stable core of one ammonium ion surrounded by four ammonia molecules and a second shell consisting predominantly of water. We relate evaporative branching ratios to free energy differences between the products of competing channels and determine the free energy differences for clusters with up to seven ammonia molecules. Clusters containing up to five ammonia molecules show a very strong scaling of these free energy differences.

  12. Relaxation time T/sub 1/ and bound water fraction of muscle by NMR imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, N.; Ikehira, H.; Yamane, T.; Tateno, Y.; Torii, S.; Matsumura, K.

    1986-05-01

    In order to establish the efficacy of NMR-CT in the diagnostic investigation of muscle disorders, proton NMR-CT imaging was performed and muscle longitudinal relaxation (T1) times were measured in 20 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients and normal controls (NC). In addition, the bound water fraction (BWF) was calculated from the measured T1 value in appropriate cases. Results show that in DMD muscle T1 values were above normal in the early clinical stages, declined rapidly with progress of the disease, and reached the same low level as the subcutaneous fat. This decrease of T1 values was not uniform for all muscles, being most prominent in gluteus maximus and least in sartorius and gracilis. In NC muscle BWF increased with maturation under the age of 10 years, and became fixed beyond that. In the early stages of DMD, BWF was below normal.

  13. Probing water structure and transport in proton exchange membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ling, X.

    2018-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have attracted tremendous attention as alternative energy sources because of their high energy density and practically zero greenhouse gas emission - water is their only direct by-product. Critical to the function of PEMFCs is fast proton and water

  14. Proton Transfer in Nucleobases is Mediated by Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khistyaev, Kirill; Golan, Amir; Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Orms, Natalie; Krylov, Anna I.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-08-08

    Water plays a central role in chemistry and biology by mediating the interactions between molecules, altering energy levels of solvated species, modifying potential energy proles along reaction coordinates, and facilitating ecient proton transport through ion channels and interfaces. This study investigates proton transfer in a model system comprising dry and microhydrated clusters of nucleobases. With mass spectrometry and tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation, we show that water shuts down ionization-induced proton transfer between nucleobases, which is very ecient in dry clusters. Instead, a new pathway opens up in which protonated nucleo bases are generated by proton transfer from the ionized water molecule and elimination of a hydroxyl radical. Electronic structure calculations reveal that the shape of the potential energy prole along the proton transfer coordinate depends strongly on the character of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed, i.e., the proton transfer from water to nucleobases is barrierless when an ionized state localized on water is accessed. The computed energetics of proton transfer is in excellent agreement with the experimental appearance energies. Possible adiabatic passage on the ground electronic state of the ionized system, while energetically accessible at lower energies, is not ecient. Thus, proton transfer is controlled electronically, by the character of the ionized state, rather than statistically, by simple energy considerations.

  15. Measurement of the relaxation rate of the magnetization in Mn12O12-acetate using proton NMR echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang; Lascialfari; Borsa; Gatteschi

    2000-03-27

    We present a novel method to measure the relaxation rate W of the magnetization of Mn 12O (12)-acetate (Mn12) magnetic molecular cluster in its S = 10 ground state at low T. It is based on the observation of an exponential growth in time of the proton NMR signal during the thermal equilibration of the magnetization of the molecules. We can explain the novel effect with a simple model which relates the intensity of the proton echo signal to the microscopic reversal of the magnetization of each individual Mn12 molecule during the equilibration process. The method should find wide application in the study of magnetic molecular clusters in off-equilibrium conditions.

  16. Measurement of the Relaxation Rate of the Magnetization in Mn12O12 -Acetate Using Proton NMR Echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Z. H.; Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.; Gatteschi, D.

    2000-01-01

    We present a novel method to measure the relaxation rate W of the magnetization of Mn 12 O 12 -acetate (Mn12) magnetic molecular cluster in its S=10 ground state at low T . It is based on the observation of an exponential growth in time of the proton NMR signal during the thermal equilibration of the magnetization of the molecules. We can explain the novel effect with a simple model which relates the intensity of the proton echo signal to the microscopic reversal of the magnetization of each individual Mn12 molecule during the equilibration process. The method should find wide application in the study of magnetic molecular clusters in off-equilibrium conditions. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  17. Kinetics of proton transport in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornyshev, A.A.; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Spohr, E.

    2003-01-01

    for rationalizing the excess proton mobility, based on computer simulations, theory of proton transfer (PT) in condensed media, and analysis of classical proton conductivity experiments over broad temperature ranges. The mechanistic options involved are (i) classical hydrodynamic motion of the hydronium ion (H3O...... are brought into the framework of quantum mechanical PT theory in condensed media. Both the nature of the elementary act and the reaction coordinates are, however, different for the two types of PT clusters. The corresponding rate constants are calculated and compared with MD simulations. Within the framework...

  18. Proton spin-lattice relaxation in a liquid crystal-Aerosil complex above the bulk isotropization temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoardo, E.; Grinberg, F.; Vilfan, M.; Kimmich, R

    2004-02-16

    We present a study of the molecular dynamics in an octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB)-Aerosil complex above the bulk isotropization temperature. Using proton nuclear magnetic relaxation experiments in the laboratory frame (T{sub 1}{sup -1}) and in the rotating-frame (T{sub 1{rho}}{sup -1}), we found a notable increase of the relaxation rates in the kHz frequency range as compared to the bulk 8CB liquid crystal at the same temperature. The field-cycling technique was used for the laboratory frame experiments while a conventional apparatus was used for the rotating frame method. The observed behavior is analyzed with the aid of Monte Carlo simulations on the basis of a two-phase fast-exchange model distinguishing surface-ordered and bulk phases. Two processes affecting the low frequency relaxation could be identified: reorientation mediated by translational displacements, accounting for molecular reorientations, and exchange losses of molecules from the surface to the bulk.

  19. Glass transition and relaxation dynamics of propylene glycol-water solutions confined in clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, Khalid; Björklund, Jimmy; Nyhlén, Fredrik; Yttergren, Madeleine; Mârtensson, Lena; Swenson, Jan

    2014-07-01

    The molecular dynamics of aqueous solutions of propylene glycol (PG) and propylene glycol methylether (PGME) confined in a two-dimensional layer-structured Na-vermiculite clay has been studied by broadband dielectric spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. As typical for liquids in confined geometries the intensity of the cooperative α-relaxation becomes considerably more suppressed than the more local β-like relaxation processes. In fact, at high water contents the calorimetric glass transition and related structural α-relaxation cannot even be observed, due to the confinement. Thus, the intensity of the viscosity related α-relaxation is dramatically reduced, but its time scale as well as the related glass transition temperature Tg are for both systems only weakly influenced by the confinement. In the case of the PGME-water solutions it is an important finding since in the corresponding bulk system a pronounced non-monotonic concentration dependence of the glass transition related dynamics has been observed due to the growth of hydrogen bonded relaxing entities of water bridging between PGME molecules [J. Sjöström, J. Mattsson, R. Bergman, and J. Swenson, Phys. Chem. B 115, 10013 (2011)]. The present results suggest that the same type of structural entities are formed in the quasi-two-dimensional space between the clay platelets. It is also observed that the main water relaxation cannot be distinguished from the β-relaxation of PG or PGME in the concentration range up to intermediate water contents. This suggests that these two processes are coupled and that the water molecules affect the time scale of the β-relaxation. However, this is most likely true also for the corresponding bulk solutions, which exhibit similar time scales of this combined relaxation process below Tg. Finally, it is found that at higher water contents the water relaxation does not merge with, or follow, the α-relaxation above Tg, but instead crosses the α-relaxation

  20. Effect of water-methanol mixed solvents on the ultrasonic relaxation of cadmium acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sree Rama Murthy, J.; Ramachandra Rao, B.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of ultrasonic absorption have been made by pulse technique in 1 M solutions of cadmium acetate with water-methanol mixed solvents. Results are analysed by assuming a single relaxation mechanism. The characteristic frequency of relaxation is found to decrease with increasing composition of methanol in the solvent. It is proposed that the mechanism of relaxation may be perturbation of chemical equilibrium between complex CdAc + ions and Cd ++ , Ac - species by soundwaves. (author)

  1. A quantum mechanical alternative to the Arrhenius equation in the interpretation of proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatowicz, Piotr; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Osior, Agnieszka; Kamieński, Bohdan; Szymański, Sławomir

    2015-11-21

    The theory of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in methyl groups in solids has been a recurring problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The current view is that, except for extreme cases of low torsional barriers where special quantum effects are at stake, the relaxation behaviour of the nuclear spins in methyl groups is controlled by thermally activated classical jumps of the methyl group between its three orientations. The temperature effects on the relaxation rates can be modelled by Arrhenius behaviour of the correlation time of the jump process. The entire variety of relaxation effects in protonated methyl groups have recently been given a consistent quantum mechanical explanation not invoking the jump model regardless of the temperature range. It exploits the damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory originally developed to describe NMR line shape effects for hindered methyl groups. In the DQR model, the incoherent dynamics of the methyl group include two quantum rate (i.e., coherence-damping) processes. For proton relaxation only one of these processes is relevant. In this paper, temperature-dependent proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in polycrystalline methyltriphenyl silane and methyltriphenyl germanium, both deuterated in aromatic positions, are reported and interpreted in terms of the DQR model. A comparison with the conventional approach exploiting the phenomenological Arrhenius equation is made. The present observations provide further indications that incoherent motions of molecular moieties in the condensed phase can retain quantum character over much broader temperature range than is commonly thought.

  2. Quantum mechanical alternative to Arrhenius equation in the interpretation of proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in solids

    KAUST Repository

    Bernatowicz, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    Theory of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in methyl groups in solids has been a recurring problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The current view is that, except for extreme cases of low torsional barriers where special quantum effects are at stake, the relaxation behaviour of the nuclear spins in methyl groups is controlled by thermally activated classical jumps of the methyl group between its three orientations. The temperature effects on the relaxation rates can be modelled by Arrhenius behaviour of the correlation time of the jump process. The entire variety of relaxation effects in protonated methyl groups has recently been given a consistently quantum mechanical explanation not invoking the jump model regardless of the temperature range. It exploits the damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory originally developed to describe NMR line shape effects for hindered methyl groups. In the DQR model, the incoherent dynamics of the methyl group include two quantum rate, i.e., coherence-damping processes. For proton relaxation only one of these processes is relevant. In this paper, temperature-dependent proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in polycrystalline methyltriphenyl silane and methyltriphenyl germanium, both deuterated in aromatic positions, are reported and interpreted in terms of the DQR model. A comparison with the conventional approach exploiting the phenomenological Arrhenius equation is made. The present observations provide further indications that incoherent motions of molecular moieties in condensed phase can retain quantum character over much broad temperature range than is commonly thought.

  3. Proton production, neutralisation and reduction in a floating water bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammer, Martina; Wexler, Adam D.; Kuntke, Philipp; Wiltsche, Helmar; Stanulewicz, Natalia; Lankmayr, Ernst; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Fuchs, Elmar C.

    2015-10-01

    This work reports on proton production, transport, reduction and neutralization in floating aqueous bridges under the application of a high dc voltage (‘floating water bridge’). Recently possible mechanisms for proton transfer through the bridge were suggested. In this work we visualize and describe the production of protons in the anolyte and their neutralization in the catholyte. Apart from that, protons are reduced to hydrogen due to electrolysis. Microbubbles are detached instantly, due to the electrohydrodynamic flow at the electrode surface. No larger, visible bubbles are formed and the system degasses through the bridge due to its higher local temperature. A detailed analysis of trace elements originating from beaker material, anode or the atmosphere is presented, showing that their influence on the overall conduction compared to the contribution of protons is negligible. Finally, an electrochemical rationale of high voltage electrolysis of low ionic strength solutions is presented.

  4. Proton production, neutralisation and reduction in a floating water bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammer, Martina; Wexler, Adam D; Kuntke, Philipp; Stanulewicz, Natalia; Lankmayr, Ernst; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Fuchs, Elmar C; Wiltsche, Helmar

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on proton production, transport, reduction and neutralization in floating aqueous bridges under the application of a high dc voltage (‘floating water bridge’). Recently possible mechanisms for proton transfer through the bridge were suggested. In this work we visualize and describe the production of protons in the anolyte and their neutralization in the catholyte. Apart from that, protons are reduced to hydrogen due to electrolysis. Microbubbles are detached instantly, due to the electrohydrodynamic flow at the electrode surface. No larger, visible bubbles are formed and the system degasses through the bridge due to its higher local temperature. A detailed analysis of trace elements originating from beaker material, anode or the atmosphere is presented, showing that their influence on the overall conduction compared to the contribution of protons is negligible. Finally, an electrochemical rationale of high voltage electrolysis of low ionic strength solutions is presented. (paper)

  5. Estimating side-chain order in methyl-protonated, perdeuterated proteins via multiple-quantum relaxation violated coherence transfer NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hechao; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Tugarinov, Vitali

    2012-01-01

    Relaxation violated coherence transfer NMR spectroscopy (Tugarinov et al. in J Am Chem Soc 129:1743–1750, 2007) is an established experimental tool for quantitative estimation of the amplitudes of side-chain motions in methyl-protonated, highly deuterated proteins. Relaxation violated coherence transfer experiments monitor the build-up of methyl proton multiple-quantum coherences that can be created in magnetically equivalent spin-systems as long as their transverse magnetization components relax with substantially different rates. The rate of this build-up is a reporter of the methyl-bearing side-chain mobility. Although the build-up of multiple-quantum 1 H coherences is monitored in these experiments, the decay of the methyl signal during relaxation delays occurs when methyl proton magnetization is in a single-quantum state. We describe a relaxation violated coherence transfer approach where the relaxation of multiple-quantum 1 H– 13 C methyl coherences during the relaxation delay period is quantified. The NMR experiment and the associated fitting procedure that models the time-dependence of the signal build-up, are applicable to the characterization of side-chain order in [ 13 CH 3 ]-methyl-labeled, highly deuterated protein systems up to ∼100 kDa in molecular weight. The feasibility of extracting reliable measures of side-chain order is experimentally verified on methyl-protonated, perdeuterated samples of an 8.5-kDa ubiquitin at 10°C and an 82-kDa Malate Synthase G at 37°C.

  6. An analysis of the NMR-CT image by the measurement of proton-relaxation times in tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Shoji; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Chuzo; Hirakawa, Kimiyoshi; Nishikawa, Hiroyasu; Shimizu, Koji; Kiri, Motosada.

    1984-01-01

    NMR-CT images were analyzed by measuring the proton-relaxation times in tissues. The NMR-CT images were obtained in 10 normal volunteers and 16 patients with brain tumors with a prototype superconducting magnet (Shimadzu Corp., Japan) operating at 0.2 T and 0.375 T. A smooth T 1 relaxation curve was obtained in each part of the brain and the brain tumor by the use of the data of the NMR-CT image; consequently, the in vivo T 1 value was proved to be reliable. The in vivo T 1 value showed the specific value corresponding to each region of the normal brain in all cases. Cerebral gray matter normally had the longest T 1 value, followed by the medulla oblongata, the pons, and white matter. The T 1 value of each region of the brain varied to the same degree in proportion to the strength of the static magnetic field. The in vivo T 1 values of the brain tumor varied with the histological type. All were longer than any part of the brain parenchyma, being between 480 and 780 msec at 0.2 T. The prolongation of the T 1 value does not always correspond to the degree of the malignancy in a tumor. The in vitro T 1 and T 2 values were also prolonged in all tumors. Although the absolute value of T 1 did not coincide between the in vitro and in vivo data, the tendency of the prolongation was the same between them. This result indicated that the NMR-CT images could be analysed by the use of the data of the in vitro T 1 and T 2 values in the tumor tissues. It is important to analyse the NMR-CT image by both in vivo and in vitro examinations of the relaxation times. (J.P.N.)

  7. Thermal Fluctuations in the Magnetic Ground State of the Molecular Cluster Mn12O12 Acetate from μSR and Proton NMR Relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.; Carretta, P.; Jang, Z.H.; Borsa, F.; Gatteschi, D.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation rate are reported for muons and protons as a function of temperature for different values of the applied magnetic field in the Mn 12 O 12 molecular cluster. Strongly field dependent maxima in the relaxation rate versus temperature are observed below 50thinspthinspK. The results are explained in terms of thermal fluctuations of the total magnetization of the cluster among the different orientations with respect to the anisotropy axis. The lifetimes of the different m components of the total spin, S T =10 , of the molecule are obtained from the experiment and shown to be consistent with the ones expected from a spin-phonon coupling mechanism. No clear evidence for macroscopic quantum tunneling was observed in the field dependence of the proton relaxation rate at low T . copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  8. Parity Nonconservation in Proton-Proton and Proton-Water Scattering at 1.5 GeV/c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischke, R. E.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R.; MacArthur, D.; Nagle, D. E.; Frauenfelder, H.; Harper, R. W.; Yuan, V.; McDonald, A. B.; Talaga, R. L.

    1984-07-01

    Experiments searching for parity nonconservation in the scattering of 1.5 GeV/c (800 MeV) polarized protons from an unpolarized water target and a liquid hydrogen target are described. The intensity of the incident proton beam was measured upstream and downstream of the target by a pair of ionization detectors. The beam helicity was reversed at a 30-Hz rate. Auxiliary detectors monitored beam properties that could give rise to false effects. The result for the longitudinal asymmetry from the water is A{sub L} = (1.7 +- 3.3 +- 1.4) x 10{sup -7}, where the first error is statistical and the second is an estimate of systematic effects. The hydrogen data yield a preliminary result of A{sub L} = (1.0 +- 1.6) x 10{sup -7}. The systematic errors for p-p are expected to be < 1 x 10{sup -7}.

  9. Correlated proton-electron hole dynamics in protonated water clusters upon extreme ultraviolet photoionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The ultrafast nuclear and electronic dynamics of protonated water clusters H+(H2On after extreme ultraviolet photoionization is investigated. In particular, we focus on cluster cations with n = 3, 6, and 21. Upon ionization, two positive charges are present in the cluster related to the excess proton and the missing electron, respectively. A correlation is found between the cluster's geometrical conformation and initial electronic energy with the size of the final fragments produced. For situations in which the electron hole and proton are initially spatially close, the two entities become correlated and separate in a time-scale of 20 to 40 fs driven by strong non-adiabatic effects.

  10. Correlated proton-electron hole dynamics in protonated water clusters upon extreme ultraviolet photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Vendrell, Oriol

    2016-01-01

    The ultrafast nuclear and electronic dynamics of protonated water clusters H+(H2O)n after extreme ultraviolet photoionization is investigated. In particular, we focus on cluster cations with n = 3, 6, and 21. Upon ionization, two positive charges are present in the cluster related to the excess proton and the missing electron, respectively. A correlation is found between the cluster's geometrical conformation and initial electronic energy with the size of the final fragments produced. For situations in which the electron hole and proton are initially spatially close, the two entities become correlated and separate in a time-scale of 20 to 40 fs driven by strong non-adiabatic effects. PMID:26798842

  11. Antisickling activity evaluation of 4 aromatic aldehydes using proton magnetic relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcon Dieguez, J.E.; Grisel del Toro Garcia; Yamirka Alonso Geli; Lores Guevara, M.A.

    2006-12-01

    The formation of a Shiff base aduct hemoglobin-aromatic aldehyde, has been reported as inhibitor of the hemoglobin S polymerization. Using the Proton Magnetic Resonance methodology, the polymerization kinetics can be studied and the delay time can be determined. Our studies in vitro show the inhibitor effect of the isovanillin, o-vanillin, m-hydroxybenzaldehyde and the p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, using molar ratio (hemoglobin S/compound) 1:1, 1:4 and 1:8. The td increment (expressed in percents) obtained for each one of the molar ratio was the following: isovanillin: 34±6% (1:1), 68±16% (1:4), ovanillin: 26±10% (1:1), 63±20% (1:4), m-hydroxybelzaldehyde: 16±4% (1:1), 44±12% (1:4) and the phydroxybenzaldehyde: 10±3% (1:1), 32±8% (1:4). In the case of 1:8, the characteristic kinetics curve was not obtained. At the used concentrations, hemolytic activity was not found on the red blood cell. These results confirm the antisickling activity of these aromatic aldehydes, for a technique different to that reported in literature that also allows the quantification of concentration effect. The same ones will facilitate the study of the therapeutic usefulness of these compounds in the sickle cell anemia treatment. (author)

  12. Proton cycling, buffering, and reaction stoichiometry in natural waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, A.F.; Middelburg, J.J.; Soetaert, K.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.A.; Meysman, F.J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing acidification of the global ocean necessitates a solid understanding of how biogeochemical processes are driving proton cycling and observed pH changes in natural waters. The standard way of calculating the pH evolution of an aquatic system is to specify first how biogeochemical processes

  13. Dielectric relaxation and hydrogen bonding interaction in xylitol-water mixtures using time domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rander, D. N.; Joshi, Y. S.; Kanse, K. S.; Kumbharkhane, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The measurements of complex dielectric permittivity of xylitol-water mixtures have been carried out in the frequency range of 10 MHz-30 GHz using a time domain reflectometry technique. Measurements have been done at six temperatures from 0 to 25 °C and at different weight fractions of xylitol (0 xylitol-water can be well described by Cole-Davidson model having an asymmetric distribution of relaxation times. The dielectric parameters such as static dielectric constant and relaxation time for the mixtures have been evaluated. The molecular interaction between xylitol and water molecules is discussed using the Kirkwood correlation factor ( g eff ) and thermodynamic parameter.

  14. Kinetics of water-mediated proton transfer in our atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loerting, T.

    2000-07-01

    Variational transition state theory and multidimensional tunneling methods on hybrid density functional theory generated hypersurfaces have been used to investigate the temperature dependence of the reaction rate constants of water-mediated proton transfer reactions relevant to the chemistry of our atmosphere, namely the hydration of sulfur dioxide and sulfur trioxide and the decomposition of chlorine nitrate. Highly accurate reaction barriers were calculated using ab initio methods taking into account most of the electron correlation, namely CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ//MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ and G2(MP2). On comparing the determined rate constants with laboratory and atmospheric data, the following points could be established: All of the investigated reactions are highly sensitive to changes in humidity, as water acts as efficient catalyst, i.e., the barrier to the reaction is reduced drastically. Present-day atmospheric chemistry can only be explained when a limited number of water molecules is available for the formation of molecular clusters. Both in the troposphere and in the stratosphere SO 3 is hydrated rather than SO 2 . SO 2 emissions have to be oxidized, therefore, before being subject to hydration. A mechanism involving two or three water molecules is relevant for the production of sulfate aerosols, which play a decisive role in the context of global climate change and acid rain. A third water molecule has the function of assisting double-proton transfer rather than acting as active participant in triple-proton transfer in the case of the hydration of sulfur oxides. The observed ozone depletion above Arctica and Antarctica can be explained either by decomposition of chlorine nitrate in the presence of three water molecules (triple proton transfer) or by decomposition of chlorine nitrate in the presence of one molecule of HCl and one molecule of water (double proton transfer). The preassociation reaction required for homogeneous gas-phase conversion of chlorine

  15. Microscopic models for proton transfer in water and strongly hydrogen-bonded complexes with a single-well proton potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    A new mechanism and formalism for proton transfer in donor-acceptor complexes with long hydrogen bonds introduced recently [1], is applied to a proton transfer in liquid water. "Structural diffusion" of hydroxonium ions is regarded as totally adiabatic process, with synchronous hindered translation...... of two closest water molecules to and from the reaction complex as crucial steps. The water molecules induce a "gated" shift of the proton from the donor to the acceptor in the double-well potential with simultaneous breaking/formation of hydrogen bonds between these molecules and the proton donor...... and acceptor. The short-range and long-range proton transfer as "structural diffusion" of Zundel complexes is also considered. The theoretical formalism is illustrated with the use of Morse, exponential, and harmonic molecular potentials. This approach is extended to proton transfer in strongly hydrogen...

  16. Proton Resonance Lines of Water in Heulandite, Mordenite and Clinoptilolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Inclan, C.; Diaz Quintanilla, D.; Diaz Ruano, A.

    1986-01-01

    It is reported for the first time the proton magnetic resonance spectra of the clinoptilolite and mordenite between 220 K and 440 K. In mordenite it was observed that all water molecules have so an intensive diffusive movement, that they are completely delocalized. In clinoptilolite below 390 K, only a part of the water molecules are completely delocalized. Over 390 K all water molecules become delocalized. This particular behavior of the water molecules in clinoptilolite and mordenite is confronted with those structural models proposed by D.W. Breck. The concept of non-localized quantum state is introduced in order to explain the difference observed with the structural models. (author)

  17. In vivo relaxation of N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine plus phosphocreatine, and choline containing compounds during the course of brain infarction: a proton MRS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Henriksen, O

    1992-01-01

    Localized water suppressed proton spectroscopy has opened up a new field of pathophysiological studies of severe brain ischemia. The signals obtained with the pulse sequences used so far are both T1 and T2 weighted. In order to evaluate the extent to which changes in metabolite signals during...... the course of infarction can be explained by changes in T1 and T2 relaxation times, eight patients with acute stroke were studied. STEAM sequences with varying echo delay times and repetition times were used to measure T1 and T2 of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), creatine plus phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr) and choline...... containing compounds (CHO) in a 27-ml voxel located in the affected area of the brain. Ten healthy volunteers served as controls. We found no difference in T1 or T2 of the metabolites between the patients and the normal controls. The T2 of CHO was longer than that of NAA and Cr+PCr. Our results indicate...

  18. Dielectric relaxation studies of some primary alcohols and their mixture with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.S.; Yaqub, M.

    2003-01-01

    The complex dielectric constant of ethyl alcohol, methyl alcohol and 1- propanol and their mixtures with water of different concentration, (0 to 100% by weight) at the temperature of 303K has been evaluated, within the frequency range of (100KHz- 100 MHz). Moreover, the viscosity mu of each alcohol and its mixture with water have been measured at this temperature. The dielectric properties have been evaluated by Hartshorn and Ward apparatus. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of aliphatic group, size and shape on the extent of hydrogen bonding and also to obtain the thermodynamic data on hydrogen bond formation in the pure liquid state and its mixture. The width of the semicircle plot determines the distribution of average relaxation time. Dielectric relaxation time in pure alcohols and their water mixture has been calculated from the respected Cole-Cole plot and dielectric data. A single relaxation time of 117.16ps has been obtained for the molecules of pure methanol, whereas, the dielectric data of prophyl alcohol which indicates the viscosity water have been measured at the temperature 303 K. The dielectric properties in distribution of relaxation time, which is in good agreement with the Davidson-cole representation. The molecules in liquid mixture within frequency range, the mixture has more than one relaxation item, leading to the shortening of main relaxation time as compared with the pure alcohol and broadening of the complex permitivity spectra. The dependence of the dielectric relaxation on composition shows a remarkable behavior. Results are discussed in the light of H-bonded molecules. (author)

  19. Dielectric Relaxation of Bound Water versus Soil Matric Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, M.A.; Dirksen, C.; Kampers, F.W.H.; Feddes, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    The electrical permittivity of soil is a function of the water content, which facilitates water content measurements. The permittivity of soil is also a function of the frequency of the applied electric field. This frequency dependence can be described by the relationship between the dielectric

  20. Graphene oxide-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle composite with high transverse proton relaxivity value for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesha, N.; Srivastava, Chandan, E-mail: csrivastava@materials.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Poojar, Pavan; Geethanath, Sairam [Medical Imaging Research Centre, Dayananda Sagar Institutions, Bangalore 560078 (India); Qurishi, Yasrib [Department of Molecular Reproduction, Development and Genetics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2015-04-21

    The potential of graphene oxide–Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle (GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite as an image contrast enhancing material in magnetic resonance imaging has been investigated. Proton relaxivity values were obtained in three different homogeneous dispersions of GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites synthesized by precipitating Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in three different reaction mixtures containing 0.01 g, 0.1 g, and 0.2 g of graphene oxide. A noticeable difference in proton relaxivity values was observed between the three cases. A comprehensive structural and magnetic characterization revealed discrete differences in the extent of reduction of the graphene oxide and spacing between the graphene oxide sheets in the three composites. The GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite framework that contained graphene oxide with least extent of reduction of the carboxyl groups and largest spacing between the graphene oxide sheets provided the optimum structure for yielding a very high transverse proton relaxivity value. It was found that the GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites possessed good biocompatibility with normal cell lines, whereas they exhibited considerable toxicity towards breast cancer cells.

  1. Magnetization transfer from macromolecules to water protons in murine dental tissues as revealed by 500 MHz 1H-NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Koji; Era, Seiichi; Nagai, Naoki; Sogami, Masaru; Takasaki, Akihiko; Kato, Kazuo.

    1997-01-01

    Although much is known about magnetization transfer phenomena in biological soft tissues, little is known about those in hard tissues. Using a 500 MHz 1 H-NMR spectrometer, we studied the spin-lattice relaxation time (T 1 (H 2 O)) and the intermolecular cross-relaxation times (T IS (H 2 O)) from irradiated macromolecular protons to observed water protons in murine lower incisors (hard tissue) and compared with those in murine lens tissue (soft tissue). Mean values for the water content (%) of murine lower incisors and lens tissue were 16.02±2.39 (n=14) and 67.20±4.60 (n=15), respectively. These findings were consistent with the large different in water content between soft tissues and hard tissues. T IS (H 2 O) values obtained by f 2 -irradiation at 7.13 or -4.00 ppm showed no significant difference between lower incisors and lens tissue. Plots of 1/T IS (H 2 O) values vs. tissue dry weight (W(%)) for lower incisor tissue approximated a straight line with slope approximately equal for that obtained for lens tissue. These results suggest that the state of water in hard tissue may be similar to that in soft tissues, in spite of the significant difference in water content. Thus, saturation transfer NMR techniques such as measurement of T IS (H 2 O) values may be applicable to the study of water-macromolecule interactions in both biological soft and hard tissues. (author)

  2. Time Resolved Broadband Terahertz Relaxation Dynamics of Electron in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Tianwu; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Cooke, David G.

    We investigated the transient response of the solvated electron in water ejected by photodetachment from potassium ferrocyanide using time resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TSTS). Ultrabroadband THz transients are generated and detected by a two-color femtosecond-induced air plasma and air biased...

  3. Superconductivity and fast proton transport in nanoconfined water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. H.

    2018-04-01

    A real-space molecular-orbital density-wave description of Cooper pairing in conjunction with the dynamic Jahn-Teller mechanism for high-Tc superconductivity predicts that electron-doped water confined to the nanoscale environment of a carbon nanotube or biological macromolecule should superconduct below and exhibit fast proton transport above the transition temperature, Tc ≅ 230 K (-43 °C).

  4. On the microscopic fluctuations driving the NMR relaxation of quadrupolar ions in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carof, Antoine; Salanne, Mathieu; Rotenberg, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.rotenberg@upmc.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS, Laboratoire PHENIX, Case 51, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Charpentier, Thibault [CEA, IRAMIS, NIMBE, LSDRM, UMR CEA-CNRS 3685, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2015-11-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation is sensitive to the local structure and dynamics around the probed nuclei. The Electric Field Gradient (EFG) is the key microscopic quantity to understand the NMR relaxation of quadrupolar ions, such as {sup 7}Li{sup +}, {sup 23}Na{sup +}, {sup 25}Mg{sup 2+}, {sup 35}Cl{sup −}, {sup 39}K{sup +}, or {sup 133}Cs{sup +}. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the statistical and dynamical properties of the EFG experienced by alkaline, alkaline Earth, and chloride ions at infinite dilution in water. Specifically, we analyze the effect of the ionic charge and size on the distribution of the EFG tensor and on the multi-step decay of its auto-correlation function. The main contribution to the NMR relaxation time arises from the slowest mode, with a characteristic time on the picosecond time scale. The first solvation shell of the ion plays a dominant role in the fluctuations of the EFG, all the more that the ion radius is small and its charge is large. We propose an analysis based on a simplified charge distribution around the ion, which demonstrates that the auto-correlation of the EFG, hence the NMR relaxation time, reflects primarily the collective translational motion of water molecules in the first solvation shell of the cations. Our findings provide a microscopic route to the quantitative interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements and open the way to the design of improved analytical theories for NMR relaxation for small ionic solutes, which should focus on water density fluctuations around the ion.

  5. Proton exchange in systems: Glucose-water and uric acid-water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maarof, S.

    2007-01-01

    It is clear that formation of glucose-water and uric acid-water solutions is related in principle to interaction accepter - donor between hydrogen atom in water and oxygen atom in glucose or uric acid. The proton exchange in hydrogen bond system is an integral process and it goes by tunnel mechanism (transfer of proton within the hydrogen bridge in these structures). Proton exchange process goes very quickly at low concentrations for glucose and uric acid solutions, because these compounds are able to form more than one hydrogen bond, which helps the proton transfer within obtained structure. However, at its high concentrations, the process becomes very slow due to higher viscosity of its solutions, which result in break down of the structures, and more hydrogen bonds. (author)

  6. Proton Transfers at the Air-Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Himanshu

    Proton transfer reactions at the interface of water with hydrophobic media, such as air or lipids, are ubiquitous on our planet. These reactions orchestrate a host of vital phenomena in the environment including, for example, acidification of clouds, enzymatic catalysis, chemistries of aerosol and atmospheric gases, and bioenergetic transduction. Despite their importance, however, quantitative details underlying these interactions have remained unclear. Deeper insight into these interfacial reactions is also required in addressing challenges in green chemistry, improved water quality, self-assembly of materials, the next generation of micro-nanofluidics, adhesives, coatings, catalysts, and electrodes. This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigation of proton transfer reactions at the air-water interface as a function of hydration gradients, electrochemical potential, and electrostatics. Since emerging insights hold at the lipid-water interface as well, this work is also expected to aid understanding of complex biological phenomena associated with proton migration across membranes. Based on our current understanding, it is known that the physicochemical properties of the gas-phase water are drastically different from those of bulk water. For example, the gas-phase hydronium ion, H3O +(g), can protonate most (non-alkane) organic species, whereas H 3O+(aq) can neutralize only relatively strong bases. Thus, to be able to understand and engineer water-hydrophobe interfaces, it is imperative to investigate this fluctuating region of molecular thickness wherein the 'function' of chemical species transitions from one phase to another via steep gradients in hydration, dielectric constant, and density. Aqueous interfaces are difficult to approach by current experimental techniques because designing experiments to specifically sample interfacial layers (applied quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics to simulate our experiments toward gaining insight at the

  7. Water equivalence of some plastic-water phantom materials for clinical proton beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sulaiti, L.; Shipley, D.; Thomas, R.; Owen, P.; Kacperek, A.; Regan, P.H.; Palmans, H.

    2012-01-01

    Plastic-water phantom materials are not exactly water equivalent since they have a different elemental composition and different interaction cross sections for protons than water. Several studies of the water equivalence of plastic-water phantom materials have been reported for photon and electron beams, but none for clinical proton beams. In proton beams, the difference between non-elastic nuclear interactions in plastic-water phantom materials compared to those in water should be considered. In this work, the water equivalence of Plastic Water ® (PW) 1 , Plastic Water ® Diagnostic Therapy (PWDT) 1 and solid water (WT1) 2 phantoms was studied for clinical proton energies of 60 MeV and 200 MeV. This was done by evaluating the fluence correction factor at equivalent depths; first with respect to water and then with respect to graphite by experiment and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using FLUKA. MC simulations showed that the fluence correction with respect to water was less than 0.5% up to the entire penetration depth of the protons at 60 MeV and less than 1% at 200 MeV up to 20 cm depth for PWDT, PW and WT1. With respect to graphite the fluence correction was about 0.5% for 60 MeV and about 4% for 200 MeV. The experimental results for modulated and un-modulated 60 MeV proton beams showed good agreement with the MC simulated fluence correction factors with respect to graphite deviating less than 1% from unity for the three plastic-water phantoms. - Highlights: ► We study plastic-water in clinical proton beams by experiment and Monte Carlo. ► We obtain fluence correction factors for water and graphite. ► The correction factor for water was close to 1 at 60 MeV and <0.990 at 200 MeV. ► The correction factor for graphite was ∼0.5% at 60 MeV and up to 4% at 200 MeV.

  8. Water-Free Proton-Conducting Membranes for Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Yen, Shiao-Pin

    2007-01-01

    Poly-4-vinylpyridinebisulfate (P4VPBS) is a polymeric salt that has shown promise as a water-free proton-conducting material (solid electrolyte) suitable for use in membrane/electrode assemblies in fuel cells. Heretofore, proton-conducting membranes in fuel cells have been made from perfluorinated ionomers that cannot conduct protons in the absence of water and, consequently, cannot function at temperatures >100 C. In addition, the stability of perfluorinated ionomers at temperatures >100 C is questionable. However, the performances of fuel cells of the power systems of which they are parts could be improved if operating temperatures could be raised above 140 C. What is needed to make this possible is a solid-electrolyte material, such as P4VPBS, that can be cast into membranes and that both retains proton conductivity and remains stable in the desired higher operating temperature range. A family of solid-electrolyte materials different from P4VPBS was described in Anhydrous Proton-Conducting Membranes for Fuel Cells (NPO-30493), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 8 (August 2005), page 48. Those materials notably include polymeric quaternized amine salts. If molecules of such a polymeric salt could be endowed with flexible chain structures, it would be possible to overcome the deficiencies of simple organic amine salts that must melt before being able to conduct protons. However, no polymeric quaternized amine salts have yet shown to be useful in this respect. The present solid electrolyte is made by quaternizing the linear polymer poly- 4-vinylpyridine (P4VP) to obtain P4VPBS. It is important to start with P4VP having a molecular weight of 160,000 daltons because P4VPBS made from lower-molecular-weight P4VP yields brittle membranes. In an experimental synthesis, P4VP was dissolved in methanol and then reacted with an excess of sulfuric acid to precipitate P4VPBS. The precipitate was recovered, washed several times with methanol to remove traces of acid, and dried to a

  9. Water Soluble Polymers as Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Joe Hwang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The relentless increase in the demand for useable power from energy-hungry economies continues to drive energy-material related research. Fuel cells, as a future potential power source that provide clean-at-the-point-of-use power offer many advantages such as high efficiency, high energy density, quiet operation, and environmental friendliness. Critical to the operation of the fuel cell is the proton exchange membrane (polymer electrolyte membrane responsible for internal proton transport from the anode to the cathode. PEMs have the following requirements: high protonic conductivity, low electronic conductivity, impermeability to fuel gas or liquid, good mechanical toughness in both the dry and hydrated states, and high oxidative and hydrolytic stability in the actual fuel cell environment. Water soluble polymers represent an immensely diverse class of polymers. In this comprehensive review the initial focus is on those members of this group that have attracted publication interest, principally: chitosan, poly (ethylene glycol, poly (vinyl alcohol, poly (vinylpyrrolidone, poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid and poly (styrene sulfonic acid. The paper then considers in detail the relationship of structure to functionality in the context of polymer blends and polymer based networks together with the effects of membrane crosslinking on IPN and semi IPN architectures. This is followed by a review of pore-filling and other impregnation approaches. Throughout the paper detailed numerical results are given for comparison to today’s state-of-the-art Nafion® based materials.

  10. Stress relaxation study of water atomized Cu-Cr-Zr powder alloys consolidated by inverse warm extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poblano-Salas, C.A.; Barceinas-Sanchez, J.D.O.

    2009-01-01

    Stress relaxation testing in compression at high temperature was performed on Cu-Cr-Zr alloys produced by consolidation of water atomized powders. Precipitation and recrystallization were monitored during stress relaxation experiments carried out at an ageing temperature of 723 K. Pre-straining imposed to the Cu-Cr-Zr samples prior to stress relaxation testing resulted in reduced hardness compared to that reported for conventionally-aged alloys; it also resulted in shorter times for achieving maximum strengthening on ageing.

  11. Automated processing for proton spectroscopic imaging using water reference deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maudsley, A A; Wu, Z; Meyerhoff, D J; Weiner, M W

    1994-06-01

    Automated formation of MR spectroscopic images (MRSI) is necessary before routine application of these methods is possible for in vivo studies; however, this task is complicated by the presence of spatially dependent instrumental distortions and the complex nature of the MR spectrum. A data processing method is presented for completely automated formation of in vivo proton spectroscopic images, and applied for analysis of human brain metabolites. This procedure uses the water reference deconvolution method (G. A. Morris, J. Magn. Reson. 80, 547(1988)) to correct for line shape distortions caused by instrumental and sample characteristics, followed by parametric spectral analysis. Results for automated image formation were found to compare favorably with operator dependent spectral integration methods. While the water reference deconvolution processing was found to provide good correction of spatially dependent resonance frequency shifts, it was found to be susceptible to errors for correction of line shape distortions. These occur due to differences between the water reference and the metabolite distributions.

  12. Measurement of the Relaxation Rate of the Magnetization in Mn{sub 12}O{sub 12} -Acetate Using Proton NMR Echo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Z. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Lascialfari, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' A. Volta' ' e Unita' , INFM di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia, (Italy); Borsa, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' A. Volta' ' e Unita' , INFM di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia, (Italy); Gatteschi, D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via Maragliano 77, 50144 Firenze, (Italy)

    2000-03-27

    We present a novel method to measure the relaxation rate W of the magnetization of Mn{sub 12}O {sub 12} -acetate (Mn12) magnetic molecular cluster in its S=10 ground state at low T . It is based on the observation of an exponential growth in time of the proton NMR signal during the thermal equilibration of the magnetization of the molecules. We can explain the novel effect with a simple model which relates the intensity of the proton echo signal to the microscopic reversal of the magnetization of each individual Mn12 molecule during the equilibration process. The method should find wide application in the study of magnetic molecular clusters in off-equilibrium conditions. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  13. Proton T2 relaxation effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide. Comparison between fast spin echo and conventional spin echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Akihiro; Satoh, Yoshinori; Higuchi, Nobuya; Izutsu, Mutsumu; Yuasa, Yuji; Hiramatsu, Kyoichi

    1995-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles have been known to show a great T 2 relaxation effect in the liver, which contributes to significant liver signal decrease and detection of hepatic neoplasms. Recently, fast spin echo (FSE) sequence with less scanning time than conventional spin echo (SE) sequence has been rapidly introduced in clinical MR imaging. To investigate whether SPIO would show decreased T 2 relaxation effect on FSE, we obtained T 2 relaxivity (R2) of SPIO in vitro and liver signal decrease caused by SPIO in vivo. SPIO showed 20% less R2 on Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence than on SE. Relative liver signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decrease caused by SPIO was significantly smaller (p 2 relaxation effect on FSE than on SE. However, further studies will be required to assess the diagnostic capability of SPIO on FSE, in the detection of hepatic neoplasms. (author)

  14. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of water + t-butyl alcohol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The water proton resonance initially shifts to higher frequencies (low fields) as the cosolvent is added to water, and the shift to higher frequency is strongly temperature dependent, the effect being greatly enhanced at lower temperatures. As the proportion of cosolvent increases the hydroxyl proton signals in the water + ...

  15. Water interactions with varying molecular states of bovine casein: 2H NMR relaxation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumosinski, T.F.; Pessen, H.; Prestrelski, S.J.; Farrell, H.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The caseins occur in milk as spherical colloidal complexes of protein and salts with an average diameter of 1200 A, the casein micelles. Removal of Ca2+ is thought to result in their dissociation into smaller protein complexes stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and called submicelles. Whether these submicelles actually occur within the micelles as discrete particles interconnected by calcium phosphate salt bridges has been the subject of much controversy. A variety of physical measurements have shown that casein micelles contain an inordinately high amount of trapped water (2 to 7 g H 2 O/g protein). With this in mind it was of interest to determine if NMR relaxation measurements could detect the presence of this trapped water within the micelles, and to evaluate whether it is a continuum with picosecond correlation times or is associated in part with discrete submicellar structures with nanosecond motions. For this purpose the variations in 2 H NMR longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates of water with protein concentration were determined for bovine casein at various temperatures, under both submicellar and micellar conditions. D 2 O was used instead of H 2 O to eliminate cross-relaxation effects. From the protein concentration dependence of the relaxation rates, the second virial coefficient of the protein was obtained by nonlinear regression analysis. Using either an isotropic tumbling or an intermediate asymmetry model, degrees of hydration, v, and correlation times, tau c, were calculated for the caseins; from the latter parameter the Stokes radius, r, was obtained. Next, estimates of molecular weights were obtained from r and the partial specific volume. Values were in the range of those published from other methodologies for the submicelles

  16. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Nagoya 462-8508 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy.

  17. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy

  18. Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienitz, Brian; Yamada, Haruhiko; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Weber, Adam

    2009-11-19

    It is well known that the proton-exchange membrane is perhaps the most critical component of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. Typical membranes, such as Nafion(R), require hydration to conduct efficiently and are instrumental in cell water management. Recently, evidence has been shown that these membranes might have different interfacial morphology and transport properties than in the bulk. In this paper, experimental data combined with theoretical simulations will be presented that explore the existence and impact of interfacial resistance on water transport for Nafion(R) 21x membranes. A mass-transfer coefficient for the interfacial resistance is calculated from experimental data using different permeation cells. This coefficient is shown to depend exponentially on relative humidity or water activity. The interfacial resistance does not seem to exist for liquid/membrane or membrane/membrane interfaces. The effect of the interfacial resistance is to flatten the water-content profiles within the membrane during operation. Under typical operating conditions, the resistance is on par with the water-transport resistance of the bulk membrane. Thus, the interfacial resistance can be dominant especially in thin, dry membranes and can affect overall fuel-cell performance.

  19. Human whole-blood (1)H2O longitudinal relaxation with normal and high-relaxivity contrast reagents: influence of trans-cell-membrane water exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gregory J; Woods, Mark; Springer, Charles S; Bastawrous, Sarah; Bhargava, Puneet; Maki, Jeffrey H

    2014-12-01

    Accurate characterization of contrast reagent (CR) longitudinal relaxivity in whole blood is required to predict arterial signal intensity in contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA). This study measured the longitudinal relaxation rate constants (R1 ) over a concentration range for non-protein-binding and protein-binding CRs in ex vivo whole blood and plasma at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla (T) under physiologic arterial conditions. Relaxivities of gadoteridol, gadobutrol, gadobenate, and gadofosveset were measured for [CR] from 0 to 18 mM [mmol(CR)/L(blood)]: the latter being the upper limit of what may be expected in CE-MRA. In plasma, the (1) H2 O R1 [CR]-dependence was nonlinear for gadobenate and gadofosveset secondary to CR interactions with the serum macromolecule albumin, and was well described by an analytical expression for effective 1:1 binding stoichiometry. In whole blood, the (1) H2 O R1 [CR]-dependence was markedly non-linear for all CRs, and was well-predicted by an expression for equilibrium exchange of water molecules between plasma and intracellular spaces using a priori parameter values only. In whole blood, (1) H2 O R1 exhibits a nonlinear relationship with [CR] over 0 to 18 mM CR. The nonlinearity is well described by exchange of water between erythrocyte and plasma compartments, and is particularly evident for high relaxivity CRs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Umbrella sampling of proton transfer in a creatine-water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, Olga; Bachert, Peter; Imhof, Petra

    2014-04-01

    Proton transfer reactions are among the most common processes in chemistry and biology. Proton transfer between creatine and surrounding solvent water is underlying the chemical exchange saturation transfer used as a contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. The free energy barrier, determined by first-principles umbrella sampling simulations (EaDFT 3 kcal/mol) is in the same order of magnitude as the experimentally obtained activation energy. The underlying mechanism is a first proton transfer from the guanidinium group to the water pool, followed by a second transition where a proton is "transferred back" from the nearest water molecule to the deprotonated nitrogen atom of creatine.

  1. Complex methyl groups dynamics in [(CH3)4P]3Sb2Br9 (PBA) from low to high temperatures by proton spin-lattice relaxation and narrowing of proton NMR spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latanowicz, L; Medycki, W; Jakubas, R

    2009-11-01

    Molecular dynamics of a polycrystalline sample of [(CH(3))(4)P](3)Sb(2)Br(9) (PBA) has been studied on the basis of the T(1) (24.7 MHz) relaxation time measurement, the proton second moment of NMR and the earlier published T(1) (90 MHz) relaxation times. The study was performed in a wide range of temperatures (30-337 K). The tunnel splitting omega(T) of the methyl groups was estimated as of low frequency (from kHz to few MHz). The proton spin pairs of the methyl group are known to perform a complex internal motion being a resultant of four components. Three of them involve mass transportation over and through the potential barrier and are characterized by the correlation times tau(3) and tau(T)of the jumps over the barrier and tunnel jumps in the threefold potential of the methyl group and tau(iso) the correlation time of isotropic rotation of the whole TMP cation. For tau(3) and tau(iso) the Arrhenius temperature dependence was assumed, while for tau(T)--the Schrödinger one. The fourth motion causes fluctuations of the tunnel splitting frequency, omega(T), and it is related to the lifetime of the methyl spin at the energy level. The correlation function for this fourth motion (tau(omega) correlation time) has been proposed by Müller-Warmuth et al. In this paper a formula for the correlation function and spectral density of the complex motion made of the above-mentioned four components was derived and used in interpretation of the T(1) relaxation time. The second moment of proton NMR line at temperatures below 50K is four times lower than its value for the rigid structure. The three components of the internal motion characterized by tau(T), tau(H), and tau(iso) were proved to reduce the second moment of the NMR line. The tunnel jumps of the methyl group reduce M(2) at almost 0K, the classical jumps over the barrier reduce M(2) in the vicinity of 50K, while the isotropic motion near 150K. Results of the study on the dynamics of CH(3) groups of TMP cation based on

  2. Stereoselective and stereospecific effects in the formation of heteronuclear tartrate complexes of 3d- and 4f-elements from proton magnetic relaxation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sal'nikov, Yu.I.; Chevela, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    A new approach to identification of stereoselective and stereospecific effects in the formation of heteronuclear tartrate complexes of 3d- and 4f-elements according to proton magnetic relaxation data is developed. At the first stage comparison of experimental dependences of the property measured (relaxation efficiency coefficient, Bjerrum function etc.) on the consentrational parameters is conducted. Their different course in systems with dH 4 L (d-tartaric acid) and dlH 4 L (dl-tartaric acid) points out to the presence of stereoeffects. Then, using mathematical simulation the most true stoichiometry of complex particles is determined as well as optimized values of their stability constants and intensity factors. The method is used when investigating the following systems: Fe 3+ -dH 4 L(dlH 4 L), Ln 3+ -dH 4 L(dlH 4 L), Fe 3+ -Ln 3+ -dH 4 L(dlH 4 L)(Ln 3+ -Gd 3+ , Ho 3+ , Er 3+ , Tm 3+ )

  3. Dual reorientation relaxation routes of water molecules in oxyanion’s hydration shell: A molecular geometry perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Yang, Yi Isaac; Gao, Yi Qin, E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering and Biodynamic Optical Imaging Center, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we examine how complex ions such as oxyanions influence the dynamic properties of water and whether differences exist between simple halide anions and oxyanions. Nitrate anion is taken as an example to investigate the hydration properties of oxyanions. Reorientation relaxation of its hydration water can occur through two different routes: water can either break its hydrogen bond with the nitrate to form one with another water or switch between two oxygen atoms of the same nitrate. The latter molecular mechanism increases the residence time of oxyanion’s hydration water and thus nitrate anion slows down the translational motion of neighbouring water. But it is also a “structure breaker” in that it accelerates the reorientation relaxation of hydration water. Such a result illustrates that differences do exist between the hydration of oxyanions and simple halide anions as a result of different molecular geometries. Furthermore, the rotation of the nitrate solute is coupled with the hydrogen bond rearrangement of its hydration water. The nitrate anion can either tilt along the axis perpendicularly to the plane or rotate in the plane. We find that the two reorientation relaxation routes of the hydration water lead to different relaxation dynamics in each of the two above movements of the nitrate solute. The current study suggests that molecular geometry could play an important role in solute hydration and dynamics.

  4. Dual reorientation relaxation routes of water molecules in oxyanion’s hydration shell: A molecular geometry perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Yang, Yi Isaac; Gao, Yi Qin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examine how complex ions such as oxyanions influence the dynamic properties of water and whether differences exist between simple halide anions and oxyanions. Nitrate anion is taken as an example to investigate the hydration properties of oxyanions. Reorientation relaxation of its hydration water can occur through two different routes: water can either break its hydrogen bond with the nitrate to form one with another water or switch between two oxygen atoms of the same nitrate. The latter molecular mechanism increases the residence time of oxyanion’s hydration water and thus nitrate anion slows down the translational motion of neighbouring water. But it is also a “structure breaker” in that it accelerates the reorientation relaxation of hydration water. Such a result illustrates that differences do exist between the hydration of oxyanions and simple halide anions as a result of different molecular geometries. Furthermore, the rotation of the nitrate solute is coupled with the hydrogen bond rearrangement of its hydration water. The nitrate anion can either tilt along the axis perpendicularly to the plane or rotate in the plane. We find that the two reorientation relaxation routes of the hydration water lead to different relaxation dynamics in each of the two above movements of the nitrate solute. The current study suggests that molecular geometry could play an important role in solute hydration and dynamics

  5. 13N species formed by proton irradiation of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilbury, R.S.; Dahl, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    We have shown that the irradiation of aerated water with 14.5-MeV protons produces as principal radioactive products nitrogen-13-labeled nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium ions. The yield of 13 NH 4 + varied from approximately 40% at low integrated dose (0.01 μAh) to 0.4% at high integrated dose (25 μAh), 13 NO 3 - varied from 50% at low dose to 85% at high dose. 13 N 2 - varied from 10% at low dose to 5% at high dose and 40% at intermediate doses. The results varied with recent use of target chamber. Induced radioactivity in the window foil was shown to have an effect on product composition. The effect of dissolved oxygen and certain additives (ethanol, ascorbic acid, formic acid, and ammonia) were investigated. In the absence of dissolved oxygen, or in the presence of ethanol, formic acid or ascorbic acid, almost pure 13 NH 3 could be produced at doses up to 2μAh. The data are explained by postulating the initial production of 13 NH 3 by successive abstraction of H atoms by the 13 NH 3 to HNO 2 and HNO 3

  6. Water versus DNA A new deal for proton transport modeling in biological matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, C; Quinto, M A; Monti, J M; Galassi, M E; Fojón, O A; Hanssen, J; Rivarola, R D; Week, P F

    2015-01-01

    Water vapor is a common surrogate of DNA for modeling the proton-induced ionizing processes in living tissue exposed to radiations. The present study aims at scrutinizing the validity of this approximation and then revealing new insights into proton-induced energy transfers by a comparative analysis between water and realistic biological medium. In this context, self-consistent quantum mechanical modeling of the ionization and electron capture processes is reported within the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state framework for both isolated water molecules and DNA components impacted by proton beams. (paper)

  7. The effects of some parameters on the calculated 1H NMR relaxation times of cell water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivula, A.; Suominen, K.; Kiviniitty, K.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of some parameters on the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times is calculated and a comparison between the calculated relaxation times with the results of different measurements is made. (M.S.)

  8. R1 correction in amide proton transfer imaging: indication of the influence of transcytolemmal water exchange on CEST measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Li, Ke; Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Zu, Zhongliang; Zaiss, Moritz; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C; Xu, Junzhong

    2015-12-01

    Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging may potentially detect mobile proteins/peptides non-invasively in vivo, but its specificity may be reduced by contamination from other confounding effects such as asymmetry of non-specific magnetization transfer (MT) effects and spin-lattice relaxation with rate R1 (=1/T1). Previously reported spillover, MT and R1 correction methods were based on a two-pool model, in which the existence of multiple water compartments with heterogeneous relaxation properties in real tissues was ignored. Such simple models may not adequately represent real tissues, and thus such corrections may be unreliable. The current study investigated the effectiveness and accuracy of correcting for R1 in APT imaging via simulations and in vivo experiments using tumor-bearing rats subjected to serial injections of Gd-DTPA that produced different tissue R1 values in regions of blood-brain-barrier breakdown. The results suggest that conventional measurements of APT contrast (such as APT* and MTRasym ) may be significantly contaminated by R1 variations, while the R1 -corrected metric AREX* was found to be relatively unaffected by R1 changes over a broad range (0.4-1 Hz). Our results confirm the importance of correcting for spin-lattice relaxation effects in quantitative APT imaging, and demonstrate the reliability of using the observed tissue R1 for corrections to obtain more specific and accurate measurements of APT contrast in vivo. The results also indicate that, due to relatively fast transcytolemmal water exchange, the influence of intra- and extracellular water compartments on CEST measurements with seconds long saturation time may be ignored in tumors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of diffusion and relaxation in hydrating white cement pastes of different water content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Galvosas, Petrik; Geier, Oliver; Zimmermann, Christian; Dakkouri, Marwan; Karger, Jorg

    2001-01-01

    While the nuclear spin relaxation time changes in hydrating cement materials have been widely studied by various groups during the last 20 years, data on the self-diffusion behavior of the pore water during hydration of a cement paste are much scarcer. Taking advantage of improved spectrometer hardware for pulsed field gradient diffusometry and a specialized pulse sequence which is designed to compensate the detrimental effects of inner magnetic field gradients in the sample we have studied the water self-diffusion behavior in pastes prepared from white cement at various water/cement ratios. For the same mixtures, studies of the transverse spin relaxation behavior were also conducted. A comparison of the results from both techniques shows that the diffusion coefficient starts to decrease only much later than the relaxation times for all pastes studied. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  10. In vivo field dependence of proton relaxation times in human brain, liver and skeletal muscle: a multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; de Certaines, J D; Spisni, A

    1993-01-01

    and MRS, the in vivo field dispersion of T1 and T2 has been measured in order to evaluate whether ex vivo data are representative for the in vivo situation. Brain, skeletal muscle, and liver of healthy human volunteers were studied. Fifteen MR units with a field strength ranging from 0.08 T to 1.5 T took......T1 and T2 relaxation times are fundamental parameters for signal contrast behaviour in MRI. A number of ex vivo relaxometry studies have dealt with the magnetic field dispersion of T1. By means of multicenter study within the frame of the COMAC BME Concerted Action on Tissue Characterization by MRI......, whereas no significant variations were seen for T2. Our in vivo data were generally in reasonable agreement with proposed models based on ex vivo measurements....

  11. The water equivalence of solid materials used for dosimetry with small proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Uwe; Pemler, Peter; Besserer, Juergen; Dellert, Matthias; Moosburger, Martin; Boer, Jorrit de; Pedroni, Eros; Boehringer, Terence

    2002-01-01

    Various solid materials are used instead of water for absolute dosimetry with small proton beams. This may result in a dose measurement different to that in water, even when the range of protons in the phantom material is considered correctly. This dose difference is caused by the diverse cross sections for inelastic nuclear scattering in water and in the phantom materials respectively. To estimate the magnitude of this effect, flux and dose measurements with a 177 MeV proton pencil beam having a width of 0.6 cm (FWHM) were performed. The proton flux and the deposited dose in the beam path were determined behind water, lucite, polyethylene, teflon, and aluminum of diverse thicknesses. The number of out-scattered protons due to inelastic nuclear scattering was determined for water and the different materials. The ratios of the number of scattered protons in the materials relative to that in water were found to be 1.20 for lucite, 1.16 for polyethylene, 1.22 for teflon, and 1.03 for aluminum. The difference between the deposited dose in water and in the phantom materials taken in the center of the proton pencil beam, was estimated from the flux measurements, always taking the different ranges of protons in the materials into account. The estimated dose difference relative to water in 15 cm water equivalent thickness was -2.3% for lucite, -1.7% for polyethylene, -2.5% for teflon, and -0.4% for aluminum. The dose deviation was verified by a measurement using an ionization chamber. It should be noted that the dose error is larger when the effective point of measurement in the material is deeper or when the energy is higher

  12. Hydroxide diffuses slower than hydronium in water because its solvated structure inhibits correlated proton transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mohan; Zheng, Lixin; Santra, Biswajit; Ko, Hsin-Yu; DiStasio, Robert A., Jr.; Klein, Michael L.; Car, Roberto; Wu, Xifan

    2018-03-01

    Proton transfer via hydronium and hydroxide ions in water is ubiquitous. It underlies acid-base chemistry, certain enzyme reactions, and even infection by the flu. Despite two centuries of investigation, the mechanism underlying why hydroxide diffuses slower than hydronium in water is still not well understood. Herein, we employ state-of-the-art density-functional-theory-based molecular dynamics—with corrections for non-local van der Waals interactions, and self-interaction in the electronic ground state—to model water and hydrated water ions. At this level of theory, we show that structural diffusion of hydronium preserves the previously recognized concerted behaviour. However, by contrast, proton transfer via hydroxide is less temporally correlated, due to a stabilized hypercoordination solvation structure that discourages proton transfer. Specifically, the latter exhibits non-planar geometry, which agrees with neutron-scattering results. Asymmetry in the temporal correlation of proton transfer leads to hydroxide diffusing slower than hydronium.

  13. Correlation between morphology, water uptake, and proton conductivity in radiation-grafted proton-exchange membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Sandor; Gasser, Urs; Mortensen, Kell

    2010-01-01

    An SANS investigation of hydrated proton exchange membranes is presented. Our membranes were synthesized by radiation-induced grafting of ETFE with styrene in the presence of a crosslinker, followed by sulfonation of the styrene. The contrast variation method was used to understand the relationship...

  14. Mathematical modeling of water mass balance for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Jaafar Sahari; Nik Suhaimi Mat Hassan

    2006-01-01

    Gas and water management are key to achieving good performance from a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. Water plays a critical role in PEMFC. The proton conductivity is increase with the water content. In order to achieve enough hydration, water is normally introduced into the cell externally by a variety of methods such as liquid injection, steam introduction, and humidification of reactants by passing them through humidifiers before entering the cell. In this paper, mathematical modeling of water mass balance for PEMFC at anode and cathode side are proposed by using external humidification and assume that steady state, constant pressure, constant temperature and gases distribution are uniform

  15. A proton wire and water channel revealed in the crystal structure of isatin hydrolase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard-Andersen, Kaare; Sommer, Theis; Jensen, Jan Kristian

    2014-01-01

    to a novel family of metalloenzymes that include the bacterial kynurenine formamidase. The product state, mimicked by bound thioisatinate, reveals a water molecule that bridges the thioisatinate to a proton wire in an adjacent water channel and thus allows the proton released by the reaction to escape only...... when the product is formed. The functional proton wire present in IH-b represents a unique catalytic feature common to all hydrolases is here trapped and visualized for the first time. The local molecular environment required to coordinate thioisatinate allows stronger and more confident identification...

  16. Protic Salt Polymer Membranes: High-Temperature Water-Free Proton-Conducting Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervasio, Dominic Francis [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2010-09-30

    This research on proton-containing (protic) salts directly addresses proton conduction at high and low temperatures. This research is unique, because no water is used for proton ionization nor conduction, so the properties of water do not limit proton fuel cells. A protic salt is all that is needed to give rise to ionized proton and to support proton mobility. A protic salt forms when proton transfers from an acid to a base. Protic salts were found to have proton conductivities that are as high as or higher than the best aqueous electrolytes at ambient pressures and comparable temperatures without or with water present. Proton conductivity of the protic salts occurs providing two conditions exist: i) the energy difference is about 0.8 eV between the protic-salt state versus the state in which the acid and base are separated and 2) the chemical constituents rotate freely. The physical state of these proton-conducting salts can be liquid, plastic crystal as well as solid organic and inorganic polymer membranes and their mixtures. Many acids and bases can be used to make a protic salt which allows tailoring of proton conductivity, as well as other properties that affect their use as electrolytes in fuel cells, such as, stability, adsorption on catalysts, environmental impact, etc. During this project, highly proton conducting (~ 0.1S/cm) protic salts were made that are stable under fuel-cell operating conditions and that gave highly efficient fuel cells. The high efficiency is attributed to an improved oxygen electroreduction process on Pt which was found to be virtually reversible in a number of liquid protic salts with low water activity (< 1% water). Solid flexible non-porous composite membranes, made from inorganic polymer (e.g., 10%indium 90%tin pyrophosphate, ITP) and organic polymer (e.g., polyvinyl pyridinium phosphate, PVPP), were found that give conductivity and fuel cell performances similar to phosphoric acid electrolyte with no need for hydration at

  17. Fast mapping of the T2 relaxation time of cerebral metabolites using proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Posse, Stefan; Lin, Yi-Ru; Ko, Cheng-Wen; Otazo, Ricardo; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2007-05-01

    Metabolite T2 is necessary for accurate quantification of the absolute concentration of metabolites using long-echo-time (TE) acquisition schemes. However, lengthy data acquisition times pose a major challenge to mapping metabolite T2. In this study we used proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) at 3T to obtain fast T2 maps of three major cerebral metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cre), and choline (Cho). We showed that PEPSI spectra matched T2 values obtained using single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS). Data acquisition for 2D metabolite maps with a voxel volume of 0.95 ml (32 x 32 image matrix) can be completed in 25 min using five TEs and eight averages. A sufficient spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for T2 estimation was validated by high Pearson's correlation coefficients between logarithmic MR signals and TEs (R2 = 0.98, 0.97, and 0.95 for NAA, Cre, and Cho, respectively). In agreement with previous studies, we found that the T2 values of NAA, but not Cre and Cho, were significantly different between gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM; P PEPSI and SVS scans was less than 9%. Consistent spatial distributions of T2 were found in six healthy subjects, and disagreement among subjects was less than 10%. In summary, the PEPSI technique is a robust method to obtain fast mapping of metabolite T2. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Acoustic time-of-flight for proton range verification in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.Avery@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Vander Stappen, François [Ion Beam Applications SA, Louvain-la-Neuve 1348 (Belgium); Sehgal, Chandra M. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: Measurement of the arrival times of thermoacoustic waves induced by pulsed proton dose depositions (protoacoustics) may provide a proton range verification method. The goal of this study is to characterize the required dose and protoacoustic proton range (distance) verification accuracy in a homogeneous water medium at a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: Gaussian-like proton pulses with 17 μs widths and instantaneous currents of 480 nA (5.6 × 10{sup 7} protons/pulse, 3.4 cGy/pulse at the Bragg peak) were generated by modulating the cyclotron proton source with a function generator. After energy degradation, the 190 MeV proton pulses irradiated a water phantom, and the generated protoacoustic emissions were measured by a hydrophone. The detector position and proton pulse characteristics were varied. The experimental results were compared to simulations. Different arrival time metrics derived from acoustic waveforms were compared, and the accuracy of protoacoustic time-of-flight distance calculations was assessed. Results: A 27 mPa noise level was observed in the treatment room during irradiation. At 5 cm from the proton beam, an average maximum pressure of 5.2 mPa/1 × 10{sup 7} protons (6.1 mGy at the Bragg peak) was measured after irradiation with a proton pulse with 10%–90% rise time of 11 μs. Simulation and experiment arrival times agreed well, and the observed 2.4 μs delay between simulation and experiment is attributed to the difference between the hydrophone’s acoustic and geometric centers. Based on protoacoustic arrival times, the beam axis position was measured to within (x, y) = (−2.0,  0.5) ± 1 mm. After deconvolution of the exciting proton pulse, the protoacoustic compression peak provided the most consistent measure of the distance to the Bragg peak, with an error distribution with mean = − 4.5 mm and standard deviation = 2.0 mm. Conclusions: Based on water tank measurements at a clinical hospital-based cyclotron

  19. Anisotropy of the proton spin--lattice relaxation time in the superconducting intercalation complex TaS2(NH3): Structural and bonding implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, F.R.; Silbernagel, B.G.

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the interaction responsible for the formation of molecular intercalation complexes between Lewis bases and layered transition metal dichalcogenides is not well understood. To some extent this is due to a lack of structural information. A prototype of these complexes is TaS 2 (NH 3 ), in which monolayers of ammonia are inserted between the metallic, superconducting layers of TaS 2 . The compound is crystalline and stoichiometric. Measurement of the anisotropy of the proton spin--lattice relaxation time at 300 degreeK indicates that the molecular threefold symmetry axis is not perpendicular to the disulfide layers as suggested by other workers, but is parallel to the layers. This orientation precludes direct interaction between the molecular lone pair orbital and the transition metal atoms. The interactions governing the structure of this complex may be similar to those obtaining in the intercalation complexes between TaS 2 and a number of substituted pyridines, in which complexes the axis of the lone pair orbital is also parallel to the layers

  20. Electron transfer activation of a second water channel for proton transport in [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sode, Olaseni; Voth, Gregory A., E-mail: gavoth@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, James Franck Institute, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, Computation Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA and Computing, Environment and Life Sciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    Hydrogenase enzymes are important because they can reversibly catalyze the production of molecular hydrogen. Proton transport mechanisms have been previously studied in residue pathways that lead to the active site of the enzyme via residues Cys299 and Ser319. The importance of this pathway and these residues has been previously exhibited through site-specific mutations, which were shown to interrupt the enzyme activity. It has been shown recently that a separate water channel (WC2) is coupled with electron transport to the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase. The water-mediated proton transport mechanisms of the enzyme in different electronic states have been studied using the multistate empirical valence bond reactive molecular dynamics method, in order to understand any role WC2 may have in facilitating the residue pathway in bringing an additional proton to the enzyme active site. In a single electronic state A{sup 2−}, a water wire was formed through which protons can be transported with a low free energy barrier. The remaining electronic states were shown, however, to be highly unfavorable to proton transport in WC2. A double amino acid substitution is predicted to obstruct proton transport in electronic state A{sup 2-} by closing a cavity that could otherwise fill with water near the proximal Fe of the active site.

  1. Electron transfer activation of a second water channel for proton transport in [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sode, Olaseni; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogenase enzymes are important because they can reversibly catalyze the production of molecular hydrogen. Proton transport mechanisms have been previously studied in residue pathways that lead to the active site of the enzyme via residues Cys299 and Ser319. The importance of this pathway and these residues has been previously exhibited through site-specific mutations, which were shown to interrupt the enzyme activity. It has been shown recently that a separate water channel (WC2) is coupled with electron transport to the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase. The water-mediated proton transport mechanisms of the enzyme in different electronic states have been studied using the multistate empirical valence bond reactive molecular dynamics method, in order to understand any role WC2 may have in facilitating the residue pathway in bringing an additional proton to the enzyme active site. In a single electronic state A 2− , a water wire was formed through which protons can be transported with a low free energy barrier. The remaining electronic states were shown, however, to be highly unfavorable to proton transport in WC2. A double amino acid substitution is predicted to obstruct proton transport in electronic state A 2- by closing a cavity that could otherwise fill with water near the proximal Fe of the active site

  2. Rotational dynamics in supercooled water from nuclear spin relaxation and molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvist, Johan; Mattea, Carlos; Sunde, Erik P; Halle, Bertil

    2012-05-28

    Structural dynamics in liquid water slow down dramatically in the supercooled regime. To shed further light on the origin of this super-Arrhenius temperature dependence, we report high-precision (17)O and (2)H NMR relaxation data for H(2)O and D(2)O, respectively, down to 37 K below the equilibrium freezing point. With the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we provide a detailed analysis of the rotational motions probed by the NMR experiments. The NMR-derived rotational correlation time τ(R) is the integral of a time correlation function (TCF) that, after a subpicosecond librational decay, can be described as a sum of two exponentials. Using a coarse-graining algorithm to map the MD trajectory on a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) in angular space, we show that the slowest TCF component can be attributed to large-angle molecular jumps. The mean jump angle is ∼48° at all temperatures and the waiting time distribution is non-exponential, implying dynamical heterogeneity. We have previously used an analogous CTRW model to analyze quasielastic neutron scattering data from supercooled water. Although the translational and rotational waiting times are of similar magnitude, most translational jumps are not synchronized with a rotational jump of the same molecule. The rotational waiting time has a stronger temperature dependence than the translation one, consistent with the strong increase of the experimentally derived product τ(R) D(T) at low temperatures. The present CTRW jump model is related to, but differs in essential ways from the extended jump model proposed by Laage and co-workers. Our analysis traces the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of τ(R) to the rotational waiting time. We present arguments against interpreting this temperature dependence in terms of mode-coupling theory or in terms of mixture models of water structure.

  3. Protonic charge defect structures in floating water bridges observed as Zundel and Eigen solvation arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Omar; de Castro, Jose Roberto; Valente Filho, Juracyr Ferraz; Soares, David Mendez

    2017-10-01

    Protonic arrangements were detected in water bridge structures using confocal Raman microscopy, and the spectra show two formed structures. The measured Raman spectra were modified using the voltage applied to the bridge structure, which changed the proportion of these two species. Initially, for a 6.3 kV applied voltage, there was a measurable increase in the bridge current above the Ohmic contribution and the observed Raman spectrum of this new injected specie corresponded to the computed spectrum for the Zundel protonic arrangement. As the voltage further increases a contribution from the Eigen proton solvation specie is added to the measured spectrum.

  4. Proton energy determinations in water and in tissue-like material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitano, R F [Ist. Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, ENEA, Roma (Italy); Rosetti, M [Div. di Fisica Applicata, ENEA, Bologna (Italy)

    1997-09-01

    The mean energy of proton beams in water and in a tissue substitute, respectively, were determined as a function of SOBP width, beam size and initial energy spread. Then an analytical expression to obtain the proton mean energy as a function of phantom depth and initial energy was established. This expression differs from the analogous ones reported in some current dosimetry protocols in that it accounts for the nuclear interaction effects in determining the mean energy. The preliminary results of the calculations referred to above are reported together with some comments on the specification of the proton beam quality for clinical dosimetry. (orig.)

  5. Airway Relaxation Effects of Water-Soluble Sclerotial Extract From Lignosus rhinocerotis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Kee Lee

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Lignosus rhinocerotis has a long history of use by the indigenous community within East Asia to treat a range of health conditions including asthma and chronic cough. To date, there is limited scientific evidence to support its therapeutic effects in relieving these airways conditions. In this study, we examined the effects of the different molecular weight fractions [high-molecular-weight (HMW, medium-molecular-weight (MMW, and low-molecular-weight (LMW] obtained from the cold water sclerotial extract (CWE of L. rhinocerotis on airways patency using airway segments isolated from Sprague Dawley rat in an organ bath set-up. It is demonstrated that the HMW and MMW fractions exhibited higher efficacy in relaxing the pre-contracted airways when compared to the CWE and LMW fraction. In addition, the HMW fraction markedly supressed carbachol-, 5-hydroxytrptamine-, and calcium-induced airway contractions. CWE demonstrated a lower efficacy than the HMW fraction but it also significantly attenuated carbachol- and calcium-induced airway contractions. Results showed that the bronchorelaxation effect of CWE and fractions is mediated via blockade of extracellular Ca2+ influx. The composition analysis revealed the following parts of carbohydrate and proteins, respectively: HMW fraction: 71 and 4%; MMW fraction: 35 and 1%; and LMW fraction: 22 and 0.3%. Our results strongly suggest that the polysaccharide–protein complex or proteins found in the HMW and MMW fractions is likely to contribute to the bronchorelaxation effect of CWE.

  6. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP1-03: Luminescence Imaging of Water During Proton Beam Irradiation for Range Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, S; Komori, M; Toshito, T; Watabe, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Since proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to a target tumor, the dose distribution should be accurately measured. A precise and efficient method to evaluate the dose distribution is desired. We found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and thought this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: For this purpose, we placed water phantoms set on a table with a spot-scanning proton-therapy system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during proton-beam irradiation. We also conducted the imaging of phantoms of pure-water, fluorescein solution and acrylic block. We made three dimensional images from the projection data. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms during the proton-beam irradiations showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. The image of the pure-water phantom also showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom was relatively matched with the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 sec. Three dimensional images were successfully obtained which have more quantitative information. Conclusion: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation has the potential to be a new method for range estimations in proton therapy.

  7. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP1-03: Luminescence Imaging of Water During Proton Beam Irradiation for Range Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, S; Komori, M [Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Toshito, T [Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Watabe, H [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Since proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to a target tumor, the dose distribution should be accurately measured. A precise and efficient method to evaluate the dose distribution is desired. We found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and thought this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: For this purpose, we placed water phantoms set on a table with a spot-scanning proton-therapy system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during proton-beam irradiation. We also conducted the imaging of phantoms of pure-water, fluorescein solution and acrylic block. We made three dimensional images from the projection data. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms during the proton-beam irradiations showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. The image of the pure-water phantom also showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom was relatively matched with the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 sec. Three dimensional images were successfully obtained which have more quantitative information. Conclusion: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation has the potential to be a new method for range estimations in proton therapy.

  8. Hydrated proton and hydroxide charge transfer at the liquid/vapor interface of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soniat, Marielle; Rick, Steven W., E-mail: srick@uno.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148 (United States); Kumar, Revati [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70808 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    The role of the solvated excess proton and hydroxide ions in interfacial properties is an interesting scientific question with applications in a variety of aqueous behaviors. The role that charge transfer (CT) plays in interfacial behavior is also an unsettled question. Quantum calculations are carried out on clusters of water with an excess proton or a missing proton (hydroxide) to determine their CT. The quantum results are applied to analysis of multi-state empirical valence bond trajectories. The polyatomic nature of the solvated excess proton and hydroxide ion results in directionally dependent CT, depending on whether a water molecule is a hydrogen bond donor or acceptor in relation to the ion. With polyatomic molecules, CT also depends on the intramolecular bond distances in addition to intermolecular distances. The hydrated proton and hydroxide affect water’s liquid/vapor interface in a manner similar to monatomic ions, in that they induce a hydrogen-bonding imbalance at the surface, which results in charged surface waters. This hydrogen bond imbalance, and thus the charged waters at the surface, persists until the ion is at least 10 Å away from the interface.

  9. Hydrated proton and hydroxide charge transfer at the liquid/vapor interface of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soniat, Marielle; Rick, Steven W.; Kumar, Revati

    2015-01-01

    The role of the solvated excess proton and hydroxide ions in interfacial properties is an interesting scientific question with applications in a variety of aqueous behaviors. The role that charge transfer (CT) plays in interfacial behavior is also an unsettled question. Quantum calculations are carried out on clusters of water with an excess proton or a missing proton (hydroxide) to determine their CT. The quantum results are applied to analysis of multi-state empirical valence bond trajectories. The polyatomic nature of the solvated excess proton and hydroxide ion results in directionally dependent CT, depending on whether a water molecule is a hydrogen bond donor or acceptor in relation to the ion. With polyatomic molecules, CT also depends on the intramolecular bond distances in addition to intermolecular distances. The hydrated proton and hydroxide affect water’s liquid/vapor interface in a manner similar to monatomic ions, in that they induce a hydrogen-bonding imbalance at the surface, which results in charged surface waters. This hydrogen bond imbalance, and thus the charged waters at the surface, persists until the ion is at least 10 Å away from the interface

  10. Effect of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) incorporation on water uptake and conductivity of proton exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproll, Véronique; Schmidt, Thomas J.; Gubler, Lorenz

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate how hygroscopic moieties like hydrolyzed glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) influence the properties of sulfonated polysytrene based proton exchange membranes (PEM). Therefore, several membranes were synthesized by electron beam treatment of the ETFE (ethylene-alt-tetrafluoroethylene) base film with a subsequent co-grafting of styrene and GMA at different ratios. The obtained membranes were sulfonated to introduce proton conducting groups and the epoxide moiety of the GMA unit was hydrolyzed for a better water absorption. The PEM was investigated regarding its structural composition, water uptake and through-plane conductivity. It could be shown that the density of sulfonic acid groups has a higher influence on the proton conductivity of the PEM than an increased water uptake.

  11. Highly Water-Stable Lanthanide-Oxalate MOFs with Remarkable Proton Conductivity and Tunable Luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Xie, Xiaoji; Li, Hongyu; Gao, Jiaxin; Nie, Li; Pan, Yue; Xie, Juan; Tian, Dan; Liu, Wenlong; Fan, Quli; Su, Haiquan; Huang, Ling; Huang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Although proton conductors derived from metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are highly anticipated for various applications including solid-state electrolytes, H 2 sensors, and ammonia synthesis, they are facing serious challenges such as poor water stability, fastidious working conditions, and low proton conductivity. Herein, we report two lanthanide-oxalate MOFs that are highly water stable, with so far the highest room-temperature proton conductivity (3.42 × 10 -3 S cm -1 ) under 100% relative humidity (RH) among lanthanide-based MOFs and, most importantly, luminescent. Moreover, the simultaneous response of both the proton conductivity and luminescence intensity to RH allows the linkage of proton conductivity with luminescence intensity. This way, the electric signal of proton conductivity variation versus RH will be readily translated to optical signal of luminescence intensity, which can be directly visualized by the naked eye. If proper lanthanide ions or even transition-metal ions are used, the working wavelengths of luminescence emissions can be further extended from visible to near infrared light for even wider-range applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Water calorimetry and ionization chamber dosimetry in an 85-MeV clinical proton beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmans, H; Seuntjens, J; Verhaegen, F; Denis, J M; Vynckier, S; Thierens, H

    1996-05-01

    In recent years, the increased use of proton beams for clinical purposes has enhanced the demand for accurate absolute dosimetry for protons. As calorimetry is the most direct way to establish the absorbed dose and because water has recently been accepted as standard material for this type of beam, the importance of water calorimetry is obvious. In this work we report water calorimeter operation in an 85-MeV proton beam and a comparison of the absorbed dose to water measured by ionometry with the dose resulting from water calorimetric measurements. To ensure a proper understanding of the heat defect for defined impurities in water for this type of radiation, a relative response study was first done in comparison with theoretical calculations of the heat defect. The results showed that pure hypoxic water and hydrogen-saturated water yielded the same response with practically zero heat defect, in agreement with the model calculations. The absorbed dose inferred from these measurements was then compared with the dose derived from ionometry by applying the European Charged Heavy Particle Dosimetry (ECHED) protocol. Restricting the comparison to chambers recommended in the protocol, the calorimeter dose was found to be 2.6% +/- 0.9% lower than the average ionometry dose. In order to estimate the significance of chamber-dependent effects in this deviation, measurements were performed using a set of ten ionization chambers of five different types. The maximum internal deviation in the ionometry results amounted to 1.1%. We detected no systematic chamber volume dependence, but observed a small but systematic effect of the chamber wall thickness. The observed deviation between calorimetry and ionometry can be attributed to a combination of the value of (Wair/e)p for protons, adopted in the ECHED protocol, the mass stopping power ratios of water to air for protons, and possibly small ionization chamber wall effects.

  13. Electronic stopping power calculation for water under the Lindhard formalism for application in proton computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, A. F., E-mail: afguerreror@uqvirtual.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Universidad Del Quindío Cra 15 # 12N Armenia, Quindío (Colombia); Mesa, J., E-mail: jmesa@ibb.unesp.br [Instituto de Biociências de Botucatu da UNESP Distrito de Rubião Jr. s/n°, 18618-000, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-07

    Because of the behavior that charged particles have when they interact with biological material, proton therapy is shaping the future of radiation therapy in cancer treatment. The planning of radiation therapy is made up of several stages. The first one is the diagnostic image, in which you have an idea of the density, size and type of tumor being treated; to understand this it is important to know how the particles beam interacts with the tissue. In this work, by using de Lindhard formalism and the Y.R. Waghmare model for the charge distribution of the proton, the electronic stopping power (SP) for a proton beam interacting with a liquid water target in the range of proton energies 10{sup 1} eV - 10{sup 10} eV taking into account all the charge states is calculated.

  14. SU-C-207A-04: Accuracy of Acoustic-Based Proton Range Verification in Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, KC; Sehgal, CM; Avery, S; Vander Stappen, F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy and dose required for acoustic-based proton range verification (protoacoustics) in water. Methods: Proton pulses with 17 µs FWHM and instantaneous currents of 480 nA (5.6 × 10 7 protons/pulse, 8.9 cGy/pulse) were generated by a clinical, hospital-based cyclotron at the University of Pennsylvania. The protoacoustic signal generated in a water phantom by the 190 MeV proton pulses was measured with a hydrophone placed at multiple known positions surrounding the dose deposition. The background random noise was measured. The protoacoustic signal was simulated to compare to the experiments. Results: The maximum protoacoustic signal amplitude at 5 cm distance was 5.2 mPa per 1 × 10 7 protons (1.6 cGy at the Bragg peak). The background random noise of the measurement was 27 mPa. Comparison between simulation and experiment indicates that the hydrophone introduced a delay of 2.4 µs. For acoustic data collected with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 21, deconvolution of the protoacoustic signal with the proton pulse provided the most precise time-of-flight range measurement (standard deviation of 2.0 mm), but a systematic error (−4.5 mm) was observed. Conclusion: Based on water phantom measurements at a clinical hospital-based cyclotron, protoacoustics is a potential technique for measuring the proton Bragg peak range with 2.0 mm standard deviation. Simultaneous use of multiple detectors is expected to reduce the standard deviation, but calibration is required to remove systematic error. Based on the measured background noise and protoacoustic amplitude, a SNR of 5.3 is projected for a deposited dose of 2 Gy.

  15. Behavior of cesium and thallium cations inside a calixarene cavity as probed by nuclear spin relaxation. Evidence of cation-pi interactions in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuc, Diana; Bouguet-Bonnet, Sabine; Morel-Desrosiers, Nicole; Morel, Jean-Pierre; Mutzenhardt, Pierre; Canet, Daniel

    2009-08-06

    We have studied the complexes formed between the p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene and cesium or thallium metal cation, first by carbon-13 longitudinal relaxation of the calixarene molecule at two values of the magnetic field B(0). From the longitudinal relaxation times of an aromatic carbon directly bonded to a proton, thus subjected essentially to the dipolar interaction with that proton, we could obtain the correlation time describing the reorientation of the CH bond. The rest of this study has demonstrated that it is also the correlation time describing the tumbling of the whole calixarene assembly. From three non-proton-bearing carbons of the aromatic cycles (thus subjected to the chemical shift anisotropy and dipolar mechanisms), we have been able to determine the variation of the chemical shift anisotropy when going from the free to the complex form of the calixarene. These variations not only provide the location of the cation inside the calixarene cavity but also constitute a direct experimental proof of the cation-pi interactions. These results are complemented by cesium and thallium relaxation measurements performed again at two values of the magnetic field B(0). An estimation of the mean distance between the cation and the calixarene protons could be obtained. These measurements have also revealed an important chemical shift anisotropy of thallium upon complexation.

  16. Spatial characterization of T1 and T2 relaxation times and the water apparent diffusion coefficient in rabbit Achilles tendon subjected to tensile loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellen, J; Helmer, K G; Grigg, P; Sotak, C H

    2005-03-01

    Tendons exhibit viscoelastic mechanical behavior under tensile loading. The elasticity arises from the collagen chains that form fibrils, while the viscous response arises from the interaction of the water with the solid matrix. Therefore, an understanding of the behavior of water in response to the application of a load is crucial to the understanding of the origin of the viscous response. Three-dimensional MRI mapping of rabbit Achilles tendons was performed at 2.0 T to characterize the response of T(1) and T(2) relaxation times and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water to tensile loading. The ADC was measured in directions both parallel (ADC( parallel)) and perpendicular (ADC( perpendicular)) to the long axis of the tendon. At a short diffusion time (5.8 ms) MR parameter maps showed the existence of two regions, here termed "core" and "rim", that exhibited statistically significant differences in T(1), T(2), and ADC( perpendicular) under the baseline loading condition. MR parameter maps were also generated at a second loading condition of approximately 1 MPa. At a diffusion time of 5.8 ms, there was a statistically significant increase in the rim region for both ADC( perpendicular) (57.5%) and ADC( parallel) (20.5%) upon tensile loading. The changes in core ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)), as well as the relaxation parameters in both core and rim regions, were not statistically significant. The effect of diffusion time on the ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)) values was investigated by creating maps at three additional diffusion times (50.0, 125.0, 250.0 ms) using a diffusion-weighted, stimulated-echo (DW-STE) pulse sequence. At longer diffusion times, ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)) values increased rather than approaching a constant value. This observation was attributed to T(1) spin-editing during the DW-STE pulse sequence, which resulted in the loss of short-T(1) components (with correspondingly lower ADCs) at longer diffusion times

  17. Proton-conductive nano zeolite-PVA composite film as a new water-absorbing electrolyte for water electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nishihara

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, organic-inorganic composite electrolyte membranes are developed for a novel water-absorbing porous electrolyte water electrolysis cell. As the materials of the composite electrolyte membrane, 80 wt% of a proton-conducting nano zeolite (H-MFI as an electrolyte and 20 wt% of poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA as a cross-linkable matrix are used. The nano zeolite is prepared by a milling process. The nano zeolite-PVA composite membrane precursors are prepared by spraying onto a substrate, followed by cross-linking. The resulting nano zeolite-cross-linked PVA composite films are then evaluated for their properties such as proton conductivity as electrolyte membranes for the water-absorbing porous electrolyte water electrolysis cell. It is confirmed that conventional materials such as zeolites and PVA can be used for the water electrolysis as an electrolyte.

  18. Proton dynamics and the phase diagram of dense water ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, J-A; Caracas, R

    2018-06-07

    All the different phases of water ice between 2 GPa and several megabars are based on a single body-centered cubic sub-lattice of oxygen atoms. They differ only by the behavior of the hydrogen atoms. In this study, we investigate the dynamics of the H atoms at high pressures and temperatures in water ice from first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. We provide a detailed analysis of the O-H⋯O bonding dynamics over the entire stability domain of the body-centered cubic (bcc) water ices and compute transport properties and vibrational density-of-states. We report the first ab initio evidence for a plastic phase of water and we propose a coherent phase diagram for bcc water ices compatible with the two groups of melting curves and with the multiple anomalies reported in ice VII around 15 GPa.

  19. Proton affinities in water of maingroup-element Hydrides - Effects of hydration and methyl substitution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, M.; Rosler, E.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2007-01-01

    We have computed the proton affinities in water of archetypal anionic and neutral bases across the periodic table using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of density functional theory (DFT) at BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P. The main purpose of this work is to provide an intrinsically consistent set

  20. Optimizing Water Exchange Rates and Rotational Mobility for High-Relaxivity of a Novel Gd-DO3A Derivative Complex Conjugated to Inulin as Macromolecular Contrast Agents for MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Luigi; Vander Elst, Luce; Henoumont, Celine; Muller, Robert N; Laurent, Sophie

    2018-02-01

    Thanks to the understanding of the relationships between the residence lifetime τ M of the coordinated water molecules to macrocyclic Gd-complexes and the rotational mobility τ R of these structures, and according to the theory for paramagnetic relaxation, it is now possible to design macromolecular contrast agents with enhanced relaxivities by optimizing these two parameters through ligand structural modification. We succeeded in accelerating the water exchange rate by inducing steric compression around the water binding site, and by removing the amide function from the DOTA-AA ligand [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid mono(p-aminoanilide)] (L) previously designed. This new ligand 10[2(1-oxo-1-p-propylthioureidophenylpropyl]-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclodecane-1,4,7-tetraacetic acid (L 1 ) was then covalently conjugated to API [O-(aminopropyl)inulin] to get the complex API-(GdL 1 )x with intent to slow down the rotational correlation time (τ R ) of the macromolecular complex. The evaluation of the longitudinal relaxivity at different magnetic fields and the study of the 17 O-NMR at variable temperature of the low-molecular-weight compound (GdL 1 ) showed a slight decrease of the τ M value (τM310 = 331 ns vs. τM310 = 450 ns for the GdL complex). Consequently to the increase of the size of the API-(GdL 1 )x complex, the rotational correlation time becomes about 360 times longer compared to the monomeric GdL 1 complex (τ R  = 33,700 ps), which results in an enhanced proton relaxivity. © 2018 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  1. Water versus DNA: new insights into proton track-structure modelling in radiobiology and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, C; Quinto, M A; Monti, J M; Galassi, M E; Weck, P F; Fojón, O A; Hanssen, J; Rivarola, R D

    2015-10-21

    Water is a common surrogate of DNA for modelling the charged particle-induced ionizing processes in living tissue exposed to radiations. The present study aims at scrutinizing the validity of this approximation and then revealing new insights into proton-induced energy transfers by a comparative analysis between water and realistic biological medium. In this context, a self-consistent quantum mechanical modelling of the ionization and electron capture processes is reported within the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state framework for both isolated water molecules and DNA components impacted by proton beams. Their respective probability of occurrence-expressed in terms of total cross sections-as well as their energetic signature (potential and kinetic) are assessed in order to clearly emphasize the differences existing between realistic building blocks of living matter and the controverted water-medium surrogate. Consequences in radiobiology and radiotherapy will be discussed in particular in view of treatment planning refinement aiming at better radiotherapy strategies.

  2. Investigation of water distribution in proton exchange membrane fuel cells via Terahertz imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thamboon, P.; Buaphad, P.; Thongbai, C.; Saisud, J.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Rhodes, M.W.; Vilaithong, T.

    2011-01-01

    Coherent transition radiation in a THz regime generated from a femtosecond electron bunch is explored for its potential use in imaging applications. Due to water sensitivity, the THz imaging experiment is performed on a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) to assess the ability to quantify water in the flow field of the cell. In this investigation, the PEMFC design and the experimental setup for the THz imaging is described. The results of the THz images in the flow field are also discussed.

  3. Comparison of the secondary electrons produced by proton and electron beams in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kia, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: m-r-kia@aut.ac.ir; Noshad, Houshyar [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), P.O. Box 15875-4413, Hafez Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The secondary electrons produced in water by electron and proton beams are compared with each other. The total ionization cross section (TICS) for an electron impact in water is obtained by using the binary-encounter-Bethe model. Hence, an empirical equation based on two adjustable fitting parameters is presented to determine the TICS for proton impact in media. In order to calculate the projectile trajectory, a set of stochastic differential equations based on the inelastic collision, elastic scattering, and bremsstrahlung emission are used. In accordance with the projectile trajectory, the depth dose deposition, electron energy loss distribution in a certain depth, and secondary electrons produced in water are calculated. The obtained results for the depth dose deposition and energy loss distribution in certain depth for electron and proton beams with various incident energies in media are in excellent agreement with the reported experimental data. The difference between the profiles for the depth dose deposition and production of secondary electrons for a proton beam can be ignored approximately. But, these profiles for an electron beam are completely different due to the effect of elastic scattering on electron trajectory.

  4. The impact of fibre orientation on T1-relaxation and apparent tissue water content in white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyboll, Felix; Jaekel, Uwe; Weber, Bernd; Neeb, Heiko

    2018-02-20

    Recent MRI studies have shown that the orientation of nerve fibres relative to the main magnetic field affects the R 2 *(= 1/T 2 *) relaxation rate in white matter (WM) structures. The underlying physical causes have been discussed in several studies but are still not completely understood. However, understanding these effects in detail is of great importance since this might serve as a basis for the development of new diagnostic tools and/or improve quantitative susceptibility mapping techniques. Therefore, in addition to the known angular dependence of R 2 *, the current study investigates the relationship between fibre orientation and the longitudinal relaxation rate, R 1 (= 1/T 1 ), as well as the apparent water content. For a group of 16 healthy subjects, a series of gradient echo, echo-planar and diffusion weighted images were acquired at 3T from which the decay rates, the apparent water content and the diffusion direction were reconstructed. The diffusion weighted data were used to determine the angle between the principle fibre direction and the main magnetic field to examine the angular dependence of R 1 and apparent water content. The obtained results demonstrate that both parameters depend on the fibre orientation and exhibit a positive correlation with the angle between fibre direction and main magnetic field. These observations could be helpful to improve and/or constrain existing biophysical models of brain microstructure by imposing additional constraints resulting from the observed angular dependence R 1 and apparent water content in white matter.

  5. Slow relaxation mode in concentrated oil-in-water microemulsions consisting of repulsive droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Y.; Ushiki, H.; Courbin, L.; Panizza, P.

    2007-02-01

    The present contribution reports on the observation of two diffusive relaxation modes in a concentrated microemulsion made of repulsive droplets. These two modes can be interpreted in the frame of Weissman’s and Pusey’s theoretical pioneering works. The fast mode is associated to the collective diffusion of droplets whereas the slow one corresponds to the relaxation of droplet concentration fluctuations associated with composition and/or size. We show that (i) repulsive interactions considerably slow down the latter and (ii) a generalized Stokes Einstein relationship between its coefficient of diffusion and the Newtonian viscosity of the solutions, similar to the Walden’s rule for electrolytes, holds for concentrated microemulsion systems made of repulsive droplets.

  6. Water equivalence of various materials for clinical proton dosimetry by experiment and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sulaiti, Leena; Shipley, David; Thomas, Russell; Kacperek, Andrzej; Regan, Patrick; Palmans, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    The accurate conversion of dose to various materials used in clinical proton dosimetry to dose-to-water is based on fluence correction factors, accounting for attenuation of primary protons and production of secondary particles due to non-elastic nuclear interactions. This work aims to investigate the depth dose distribution and the fluence correction with respect to water or graphite at water equivalent depths (WED) in different target materials relevant for dosimetry such as polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), graphite, A-150, aluminium and copper at 60 and 200 MeV. This was done through a comparison between Monte Carlo simulation using MCNPX 2.5.0, analytical model calculations and experimental measurements at Clatterbridge Centre of Oncology (CCO) in a 60 MeV modulated and un-modulated proton beam. MCNPX simulations indicated small fluence corrections for all materials with respect to graphite and water in 60 and 200 MeV except for aluminium. The analytical calculations showed an increase in the fluence correction factor to a few percent for all materials with respect to water at 200 MeV. The experimental measurements for 60 MeV un-modulated beam indicated a good agreement with MCNPX. For the modulated beam the fluence correction factor was found to be decreasing below unity by up to few percent with depth for aluminium and copper but almost constant and unity for A-150.

  7. Adsorption of phospholipids at oil/water interfaces during emulsification is controlled by stress relaxation and diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Ellen; Nirschl, Hermann; Kok, Robbert Jan; Leneweit, Gero

    2018-05-16

    Adsorption of phosphatidylcholines at oil/water interfaces strongly deviates from spread monolayers at air/water surfaces. Understanding its nature and consequences could vastly improve applications in medical nanoemulsions and biotechnologies. Adsorption kinetics at interfaces of water with different oil phases were measured by profile analysis tensiometry. Adsorption kinetics for 2 different phospholipids, DPPC and POPC, as well as 2 organic phases, squalene and squalane, show that formation of interfacial monolayers is initially dominated by stress-relaxation in the first minutes. Diffusion only gradually contributes to a decrease in interfacial tension at later stages of time and higher film pressures. The results can be applied for the optimization of emulsification protocols using mechanical treatments. Emulsions using phospholipids with unsaturated fatty acids are dominated much more strongly by stress-relaxation and cover interfaces very fast compared to those with saturated fatty acids. In contrast, phospholipid layers consisting of saturated fatty acids converge faster towards the equilibrium than those with unsaturated fatty acids.

  8. Quantum mechanical alternative to Arrhenius equation in the interpretation of proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in solids

    KAUST Repository

    Bernatowicz, Piotr; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Osior, Agnieszka; Kamieński, Bohdan; Szymański, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Theory of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in methyl groups in solids has been a recurring problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The current view is that, except for extreme cases of low torsional barriers where special quantum

  9. submitter A model for the accurate computation of the lateral scattering of protons in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bellinzona, EV; Embriaco, A; Ferrari, A; Fontana, A; Mairani, A; Parodi, K; Rotondi, A; Sala, P; Tessonnier, T

    2016-01-01

    A pencil beam model for the calculation of the lateral scattering in water of protons for any therapeutic energy and depth is presented. It is based on the full Molière theory, taking into account the energy loss and the effects of mixtures and compounds. Concerning the electromagnetic part, the model has no free parameters and is in very good agreement with the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. The effects of the nuclear interactions are parametrized with a two-parameter tail function, adjusted on MC data calculated with FLUKA. The model, after the convolution with the beam and the detector response, is in agreement with recent proton data in water from HIT. The model gives results with the same accuracy of the MC codes based on Molière theory, with a much shorter computing time.

  10. Precise determination of the Bragg peak position of proton beams in liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marouane, Abdelhak; Ouaskit, Said; Inchaouh, Jamal

    2011-01-01

    The influence of water molecules on the surrounding biological molecules during irradiation with protons is currently a major subject in radiation science. Proton collisions with the water molecules are estimated around the Bragg peak region, taking into account ionization, excitation, charge-changing processes, and energetic secondary electron behavior. The Bragg peak profile and position was determined by adopting a new approach involving discretization, incrementation, and dividing the target into layers, the thickness of each layer being selected randomly from a distribution weighted by the values of the total interaction cross section, from excitation up to ionization of the target and the incident projectile charge exchange. The calculation was carried out by a Monte-Carlo simulation in the energy range 20 ≤ E ≤ 10 8 eV, including the relativistic corrections.

  11. Thermodynamics of proton binding at the alumina-water interface revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, J.P.; Morel-Desrosiers, N.; Guillaud, A.; Marmier, N.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Since sorption on natural or synthetic materials can attenuate the migration of the radionuclides, sorption reactions have to be taken into account in repository performance assessment models. In order to check these models at different temperatures, experimental data such as the enthalpies of sorption are thus required. Highly sensitive micro-calorimeters can now be used to determine the heat effects accompanying the sorption of radionuclides on oxide-water interfaces, but enthalpies of sorption cannot be extracted from microcalorimetric data without a clear knowledge of the thermodynamics of protonation and deprotonation of the oxide surface. However, the values reported in the literature show large discrepancies and one must conclude that, amazingly, this fundamental problem of proton binding is not yet resolved. We have thus undertaken to measure by titration micro-calorimetry the heat effects accompanying proton exchange at the alumina-water interface at 25 deg. C. Based on (i) the surface sites speciation provided by a surface complexation model (built from acid-base titrations at 25 deg. C), and (ii) results of the microcalorimetric experiments, calculations have been made to extract the enthalpy variations associated respectively to protonation and deprotonation of the alumina surface. In a second step, the protonation and deprotonation enthalpy values have been used to calculate the alumina surface acidity constants at 60 deg. C via the Van't Hoff equation. Then, a theoretical titration curve at 60 deg. C has been calculated and compared to the experimental alumina surface titration curve. A good agreement between the predicted acid-base titration curve and the experimental one was observed. (authors)

  12. Thermodynamics of proton binding at the alumina-water interface revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, J.P.; Morel-Desrosiers, N. [Laboratoire de Thermodynamique des Solutions et des Polymeres, UMR CNRS 6003, Universite Blaise Pascal, 24 avenue des Landais, 63177 Aubiere cedex (France); Guillaud, A.; Marmier, N. [Laboratoire de Radiochimie, Sciences Analytiques et Environnement, EA 1175, Universite de Nice, 28 avenue de Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 2 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Since sorption on natural or synthetic materials can attenuate the migration of the radionuclides, sorption reactions have to be taken into account in repository performance assessment models. In order to check these models at different temperatures, experimental data such as the enthalpies of sorption are thus required. Highly sensitive micro-calorimeters can now be used to determine the heat effects accompanying the sorption of radionuclides on oxide-water interfaces, but enthalpies of sorption cannot be extracted from microcalorimetric data without a clear knowledge of the thermodynamics of protonation and deprotonation of the oxide surface. However, the values reported in the literature show large discrepancies and one must conclude that, amazingly, this fundamental problem of proton binding is not yet resolved. We have thus undertaken to measure by titration micro-calorimetry the heat effects accompanying proton exchange at the alumina-water interface at 25 deg. C. Based on (i) the surface sites speciation provided by a surface complexation model (built from acid-base titrations at 25 deg. C), and (ii) results of the microcalorimetric experiments, calculations have been made to extract the enthalpy variations associated respectively to protonation and deprotonation of the alumina surface. In a second step, the protonation and deprotonation enthalpy values have been used to calculate the alumina surface acidity constants at 60 deg. C via the Van't Hoff equation. Then, a theoretical titration curve at 60 deg. C has been calculated and compared to the experimental alumina surface titration curve. A good agreement between the predicted acid-base titration curve and the experimental one was observed. (authors)

  13. Xenon-Water Interaction in Bacterial Suspensions as Studied by NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodin, V.; Ponomarev, Alexander; Gerasimov, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    suspensions of Escherichia coli in the presence of xenon using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The work studied how the spin-lattice relaxation times of water protons in suspension change under xenon conditions. Xenon is able to form clathrate hydrates with water molecules at a temperature above the melting...... point of ice. The work studied NMR relaxation times which reflect the rotation freedom of water molecules in suspension. Lower relaxation times indicate reduced rotational freedom of water. Single exponential behavior of spin-lattice relaxation of protons in the suspensions of microorganisms has been...

  14. Which Density Functional Should Be Used to Describe Protonated Water Clusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ruili; Huang, Xiaoming; Su, Yan; Lu, Hai-Gang; Li, Si-Dian; Tang, Lingli; Zhao, Jijun

    2017-04-27

    Protonated water cluster is one of the most important hydrogen-bond network systems. Finding an appropriate DFT method to study the properties of protonated water clusters can substantially improve the economy in computational resources without sacrificing the accuracy compared to high-level methods. Using high-level MP2 and CCSD(T) methods as well as experimental results as benchmark, we systematically examined the effect of seven exchange-correlation GGA functionals (with BLYP, B3LYP, X3LYP, PBE0, PBE1W, M05-2X, and B97-D parametrizations) in describing the geometric parameters, interaction energies, dipole moments, and vibrational properties of protonated water clusters H + (H 2 O) 2-9,12 . The overall performance of all these functionals is acceptable, and each of them has its advantage in certain aspects. X3LYP is the best to describe the interaction energies, and PBE0 and M05-2X are also recommended to investigate interaction energies. PBE0 gives the best anharmonic frequencies, followed by PBE1W, B97-D and BLYP methods. PBE1W, B3LYP, B97-D, and X3LYP can yield better geometries. The capability of B97-D to distinguish the relative energies between isomers is the best among all the seven methods, followed by M05-2X and PBE0.

  15. Radiation damage to uracil and water by proton and electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheier, P.; Hanel, G.; Denifl, S; Gstir, B.; Maerk, T.D.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Coupier, B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The inelastic interaction of protons (in the energy range from 20 keV to 150 keV) and electrons (from thermal energies up to 20 eV) with water and uracil, the latter a building block of the RNA has been studied in two laboratories with specially designed experimental setups. These measurements are motivated from a present lack of understanding how on a molecular level damage to living cells and organisms is caused. A unique way of simultaneous detection of the product ions after swift proton (or hydrogen) impact and the analysis of the charge state of the projectile after the collision allows to distinguish between direct ionization (e.g., projectile remains a proton) and electron capture events (e.g., proton becomes neutralized). The latter process turns out to be more destructive, i.e. leads to a higher yield of fragmentation. For electrons both the formation of positively and negatively charged ions has been investigated. We discovered that already thermal electrons lead with a rather large cross section to a dissociation of the uracil molecule producing an anion and a fast hydrogen radical. (author)

  16. Transverse water relaxation in whole blood and erythrocytes at 3T, 7T, 9.4T, 11.7T and 16.4T; determination of intracellular hemoglobin and extracellular albumin relaxivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgac, Ksenija; Li, Wenbo; Huang, Alan; Qin, Qin; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2017-05-01

    Blood is a physiological substance with multiple water compartments, which contain water-binding proteins such as hemoglobin in erythrocytes and albumin in plasma. Knowing the water transverse (R 2 ) relaxation rates from these different blood compartments is a prerequisite for quantifying the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect. Here, we report the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) based transverse (R 2CPMG ) relaxation rates of water in bovine blood samples circulated in a perfusion system at physiological temperature in order to mimic blood perfusion in humans. R 2CPMG values of blood plasma, lysed packed erythrocytes, lysed plasma/erythrocyte mixtures, and whole blood at 3 T, 7 T, 9.4 T, 11.7 T and 16.4 T were measured as a function of hematocrit or hemoglobin concentration, oxygenation, and CPMG inter-echo spacing (τ cp ). R 2CPMG in lysed cells showed a small τ cp dependence, attributed to the water exchange rate between free and hemoglobin-bound water to be much faster than τ cp . This was contrary to the tangential dependence in whole blood, where a much slower exchange between cells and blood plasma applies. Whole blood data were fitted as a function of τ cp using a general tangential correlation time model applicable for exchange as well as diffusion contributions to R 2CPMG , and the intercept R 20blood at infinitely short τ cp was determined. The R 20blood values at different hematocrit and the R 2CPMG values of lysed erythrocyte/plasma mixtures at different hemoglobin concentration were used to determine the relaxivity of hemoglobin inside the erythrocyte (r 2Hb ) and albumin (r 2Alb ) in plasma. The r 2Hb values obtained from lysed erythrocytes and whole blood were comparable at full oxygenation. However, while r 2Hb determined from lysed cells showed a linear dependence on oxygenation, this dependence became quadratic in whole blood. This possibly suggests an additional relaxation effect inside intact cells, perhaps due to hemoglobin

  17. Proton T2 Relaxation effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide on fast spin echo sequence. Influence of echo number (even or odd) of effective TE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Maki, Toshio; Kitagawa, Matsuo; Suzuki, Takeshi; Fujita, Isao

    1999-01-01

    The T 2 relaxation effect of the fast spin echo sequence (FSE) was investigated using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles. When even echoes were used as the effective TE of FSE, the signal intensity ratio [signal intensity of FSE/signal intensity of conventional spin echo sequence (CSE)] of FSE and CSE increased, whereas the T 2 relaxation effect of SPIO with FSE was reduced. However, when odd echoes were used, neither signal intensity changed, and weakening of the T 2 relaxation effect, considered a problem with FSE, was reduced. This phenomenon was not observed when the refocusing flip angle was changed to 30 and 60 degrees. However, it was observed when the refocusing flip angle was 120 and 150 degrees. Thus, this phenomenon can be considered to be related to oscillation in longitudinal magnetization when using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) technique. (author)

  18. Parity Nonconservation in Proton-water Scattering at 800 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, D. E.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R.; Mischke, R. E.; Frauenfelder, H.; Harper, R. W.; Yuan, V.; McDonald, A. B.; Talaga, R.

    1982-01-01

    A search has been made for parity nonconservation in the scattering of 800 MeV polarized protons from an unpolarized water target. The result is for the longitudinal asymmetry, A{sub L} = +(6.6 +- 3.2) x 10{sup -7}. Control runs with Pb, using a thickness which gave equivalent beam broadening from Coulomb multiple scattering, but a factor of ten less nuclear interactions than the water target, gave A{sub L} = -(0.5 +- 6.0) x 10{sup -7}.

  19. A nuclear magnetic relaxation study on internal motion of polyelectrolytes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriever, J.

    1977-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate the significance and the amount of information which can be extracted from the study of frequency dependence of magnetic relaxation rates in solutions of a synthetic macromolecule. Solutions of poly(methacrylic acid), PMA, in water were chosen as the object of the present work. A short survey of nuclear magnetic relaxation in solutions of simple macromolecules is presented. Results obtained by continuous wave experiments on PMA solutions are shown (viz. the information about the transverse relaxation from line width analysis of 60 MHz proton spectra). Water enriched in 17 O is used in magnetic relaxation studies; the results of the determination of hydrogen lifetimes in aqueous solutions of acetic acid and poly(methacrylic acid) are given. The possibility of obtaining information about the dynamics of deuterons in the acid side groups of weak polyacids by measuring deuteron relaxation in heavy water solutions of those acids is considered. The use of deuteron relaxation rate experiments on solutions of selectively methylene deuterated poly(methacrylic acid), [-CD 2 -CCH 3 COOH-]n, is demonstrated and the backbone methylene C-atom motion is charachterized. The magne-tic relaxation of nuclei in the side groups of methylene deuterated PMA, viz. protons in the methyland deuterons in the acid side groups is presented

  20. Silicon hydride nanocrystals as catalysts for proton production in water-organic liquid mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2014-08-05

    Embodiments of the present methods may be used to produce energy in the form of an electrical current from water without the use of fossil fuel. Silicon hydride is very easy to make. This procedure in conjunction with an enzyme to produce hydrogen gas for fuel cells and other small devices. In fuel cells the production of protons may be bypassed, and an oxidant such as permanganate or oxygen from air may be used to drive the fuel cells. In such an embodiment, an intermediate reaction may not be needed to produce protons. In one embodiment, membrane-less laminar flow fuel cells with an external grid for oxygen supply from the air may be used.

  1. Prospects for very large, sensitive water Cherenkov detectors for proton decay and neutrino oscillations search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of constructing large water Cherenkov detectors with mass 10 5 to 10 6 tons that would be sensitive to a few hundred MeV - few GeV energy release. The 10 5 ton detector would be suitable for a search for certain proton decay modes whereas the 10 6 ton detector would act as an active shield for the proton decay detector and as a nu/sub e/, nu/sub μ/ and possibly nu/sub tau/ interaction detector. The neutrino physics would include a sensitive search for neutrino oscillations using atmospheric neutrinos. The location of this detector could be in the deep ocean near Hawaii or in a deep trench between Cuba and Haiti or perhaps deep lakes like Superior or Baikal if flexible containers are used

  2. Proton transfer dynamics in a polar nanodroplet: ESIPT of 4'-n,n-dimethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone in AOT/alkane/water reverse micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Deborin [Department of Chemistry, University College of Science & Technology, University of Calcutta, 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Batuta, Shaikh; Begum, Naznin Ara [Bio-Organic Chemistry Lab, Department of Chemistry, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731 235 (India); Mandal, Debabrata, E-mail: dmandal.chemistry@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University College of Science & Technology, University of Calcutta, 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India)

    2017-04-15

    The excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) of the well-known fluorophore 4'-N,N-Dimethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone (DMA3HF) was studied in AOT/n-heptane/water reverse micelle solutions. For DMA3HF molecules located inside the AOT encapsulated polar nanodroplets, ESIPT from excited enol (E*) to tautomer (T*) forms was markedly inhibited, yielding time-constants of ≥100 ps, and followed the same trend as solvent relaxation when the ratio W= [H{sub 2}O]/[AOT] was varied. At W=0, the DMA3HF molecules were attached to the ionic AOT headgroups via strong intermolecular H-bonding, which hindered ESIPT. Addition of water changes the situation radically: water molecules form stronger H-bonds with AOT headgroups, displacing the DMA3HF, which are instead engaged in intermolecular H-bonded complexes of the type [DMA3HF···water]. ESIPT of these complex-bound fluorophores involves substantial rearrangement of H-bonding, and is coupled to solvation dynamics. With increasing W-value, solvation becomes faster, and so does ESIPT, reducing the yield of E* species. At the same time, the local environment within the nanodroplets become more more polar with gradual accumulation of water, which causes a monotonic red-shift of the E* emission peak.

  3. Spin-locking vs. chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI for investigating chemical exchange process between water and labile metabolite protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Autio, Joonas; Obata, Takayuki; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and spin-locking (SL) experiments were both able to probe the exchange process between protons of non-equivalent chemical environments. To compare the characteristics of the CEST and SL approaches in the study of chemical exchange effects, we performed CEST and SL experiments at varied pH and concentrated metabolites with exchangeable amide, amine, and hydroxyl protons at 9.4 T. Our results show that: i) On-resonance SL is most sensitive to chemical exchanges in the intermediate exchange regime and is able to detect hydroxyl and amine protons on a millimolar concentration scale. Off-resonance SL and CEST approaches are sensitive to slow-exchanging protons when an optimal SL or saturation pulse power matches the exchanging rate, respectively. ii) Offset frequency-dependent SL and CEST spectra are very similar, and can be explained well with an SL model recently developed by Trott and Palmer. iii) The exchange rate and population of metabolite protons can be determined from offset-dependent SL or CEST spectra or from on-resonance SL relaxation dispersion measurements. iv) The asymmetry of the magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) is highly dependent on the choice of saturation pulse power. In the intermediate exchange regime, MTRasym becomes complicated and should be interpreted with care. PMID:21500270

  4. Spin-locking versus chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI for investigating chemical exchange process between water and labile metabolite protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Autio, Joonas; Obata, Takayuki; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2011-05-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and spin-locking (SL) experiments were both able to probe the exchange process between protons of nonequivalent chemical environments. To compare the characteristics of the CEST and SL approaches in the study of chemical exchange effects, we performed CEST and SL experiments at varied pH and concentrated metabolite phantoms with exchangeable amide, amine, and hydroxyl protons at 9.4 T. Our results show that: (i) on-resonance SL is most sensitive to chemical exchanges in the intermediate-exchange regime and is able to detect hydroxyl and amine protons on a millimolar concentration scale. Off-resonance SL and CEST approaches are sensitive to slow-exchanging protons when an optimal SL or saturation pulse power matches the exchanging rate, respectively. (ii) Offset frequency-dependent SL and CEST spectra are very similar and can be explained well with an SL model recently developed by Trott and Palmer (J Magn Reson 2002;154:157-160). (iii) The exchange rate and population of metabolite protons can be determined from offset-dependent SL or CEST spectra or from on-resonance SL relaxation dispersion measurements. (iv) The asymmetry of the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR(asym)) is highly dependent on the choice of saturation pulse power. In the intermediate-exchange regime, MTR(asym) becomes complicated and should be interpreted with care. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Calculation of the protons stopping power in water using dielectric formalism in the MELF-GOS approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Franciane; Mazer, Amanda Cristina; Hormaza, Joel Mesa

    2016-01-01

    In order to calculate the stopping power of protons, there are many very successful models at high energies, which are extrapolated to low-energy regions. From the point of view of application of proton beam in cancer treatment is just this low energy region the most relevant due to the dose deposition profile in depth for protons. In this work, we present a calculation of the stopping power of protons in a water target using the dielectric formalism in MELF-GOS approach. The results when compared to other models show good agreement for energies above 100 keV and lower values below this energy. This result should impact the range of values of protons and the Bragg peak position. (author)

  6. Picosecond Fluorescence Dynamics of Tryptophan and 5-Fluorotryptophan in Monellin : Slow Water-Protein Relaxation Unmasked

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Binbin; Callis, Patrik Robert; Muiño, Pedro L; Rozeboom, Henriette J; Broos, Jaap; Toptygin, Dmitri; Brand, Ludwig; Knutson, Jay R

    2015-01-01

    Time Dependent Fluorescence Stokes (emission wavelength) Shifts (TDFSS) from tryptophan (Trp) following sub-picosecond excitation are increasingly used to investigate protein dynamics, most recently enabling active research interest into water dynamics near the surface of proteins. Unlike many

  7. Total water, phosphorus relaxation and inter-atomic organic to inorganic interface are new determinants of trabecular bone integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratan Kumar Rai

    Full Text Available Bone is the living composite biomaterial having unique structural property. Presently, there is a considerable gap in our understanding of bone structure and composition in the native state, particularly with respect to the trabecular bone, which is metabolically more active than cortical bones, and is readily lost in post-menopausal osteoporosis. We used solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR to compare trabecular bone structure and composition in the native state between normal, bone loss and bone restoration conditions in rat. Trabecular osteopenia was induced by lactation as well as prolonged estrogen deficiency (bilateral ovariectomy, Ovx. Ovx rats with established osteopenia were administered with PTH (parathyroid hormone, trabecular restoration group, and restoration was allowed to become comparable to sham Ovx (control group using bone mineral density (BMD and µCT determinants. We used a technique combining (1H NMR spectroscopy with (31P and (13C to measure various NMR parameters described below. Our results revealed that trabecular bones had diminished total water content, inorganic phosphorus NMR relaxation time (T1 and space between the collagen and inorganic phosphorus in the osteopenic groups compared to control, and these changes were significantly reversed in the bone restoration group. Remarkably, bound water was decreased in both osteopenic and bone restoration groups compared to control. Total water and T1 correlated strongly with trabecular bone density, volume, thickness, connectivity, spacing and resistance to compression. Bound water did not correlate with any of the microarchitectural and compression parameters. We conclude that total water, T1 and atomic space between the crystal and organic surface are altered in the trabecular bones of osteopenic rats, and PTH reverses these parameters. Furthermore, from these data, it appears that total water and T1 could serve as trabecular surrogates of micro-architecture and

  8. Dynamic and structural characterisation of micellar solutions of surfactants by spin relaxation and translational diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahieu, Nathalie

    1992-01-01

    The work reported in this research thesis aimed at characterizing micellar phases formed by some surfactants (sodium carboxylates) in aqueous solution. After some recalls on nuclear magnetic resonance dealing with spin relaxation (longitudinal relaxation, transverse relaxation, relaxation in the rotating coordinate system, and crossed relaxation), and comments on the dipolar mechanism responsible of relaxation phenomena, the author presents the methods used for relaxation parameter measurement and the data processing software issued from experiments. He presents experiments which allowed the self-diffusion coefficient to be measured, reports data processing, and addresses problems of special diffusion and of coherence transfers during diffusion measurements. Results of proton relaxation measurements are then presented and discussed. They are used to determine the micellar state of the studied carboxylates. The case of the oleate is also addressed. Measurements of carbon-13 relaxation times are reported, and exploited in terms of structural parameters by using the Relaxator software. An original method of the hetero-nuclear Overhauser method is presented, and used to assess the average distance between water molecules and micelle surface [fr

  9. Water equivalent thickness values of materials used in beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Taddei, Phillip J; Fitzek, Markus M; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-05-07

    Heavy charged particle beam radiotherapy for cancer is of increasing interest because it delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume. Accurate knowledge of the range of a heavy charged particle beam after it penetrates a patient's body or other materials in the beam line is very important and is usually stated in terms of the water equivalent thickness (WET). However, methods of calculating WET for heavy charged particle beams are lacking. Our objective was to test several simple analytical formulas previously developed for proton beams for their ability to calculate WET values for materials exposed to beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions. Experimentally measured heavy charged particle beam ranges and WET values from an iterative numerical method were compared with the WET values calculated by the analytical formulas. In most cases, the deviations were within 1 mm. We conclude that the analytical formulas originally developed for proton beams can also be used to calculate WET values for helium, carbon and iron ion beams with good accuracy.

  10. The generation of absorbed dose profiles of proton beam in water using Geant4 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christovao, Marilia T.; Campos, Tarcisio Passos R. de

    2007-01-01

    The present article approaches simulations on the proton beam radiation therapy, using an application based on the code GEANT4, with Open GL as a visualization drive and JAS3 (Java Analysis Studio) analysis data tools systems, implementing the AIDA interfaces. The proton radiotherapy is adapted to treat cancer or other benign tumors that are close to sensitive structures, since it allows precise irradiation of the target with high doses, while the health tissues adjacent to vital organs and tissues are preserved, due to physical property of dose profile. GEANT4 is a toolkit for simulating the transport of particles through matter, in complex geometries. Taking advantage of the object-oriented project features, the user can adapt or extend the tool in all domain, due to the flexibility of the code, providing a subroutine's group for materials definition, geometries and particles properties in agreement with the user's needs to generate the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper, the parameters of beam line used in the simulation possess adjustment elements, such as: the range shifter, composition and dimension; the beam line, energy, intensity, length, according with physic processes applied. The simulation result is the depth dose profiles on water, dependent on the various incident beam energy. Starting from those profiles, one can define appropriate conditions for proton radiotherapy in ocular region. (author)

  11. DINS measurements on VESUVIO in the Resonance Detector configuration: proton mean kinetic energy in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietropaolo, Antonino; Andreani, Carla; Filabozzi, Alessandra; Senesi, Roberto; Gorini, Giuseppe; Perelli-Cippo, Enrico; Tardocchi, Marco; Rhodes, Nigel J.; Schooneveld, Erik M.

    2006-04-01

    Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) measurements have been performed on a liquid water sample at two different temperatures and pressures. The experiments were carried out using the VESUVIO spectrometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source. This experiment represents the first DINS measurement from water using the Resonance Detector configuration, employing yttrium-aluminum-perovskite scintillator and a 238U analyzer foil. The maximum energy of the scattered neutrons was about 70 eV, allowing to access an extended kinematic space with energy and wave vector transfers at the proton recoil peak in the range 1 eV <= hbarω <= 20 eV and 25 Å-1 <= q <= 90 Å-1, respectively. Comparison with DINS measurements on water performed in the standard Resonance Filter configuration indicates the potential advantages offered by the use of Resonance Detector approach for DINS measurements at forward scattering angles.

  12. The Effect of Isotopic Substitution on Quantum Proton Transfer Across Short Water Bridges in Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazejewski, Jacob; Schultz, Chase; Mazzuca, James

    2015-03-01

    Many biological systems utilize water chains to transfer charge over long distances by means of an excess proton. This study examines how quantum effects impact these reactions in a small model system. The model consists of a water molecule situated between an imidazole donor and acceptor group, which simulate a fixed amino acid backbone. A one dimensional energy profile is evaluated using density functional theory at the 6-31G*/B3LYP level, which generates a barrier with a width of 0.6 Å and a height of 20.7 kcal/mol. Quantum transmission probability is evaluated by solving the time dependent Schrödinger equation on a grid. Isotopic effects are examined by performing calculations with both hydrogen and deuterium. The ratio of hydrogen over the deuterium shows a 130-fold increase in transmission probability at low temperatures. This indicates a substantial quantum tunneling effect. The study of higher dimensional systems as well as increasing the number of water molecules in the chain will be necessary to fully describe the proton transfer process. Alma College Provost's Office.

  13. A study of nuclear relaxation to the electron non-Zeeman system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honten, J. van.

    1979-01-01

    An examination of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation mechanism in a series of diluted copper-caesium Tutton salt crystals, containing different percentages of D 2 O in the waters of hydration, is described. Results of relaxation measurements are presented and a strong angular dependence is observed. It is proved, however, that under most experimental conditions applied, the bottleneck in the relaxation path is not the cross-relaxation but the thermal contact between the proton Zeeman system and the electron dipole-dipole interaction system. Hence the proton spin-lattice relaxation measurements have enabled determination of the time constant of this thermal contact. The microscopic coupling process which provides thermal contact, is a simultaneous transition of two electron spins and one proton spin. This so-called three-spin transition is described and calculations presented. Double resonance experiments are performed, where the resonance signal of deuterium or caesium spins is saturated and the effect on the proton resonance signal observed. (C.F.)

  14. Correlation between magnetic resonance image and content of water and fat in experimental tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tachio; Yamada, Kenji; Yamada, Susumu; Yoshioka, Seiro; Ono, Shuichi; Hishinuma, Takashi; Abe, Yoshinao; Matsuzawa, Taiju; Ogata, Yuko.

    1987-01-01

    Water and fat are considered to be major protons contributing to magnetic resonance (MR) signals in living tissues. This study compared proton density and T1 and T2 relaxation times with content of water and fat in tumor bearing rabbits. MR scans were performed using a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence with short and long repetition times. There was a strong correlation between proton density and the content of water and fat. The correlation of the content of water and fat to T1 and T2 relaxation times was not so strong as that to proton density. Viable tumor tissues had significantly shorter T2 relaxation time than the surrounding edematous tissues (p < 0.005), although the content of water and fat did not differ in the two types of tissues. T1 relaxation time did not differ in viable tumorous and edematous tissues. (Namekawa, K.)

  15. Estimation and correction of produced light from prompt gamma photons on luminescence imaging of water for proton therapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Takuya; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka; Kawachi, Naoki; Yamamoto, Seiichi

    2018-02-01

    Although the luminescence images of water during proton-beam irradiation using a cooled charge-coupled device camera showed almost the same ranges of proton beams as those measured by an ionization chamber, the depth profiles showed lower Bragg peak intensities than those measured by an ionization chamber. In addition, a broad optical baseline signal was observed in depths that exceed the depth of the Bragg peak. We hypothesize that this broad baseline signal originates from the interaction of proton-induced prompt gamma photons with water. These prompt gamma photons interact with water to form high-energy Compton electrons, which may cause luminescence or Cherenkov emission from depths exceeding the location of the Bragg peak. To clarify this idea, we measured the luminescence images of water during the irradiations of protons in water with minimized parallax errors, and also simulated the produced light by the interactions of prompt gamma photons with water. We corrected the measured depth profiles of the luminescence images by subtracting the simulated distributions of the produced light by the interactions of prompt gamma photons in water. Corrections were also conducted using the estimated depth profiles of the light of the prompt gamma photons, as obtained from the off-beam areas of the luminescence images of water. With these corrections, we successfully obtained depth profiles that have almost identical distributions as the simulated dose distributions for protons. The percentage relative height of the Bragg peak with corrections to that of the simulation data increased to 94% from 80% without correction. Also, the percentage relative offset heights of the deeper part of the Bragg peak with corrections decreased to 0.2%-0.4% from 4% without correction. These results indicate that the luminescence imaging of water has potential for the dose distribution measurements for proton therapy dosimetry.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of proton-ordered water confined in low-diameter carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujuan; Schmidt, Burkhard

    2015-03-21

    The present work deals with molecular dynamics simulations of water confined in single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with emphasis on the proton-ordering of water and its polarization. First, the water occupancy of open-ended armchair and zigzag CNTs immersed in water under ambient NPT conditions is calculated for various water models, and for varying Lennard-Jones parameters of the water-carbon interaction. As a function of the CNT diameter, the water density displays several oscillations before converging to the bulk value. Based on these results, the water structures encapsulated in 10 nm long armchair CNTs (n,n) with 5 ≤ n ≤ 10, are investigated under NVT conditions. Inside the smallest nanotubes (n = 5, 6) highly ferroelectric (FE), quasi-one-dimensional water chains are found while inside the other CNTs water molecules assemble into single-walled ice nanotubes (INTs). There are several, near-degenerate minimum energy INT structures: single helical structures were found for 7 ≤ n ≤ 10, in all cases in FE arrangement. In addition, a double helical INT structure was found for n = 8 with an even higher polarization. Prism-like structures were found only for 8 ≤ n ≤ 10 with various FE, ferrielectric (FI), and antiferroelectric (AF, n = 9, 10) proton ordering. The coexistence of the nearly iso-energetic FE, FI, and AF INT structures separated by high barriers renders the molecular dynamics highly metastable, typically with nanosecond timescales at room temperature. Hence, the replica exchange simulation method is used to obtain populations of different INT states at finite temperatures. Many of the FE INT structures confined in low-diameter CNTs are still prevalent at room temperature. Both helix-helix and helix-prism structural transitions are detected which can be either continuous (around 470 K for n = 8) or discontinuous (at 218 K for n = 9). Also melting-like transitions are found in which the INT structures are disrupted leading to a loss of FE

  17. Water-mediated variability in the structure of relaxed-state haemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, Prem Singh; Sankaranarayanan, R.; Vijayan, M.

    2008-01-01

    Partial dehydration of high-salt horse methaemoglobin crystals tends to shift the structure from the R state to the R2 state, in agreement with previous observations that movements in the molecule resulting from changes in water content mimic those involved in protein action. The crystal structure of high-salt horse methaemoglobin has been determined at environmental relative humidities (r.h.) of 88, 79, 75 and 66%. The molecule is in the R state in the native and the r.h. 88% crystals. At r.h. 79%, the water content of the crystal is reduced and the molecule appears to move towards the R2 state. The crystals undergo a water-mediated transformation involving a doubling of one of the unit-cell parameters and an increase in water content when the environmental humidity is further reduced to r.h. 75%. The water content is now similar to that in the native crystals and the molecules are in the R state. The crystal structure at r.h. 66% is similar, but not identical, to that at r.h. 75%, but the solvent content is substantially reduced and the molecules have a quaternary structure that is in between those corresponding to the R and R2 states. Thus, variation in hydration leads to variation in the quaternary structure. Furthermore, partial dehydration appears to shift the structure from the R state to the R2 state. This observation is in agreement with the earlier conclusion that the changes in protein structure that accompany partial dehydration are similar to those that occur during protein action

  18. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossuin, Y; Orlando, T; Basini, M; Henrard, D; Lascialfari, A; Mattea, C; Stapf, S; Vuong, Q L

    2016-04-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water.

  19. Quantitative description of proton exchange processes between water and endogenous and exogenous agents for WEX, CEST, and APT experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinyuan; Wilson, David A; Sun, Phillip Zhe; Klaus, Judith A; Van Zijl, Peter C M

    2004-05-01

    The proton exchange processes between water and solutes containing exchangeable protons have recently become of interest for monitoring pH effects, detecting cellular mobile proteins and peptides, and enhancing the detection sensitivity of various low-concentration endogenous and exogenous species. In this work, the analytic expressions for water exchange (WEX) filter spectroscopy, chemical exchange-dependent saturation transfer (CEST), and amide proton transfer (APT) experiments are derived by the use of Bloch equations with exchange terms. The effects of the initial states for the system, the difference between a steady state and a saturation state, and the relative contributions of the forward and backward exchange processes are discussed. The theory, in combination with numerical calculations, provides a useful tool for designing experimental schemes and assessing magnetization transfer (MT) processes between water protons and solvent-exchangeable protons. As an example, the case of endogenous amide proton exchange in the rat brain at 4.7 T is analyzed in detail. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Effect of cations on the hydrated proton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosson, Niklas; Hunger, Johannes; Bakker, Huib J

    2014-09-17

    We report on a strong nonadditive effect of protons and other cations on the structural dynamics of liquid water, which is revealed using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy in the frequency range of 1-50 GHz. For pure acid solutions, protons are known to have a strong structuring effect on water, leading to a pronounced decrease of the dielectric response. We observe that this structuring is reduced when protons are cosolvated with salts. This reduction is exclusively observed for combinations of protons with other ions; for all studied solutions of cosolvated salts, the effect on the structural dynamics of water is observed to be purely additive, even up to high concentrations. We derive an empirical model that quantitatively describes the nonadditive effect of cosolvated protons and cations. We argue that the effect can be explained from the special character of the proton in water and that Coulomb fields exerted by other cations, in particular doubly charged cations like Mg(2+)aq and Ca(2+)aq, induce a localization of the H(+)aq hydration structures.

  1. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: Multi-spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2017-08-01

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissues, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. Starting from the stochastic Liouville equation, we have previously developed a rigorous EMOR relaxation theory for dipole-coupled two-spin and three-spin systems. Here, we extend the stochastic Liouville theory to four-spin systems and use these exact results as a guide for constructing an approximate multi-spin theory, valid for spin systems of arbitrary size. This so-called generalized stochastic Redfield equation (GSRE) theory includes the effects of longitudinal-transverse cross-mode relaxation, which gives rise to an inverted step in the relaxation dispersion profile, and coherent spin mode transfer among solid-like spins, which may be regarded as generalized spin diffusion. The GSRE theory is compared to an existing theory, based on the extended Solomon equations, which does not incorporate these phenomena. Relaxation dispersion profiles are computed from the GSRE theory for systems of up to 16 protons, taken from protein crystal structures. These profiles span the range from the motional narrowing limit, where the coherent mode transfer plays a major role, to the ultra-slow motion limit, where the zero-field rate is closely related to the strong-collision limit of the dipolar relaxation rate. Although a quantitative analysis of experimental data is beyond the scope of this work, it is clear from the magnitude of the predicted relaxation rate and the shape of the relaxation dispersion profile that the dipolar EMOR mechanism is the principal cause of water-1H low-field longitudinal relaxation in aqueous systems of immobilized macromolecules, including soft biological tissues. The relaxation theory developed here therefore provides a basis for molecular-level interpretation of endogenous soft

  2. A review of proton exchange membrane water electrolysis on degradation mechanisms and mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qi; Yuan, Xiao-Zi; Liu, Gaoyang; Wei, Bing; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Hui; Wang, Haijiang

    2017-10-01

    Proton exchange membrane water electrolysis (PEMWE) is an advanced and effective solution to the primary energy storage technologies. A better understanding of performance and durability of PEMWE is critical for the engineers and researchers to further advance this technology for its market penetration, and for the manufacturers of PEM water electrolyzers to implement quality control procedures for the production line or on-site process monitoring/diagnosis. This paper reviews the published works on performance degradations and mitigation strategies for PEMWE. Sources of degradation for individual components are introduced. With degradation causes discussed and degradation mechanisms examined, the review emphasizes on feasible strategies to mitigate the components degradation. To avoid lengthy real lifetime degradation tests and their high costs, the importance of accelerated stress tests and protocols is highlighted for various components. In the end, R&D directions are proposed to move the PEMWE technology forward to become a key element in future energy scenarios.

  3. Carbon Nitride Materials as Efficient Catalyst Supports for Proton Exchange Membrane Water Electrolyzers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belen Jorge

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nitride materials with graphitic to polymeric structures (gCNH were investigated as catalyst supports for the proton exchange membrane (PEM water electrolyzers using IrO2 nanoparticles as oxygen evolution electrocatalyst. Here, the performance of IrO2 nanoparticles formed and deposited in situ onto carbon nitride support for PEM water electrolysis was explored based on previous preliminary studies conducted in related systems. The results revealed that this preparation route catalyzed the decomposition of the carbon nitride to form a material with much lower N content. This resulted in a significant enhancement of the performance of the gCNH-IrO2 (or N-doped C-IrO2 electrocatalyst that was likely attributed to higher electrical conductivity of the N-doped carbon support.

  4. Direct fabrication of gas diffusion cathode by pulse electrodeposition for proton exchange membrane water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyanjoo; Choe, Seunghoe; Kim, Hoyoung; Kim, Dong-Kwon; Cho, GeonHee; Park, YoonSu; Jang, Jong Hyun; Ha, Don-Hyung; Ahn, Sang Hyun; Kim, Soo-Kil

    2018-06-01

    Pt catalysts for water electrolysis were prepared on carbon paper by using both direct current and pulse electrodeposition. Controlling the mass transfer of Pt precursor in the electrolyte by varying the deposition potential enables the formation of various Pt particle shapes such as flower-like and polyhedral particles. Further control of the deposition parameters for pulse electrodeposition resulted in changes to the particle size and density. In particular, the upper potential of pulse was found to be the critical parameter controlling the morphology of the particles and their catalytic activity. In addition to the typical electrochemical measurements, Pt samples deposited on carbon paper were used as cathodes for a proton exchange membrane water electrolyser. This single cell test revealed that our Pt particle samples have exceptional mass activity while being cost effective.

  5. Study of the water content and relaxation properties of the uterine junctional zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, S.; Scott, G.; Majumdar, S.; Thompson, S.; Shapiro, B.; Lange, R.; Gore, J.

    1988-01-01

    Nine hysterectomy specimens were imaged at 1.5T (General Electric Sigma), 5-mm single section, repetition time msec/echo time msec = 2,000/ 20, 40, 60, 80; and 500/20. With the use of tissue thickness measured from the images, weighed samples of myometrium, junctional zone, and endometrium were excised for determination of T1 and T2 in a 20-MHz spectrometer and then dried for determination of water content. The remainder of the uterus, examined with special histopathologic stains, demonstrated no significant difference in the number of blood vessels, smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, elastin, iron, collagen, mucin, polysaccharide, or amyloid. The junctional zone water content (79.28%) was significantly lower than those of endometrium (82.88%; P = .004) and myometrium (8.05%; P = .0046). The T1 of the junctional zone (643) was significantly lower than those of endometrium (836, P = .004) and myometrium (709; P = .0114). Junctional zone T2 (58) was significantly lower than those of endometrium (87; P = .0114) and myometrium (66.7; P = .006)

  6. Two-state model of excess electron relaxation and geminate recombination in water and aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorenko, S.G.

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: After photo-induced ionization a free electron suffers a quick conversion to a solvated state, and then recombines with the parent atom or ion. However, high mobility and reactivity of a free electron can allow the electron to delocalize and recombine in the free state. The theory of two channel processes of geminate electron recombination is developed and applied to the experiment of three-pulse generation of excess electrons in water. - Abstract: After photo-induced ionization a free electron suffers a quick conversion to a solvated state, and then can recombine with the parent atom or ion. However, high mobility and reactivity of a free electron can allow the electron to delocalize and recombine in the free state. The theory of two channel processes of geminate electron recombination is developed here for the general type of the Markovian motion of reactants. A contact model is used for analytical solution of the problem of geminate recombination of neutral and charged reactants. The theory is applied to the experiment of three-pulse generation of excess electrons in water.

  7. Temperature dependence of electron spin-lattice relaxation of radiation-produced silver atoms in polycrystalline aqueous and glassy organic matrices. Importance of relaxation by tunneling modes in disordered matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, J.; Kevan, L.

    1978-01-01

    The electron spin-lattice relaxation of trapped silver atoms in polycrystalline ice matrices and in methanol, ethanol, propylene carbonate, and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran organic glasses has been directly studied as a function of temperature by the saturation-recovery method. Below 40 K the dominant electron spin-lattice relaxation mechanism involves modulation of the electron nuclear dipolar interaction with nuclei in the radical's environment by tunneling of those nuclei between two nearly equal energy configurations. This relaxation mechanism occurs with high efficiency, has a characteristic linear temperature dependence, and is typically found in highly disordered matrices. The efficiency of this relaxation mechanism seems to decrease with decreasing polarity of the matrix. Deuteration experiments show that the tunneling nuclei are protons and in methanol it is shown that the methyl protons have more tunneling modes available than the hydroxyl protons. In polycrystalline ice matrices silver atoms can be stabilized with two different orientations of surrounding water molecules; the efficiency of the tunneling relaxation reflects this difference. From these and previous results on tunneling relaxation of trapped electrons in glassy matrices it appears that tunneling relaxation may be used to distinguish models with different geometrical configurations and to determine the relative rigidity of such configurations around trapped radicals in disordered solids. (author)

  8. Complex dielectric permittivity and dielectric relaxation of heavy water along its curve of existence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabokov, O.A.; Lyubimov, Yu.A.

    1985-10-01

    The authors previously studied the complex dielectric permittivity of ordinary water at 70-200/sup 0/C. Similar measurements were performed in this work for D/sub 2/O by incomplete filling of a microwave resonator at a frequency of about 9.3 GHz. Distilled 99.8% D/sub 2/O was used. For D/sub 2/O, the value of tau/sub D/T/eta (where eta is the viscosity) increases with increasing temperature, so that at 140/sup 0/C its change goes beyond the limits of error of the measurement of tau/sub D/ and eta. The gradual increase in tau/sub D/T/eta and tau/sub D/D with temperature indicates weakening of the interaction between orientation and translation movements of the liquid D/sub 2/O molecules with increasing temperature. 11 references, 1 figure.

  9. The calculation of proton and secondary electron stopping powers in liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marouane, Abdelhak; Inchaouh, Jamal; Ouaskit, Said; Fathi, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    The stopping power of energetic protons in liquid water has been calculated using a new model based on different theoretical and semi-empirical approaches. In this model, we consider the relativistic corrections along with the electronic and nuclear stopping power. The present work accounts for the different interactions made with electrons and nuclei inside the target. Interactions of the incident particle with the target's electrons dominate in the high energy regime; in the low energy regime, the interactions of the projectile with the target nuclei contribute importantly and are included in the calculation. We also compute the stopping cross sections and the stopping power of secondary electrons ejected from proton and hydrogen ionization impact, and generated by hydrogen electron loss processes. The consideration of secondary electrons' stopping power can contribute to the study of nano-dosimetry. Our results are in good agreement with existing experimental data. This calculation model can be useful for different applications in medical physics and space radiation health, such as hadron therapy for cancer treatment or radiation protection for astronauts. - Highlights: ► We discussed the stopping cross sections at the Bragg peak region of primary and secondary processes. ► We considered the corrections of incident particle energy focusing on the Rudds semi-empirical model. ► We calculated the electronic and nuclear stopping power, and we deduced the total stopping power. ► We calculated the stopping power of the secondary electrons.

  10. Molecular theory for nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein solutions and tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmich, R.; Nusser, W.; Gneiting, T.

    1990-01-01

    A model theory is presented explaining a series of striking phenomena observed with nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein systems such as solutions or tissue. The frequency, concentration and temperature dependences of proton or deuteron relaxation times of protein solutions and tissue are explained. It is concluded that the translational diffusion of water molecules along the rugged surfaces of proteins and, to a minor degree, protein backbone fluctuations are crucial processes. The rate limiting factor of macromolecular tumbling is assumed to be given by the free water content in a certain analogy to the free-volume model of Cohen ad Turnbull. There are two characteristic water mass fractions indicating the saturation of the hydration shells and the onset of protein tumbling. A closed and relatively simple set of relaxation formulas is presented. The potentially fractal nature of the diffusion of water molecules on the protein surface is discussed. (author). 43 refs.; 4 figs

  11. Development of Less Water-Dependent Radiation Grafted Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasef, M M; Ahmad, A; Saidi, H; Dahlan, K Z.M. [Institute of Hydrogen Economy, Energy Research Alliance (ERA), International Campus, Univeristi Teknologi Malaysia, Jalan Semarak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Radiation Processing Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, Kajang (Malaysia)

    2012-09-15

    The aim of these studies was the development of proton exchange membranes for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell operated above 100{sup o}C, in order to obtain less water dependent, high quality and cheap electrolyte membrane. Sulfonic acid membranes were prepared by radiation induced grafting (RIG) of sodium styrene sulfonate (SSS) onto electron beam (EB) irradiated poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) films in a single step reaction for the first time using synergetic effect of acid addition to grafting mixture under various grafting conditions. The fuel cell related properties of the membranes were evaluated and the in situ performance was tested in a single H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} fuel cell under dynamic conditions and compared with a similar sulfonated polystyrene PVDF membrane obtained by two-step conventional RIG method i.e. grafting of styrene and subsequent sulfonation. The newly obtained membrane (degree of grafting, G% = 53) showed an improved performance and higher stability together with a cost reduction mainly as a result of elimination of sulfonation reaction. Acid-base composite membranes were also studied. EB pre-irradiated poly(ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) (ETFE) films were grafted with N-vinyl pyridine (NVP). The effects of monomer concentration, dose, reaction time, film thickness, temperature and film storage time on G% were investigated. The membranes were subsequently doped with phosphoric acid under controlled condition. The proton conductivity of these membranes was investigated under low water conditions in correlation with the variation in G% and temperature (30-130{sup o}C). The performance of 34 and 49% grafted and doped membranes was tested in a single fuel cell at 130{sup o}C under dynamic conditions with 146 and 127 mW/cm{sup 2} power densities. The polarization, power density characteristics and the initial stability of the membrane showed a promising electrolyte candidate for fuel cell operation above 100 deg. C. (author)

  12. Water droplet accumulation and motion in PEM (Proton Exchange Membrane) fuel cell mini-channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carton, J.G.; Lawlor, V.; Olabi, A.G.; Hochenauer, C.; Zauner, G.

    2012-01-01

    Effective water management is one of the key strategies for improving low temperature PEM (Proton Exchange Membrane) fuel cell performance and durability. Phenomena such as membrane dehydration, catalyst layer flooding, mass transport and fluid flow regimes can be affected by the interaction, distribution and movement of water in flow plate channels. In this paper a literature review is completed in relation to PEM fuel cell water flooding. It is clear that droplet formation, movement and interaction with the GDL (Gas Diffusion Layer) have been studied extensively. However slug formation and droplet accumulation in the flow channels has not been analysed in detail. In this study, a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamic) model and VOF (Volume of Fluid) method is used to simulate water droplet movement and slug formation in PEM fuel cell mini-channels. In addition, water slug visualisation is recorded in ex situ PEM fuel cell mini-channels. Observation and simulation results are discussed with relation to slug formation and the implications to PEM fuel cell performance. -- Highlights: ► Excess water in mini-channels from the collision and coalescence of droplets can directly form slugs in PEM fuel cells. ► Slugs can form at low flow rates so increasing the flow rate can reduce the size and frequency of slugs. ► One channel of a double serpentine mini-channel may become blocked due to the redistribution of airflow and pressure caused by slug formation. ► Correct GDL and mini-channel surface coatings are essential to reduce slug formation and stagnation. ► Having geometry changes (bends and steps) in the flow fields can disrupt slug movement and avoid channel blockages.

  13. On the nuclear halo of a proton pencil beam stopping in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, Bernard; Cascio, Ethan W; Daartz, Juliane; Wagner, Miles S

    2015-01-01

    The dose distribution of a proton beam stopping in water has components due to basic physics and may have others from beam contamination. We propose the concise terms core for the primary beam, halo (see Pedroni et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 541–61) for the low dose region from charged secondaries, aura for the low dose region from neutrals, and spray for beam contamination.We have measured the dose distribution in a water tank at 177 MeV under conditions where spray, therefore radial asymmetry, is negligible. We used an ADCL calibrated thimble chamber and a Faraday cup calibrated integral beam monitor so as to obtain immediately the absolute dose per proton. We took depth scans at fixed distances from the beam centroid rather than radial scans at fixed depths. That minimizes the signal range for each scan and better reveals the structure of the core and halo.Transitions from core to halo to aura are already discernible in the raw data. The halo has components attributable to coherent and incoherent nuclear reactions. Due to elastic and inelastic scattering by the nuclear force, the Bragg peak persists to radii larger than can be accounted for by Molière single scattering. The radius of the incoherent component, a dose bump around midrange, agrees with the kinematics of knockout reactions.We have fitted the data in two ways. The first is algebraic or model dependent (MD) as far as possible, and has 25 parameters. The second, using 2D cubic spline regression, is model independent. Optimal parameterization for treatment planning will probably be a hybrid of the two, and will of course require measurements at several incident energies.The MD fit to the core term resembles that of the PSI group (Pedroni et al 2005), which has been widely emulated. However, we replace their T(w), a mass stopping power which mixes electromagnetic (EM) and nuclear effects, with one that is purely EM, arguing that protons that do not undergo hard single scatters continue to lose energy

  14. On the nuclear halo of a proton pencil beam stopping in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Bernard; Cascio, Ethan W.; Daartz, Juliane; Wagner, Miles S.

    2015-07-01

    The dose distribution of a proton beam stopping in water has components due to basic physics and may have others from beam contamination. We propose the concise terms core for the primary beam, halo (see Pedroni et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 541-61) for the low dose region from charged secondaries, aura for the low dose region from neutrals, and spray for beam contamination. We have measured the dose distribution in a water tank at 177 MeV under conditions where spray, therefore radial asymmetry, is negligible. We used an ADCL calibrated thimble chamber and a Faraday cup calibrated integral beam monitor so as to obtain immediately the absolute dose per proton. We took depth scans at fixed distances from the beam centroid rather than radial scans at fixed depths. That minimizes the signal range for each scan and better reveals the structure of the core and halo. Transitions from core to halo to aura are already discernible in the raw data. The halo has components attributable to coherent and incoherent nuclear reactions. Due to elastic and inelastic scattering by the nuclear force, the Bragg peak persists to radii larger than can be accounted for by Molière single scattering. The radius of the incoherent component, a dose bump around midrange, agrees with the kinematics of knockout reactions. We have fitted the data in two ways. The first is algebraic or model dependent (MD) as far as possible, and has 25 parameters. The second, using 2D cubic spline regression, is model independent. Optimal parameterization for treatment planning will probably be a hybrid of the two, and will of course require measurements at several incident energies. The MD fit to the core term resembles that of the PSI group (Pedroni et al 2005), which has been widely emulated. However, we replace their T(w), a mass stopping power which mixes electromagnetic (EM) and nuclear effects, with one that is purely EM, arguing that protons that do not undergo hard single scatters continue to lose

  15. Relaxation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  16. Evaluation of self-water-removal in a dead-ended proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Zhongmin; Liu, Jing; Luo, Zhiping; Tu, Zhengkai; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Operation characteristics in a dead-ended PEM fuel cell were addressed. ► Modified flow channel was used to realize water removal. ► A novel method by condensing the moisture in the stack end was introduced. - Abstract: In this paper, the operation characteristic of a dead-ended proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) placed with vertical orientation is investigated. The relationship between the channel geometry and the wettability of the gas diffusion layer (GDL) surface is theoretically analyzed. Based on the theoretical analysis, straight flow channels with 2.0 mm width and 1.0 mm depth are used for the experimental investigation and the moisture is condensed at the stack end to improve water removal. The results show that the designed fuel cell can operate for about 1 h at 800 mA cm −2 and the performance of the cell decreases with the increase in the operation temperature. Moreover, the recovered liquid water is corresponded closely to the theoretical values

  17. Sci-Fri AM: MRI and Diagnostic Imaging - 01: Estimating the Transverse Relaxation Time of Taurine Protons in Rat Brain at 9.4 T with Optimized PRESS Sequence Timings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Marissa; Dobberthien, Brennen; Tessier, Anthony; Yahya, Atiyah [University of Alberta, University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the response of taurine (Tau) protons as a function of PRESS echo times, TE{sub 1} and TE{sub 2}, to determine two TE combinations that can be employed to estimate the T{sub 2} (transverse relaxation) value of Tau at 9.4 T. The Tau protons are involved in J-coupling interactions; therefore, the two timing combinations should result in similar signal losses due to J-coupling. Methods: Experiments were performed with a 9.4 T animal MRI scanner. Numerical calculations of the response of Tau as a function of PRESS TE{sub 1} and TE{sub 2} were calculated and two TE combinations that yield a similar area for the 3.42 ppm Tau resonance were selected as optimal. The timings were verified on a 50 mM Tau/10 mM Cr (creatine) phantom. In-vivo experiments were performed on four rats. Spectra were acquired with the timings from a voxel placed in the rat brain and Tau peak areas were fit to monoexponentially decaying functions to obtain T{sub 2} values. Results: The PRESS TE combinations selected for Tau T{sub 2} determination are (TE{sub 1}, TE{sub 2}) = (17 ms, 10 ms) and (80 ms, 70 ms); the signal yield for the two timings differs by 5 % theoretically. The average Tau T{sub 2} for the four rats was found to be 106 ms with a standard deviation of 12 ms. Conclusions: We have demonstrated that acquiring PRESS spectra with (TE{sub 1}, TE{sub 2}) = (17 ms, 10 ms) and (TE{sub 1}, TE{sub 2}) = (80 ms, 70 ms) enables T{sub 2} corrected measures of Tau to be obtained at 9.4 T.

  18. Characterization of water in hydrated Bombyx mori silk fibroin fiber and films by 2H NMR relaxation and 13C solid state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Isobe, Kotaro; Kametani, Shunsuke; Ukpebor, Obehi T; Silverstein, Moshe C; Boutis, Gregory S

    2017-03-01

    The mechanical properties of Bombyx mori silk fibroin (SF), such as elasticity and tensile strength, change remarkably upon hydration. However, the microscopic interaction with water is not currently well understood on a molecular level. In this work, the dynamics of water molecules interacting with SF was studied by 2 H solution NMR relaxation and exchange measurements. Additionally, the conformations of hydrated [3- 13 C]Ala-, [3- 13 C]Ser-, and [3- 13 C]Tyr-SF fibers and films were investigated by 13 C DD/MAS NMR. Using an inverse Laplace transform algorithm, we were able to identify four distinct components in the relaxation times for water in SF fiber. Namely, A: bulk water outside the fiber, B: water molecules trapped weakly on the surface of the fiber, C: bound water molecules located in the inner surface of the fiber, and D: bound water molecules located in the inner part of the fiber were distinguishable. In addition, four components were also observed for water in the SF film immersed in methanol for 30s, while only two components for the film immersed in methanol for 24h. The effects of hydration on the conformation of Ser and Tyr residues in the site-specific crystalline and non-crystalline domains of 13 C selectively labeled SF, respectively, could be determined independently. Our measurements provide new insight relating the characteristics of water and the hydration structure of silk, which are relevant in light of current interest in the design of novel silk-based biomaterials. The mechanical properties of Bombyx mori silk fibroin (SF) change remarkably upon hydration. However, the microscopic interaction between SF and water is not currently well understood on a molecular level. We were able to identify four distinct components in the relaxation times for water in SF fiber by 2 H solution NMR relaxation and exchange measurements. In addition, the effects of hydration on the conformation of Ser and Tyr residues in the site-specific crystalline and

  19. On the Effect of Clamping Pressure and Method on the Current Mapping of Proton Exchange Membrane Water Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Zhou, Fan; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    The degradation of the electrochemical reaction of the proton exchange membrane water electrolysis (PEMWE) can be characterized using in-situ current mapping measurements (CMM). CMM is significantly affected by the amount of clamping pressure and method. In this work the current is mapped...

  20. Dynamic behavior of liquid water transport in a tapered channel of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akhtar, N.; Kerkhof, P.J.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    A numerical model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cathode with a tapered channel design has been developed in order to examine the dynamic behavior of liquid water transport. Three-dimensional, transient simulations employing the level-set method (available in COMSOL 3.5a, a

  1. Dose distribution of secondary radiation in a water phantom for a proton pencil beam-EURADOS WG9 intercomparison exercise

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stolarczyk, L.; Trinkl, S.; Romero-Exposito, M.; Mojzeszek, N.; Ambrožová, Iva; Domingo, C.; Davídková, Marie; Farah, J.; Klodowska, M.; Kneževic, Z.; Liszka, M.; Majer, M.; Miljanic, S.; Ploc, Ondřej; Schwarz, M.; Harrison, R. M.; Olko, P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 8 (2018), č. článku 085017. ISSN 0031-9155 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : passive detectors * neutron dosimetry * gamma radiation dosimetry * water phantom measurements * secondary radiation measurements * pencil beam scanning proton radiotherapy Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Radiology, nuclear medicine and medical imaging Impact factor: 2.742, year: 2016

  2. Predicting liquid water saturation through differently structured cathode gas diffusion media of a proton exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akhtar, N.; Kerkhof, P.J.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The role of gas diffusion media with differently structured properties have been examined with emphasis on the liquid water saturation within the cathode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The cathode electrode consists of a gas diffusion layer (GDL), a micro-porous layer and a

  3. Full dimensional (15-dimensional) quantum-dynamical simulation of the protonated water dimer. II. Infrared spectrum and vibrational dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendrell, Oriol; Gatti, Fabien; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2007-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectrum of the protonated water dimer (H5O2+) is simulated in full dimensionality (15 dimensional) in the spectral range of 0-4000 cm(-1). The calculations are performed using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method for propagation of wavepackets. All...

  4. DNA-Accelerated Copper Catalysis of Friedel-Crafts Conjugate Addition/Enantioselective Protonation Reactions in Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Fernández, Almudena; Megens, Rik P.; Villarino, Lara; Roelfes, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    DNA-induced rate acceleration has been identified as one of the key elements for the success of the DNA-based catalysis concept. Here we report on a novel DNA-based catalytic Friedel-Crafts conjugate addition/enantioselective protonation reaction in water, which represents the first example of a

  5. Calculations and measurements of the scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio of liquid scintillators for use in proton radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott Ingram, W.; Robertson, Daniel; Beddar, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillators are a promising detector for high-resolution three-dimensional proton therapy dosimetry. Because the scintillator comprises both the active volume of the detector and the phantom material, an ideal scintillator will exhibit water equivalence in its radiological properties. One of the most fundamental of these is the scintillator’s stopping power. The objective of this study was to compare calculations and measurements of scintillator-to-water stopping power ratios to evaluate the suitability of the liquid scintillators BC-531 and OptiPhase HiSafe 3 for proton dosimetry. We also measured the relative scintillation output of the two scintillators. Both calculations and measurements show that the linear stopping power of OptiPhase is significantly closer to water than that of BC-531. BC-531 has a somewhat higher scintillation output. OptiPhase can be mixed with water at high concentrations, which further improves its scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio. However, this causes the solution to become cloudy, which has a negative impact on the scintillation output and spatial resolution of the detector. OptiPhase is preferred over BC-531 for proton dosimetry because its density and scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio are more water equivalent

  6. Effects of the Relaxation of Upwelling-Favorable Winds on the Diurnal and Semidiurnal Water Temperature Fluctuations in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristizábal, María. F.; Fewings, Melanie R.; Washburn, Libe

    2017-10-01

    In the Santa Barbara Channel, California, and around the Northern Channel Islands, water temperature fluctuations in the diurnal and semidiurnal frequency bands are intermittent, with amplitudes that vary on time scales of days to weeks. The cause of this intermittency is not well understood. We studied the effects of the barotropic tide, vertical stratification, propagation of coastal-trapped waves, regional wind relaxations, and diurnal-band winds on the intermittency of the temperature fluctuations during 1992-2015. We used temperature data from 43 moorings in 10-200 m water depth and wind data from two buoys and one land station. Subtidal-frequency changes in vertical stratification explain 20-40% of the intermittency in diurnal and semidiurnal temperature fluctuations at time scales of days to weeks. Along the mainland north of Point Conception and at the Northern Channel Islands, the relaxation of upwelling-favorable winds substantially increases vertical stratification, accounting for up to 55% of the subtidal-frequency variability in stratification. As a result of the enhanced stratification, wind relaxations enhance the diurnal and semidiurnal temperature fluctuations at those sites, even though the diurnal-band wind forcing decreases during wind relaxation. A linear model where the background stratification is advected vertically explains a substantial fraction of the temperature fluctuations at most sites. The increase of vertical stratification and subsequent increase in diurnal and semidiurnal temperature fluctuations during wind relaxation is a mechanism that can supply nutrients to the euphotic zone and kelp forests in the Channel in summer when upwelling is weak.

  7. Relaxation study of a paramagnetic ion by the observation of nuclear resonance signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landesman, A.

    1960-01-01

    Dynamic polarization of protons in water containing the paramagnetic ion NO(SO 3 ) 2 was studied, both theoretically and experimentally, as a function of magnetic field. The enhancement of the proton polarization depends appreciably on the relaxation process of the electron spin and so enables us to decide which is the real relaxation process. We tried the two following processes: a) The electron spin is coupled with the nitrogen magnetic moment by hyperfine interaction; if this interaction has an anisotropic part, a relaxation process for the electronic spin will result through the Brownian motion of the ion. b) The relaxation of the electron spin takes place through spin-orbit coupling of the electron spin. Experimental results showed that the relaxation took place through the second process with the help of dynamic polarization we were able to study the relaxation of an electron spin in a liquid without using any electron resonance spectrometer, simply by observing the resonance of a nuclear spin coupled with the electron spin. Reprint of a paper published in Le Journal de Physique et le Radium, t. 20, p. 937-948, 1959 [fr

  8. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance of a Commercial Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Berning, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive (e.g. the Toyota Mirai) to stationary such as powering telecom backup units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce...... and increased degradation rates. Clearly, a fundamental understanding of all aspects of water management in PEMFC is imperative. This includes the fuel cell water balance, i.e. which fraction of the product water leaves the fuel cell via the anode channels versus the cathode channel. Our research group...... signal received gives valuable insight into heat and mass transfer phenomena in a PEMFC....

  9. Lanthanide(III) complexes of a mono(methylphosphonate) analogue of H4dota: the influence of protonation of the phosphonate moiety on the TSAP/SAP isomer ratio and the water exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudovský, Jakub; Cígler, Petr; Kotek, Jan; Hermann, Petr; Vojtísek, Pavel; Lukes, Ivan; Peters, Joop A; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N

    2005-04-08

    A monophosphonate analogue of H4dota, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-4,7,10-tris(carboxymethyl)-1-methylphosphonic acid (H5do3aP), and its complexes with lanthanides were synthesized. Multinuclear NMR studies reveal that, in aqueous solution, lanthanide(III) complexes of the ligand exhibit structures analogous to those of H4dota complexes. Thus, the central ion is nine-coordinate, surrounded by four nitrogen atoms, three acetate and one phosphonate oxygen atoms, and one water molecule in an apical position. For complexes of H5do3aP with Ln(III) ions in the middle of the series, the abundance of the desired twisted square-antiprismatic (TSAP) isomer is higher than for the corresponding H4dota complexes. The TSAP/square-antiprismatic (SAP) isomer ratio is highly sensitive to protonation of the phosphonate group: a higher abundance of the TSAP isomer was found in acidic solutions. The microscopic protonation constants of the TSAP isomers are higher than those of the SAP isomers. The presence of one water molecule in the first coordination sphere of the complexes in the pH region studied (pH 2.5-7.0) is confirmed by 17O NMR spectroscopy. The results of a simultaneous fit of variable-temperature 17O NMR relaxation data and 1H NMRD profiles show that the residence time of water (tauM) in the Gd(III) complex is much smaller than for [Gd(dota)(H2O)]-. The exchange rate appears to be dependent on the pH of the solution. The values of tauM are 37, 40, and 14 ns at pH 2.5, 4.7, and 7.0, respectively. These observations can be explained by an extensive second-sphere hydrogen-bonding network that varies with the state of protonation of the phosphonate moiety. Upon protonation of the complex, the second-sphere hydration probably becomes more ordered, which may result in a decrease in penetrability and an increase in tauM. The relaxivity of the Gd(III) complex is almost independent of the pH and is equal to 4.7 s(-1) mM(-1) (20 MHz, pH 7 and 37 degrees C). The solid

  10. Pressure control of a proton beam-irradiated water target through an internal flow channel-induced thermosyphon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bong Hwan; Jung, In Su

    2017-07-01

    A water target was designed to enhance cooling efficiency using a thermosyphon, which is a system that uses natural convection to induce heat exchange. Two water targets were fabricated: a square target without any flow channel and a target with a flow channel design to induce a thermosyphon mechanism. These two targets had the same internal volume of 8 ml. First, visualization experiments were performed to observe the internal flow by natural convection. Subsequently, an experiment was conducted to compare the cooling performance of both water targets by measuring the temperature and pressure. A 30-MeV proton beam with a beam current of 20 μA was used to irradiate both targets. Consequently, the target with an internal flow channel had a lower mean temperature and a 50% pressure drop compared to the target without a flow channel during proton beam irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: General theory with applications to two-spin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2016-02-28

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissue, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. We have embarked on a systematic program to develop, from the stochastic Liouville equation, a general and rigorous theory that can describe relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism over the full range of exchange rates, dipole coupling strengths, and Larmor frequencies. Here, we present a general theoretical framework applicable to spin systems of arbitrary size with symmetric or asymmetric exchange. So far, the dipolar EMOR theory is only available for a two-spin system with symmetric exchange. Asymmetric exchange, when the spin system is fragmented by the exchange, introduces new and unexpected phenomena. Notably, the anisotropic dipole couplings of non-exchanging spins break the axial symmetry in spin Liouville space, thereby opening up new relaxation channels in the locally anisotropic sites, including longitudinal-transverse cross relaxation. Such cross-mode relaxation operates only at low fields; at higher fields it becomes nonsecular, leading to an unusual inverted relaxation dispersion that splits the extreme-narrowing regime into two sub-regimes. The general dipolar EMOR theory is illustrated here by a detailed analysis of the asymmetric two-spin case, for which we present relaxation dispersion profiles over a wide range of conditions as well as analytical results for integral relaxation rates and time-dependent spin modes in the zero-field and motional-narrowing regimes. The general theoretical framework presented here will enable a quantitative analysis of frequency-dependent water-proton longitudinal relaxation in model systems with immobilized macromolecules and, ultimately, will provide a rigorous link between relaxation-based magnetic resonance image contrast and molecular parameters.

  12. Rapid simultaneous high-resolution mapping of myelin water fraction and relaxation times in human brain using BMC-mcDESPOT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhrara, Mustapha; Spencer, Richard G

    2017-02-15

    A number of central nervous system (CNS) diseases exhibit changes in myelin content and magnetic resonance longitudinal, T 1 , and transverse, T 2 , relaxation times, which therefore represent important biomarkers of CNS pathology. Among the methods applied for measurement of myelin water fraction (MWF) and relaxation times, the multicomponent driven equilibrium single pulse observation of T 1 and T 2 (mcDESPOT) approach is of particular interest. mcDESPOT permits whole brain mapping of multicomponent T 1 and T 2 , with data acquisition accomplished within a clinically realistic acquisition time. Unfortunately, previous studies have indicated the limited performance of mcDESPOT in the setting of the modest signal-to-noise range of high-resolution mapping, required for the depiction of small structures and to reduce partial volume effects. Recently, we showed that a new Bayesian Monte Carlo (BMC) analysis substantially improved determination of MWF from mcDESPOT imaging data. However, our previous study was limited in that it did not discuss determination of relaxation times. Here, we extend the BMC analysis to the simultaneous determination of whole-brain MWF and relaxation times using the two-component mcDESPOT signal model. Simulation analyses and in-vivo human brain studies indicate the overall greater performance of this approach compared to the stochastic region contraction (SRC) algorithm, conventionally used to derive parameter estimates from mcDESPOT data. SRC estimates of the transverse relaxation time of the long T 2 fraction, T 2,l , and the longitudinal relaxation time of the short T 1 fraction, T 1,s , clustered towards the lower and upper parameter search space limits, respectively, indicating failure of the fitting procedure. We demonstrate that this effect is absent in the BMC analysis. Our results also showed improved parameter estimation for BMC as compared to SRC for high-resolution mapping. Overall we find that the combination of BMC analysis

  13. 31-P Relaxation times of metabolic compounds in tumors grafted in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remy, C.; Benabid, A.L.; Jacrot, M.; Riondel, J.; Albrand, J.P.; Decorps, M.

    1985-08-01

    The observation that water proton relaxation rates were longer in tumors than in normal tissues provided a basis for the detection of human tumors by the NMR imaging technique. To evaluate the potentiality of 31-P NMR spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool of the pathological state of tissues, T1 and T2 relaxation times have been measured for the phosphates of ATP, inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphomonoesters (PME) and phosphocreatine (PCr) in the 31-P NMR spectra obtained in vivo for normal rat brain and rat brain tumors implanted in nude mice

  14. Calculation of the protons stopping power in water using dielectric formalism in the MELF-GOS approach; Calculo do poder de freamento de protons em agua utilizando o formalismo dieletrico na aproximacao MELF-GOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Franciane; Mazer, Amanda Cristina; Hormaza, Joel Mesa [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    In order to calculate the stopping power of protons, there are many very successful models at high energies, which are extrapolated to low-energy regions. From the point of view of application of proton beam in cancer treatment is just this low energy region the most relevant due to the dose deposition profile in depth for protons. In this work, we present a calculation of the stopping power of protons in a water target using the dielectric formalism in MELF-GOS approach. The results when compared to other models show good agreement for energies above 100 keV and lower values below this energy. This result should impact the range of values of protons and the Bragg peak position. (author)

  15. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance in a Proton Exchange membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Hussain, Nabeel; Berning, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) remains a critical problem for their durability, cost, and performance. Because the anode side of this fuel cell has the tendency to become dehydrated, measuring the water balance can be an important diagnosis tool during fuel cell...... operation. The water balance indicates how much of the product water leaves at the anode side versus the cathode side. Previous methods of determining the fuel cell water balance often relied on condensing the water in the exhaust gas streams and weighing the accumulated mass which is a time consuming...... process that has limited accuracy. Currently, our group is developing a novel method to accurately determine the water balance in a PEMFC in real time by employing hot-wire anemometry. The amount of heat transferred from the wire to the anode exhaust stream can be translated into a voltage signal which...

  16. On the Experimental Investigation of the Clamping Pressure Effects on the Proton Exchange Membrane Water Electrolyser Cell Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Frensch, Steffen Henrik; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2017-01-01

    energy sources. The proton exchange membrane water electrolyser(PEMWE) is the most candidate technology to produce hydrogen from renewable energysources. PEMWE cell splits water into hydrogen and oxygen when an electric current is passedthrough it. Electrical current forces the positively charged ions...... to migrate to negatively chargedcathode, where hydrogen is reduced. Meanwhile, oxygen is produced at the anode sideelectrode and escape as a gas with the circulating water. In the recent few years, PEMWE’s R&D has inched towards; operating conditions; such asincreased operating temperature and cathode...

  17. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Berning, Torsten

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive to stationary such as powering telecom back-up units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce electricity and waste......-hoc and real time electrical signal of the fuel cell water balance by employing hot wire anemometry. The hot wire sensor is placed into a binary mixture of hydrogen and water vapour, and the voltage signal received gives valuable insight into heat and mass transfer phenomena in a PEMFC. A central question...

  18. Energy related germination and survival rates of water-imbibed Arabidopsis seeds irradiated with protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, H.L.; Xue, J.M.; Lai, J.N.; Wang, J.Y.; Zhang, W.M.; Miao, Q.; Yan, S.; Zhao, W.J.; He, F.; Gu, H.Y.; Wang, Y.G.

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of ion energy on the germination and survival rates, water-imbibed Arabidopsis seeds were irradiated with protons in atmosphere. The ion fluence used in this experiment was in the range of 4 x 10 9 -1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 . The ion energy is from 1.1 MeV to 6.5 MeV. According to the structure of the seed and TRIM simulation, the ions with the energy of 6.5 MeV can irradiate the shoot apical meristem directly whereas the ions with the energy of 1.1 MeV cannot. The results showed that both the germination and survival rates decrease while increasing the ion fluence, and the fluence-respond curve for each energy has different character. Besides the shoot apical meristem (SAM), which is generally considered as the main radiobiological target, the existence of a secondary target around SAM is proposed in this paper

  19. High-dimensional neural network potentials for solvation: The case of protonated water clusters in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schran, Christoph; Uhl, Felix; Behler, Jörg; Marx, Dominik

    2018-03-01

    The design of accurate helium-solute interaction potentials for the simulation of chemically complex molecules solvated in superfluid helium has long been a cumbersome task due to the rather weak but strongly anisotropic nature of the interactions. We show that this challenge can be met by using a combination of an effective pair potential for the He-He interactions and a flexible high-dimensional neural network potential (NNP) for describing the complex interaction between helium and the solute in a pairwise additive manner. This approach yields an excellent agreement with a mean absolute deviation as small as 0.04 kJ mol-1 for the interaction energy between helium and both hydronium and Zundel cations compared with coupled cluster reference calculations with an energetically converged basis set. The construction and improvement of the potential can be performed in a highly automated way, which opens the door for applications to a variety of reactive molecules to study the effect of solvation on the solute as well as the solute-induced structuring of the solvent. Furthermore, we show that this NNP approach yields very convincing agreement with the coupled cluster reference for properties like many-body spatial and radial distribution functions. This holds for the microsolvation of the protonated water monomer and dimer by a few helium atoms up to their solvation in bulk helium as obtained from path integral simulations at about 1 K.

  20. Proton transfer along water bridges in biological systems with density-functional tight-binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Krystle; Wise, Abigail; Mazzuca, James

    2015-03-01

    When examining the dynamics of charge transfer in high dimensional enzymatic systems, the cost of quantum mechanical treatment of electrons increases exponentially with the size of the system. As a semi-empirical method, density-functional tight-binding aids in shortening these calculation times, but can be inaccurate in the regime where bonds are being formed and broken. To address these inaccuracies with respect to proton transfer in an enzymatic system, DFTB is being used to calculate small model systems containing only a single amino acid residue donor, represented by an imidazole molecule, and a water acceptor. When DFTB calculations are compared to B3LYP geometry calculations of the donor molecule, we observe a bond angle error on the order of 1.2 degrees and a bond length error on the order of 0.011 Å. As we move forward with small donor-acceptor systems, comparisons between DFTB and B3LYP energy profiles will provide a better clue as to what extent improvements need to be made. To improve the accuracy of the DFTB calculations, the internuclear repulsion term may be altered. This would result in energy profiles that closely resemble those produced by higher-level theory. Alma College Provost's Office.

  1. Energy related germination and survival rates of water-imbibed Arabidopsis seeds irradiated with protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, H.L. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xue, J.M. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Lai, J.N. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, J.Y. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, W.M. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Miao, Q. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yan, S. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhao, W.J. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); He, F. [School of Life Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gu, H.Y. [School of Life Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Y.G. [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)]. E-mail: ygwang@pku.edu.cn

    2006-04-15

    In order to investigate the influence of ion energy on the germination and survival rates, water-imbibed Arabidopsis seeds were irradiated with protons in atmosphere. The ion fluence used in this experiment was in the range of 4 x 10{sup 9}-1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. The ion energy is from 1.1 MeV to 6.5 MeV. According to the structure of the seed and TRIM simulation, the ions with the energy of 6.5 MeV can irradiate the shoot apical meristem directly whereas the ions with the energy of 1.1 MeV cannot. The results showed that both the germination and survival rates decrease while increasing the ion fluence, and the fluence-respond curve for each energy has different character. Besides the shoot apical meristem (SAM), which is generally considered as the main radiobiological target, the existence of a secondary target around SAM is proposed in this paper.

  2. Production and characterization of protonated molecular clusters containing a given number of water molecules with the DIAM set-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruny, G.

    2010-01-01

    nano-scale characterization of irradiation in bio-molecular systems requires observation of novel features which are now achievable with the recent technical progress. This work is a central part in the development of DIAM which is a new experimental set-up devoted to irradiation of bio-molecular clusters at the Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon. The development of the cluster source and of a double focusing mass spectrometer leads to the production of intense beams of mass selected protonated molecular clusters. Combined with this mass selected cluster beams an innovative detection technique is demonstrated in collision induced dissociation experiments. The results contribute to the knowledge of the stability and the structure of the small protonated water clusters and mixed clusters of water and pyridine. (author)

  3. Proton exchange membranes from sulfonated polyetheretherketone and sulfonated polyethersulfone-cardo blends: Conductivity, water sorption and permeation properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yongli; Nguyen, Quang Trong; Schaetzel, Pierre; Lixon-Buquet, Camille; Colasse, Laurent; Ratieuville, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Five blend membranes were prepared by solvent evaporation from solutions of the synthesized sulfonated polyetheretherketone (SPEEK) and sulfonated polyethersulfone-cardo (SPESc). Their ion exchange capacity and degree of sulfonation determined by acid–base titration and by thermogravimetric analysis were consistent. The blends glass transition behavior obtained by differential scanning calorimetry suggests that the two sulfonated polymers are compatible in the whole composition range. The values of the activation energy for proton transport determined by conductivity measurements on the SPEEK-based blend membranes were in the range of 13–34 kJ mol −1 , which suggest a mixed transport mechanism that involves both proton jumps on ionic sites and water of hydration and diffusion of proton–water complex in hydrophilic domains. The water vapor sorption in the membranes exhibits sigmoid-shape isotherms which were well fitted by the “new dual mode sorption” model, and the fitted parameters values were successfully used to model the change in the water permeation flux with the upstream water activity using the first Fick's diffusion equation. The fast increase in the permeation flux beyond a critical value of activity (0.5) was owing to the exponential concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient. These modelings allowed us to show a strong increase in the limit diffusion coefficient of water and a decrease in the water-diffusion plasticization coefficient with the SPEEK content in the polymer blends

  4. Low-energy proton stopping power of N2, O2, and water vapor, and deviations from Bragg's rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y.J.; Khandelwal, G.S.; Wilson, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    A modified local-plasma model, based on the works of Lindhard and Winther, and Bethe, Brown, and Walske is established. The Gordon-Kim model for molecular-electron density is used to calculate stopping power of N 2 , O 2 , and water vapor for protons of energy ranging from 40 keV to 2.5 MeV, resulting in good agreement with experimental data. Deviations from Bragg's rule are evaluated and are discussed under the present theoretical model

  5. Paramagnetic metal complexes as potential relaxation agents for NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coroiu, Ilioara; Demco, D. E.; Darabont, Al.; Bogdan, M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging technique as a clinical diagnostic modality has prompted the need for a new class of pharmaceuticals. These drugs must be administered to a patient in order to enhance the image contrast between the normal and diseased tissue and/or indicate the status of organ function or blood flow. Paramagnetic compounds are presently undergoing extensive evaluation as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These agents increase contrast in MRI by differentially localizing in tissue where they increase the relaxation rates of nearby water protons. The longitudinal R 1 and transverse R 2 relaxivities were measured as a function of molar concentrations for some new paramagnetic complexes like the following: dysprosium, erbium and gadolinium citrates, gadolinium methylene diphosphonate, dysprosium and gadolinium iminodiacetate, manganese para-aminobenzoate and copper nicotinate. The available theoretical approaches for quantitative understanding are presented. (authors)

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation characterisation of water status of developing grains of maize (Zea mays L.) grown at different nitrogen levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Prameela; Chopra, Usha Kiran; Verma, Ajay Pal Singh; Joshi, Devendra Kumar; Chand, Ishwar

    2014-04-01

    Changes in water status of developing grains of maize (Zea mays L.) grown under different nitrogen levels were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. There were distinct changes in water status of grains due to the application of different levels of nitrogen (0, 120 and 180 kg N ha(-1)). A comparison of the grain developmental characteristics, composition and physical properties indicated that, not only the developmental characteristics like grain weight, grain number/ear, and rate of grain filling increased, but also bound water characterized by the T2 component of NMR relaxation increased with nitrogen application (50-70%) and developmental stages leading to maturation (10-60%). The consistency in the patterns of responses to free water and intermediate water to increasing levels of nitrogen application and grain maturity suggested that nitrogen application resulted in more proportion of water to both bound- and intermediate states and less in free state. These changes are further corroborated by the concomitant increases in protein and starch contents in grains from higher nitrogen treatments as macromolecules like protein and starch retain more amount of water in the bound state. The results of the changes in T2 showed that water status during grain development was not only affected by developmental processes but also by nitrogen supply to plants. This study strongly indicated a clear nutrient and developmental stage dependence of grain tissue water status in maize. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular theory for nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein solutions and tissue; Surface diffusion and free-volume analogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmich, R; Nusser, W; Gneiting, T [Ulm Universitaet (Federal Republic of Germany). Sektion Kernresonanzspektroskopie

    1990-04-01

    A model theory is presented explaining a series of striking phenomena observed with nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein systems such as solutions or tissue. The frequency, concentration and temperature dependences of proton or deuteron relaxation times of protein solutions and tissue are explained. It is concluded that the translational diffusion of water molecules along the rugged surfaces of proteins and, to a minor degree, protein backbone fluctuations are crucial processes. The rate limiting factor of macromolecular tumbling is assumed to be given by the free water content in a certain analogy to the free-volume model of Cohen ad Turnbull. There are two characteristic water mass fractions indicating the saturation of the hydration shells and the onset of protein tumbling. A closed and relatively simple set of relaxation formulas is presented. The potentially fractal nature of the diffusion of water molecules on the protein surface is discussed. (author). 43 refs.; 4 figs.

  8. Embedding of Hollow Polymer Microspheres with Hydrophilic Shell in Nafion Matrix as Proton and Water Micro-Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaolin Liu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Assimilating hydrophilic hollow polymer spheres (HPS into Nafion matrix by a loading of 0.5 wt % led to a restructured hydrophilic channel, composed of the pendant sulfonic acid groups (–SO3H and the imbedded hydrophilic hollow spheres. The tiny hydrophilic hollow chamber was critical to retaining moisture and facilitating proton transfer in the composite membranes. To obtain such a tiny cavity structure, the synthesis included selective generation of a hydrophilic polymer shell on silica microsphere template and the subsequent removal of the template by etching. The hydrophilic HPS (100–200 nm possessed two different spherical shells, the styrenic network with pendant sulfonic acid groups and with methacrylic acid groups, respectively. By behaving as microreservoirs of water, the hydrophilic HPS promoted the Grotthus mechanism and, hence, enhanced proton transport efficiency through the inter-sphere path. In addition, the HPS with the –SO3H borne shell played a more effective role than those with the –CO2H borne shell in augmenting proton transport, in particular under low humidity or at medium temperatures. Single H2-PEMFC test at 70 °C using dry H2/O2 further verified the impactful role of hydrophilic HPS in sustaining higher proton flux as compared to pristine Nafion membrane.

  9. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Compression on Water Transport in the Cathode of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional, multicomponent, two-fluid model developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS Inc.) is used to investigate the effect of porous media compression on water transport in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC model only consist of the cathode channel, gas....... Furthermore, the presence of irreducible liquid water is taken into account. In order to account for compression, porous media morphology variations are specified based on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) through-plane strain and intrusion which are stated as a function of compression. These morphology...... variations affect gas and liquid water transport, and hence liquid water distribution and the risk of blocking active sites. Hence, water transport is studied under GDL compression in order to investigate the qualitative effects. Two simulation cases are compared; one with and one without compression....

  10. Tracking the Structural and Electronic Configurations of a Cobalt Proton Reduction Catalyst in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Gimbert-Suriñach, Carolina [Institute; Guda, Alexander [International; Picon, Antonio; Lehmann, C. Stefan; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Doumy, Gilles; March, Anne Marie; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi [Institute; Soldatov, Alexander [International; Llobet, Antoni [Institute; Departament; Southworth, Stephen H.

    2016-08-09

    Time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy (X-TAS) has been used to study the light induced hydrogen evolution reaction catalyzed by a highly stable cobalt complex, [Ru(bpy)3]2+ photosensitizer and an equimolar mixture of sodium ascorbate/ascorbic acid electron donor in pure water. XANES and EXAFS analysis of a binary mixture of the octahedral Co(III) pre-catalyst and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ after illumination, revealed in-situ formation of a square pyramidal Co(II) intermediate, with electron transfer kinetics of 51 ns. On the other hand, X-TAS experiments of the complete photocatalytic system in the presence of the electron donor showed the formation of a square planar Co(I) intermediate species within a few nanoseconds followed by its decay in the microsecond timescales. The Co(I) structural assignment is supported by calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). At longer reaction times, we observe the formation of the initial Co(III) species concomitant to the decay of Co(I), thus closing the catalytic cycle. The experimental X-ray absorption spectra of the molecular species formed along the catalytic cycle are modeled using a combination of molecular orbital DFT calculations (DFT-MO) and Finite Difference Method (FDM). These findings allowed us to unequivocally assign the full mechanistic pathway followed by the catalyst as well as to determine the rate limiting step of the process, which consists in the protonation of the Co(I). This study provides a complete kinetics scheme for the hydrogen evolution reaction by a cobalt catalyst, revealing unique information for the development of better catalysts for the reductive side of hydrogen fuel cells.

  11. Proton transport facilitating water-oxidation: the role of second sphere ligands surrounding the catalytic metal cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Han; Dilbeck, Preston L; Burnap, Robert L

    2013-10-01

    The ability of PSII to extract electrons from water, with molecular oxygen as a by-product, is a remarkable biochemical and evolutionary innovation. From an evolutionary perspective, the invention of PSII approximately 2.7 Ga led to the accelerated accumulation of biomass in the biosphere and the accumulation of oxygen in the atmosphere, a combination that allowed for the evolution of a much more complex and extensive biosphere than would otherwise have been possible. From the biochemical and enzymatic perspective, PSII is remarkable because of the thermodynamic and kinetic obstacles that needed to have been overcome to oxidize water as the ultimate photosynthetic electron donor. This article focuses on how proton release is an integral part of how these kinetic and thermodynamic obstacles have been overcome: the sequential removal of protons from the active site of H2O-oxidation facilitates the multistep oxidation of the substrate water at the Mn4CaOx, the catalytic heart of the H2O-oxidation reaction. As noted previously, the facilitated deprotonation of the Mn4CaOx cluster exerts a redox-leveling function preventing the accumulation of excess positive charge on the cluster, which might otherwise hinder the already energetically difficult oxidation of water. Using recent results, including the characteristics of site-directed mutants, the role of the second sphere of amino acid ligands and the associated network of water molecules surrounding the Mn4CaOx is discussed in relation to proton transport in other systems. In addition to the redox-leveling function, a trapping function is assigned to the proton release step occurring immediately prior to the dioxygen chemistry. This trapping appears to involve a yet-to-be clarified gating mechanism that facilitates to coordinated release of a proton from the neighborhood of the active site thereby insuring that the backward charge-recombination reaction does not out-compete the forward reaction of dioxygen chemistry

  12. Study of coupled heat and water transfer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells by the way of internal measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, A; Maranzana, G; Didierjean, S; Dillet, J; Lottin, O

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of electrode temperatures within a proton exchange membrane fuel cell were performed using platinum wires. A temperature difference of 7°C between the electrodes and the bipolar plates was observed for a cell operating at a current density of 1.5 A.cm −2 . These measurements show a strong non-uniformity of the temperature profile through membrane electrode assembly (MEA) that future phenomenological models must take into account. In addition, the simultaneous measurements of heat and water flux through the MEA leads to the conclusion that produced water crosses the diffusion layer in vapor phase. A very simple heat transfer model is proposed.

  13. High Relaxivity Gadolinium Hydroxypyridonate-Viral Capsid Conjugates: Nano-sized MRI Contrast Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meux, Susan C.; Datta, Ankona; Hooker, Jacob M.; Botta, Mauro; Francis, Matthew B.; Aime, Silvio; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-08-29

    High relaxivity macromolecular contrast agents based on the conjugation of gadolinium chelates to the interior and exterior surfaces of MS2 viral capsids are assessed. The proton nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles of the conjugates show up to a five-fold increase in relaxivity, leading to a peak relaxivity (per Gd{sup 3+} ion) of 41.6 mM{sup -1}s{sup -1} at 30 MHz for the internally modified capsids. Modification of the exterior was achieved through conjugation to flexible lysines, while internal modification was accomplished by conjugation to relatively rigid tyrosines. Higher relaxivities were obtained for the internally modified capsids, showing that (1) there is facile diffusion of water to the interior of capsids and (2) the rigidity of the linker attaching the complex to the macromolecule is important for obtaining high relaxivity enhancements. The viral capsid conjugated gadolinium hydroxypyridonate complexes appear to possess two inner-sphere water molecules (q = 2) and the NMRD fittings highlight the differences in the local motion for the internal ({tau}{sub RI} = 440 ps) and external ({tau}{sub RI} = 310 ps) conjugates. These results indicate that there are significant advantages of using the internal surface of the capsids for contrast agent attachment, leaving the exterior surface available for the installation of tissue targeting groups.

  14. Antimony Doped Tin Oxides and Their Composites with Tin pyrophosphates as Catalyst Supports for Oxygen Evolution Reaction in Proton Exchange Membrane Water Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Junyuan; Li, Qingfeng; Christensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane water electrolysers operating at typically 80 °C or at further elevated temperatures suffer from insufficient catalyst activity and durability. In this work, antimony doped tin oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and further doped with an inorganic proton conducting phase...... based on tin pyrophosphates as the catalyst support. The materials showed an overall conductivity of 0.57 S cm−1 at 130 °C under the water vapor atmosphere with a contribution of the proton conduction. Using this composite support, iridium oxide nanoparticle catalysts were prepared and characterized...

  15. Sulfonated poly(fluorenyl ether ketone nitrile) electrolyte membrane with high proton conductivity and low water uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, S.H.; Wang, S.J.; Xiao, M.; Meng, Y.Z. [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies/Institute of Optoelectronic and Functional Composite Materials, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Shu, D. [School of Chemistry and Environmental, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2010-01-01

    High molecular weight sulfonated poly(fluorenyl ether ketone nitrile)s with different equivalent weight (EW) from 681 to 369 g mequiv.{sup -1} are synthesized by the nucleophilic substitution polycondensation of various amounts of sulfonated difluorobenzophenone (SDFBP) and 2,6-difluorobenzonitrile (DFBN) with bisphenol fluorene (BPF). The synthesized copolymers are characterized by {sup 1}H NMR, FT-IR, TGA, and DSC techniques. The membranes cast from the corresponding copolymers exhibit superior thermal stability, good oxidative stability and high proton conductivity, but low water uptake due to the strong nitrile dipole interchain interactions that combine to limit swelling. Among all the membranes, the membrane with EW of 441 g mequiv.{sup -1} shows optimum properties of both high proton conductivity of 41.9 mS cm{sup -1} and low water uptake of 42.6%. Accordingly, That membrane is fabricated into a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and evaluated in a single proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The experimental results indicate its similar cell performance as that of Nafion {sup registered} 117 at 70 C, but much better cell performance at higher temperatures. At the potential of 0.6 V, the current density of fuel cell using the prepared membrane and Nafion {sup registered} 117 is 0.46 and 0.25 A cm{sup -2}, respectively. The highest current density of the former reaches as high as 1.25 A cm{sup -2}. (author)

  16. Proton and aluminum binding properties of organic acids in surface waters of the northeastern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraei, Habibollah; Driscoll, Charles T

    2015-03-03

    A variety of mathematical estimators have been used to quantify the degree of protonation of naturally occurring organic acids. These estimators range from monoprotic, diprotic, and triprotic analog models to the discrete and continuous (Gaussian) distributions of a single proton binding-dissociation. Natural water samples from two long-term monitoring programs in the northeastern U.S. were used to quantify proton- and aluminum-binding properties of naturally occurring organic matter. Water chemistry observations were clustered into 0.05 pH intervals (over 3.75-7.35 pH range) and fit to a triprotic analog model. The model optimization indicates that about 5% of dissolved organic carbon participates in ion binding, and organic acids are composed of both strong and weak acids (i.e., pKa1 = 2.54, pKa2 = 6.19, and pKa3 = 7.52 for Adirondack samples). Binding between organic acids and aluminum can substantially influence the acid behavior of dissolved organic matter and the availability of the toxic form of aluminum (i.e., inorganic monomeric aluminum).

  17. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize some of the information about the nucleon-nucleon force which has been obtained by comparing recent calculations of proton-proton bremsstrahlung with cross section and analyzing power data from the new TRIUMF bremsstrahlung experiment. Some comments are made as to how these results can be extended to neutron-proton bremsstrahlung. (Author) 17 refs., 6 figs

  18. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...... concentrations of CuSO4 and correlating the calculated T1 and T2 values with reference values obtained by two spectrometers (corrected to MRI-proton frequency = 64 MHz) we found a maximum deviation of about 10 per cent. Measurements performed on a large water phantom in order to evaluate the homogeneity...... in the imaging plane showed a variation of less than 10 per cent within 10 cm from the centre of the magnet in all three imaging planes. Changing the gradient field strength apparently had no influence on the T2 values recorded. Consequently diffusion processes seem without significance. It is concluded...

  19. How the shape of an H-bonded network controls proton-coupled water activation in HONO formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relph, Rachael A; Guasco, Timothy L; Elliott, Ben M; Kamrath, Michael Z; McCoy, Anne B; Steele, Ryan P; Schofield, Daniel P; Jordan, Kenneth D; Viggiano, Albert A; Ferguson, Eldon E; Johnson, Mark A

    2010-01-15

    Many chemical reactions in atmospheric aerosols and bulk aqueous environments are influenced by the surrounding solvation shell, but the precise molecular interactions underlying such effects have rarely been elucidated. We exploited recent advances in isomer-specific cluster vibrational spectroscopy to explore the fundamental relation between the hydrogen (H)-bonding arrangement of a set of ion-solvating water molecules and the chemical activity of this ensemble. We find that the extent to which the nitrosonium ion (NO+)and water form nitrous acid (HONO) and a hydrated proton cluster in the critical trihydrate depends sensitively on the geometrical arrangement of the water molecules in the network. Theoretical analysis of these data details the role of the water network in promoting charge delocalization.

  20. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...... proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK (a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires....

  1. Fast hydrogen exchange affects 15N relaxation measurements in intrinsically disordered proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seho; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Baum, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Unprotected amide protons can undergo fast hydrogen exchange (HX) with protons from the solvent. Generally, NMR experiments using the out-and-back coherence transfer with amide proton detection are affected by fast HX and result in reduced signal intensity. When one of these experiments, 1 H– 15 N HSQC, is used to measure the 15 N transverse relaxation rate (R 2 ), the measured R 2 rate is convoluted with the HX rate (k HX ) and has higher apparent R 2 values. Since the 15 N R 2 measurement is important for analyzing protein backbone dynamics, the HX effect on the R 2 measurement is investigated and described here by multi-exponential signal decay. We demonstrate these effects by performing 15 N R 2 CPMG experiments on α-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein, in which the amide protons are exposed to solvent. We show that the HX effect on R 2 CPMG can be extracted by the derived equation. In conclusion, the HX effect may be pulse sequence specific and results from various sources including the J coupling evolution, the change of steady state water proton magnetization, and the D 2 O content in the sample. To avoid the HX effect on the analysis of relaxation data of unprotected amides, it is suggested that NMR experimental conditions insensitive to the HX should be considered or that intrinsic R 2 CPMG values be obtained by methods described herein.

  2. Simultaneous spectral and temporal analyses of kinetic energies in nonequilibrium systems: theory and application to vibrational relaxation of O-D stretch mode of HOD in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jonggu; Lim, Joon Hyung; Kim, Seongheun; Kim, Heejae; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-05-28

    A time series of kinetic energies (KE) from classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation contains fundamental information on system dynamics. It can also be analyzed in the frequency domain through Fourier transformation (FT) of velocity correlation functions, providing energy content of different spectral regions. By limiting the FT time span, we have previously shown that spectral resolution of KE evolution is possible in the nonequilibrium situations [Jeon and Cho, J. Chem. Phys. 2011, 135, 214504]. In this paper, we refine the method by employing the concept of instantaneous power spectra, extending it to reflect an instantaneous time-correlation of velocities with those in the future as well as with those in the past, and present a new method to obtain the instantaneous spectral density of KE (iKESD). This approach enables the simultaneous spectral and temporal resolution of KE with unlimited time precision. We discuss the formal and novel properties of the new iKESD approaches and how to optimize computational methods and determine parameters for practical applications. The method is specifically applied to the nonequilibrium MD simulation of vibrational relaxation of the OD stretch mode in a hydrated HOD molecule by employing a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potential. We directly compare the computational results with the OD band population relaxation time profiles extracted from the IR pump-probe measurements for 5% HOD in water. The calculated iKESD yields the OD bond relaxation time scale ∼30% larger than the experimental value, and this decay is largely frequency-independent if the classical anharmonicity is accounted for. From the integrated iKESD over intra- and intermolecular bands, the major energy transfer pathways were found to involve the HOD bending mode in the subps range, then the internal modes of the solvent until 5 ps after excitation, and eventually the solvent intermolecular modes. Also, strong hydrogen

  3. Silicon hydride nanocrystals as catalysts for proton production in water-organic liquid mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Saharoui; Holt, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    gas for fuel cells and other small devices. In fuel cells the production of protons may be bypassed, and an oxidant such as permanganate or oxygen from air may be used to drive the fuel cells. In such an embodiment, an intermediate reaction may

  4. High proton conductivity in cyanide-bridged metal-organic frameworks: understanding the role of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Y.; Broersen, R.; Hageman, W.; Yan, N.; Mittelmeijer-Hazeleger, M.; Rothenberg, G.; Tanase, S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate and discuss the proton conductivity properties of the cyanide-bridged metal–organic framework (MOF) [Nd(mpca)2Nd(H2O)6Mo(CN)8]·nH2O (where mpca is 5-methyl-2-pyrazinecarboxylate). This MOF is one of an exciting class of cyanide-bridged materials that can combine porosity with

  5. Analysis of coupled proton and water transport in a PEM fuel cell using the binary friction membrane model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnes, B.; Djilali, N.

    2006-01-01

    Transport of liquid water within a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) is critical to the operation of a PEM fuel cell, due to the strong dependence of the membrane transport coefficients on water content. In addition, enhanced predictive abilities are particularly significant in the context of passive air breathing fuel cell designs where lower water contents will prevail in the membrane. We investigate and analyze the numerical predictions of a recently proposed rational model for transport of protons and water in a PEM, when compared to a widely used empirical model. While the performance is similar for a saturated membrane, for PEMs with low water content, the difference in computed current density and membrane water crossover can be substantial. The effects of coupling partially saturated gas diffusion electrodes (GDLs) with the membrane are studied in both a 1D and 2D context. In addition, a simplified 1D analytical membrane water transport model is validated against the complete 1D model predictions. Our numerical results predict a higher current density and more uniform membrane hydration using a dry cathode instead of a dry anode, and illustrate that the strongest 2D effects are for water vapor transport

  6. Proton transfer through hydrogen bonds in two-dimensional water layers: A theoretical study based on ab initio and quantum-classical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of proton transfer (PT) through hydrogen bonds in a two-dimensional water layer confined between two graphene sheets at room temperature are investigated through ab initio and quantum-classical simulations. The excess proton is found to be mostly solvated as an Eigen cation where the hydronium ion donates three hydrogen bonds to the neighboring water molecules. In the solvation shell of the hydronium ion, the three coordinated water molecules with two donor hydrogen bonds are found to be properly presolvated to accept a proton. Although no hydrogen bond needs to be broken for transfer of a proton to such presolvated water molecules from the hydronium ion, the PT rate is still found to be not as fast as it is for one-dimensional chains. Here, the PT is slowed down as the probability of finding a water with two donor hydrogen bonds in the solvation shell of the hydronium ion is found to be only 25%-30%. The hydroxide ion is found to be solvated mainly as a complex anion where it accepts four H-bonds through its oxygen atom and the hydrogen atom of the hydroxide ion remains free all the time. Here, the presolvation of the hydroxide ion to accept a proton requires that one of its hydrogen bonds is broken and the proton comes from a neighboring water molecule with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds. The coordination number reduction by breaking of a hydrogen bond is a slow process, and also the population of water molecules with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds is only 20%-25% of the total number of water molecules. All these factors together tend to slow down the hydroxide ion migration rate in two-dimensional water layers compared to that in three-dimensional bulk water

  7. Thermal and water management of low temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell in fork-lift truck power system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Rokni, Masoud; Rabbani, Raja Abid

    2013-01-01

    A general zero-dimensional Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) model has been developed for forklift truck application. The balance of plant (BOP) comprises of a compressor, an air humidifier, a set of heat exchangers and a recirculation pump. Water and thermal management of the fuel cell...... stack and BOP has been investigated in this study. The results show that humidification of the inlet air is of great importance. By decreasing the relative humidity of inlet air from 95% to 25%, the voltage can drop by 29%. In addition, elevated stack temperature can lead to a higher average cell...... voltage when membrane is fully hydrated otherwise it causes a drastic voltage drop in the stack. Furthermore, by substituting liquid water with water-ethylene glycol mixture of 50%, the mass flow of coolant increases by about 32-33% in the inner loop and 60-65% in the outer loop for all ranges of current...

  8. Applying hot wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell - Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Al Shakhshir, Saher

    2015-01-01

    In order to accurately determine the water balance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell it has recently been suggested to employ constant temperature anemometry (CTA), a frequently used method to measure the velocity of a fluid stream. CTA relies on convective heat transfer around a heated wire...... the equations required to calculate the heat transfer coefficient and the resulting voltage signal as function of the fuel cell water balance. The most critical and least understood part is the determination of the Nusselt number to calculate the heat transfer between the wire and the gas stream. Different...... expressions taken from the literature will be examined in detail, and it will be demonstrated that the power-law approach suggested by Hilpert is the only useful one for the current purposes because in this case the voltage response from the hot-wire sensor E/E0 shows the same dependency to the water balance...

  9. Chemical dynamics of the first proton-coupled electron transfer of water oxidation on TiO2 anatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Li, Ye-Fei; Sit, Patrick; Selloni, Annabella

    2013-12-18

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a prototype, water-splitting (photo)catalyst, but its performance is limited by the large overpotential for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We report here a first-principles density functional theory study of the chemical dynamics of the first proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which is considered responsible for the large OER overpotential on TiO2. We use a periodic model of the TiO2/water interface that includes a slab of anatase TiO2 and explicit water molecules, sample the solvent configurations by first principles molecular dynamics, and determine the energy profiles of the two electronic states involved in the electron transfer (ET) by hybrid functional calculations. Our results suggest that the first PCET is sequential, with the ET following the proton transfer. The ET occurs via an inner sphere process, which is facilitated by a state in which one electronic hole is shared by the two oxygen ions involved in the transfer.

  10. Thermal and water management of low temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell in fork-lift truck power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Rokni, Masoud; Rabbani, Abid; Mortensen, Henrik Hilleke

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Developing a general zero dimensional Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) model for a forklift. ► System performance with different cooling fluids. ► Water and thermal management of fuel cell system. ► Effect of inlet temperature, outlet temperature and temperature gradient on system performance. - Abstract: A general zero-dimensional Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) model has been developed for forklift truck application. The balance of plant (BOP) comprises of a compressor, an air humidifier, a set of heat exchangers and a recirculation pump. Water and thermal management of the fuel cell stack and BOP has been investigated in this study. The results show that humidification of the inlet air is of great importance. By decreasing the relative humidity of inlet air from 95% to 25%, the voltage can drop by 29%. In addition, elevated stack temperature can lead to a higher average cell voltage when membrane is fully hydrated otherwise it causes a drastic voltage drop in the stack. Furthermore, by substituting liquid water with water–ethylene glycol mixture of 50%, the mass flow of coolant increases by about 32–33% in the inner loop and 60–65% in the outer loop for all ranges of current. The system can then be started up at about −25 °C with negligible change in the efficiency

  11. Real-Time Microscopic Monitoring of Flow, Voltage and Current in the Proton Exchange Membrane Water Electrolyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Li, Shih-Chun; Chen, Chia-Hung; Huang, Yen-Ting; Wang, Yu-Syuan

    2018-03-15

    Looking for alternative energy sources has been an inevitable trend since the oil crisis, and close attentioned has been paid to hydrogen energy. The proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolyzer is characterized by high energy efficiency, high yield, simple system and low operating temperature. The electrolyzer generates hydrogen from water free of any carbon sources (provided the electrons come from renewable sources such as solar and wind), so it is very clean and completely satisfies the environmental requirement. However, in long-term operation of the PEM water electrolyzer, the membrane material durability, catalyst corrosion and nonuniformity of local flow, voltage and current in the electrolyzer can influence the overall performance. It is difficult to measure the internal physical parameters of the PEM water electrolyzer, and the physical parameters are interrelated. Therefore, this study uses micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology to develop a flexible integrated microsensor; internal multiple physical information is extracted to determine the optimal working parameters for the PEM water electrolyzer. The real operational data of local flow, voltage and current in the PEM water electrolyzer are measured simultaneously by the flexible integrated microsensor, so as to enhance the performance of the PEM water electrolyzer and to prolong the service life.

  12. Changes in the Zero-Point Energy of the Protons as the Source of the Binding Energy of Water to A-Phase DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, G. F.; Senesi, R.; Mayers, J.

    2010-01-01

    The measured changes in the zero-point kinetic energy of the protons are entirely responsible for the binding energy of water molecules to A phase DNA at the concentration of 6 water molecules/base pair. The changes in kinetic energy can be expected to be a significant contribution to the energy balance in intracellular biological processes and the properties of nano-confined water. The shape of the momentum distribution in the dehydrated A phase is consistent with coherent delocalization of some of the protons in a double well potential, with a separation of the wells of 0.2 Angst .

  13. Changes in the zero-point energy of the protons as the source of the binding energy of water to A-phase DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, G F; Senesi, R; Mayers, J

    2010-10-01

    The measured changes in the zero-point kinetic energy of the protons are entirely responsible for the binding energy of water molecules to A phase DNA at the concentration of 6  water molecules/base pair. The changes in kinetic energy can be expected to be a significant contribution to the energy balance in intracellular biological processes and the properties of nano-confined water. The shape of the momentum distribution in the dehydrated A phase is consistent with coherent delocalization of some of the protons in a double well potential, with a separation of the wells of 0.2 Å.

  14. MR spectroscopy of liver in overweight children and adolescents: Investigation of 1H T2 relaxation times at 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Bille, Dorthe S.; Thisted, Ebbe; Holm, Jens-Christian; Thomsen, Henrik S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to investigate T 2 relaxation values and to optimize hepatic fat quantification using proton MR spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) at 3 T in overweight and obese children and adolescents. Subjects: The study included 123 consecutive children and adolescents with a body mass index above the 97th percentile according to age and sex. 1 H MR spectroscopy was performed at 3.0 T using point resolved spectroscopy sequence with series TE. T 2 relaxation values and hepatic fat content corrected for the T 2 relaxation effects were calculated. Results: T 2 values for water ranged from 22 ms to 42 ms (mean value 28 ms) and T 2 values for fat ranged from 36 ms to 99 ms (mean value 64 ms). Poor correlation was observed: (1) between T 2 relaxation times of fat and T 2 relaxation times of water (correlation coefficient r = 0.038, P = 0.79); (2) between T 2 relaxation times of fat and fat content (r = 0.057, P = 0.69); (3) between T 2 relaxation times of water and fat content (r = 0.160, P = 0.26). Correlation between fat peak content and the T 2 corrected fat content decreased with increasing echo time TE: r = 0.97 for TE = 45, r = 0.93 for TE = 75, r = 0.89 for TE = 105, P 1 H MRS at 3 T is an effective technique for measuring hepatic fat content in overweight and obese children and adolescents. It is necessary to measure T 2 relaxation values and to correct the spectra for the T 2 relaxation effects in order to obtain an accurate estimate of the hepatic fat content.

  15. Analytical calculation of electrolyte water content of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for on-board modelling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Alessandro; Polverino, Pierpaolo; Pianese, Cesare

    2018-06-01

    This paper proposes an analytical model of the water content of the electrolyte of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell. The model is designed by accounting for several simplifying assumptions, which make the model suitable for on-board/online water management applications, while ensuring a good accuracy of the considered phenomena, with respect to advanced numerical solutions. The achieved analytical solution, expressing electrolyte water content, is compared with that obtained by means of a complex numerical approach, used to solve the same mathematical problem. The achieved results show that the mean error is below 5% for electrodes water content values ranging from 2 to 15 (given as boundary conditions), and it does not overcome 0.26% for electrodes water content above 5. These results prove the capability of the solution to correctly model electrolyte water content at any operating condition, aiming at embodiment into more complex frameworks (e.g., cell or stack models), related to fuel cell simulation, monitoring, control, diagnosis and prognosis.

  16. Water types and their relaxation behavior in partially rehydrated CaFe-mixed binary oxide obtained from CaFe-layered double hydroxide in the 155-298 K temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugris, Valéria; Haspel, Henrik; Kukovecz, Ákos; Kónya, Zoltán; Sipiczki, Mónika; Sipos, Pál; Pálinkó, István

    2013-10-29

    Heat-treated CaFe-layered double hydroxide samples were equilibrated under conditions of various relative humidities (11%, 43% and 75%). Measurements by FT-IR and dielectric relaxation spectroscopies revealed that partial to full reconstruction of the layered structure took place. Water types taking part in the reconstruction process were identified via dielectric relaxation measurements either at 298 K or on the flash-cooled (to 155 K) samples. The dynamics of water molecules at the various positions was also studied by this method, allowing the flash-cooled samples to warm up to 298 K.

  17. Simple expressions of the nuclear relaxation rate enhancement due to quadrupole nuclei in slowly tumbling molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Pascal H., E-mail: pascal-h.fries@cea.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SCIB, RICC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SCIB, RICC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Belorizky, Elie [Université Grenoble Alpes, LIPHY, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, Leti-Clinatec, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-28

    For slowly tumbling entities or quasi-rigid lattices, we derive very simple analytical expressions of the quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R{sub 1} of nuclear spins I due to their intramolecular magnetic dipolar coupling with quadrupole nuclei of arbitrary spins S ≥ 1. These expressions are obtained by using the adiabatic approximation for evaluating the time evolution operator of the quantum states of the quadrupole nuclei S. They are valid when the gyromagnetic ratio of the spin S is much smaller than that of the spin I. The theory predicts quadrupole resonant peaks in the dispersion curve of R{sub 1} vs magnetic field. The number, positions, relative intensities, Lorentzian shapes, and widths of these peaks are explained in terms of the following properties: the magnitude of the quadrupole Hamiltonian and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) acting on the spin S, the S-I inter-spin orientation with respect to the EFG principal axes, the rotational correlation time of the entity carrying the S–I pair, and/or the proper relaxation time of the spin S. The theory is first applied to protein amide protons undergoing dipolar coupling with fast-relaxing quadrupole {sup 14}N nuclei and mediating the QRE to the observed bulk water protons. The theoretical QRE agrees well with its experimental counterpart for various systems such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and cartilages. The anomalous behaviour of the relaxation rate of protons in synthetic aluminium silicate imogolite nano-tubes due to the QRE of {sup 27}Al (S = 5/2) nuclei is also explained.

  18. Applying hot-wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Berning, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand and more accurately measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, our group has recently proposed to apply hot wire anemometry in the fuel cell's anode outlet. It was theoretically shown that the electrical signal obtained from the hot wire sensor...... can be directly converted into the fuel cell water balance. In this work an ex-situ experimental investigation is performed to examine the effect of the wire diameter and the outlet pipe diameter on the voltage signal. For a laboratory fuel cell where the mass flow rate the anode outlet is small...... number Nu range between m = 0.137 and m = 0.246. In general, it is shown that applying hot wire anemometry yields in fact very clear voltage readings with high frequency, and it can be used as a diagnosis tool in various fuel cell applications....

  19. Corrosion of target and structural materials in water irradiated by an 800 MeV proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, D.P.; Kanner, G.S.; Lillard, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation enhanced, aqueous corrosion of solid neutron-targets such as tungsten or tantalum, or target cladding or structural materials such as superalloys and stainless steels, is a significant concern in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies. In this paper we briefly describe our current methods for control and in situ monitoring of corrosion in accelerator cooling water loops. Using floating, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), we have measured the corrosion rates of aluminum 6061, copper, Inconel 718, and 304L stainless steel in the flow loop of a water target irradiated by a μamp, 800 MeV proton beam. Impedance spectroscopy allows us to model the corrosion process of a material as an equivalent electrical circuit. Thus the polarization resistance, which is inversely proportional to the corrosion rate, can be extracted from the frequency response of a metal specimen. During a three month period, without the use of corrosion mitigation techniques, we observed increases of several orders of magnitude in the water conductivity and the corrosion rates. The increase in corrosion is at least partially attributed to a build up of peroxide in our pseudo-closed loop system. In this paper we also briefly describe our second generation experiments, scheduled to begin in late 1996. In these experiments we plan to measure the corrosion rates of tungsten, tantalum, Inconel 718, 316L and 304L stainless steel, HT-9 austenitic stainless steel, and aluminum 5053. Two or three electrode probes of each material are being placed directly in the proton beam, in a high neutron flux region, or a significant distance from the high radiation area. We will be measuring corrosion rates, changes in pH and conductivity, and we will be establishing parameters for filtration and mitigation of corrosion. We will also discuss our ideas for making in situ measurements of water radiolysis using optical and laser diagnostic techniques

  20. Proton and deuteron NMR study of PTFE ionomer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, G; Pak, Y S [Dept. of Materials Science, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    1992-02-01

    Proton and deuteron NMR have been conducted to investigate the ionic motion in perfluorinated ionomer membranes from Dow Chemical (XUS) and DuPont (Nafion{sup R}). Two proton relaxation peaks were found in the XUS specimen absorbed with H{sub 2}O. The major (narrow) peak presented a spin-lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1}) of 107 ms while the minor (broader) one gave much longer T{sub 1}. While the former was attributed to the water molecules involved in restricted motion, the latter was expected to be associated with the protons located in the vicinity of the sulfonate groups. Similar to the previous results from the others, only a single peak was detected in Nafion{sup R} in {sup 1}H spectra, indicating that the protons in the different environments were engaging rapid exchange within NMR time scale. In contrast to the inverse proportion dependence of the linewidth on the water sorption in Nafion{sup R}, the major line of the XUS membrane exhibited insensitive linewidth dependence on the variation of H{sub 2}O concentration. The difference was attributed to the existence of narrow breaths of the pores in XUS sample, such that free water contribution to the enhancement of proton mobility was limited. The {sup 2}H spectra of Nafion{sup R} were found to possess a doublet, due to nuclear quadrupolar interaction. Dow (XUS) membrane treated in at 100% relative humidity (RH) D{sub 2}O presented a single peak with the linewidth insensitive to the amount of heavy water absorbed. An additional rise emerged on the ''shoulder'' of this single peak when treated at 33% RH. It is concluded that XUS membrane does not provide strong hydrogen bonding to eliminate the rapid motion average over the nuclear quadrupole interaction. (orig.).

  1. Dose distribution of secondary radiation in a water phantom for a proton pencil beam—EURADOS WG9 intercomparison exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarczyk, L.; Trinkl, S.; Romero-Expósito, M.; Mojżeszek, N.; Ambrozova, I.; Domingo, C.; Davídková, M.; Farah, J.; Kłodowska, M.; Knežević, Ž.; Liszka, M.; Majer, M.; Miljanić, S.; Ploc, O.; Schwarz, M.; Harrison, R. M.; Olko, P.

    2018-04-01

    Systematic 3D mapping of out-of-field doses induced by a therapeutic proton pencil scanning beam in a 300  ×  300  ×  600 mm3 water phantom was performed using a set of thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs): MTS-7 (7LiF:Mg,Ti), MTS-6 (6LiF:Mg,Ti), MTS-N (natLiF:Mg,Ti) and TLD-700 (7LiF:Mg,Ti), radiophotoluminescent (RPL) detectors GD-352M and GD-302M, and polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC)-based (C12H18O7) track-etched detectors. Neutron and gamma-ray doses, as well as linear energy transfer distributions, were experimentally determined at 200 points within the phantom. In parallel, the Geant4 Monte Carlo code was applied to calculate neutron and gamma radiation spectra at the position of each detector. For the cubic proton target volume of 100  ×  100  ×  100 mm3 (spread out Bragg peak with a modulation of 100 mm) the scattered photon doses along the main axis of the phantom perpendicular to the primary beam were approximately 0.5 mGy Gy‑1 at a distance of 100 mm and 0.02 mGy Gy‑1 at 300 mm from the center of the target. For the neutrons, the corresponding values of dose equivalent were found to be ~0.7 and ~0.06 mSv Gy‑1, respectively. The measured neutron doses were comparable with the out-of-field neutron doses from a similar experiment with 20 MV x-rays, whereas photon doses for the scanning proton beam were up to three orders of magnitude lower.

  2. The Role of the Primitive Relaxation in the Dynamics of Aqueous Mixtures, Nano-confined Water and Hydrated Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    and polysaccharides ) and some hydrophilic macromolecular systems, including biopolymers (from polypeptides to several proteins) [r008, r009, r010...investigated and here presented are the monosaccharide 2-Deoxy-D- ribose, mixed with 32% wt. fraction of water, and the heptamer of polypropylene glycol, with

  3. Fast neutron spectroscopy by gas proton-recoil methods at the light water reactor pressure vessel simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.W.

    1980-10-01

    Fast neutron spectrum measurements were made in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessel Simulator (PVS) to provide neutron spectral definition required to appropriately perform and interpret neutron dosimetry measurements related to fast neutron damage in LWR-PV steels. Proton-recoil proportional counter methods using hydrogen and methane gas-filled detectors were applied to obtain the proton spectra from which the neutron spectra were derived. Cylindrical and spherical geometry detectors were used to cover the neutron energy range between 50 keV and 2 MeV. Results show that the neutron spectra shift in energy distribution toward lower energy between the front and back of a PVS. The relative neutron flux densities increase in this energy range with increasing thickness of the steel. Neutron spectrum fine structure shapes and changes are observed. These results should assist in the generation of more accurate effective cross sections and fluences for use in LWR-PV fast neutron dosimetry and materials damage analyses

  4. A Water-Stable Proton-Conductive Barium(II)-Organic Framework for Ammonia Sensing at High Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kaimeng; Zhao, Lili; Yu, Shihang; Zhou, Wenyan; Li, Zifeng; Li, Gang

    2018-06-07

    In view of environmental protection and the need for early prediction of major diseases, it is necessary to accurately monitor the change of trace ammonia concentration in air or in exhaled breath. However, the adoption of proton-conductive metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as smart sensors in this field is limited by a lack of ultrasensitive gas-detecting performance at high relative humidity (RH). Here, the pellet fabrication of a water-stable proton-conductive MOF, Ba( o-CbPhH 2 IDC)(H 2 O) 4 ] n (1) ( o-CbPhH 4 IDC = 2-(2-carboxylphenyl)-1 H-imidazole-4,5-dicarboxylic acid) is reported. The MOF 1 displays enhanced sensitivity and selectivity to NH 3 gas at high RHs (>85%) and 30 °C, and the sensing mechanism is suggested. The electrochemical impedance gas sensor fabricated by MOF 1 is a promising sensor for ammonia at mild temperature and high RHs.

  5. NMR studies of proton exchange kinetics in aqueous formaldehyde solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivlin, Michal; Eliav, Uzi; Navon, Gil

    2014-05-01

    Aqueous solutions of formaldehyde, formalin, are commonly used for tissue fixation and preservation. Treatment with formalin is known to shorten the tissue transverse relaxation time T2. Part of this shortening is due to the effect of formalin on the water T2. In the present work we show that the shortening of water T2 is a result of proton exchange between water and the major constituent of aqueous solutions of formaldehyde, methylene glycol. We report the observation of the signal of the hydroxyl protons of methylene glycol at 2ppm to high frequency of the water signal that can be seen at low temperatures and at pH range of 6.0±1.5 and, at conditions where it cannot be observed by the single pulse experiment, it can be detected indirectly through the water signal by the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment. The above finding made it possible to obtain the exchange rate between the hydroxyl protons of the methylene glycol and water in aqueous formaldehyde solutions, either using the dispersion of the spin-lattice relaxation rate in the rotating frame (1/T1ρ) or, at the slow exchange regime, from the line width hydroxyl protons of methylene glycol. The exchange rate was ∼10(4)s(-1) at pH 7.4 and 37°C, the activation energy, 50.2kJ/mol and its pH dependence at 1.1°C was fitted to: k (s(-1))=520+6.5×10(7)[H(+)]+3.0×10(9)[OH(-)]. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Design change of tower cooling water system for proton accelerator research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, G. P.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, I. T.; Min, Y. S.; Mun, K. J.; Cho, J. S.; Nam, J. M.; Park, S. S.; Han, Y. G.

    2012-01-01

    The Tower Cooling Water System (TC) is designed to reject the heat load generated by operating the accelerators and the utility facilities through the component cooling water (CCW) heat exchangers. The circulating water discharged from the circulating water pumps passes through the CCW heat exchangers, the Chiller condenser and the air compressor, and the heated circulating water is return to the cooling tower for the heat removal. In this study, The design of Tower Cooling Water System is changed as follows : At First, The quantity of cells is changed into six in order to operate the cooling tower accurately correspond with condition of each equipment of head loads. The fans of cooling tower are controlled by the signal of TEW installed in the latter parts of it. The type of circulation water pump is modified to centrifugal pump and debris filter system is deleted

  7. Design change of tower cooling water system for proton accelerator research center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, G. P.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, I. T.; Min, Y. S.; Mun, K. J.; Cho, J. S.; Nam, J. M.; Park, S. S.; Han, Y. G. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The Tower Cooling Water System (TC) is designed to reject the heat load generated by operating the accelerators and the utility facilities through the component cooling water (CCW) heat exchangers. The circulating water discharged from the circulating water pumps passes through the CCW heat exchangers, the Chiller condenser and the air compressor, and the heated circulating water is return to the cooling tower for the heat removal. In this study, The design of Tower Cooling Water System is changed as follows : At First, The quantity of cells is changed into six in order to operate the cooling tower accurately correspond with condition of each equipment of head loads. The fans of cooling tower are controlled by the signal of TEW installed in the latter parts of it. The type of circulation water pump is modified to centrifugal pump and debris filter system is deleted.

  8. Nuclear relaxation induced by diffusion in confined media; the case of inverted micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llor, Antoine

    1983-01-01

    This work emphasizes the specificities of molecular motions in restricted media observed by NMR. The observation of proton nuclear relaxation of small water pools in AOT reversed micelles has led to separation of dipolar contributions using substitution by deuterium. The water-water contributions to relaxation are easily explained by well-known models and show that water rotational movements are, at most, five times slower than in pure water. The other contributions display a strong frequency dependence with spectrometer frequency and, in order to explain them, a specific dipolar relaxation model was developed between two particles whose movements are restricted to the surface of a sphere and in a concentric sphere respectively. This model was generalized to all cases of diffusion movements of particles in a spherical symmetry environment. In the case of AOT micelles, this model can not explain the experimental results. An elementary discussion taking into account the polar heads specificities and their interactions with water lead to a qualitative interpretation of the experimental data. (author) [fr

  9. Non-noble metal based electro-catalyst compositions for proton exchange membrane based water electrolysis and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumta, Prashant N.; Kadakia, Karan Sandeep; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg

    2017-02-07

    The invention provides electro-catalyst compositions for an anode electrode of a proton exchange membrane-based water electrolysis system. The compositions include a noble metal component selected from the group consisting of iridium oxide, ruthenium oxide, rhenium oxide and mixtures thereof, and a non-noble metal component selected from the group consisting of tantalum oxide, tin oxide, niobium oxide, titanium oxide, tungsten oxide, molybdenum oxide, yttrium oxide, scandium oxide, cooper oxide, zirconium oxide, nickel oxide and mixtures thereof. Further, the non-noble metal component can include a dopant. The dopant can be at least one element selected from Groups III, V, VI and VII of the Periodic Table. The compositions can be prepared using a surfactant approach or a sol gel approach. Further, the compositions are prepared using noble metal and non-noble metal precursors. Furthermore, a thin film containing the compositions can be deposited onto a substrate to form the anode electrode.

  10. MR-visible water content in human brain: a proton MRS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, P; Toft, P B; Gideon, P

    1994-01-01

    . The major drawbacks are the necessity to make the assumptions that the water concentrations in the brain and that all tissue water is MR-visible. A number of in vivo measurements were carried out to estimate the concentration of MR-visible water in the brain of healthy volunteers divided into four age...... and biochemical data published, suggest that only a small fraction (invisible.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  11. Breathing and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Doctor Relaxation is the absence of tension in muscle groups and a minimum or absence ... Drill Meditation Progressive Muscle Relaxation Minimizing Shortness of Breath Visualization This information has been approved by Shelby ...

  12. Analyzing water soluble soil organics as Trifluoroacetyl derivatives by liquid state proton nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe Garza Sanchez; Zakiya Holmes Leggett; Sabapathy Sankar

    2005-01-01

    In forested ecosystems, water soluble organics play an important role in soil processes including carbon and nutrient turnover, microbial activity and pedogenesis. The quantity and quality (i.e., chemistry) of these materials is sensitive to land management practices. Monitoring alterations in the chemistry of water soluble organics resulting from land management...

  13. Local area water removal analysis of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell under gas purge conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Yu-Ming; Lee, Shuo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, local area water content distribution under various gas purging conditions are experimentally analyzed for the first time. The local high frequency resistance (HFR) is measured using novel micro sensors. The results reveal that the liquid water removal rate in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is non-uniform. In the under-the-channel area, the removal of liquid water is governed by both convective and diffusive flux of the through-plane drying. Thus, almost all of the liquid water is removed within 30 s of purging with gas. However, liquid water that is stored in the under-the-rib area is not easy to remove during 1 min of gas purging. Therefore, the re-hydration of the membrane by internal diffusive flux is faster than that in the under-the-channel area. Consequently, local fuel starvation and membrane degradation can degrade the performance of a fuel cell that is started from cold.

  14. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-01-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research

  15. Water in Brain Edema : Observations by the Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GO, KG; Edzes, HT

    The state of water in three types of brain edema and in normal brain of the rat was studied by the pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. In cold-induced edema and in osmotic edema both in cortex and in white matter, the water protons have longer nuclear magnetic relaxation times than in

  16. Excited state proton transfer in 9-aminoacridine carboxamides in water and in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Charles A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-09-26

    The 9-aminoacridine molecule is important in several different fields of chemistry. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of this compound are pH sensitive and it is this property that allowed it to be used as a pH probe in different chemical environments. The compound exhibits proton transfer reactions which are among the most fundamental of chemical reactions. The planarity of 9-aminoacridine allows it to intercalate into DNA. Intercalation is a process in which the aromatic flat surface of the intercalator inserts between adjacent base pairs of DNA. The large surface area of 9-aminoacridine`s fused tricyclic ring system allows strong intercalative binding through van der Waals attractions. 9-aminoacridine and many of its derivatives have been tried as possible antitumor drugs. The cytotoxicity of an antitumor agent can be dramatically increased through the addition of one or two cationic side chains. This increase in cytotoxicity using the 9-aminoacridine compound as a parent molecule has been investigated through various derivatives with cationic side chains consisting of different number of carbon atoms between the proximal and distal N atoms. Similar derivatives varied the position of the carboxamide side chain on the aromatic ring system. The objective of this work is to first create a baseline study of the excited state kinetics of the 9-aminoacridine carboxamides in the absence of DNA. The baseline study will allow the excited state kinetics of these antitumor drugs when placed in DNA to be more fully understood.

  17. Liquid Water Transport in the Reactant Channels of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rupak

    Water management has been identified as a critical issue in the development of PEM fuel cells for automotive applications. Water is present inside the PEM fuel cell in three phases, i.e. liquid phase, vapor phase and mist phase. Liquid water in the reactant channels causes flooding of the cell and blocks the transport of reactants to the reaction sites at the catalyst layer. Understanding the behavior of liquid water in the reactant channels would allow us to devise improved strategies for removing liquid water from the reactant channels. In situ fuel cell tests have been performed to identify and diagnose operating conditions which result in the flooding of the fuel cell. A relationship has been identified between the liquid water present in the reactant channels and the cell performance. A novel diagnostic technique has been established which utilizes the pressure drop multiplier in the reactant channels to predict the flooding of the cell or the drying-out of the membrane. An ex-situ study has been undertaken to quantify the liquid water present in the reactant channels. A new parameter, the Area Coverage Ratio (ACR), has been defined to identify the interfacial area of the reactant channel which is blocked for reactant transport by the presence of liquid water. A parametric study has been conducted to study the effect of changing temperature and the inlet relative humidity on the ACR. The ACR decreases with increase in current density as the gas flow rates increase, removing water more efficiently. With increase in temperature, the ACR decreases rapidly, such that by 60°C, there is no significant ACR to be reported. Inlet relative humidity of the gases does change the saturation of the gases in the channel, but did not show any significant effect on the ACR. Automotive powertrains, which is the target for this work, are continuously faced with transient changes. Water management under transient operating conditions is significantly more challenging and has not

  18. Relaxation dynamics following transition of solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.B.; Landman, U.; Nitzan, A.

    1989-01-01

    Relaxation dynamics following an electronic transition of an excess solvated electron in clusters and in bulk water is studied using an adiabatic simulation method. In this method the solvent evolves classically and the electron is constrained to a specified state. The coupling between the solvent and the excess electron is evaluated via the quantum expectation value of the electron--water molecule interaction potential. The relaxation following excitation (or deexcitation) is characterized by two time scales: (i) a very fast (/similar to/20--30 fs) one associated with molecular rotations in the first solvation shell about the electron, and (ii) a slower stage (/similar to/200 fs), which is of the order of the longitudinal dielectric relaxation time. The fast relaxation stage exhibits an isotope effect. The spectroscopical consequences of the relaxation dynamics are discussed

  19. Vibrational and Rotational Energy Relaxation in Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jakob

    Vibrational and rotational energy relaxation in liquids are studied by means of computer simulations. As a precursor for studying vibrational energy relaxation of a solute molecule subsequent to the formation of a chemical bond, the validity of the classical Bersohn-Zewail model for describing......, the vibrational energy relaxation of I2 subsequent to photodissociation and recombination in CCl4 is studied using classical Molecular Dynamics simulations. The vibrational relaxation times and the time-dependent I-I pair distribution function are compared to new experimental results, and a qualitative agreement...... is found in both cases. Furthermore, the rotational energy relaxation of H2O in liquid water is studied via simulations and a power-and-work analysis. The mechanism of the energy transfer from the rotationally excited H2O molecule to its water neighbors is elucidated, i.e. the energy-accepting degrees...

  20. Water vapour solubility and conductivity study of the proton conductor BaCe(0.9 − x)ZrxY0.1O(3 − δ)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricote, Sandrine; Bonanos, Nikolaos; Caboche, G:

    2009-01-01

    The perovskite BaCe(0.9 − x)ZrxY0.1O(3 − δ) has been prepared by solid state reaction at 1400 °C and conventional sintering at 1700 °C. Water uptake experiments performed between 400 and 600 °C, at a water vapour pressure of 0.02 atm, provide data on the concentration of protons incorporated in t...

  1. Characterization of mu s-ms dynamics of proteins using a combined analysis of N-15 NMR relaxation and chemical shift: Conformational exchange in plastocyanin induced by histidine protonations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, M. A. S.; Thuesen, Marianne Hallberg; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2004-01-01

    of the exchanging species can be determined independently of the relaxation rates. The applicability of the approach is demonstrated by a detailed analysis of the conformational exchange processes previously observed in the reduced form of the blue copper protein, plastocyanin from the cyanobacteria Anabaena......An approach is presented that allows a detailed, quantitative characterization of conformational exchange processes in proteins on the mus-ms time scale. The approach relies on a combined analysis of NMR relaxation rates and chemical shift changes and requires that the chemical shift...... quantitatively by the correlation between the R-ex terms and the corresponding chemical shift differences of the exchanging species. By this approach, the R-ex terms of N-15 nuclei belonging to contiguous regions in the protein could be assigned to the same exchange process. Furthermore, the analysis...

  2. Study of the iron corrosion at the interface of different media (water, air) submitted to protons irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapuerta, S.

    2005-10-01

    During the deep geological disposal, stainless steel containers of the vitrified waste will be put in carbon steel overpacks. After the closing of the storage site, overpacks will be in contact with a humid air and a radioactive medium. After hundred years, overpacks could be in contact with water radiolysis in an anoxic medium. In this context, my PhD work is a fundamental study which is the understanding of the corrosion mechanisms of pure iron under proton irradiation. This corrosion is affected by the contact of iron with different atmospheres (air, nitrogen) and water. In the case of the atmospheric iron corrosion under irradiation, we have studied the influence of the proton beam flux. During this work, we have characterized the structure of the oxides formed at the iron surface. The structure formed does not correspond to iron oxides and hydroxides indexed. However, we have shown that the oxide structure is close to that of lepidocrocite and bernalite. Moreover, we have determined the oxygen diffusion coefficient in iron under irradiation and we have shown that the irradiation accelerates of 6 orders of magnitude the iron corrosion. In addition, the irradiations which were realized in different gas have put in evidence the negligible role of nitrates, and the importance of the O 2 /H 2 O coupling on the iron corrosion. Finally, we have shown the influence of the relative humidity, the maximum of the corrosion being observed for a relative humidity close to 45%. In the case of the iron corrosion in aqueous media under irradiation, the influence of the oxygen dissolved in water has been studied using a surface marker. We have put in evidence that the corrosion is twice more significant in aerated medium than in deaerated medium. Moreover, the influence of radicals has been shown. An irradiated sample is more corroded than a sample put in contact with a H 2 O 2 solution. Finally, the follow-up of the iron potential under irradiation have shown the majority role

  3. Quantum nature of protons in water probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Lü, Jing-Tao; Feng, Yexin; Chen, Ji; Peng, Jinbo; Lin, Zeren; Meng, Xiangzhi; Wang, Zhichang; Li, Xin-Zheng; Wang, En-Ge; Jiang, Ying; Jing-Tao Lü Team; Xin-Zheng Li Team

    The complexity of hydrogen-bonding interaction largely arises from the quantum nature of light hydrogen nuclei, which has remained elusive for decades. Here we report the direct assessment of nuclear quantum effects on the strength of a single hydrogen bond formed at a water-salt interface, using tip-enhanced inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) based on a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The IETS signals are resonantly enhanced by gating the frontier orbitals of water via a chlorine-terminated STM tip, such that the hydrogen-bonding strength can be determined with unprecedentedly high accuracy from the redshift in the O-H stretching frequency of water. Isotopic substitution experiments combined with quantum simulations reveal that the anharmonic quantum fluctuations of hydrogen nuclei weaken the weak hydrogen bonds and strengthen the relatively strong ones. However, this trend can be completely reversed when the hydrogen bond is strongly coupled to the polar atomic sites of the surface.

  4. Effects of thermal conduction and convection on temperature profile in a water calorimeter for proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gargioni, E; Manfredotti, C [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Laitano, R F; Guerra, A S [Ist. Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, ENEA, Roma (Italy)

    1997-09-01

    In water calorimetry, in addition to the temperature increase due to beam energy deposition in water, unwanted thermal effects occur during and after calorimeter irradiation. This should be accounted for by applying proper corrections to the experimental results. In order to determine such corrections heat flow calculations were performed using the `finite element` method. This method applies even to complex 3D geometries with not necessarily symmetric conditions. Some preliminary results of these calculations are presented together with a description of the analytical method for the evaluation of the correction factors that should be applied to the experimental results to account for the above thermal effects. (orig.)

  5. Protein proton-proton dynamics from amide proton spin flip rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Daniel S.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.

    2009-01-01

    Residue-specific amide proton spin-flip rates K were measured for peptide-free and peptide-bound calmodulin. K approximates the sum of NOE build-up rates between the amide proton and all other protons. This work outlines the theory of multi-proton relaxation, cross relaxation and cross correlation, and how to approximate it with a simple model based on a variable number of equidistant protons. This model is used to extract the sums of K-rates from the experimental data. Error in K is estimated using bootstrap methodology. We define a parameter Q as the ratio of experimental K-rates to theoretical K-rates, where the theoretical K-rates are computed from atomic coordinates. Q is 1 in the case of no local motion, but decreases to values as low as 0.5 with increasing domination of sidechain protons of the same residue to the amide proton flips. This establishes Q as a monotonous measure of local dynamics of the proton network surrounding the amide protons. The method is applied to the study of proton dynamics in Ca 2+ -saturated calmodulin, both free in solution and bound to smMLCK peptide. The mean Q is 0.81 ± 0.02 for free calmodulin and 0.88 ± 0.02 for peptide-bound calmodulin. This novel methodology thus reveals the presence of significant interproton disorder in this protein, while the increase in Q indicates rigidification of the proton network upon peptide binding, confirming the known high entropic cost of this process

  6. The protonation state of small carboxylic acids at the water surface from photoelectron spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ottosson, N.; Wernersson, Erik; Söderström, J.; Pokapanich, W.; Kaufmann, S.; Svensson, S.; Persson, I.; Öhrwall, G.; Björneholm, O.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 26 (2011), s. 12261-12267 ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : water surface * carboxylic acids * photoelectron spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.573, year: 2011

  7. Electro-activity of cobalt and nickel complexes for the reduction of protons into di-hydrogen. Application to PEM water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantani, O.; Anxolabehere, E.; Aukauloo, A.; Millet, P.

    2006-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysis is a safe and efficient way to perform water splitting into di-hydrogen and di-oxygen. In a PEM water electrolyser, platinum is commonly used as electro-catalyst on the cathodic side of the cells, mostly because of its efficiency for hydrogen evolution. But for cost considerations, there is a need to find alternative low-cost electrocatalysts. Molecular chemistry offers the possibility of synthesizing new compounds for this purpose, such as transition metal complexes. Results obtained with nickel- and cobalt-oximes compounds are presented in this paper. They have been chemically (1H NMR, EPR) and electrochemically (voltametry, spectro-electrochemistry) characterized. Their ability to electrochemically reduce protons into di-hydrogen when they are either dissolved in solution or immobilized at the surface of a solid electrode is discussed. (authors)

  8. Quantitative pancreatic β cell MRI using manganese-enhanced Look-Locker imaging and two-site water exchange analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antkowiak, Patrick F; Vandsburger, Moriel H; Epstein, Frederick H

    2012-06-01

    Pancreatic β-cell imaging would be useful in monitoring the progression of and therapies for diabetes. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate quantitative β-cell MRI using manganese (Mn(2+)) labeling of β cells, T1 mapping, and a two-site water exchange model. Normal, pharmacologically-treated, and severely diabetic mice underwent injection of MnCl(2). Pancreatic water proton T1 relaxation was measured using Look-Locker MRI, and two-site water exchange analysis was used to estimate model parameters including the intracellular water proton relaxation rate constant (R1(ic)) and the intracellular fraction as indicators of β-cell function and mass, respectively. Logarithmic plots of T1 relaxation revealed two distinct proton pools relaxing with different T1s, and the two-site water exchange model fit the measured T1 relaxation data better than a monoexponential model. The intracellular R1(ic) time course revealed the kinetics of β-cell Mn(2+) labeling. Pharmacological treatments with nifedipine, tolbutamide, and diazoxide altered R1(ic), indicating that beta cell function was a determinant of Mn(2+) uptake. Intracellular fraction was significantly higher in mice with normal β cell mass than in diabetic mice (14.9% vs. 14.4%, P exchange analysis of T1 relaxation of the Mn(2+)-enhanced pancreas is a promising method for quantifying β cell volume fraction and function. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Mechanical relaxation in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiki, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The basic properties of glasses and the characteristics of mechanical relaxation in glasses were briefly reviewed, and then our studies concerned were presented. Experimental methods adopted were viscosity, internal friction, ultrasonic attenuation, and Brillouin scattering measurements. The specimens used were several kinds of inorganic, organic, and metallic glasses. The measurements were mainly carried out from the room temperature up to the glass transition temperature, and the relaxation time was determined as a function of temperature. The 'double relaxation' composed of two Arrhenius-type relaxations was observed in many materials. In both relaxations, the 'compensation effect' showing a correlation of the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy was observed. These results were explained by considering the 'complex relaxation' due to cooperative motions of atoms or group of atoms. Values of activation energy near the glass transition determined by the various experimental methods were compared with each other

  10. Fast hydrogen exchange affects {sup 15}N relaxation measurements in intrinsically disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seho; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Baum, Jean, E-mail: jean.baum@rutgers.edu [Rutgers University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Unprotected amide protons can undergo fast hydrogen exchange (HX) with protons from the solvent. Generally, NMR experiments using the out-and-back coherence transfer with amide proton detection are affected by fast HX and result in reduced signal intensity. When one of these experiments, {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC, is used to measure the {sup 15}N transverse relaxation rate (R{sub 2}), the measured R{sub 2} rate is convoluted with the HX rate (k{sub HX}) and has higher apparent R{sub 2} values. Since the {sup 15}N R{sub 2} measurement is important for analyzing protein backbone dynamics, the HX effect on the R{sub 2} measurement is investigated and described here by multi-exponential signal decay. We demonstrate these effects by performing {sup 15}N R{sub 2}{sup CPMG} experiments on {alpha}-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein, in which the amide protons are exposed to solvent. We show that the HX effect on R{sub 2}{sup CPMG} can be extracted by the derived equation. In conclusion, the HX effect may be pulse sequence specific and results from various sources including the J coupling evolution, the change of steady state water proton magnetization, and the D{sub 2}O content in the sample. To avoid the HX effect on the analysis of relaxation data of unprotected amides, it is suggested that NMR experimental conditions insensitive to the HX should be considered or that intrinsic R{sub 2}{sup CPMG} values be obtained by methods described herein.

  11. Water-soluble triazabutadienes that release diazonium species upon protonation under physiologically relevant conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimani, Flora W; Jewett, John C

    2015-03-23

    Triazabutadienes are an understudied structural motif that have remarkable reactivity once rendered water-soluble. It is shown that these molecules readily release diazonium species in a pH-dependent manner in a series of buffer solutions with pH ranges similar to those found in cells. Upon further development, we expect that this process will be well suited to cargo-release strategies and organelle-specific bioconjugation reactions. These compounds offer one of the mildest ways of generating diazonium species in aqueous solutions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Pair plasma relaxation time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, A G; Ruffini, R; Vereshchagin, G V

    2010-04-01

    By numerically solving the relativistic Boltzmann equations, we compute the time scale for relaxation to thermal equilibrium for an optically thick electron-positron plasma with baryon loading. We focus on the time scales of electromagnetic interactions. The collisional integrals are obtained directly from the corresponding QED matrix elements. Thermalization time scales are computed for a wide range of values of both the total-energy density (over 10 orders of magnitude) and of the baryonic loading parameter (over 6 orders of magnitude). This also allows us to study such interesting limiting cases as the almost purely electron-positron plasma or electron-proton plasma as well as intermediate cases. These results appear to be important both for laboratory experiments aimed at generating optically thick pair plasmas as well as for astrophysical models in which electron-positron pair plasmas play a relevant role.

  13. Role of the interaction processes in the depth-dose distribution of proton beams in liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel; De Vera, Pablo; Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    We use a simulation code, based on Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo, to investigate the depth-dose profile and lateral radial spreading of swift proton beams in liquid water. The stochastic nature of the projectile-target interaction is accounted for in a detailed manner by including in a consistent way fluctuations in both the energy loss due to inelastic collisions and the angular deflection from multiple elastic scattering. Depth-variation of the projectile charge-state as it slows down into the target, due to electron capture and loss processes, is also considered. By selectively switching on/off these stochastic processes in the simulation, we evaluate the contribution of each one of them to the Bragg curve. Our simulations show that the inclusion of the energy-loss straggling sizeably affects the width of the Bragg peak, whose position is mainly determined by the stopping power. The lateral spread of the beam as a function of the depth in the target is also examined.

  14. A Comparison of Alkaline Water and Mediterranean Diet vs Proton Pump Inhibition for Treatment of Laryngopharyngeal Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalvan, Craig H; Hu, Shirley; Greenberg, Barbara; Geliebter, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is a common disorder with protean manifestations in the head and neck. In this retrospective study, we report the efficacy of a wholly dietary approach using alkaline water, a plant-based, Mediterranean-style diet, and standard reflux precautions compared with that of the traditional treatment approach of proton pump inhibition (PPI) and standard reflux precautions. To determine whether treatment with a diet-based approach with standard reflux precautions alone can improve symptoms of LPR compared with treatment with PPI and standard reflux precautions. This was a retrospective medical chart review of 2 treatment cohorts. From 2010 to 2012, 85 patients with LPR that were treated with PPI and standard reflux precautions (PS) were identified. From 2013 to 2015, 99 patients treated with alkaline water (pH >8.0), 90% plant-based, Mediterranean-style diet, and standard reflux precautions (AMS) were identified. The outcome was based on change in Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). Recorded change in the RSI after 6 weeks of treatment. Of the 184 patients identified in the PS and AMS cohorts, the median age of participants in each cohort was 60 years (95% CI, 18-82) and 57 years (95% CI, 18-93), respectively (47 [56.3%] and 61 [61.7%] were women, respectively). The percentage of patients achieving a clinically meaningful (≥6 points) reduction in RSI was 54.1% in PS-treated patients and 62.6% in AMS-treated patients (difference between the groups, 8.05; 95% CI, -5.74 to 22.76). The mean reduction in RSI was 27.2% for the PS group and 39.8% in the AMS group (difference, 12.10; 95% CI, 1.53 to 22.68). Our data suggest that the effect of PPI on the RSI based on proportion reaching a 6-point reduction in RSI is not significantly better than that of alkaline water, a plant-based, Mediterranean-style diet, and standard reflux precautions, although the difference in the 2 treatments could be clinically meaningful in favor of the dietary approach. The

  15. Relaxation characteristics of hastelloy X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko

    1980-02-01

    Relaxation diagrams of Hastelloy X (relaxation curves, relaxation design diagrams, etc.) were generated from the creep constitutive equation of Hastelloy X, using inelastic stress analysis code TEPICC-J. These data are in good agreement with experimental relaxation data of ORNL-5479. Three typical inelastic stress analyses were performed for various relaxation behaviors of the high-temperature structures. An attempt was also made to predict these relaxation behaviors by the relaxation curves. (author)

  16. Low-field one-dimensional and direction-dependent relaxation imaging of bovine articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Mollova, Ayret; Stapf, Siegfried

    2011-12-01

    The structure of articular cartilage is separated into three layers of differently oriented collagen fibers, which is accompanied by a gradient of increasing glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and decreasing water concentration from the top layer towards the bone interface. The combined effect of these structural variations results in a change of the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times as a function of the distance from the cartilage surface. In this paper, this dependence is investigated at a magnetic field strength of 0.27 T with a one-dimensional depth resolution of 50 μm on bovine hip and stifle joint articular cartilage. By employing this method, advantage is taken of the increasing contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate found at lower magnetic field strengths. Furthermore, evidence for an orientational dependence of relaxation times with respect to an axis normal to the surface plane is given, an observation that has recently been reported using high-field MRI and that was explained by preferential orientations of collagen bundles in each of the three cartilage zones. In order to quantify the extent of a further contrast mechanism and to estimate spatially dependent glycosaminoglycan concentrations, the data are supplemented by proton relaxation times that were acquired in bovine articular cartilage that was soaked in a 0.8 mM aqueous Gd ++ solution.

  17. Development of gas diffusion layer using water based carbon slurry for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, J.F.; Liu, X.; Adame, A.; Villacorta, R. [Fuel Cell Research Laboratory, Engineering Technology Department, Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ 85212 (United States); Wertz, J. [Hollingsworth and Vose Co., A.K. Nicholson Research Lab, 219 Townsend Road, West Groton, MA 01472 (United States); Ahmad, R.; Thommes, M. [Quantachrome Instruments, 1900 Corporate Drive, Boynton Beach, FL 33426 (United States); Kannan, A.M., E-mail: amk@asu.ed [Fuel Cell Research Laboratory, Engineering Technology Department, Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ 85212 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The micro-porous layer of gas diffusion layers (GDLs) was fabricated with the carbon slurry dispersed in water containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), by wire rod coating process. The aqueous carbon slurry with micelle-encapsulation was highly consistent and stable without losing any homogeneity even after adding polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder for hundreds of hours. The surface morphology, contact angle and pore size distribution of the GDLs were examined using SEM, Goniometer and Hg Porosimeter, respectively. GDLs fabricated with various SDS concentrations were assembled into MEAs and evaluated in a single cell PEMFC under diverse operating relative humidity (RH) conditions using H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/air as reactants. The peak power density of the single cell using the GDLs with optimum SDS concentration was 1400 and 500 mW cm{sup -2} with H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/air at 90% RH, respectively. GDLs were also fabricated with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) based carbon slurry for fuel cell performance comparison. It was found that the composition of the carbon slurry, specifically SDS concentration played a critical role in controlling the pore diameter as well as the corresponding pore volumes of the GDLs.

  18. A combined molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation of the spatial distribution of energy deposition by proton beams in liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion en Optica y Nanofisica (CIOyN), Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain); Abril, Isabel [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat d' Alacant, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Heredia-Avalos, Santiago [Departament de Fisica, Enginyeria de Sistemes i Teoria del Senyal, Universitat d' Alacant, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris, E-mail: rgm@um.es [Medical Physics Laboratory, University of Ioannina Medical School, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2011-10-07

    We have evaluated the spatial distribution of energy deposition by proton beams in liquid water using the simulation code SEICS (Simulation of Energetic Ions and Clusters through Solids), which combines molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques and includes the main interaction phenomena between the projectile and the target constituents: (i) the electronic stopping force due to energy loss to target electronic excitations, including fluctuations due to the energy-loss straggling, (ii) the elastic scattering with the target nuclei, with their corresponding energy loss and (iii) the dynamical changes in projectile charge state due to electronic capture and loss processes. An important feature of SEICS is the accurate account of the excitation spectrum of liquid water, based on a consistent solid-state description of its energy-loss-function over the whole energy and momentum space. We analyse how the above-mentioned interactions affect the depth distribution of the energy delivered in liquid water by proton beams with incident energies of the order of several MeV. Our simulations show that the position of the Bragg peak is determined mainly by the stopping power, whereas its width can be attributed to the energy-loss straggling. Multiple elastic scattering processes contribute slightly only at the distal part of the Bragg peak. The charge state of the projectiles only changes when approaching the end of their trajectories, i.e. near the Bragg peak. We have also simulated the proton-beam energy distribution at several depths in the liquid water target, and found that it is determined mainly by the fluctuation in the energy loss of the projectile, evaluated through the energy-loss straggling. We conclude that a proper description of the target excitation spectrum as well as the inclusion of the energy-loss straggling is essential in the calculation of the proton beam depth-dose distribution.

  19. Applying hot-wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell for a pre-humidified hydrogen stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Shakhshir, Saher Al

    2016-01-01

    In a recent publication it has been shown how the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell can be determined employing hot wire anemometry. The hot wire sensor has to be placed into the anode outlet pipe of the operating fuel cell, and the voltage signal E that is read from the senso....... Finally, it will be shown how previously developed dew point diagrams for the anode side in a fuel cell can be corrected for a humidified hydrogen inlet stream....

  20. A combined molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation of the spatial distribution of energy deposition by proton beams in liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel; Heredia-Avalos, Santiago; Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris

    2011-01-01

    We have evaluated the spatial distribution of energy deposition by proton beams in liquid water using the simulation code SEICS (Simulation of Energetic Ions and Clusters through Solids), which combines molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques and includes the main interaction phenomena between the projectile and the target constituents: (i) the electronic stopping force due to energy loss to target electronic excitations, including fluctuations due to the energy-loss straggling, (ii) the elastic scattering with the target nuclei, with their corresponding energy loss and (iii) the dynamical changes in projectile charge state due to electronic capture and loss processes. An important feature of SEICS is the accurate account of the excitation spectrum of liquid water, based on a consistent solid-state description of its energy-loss-function over the whole energy and momentum space. We analyse how the above-mentioned interactions affect the depth distribution of the energy delivered in liquid water by proton beams with incident energies of the order of several MeV. Our simulations show that the position of the Bragg peak is determined mainly by the stopping power, whereas its width can be attributed to the energy-loss straggling. Multiple elastic scattering processes contribute slightly only at the distal part of the Bragg peak. The charge state of the projectiles only changes when approaching the end of their trajectories, i.e. near the Bragg peak. We have also simulated the proton-beam energy distribution at several depths in the liquid water target, and found that it is determined mainly by the fluctuation in the energy loss of the projectile, evaluated through the energy-loss straggling. We conclude that a proper description of the target excitation spectrum as well as the inclusion of the energy-loss straggling is essential in the calculation of the proton beam depth-dose distribution.

  1. Using low-field NMR to infer the physical properties of glassy oligosaccharide/water mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeberhardt, Kasia; Bui, Quang D; Normand, Valéry

    2007-03-01

    Low-field NMR (LF-NMR) is usually used as an analytical technique, for instance, to determine water and oil contents. For this application, no attempt is made to understand the physical origin of the data. Here we build a physical model to explain the five fit parameters of the conventional free induction decay (FID) for glassy oligosaccharide/water mixtures. The amplitudes of the signals from low-mobility and high-mobility protons correspond to the density of oligosaccharide protons and water protons, respectively. The relaxation time of the high-mobility protons is described using a statistical model for the probability that oligosaccharide hydroxyl groups form multiple hydrogen bonds. The variation of energy of the hydrogen bond is calculated from the average bond distance and the average angle contribution. Applying the model to experimental data shows that hydrogen atoms screen the water oxygen atoms when two water molecules solvate a single hydroxyl group. Furthermore, the relaxation time of the oligosaccharide protons is independent of its molecular weight and the water content. Finally, inversion of the FID using the inverse Laplace transform gives the continuous spectrum of relaxation times, which is a fingerprint of the oligosaccharide.

  2. TEACHING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NORRIS, JEANNE E.; STEINHAUS, ARTHUR H.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO FIND OUT WHETHER (1) THE METHODS FOR ATTAINING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION THAT HAVE PROVED FRUITFUL IN THE ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLINIC CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ADAPTED TO THE TEACHER-CLASS RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLASSROOM AND GYMNASIUM, AND (2) NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION CAN BE TAUGHT SUCCESSFULLY BY AN APPROPRIATELY TRAINED…

  3. Relaxation of Anisotropic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deubener, Joachim; Martin, Birgit; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2004-01-01

    . When the load was removed at room temperature a permanent optical anisotropy (birefringence) was observed only perpendicular to cylinder axis and the pressure direction indicating complete elimination of thermal stresses. Relaxation of structural anisotropy was studied from reheating experiments using...... the energy release, thermo-mechanical and optical relaxation behaviour are drawn....

  4. Relaxation techniques for stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... raise your heart rate. This is called the stress response. Relaxation techniques can help your body relax and lower your blood pressure ... also many other types of breathing techniques you can learn. In many cases, you do not need much ... including those that cause stress. Meditation has been practiced for thousands of years, ...

  5. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  6. NMR relaxation times of natural rubber latex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harun, S.; Aziz, H.; Basir, Z.

    1994-01-01

    NMR relaxation times T sub 1 and T sub 2 of natural rubber latex have been measured at 25 degree C on a pulsed NMR spectrometer. The work focuses on the variation of the relaxation times with the amount of water content from 0% to 50%. The water content was adjusted by centrifuging and removing a certain amount of water from the sample. The data were analysed using a biexponential fitting procedure which yields simultaneously either T sub 1a and T sub 1b or T sub 2a and T sub 2b. The amount of solid was compared with the known amount of dry rubber content

  7. Proton permeation of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamer, D W

    1987-10-01

    Proton permeation of the lipid bilayer barrier has two unique features. First, permeability coefficients measured at neutral pH ranges are six to seven orders of magnitude greater than expected from knowledge of other monovalent cations. Second, proton conductance across planar lipid bilayers varies at most by a factor of 10 when pH is varied from near 1 to near 11. Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for this anomalous behavior: proton conductance related to contaminants of lipid bilayers, and proton translocation along transient hydrogen-bonded chains (tHBC) of associated water molecules in the membrane. The weight of evidence suggests that trace contaminants may contribute to proton conductance across planar lipid membranes at certain pH ranges, but cannot account for the anomalous proton flux in liposome systems. Two new results will be reported here which were designed to test the tHBC model. These include measurements of relative proton/potassium permeability in the gramicidin channel, and plots of proton flux against the magnitude of pH gradients. (1) The relative permeabilities of protons and potassium through the gramicidin channel, which contains a single strand of hydrogen-bonded water molecules, were found to differ by at least four orders of magnitude when measured at neutral pH ranges. This result demonstrates that a hydrogen-bonded chain of water molecules can provide substantial discrimination between protons and other cations. It was also possible to calculate that if approximately 7% of bilayer water was present in a transient configuration similar to that of the gramicidin channel, it could account for the measured proton flux. (2) The plot of proton conductance against pH gradient across liposome membranes was superlinear, a result that is consistent with one of three alternative tHBC models for proton conductance described by Nagle elsewhere in this volume.

  8. Absorbed dose to water determination with ionization chamber dosimetry and calorimetry in restricted neutron, photon, proton and heavy-ion radiation fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brede, H J; Greif, K-D; Hecker, O; Heeg, P; Heese, J; Jones, D T L; Kluge, H; Schardt, D

    2006-08-07

    Absolute dose measurements with a transportable water calorimeter and ionization chambers were performed at a water depth of 20 mm in four different types of radiation fields, for a collimated (60)Co photon beam, for a collimated neutron beam with a fluence-averaged mean energy of 5.25 MeV, for collimated proton beams with mean energies of 36 MeV and 182 MeV at the measuring position, and for a (12)C ion beam in a scanned mode with an energy per atomic mass of 430 MeV u(-1). The ionization chambers actually used were calibrated in units of air kerma in the photon reference field of the PTB and in units of absorbed dose to water for a Farmer-type chamber at GSI. The absorbed dose to water inferred from calorimetry was compared with the dose derived from ionometry by applying the radiation-field-dependent parameters. For neutrons, the quantities of the ICRU Report 45, for protons the quantities of the ICRU Report 59 and for the (12)C ion beam, the recommended values of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) protocol (TRS 398) were applied. The mean values of the absolute absorbed dose to water obtained with these two independent methods agreed within the standard uncertainty (k = 1) of 1.8% for calorimetry and of 3.0% for ionometry for all types and energies of the radiation beams used in this comparison.

  9. Rotational dynamics account for pH-dependent relaxivities of PAMAM dendrimeric, Gd-based potential MRI contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laus, Sabrina; Sour, Angélique; Ruloff, Robert; Tóth, Eva; Merbach, André E

    2005-05-06

    The EPTPA5) chelate, which ensures fast water exchange in GdIII complexes, has been coupled to three different generations (5, 7, and 9) of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers through benzylthiourea linkages (H5EPTPA = ethylenepropylenetriamine-N,N,N',N'',N''-pentaacetic acid). The proton relaxivities measured at pH 7.4 for the dendrimer complexes G5-(GdEPTPA)111, G7-(GdEPTPA)253 and G9-(GdEPTPA)1157 decrease with increasing temperature, indicating that, for the first time for dendrimers, slow water exchange does not limit relaxivity. At a given field and temperature, the relaxivity increases from G5 to G7, and then slightly decreases for G9 (r1 = 20.5, 28.3 and 27.9 mM(-1) s(-1), respectively, at 37 degrees C, 30 MHz). The relaxivities show a strong and reversible pH dependency for all three dendrimer complexes. This originates from the pH-dependent rotational dynamics of the dendrimer skeleton, which was evidenced by a combined variable-temperature and multiple-field 17O NMR and 1H relaxivity study performed at pH 6.0 and 9.9 on G5-(GdEPTPA)111. The longitudinal 17O and 1H relaxation rates of the dendrimeric complex are strongly pH-dependent, whereas they are not for the [Gd(EPTPA)(H2O)]2- monomer chelate. The longitudinal 17O and 1H relaxation rates have been analysed by the Lipari-Szabo spectral density functions and correlation times have been calculated for the global motion of the entire macromolecule (tau(gO)) and the local motion of the GdIII chelates on the surface (tau(lO)), correlated by means of an order parameter S2. The dendrimer complex G5-(GdEPTPA)111 has a considerably higher tau(gO) under acidic than under basic conditions (tau(298)gO = 4040 ps and 2950 ps, respectively), while local motions are less influenced by pH (tau(298)lO = 150 and 125 ps). The order parameter, characterizing the rigidity of the macromolecule, is also higher at pH 6.0 than at pH 9.9 (S2 = 0.43 vs 0.36, respectively). The pH dependence of the global correlation time can be

  10. The relaxation time approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gairola, R.P.; Indu, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    A plausible approximation has been made to estimate the relaxation time from a knowledge of the transition probability of phonons from one state (r vector, q vector) to other state (r' vector, q' vector), as a result of collision. The relaxation time, thus obtained, shows a strong dependence on temperature and weak dependence on the wave vector. In view of this dependence, relaxation time has been expressed in terms of a temperature Taylor's series in the first Brillouin zone. Consequently, a simple model for estimating the thermal conductivity is suggested. the calculations become much easier than the Callaway model. (author). 14 refs

  11. Relaxation processes in aqueous solutions upon X-ray exposure. Entanglement of electronic and nuclear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unger, Isaak

    2017-07-01

    About a decade ago new types of electronic non-radiative relaxation processes, involving the environment of an electronically excited or ionized monomer, have been predicted for van der Waals clusters and these were also the first systems where such processes have been detected experimentally. These new autoionization channels encompass the recombination of an electron and a hole, and the energy transfer to a neighboring atom or molecule. Two processes can be distinguished here. In the intermolecular Coulombic decay (ICD) the hole created upon ionization of a monomer is filled by a valence electron of the same species, and the energy released in this electron-hole recombination is used to ionize a neighboring species. In the electron transfer mediated decay (ETMD) the initial hole is filled by an electron from a neighboring species, and the energy released by this recombination is either used to ionize the same neighbor species, or to ionize a third monomer. In more recent experiments on liquid water it has been discovered that these non- local autoionization processes are strongly coupled with ultrafast nuclear dynamics. The core ionization initiates proton motion along a hydrogen donor-bond of the electronically excited water cation. This nuclear dynamics leads to the formation of transient cationic species where a proton is shared by two neighboring water molecules. Subsequent autoionization, either via Auger decay, ICD or ETMD, then occurs from any of such structure transients. This relaxation process is termed proton transfer mediated charge separation, PTM-CS. It has been found in a number of experiments that the probability of PTM-CS to occur depends on the hydrogen-bond strength between the core-ionized molecule and solvent molecules.

  12. Measurement of activation reaction rate distribution on a mercury target with a lead-reflector and light-water-moderator for high energy proton bombardment using AGS accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasugai, Yoshimi; Takada, Hiroshi; Meigo, Shin-ichiro

    2001-02-01

    Characteristic of spallation neutrons driven by GeV protons from a mercury target with a lead-reflector and light-water-moderator was studied experimentally using the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory in a framework of the ASTE (AGS Spallation Target Experiment) collaboration. Several reaction rates along with the mercury target were measured with the activation method at incident proton energies of 1.94, 12 and 24 GeV. Indium, niobium, aluminum, cobalt, nickel and bismuth were used as activation detectors to cover the threshold energy of between 0.33 and 40.9 MeV. This report summarizes the experimental procedure with all the measured data. (author)

  13. Localized in vivo proton spectroscopy of the bone marrow in patients with leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Jensen, M; Grundtvig, P

    1990-01-01

    Volume selective magnetic resonance (MR) proton spectroscopy was used to investigate the haemopoietic (iliac bone) and fatty bone marrow (tibia) in patients with leukemia and polycythaemia vera. Selective measurements of the relaxation times T1 and T2 for the "water" and "fat" resonances in the b......Volume selective magnetic resonance (MR) proton spectroscopy was used to investigate the haemopoietic (iliac bone) and fatty bone marrow (tibia) in patients with leukemia and polycythaemia vera. Selective measurements of the relaxation times T1 and T2 for the "water" and "fat" resonances...... to chemotherapeutic treatment. Nine patients with polycythaemia vera and 21 normal control subjects were examined with identical methods for comparison. All patients had bone marrow biopsies performed prior to every MR examination. Significant differences could be detected in the spectral patterns from iliac bone...... decrease in marrow fat content. The T1 relaxation times of the "water" resonance in the spectra from the iliac bone marrow of the leukemic patients were significantly prolonged at diagnosis, compared to the normal controls and the patients with polycythaemia vera. After chemotherapeutic induction...

  14. Advantages of chemical exchange-sensitive spin-lock (CESL) over chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) for hydroxyl- and amine-water proton exchange studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2014-11-01

    The chemical exchange (CE) rate of endogenous hydroxyl and amine protons with water is often comparable to the difference in their chemical shifts. These intermediate exchange processes have been imaged by the CE saturation transfer (CEST) approach with low-power and long-duration irradiation. However, the sensitivity is not optimal and, more importantly, the signal is contaminated by slow magnetization transfer processes. Here, the properties of CEST signals are compared with those of a CE-sensitive spin-lock (CESL) technique irradiating at the labile proton frequency. First, using a higher power and shorter irradiation in CE-MRI, we obtain: (i) an increased selectivity to faster CE rates via a higher sensitivity to faster CEs and a lower sensitivity to slower CEs and magnetization transfer processes; and (ii) a decreased in vivo asymmetric magnetization transfer contrast measured at ±15 ppm. The sensitivity gain of CESL over CEST is higher for a higher power and shorter irradiation. Unlike CESL, CEST signals oscillate at a very high power and short irradiation. Second, time-dependent CEST and CESL signals are well modeled by analytical solutions of CE-MRI with an asymmetric population approximation, which can be used for quantitative CE-MRI and validated by simulations of Bloch-McConnell equations and phantom experiments. Finally, the in vivo amine-water proton exchange contrast measured at 2.5 ppm with ω1 = 500 Hz is 18% higher in sensitivity for CESL than CEST at 9.4 T. Overall, CESL provides better exchange rate selectivity and sensitivity than CEST; therefore, CESL is more suitable for CE-MRI of intermediate exchange protons. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Advantages of Chemical Exchange-Sensitive Spin-Lock (CESL) Over Saturation Transfer (CEST) for Hydroxyl- and Amine-Water Proton Exchange Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2014-01-01

    The chemical exchange (CE) rate of endogenous hydroxyl and amine protons with water is often comparable to the difference in their chemical shifts. These intermediate exchange (IMEX) processes have been imaged by the CE saturation transfer (CEST) approach with low-power and long-duration irradiation. However, its sensitivity is not optimal, and more importantly, the signal is contaminated by slow magnetization transfer processes. Here, the property of CEST signals is compared to a CE-sensitive spin-locking (CESL) technique irradiating at the labile proton frequency. Firstly, using a higher power and shorter irradiation in CE-MRI yields i) increasing selectivity to faster chemical exchange rates by higher sensitivity to faster exchanges and less sensitivity to slower CE and magnetization transfer processes, and ii) decreasing in vivo asymmetric magnetization transfer contrast measured at ±15 ppm. The sensitivity gain of CESL over CEST is higher for a higher-power and shorter irradiation. Unlike CESL, CEST signals oscillate at a very high power and short irradiation. Secondly, time-dependent CEST and CESL signals are well modeled by analytical solutions of CE-MRI with asymmetric population approximation (CEAPA), which can be used for quantitative CE-MRI, and validated by simulations of Bloch-McConnell equations and phantom experiments. Lastly, in vivo amine-water proton exchange contrast measured at 2.5 ppm with ω1 of 500 Hz is 18% higher in sensitivity for CESL than CEST at 9.4 T. Overall, CESL provides better exchange rate selectivity and sensitivity than CEST; therefore, CESL is more suitable for CE-MRI of IMEX protons. PMID:25199631

  16. Proton transfer events in GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Stuart, Thomas Cohen; Kennis, John T M; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2011-09-28

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton transfer through a 'proton-wire', formed by the chromophore (the proton donor), water molecule W22, Ser205 and Glu222 (the acceptor), on a picosecond time scale. To obtain a more refined view of this process, we have used a combined approach of time resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy and visible pump-dump-probe spectroscopy to resolve with atomic resolution how and how fast protons move through this wire. Our results indicate that absorption of light by GFP induces in 3 ps (10 ps in D(2)O) a shift of the equilibrium positions of all protons in the H-bonded network, leading to a partial protonation of Glu222 and to a so-called low barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) for the chromophore's proton, giving rise to dual emission at 475 and 508 nm. This state is followed by a repositioning of the protons on the wire in 10 ps (80 ps in D(2)O), ultimately forming the fully deprotonated chromophore and protonated Glu222.

  17. In vivo relaxation time measurements on a murine tumor model--prolongation of T1 after photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y H; Hawk, R M; Ramaprasad, S

    1995-01-01

    RIF tumors implanted on mice feet were investigated for changes in relaxation times (T1 and T2) after photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photodynamic therapy was performed using Photofrin II as the photosensitizer and laser light at 630 nm. A home-built proton solenoid coil in the balanced configuration was used to accommodate the tumors, and the relaxation times were measured before, immediately after, and up to several hours after therapy. Several control experiments were performed untreated tumors, tumors treated with Photofrin II alone, or tumors treated with laser light alone. Significant increases in T1s of water protons were observed after PDT treatment. In all experiments, 31P spectra were recorded before and after the therapy to study the tumor status and to confirm the onset of PDT. These studies show significant prolongation of T1s after the PDT treatment. The spin-spin relaxation measurements, on the other hand, did not show such prolongation in T2 values after PDT treatment.

  18. Rotational and translational dynamics and their relation to hydrogen bond lifetimes in an ionic liquid by means of NMR relaxation time experiments and molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strate, Anne; Neumann, Jan; Overbeck, Viviane; Bonsa, Anne-Marie; Michalik, Dirk; Paschek, Dietmar; Ludwig, Ralf

    2018-05-01

    We report a concerted theoretical and experimental effort to determine the reorientational dynamics as well as hydrogen bond lifetimes for the doubly ionic hydrogen bond +OH⋯O- in the ionic liquid (2-hydroxyethyl)trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [Ch][NTf2] by using a combination of NMR relaxation time experiments, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Due to fast proton exchange, the determination of rotational correlation times is challenging. For molecular liquids, 17O-enhanced proton relaxation time experiments have been used to determine the rotational correlation times for the OH vectors in water or alcohols. As an alternative to those expensive isotopic substitution experiments, we employed a recently introduced approach which is providing access to the rotational dynamics from a single NMR deuteron quadrupolar relaxation time experiment. Here, the deuteron quadrupole coupling constants (DQCCs) are obtained from a relation between the DQCC and the δ1H proton chemical shifts determined from a set of DFT calculated clusters in combination with experimentally determined proton chemical shifts. The NMR-obtained rotational correlation times were compared to those obtained from MD simulations and then related to viscosities for testing the applicability of popular hydrodynamic models. In addition, hydrogen bond lifetimes were derived, using hydrogen bond population correlation functions computed from MD simulations. Here, two different time domains were observed: The short-time contributions to the hydrogen lifetimes and the reorientational correlation times have roughly the same size and are located in the picosecond range, whereas the long-time contributions decay with relaxation times in the nanosecond regime and are related to rather slow diffusion processes. The computed average hydrogen bond lifetime is dominated by the long-time process, highlighting the importance and longevity of

  19. Water recovery and air humidification by condensing the moisture in the outlet gas of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Z.M.; Wan, J.H.; Liu, J.; Tu, Z.K.; Pan, M.; Liu, Z.C.; Liu, W.

    2012-01-01

    Humidification is one of the most important factors for the operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). To maintain the membrane at hydrated state, plenty of water is needed for the state-of-the-art of PEMFC technology, especially in large power applications or long time operation. A condenser is introduced to separate liquid water from the air outlet for air self-sufficient in water of the stack in this study. The condensed temperature at the outlet of the condenser and water recovered amount for air self-sufficient in water are investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that the condensed temperature for air self-sufficient in water is irrelevant with the working current of the stack. When the condenser outlet temperature was above the theoretical line, recovery water was not sufficient for the air humidification. On the contrary, it is sufficient while the temperature was below the theoretical line. It is also shown that when the moisture is sufficiently cooled, large amount water can be separated from the outlet gas, and it increased almost linearly with the time. With the introduction of the condenser, the recovered amount of water can easily satisfy the air self-sufficient in water by condensing the outlet gas to a proper temperature. - Highlights: ► We introduce a condenser to separate liquid water from the air outlet in the stack. ► The mechanism of air self-sufficient in water by condensing gas is presented. ► The condensed temperature and water recovered amount are investigated. ► An experiment is present to validate simplicity and feasibility of the criterion. ► The criterion for air humidification is used for choosing the condenser.

  20. Thermodynamic parameters for the protonation and the interaction of arsenate with Mg2+, Ca2+ and Sr2+: Application to natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillè, Donatella; Foti, Claudia; Giuffrè, Ottavia

    2018-01-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for the protonation of AsO 4 3- and for the interaction with Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ were reported, comprehensive also of their dependence on ionic strength, considering the 0.1 ≤ I ≤ 1 M range and using NaCl as background salt. The same speciation models were obtained for Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ systems, with the formation of three different species: ML, MLH and MLH 2 (L = AsO 4 3- ). Mono- and di-protonated species were very weak, with formation constant values (log K) ranging from 1.45 to 3.23. In order to have a complete picture of thermodynamic properties of the systems under study and to fill the shortage of thermodynamic data on arsenate complex systems, the ligand protonation and metal complex enthalpies were also determined by calorimetric titrations, at t = 25 °C and in NaCl at I = 0.7 M (for H + -AsO 4 3- species also at I = 0.1 M). On the light of the proposed speciation models, examples of As(V) distribution in some natural waters are reported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Revisit the landscape of protonated water clusters H+(H2O)n with n = 10-17: An ab initio global search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ruili; Li, Keyao; Su, Yan; Tang, Lingli; Huang, Xiaoming; Sai, Linwei; Zhao, Jijun

    2018-05-01

    Using a genetic algorithm incorporated with density functional theory, we explore the ground state structures of protonated water clusters H+(H2O)n with n = 10-17. Then we re-optimize the isomers at B97-D/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. The extra proton connects with a H2O molecule to form a H3O+ ion in all H+(H2O)10-17 clusters. The lowest-energy structures adopt a monocage form at n = 10-16 and core-shell structure at n = 17 based on the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B97-D/aug-cc-pVDZ+ZPE single-point-energy calculation. Using second-order vibrational perturbation theory, we further calculate the infrared spectra with anharmonic correction for the ground state structures of H+(H2O)10-17 clusters at the PBE0/aug-cc-pVDZ level. The anharmonic correction to the spectra is crucial since it reproduces the experimental results quite well. The extra proton weakens the O-H bond strength in the H3O+ ion since the Wiberg bond order of the O-H bond in the H3O+ ion is smaller than that in H2O molecules, which causes a red shift of the O-H stretching mode in the H3O+ ion.

  2. Faster proton transfer dynamics of water on SnO2 compared to TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nitin; Kent, Paul R C; Bandura, Andrei V; Kubicki, James D; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R; Sofo, Jorge O

    2011-01-28

    Proton jump processes in the hydration layer on the iso-structural TiO(2) rutile (110) and SnO(2) cassiterite (110) surfaces were studied with density functional theory molecular dynamics. We find that the proton jump rate is more than three times faster on cassiterite compared with rutile. A local analysis based on the correlation between the stretching band of the O-H vibrations and the strength of H-bonds indicates that the faster proton jump activity on cassiterite is produced by a stronger H-bond formation between the surface and the hydration layer above the surface. The origin of the increased H-bond strength on cassiterite is a combined effect of stronger covalent bonding and stronger electrostatic interactions due to differences of its electronic structure. The bridging oxygens form the strongest H-bonds between the surface and the hydration layer. This higher proton jump rate is likely to affect reactivity and catalytic activity on the surface. A better understanding of its origins will enable methods to control these rates.

  3. A Ratio-Analysis Method to the Dynamics of Excited State Proton Transfer: Pyranine in Water and Micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Kalyanasis; Nandi, Nilanjana; Dolai, Suman; Bera, Avisek

    2018-06-05

    Emission spectrum of a fluorophore undergoing excited state proton transfer (ESPT) often exhibits two distinct bands each representing emissions from protonated and deprotonated forms. The relative contribution of the two bands, best represented by an emission intensity ratio (R) (intensity maximum of the protonated band / intensity maximum of the deprotonated band), is an important parameter which usually denotes feasibility or promptness of the ESPT process. However, the use of ratio is only limited to the interpretation of steady-state fluorescence spectra. Here, for the first time, we exploit the time-dependence of the ratio (R(t)), calculated from time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) at different times, to analyze ESPT dynamics. TRES at different times were fitted with a sum of two lognormal-functions representing each peaks and then, the peak intensity ratio, R(t) was calculated and further fitted with an analytical function. Recently, a time-resolved area-normalized emission spectra (TRANES)-based analysis was presented where the decay of protonated emission or the rise of deprotonated emission intensity conveniently accounts for the ESPT dynamics. We show that these two methods are equivalent but the new method provides more insights on the nature of the ESPT process.

  4. Relaxation Time of High-Density Amorphous Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handle, Philip H.; Seidl, Markus; Loerting, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Amorphous water plays a fundamental role in astrophysics, cryoelectron microscopy, hydration of matter, and our understanding of anomalous liquid water properties. Yet, the characteristics of the relaxation processes taking place in high-density amorphous ice (HDA) are unknown. We here reveal that the relaxation processes in HDA at 110-135 K at 0.1-0.2 GPa are of collective and global nature, resembling the alpha relaxation in glassy material. Measured relaxation times suggest liquid-like relaxation characteristics in the vicinity of the crystallization temperature at 145 K. By carefully relaxing pressurized HDA for several hours at 135 K, we produce a state that is closer to the ideal glass state than all HDA states discussed so far in literature.

  5. Water-Protein Interactions: The Secret of Protein Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Martini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-protein interactions help to maintain flexible conformation conditions which are required for multifunctional protein recognition processes. The intimate relationship between the protein surface and hydration water can be analyzed by studying experimental water properties measured in protein systems in solution. In particular, proteins in solution modify the structure and the dynamics of the bulk water at the solute-solvent interface. The ordering effects of proteins on hydration water are extended for several angstroms. In this paper we propose a method for analyzing the dynamical properties of the water molecules present in the hydration shells of proteins. The approach is based on the analysis of the effects of protein-solvent interactions on water protons NMR relaxation parameters. NMR relaxation parameters, especially the nonselective (R1NS and selective (R1SE spin-lattice relaxation rates of water protons, are useful for investigating the solvent dynamics at the macromolecule-solvent interfaces as well as the perturbation effects caused by the water-macromolecule interactions on the solvent dynamical properties. In this paper we demonstrate that Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy can be used to determine the dynamical contributions of proteins to the water molecules belonging to their hydration shells.

  6. Conceptual design of proton beam window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraoku, Takuji; Kaminaga, Masanori; Terada, Atsuhiko; Ishikura, Syuichi; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Hino, Ryutaro

    2001-01-01

    In a MW-scale neutron scattering facility coupled with a high-intensity proton accelerator, a proton beam window is installed as the boundary between a high vacuum region of the proton beam transport line and a helium environment around the target assembly working as a neutron source. The window is cooled by water so as to remove high volumetric heat generated by the proton beam. A concept of the flat-type proton beam window consisting of two plates of 3 mm thick was proposed, which was found to be feasible under the proton beam power of 5 MW through thermal-hydraulic and structural strength analyses. (authors)

  7. Relaxed Binaural LCMV Beamforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutrouvelis, A.; Hendriks, R.C.; Heusdens, R.; Jensen, Jesper Rindom

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new binaural beamforming technique, which can be seen as a relaxation of the linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) framework. The proposed method can achieve simultaneous noise reduction and exact binaural cue preservation of the target source, similar to the

  8. Hangman Catalysis for Photo–and Photoelectro–Chemical Activation of Water Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanisms of Small Molecule Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocera, Daniel G. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-03-15

    The weakest link for the large-scale deployment of solar energy and for that matter, any renewable energy source, is its storage. The energy needs of future society demands are so large that storage must be in the form of fuels owing to their high energy density. Indeed, society has intuitively understood this disparity in energy density as it has developed over the last century as all large-scale energy storage in our society is in the form of fuels. But these fuels are carbon-based. The imperative for the discipline of chemistry, and more generally science, is to develop fuel storage methods that are easily scalable, carbon-neutral and sustainable. These methods demand the creation of catalysts to manage the multi-electron, multi-proton transformations of the conversion of small molecules into fuels. The splitting of water using solar light is a fuel-forming reaction that meets the imperative of large scale energy storage. As light does not directly act on water to engender its splitting into its elemental components, we have designed “hangman” catalysts to effect the energy conversion processes needed for the fuel forming reactions. The hangman construct utilizes a pendant acid/base functionality within the secondary coordination sphere that is “hung” above the redox platform onto which substrate binds. In this way, we can precisely control the delivery of a proton to the substrate, thus ensuring efficient coupling between the proton and electron. An emphasis was on the coupling of electron and proton in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on Ni, Co and Fe porphyrin platforms. Electrokinetic rate laws were developed to define the proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism. The HER of Co and Fe porphyrins was metal-centered. Surprisingly, HER this was not the case for Ni porphyrins. In this system, the PCET occurred at the porphyrin platform to give rise to a phlorin. This is one of the first examples of an HER occurring via ligand non

  9. Water droplet dynamic behavior during removal from a proton exchange membrane fuel cell gas diffusion layer by Lattice-Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molaeimanesh, Golamreza; Akbari, Mohammad Hadi [Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    A major challenge in the application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is water management, with the flooding of electrodes as the main issue. The Lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is a relatively new technique that is superior in modeling the dynamic interface of multiphase fluid flow in complex microstructures such as non-homogeneous and anisotropic porous media of PEMFC electrodes. In this study, the dynamic behavior of a water droplet during removal from gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a PEMFC electrode with interdigitated flow field is simulated using LBM. The effects of GDL wettability and its spanwise and transverse gradients on the removal process are investigated. The results demonstrate great influence of wettability and its spanwise and transverse gradients on the dynamic behavior of droplets during the removal process. Although increasing the hydrophobicity of GDL results in better droplet removal, its increase beyond a critical value does not show a significant effect.

  10. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  11. Generation and relaxation of high rank coherences in AX3 systems in a selectively methionine labelled SH2 domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloiber, Karin; Fischer, Michael; Ledolter, Karin; Nagl, Michael; Schmid, Walther; Konrat, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The usefulness of selective isotope labelling patterns is demonstrated using the C-terminal SH2 domain of PLC-γ1 selectively 13 C labelled at methionine methyl groups. We demonstrate the generation and relaxation of coherences that are second rank in protons and first rank in carbons that derive from quadrupolar order in protons. The decay rates of second rank double quantum proton coherences are measured. These terms exhibit fewer channels for cross-correlated relaxation compared to single quantum coherences. Our results indicate the potential application of the measurement of high order proton coherences to the analysis of dynamics in methyl-bearing side chains

  12. An investigation of proton conductivity of binary matrices sulfonated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to their potential applications in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) ... is highly sulfonated and has high water uptake property.11,12 The proton conductivity ... SPSU membranes have lower gas permeability and liquid. (water and ...

  13. Quasi-three dimensional dynamic modeling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell with consideration of two-phase water transport through a gas diffusion layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sanggyu

    2015-01-01

    Water management is one of the challenging issues for low-temperature PEMFCs (proton exchange membrane fuel cells). When liquid water is formed at the GDL (gas diffusion layer), the pathway of reactant gas can be blocked, which inhibits the electrochemical reaction of PEMFC. Thus, liquid water transport through GDL is a critical factor determining the performance of a PEMFC. In present study, quasi-three dimensional dynamic modeling of PEMFC with consideration of two-phase water transport through GDL is developed. To investigate the distributions of PEMFC characteristics, including current density, species mole fraction, and membrane hydration, the PEMFC was discretized into twenty control volumes along the anode channel. To resolve the mass and energy conservation, the PEMFC is discretized into eleven and fifteen control volumes in the perpendicular direction, respectively. The dynamic variation of PEMFC characteristics of cell voltage, overvoltage of activation and ohmic, liquid water saturation through a GDL, and oxygen concentration were captured during transient behavior. - Highlights: • A quasi-three dimensional two-phase dynamic model of PEMFC is developed. • Presented model is validated by comparison with experimental data. • Two-phase model is compared with one-phase model at steady-states and transients.

  14. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  15. Nuclear magnetic relaxation in aqueous praseodymium and europium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J.L.; Diaz, D.

    1991-01-01

    A general theory for the relaxation of the nuclear spin in paramagnetic complexes where the electronic spin is within a slow-movement regime was presented by Benetis et al. and applied to d-group elements (Ni 2+ , Co 2+ ). This paper show the possibility to apply such formalism to f-group elements and it was developed for S=3(Eu 3+ ). A group of magnitudes characterizing the microstructure and dynamics of these solutions is reported with the approximations used. The dispersion of the nuclear magnetic relaxation (NMRD) for the proton of the variable field was also assessed which had a similar behaviour to what was experimentally reported

  16. Methyl group rotation and nuclear relaxation at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweers, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    This thesis deals with the proton spin-lattice relaxation of some methyl group compounds at liquid helium temperatures. In these molecular crystals, an energy difference between the ground and first rotational state of the methyl group occurs, the so-called tunnelling splitting, which is of the order of a few degrees Kelvin. This means that the high temperature approximation is inappropriate for the description of the occupation densities of the two lowest rotational levels. A description of the properties of the methyl group in connection with relaxation

  17. Experiments in paramagnetic relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lijphart, E.E.

    1976-01-01

    This thesis presents two attempts to improve the resolving power of the relaxation measurement technique. The first attempt reconsiders the old technique of steady state saturation. When used in conjunction with the pulse technique, it offers the possibility of obtaining additional information about the system in which all-time derivatives are zero; in addition, non-linear effects may be distinguished from each other. The second attempt involved a systematic study of only one system: Cu in the Tutton salts (K and Rb). The systematic approach, the high accuracy of the measurement and the sheer amount of experimental data for varying temperature, magnetic field and concentration made it possible in this case to separate the prevailing relaxation mechanisms reliably

  18. Synthesis and characterization of water-dispersible core/shell Mn-doped magnetite/Au nanoparticles for proton radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Chan

    2015-01-01

    The surface modification of the nanomaterials is required for the biomedical use to give physiological stability, surface reactivity and targeting properties. Among many approaches for the surface modification with materials, such as polymers, organic ligands and metals, one of the most attractive ways is to employ metals. The fabrication of metal-based, monolayer coated magnetic nanoparticles has been intensively studied. However, the synthesis of metal-capped magnetic nanoparticles with monodispersities and controllable sizes is still challenged. Recently, gold-capped magnetic nanoparticles have been reported to increase stability and to provide biocompatibility. Gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles are an attractive system, which can be stabilized in biological conditions and readily functionalized through well-established surface modification chemistry. In addition, the Au coating offers plasmonic properties to magnetic nanoparticles. This makes the magnetic/Au core/shell combinations interesting for magnetic and optical applications. The monodisperse Mn:Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles have been prepared in organic solvent first and then transferred from an organic phase to an aqueous solution. The resulting core/shell-structured nanoparticles may be an attractive system for biomedical applications, which are needed both magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging. In addition, the resulting nanoparticles may be useful for proton radiotherapy due to the enhanced therapeutic effects of secondary radiation stemmed from gold and proton beam bombardment

  19. Relaxation from particle production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    We consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a “Relaxion” solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  20. Magnetic relaxation in anisotropic magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1971-01-01

    The line shape and the kinematic and thermodynamic slowing down of the critical and paramagnetic relaxation in axially anisotropic materials are discussed. Kinematic slowing down occurs only in the longitudinal relaxation function. The thermodynamic slowing down occurs in either the transverse...... or longitudinal relaxation function depending on the sign of the axial anisotropy....

  1. Momentum constraint relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marronetti, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Full relativistic simulations in three dimensions invariably develop runaway modes that grow exponentially and are accompanied by violations of the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints. Recently, we introduced a numerical method (Hamiltonian relaxation) that greatly reduces the Hamiltonian constraint violation and helps improve the quality of the numerical model. We present here a method that controls the violation of the momentum constraint. The method is based on the addition of a longitudinal component to the traceless extrinsic curvature A ij -tilde, generated by a vector potential w i , as outlined by York. The components of w i are relaxed to solve approximately the momentum constraint equations, slowly pushing the evolution towards the space of solutions of the constraint equations. We test this method with simulations of binary neutron stars in circular orbits and show that it effectively controls the growth of the aforementioned violations. We also show that a full numerical enforcement of the constraints, as opposed to the gentle correction of the momentum relaxation scheme, results in the development of instabilities that stop the runs shortly

  2. Magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation characterization of water in the unfrozen vein network in polycrystalline ice and its response to microbial metabolic products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer R.; Brox, Timothy I.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2012-12-01

    Polycrystalline ice, as found in glaciers and the ice sheets of Antarctica, is a low porosity porous media consisting of a complicated and dynamic pore structure of liquid-filled intercrystalline veins within a solid ice matrix. In this work, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements of relaxation rates and molecular diffusion, useful for probing pore structure and transport dynamics in porous systems, were used to physically characterize the unfrozen vein network structure in ice and its response to the presence of metabolic products produced by V3519-10, a cold tolerant microorganism isolated from the Vostok ice core. Recent research has found microorganisms that can remain viable and even metabolically active within icy environments at sub-zero temperatures. One potential mechanism of survival for V3519-10 is secretion of an extracellular ice binding protein that binds to the prism face of ice crystals and inhibits ice recrystallization, a coarsening process resulting in crystal growth with ice aging. Understanding the impact of ice binding activity on the bulk vein network structure in ice is important to modeling of frozen geophysical systems and in development of ice interacting proteins for biotechnology applications, such as cryopreservation of cell lines, and manufacturing processes in food sciences. Here, we present the first observations of recrystallization inhibition in low porosity ice containing V3519-10 extracellular protein extract as measured with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  3. Detection of Amide and Aromatic Proton Resonances of Human Brain Metabolites Using Localized Correlated Spectroscopy Combined with Two Different Water Suppression Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajakumar Nagarajan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to demonstrate the J-coupling connectivity network between the amide, aliphatic, and aromatic proton resonances of metabolites in human brain using two-dimensional (2D localized correlated spectroscopy (L-COSY. Two different global water suppression techniques were combined with L-COSY, one before and another after localizing the volume of interest (VOI. Phantom solutions containing several cerebral metabolites at physiological concentrations were evaluated initially for sequence optimization. Nine healthy volunteers were scanned using a 3T whole body MRI scanner. The VOI for 2D L-COSY was placed in the right occipital white/gray matter region. The 2D cross and diagonal peak volumes were measured for several metabolites such as N-acetyl aspartate (NAA, creatine (Cr, free choline (Ch, glutamate/glutamine (Glx, aspartate (Asp, myo-inositol (mI, GABA, glutathione (GSH, phosphocholine (PCh, phosphoethanolamine (PE, tyrosine (Tyr, lactate (Lac, macromolecules (MM and homocarnosine (Car. Using the pre-water suppression technique with L-COSY, the above mentioned metabolites were clearly identifiable and the relative ratios of metabolites were calculated. In addition to detecting multitude of aliphatic resonances in the high field region, we have demonstrated that the amide and aromatic resonances can also be detected using 2D L-COSY by pre water suppression more reliably than the post-water suppression.

  4. Effects of clamping force on the water transport and performance of a PEM (proton electrolyte membrane) fuel cell with relative humidity and current density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Dowon; Ahn, Jae Hwan; Kim, Hyung Soon; Kim, Yongchan

    2015-01-01

    The clamping force should be applied to a proton electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell due to its structural characteristics. The clamping force affects the ohmic and mass transport resistances in the PEM fuel cell. In this study, the effects of the clamping force on the water transport and performance characteristics of a PEM fuel cell are experimentally investigated with variations in the relative humidity and current density. The water transport characteristics were analyzed by calculating the net drag coefficient. The ohmic resistance decreased with the increase in the clamping force due to the reduced contact resistance and more even membrane hydration. However, the mass transport resistance increased with the increase in the clamping force due to the gas diffusion layer compression. The net drag coefficient decreased with the increase in the clamping force due to high water back-diffusion. Additionally, the relationship between the total resistance and the net drag coefficient was investigated. - Highlights: • Effects of clamping force on the performance of a PEM fuel cell are investigated. • Water transport characteristics are analyzed using net drag coefficient. • Ohmic resistance decreased with clamping force, but mass transport resistance increased. • Net drag coefficient decreased with the increase in clamping force. • Total resistance was significantly degraded for a net drag coefficient below 0.2.

  5. Thermodynamic stability and relaxation studies of small, triaza-macrocyclic Mn(II) chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Arsénio; Bonnet, Célia S; Geraldes, Carlos F G C; Tóth, Éva; Ferreira, Paula M T; André, João P

    2013-04-07

    Due to its favorable relaxometric properties, Mn(2+) is an appealing metal ion for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. This paper reports the synthesis and characterization of three new triazadicarboxylate-type ligands and their Mn(2+) chelates (NODAHep, 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetate-7-heptanil; NODABA, 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetate-7-benzoic acid; and NODAHA, 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetate-7-hexanoic acid). The protonation constants of the ligands and the stability constants of the chelates formed with Mn(2+) and the endogenous Zn(2+) ion have been determined by potentiometry. In overall, the thermodynamic stability of the chelates is lower than that of the corresponding NOTA analogues (NOTA = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetate), consistent with the decreased number of coordinating carboxylate groups. Variable temperature (1)H NMRD and (17)O NMR measurements have been performed on the paramagnetic chelates to provide information on the water exchange rates and the rotational dynamics. The values of the (17)O chemical shifts are consistent with the presence of one water molecule in the first coordination sphere of Mn(2+). The three complexes are in the slow to intermediate regime for the water exchange rate, and they all display relatively high rotational correlation times, which explain the relaxivity values between 4.7 and 5.8 mM(-1) s(-1) (20 MHz and 298 K). These relaxivities are higher than expected for Mn(2+) chelates of such size and comparable to those of small monohydrated Gd(3+) complexes. The amphiphilic [Mn(NODAHep)] forms micelles above 22 mM (its critical micellar concentration was determined by relaxometry and fluorescence), and interacts with HSA via its alkylic carbon chain providing a 60% relaxivity increase at 20 MHz due to a longer tumbling time.

  6. Hydrogen-bond dynamics and proton transfer in nanoconfinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Loop, T.H.

    2015-01-01

    Proton transfer is of fundamental importance to both biology and chemistry. Much is known about proton transfer in large water volumes but often proton transfer reactions take place in very small nanometer sized volumes for example between lipid layers and in proton channels in mitochondria and

  7. Energizing porters by proton-motive force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, N

    1994-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the chemistry of water was the most crucial determinant in shaping life on earth. Among the more important chemical features of water is its dissociation into protons and hydroxyl ions. The presence of relatively high proton concentrations in the ambient solution resulted in the evolution of proton pumps during the dawn of life on earth. These proton pumps maintained neutral pH inside the cells and generated electrochemical gradients of protons (proton-motive force) across their membranes. The existence of proton-motive force enabled the evolution of porters driven by it that are most probably among the more primitive porters in the world. The directionality of the substrate transport by the porters could be to both sides of the membranes because they can serve as proton symporters or antiporters. One of the most important subjects of this meeting is the mechanism by which proton-motive and other ion-motive forces drive the transport processes through porters. Is there a common mechanism of action for all proton-driven porters? Is there some common partial reaction by which we can identify the way that porters are energized by proton-motive force? Is there a common coupling between proton movement and uptake or secretion of certain molecules? Even a partial answer to one of these questions would advance our knowledge... or confusion. As my mentor Efraim Racker used to say: 'If you are not totally confused you do not understand the issue'.

  8. Contribution of proton NMR relaxation to the investigation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dominant in the low frequency range, translational self-diffusion is dominant in .... geometry of the core (rod-like vs. disc-like) and the particular orientation of its main sym- .... out of the molecular disc plane are constrained by the piling up of the ...

  9. Proton decay theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay

  10. Absolute quantitative proton NMR spectroscopy based on the amplitude of the local water suppression pulse. Quantification of brain water and metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E R; Henriksen, O

    1994-01-01

    Quantification in localized proton NMR spectroscopy has been achieved by various methods in recent years. A new method for absolute quantification is described in this paper. The method simultaneously rules out problems with B1 field inhomogeneity and coil loading, utilizing a relation between th......M and [NAA] = 9.15 +/- 0.74 nM. It is concluded that the quantification method is easily applied in vivo, and that the absolute concentrations obtained are similar to results in other studies except those relying on assumptions of the concentration of an internal reference. The advantage...

  11. Cross-relaxation imaging:methods, challenges and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stikov, Nikola

    2010-01-01

    An overview of quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) is given, with focus on cross relaxation imaging (CRI) as a fast method for quantifying the proportion of protons bound to complex macromolecules in tissue. The procedure for generating CRI maps is outlined, showing examples in the human brain and knee, and discussing the caveats and challenges in generating precise and accurate CRI maps. Finally, several applications of CRI for imaging tissue microstructure are presented.(Author)

  12. NMR relaxation times in human brain tumors (preliminary results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoist, L.; Certaines, J. de; Chatel, M.; Menault, F.

    1981-01-01

    Since the early work of Damadian in 1971, proton NMR studies of tumors has been well documented. Present study concerns the spin-lattice T 1 and spin-spin T 2 relaxation times of normal dog brain according to the histological differentiation and of 35 human benignant or malignant tumors. The results principally show T 2 important variations between white and gray substance in normal brain but no discrimination between malignant and benignant tumors [fr

  13. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  14. Variational formulation of relaxed and multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, R. L.; Yoshida, Z.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Hudson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    > Ideal magnetohydrodynamics (IMHD) is strongly constrained by an infinite number of microscopic constraints expressing mass, entropy and magnetic flux conservation in each infinitesimal fluid element, the latter preventing magnetic reconnection. By contrast, in the Taylor relaxation model for formation of macroscopically self-organized plasma equilibrium states, all these constraints are relaxed save for the global magnetic fluxes and helicity. A Lagrangian variational principle is presented that leads to a new, fully dynamical, relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (RxMHD), such that all static solutions are Taylor states but also allows state with flow. By postulating that some long-lived macroscopic current sheets can act as barriers to relaxation, separating the plasma into multiple relaxation regions, a further generalization, multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) is developed.

  15. Relaxation-compensated CEST-MRI at 7 T for mapping of creatine content and pH--preliminary application in human muscle tissue in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerich, Eugenia; Zaiss, Moritz; Korzowski, Andreas; Ladd, Mark E; Bachert, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The small biomolecule creatine is involved in energy metabolism. Mapping of the total creatine (mostly PCr and Cr) in vivo has been done with chemical shift imaging. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) allows an alternative detection of creatine via water MRI. Living tissue exhibits CEST effects from different small metabolites, including creatine, with four exchanging protons of its guanidinium group resonating about 2 ppm from the water peak and hence contributing to the amine proton CEST peak. The intermediate exchange rate (≈ 1000 Hz) of the guanidinium protons requires high RF saturation amplitude B1. However, strong B1 fields also label semi-solid magnetization transfer (MT) effects originating from immobile protons with broad linewidths (~kHz) in the tissue. Recently, it was shown that endogenous CEST contrasts are strongly affected by the MT background as well as by T1 relaxation of the water protons. We show that this influence can be corrected in the acquired CEST data by an inverse metric that yields the apparent exchange-dependent relaxation (AREX). AREX has some useful linearity features that enable preparation of both concentration, and--by using the AREX-ratio of two RF irradiation amplitudes B1--purely exchange-rate-weighted CEST contrasts. These two methods could be verified in phantom experiments with different concentration and pH values, but also varying water relaxation properties. Finally, results from a preliminary application to in vivo CEST imaging data of the human calf muscle before and after exercise are presented. The creatine concentration increases during exercise as expected and as confirmed by (31)P NMR spectroscopic imaging. However, the estimated concentrations obtained by our method were higher than the literature values: cCr,rest=24.5±3.74mM to cCr,ex=38.32±13.05mM. The CEST-based pH method shows a pH decrease during exercise, whereas a slight increase was observed by (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Copyright © 2015

  16. Serial water changes in human skeletal muscles on exercise studied with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Toru; Ikehira, Hiroo; Arimizu, Noboru

    1994-01-01

    In vivo 1 H-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enabled us to study the distribution of water in living tissues and to document changes in human skeletal muscles during physical exercise. The purpose of the present study was to determine the total muscle water changes after exercise using water in 1 H-MR spectroscopy and to compare these changes to the signal intensity change on T 2 * -weighted images and/or to the T 2 value change. Seven young male volunteers were positioned in a 1.5 T Philips MR imaging system. They were then asked to dorsiflex their ankle joint against a 2 kg weight once every 2 seconds for 2 minutes. The peak height of water declined according to the clearance curve after exercise in all seven cases with the 1 H-MRS similar to the signal intensity. The increasing rate at peak height of total muscle water exceeded both the signal intensity and the T 2 value because the water peak height on the 1 H-MRS included the extracellular water. In addition, we measured the changes in signal intensity in both calf muscles after walking race exercise. The time intensity curves were used to draw a clearance curve for each muscle group after exercise. It was possible to discern which muscle was used most from the T 2 * -weighted image that was obtained once after exercise. (author)

  17. Dynamics of relaxed inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangarife, Walter; Tobioka, Kohsaku; Ubaldi, Lorenzo; Volansky, Tomer

    2018-02-01

    The cosmological relaxation of the electroweak scale has been proposed as a mechanism to address the hierarchy problem of the Standard Model. A field, the relaxion, rolls down its potential and, in doing so, scans the squared mass parameter of the Higgs, relaxing it to a parametrically small value. In this work, we promote the relaxion to an inflaton. We couple it to Abelian gauge bosons, thereby introducing the necessary dissipation mechanism which slows down the field in the last stages. We describe a novel reheating mechanism, which relies on the gauge-boson production leading to strong electro-magnetic fields, and proceeds via the vacuum production of electron-positron pairs through the Schwinger effect. We refer to this mechanism as Schwinger reheating. We discuss the cosmological dynamics of the model and the phenomenological constraints from CMB and other experiments. We find that a cutoff close to the Planck scale may be achieved. In its minimal form, the model does not generate sufficient curvature perturbations and additional ingredients, such as a curvaton field, are needed.

  18. Restrained Proton Indicator in Combined Quantum-Mechanics/Molecular-Mechanics Dynamics Simulations of Proton Transfer through a Carbon Nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duster, Adam W; Lin, Hai

    2017-09-14

    Recently, a collective variable "proton indicator" was purposed for tracking an excess proton solvated in bulk water in molecular dynamics simulations. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing the position of this proton indicator as a reaction coordinate to model an excess proton migrating through a hydrophobic carbon nanotube in combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics simulations. Our results indicate that applying a harmonic restraint to the proton indicator in the bulk solvent near the nanotube pore entrance leads to the recruitment of water molecules into the pore. This is consistent with an earlier study that employed a multistate empirical valence bond potential and a different representation (center of excess charge) of the proton. We attribute this water recruitment to the delocalized nature of the solvated proton, which prefers to be in high-dielectric bulk solvent. While water recruitment into the pore is considered an artifact in the present simulations (because of the artificially imposed restraint on the proton), if the proton were naturally restrained, it could assist in building water wires prior to proton transfer through the pore. The potential of mean force for a proton translocation through the water-filled pore was computed by umbrella sampling, where the bias potentials were applied to the proton indicator. The free energy curve and barrier heights agree reasonably with those in the literature. The results suggest that the proton indicator can be used as a reaction coordinate in simulations of proton transport in confined environments.

  19. Oxygen Mapping within Healthy and Acutely Infarcted Brain Tissue in Humans Using the NMR Relaxation of Lipids: A Proof-Of-Concept Translational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliez, Florence; Safronova, Marta M; Magat, Julie; Joudiou, Nicolas; Peeters, André P; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Gallez, Bernard; Duprez, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The clinical applicability of brain oxygenation mapping using the MOBILE (Mapping of Oxygen By Imaging Lipids relaxation Enhancement) magnetic resonance (MR) technique was assessed in the clinical setting of normal brain and of acute cerebral ischemia as a founding proof-of-concept translational study. Changes in the oxygenation level within healthy brain tissue can be detected by analyzing the spin-lattice proton relaxation ('Global T1' combining water and lipid protons) because of the paramagnetic properties of molecular oxygen. It was hypothesized that selective measurement of the relaxation of the lipid protons ('Lipids T1') would result in enhanced sensitivity of pO2 mapping because of higher solubility of oxygen in lipids than in water, and this was demonstrated in pre-clinical models using the MOBILE technique. In the present study, 12 healthy volunteers and eight patients with acute (48-72 hours) brain infarction were examined with the same clinical 3T MR system. Both Lipids R1 (R1 = 1/T1) and Global R1 were significantly different in the infarcted area and the contralateral unaffected brain tissue, with a higher statistical significance for Lipids R1 (median difference: 0.408 s-1; pbrain tissue of stroke patients were not significantly different from the R1 values calculated in the brain tissue of healthy volunteers. The main limitations of the present prototypic version of the MOBILE sequence are the long acquisition time (4 min), hampering robustness of data in uncooperative patients, and a 2 mm slice thickness precluding accurate measurements in small infarcts because of partial volume averaging effects.

  20. Magnetic relaxation in analytical, coordination and bioinorganic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, O.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation is a special type of nuclear magnetic resonance in which the rate is measured of energy transfer between the excited nuclei and their molecular medium (spin-lattice relaxation) or the whole nuclear spin system (spin-spin relaxation). Nuclear magnetic relaxation relates to nuclei with a spin of 1/2, primarily H 1 1 , and is mainly measured in water solutions. It is suitable for (1) analytical chemistry because the relaxation time rapidly reduces in the presence of paramagnetic ions, (2) the study of complex compounds, (3) the study of biochemical reactions in the presence of different metal ions. It is also suitable for testing the composition of a flowing liquid. Its disadvantage is that it requires complex and expensive equipment. (Ha)

  1. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of plasma lipoproteins in malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabholtz, J.M.; Rossignol, A.; Farnier, M.; Gambert, P.; Tremeaux, J.C.; Friedman, S.; Guerrin, J.

    1988-01-01

    A recent study described a method of detecting malignant tumors by water-supressed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1 H NMR) study of plasma. We performed a similar study of the W 1/2, a mean of the full width at half height of the resonances of the methyl and methylene groups of the lipids of plasma lipoproteins which is inversely related to the spin-spin apparent relaxation time (T 2 * ). W 1/2 values were measured at a fixed baseline width of 310 Hz. The study was prospective and blinded and comprised 182 subjects consisting of 40 controls, 68 patients with untreated malignancies, 45 with malignant tumors undergoing therapy and 29 benign tumor patients. No differences were seen between any groups that could serve as a basis for a useful clinical test. The major difficulty in the determination of W 1/2 was due to interference of metabolite protons (particularly lactate) within the lipoprotein resonance signal. Triglyceride level was seen to correlate inversely with W 1/2 within malignant patient groups. These discrepant results may be related to differing triglyceride-rich very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) levels in the ;atient populations of each study. We conclude that the water-suppressed 1H NMR of plasma lipoproteins is not a valid measurement for assessing malignancy. (orig.)

  2. In contrast to BOLD: signal enhancement by extravascular water protons as an alternative mechanism of endogenous fMRI signal change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figley, Chase R; Leitch, Jordan K; Stroman, Patrick W

    2010-10-01

    Despite the popularity and widespread application of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in recent years, the physiological bases of signal change are not yet fully understood. Blood oxygen level-dependant (BOLD) contrast - attributed to local changes in blood flow and oxygenation, and therefore magnetic susceptibility - has become the most prevalent means of functional neuroimaging. However, at short echo times, spin-echo sequences show considerable deviations from the BOLD model, implying a second, non-BOLD component of signal change. This has been dubbed "signal enhancement by extravascular water protons" (SEEP) and is proposed to result from proton-density changes associated with cellular swelling. Given that such changes are independent of magnetic susceptibility, SEEP may offer new and improved opportunities for carrying out fMRI in regions with close proximity to air-tissue and/or bone-tissue interfaces (e.g., the prefrontal cortex and spinal cord), as well as regions close to large blood vessels, which may not be ideally suited for BOLD imaging. However, because of the interdisciplinary nature of the literature, there has yet to be a thorough synthesis, tying together the various and sometimes disparate aspects of SEEP theory. As such, we aim to provide a concise yet comprehensive overview of SEEP, including recent and compelling evidence for its validity, its current applications and its future relevance to the rapidly expanding field of functional neuroimaging. Before presenting the evidence for a non-BOLD component of endogenous functional contrast, and to enable a more critical review for the nonexpert reader, we begin by reviewing the fundamental principles underlying BOLD theory. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

  4. A cost-effective nanoporous ultrathin film electrode based on nanoporous gold/IrO2 composite for proton exchange membrane water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yachao; Guo, Xiaoqian; Shao, Zhigang; Yu, Hongmei; Song, Wei; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Hongjie; Yi, Baolian

    2017-02-01

    A cost-effective nanoporous ultrathin film (NPUF) electrode based on nanoporous gold (NPG)/IrO2 composite has been constructed for proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysis. The electrode was fabricated by integrating IrO2 nanoparticles into NPG through a facile dealloying and thermal decomposition method. The NPUF electrode is featured in its 3D interconnected nanoporosity and ultrathin thickness. The nanoporous ultrathin architecture is binder-free and beneficial for improving electrochemical active surface area, enhancing mass transport and facilitating releasing of oxygen produced during water electrolysis. Serving as anode, a single cell performance of 1.728 V (@ 2 A cm-2) has been achieved by NPUF electrode with a loading of IrO2 and Au at 86.43 and 100.0 μg cm-2 respectively, the electrolysis voltage is 58 mV lower than that of conventional electrode with an Ir loading an order of magnitude higher. The electrolysis voltage kept relatively constant up to 300 h (@250 mA cm-2) during the course of durability test, manifesting that NPUF electrode is promising for gas evolution.

  5. Water-assisted and thermally-enhanced protonic conduction in HZSM-5, effect of gamma-irradiation on the electric properties. [Zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higazy, A.A.; Kassem, M.E. (Qatar Univ. (Qatar). Physics Dept.); Sayed, M.B. (Qatar Univ. (Qatar). Chemistry Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the a.c. conductivity of the zeolite HZSM-5, in the 0.1-100 kHz frequency region and the 300-700 K temperature range, reveals semiconducting features based predominantly on an ionic mechanism. This is reflected in a low-frequency Cole-Cole dependence of the Z''(Z') impedance and in a linear dependence of the {epsilon}''(''epsilon''') dielectric constant throughout the temperature range. The zeolite Broensted sites are the active centers responsible for the ionic conduction. As the conductivity drops to 373 K, sorbed water seems to participate in the conduction as a vehicle assisting the proton mobility. Above 373 K, the conductivity continues to rise as an indication of critical transition into a thermally enhanced ionic conduction. Both low-temperature sorbed water and high-temperature thermal motion are necessary to ensure a firm contact at the aggregate surfaces, where conduction takes place. Gamma-irradiation also participates in the conduction by creating new sites sensitive to the same parameters governing the conduction mechanism. (author).

  6. DIFFUSIVE-Magnetoresistance(DMR) Proton(PMR)/Hydrogen-ion WATER: PRE-``Fert''/``Grunberg'' GMR[and CMR]: Quo-Vadis ``Honesty''???: PLAGIARISM!!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fart, Albart; Gruntbug, Peter; Siegel, Edward

    2011-03-01

    Proton/Hydrogen-ion Diffusive-Magnetoresistance(DMR) of Siegel[APS March-Mtgs.(70s)] based upon Siegel[Int'l. Conf. Mag.-Alloys and Oxides("ICMAO"), The Technion(77); J. Mag. Mag. Mtls. 7, 312(78)] FIRST experimental-discovery of GMR and FIRST theoretical prediction of CMR[ibid. 7, 338 (78)], facilitates NEW water production in global-warming exacerbated dry arid/semi-arid regions: Only HYDROGEN is/can be "FLYING-WATER"!!! (aka "chemical-rain-in-pipelines"). EMET/TRUTH-in-the-``SEANCES'', would-be "Sciences": C. Perelman-Corredoira [Against the Tide(07)] featuring Martin-Bradshaw ["Healing the SHAME That BINDS You"(80s)] systemic sociological-dysfunctionality(S-D), and Grigory Perelman's HEROIC ETHICS (refusal of both pure-maths Poincare-conjecture proof 2007 Fields-medal and 2010 Clay-Institute so-called/media-hyped/P.Red/spin-doctored millennium-prize million-dollar would-be award, militates as well in the current "SEANCE" of physics/maths politics/media-hype/P.R /spin-doctoring VS. Siegel FIRST experimental GMR a never-acknowledged full decade PRE-"Fert"(88) /"Grunberg(89)" ``Phales-GroPE''/Thompson-CSF/ KFZ-JEWlich 2007 physics Wolf/Japan/Nobel-prizes!!!

  7. Proton beam monitor chamber calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomà, C; Meer, D; Safai, S; Lorentini, S

    2014-01-01

    The first goal of this paper is to clarify the reference conditions for the reference dosimetry of clinical proton beams. A clear distinction is made between proton beam delivery systems which should be calibrated with a spread-out Bragg peak field and those that should be calibrated with a (pseudo-)monoenergetic proton beam. For the latter, this paper also compares two independent dosimetry techniques to calibrate the beam monitor chambers: absolute dosimetry (of the number of protons exiting the nozzle) with a Faraday cup and reference dosimetry (i.e. determination of the absorbed dose to water under IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions) with an ionization chamber. To compare the two techniques, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to convert dose-to-water to proton fluence. A good agreement was found between the Faraday cup technique and the reference dosimetry with a plane-parallel ionization chamber. The differences—of the order of 3%—were found to be within the uncertainty of the comparison. For cylindrical ionization chambers, however, the agreement was only possible when positioning the effective point of measurement of the chamber at the reference measurement depth—i.e. not complying with IAEA TRS-398 recommendations. In conclusion, for cylindrical ionization chambers, IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions for monoenergetic proton beams led to a systematic error in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, especially relevant for low-energy proton beams. To overcome this problem, the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers should be taken into account when positioning the reference point of the chamber. Within the current IAEA TRS-398 recommendations, it seems advisable to use plane-parallel ionization chambers—rather than cylindrical chambers—for the reference dosimetry of pseudo-monoenergetic proton beams. (paper)

  8. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  9. Calorimetric determination of enthalpies for the proton ionization of N,N-bis[2-hydroxyethyl]-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (BES) and N-tris[hydroxymethyl]methyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (TES) in water-methanol mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, B.N.; Jumean, F.H.

    2004-01-01

    The enthalpies of proton ionization of the biochemical buffers N,N-bis[2-hydroxyethyl]-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (BES) and N-tris[hydroxymethyl]methyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (TES) were obtained in water-methanol mixtures in which the methanol mole fraction (X m ) varied in the range 0-0.36. For both buffers, ionization enthalpy for the first proton (ΔH 1 ) was small in all solvent media. However, upon addition of methanol, ΔH 2 increased steadily from 22.2 to a maximum of 27.2 kJ mol -1 for BES, whereas for TES it varied from 30.0 to 32.4, with a minimum of 28.6 kJ mol -1 at X m =0.123. It is noteworthy that this solvent composition lies within the region of maximum structure enhancement of water by methanol. The results were interpreted in terms of methanol-water interactions

  10. High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity, Polymer-type Membranes Based on Disulfonated Poly(arylene ether) Block and Random Copolymers Optionally Incorporating Protonic Conducting Layered Water insoluble Zirconium Fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, James E.; Baird, Donald G.

    2010-06-03

    Our research group has been engaged in the past few years in the synthesis of biphenol based partially disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) random copolymers as potential PEMs. This series of polymers are named as BPSH-xx, where BP stands for biphenol, S stands for sulfonated, H stands for acidified and xx represents the degree of disulfonation. All of these sulfonated copolymers phase separate to form nano scale hydrophilic and hydrophobic morphological domains. The hydrophilic phase containing the sulfonic acid moieties causes the copolymer to absorb water. Water confined in hydrophilic pores in concert with the sulfonic acid groups serve the critical function of proton (ion) conduction and water transport in these systems. Both Nafion and BPSH show high proton conductivity at fully hydrated conditions. However proton transport is especially limited at low hydration level for the BPSH random copolymer. It has been observed that the diffusion coefficients of both water and protons change with the water content of the pore. This change in proton and water transport mechanisms with hydration level has been attributed to the solvation of the acid groups and the amount of bound and bulk-like water within a pore. At low hydration levels most of the water is tightly associated with sulfonic groups and has a low diffusion coefficient. This tends to encourage isolated domain morphology. Thus, although there may be significant concentrations of protons, the transport is limited by the discontinuous morphological structure. Hence the challenge lies in how to modify the chemistry of the polymers to obtain significant protonic conductivity at low hydration levels. This may be possible if one can alter the chemical structure to synthesize nanophase separated ion containing block copolymers. Unlike the BPSH copolymers, where the sulfonic acid groups are randomly distributed along the chain, the multiblock copolymers will feature an ordered sequence of hydrophilic and

  11. Transverse relaxation dispersion of the p7 membrane channel from hepatitis C virus reveals conformational breathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, Jyoti; Brüschweiler, Sven [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Ouyang, Bo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology (China); Chou, James J., E-mail: james-chou@hms.harvard.edu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The p7 membrane protein encoded by hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembles into a homo-hexamer that selectively conducts cations. An earlier solution NMR structure of the hexameric complex revealed a funnel-like architecture and suggests that a ring of conserved asparagines near the narrow end of the funnel are important for cation interaction. NMR based drug-binding experiments also suggest that rimantadine can allosterically inhibit ion conduction via a molecular wedge mechanism. These results suggest the presence of dilation and contraction of the funnel tip that are important for channel activity and that the action of the drug is attenuating this motion. Here, we determined the conformational dynamics and solvent accessibility of the p7 channel. The proton exchange measurements show that the cavity-lining residues are largely water accessible, consistent with the overall funnel shape of the channel. Our relaxation dispersion data show that residues Val7 and Leu8 near the asparagine ring are subject to large chemical exchange, suggesting significant intrinsic channel breathing at the tip of the funnel. Moreover, the hinge regions connecting the narrow and wide regions of the funnel show strong relaxation dispersion and these regions are the binding sites for rimantadine. Presence of rimantadine decreases the conformational dynamics near the asparagine ring and the hinge area. Our data provide direct observation of μs–ms dynamics of the p7 channel and support the molecular wedge mechanism of rimantadine inhibition of the HCV p7 channel.

  12. Ultrahigh relaxivity and safe probes of manganese oxide nanoparticles for in vivo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, J; Tian, X M; Yang, C; Liu, P; Luo, N Q; Liang, Y; Li, H B; Chen, D H; Wang, C X; Li, L; Yang, G W

    2013-12-05

    Mn-based nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as new class of probes for magnetic resonance imaging due to the impressive contrast ability. However, the reported Mn-based NPs possess low relaxivity and there are no immunotoxicity data regarding Mn-based NPs as contrast agents. Here, we demonstrate the ultrahigh relaxivity of water protons of 8.26 mM(-1) s(-1) from the Mn3O4 NPs synthesized by a simple and green technique, which is twice higher than that of commercial gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents (4.11 mM(-1) s(-1)) and the highest value reported to date for Mn-based NPs. We for the first time demonstrate these Mn3O4 NPs biocompatibilities both in vitro and in vivo are satisfactory based on systematical studies of the intrinsic toxicity including cell viability of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells, normal nasopharyngeal epithelium, apoptosis in cells and in vivo immunotoxicity. These findings pave the way for the practical clinical diagnosis of Mn based NPs as safe probes for in vivo imaging.

  13. Towards quantitative measurements of relaxation times and other parameters in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tofts, P.S.; Du Boulay, E.P.G.H.

    1990-01-01

    The nature and physical significance of the relaxation times T1 and T2 and of proton density are described. Methods of measuring T1 and T2 are discussed with emphasis on the establishment of precision and the maintenance of accuracy. Reported standards of success are briefly reviewed. We expect sensitivities of the order of 1% to be achievable in serial studies. Although early hopes of disease diagnosis by tissue characterisation were not realised, strict scientific method and careful calibration have made it pracitcable to apply relaxation time measurement to research into disease process. Serial measurements in patients and correlation with similar studies in animal models, biopsy results and autopsy material taken together have provided new knowledge about cerebral oedema, water compartmentation, alcoholism and the natural history of multiple sclerosis. There are prospects of using measurement to monitor treatment in other diseases with diffuse brain abnormalities invisible on the usual images. Secondarily derived parameters and notably the quantification of blood-brain barrier defect after injection of Gadolinium-DTPA also offer prospects of valuable data. (orig.)

  14. Transverse relaxation dispersion of the p7 membrane channel from hepatitis C virus reveals conformational breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, Jyoti; Brüschweiler, Sven; Ouyang, Bo; Chou, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The p7 membrane protein encoded by hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembles into a homo-hexamer that selectively conducts cations. An earlier solution NMR structure of the hexameric complex revealed a funnel-like architecture and suggests that a ring of conserved asparagines near the narrow end of the funnel are important for cation interaction. NMR based drug-binding experiments also suggest that rimantadine can allosterically inhibit ion conduction via a molecular wedge mechanism. These results suggest the presence of dilation and contraction of the funnel tip that are important for channel activity and that the action of the drug is attenuating this motion. Here, we determined the conformational dynamics and solvent accessibility of the p7 channel. The proton exchange measurements show that the cavity-lining residues are largely water accessible, consistent with the overall funnel shape of the channel. Our relaxation dispersion data show that residues Val7 and Leu8 near the asparagine ring are subject to large chemical exchange, suggesting significant intrinsic channel breathing at the tip of the funnel. Moreover, the hinge regions connecting the narrow and wide regions of the funnel show strong relaxation dispersion and these regions are the binding sites for rimantadine. Presence of rimantadine decreases the conformational dynamics near the asparagine ring and the hinge area. Our data provide direct observation of μs–ms dynamics of the p7 channel and support the molecular wedge mechanism of rimantadine inhibition of the HCV p7 channel

  15. Experimental study on the influence of clamping pressure on proton exchange membrane water electrolyzer (PEMWE) cell’s characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Cui, Xiaoti; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    Energy transition can be led by more hydrogen production. Hydrogen offers a clean, sustainable, and flexible option for overcoming different obstacles that face the low-carbon economy [1]. PEMWE is one of the most promising candidate technologies to produce hydrogen from renewable energy sources...... with the circulating water. In the recent few years, PEMWE’s R&D has inched towards; operating conditions; such as increased operating temperature and cathode-anode high differential pressure operation, flow field design, stack development, and numerical modelling [2,3]. In this work the effect of clamping pressure...... on the PEMWE cell characteristics’; performance, conductivity, hydrogen and water cross-over through the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is studied. A 50 cm2 active area PEMWE cell with double serpentine flow field channels for the anode and cathode side is used. Measurements are carried out at constant cell...

  16. Magnetic-relaxation method of analysis of inorganic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popel', A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic-relaxation method is considered of the quantitative analysis of inorganic substances based on time dependence of magnetic nuclei relaxation on the quantity of paramagnetic centres in a solution. The characteristic is given of some methods of measuring nuclear magnetic relaxation times: method of weak oscillation generator and pulse methods. The effect of temperature, general solution viscosity, diamagnetic salt concentration, medium acidity on nuclear relaxation velocity is described. The determination sensitivity is estimated and the means of its increase definable concentration intervals and method selectivity are considered. The method application when studying complexing in the solution is described. A particular attention is given to the investigation of heteroligand homocentre, heterocentre and protonated complexes as well as to the problems of particle exchange of the first coordination sphere with particles from the mass of solution. The equations for equilibrium constant calculation in different systems are given. Possibilities of determining diamagnetic ions by the magnetic-relaxation method using paramagnetic indicators are confirmed by the quantitative analysis of indium, gallium, thorium and scandium in their salt solutions

  17. Electrochemical performance of Ni/TiO{sub 2} hollow sphere in proton exchange membrane water electrolyzers system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Jayeeta; Srivastava, Rohit; Srivastava, Prem Kumar [Birla Institute of Technology, Jharkhand (India)

    2013-08-15

    This work presents the electrocatalytic evaluation of Ni/TiO{sub 2} hollow sphere materials in PEM water electrolysis cell. All the electrocatalysts have shown remarkably enhanced electrocatalytic properties in comparison with their performance in aqueous electrolysis cell. According to cyclic voltammetric results, 0.36 A cm{sup −2} peak current density has been exhibited in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) from 30 wt% Ni/TiO{sub 2} electrocatalyst. 15 wt% Ni-doped titania sample has shown the best result in oxygen evolution reaction (OER) with the anodic peak current density of 0.3 A cm{sup −2}. In the anodic polarization curves, the performance of 15 wt% Ni/TiO{sub 2} hollow sphere electrocatalyst was evaluated up to 140 mA cm{sup −2} at comparatively lower over-potential value. 20 wt% Ni/TiO{sub 2} hollow sphere electrocatalyst has also shown electrochemical stability in PEM water electrolyzer for 48 h long analysis. The comparative electrocatalytic behavior of hollow spherical materials with non-sphericals is also presented, which clearly shows the influence of hollow spherical structure in greater electrocatalytic activity of the materials. The physical characterization of all the hollow spherical materials is presented in this work, which has confirmed their better electrochemical behavior in PEM water electrolyzer.

  18. Electrochemical performance of Ni/TiO_2 hollow sphere in proton exchange membrane water electrolyzers system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, Jayeeta; Srivastava, Rohit; Srivastava, Prem Kumar

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the electrocatalytic evaluation of Ni/TiO_2 hollow sphere materials in PEM water electrolysis cell. All the electrocatalysts have shown remarkably enhanced electrocatalytic properties in comparison with their performance in aqueous electrolysis cell. According to cyclic voltammetric results, 0.36 A cm"−"2 peak current density has been exhibited in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) from 30 wt% Ni/TiO_2 electrocatalyst. 15 wt% Ni-doped titania sample has shown the best result in oxygen evolution reaction (OER) with the anodic peak current density of 0.3 A cm"−"2. In the anodic polarization curves, the performance of 15 wt% Ni/TiO_2 hollow sphere electrocatalyst was evaluated up to 140 mA cm"−"2 at comparatively lower over-potential value. 20 wt% Ni/TiO_2 hollow sphere electrocatalyst has also shown electrochemical stability in PEM water electrolyzer for 48 h long analysis. The comparative electrocatalytic behavior of hollow spherical materials with non-sphericals is also presented, which clearly shows the influence of hollow spherical structure in greater electrocatalytic activity of the materials. The physical characterization of all the hollow spherical materials is presented in this work, which has confirmed their better electrochemical behavior in PEM water electrolyzer

  19. Proton diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Allen, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Lindhard theory on ion channeling in crystals has been widely accepted throughout ion beam analysis for use in simulating such experiments. The simulations use a Monte Carlo method developed by Barret, which utilises the classical 'billiard ball' theory of ions 'bouncing' between planes or tubes of atoms in the crystal. This theory is not valid for 'thin' crystals where the planes or strings of atoms can no longer be assumed to be of infinite proportions. We propose that a theory similar to that used for high energy electron diffraction can be applied to MeV ions, especially protons, in thin crystals to simulate the intensities of transmission channeling and of RBS spectra. The diffraction theory is based on a Bloch wave solution of the Schroedinger equation for an ion passing through the periodic crystal potential. The widely used universal potential for proton-nucleus scattering is used to construct the crystal potential. Absorption due to thermal diffuse scattering is included. Experimental parameters such as convergence angle, beam tilt and scanning directions are considered in our calculations. Comparison between theory and experiment is encouraging and suggests that further work is justified. (authors)

  20. Accurate Quantitation of Water-amide Proton Exchange Rates Using the Phase-Modulated CLEAN Chemical EXchange (CLEANEX-PM) Approach with a Fast-HSQC (FHSQC) Detection Scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Tsang-Lin; Zijl, Peter C.M. van; Mori, Susumu

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of exchange rates between water and NH protons by magnetization transfer methods is often complicated by artifacts, such as intramolecular NOEs, and/or TOCSY transfer from Cα protons coincident with the water frequency, or exchange-relayed NOEs from fast exchanging hydroxyl or amine protons. By applying the Phase-Modulated CLEAN chemical EXchange (CLEANEX-PM) spin-locking sequence, 135 o (x) 120 o (-x) 110 o (x) 110 o (-x) 120 o (x) 135 o (-x) during the mixing period, these artifacts can be eliminated, revealing an unambiguous water-NH exchange spectrum. In this paper, the CLEANEX-PM mixing scheme is combined with Fast-HSQC (FHSQC) detection and used to obtain accurate chemical exchange rates from the initial slope analysis for a sample of 15N labeled staphylococcal nuclease. The results are compared to rates obtained using Water EXchange filter (WEX) II-FHSQC, and spin-echo-filtered WEX II-FHSQC measurements, and clearly identify the spurious NOE contributions in the exchange system

  1. Heat Effect of the Protonation of Glycine and the Enthalpies of Resolvation of Participating Chemical Species in Water-Dimethylsulfoxide Solvent Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaeva, V. A.; Sharnin, V. A.

    2018-02-01

    Enthalpies of the protonation of glycine in water‒dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) mixed solvents are determined calorimetrically in the range of DMSO mole fractions of 0.0 to 0.9, at T = 298.15 K and an ionic strength μ = 0.3 (NaClO4). It is established that the protonation of glycine becomes more exothermic with an increasing mole fraction of DMSO, and the enthalpies of resolvation of glycine and glycinium ions in water‒DMSO solvent mixtures are calculated. It is shown that the small changes in the enthalpy of protonation observed at low mole fractions of DMSO are caused by the contributions from the solvation of proton and protonated glycine cancelling each other out. The enthalpy term of the Gibbs energy of the reaction leading to the formation of glycinium ion is estimated along with the enthalpy of resolvation of the reacting species in the water‒DMSO mixed solvent.

  2. Dielectric relaxation in Yb-doped SrZrO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamishima, O; Abe, Y; Ishii, T; Kawamura, J; Hattori, T

    2004-01-01

    The dielectric constant of the proton conductor SrZr 1-x Yb x O 3 (x 0-0.1) was measured as a function of temperature and frequency. Two well-defined relaxation peaks were observed in SrZrO 3 doped with more than 1 mol% of Yb. The assignment of the two dielectric relaxations is discussed in terms of IR spectra and by free energy calculation for a miscibility of dopant Yb ions. The Yb concentration dependence of the relaxation strength of the two dielectric relaxations is in agreement with the results calculated from the free energy. The two relaxations can be assigned to a reorientation of a single Yb-OH dipole and of Yb-OH dipoles associated with Yb-clusters. The attractive energy for Yb-clustering in SrZrO 3 is evaluated at about -85 meV

  3. Thermodynamic evaluation and modeling of proton and water exchange associated with benzamidine and berenil binding to ß-trypsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Pereira

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Serine-proteases are involved in vital processes in virtually all species. They are important targets for researchers studying the relationships between protein structure and activity, for the rational design of new pharmaceuticals. Trypsin was used as a model to assess a possible differential contribution of hydration water to the binding of two synthetic inhibitors. Thermodynamic parameters for the association of bovine ß-trypsin (homogeneous material, observed 23,294.4 ± 0.2 Da, theoretical 23,292.5 Da with the inhibitors benzamidine and berenil at pH 8.0, 25ºC and with 25 mM CaCl2, were determined using isothermal titration calorimetry and the osmotic stress method. The association constant for berenil was about 12 times higher compared to the one for benzamidine (binding constants are K = 596,599 ± 25,057 and 49,513 ± 2,732 M-1, respectively; the number of binding sites is the same for both ligands, N = 0.99 ± 0.05. Apparently the driving force responsible for this large difference of affinity is not due to hydrophobic interactions because the variation in heat capacity (DCp, a characteristic signature of these interactions, was similar in both systems tested (-464.7 ± 23.9 and -477.1 ± 86.8 J K-1 mol-1 for berenil and benzamidine, respectively. The results also indicated that the enzyme has a net gain of about 21 water molecules regardless of the inhibitor tested. It was shown that the difference in affinity could be due to a larger number of interactions between berenil and the enzyme based on computational modeling. The data support the view that pharmaceuticals derived from benzamidine that enable hydrogen bond formation outside the catalytic binding pocket of ß-trypsin may result in more effective inhibitors.

  4. Characterization of creatine guanidinium proton exchange by water-exchange (WEX) spectroscopy for absolute-pH CEST imaging in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerke, Steffen; Zaiss, Moritz; Bachert, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) enables indirect detection of small metabolites in tissue by MR imaging. To optimize and interpret creatine-CEST imaging we characterized the dependence of the exchange-rate constant k(sw) of creatine guanidinium protons in aqueous creatine solutions as a function of pH and temperature T in vitro. Model solutions in the low pH range (pH = 5-6.4) were measured by means of water-exchange (WEX)-filtered ¹H NMR spectroscopy on a 3 T whole-body MR tomograph. An extension of the Arrhenius equation with effective base-catalyzed Arrhenius parameters yielded a general expression for k(sw) (pH, T). The defining parameters were identified as the effective base-catalyzed rate constant k(b,eff) (298.15 K) = (3.009 ± 0.16) × 10⁹  Hz l/mol and the effective activation energy E(A,b,eff)  = (32.27 ± 7.43) kJ/mol at a buffer concentration of c(buffer)  = (1/15) M. As expected, a strong dependence of k(sw) on temperature was observed. The extrapolation of the exchange-rate constant to in vivo conditions (pH = 7.1, T = 37 °C) led to the value of the exchange-rate constant k(sw)  = 1499 Hz. With the explicit function k(sw) (pH, T) available, absolute-pH CEST imaging could be realized and experimentally verified in vitro. By means of our calibration method it is possible to adjust the guanidinium proton exchange-rate constant k(sw) to any desired value by preparing creatine model solutions with a specific pH and temperature. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Relaxed states with plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avinash, K.; Taylor, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    In the theory of relaxation, a turbulent plasma reaches a state of minimum energy subject to constant magnetic helicity. In this state the plasma velocity is zero. Attempts have been made by introducing a number of different constraints, to obtain relaxed states with plasma flow. It is shown that these alternative constraints depend on two self-helicities, one for ions, and one for electrons. However, whereas there are strong arguments for the effective invariance of the original magnetic-helicity, these arguments do not apply to the self-helicities. Consequently the existence of relaxed states with flow remains in doubt. (author)

  6. Proton imaging apparatus for proton therapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipala, V.; Lo Presti, D.; Brianzi, M.; Civinini, C.; Bruzzi, M.; Scaringella, M.; Talamonti, C.; Bucciolini, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Randazzo, N.; Stancampiano, C.; Tesi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy with protons, due to the physical properties of these particles, offers several advantages for cancer therapy as compared to the traditional radiotherapy and photons. In the clinical use of proton beams, a p CT (Proton Computer Tomography) apparatus can contribute to improve the accuracy of the patient positioning and dose distribution calculation. In this paper a p CT apparatus built by the Prima (Proton Imaging) Italian Collaboration will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  7. Proton radioactivity from proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, F.; Goncalves, M.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Garcia, F.; Rodriguez, O.

    1999-03-01

    Half-lives for proton emission from proton-rich nuclei have been calculated by using the effective liquid drop model of heavy-particle decay of nuclei. It is shown that this model is able to offer results or spontaneous proton-emission half-life-values in excellent agreement with the existing experimental data. Predictions of half-life-values for other possible proton-emission cases are present for null orbital angular momentum. (author)

  8. Preliminary study on 2-dimensional distributions of 10B reaction rate in a water phantom with boron-doped CR-39 for 7Li(p, n)7Be neutrons by 1.95 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Tsuruta, T.

    2000-01-01

    In an Accelerator-based neutron irradiation field using 7 Li(p, n) 7 Be neutrons by 1.95 MeV protons, the distributions of 10 B reaction rates and thermal neutron fluence in a water phantom were measured using Boron-doped CR-39 and Au activation analysis, respectively. Comparing the results of the measurements, we discussed the validity of the evaluation method of 10 B reaction rate using thermal neutron fluence. (author)

  9. Short echo time proton spectroscopy of the brain in healthy volunteers using an insert gradient head coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Danielsen, E R; Schneider, M

    1995-01-01

    An insert gradient head coil with built-in X, Y, and Z gradients was used for localized proton spectroscopy in the brain of healthy volunteers, using short echo time stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequences. Volume of interest size was 3.4 ml, repetition time was 6.0 s, and echo times...... were 10 and 20 ms, respectively. Good quality proton spectra with practically no eddy current artefacts were acquired allowing observation of strongly coupled compounds, and compounds with short T2 relaxation times. The gradient head coil thus permits further studies of compounds such as glutamine....../glutamate and myo-inositols. These compounds were more prominent within grey matter than within white matter. Rough estimations of metabolite concentrations using water as an internal standard were in good agreement with previous reports....

  10. Structural and dynamical characterization of piroxicam by 1H- and 13C-NMR relaxation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, C.; Casini, A.; Picchi, M.P.; Laschi, F.; Calabria, A.; Marcolongo, R.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon spin-lattice relaxation rates of anti-inflammatory drug, piroxicam, have been measured. These results have been used in determining the reorientational rates of the proton carbon vectors. An analysis of internal motions within the pyridinyl moiety of piroxicam was carried out. Selective proton-carbon nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) measurements were made in order to determine the solution structure of piroxicam. The effect of indirect NOE arising from exchangeable protons has been analyzed and considered. 20 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  11. Relaxed states of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucinski, M.Y.; Okano, V.

    1993-01-01

    The relaxed states of tokamak plasmas are studied. It is assumed that the plasma relaxes to a quasi-steady state which is characterized by a minimum entropy production rate, compatible with a number of prescribed conditions and pressure balance. A poloidal current arises naturally due to the anisotropic resistivity. The minimum entropy production theory is applied, assuming the pressure equilibrium as fundamental constraint on the final state. (L.C.J.A.)

  12. Negative magnetic relaxation in superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoperov E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was observed that the trapped magnetic moment of HTS tablets or annuli increases in time (negative relaxation if they are not completely magnetized by a pulsed magnetic field. It is shown, in the framework of the Bean critical-state model, that the radial temperature gradient appearing in tablets or annuli during a pulsed field magnetization can explain the negative magnetic relaxation in the superconductor.

  13. Relaxation effects in ferrous complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolini, C.; Mathieu, J.P.; Chappert, J.

    1976-01-01

    The slow relaxation mechanism of the Fe 2+ ion in the tri-fluorinated TF(acac) and hexafluorinated HF(acac) complexes of Fe(II) acetylacetonate was investigated. The 300K and 77K Moessbauer spectra for TF(acac) consist in a slightly asymmetric quadrupole doublet. On the contrary, at 4.2K the higher energy line is strongly widened; that is typical of a slowing down in the electron relaxation frequency [fr

  14. Dielectric properties of residual water in amorphous lyophilized mixtures of sugar and drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moznine, R El [School of Pharmacy, De Montfort University, Leiceste (United Kingdom); Smith, G [School of Pharmacy, De Montfort University, Leicester (United Kingdom); Polygalov, E [School of Pharmacy, De Montfort University, Leicester (United Kingdom); Suherman, P M [School of Pharmacy, De Montfort University, Leicester (United Kingdom); Broadhead, J [AstraZeneca Charnwood R and D, Bakewell Rd, Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-21

    Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy was used to investigate the properties of residual water in lyophilized formulations of a proprietary tri-phosphate drug containing a sugar (trehalose, lactose or sucrose) or dextran. The dielectric properties of each formulation were determined in the frequency range (0.1 Hz-0.1 MHz) and temperature range (30 deg. C-T{sub g}). The temperature dependence of the relaxation times for all samples showed Arrhenuis behaviour, from which the activation energy was derived. Proton hopping through the hydrogen-bonded network (clusters) of water molecules was suggested as the principle mode of charge transport. Significant differences in dielectric relaxation kinetics and activation energy were observed for the different formulations, which were found to correlate with the amount of monophosphate degradation product.

  15. Paraffin molecule mobility in channel clathrates of urea on spectroscopic NMR relaxation data

    CERN Document Server

    Kriger, Y G; Chekhova, G N

    2001-01-01

    The temperature dependences of the protons spin-lattice relaxation time (T sub I) in the channel clathrates of urea with paraffins are measured. The data on the T sub I are interpreted within the frames of the model of the paraffins molecules and their fragments orientation in the clathrate channels. The dynamics peculiarities are connected with the disproportion effects of these compounds

  16. Niobium–niobium oxide multilayered coatings for corrosion protection of proton-irradiated liquid water targets for ["1"8F] production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skliarova, Hanna; Renzelli, Marco; Azzolini, Oscar; Felicis, Daniele de; Bemporad, Edoardo; Johnson, Richard R.; Palmieri, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Chemically inert coatings on Havar"® entrance foils of the targets for ["1"8F] production via proton irradiation of enriched water at pressurized conditions are needed to decrease the amount of ionic contaminants released from Havar"®. During current investigation, magnetron sputtered niobium and niobium oxide were chosen as the candidates for protective coatings because of their superior chemical resistance. Aluminated quartz substrates allowed us to verify the protection efficiency of the desirable coatings as diffusion barriers. Two modeling corrosion tests based on the extreme susceptibility of aluminum to liquid gallium and acid corrosion were applied. As far as niobium coatings obtained by magnetron sputtering are columnar, the grain boundaries provide a fast diffusion path for active species of corrosive media to penetrate and to corrode the substrate. Amorphous niobium oxide films obtained by reactive magnetron sputtering showed superior barrier properties according to the corrosion tests performed. In order to prevent degrading of brittle niobium oxide at high pressures, multilayers combining high ductility of niobium with superior diffusion barrier efficiency of niobium oxide were proposed. The intercalation of niobium oxide interlayers was proved to interrupt the columnar grain growth of niobium during sputtering, resulting in improved diffusion barrier efficiency of obtained multilayers. The thin layer multilayer coating architecture with 70 nm bi-layer thickness was found preferential because of higher thermal stability. - Highlights: • Diffusion barrier efficiency of niobium, niobium oxide and their multilayers was studied. • The intercalation of niobium oxide layers interrupted the columnar grain growth of niobium. • The bilayer architectures influenced the stability of the multilayer coatings. • The thin layer multilayer coating with 70 nm double-layer was found superior.

  17. Water equivalent thickness of immobilization devices in proton therapy planning - Modelling at treatment planning and validation by measurements with a multi-layer ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellin, Francesco; Righetto, Roberto; Fava, Giovanni; Trevisan, Diego; Amelio, Dante; Farace, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the range errors made in treatment planning due to the presence of the immobilization devices along the proton beam path. The measured water equivalent thickness (WET) of selected devices was measured by a high-energy spot and a multi-layer ionization chamber and compared with that predicted by treatment planning system (TPS). Two treatment couches, two thermoplastic masks (both un-stretched and stretched) and one headrest were selected. At TPS, every immobilization device was modelled as being part of the patient. The following parameters were assessed: CT acquisition protocol, dose-calculation grid-sizes (1.5 and 3.0mm) and beam-entrance with respect to the devices (coplanar and non-coplanar). Finally, the potential errors produced by a wrong manual separation between treatment couch and the CT table (not present during treatment) were investigated. In the thermoplastic mask, there was a clear effect due to beam entrance, a moderate effect due to the CT protocols and almost no effect due to TPS grid-size, with 1mm errors observed only when thick un-stretched portions were crossed by non-coplanar beams. In the treatment couches the WET errors were negligible (0.5mm with a 3.0mm grid-size. In the headrest, WET errors were negligible (0.2mm). With only one exception (un-stretched mask, non-coplanar beams), the WET of all the immobilization devices was properly modelled by the TPS. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Niobium–niobium oxide multilayered coatings for corrosion protection of proton-irradiated liquid water targets for [{sup 18}F] production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skliarova, Hanna, E-mail: Hanna.Skliarova@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Renzelli, Marco, E-mail: marco.renzelli@uniroma3.it [University of Rome “Roma TRE”, Via della Vasca Navale, 79, 00146 Rome (Italy); Azzolini, Oscar, E-mail: Oscar.Azzolini@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); Felicis, Daniele de, E-mail: daniele.defelicis@uniroma3.it [University of Rome “Roma TRE”, Via della Vasca Navale, 79, 00146 Rome (Italy); Bemporad, Edoardo, E-mail: edoardo.bemporad@uniroma3.it [University of Rome “Roma TRE”, Via della Vasca Navale, 79, 00146 Rome (Italy); Johnson, Richard R., E-mail: richard.johnson@teambest.com [BEST Cyclotron Systems Inc., 8765 Ash Street Unit 7, Vancouver BC V6P 6T3 (Canada); Palmieri, Vincenzo, E-mail: Vincenzo.Palmieri@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); University of Padua, Padua (Italy)

    2015-09-30

    Chemically inert coatings on Havar{sup ®} entrance foils of the targets for [{sup 18}F] production via proton irradiation of enriched water at pressurized conditions are needed to decrease the amount of ionic contaminants released from Havar{sup ®}. During current investigation, magnetron sputtered niobium and niobium oxide were chosen as the candidates for protective coatings because of their superior chemical resistance. Aluminated quartz substrates allowed us to verify the protection efficiency of the desirable coatings as diffusion barriers. Two modeling corrosion tests based on the extreme susceptibility of aluminum to liquid gallium and acid corrosion were applied. As far as niobium coatings obtained by magnetron sputtering are columnar, the grain boundaries provide a fast diffusion path for active species of corrosive media to penetrate and to corrode the substrate. Amorphous niobium oxide films obtained by reactive magnetron sputtering showed superior barrier properties according to the corrosion tests performed. In order to prevent degrading of brittle niobium oxide at high pressures, multilayers combining high ductility of niobium with superior diffusion barrier efficiency of niobium oxide were proposed. The intercalation of niobium oxide interlayers was proved to interrupt the columnar grain growth of niobium during sputtering, resulting in improved diffusion barrier efficiency of obtained multilayers. The thin layer multilayer coating architecture with 70 nm bi-layer thickness was found preferential because of higher thermal stability. - Highlights: • Diffusion barrier efficiency of niobium, niobium oxide and their multilayers was studied. • The intercalation of niobium oxide layers interrupted the columnar grain growth of niobium. • The bilayer architectures influenced the stability of the multilayer coatings. • The thin layer multilayer coating with 70 nm double-layer was found superior.

  19. Nuclear relaxation and critical fluctuations in membranes containing cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Harden

    2009-04-01

    Nuclear resonance frequencies in bilayer membranes depend on lipid composition. Our calculations describe the combined effects of composition fluctuations and diffusion on nuclear relaxation near a miscibility critical point. Both tracer and gradient diffusion are included. The calculations involve correlation functions and a correlation length ξ =ξ0T/(T -Tc), where T -Tc is temperature above the critical temperature and ξ0 is a parameter of molecular length. Several correlation functions are examined, each of which is related in some degree to the Ising model correlation function. These correlation functions are used in the calculation of transverse deuterium relaxation rates in magic angle spinning and quadrupole echo experiments. The calculations are compared with experiments that report maxima in deuterium and proton nuclear relaxation rates at the critical temperature [Veatch et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 17650 (2007)]. One Ising-model-related correlation function yields a maximum 1/T2 relaxation rate at the critical temperature for both magic angle spinning and quadrupole echo experiments. The calculated rates at the critical temperature are close to the experimental rates. The rate maxima involve relatively rapid tracer diffusion in a static composition gradient over distances of up to 10-100 nm.

  20. Reflexogenic relaxation gastroduodenography by the acupuncture method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabkin, I.Kh.; Tsibulyak, V.N.; Mnatsakyan, K.A.; Kondorskaya, I.L.; Galkina, T.V.

    The communication is based upon the results of x-ray examination of the stomach and duodenum in 63 patients with stenoses of the pyloroduodenal zone, cicatrical deformities of the duodenal bulb, bulbar ulcer, duodenal organic lesions, and functional stenosis of the loop. First a routine X-ray examination of the stomach and duodenum was performed using barium-water mixture, then followed acupuncture aimed at hypotension in the definite points of the floor of the auricle where branches of the vagus innervating the stomach and duodenum are located. As distinct from pharmacological relaxation this method produces a purpose-oriented selective effect.

  1. Reflexogenic relaxation gastroduodenography by the acupuncture method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabkin, I.Kh.; Tsibulyak, V.N.; Mnatsakyan, K.A.; Kondorskaya, I.L.; Galkina, T.V.

    1985-01-01

    The communication is based upon the results of x-ray examination of the stomach and duodenum in 63 patients with stenoses of the pyloroduodenal zone, cicatrical deformities of the duodenal bulb, bulbar ulcer, duodenal organic lesions, and functional stenosis of the loop. First a routine X-ray examination of the stomach and duodenum was performed using barium-water mixture, than followed acupuncture aimed at hypotension in the definite points of the floor of the auricle where branches of the vagus innervating the stomach and duodenum are located. As distinct from pharmacological relaxation this method produces a purpose-oriented selective effect

  2. Proton movies

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A humorous short film made by three secondary school students received an award at a Geneva film festival. Even without millions of dollars or Hollywood stars at your disposal, it is still possible to make a good science fiction film about CERN. That is what three students from the Collège Madame de Staël in Carouge, near Geneva, demonstrated. For their amateur short film on the LHC, they were commended by the jury of the video and multimedia festival for schools organised by the "Media in education" service of the Canton of Geneva’s Public Education Department. The film is a spoof of a television news report on the LHC start-up. In sequences full of humour and imagination, the reporter conducts interviews with a very serious "Professor Sairne", some protons preparing for their voyage and even the neutrons that were rejected by the LHC. "We got the idea of making a film about CERN at the end of the summer," explains Lucinda Päsche, one of the three students. "We did o...

  3. SU-F-I-63: Relaxation Times of Lipid Resonances in NAFLD Animal Model Using Enhanced Curve Fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, K-H; Yoo, C-H; Lim, S-I; Choe, B-Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to evaluate the relaxation time of methylene resonance in comparison with other lipid resonances. Methods: The examinations were performed on a 3.0T MRI scanner using a four-channel animal coil. Eight more Sprague-Dawley rats in the same baseline weight range were housed with ad libitum access to water and a high-fat (HF) diet (60% fat, 20% protein, and 20% carbohydrate). In order to avoid large blood vessels, a voxel (0.8×0.8×0.8 cm{sup 3}) was placed in a homogeneous area of the liver parenchyma during free breathing. Lipid relaxations in NC and HF diet rats were estimated at a fixed repetition time (TR) of 6000 msec, and multi echo time (TEs) of 40–220 msec. All spectra for data measurement were processed using the Advanced Method for Accurate, Robust, and Efficient Spectral (AMARES) fitting algorithm of the Java-based Magnetic Resonance User Interface (jMRUI) package. Results: The mean T2 relaxation time of the methylene resonance in normal-chow diet was 37.1 msec (M{sub 0}, 2.9±0.5), with a standard deviation of 4.3 msec. The mean T2 relaxation time of the methylene resonance was 31.4 msec (M{sub 0}, 3.7±0.3), with a standard deviation of 1.8 msec. The T2 relaxation times of methylene protons were higher in normal-chow diet rats than in HF rats (p<0.05), and the extrapolated M{sub 0} values were higher in HF rats than in NC rats (p<0.005). The excellent linear fit with R{sup 2}>0.9971 and R{sup 2}>0.9987 indicates T2 relaxation decay curves with mono-exponential function. Conclusion: In in vivo, a sufficient spectral resolution and a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be achieved, so that the data measured over short TE values can be extrapolated back to TE = 0 to produce better estimates of the relative weights of the spectral components. In the short term, treating the effective decay rate as exponential is an adequate approximation.

  4. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  5. First report of vertically aligned (Sn,Ir)O2:F solid solution nanotubes: Highly efficient and robust oxygen evolution electrocatalysts for proton exchange membrane based water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadge, Shrinath Dattatray; Patel, Prasad P.; Datta, Moni K.; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; Shanthi, Pavithra M.; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2018-07-01

    One dimensional (1D) vertically aligned nanotubes (VANTs) of (Sn0.8Ir0.2)O2:10F are synthesized for the first time by a sacrificial template assisted approach. The aim is to enhance the electrocatalytic activity of F doped (Sn,Ir)O2 solid solution electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) based water electrolysis by generating (Sn0.8Ir0.2)O2:10F nanotubes (NTs). The 1D vertical channels and the high electrochemically active surface area (ECSA ∼38.46 m2g-1) provide for facile electron transport. This results in low surface charge transfer resistance (4.2 Ω cm2), low Tafel slope (58.8 mV dec-1) and excellent electrochemical OER performance with ∼2.3 and ∼2.6 fold higher electrocatalytic activity than 2D thin films of (Sn0.8Ir0.2)O2:10F and benchmark IrO2 electrocatalysts, respectively. Furthermore, (Sn0.8Ir0.2)O2:10F NTs exhibit excellent mass activity (21.67 A g-1), specific activity (0.0056 mAcm-2) and TOF (0.016 s-1), which is ∼2-2.6 fold higher than thin film electrocatalysts at an overpotential of 270 mV, with a total mass loading of 0.3 mg cm-2. In addition, (Sn0.8Ir0.2)O2:10F NTs demonstrate remarkable electrochemical durability - comparable to thin films of (Sn0.8Ir0.2)O2:10F and pure IrO2, operated under identical testing conditions in PEM water electrolysis. These results therefore indicate promise of (Sn0.8Ir0.2)O2:10F NTs as OER electrocatalysts for efficient and sustainable hydrogen production.

  6. Heavy-water (D2O) take-up-induced lattice expansion in the high-temperature proton conductor Ba3Ca1.18Nb1.82O9-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papathanassopoulos, K.; Wenzl, H.; Schober, T.

    1997-01-01

    Dimensional changes of the high-temperature proton conductor Ba 3 Ca 1.18 Nb 1.82 O 9-δ , when exposed to D 2 O vapor, were investigated using length-change and precision density measurements. Such information is essential for possible applications of proton conductors in solid oxide fuel cells and humidity and hydrogen sensors. A linear increase of the sample lengths with increases in the deuterium content was observed. Comparison of the present D 2 O data with those that were previously obtained for H 2 O showed that there was a small isotope effect in the lattice expansion. The fact that the length-change-versus-hydrogen-isotope-concentration curves were almost isotope independent supported the validity of the take-up reaction H 2 O(g) + V sm-bulletsm-bullet O + O x O right-reversible 2OH sm-bullet O , where V O is the vacancies in the oxygen sublattice and OH sm-bullet O is the proton that are embedded in the electron cloud of an oxygen atom. In regard to the latter equation, it was found that small islands of silver, palladium, nickel, and platinum act as catalytic promoters of the reaction and lead, for given heavy-water-steam exposure conditions, to an increase of water absorption of up to 100%, when compared with samples without the catalytic surface layers

  7. Muon spin relaxation by electronic excitations moving in one dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jestaedt, Th.; Sivia, D.S.; Cox, S.F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The manner in which an electronic spin, executing a linear random walk, e.g. along a polymer chain, depolarizes a muon (or proton) probe spin, is investigated by computer simulation. The essential features of the model are the assumptions of a contact hyperfine interaction with limited range and of loss of coherence between successive encounters. The low dimensionality of the motion is reflected in the shape of the relaxation functions generated, which depart significantly from simple exponentials. Fits to various functional forms are examined for different combinations of hop rate and chain length, hyperfine constant and applied magnetic field

  8. Coupling fast water exchange to slow molecular tumbling in Gd3+ chelates: why faster is not always better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avedano, Stefano; Botta, Mauro; Haigh, Julian S; Longo, Dario L; Woods, Mark

    2013-08-05

    The influence of dynamics on solution state structure is a widely overlooked consideration in chemistry. Variations in Gd(3+) chelate hydration with changing coordination geometry and dissociative water exchange kinetics substantially impact the effectiveness (or relaxivity) of monohydrated Gd(3+) chelates as T1-shortening contrast agents for MRI. Theory shows that relaxivity is highly dependent upon the Gd(3+)-water proton distance (rGdH), and yet this distance is almost never considered as a variable in assessing the relaxivity of a Gd(3+) chelate as a potential contrast agent. The consequence of this omission can be seen when considering the relaxivity of isomeric Gd(3+) chelates that exhibit different dissociative water exchange kinetics. The results described herein show that the relaxivity of a chelate with "optimal" dissociative water exchange kinetics is actually lower than that of an isomeric chelate with "suboptimal" dissociative water exchange. When the rate of molecular tumbling of these chelates is slowed, an approach that has long been understood to increase relaxivity, the observed difference in relaxivity is increased with the more rapidly exchanging ("optimal") chelate exhibiting lower relaxivity than the "suboptimally" exchanging isomer. The difference between the chelates arises from a non-field-dependent parameter: either the hydration number (q) or rGdH. For solution state Gd(3+) chelates, changes in the values of q and rGdH are indistinguishable. These parametric expressions simply describe the hydration state of the chelate--i.e., the number and position of closely associating water molecules. The hydration state (q/rGdH(6)) of a chelate is intrinsically linked to its dissociative water exchange rate kex, and the interrelation of these parameters must be considered when examining the relaxivity of Gd(3+) chelates. The data presented herein indicate that the changes in the hydration parameter (q/rGdH(6)) associated with changing dissociative

  9. Peeling mode relaxation ELM model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimblett, C. G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses an approach to modelling Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) in which toroidal peeling modes are envisaged to initiate a constrained relaxation of the tokamak outer region plasma. Relaxation produces both a flattened edge current profile (which tends to further destabilise a peeling mode), and a plasma-vacuum negative current sheet which has a counteracting stabilising influence; the balance that is struck between these two effects determines the radial extent (rE) of the ELM relaxed region. The model is sensitive to the precise position of the mode rational surfaces to the plasma surface and hence there is a 'deterministic scatter' in the results that has an accord with experimental data. The toroidal peeling stability criterion involves the edge pressure, and using this in conjunction with predictions of rE allows us to evaluate the ELM energy losses and compare with experiment. Predictions of trends with the edge safety factor and collisionality are also made

  10. Hydrogen-1 NMR relaxation time studies in membrane: anesthetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, L.M.A.; Fraceto, L.; Paula, E. de; Franzoni, L.; Spisni, A.

    1997-01-01

    The study of local anesthetics'(LA) interaction with model phospholipid membranes is justified by the direct correlation between anesthetic's hydrophobicity and its potency/toxicity. By the same reason, uncharged LA species seems to play a crucial role in anesthesia. Most clinically used LA are small amphiphilics with a protonated amine group (pKa around 8). Although both charged (protonated) and uncharged forms can coexist at physiological pH, it has been shown (Lee, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 514:95, 1978; Screier et al. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 769:231, 1984) that the real anesthetic pka can be down-shifted, due to differential partition into membranes, increasing the ratio of uncharged species at pH 7.4. We have measured 1 H-NMR longitudinal relaxation times (T 1 ) for phospholipid and three local anesthetics (tetracaine, lidocaine, benzocaine), in sonicated vesicles at a 3:1 molar ratio. All the LA protons have shown smaller T 1 in this system than in isotropic phases, reflecting LA immobilization caused by insertion in the membrane. T 1 values for the lipid protons in the presence of LA were analyzed, in an attempt to identify specific LA:lipid contact regions. (author)

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema. Time course of /sup 1/H-NMR relaxation times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naruse, S; Horikawa, Y; Tanaka, C; Hirakawa, K; Nishikawa, H [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1981-06-01

    1. The state of water in normal and edematous brain tissue was studied by measurement of proton longitudinal (T/sub 1/) and transverse (T/sub 2/) relaxation times using pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. 2. In control rats, T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ of water showed one component, which was more fast in white matter. Those values displayed 1.07 - 1.18 sec. of T/sub 1/ and 75 - 76 msec. of T/sub 2/. 3. When rat brain was injured by cold, T/sub 1/ was observed to become longer (1.18 - 1.27 sec.), and T/sub 2/ was observed be separated into two components, the faster T/sub 2/ (45 - 50 msec.) and slower T/sub 2/ (100 - 105 msec.), in both gray and white matter of the injured side. 4. In triethyltin (TET) induced brain edema, elongation of T/sub 1/ (1.2 sec.) and remarkable separation of T/sub 2/, faster T/sub 2/ (75 msec.) and slower T/sub 2/ (400 - 450 msec.), were observed in white matter. 5. In both cold and TET induced edema, slower T/sub 2/ fraction is suggested to be the extracellular space and faster T/sub 2/ fraction, intracellular. 6. T/sub 2/ changes precede the water content changes in cold injury, and parallel in TET induced edema. Those changes of relaxation times are reversible. 7. T/sub 2/ changes of water is more sensitive than the T/sub 1/ for the detection of production and disappearance of brain edema. 8. These results disclose the dynamic movements of water during the course of brain edema and offered significant information of the clinical application of NMR-CT.

  12. Protonation and structural/chemical stability of Ln{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} ceramics vs. H{sub 2}O/CO{sub 2}: High temperature/water pressure ageing tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upasen, S. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 8233, MONARIS, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS-IP2CT, UMR 8233, MONARIS, F-75005 Paris (France); Batocchi, P.; Mauvy, F. [ICMCB, ICMCB-CNRS-IUT-Université de Bordeaux, 33608 Pessac Cedex (France); Slodczyk, A. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 8233, MONARIS, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS-IP2CT, UMR 8233, MONARIS, F-75005 Paris (France); Colomban, Ph., E-mail: philippe.colomban@upmc.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 8233, MONARIS, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS-IP2CT, UMR 8233, MONARIS, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • High temperature/water pressure autoclave is used to study the reaction/corrosion at SOFC/HTSE electrode. • High stability of Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} (PNO) and Nd{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} (NNO) dense ceramics vs. water pressure is demonstrated. • Protonated rare-earth nickelates retain the perovskite-type structure and their H-content is determined. • Very low laser illumination power is required to avoid RE nickelate phase transition. • Nickelates show increasing stability from La to Pr/Nd vs. CO{sub 2}-rich high temperature water vapor. - Abstract: Mixed ionic-electronic conductors (MIEC) such as rare-earth nickelates with a general formula Ln{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} (Ln = La, Pr, Nd) appear as potential for energy production and storage systems: fuel cells, electrolysers and CO{sub 2} converters. Since a good electrode material should exhibit important stability in operating conditions, the structural and chemical stability of different nickelate-based, well-densified ceramics have been studied using various techniques: TGA, dilatometry, XRD, Raman scattering and IR spectroscopy. Consequently, La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} (LNO), Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} (PNO) and Nd{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} (NNO) have been exposed during 5 days to high water vapor pressure (40 bar) at intermediate temperature (550 °C) in an autoclave device, the used water being almost free or saturated with CO{sub 2}. Such protonation process offers an accelerating stability test and allows the choice of the most pertinent composition for industrial applications requiring a selected material with important life-time. In order to understand any eventual change of crystal structure, the ceramics were investigated in as-prepared, pristine state as well as after protonation and deprotonation (due to thermal treatment till 1000 °C under dry atmosphere). The results show the presence of traces or second phases originating from undesirable hydroxylation and carbonation, detected in the near

  13. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  14. Water network-mediated, electron-induced proton transfer in [C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N ⋅ (H{sub 2}O){sub n}]{sup −} clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeBlase, Andrew F.; Wolke, Conrad T.; Johnson, Mark A., E-mail: jordan@pitt.edu, E-mail: nhammer@olemiss.edu, E-mail: mark.johnson@yale.edu [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, P.O. Box 208107, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Weddle, Gary H. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, P.O. Box 208107, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Fairfield University, 1073 North Benson Road, Fairfield, Connecticut 06824 (United States); Archer, Kaye A.; Jordan, Kenneth D., E-mail: jordan@pitt.edu, E-mail: nhammer@olemiss.edu, E-mail: mark.johnson@yale.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, 219 Parkman Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Kelly, John T.; Tschumper, Gregory S.; Hammer, Nathan I., E-mail: jordan@pitt.edu, E-mail: nhammer@olemiss.edu, E-mail: mark.johnson@yale.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi 38677 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    The role of proton-assisted charge accommodation in electron capture by a heterocyclic electron scavenger is investigated through theoretical analysis of the vibrational spectra of cold, gas phase [Py ⋅ (H{sub 2}O){sub n=3−5}]{sup −} clusters. These radical anions are formed when an excess electron is attached to water clusters containing a single pyridine (Py) molecule in a supersonic jet ion source. Under these conditions, the cluster ion distribution starts promptly at n = 3, and the photoelectron spectra, combined with vibrational predissociation spectra of the Ar-tagged anions, establish that for n > 3, these species are best described as hydrated hydroxide ions with the neutral pyridinium radical, PyH{sup (0)}, occupying one of the primary solvation sites of the OH{sup −}. The n = 3 cluster appears to be a special case where charge localization on Py and hydroxide is nearly isoenergetic, and the nature of this species is explored with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations of the trajectories that start from metastable arrangements of the anion based on a diffuse, essentially dipole-bound electron. These calculations indicate that the reaction proceeds via a relatively slow rearrangement of the water network to create a favorable hydration configuration around the water molecule that eventually donates a proton to the Py nitrogen atom to yield the product hydroxide ion. The correlation between the degree of excess charge localization and the evolving shape of the water network revealed by this approach thus provides a microscopic picture of the “solvent coordinate” at the heart of a prototypical proton-coupled electron transfer reaction.

  15. Sparse-view proton computed tomography using modulated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byungjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, 110–746 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, 138–736 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, 410–769 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungyong [Proton Therapy Center, McLaren Cancer Institute, Flint, Michigan 48532 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proton imaging that uses a modulated proton beam and an intensity detector allows a relatively fast image acquisition compared to the imaging approach based on a trajectory tracking detector. In addition, it requires a relatively simple implementation in a conventional proton therapy equipment. The model of geometric straight ray assumed in conventional computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction is however challenged by multiple-Coulomb scattering and energy straggling in the proton imaging. Radiation dose to the patient is another important issue that has to be taken care of for practical applications. In this work, the authors have investigated iterative image reconstructions after a deconvolution of the sparsely view-sampled data to address these issues in proton CT. Methods: Proton projection images were acquired using the modulated proton beams and the EBT2 film as an intensity detector. Four electron-density cylinders representing normal soft tissues and bone were used as imaged object and scanned at 40 views that are equally separated over 360°. Digitized film images were converted to water-equivalent thickness by use of an empirically derived conversion curve. For improving the image quality, a deconvolution-based image deblurring with an empirically acquired point spread function was employed. They have implemented iterative image reconstruction algorithms such as adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS), superiorization method–projection onto convex sets (SM-POCS), superiorization method–expectation maximization (SM-EM), and expectation maximization-total variation minimization (EM-TV). Performance of the four image reconstruction algorithms was analyzed and compared quantitatively via contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and root-mean-square-error (RMSE). Results: Objects of higher electron density have been reconstructed more accurately than those of lower density objects. The bone, for example, has been reconstructed

  16. Proton therapy device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention concerns a proton therapy device using a proton linear accelerator which produces a proton beam with high energies and intensities. The invention lies in actual fact that the proton beam which is produced by the linear accelerator is deflected from 270 deg in its plan by a deflecting magnetic device towards a patient support including a bed the longitudinal axis of which is parallel to the proton beam leaving the linear accelerator. The patient support and the deflecting device turn together around the proton beam axis while the bed stays in an horizontal position. The invention applies to radiotherapy. 6 refs., 5 figs

  17. Scalar Similarity for Relaxed Eddy Accumulation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Johannes; Thomas, Christoph; Foken, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    The relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method allows the measurement of trace gas fluxes when no fast sensors are available for eddy covariance measurements. The flux parameterisation used in REA is based on the assumption of scalar similarity, i.e., similarity of the turbulent exchange of two scalar quantities. In this study changes in scalar similarity between carbon dioxide, sonic temperature and water vapour were assessed using scalar correlation coefficients and spectral analysis. The influence on REA measurements was assessed by simulation. The evaluation is based on observations over grassland, irrigated cotton plantation and spruce forest. Scalar similarity between carbon dioxide, sonic temperature and water vapour showed a distinct diurnal pattern and change within the day. Poor scalar similarity was found to be linked to dissimilarities in the energy contained in the low frequency part of the turbulent spectra ( definition.

  18. Nuclear magnetic relaxation of methyl group in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blicharska, B.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical description of the relaxation process of methyl group in liquids and some results of the measurements of relaxation function and relaxation times for cryoprotective solutions are presented. Starting from the application of the operator formalism the general equation for spin operators e.g. components of the nuclear spin and magnetization is founded. Next, the spin Hamiltonian is presented as contraction of the symmetry adapted spherical tensors as well as the correlation functions and spectral densities. On the basis of extended and modified Woessner model of motion the correlation functions and spectral densities are calculated for methyl group in liquids. Using these functions the relaxation matrix elements, the spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times can be expressed. The prediction of the theory agrees with author's previous experiments on cryoprotective solutions. The observed dependence on temperature, frequency and isotopic dilution in methanol-water, methanol-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and DMSO-water solutions is in a satisfactory agreement with theoretical equations. 34 refs. (author)

  19. A diffusion model-free framework with echo time dependence for free-water elimination and brain tissue microstructure characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Romero, Miguel; Gómez, Pedro A; Sperl, Jonathan I; Czisch, Michael; Sämann, Philipp G; Jones, Derek K; Menzel, Marion I; Menze, Bjoern H

    2018-03-23

    The compartmental nature of brain tissue microstructure is typically studied by diffusion MRI, MR relaxometry or their correlation. Diffusion MRI relies on signal representations or biophysical models, while MR relaxometry and correlation studies are based on regularized inverse Laplace transforms (ILTs). Here we introduce a general framework for characterizing microstructure that does not depend on diffusion modeling and replaces ill-posed ILTs with blind source separation (BSS). This framework yields proton density, relaxation times, volume fractions, and signal disentanglement, allowing for separation of the free-water component. Diffusion experiments repeated for several different echo times, contain entangled diffusion and relaxation compartmental information. These can be disentangled by BSS using a physically constrained nonnegative matrix factorization. Computer simulations, phantom studies, together with repeatability and reproducibility experiments demonstrated that BSS is capable of estimating proton density, compartmental volume fractions and transversal relaxations. In vivo results proved its potential to correct for free-water contamination and to estimate tissue parameters. Formulation of the diffusion-relaxation dependence as a BSS problem introduces a new framework for studying microstructure compartmentalization, and a novel tool for free-water elimination. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Similarities between intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in RNA kissing complexes found by means of cross-correlated relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, Jens; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    The bond lengths and dynamics of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in an RNA kissing complex have been characterized by determining the NMR relaxation rates of various double- and triple-quantum coherences that involve an imino proton and two neighboring nitrogen-15 nuclei belonging to opposite bases. New experiments allow one to determine the chemical shift anisotropy of the imino protons. The bond lengths derived from dipolar relaxation and the lack of modulations of the nitrogen chemical shifts indicate that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds which hold the kissing complex together are very similar to the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the double-stranded stem of the RNA

  1. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  2. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samain, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author)

  3. Anisotropic spin relaxation in graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, N.; Tanabe, S.; Veligura, A.; Jozsa, C.; Popinciuc, M.; Jonkman, H. T.; van Wees, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    Spin relaxation in graphene is investigated in electrical graphene spin valve devices in the nonlocal geometry. Ferromagnetic electrodes with in-plane magnetizations inject spins parallel to the graphene layer. They are subject to Hanle spin precession under a magnetic field B applied perpendicular

  4. Stochastic and Chaotic Relaxation Oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Roerdink, J.B.T.M.

    1988-01-01

    For relaxation oscillators stochastic and chaotic dynamics are investigated. The effect of random perturbations upon the period is computed. For an extended system with additional state variables chaotic behavior can be expected. As an example, the Van der Pol oscillator is changed into a

  5. Tensions relaxation in Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuniberti, A.M.; Picasso, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    Traction and stress relaxation studies were performed on polycrystalline Zry-4 at room temperature. The effect of loading velocity on the plastic behaviour of the material is discussed, analysing log σ vs. log dε/dt at different deformation levels. The contribution introduced by the testing machine was taken into account in data evaluation. (Author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Oxidation of SO2 and formation of water droplets under irradiation of 20MeV protons in N2/H2O/SO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomita, Shigeo; Nakai, Yoichi; Funada, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    We have performed an experiment on charged droplet formation in a humidified N2 gas with trace SO2 concentration and induced by 20MeV proton irradiation. It is thought that SO2 reacts with the chemical species, such as OH radicals, generated through the reactions triggered by N2+ production. Both...

  7. Sleep, Stress & Relaxation: Rejuvenate Body & Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep, Stress & Relaxation: Rejuvenate Body & Mind; Relieve Stress; best ways to relieve stress; best way to relieve stress; different ways to relieve stress; does smoking relieve stress; does tobacco relieve stress; how can I relieve stress; how can you relieve stress; how do I relieve stress; reduce stress; does smoking reduce stress; how can I reduce stress; how to reduce stress; reduce stress; reduce stress levels; reducing stress; smoking reduce stress; smoking reduces stress; stress reducing techniques; techniques to reduce stress; stress relief; best stress relief; natural stress relief; need stress relief; relief for stress; relief from stress; relief of stress; smoking and stress relief; smoking for stress relief; smoking stress relief; deal with stress; dealing with stress; dealing with anger; dealing with stress; different ways of dealing with stress; help dealing with stress; how to deal with anger; how to deal with stress; how to deal with stress when quitting smoking; stress management; free stress management; how can you manage stress; how do you manage stress; how to manage stress; manage stress; management of stress; management stress; managing stress; strategies for managing stress; coping with stress; cope with stress; copeing with stress; coping and stress; coping skills for stress; coping strategies for stress; coping strategies with stress; coping strategy for stress; coping with stress; coping with stress and anxiety; emotional health; emotional health; emotional health article; emotional health articles; deep relaxation; deep breathing relaxation techniques; deep muscle relaxation; deep relaxation; deep relaxation meditation; deep relaxation technique; deep relaxation techniques; meditation exercises; mindful exercises; mindful meditation exercises; online relaxation exercises; relaxation breathing exercises; relaxation exercise; relaxation exercises; stress relaxation; methods of relaxation for stress; relax stress; relax techniques stress

  8. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  9. Baryon production in proton-proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, F.M.; Werner, K.

    2002-01-01

    Motivated by the recent rapidity spectra of baryons and antibaryons in pp collisions at 158 GeV and the Ω-bar/Ω ratio discussion, we reviewed string formation mechanism and some string models. This investigation told us how color strings are formed in ultrarelativistic proton-proton collisions

  10. Calorimetric determination of enthalpies for the proton ionization of N,N-bis[2-hydroxyethyl]-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (BES) and N-tris[hydroxymethyl]methyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (TES) in water-methanol mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulos, B.N.; Jumean, F.H

    2004-02-19

    The enthalpies of proton ionization of the biochemical buffers N,N-bis[2-hydroxyethyl]-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (BES) and N-tris[hydroxymethyl]methyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (TES) were obtained in water-methanol mixtures in which the methanol mole fraction (X{sub m}) varied in the range 0-0.36. For both buffers, ionization enthalpy for the first proton ({delta}H{sub 1}) was small in all solvent media. However, upon addition of methanol, {delta}H{sub 2} increased steadily from 22.2 to a maximum of 27.2 kJ mol{sup -1} for BES, whereas for TES it varied from 30.0 to 32.4, with a minimum of 28.6 kJ mol{sup -1} at X{sub m}=0.123. It is noteworthy that this solvent composition lies within the region of maximum structure enhancement of water by methanol. The results were interpreted in terms of methanol-water interactions.

  11. Modeling the outflow of liquid with initial supercritical parameters using the relaxation model for condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lezhnin Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-temperature model of the outflow from a vessel with initial supercritical parameters of medium has been realized. The model uses thermodynamic non-equilibrium relaxation approach to describe phase transitions. Based on a new asymptotic model for computing the relaxation time, the outflow of water with supercritical initial pressure and super- and subcritical temperatures has been calculated.

  12. Three-way modelling of NMR relaxation profiles from thawed cod muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristina Nedenskov; Guldager, Helle Skov; Jørgensen, Bo Munk

    2002-01-01

    Low-field 1H nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation was used to measure water mobility and distribution in cod stored at -20°C or -30°C for up to 12 months and subsequently from 0 to 21 days in modified atmosphere at +2°C. The relaxation profiles were decomposed by parallel factor analy...

  13. Proton: the particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  14. Proton: The Particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  15. Computation of transverse muon-spin relaxation functions including trapping-detrapping reactions, with application to electron-irradiated tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doering, K.P.; Aurenz, T.; Herlach, D.; Schaefer, H.E.; Arnold, K.P.; Jacobs, W.; Orth, H.; Haas, N.; Seeger, A.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart

    1986-01-01

    A new technique for the economical evaluation of transverse muon spin relaxation functions in situations involving μ + trapping at and detrapping from crystal defects is applied to electron-irradiated Ta exhibiting relaxation maxima at about 35 K, 100 K, and 250 K. The long-range μ + diffusion is shown to be limted by traps over the entire temperature range investigated. The (static) relaxation rates for several possible configurations of trapped muons are discussed, including the effect of the simultaneous presence of a proton in a vacancy. (orig.)

  16. Water permeability of acinar cell membranes in the isolated perfused rabbit mandibular salivary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, M C; Seo, Y; Rawlings, J M; Case, R M

    1990-01-01

    1. The diffusive water permeability of epithelial cell membranes in the perfused rabbit mandibular salivary gland was measured at 37 degrees C by a 1H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation method using an extracellular relaxation reagent, gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd(DTPA)). 2. In glands perfused with a HEPES-buffered solution containing 10 mmol l-1 Gd(DTPA), the spin-lattice (T1) relaxation of the water protons showed two exponential components. The water compartment responsible for the slower component corresponded in magnitude to 71 +/- 5% of the wet weight of the gland, and was attributed to the exchangeable intracellular water of the acinar cells. 3. The rate constant for water efflux from the cells was estimated to be 4.1 +/- 0.1 s-1 which would be consistent with a diffusive membrane permeability (Pd) of approximately 3 x 10(-3) cm s-1. Stimulation with acetylcholine (10(-6) mol l-1) did not cause any detectable change in membrane water permeability. 4. Since the basolateral membrane probably provides the main pathway for water efflux, the osmotic water permeability of this barrier (expressed per gland) was estimated to be less than 6.2 cm3 s-1. This would be insufficient to account for the generation of a near-isosmotic fluid at the flow rates observed during secretion, and suggests that a substantial fraction of the flow of water occurs via a paracellular route. PMID:1966053

  17. Relaxation Techniques to Manage IBS Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for 15–20 seconds and then begin again. Progressive Muscle Relaxation This method of relaxation focuses on ... helpful, please consider supporting IFFGD with a small tax- deductible donation. Make Donation Adapted from IFFGD Publication # ...

  18. Relaxation and Distraction in Experimental Desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, R. O.; Marshall, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Compared experimental desensitization with a procedure that replaced relaxation with a distraction task and with an approach that combined both relaxation and distraction. Desensitization generally was more effective than the other two procedures. (Author)

  19. Relaxation as a Factor in Semantic Desensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, James E.; McNamara, J. Regis

    1975-01-01

    Relaxation and semantic desensitization were used to alleviate the fear of phobic females. Results showed that semantic desensitization, alone or in combination with relaxation, failed to modify the evaluative meanings evoked by the feared object. (SE)

  20. PREFACE: Transport phenomena in proton conducting media Transport phenomena in proton conducting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikerling, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Proton transport phenomena are of paramount importance for acid-base chemistry, energy transduction in biological organisms, corrosion processes, and energy conversion in electrochemical systems such as polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The relevance for such a plethora of materials and systems, and the ever-lasting fascination with the highly concerted nature of underlying processes drive research across disciplines in chemistry, biology, physics and chemical engineering. A proton never travels alone. Proton motion is strongly correlated with its environment, usually comprised of an electrolyte and a solid or soft host material. For the transport in nature's most benign proton solvent and shuttle, water that is, insights from ab initio simulations, matured over the last 15 years, have furnished molecular details of the structural diffusion mechanism of protons. Excess proton movement in water consists of sequences of Eigen-Zundel-Eigen transitions, triggered by hydrogen bond breaking and making in the surrounding water network. Nowadays, there is little debate about the validity of this mechanism in water, which bears a stunning resemblance to the basic mechanistic picture put forward by de Grotthuss in 1806. While strong coupling of an excess proton with degrees of freedom of solvent and host materials facilitates proton motion, this coupling also creates negative synergies. In general, proton mobility in biomaterials and electrochemical proton conducting media is highly sensitive to the abundance and structure of the proton solvent. In polymer electrolyte membranes, in which protons are bound to move in nano-sized water-channels, evaporation of water or local membrane dehydration due to electro-osmotic coupling are well-known phenomena that could dramatically diminish proton conductivity. Contributions in this special issue address various vital aspects of the concerted nature of proton motion and they elucidate important structural and dynamic effects of solvent

  1. Neutron scattering from polarised proton domains

    CERN Document Server

    Van den Brandt, B; Kohbrecher, J; Konter, J A; Mango, S; Glattli, H; Leymarie, E; Grillo, I; May, R P; Jouve, H; Stuhrmann, H B; Stuhrmann, H B; Zimmer, O

    2002-01-01

    Time-dependent small-angle polarised neutron scattering from domains of polarised protons has been observed at the onset of dynamic nuclear polarisation in a frozen solution of 98% deuterated glycerol-water at 1 K containing a small concentration of paramagnetic centres (EHBA-Cr sup V). Simultaneous NMR measurements show that the observed scattering arises from protons around the Cr sup V -ions which are polarised to approx 10% in a few seconds, much faster than the protons in the bulk. (authors)

  2. High-Relaxivity MRI Contrast Agents: Where Coordination Chemistry Meets Medical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Eric J.; Datta, Ankona; Jocher, Christoph J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-01-15

    The desire to improve and expand the scope of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has prompted the search for contrast agents of higher efficiency. The development of better agents requires consideration of the fundamental coordination chemistry of the gadolinium(III) ion and the parameters that affect its efficacy as a proton relaxation agent. In optimizing each parameter, other practical issues such as solubility and in vivo toxicity must also be addressed, making the attainment of safe, high-relaxivity agents a challenging goal. Here we present recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on the hydroxypyridinone family of Gd{sup III} chelates.

  3. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, D. K. [School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5706 (United States); Somphonsane, R. [Department of Physics, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology, Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, the State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-1500 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  4. Calorimetric determination of enthalpy changes for the proton ionization of 3-[N-morpholino]propanesulfonic acid (MOPS), 4-[N-morpholino]butanesulfonic acid (MOBS) and 3-[N-morpholino]-2-hydroxypropanesulfonic acid (MOPSO) in water-methanol mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumean, F.H.; Abdo, N.M.; Khamis, M.I.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Two-stage proton ionizations for three N-substituted sulfonic acid derivatives of morpholine. → ΔH 1 and ΔH 2 in x methanol = 0-0.360 measured for MOPS, MOBS and MOPSO. → In water, ΔH 1 = ±1.2 kJ mol -1 , ΔH 2 range 20.7-26.3 kJ mol -1 . → Methanol addition had little effect on ΔH 1 but ΔH 2 rose steadily to 32.2 kJ mol -1 . → Results related to molecular and solvent parameters. - Abstract: Proton ionization enthalpies for three structurally related biological buffers, each with two ionizable protons, were determined using solution calorimetry. These buffers are 3-[N-morpholino]propanesulfonic acid (MOPS), 4-[N-morpholino]butanesulfonic acid (MOBS) and 3-[N-morpholino]-2-hydroxypropanesulfonic acid (MOPSO). Enthalpies were obtained in water-methanol mixtures with methanol mole fraction (X m ) from 0 to 0.360. The first ionization enthalpy (ΔH 1 ) of all buffers was small (±1.2 kJ mol -1 ) at all solvent compositions. The second ionization enthalpy (ΔH 2 ) increased steadily with X m , rising from 20.7 to 25.6 kJ mol -1 for MOPS, 26.3-31.0 kJ mol -1 for MOBS and 23.5-32.2 kJ mol -1 for MOPSO. The results were compared to those for related biological buffers. The observed variations were interpreted in terms of solvent-solvent and solvent-solute interactions.

  5. Nonlinear Relaxation in Population Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirone, Markus A.; de Pasquale, Ferdinando; Spagnolo, Bernardo

    We analyze the nonlinear relaxation of a complex ecosystem composed of many interacting species. The ecological system is described by generalized Lotka-Volterra equations with a multiplicative noise. The transient dynamics is studied in the framework of the mean field theory and with random interaction between the species. We focus on the statistical properties of the asymptotic behaviour of the time integral of the ith population and on the distribution of the population and of the local field.

  6. Structural relaxation: low temperature properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, F. de la

    1984-01-01

    We discuss the changes in transport and superconducting properties of amorphous Zr 70 Cu 30 , induced by thermal relaxation. The experimental results are used to investigate the relation between the microscopic parameters and the observed physical properties. It is shown that the density of eletronic states determines the shift Tc as well as the variation of the electrical resistivity. It is necessary to assume strong hybridization between s and d bands to understand the eletrodynamic response of the superconductor. (Author) [pt

  7. On the formation of radical dications of protonated amino acids in a "microsolution" of water or acetonitrile and their reactivity towards the solvent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M; Forster, JS; Hvelplund, P

    2001-01-01

    +* in the "microsolution" depends on the energetics of the electron transfer reaction AH2+* +S --> AH++S+*, the hydrogen abstraction reaction AH2+*+S --> AH2(2+)+[S-H]*, and the proton transfer reaction AH2+* + S --> A+*+SH+. Using B3LYP/ 6-311+G(2d,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d) model chemistry, we describe these three reactions...

  8. The Effects of Suggestibility on Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Henry C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Selected undergraduates (N=32) on the basis of Creative Imagination Scale scores and randomly assigned high and low suggestibility subjects to progressive relaxation (PR) and suggestions of relaxation (SR) training modes. Results revealed a significant pre-post relaxation effect, and main efffects for both suggestibility and training mode. (NRB)

  9. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  11. Vibrational relaxation in OCS mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, C.J.S.M.; Gait, P.D.; Simmie, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental measurements are reported of vibrational relaxation times which may be used to show whether there is near resonant vibration-rotation energy transfer between OCS and H 2 , D 2 or HD. Vibrational relaxation times have been measured in OCS and OCS mixtures over the temperature range 360 to 1000 K using a shock tube and a laser schlieren system. The effectiveness of the additives in reducing the relaxation time of OCS is in the order 4 He 3 He 2 2 and HD. Along this series the effect of an increase in temperature changes from the case of speeding up the rate with 4 He to retarding it with D 2 , HD and H 2 . There is no measurable difference in the effectiveness of n-D 2 and o-D 2 and little, or no, difference between n-H 2 and p-H 2 . Thus the experimental results do not give clear evidence for rotational-vibration energy transfer between hydrogen and OCS. This contrasts with the situation for CO 2 + H 2 mixtures. (author)

  12. Relaxed plasma-vacuum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, G.O.; Lortz, D.; Kaiser, R.

    2001-01-01

    Taylor's theory of relaxed toroidal plasmas (states of lowest energy with fixed total magnetic helicity) is extended to include a vacuum between the plasma and the wall. In the extended variational problem, one prescribes, in addition to the helicity and the magnetic fluxes whose conservation follows from the perfect conductivity of the wall, the fluxes whose conservation follows from the assumption that the plasma-vacuum interface is also perfectly conducting (if the wall is a magnetic surface, then one has the toroidal and the poloidal flux in the vacuum). Vanishing of the first energy variation implies a pressureless free-boundary magnetohydrostatic equilibrium with a Beltrami magnetic field in the plasma, and in general with a surface current in the interface. Positivity of the second variation implies that the equilibrium is stable according to ideal magnetohydrodynamics, that it is a relaxed state according to Taylor's theory if the interface is replaced by a wall, and that the surface current is nonzero (at least if there are no closed magnetic field lines in the interface). The plane slab, with suitable boundary conditions to simulate a genuine torus, is investigated in detail. The relaxed state has the same double symmetry as the vessel if, and only if, the prescribed helicity is in an interval that depends on the prescribed fluxes. This interval is determined in the limit of a thin slab

  13. Regularized Label Relaxation Linear Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaozhao; Xu, Yong; Li, Xuelong; Lai, Zhihui; Wong, Wai Keung; Fang, Bingwu

    2018-04-01

    Linear regression (LR) and some of its variants have been widely used for classification problems. Most of these methods assume that during the learning phase, the training samples can be exactly transformed into a strict binary label matrix, which has too little freedom to fit the labels adequately. To address this problem, in this paper, we propose a novel regularized label relaxation LR method, which has the following notable characteristics. First, the proposed method relaxes the strict binary label matrix into a slack variable matrix by introducing a nonnegative label relaxation matrix into LR, which provides more freedom to fit the labels and simultaneously enlarges the margins between different classes as much as possible. Second, the proposed method constructs the class compactness graph based on manifold learning and uses it as the regularization item to avoid the problem of overfitting. The class compactness graph is used to ensure that the samples sharing the same labels can be kept close after they are transformed. Two different algorithms, which are, respectively, based on -norm and -norm loss functions are devised. These two algorithms have compact closed-form solutions in each iteration so that they are easily implemented. Extensive experiments show that these two algorithms outperform the state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of the classification accuracy and running time.

  14. Spherical proton emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, S.; Semmes, P.B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    1997-01-01

    Various theoretical approaches to proton emission from spherical nuclei are investigated, and it is found that all the methods employed give very similar results. The calculated decay widths are found to be qualitatively insensitive to the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential, i.e., changing the potential parameters over a fairly large range typically changes the decay width by no more than a factor of ∼3. Proton half-lives of observed heavy proton emitters are, in general, well reproduced by spherical calculations with the spectroscopic factors calculated in the independent quasiparticle approximation. The quantitative agreement with experimental data obtained in our study requires that the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential be chosen carefully. It also suggests that deformed proton emitters will provide invaluable spectroscopic information on the angular momentum decomposition of single-proton orbitals in deformed nuclei. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  15. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  16. 1H NMR relaxometry as an indicator of setting and water depletion during cement hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Biyun; Faure, Paméla; Thiéry, Mickaël; Baroghel-Bouny, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry has been used to detect setting and microstructure evolution during cement hydration. NMR measurements were performed since casting, during setting and until hardening (from 0 to 3 days). The mobility of water molecules was assessed by an analysis focused on the diagram of longitudinal relaxation time T 1 generated by an Inversion Recovery sequence. The initial stiffening of the solid network was identified by an analysis of the relaxation rate 1/T 1 . The kinetics of water depletion was investigated by using a simple one-pulse acquisition sequence. In parallel, conventional techniques (Vicat needle and temperature monitoring), as well as numerical simulations of hydration, were used to complement and validate these NMR results. Cement pastes and mortars with different water-to-cement ratios made of grey or white OPCs were tested. Furthermore, the effects of the addition of sand, super-plasticizer and silica fume on the hydration kinetics were investigated

  17. Proton solvation and proton transfer in chemical and electrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, S.; Conway, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines the proton solvation and characterization of the H 3 O + ion, proton transfer in chemical ionization processes in solution, continuous proton transfer in conductance processes, and proton transfer in electrode processes. Topics considered include the condition of the proton in solution, the molecular structure of the H 3 O + ion, thermodynamics of proton solvation, overall hydration energy of the proton, hydration of H 3 O + , deuteron solvation, partial molal entropy and volume and the entropy of proton hydration, proton solvation in alcoholic solutions, analogies to electrons in semiconductors, continuous proton transfer in conductance, definition and phenomenology of the unusual mobility of the proton in solution, solvent structure changes in relation to anomalous proton mobility, the kinetics of the proton-transfer event, theories of abnormal proton conductance, and the general theory of the contribution of transfer reactions to overall transport processes

  18. Study of proton radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  19. Proton spectroscopic imaging of polyacrylamide gel dosimeters for absolute radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.S.; Schwarz, A.J.; Leach, M.O.

    2000-01-01

    Proton spectroscopy has been evaluated as a method for quantifying radiation induced changes in polyacrylamide gel dosimeters. A calibration was first performed using BANG-type gel samples receiving uniform doses of 6 MV photons from 0 to 9 Gy in 1 Gy intervals. The peak integral of the acrylic protons belonging to acrylamide and methylenebisacrylamide normalized to the water signal was plotted against absorbed dose. Response was approximately linear within the range 0-7 Gy. A large gel phantom irradiated with three, coplanar 3x3cm square fields to 5.74 Gy at isocentre was then imaged with an echo-filter technique to map the distribution of monomers directly. The image, normalized to the water signal, was converted into an absolute dose map. At the isocentre the measured dose was 5.69 Gy (SD = 0.09) which was in good agreement with the planned dose. The measured dose distribution elsewhere in the sample shows greater errors. A T 2 derived dose map demonstrated a better relative distribution but gave an overestimate of the dose at isocentre of 18%. The data indicate that MR measurements of monomer concentration can complement T 2 -based measurements and can be used to verify absolute dose. Compared with the more usual T 2 measurements for assessing gel polymerization, monomer concentration analysis is less sensitive to parameters such as gel pH and temperature, which can cause ambiguous relaxation time measurements and erroneous absolute dose calculations. (author)

  20. SU-E-J-63: Feasibility Study of Proton Digital Tomosynthesis in Proton Beam Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, B; Kwak, J; Lee, J; Cho, S; Park, S; Yoo, S; Chung, K; Cho, S; Lim, Y; Shin, D; Lee, S; Kim, J

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the feasibility of proton tomosynthesis as daily positioning of patients and compared the results with photon tomosynthesis as an alternative to conventional portal imaging or on-board cone-beam computed tomography. Dedicated photon-like proton beam using the passively scattered proton beams by the cyclotron was generated for proton imaging. The eleven projections were acquired over 30 degree with 3 degree increment in order to investigate the performance of proton tomosynthesis. The cylinder blocks and resolution phantom were used to evaluate imaging performance. Resolution phantom of a cylinder of diameter 12 cm was used to investigate the reconstructed imaging characteristics. Electron density cylinder blocks with diameter of 28 mm and height of 70 mm were employed to assess the imaging quality. The solid water, breast, bone, adipose, lung, muscle, and liver, which were tissue equivalent inserts, were positioned around the resolution phantom. The images were reconstructed by projection onto convex sets (POCS) algorithm and total variation minimization (TVM) methods. The Gafchromic EBT films were utilized for measuring the photon-like proton beams as a proton detector. In addition, the photon tomosynthesis images were obtained for a comparison with proton tomosynthesis images. The same angular sampling data were acquired for both proton and photon tomosynthesis. In the resolution phantom image obtained proton tomosynthesis, down to 1.6 mm diameter rods were resolved visually, although the separation between adjacent rods was less distinct. In contrast, down to 1.2 mm diameter rods were resolved visually in the reconstructed image obtained photon tomosynthesis. Both proton and photon tomosynthesis images were similar in intensities of different density blocks. Our results demonstrated that proton tomosynthesis could make it possible to provide comparable tomography imaging to photon tomosynthesis for positioning as determined by manual registration

  1. Capturing molecular multimode relaxation processes in excitable gases based on decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Kesheng

    2017-08-01

    Existing two-frequency reconstructive methods can only capture primary (single) molecular relaxation processes in excitable gases. In this paper, we present a reconstructive method based on the novel decomposition of frequency-dependent acoustic relaxation spectra to capture the entire molecular multimode relaxation process. This decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra is developed from the frequency-dependent effective specific heat, indicating that a multi-relaxation process is the sum of the interior single-relaxation processes. Based on this decomposition, we can reconstruct the entire multi-relaxation process by capturing the relaxation times and relaxation strengths of N interior single-relaxation processes, using the measurements of acoustic absorption and sound speed at 2N frequencies. Experimental data for the gas mixtures CO2-N2 and CO2-O2 validate our decomposition and reconstruction approach.

  2. Sandpile model for relaxation in complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, A.; Sotolongo-Costa, O.; Brouers, F.

    1997-10-01

    The relaxation in complex systems is, in general, nonexponential. After an initial rapid decay the system relaxes slowly following a long time tail. In the present paper a sandpile moderation of the relaxation in complex systems is analysed. Complexity is introduced by a process of avalanches in the Bethe lattice and a feedback mechanism which leads to slower decay with increasing time. In this way, some features of relaxation in complex systems: long time tails relaxation, aging, and fractal distribution of characteristic times, are obtained by simple computer simulations. (author)

  3. Electrical spectroscopy studies of two new siloxanic proton conducting membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Noto, Vito [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 1, I-35135 Padova (Italy)]. E-mail: vito.dinoto@unipd.it; Vittadello, Michele [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 1, I-35135 Padova (Italy); Zago, Vanni [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 1, I-35135 Padova (Italy); Pace, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 1, I-35135 Padova (Italy); Vidali, Maurizio [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 1, I-35135 Padova (Italy)

    2006-01-20

    This contribution is focused on the conductivity study and the protonic transfer investigation of two new siloxanic membranes. The conductivity of the systems has been studied within the temperature range 5 deg. C {<=} T {<=} 145 deg. C, both for pristine and hydrated membranes. Membrane A has been hydrated up to 33.12% in weight, while in B up to 27.76%. The conductivity of these membranes has shown a temperature dependence of the Arrhenius type variable in the interval 1.6 x 10{sup -4} {<=} {sigma} {sub A} {<=} 2.3 x 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} and 1.3 x 10{sup -5} {<=} {sigma} {sub B} {<=} 2.9 x 10{sup -4} S cm{sup -1}, respectively, for A and B. In particular, conductivities of 2 x 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} (A) and of 2 x 10{sup -4} S cm{sup -1} (B) at 125 deg. C were observed. The conductivity mechanism was investigated by using broad band electrical spectroscopy in the region between 40 Hz and 10 MHz. This study, for both the materials has shown the presence at low frequencies (10{sup 2} {<=} f {sub {beta}} {<=} 10{sup 4} Hz) of {beta} relaxations related to the sulphonic side chain dynamics. The activation energy measured for this molecular dynamics is about {approx_equal}30 kJ mol{sup -1} and corresponds to the typical interaction energy associated with hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, it was observed that the activation energies determined from the conductivity measurements are 12 and 14 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively, for A and B. This shows that the protonic conductivity is strongly influenced by the side chain dynamics and that the charge migration occurs through an ion hopping mechanism between different regions, consisting of micro-clusters of hydration water coordinated with the polar sulphonic groups of the side chains. The comparable activation energies and the values of the conductivity demonstrate that in these systems the conductivity is proportional to the concentration of the sulphonic groups. This shows also that these kinds of membranes, with a high

  4. Electrical spectroscopy studies of two new siloxanic proton conducting membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Noto, Vito; Vittadello, Michele; Zago, Vanni; Pace, Giuseppe; Vidali, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    This contribution is focused on the conductivity study and the protonic transfer investigation of two new siloxanic membranes. The conductivity of the systems has been studied within the temperature range 5 deg. C ≤ T ≤ 145 deg. C, both for pristine and hydrated membranes. Membrane A has been hydrated up to 33.12% in weight, while in B up to 27.76%. The conductivity of these membranes has shown a temperature dependence of the Arrhenius type variable in the interval 1.6 x 10 -4 ≤ σ A ≤ 2.3 x 10 -3 S cm -1 and 1.3 x 10 -5 ≤ σ B ≤ 2.9 x 10 -4 S cm -1 , respectively, for A and B. In particular, conductivities of 2 x 10 -3 S cm -1 (A) and of 2 x 10 -4 S cm -1 (B) at 125 deg. C were observed. The conductivity mechanism was investigated by using broad band electrical spectroscopy in the region between 40 Hz and 10 MHz. This study, for both the materials has shown the presence at low frequencies (10 2 ≤ f β ≤ 10 4 Hz) of β relaxations related to the sulphonic side chain dynamics. The activation energy measured for this molecular dynamics is about ≅30 kJ mol -1 and corresponds to the typical interaction energy associated with hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, it was observed that the activation energies determined from the conductivity measurements are 12 and 14 kJ mol -1 , respectively, for A and B. This shows that the protonic conductivity is strongly influenced by the side chain dynamics and that the charge migration occurs through an ion hopping mechanism between different regions, consisting of micro-clusters of hydration water coordinated with the polar sulphonic groups of the side chains. The comparable activation energies and the values of the conductivity demonstrate that in these systems the conductivity is proportional to the concentration of the sulphonic groups. This shows also that these kinds of membranes, with a high concentration of SO 3 H are necessary in order to obtain materials with a high protonic conductivity with the capacity to

  5. The relationships between suggestibility, influenceability, and relaxability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polczyk, Romuald; Frey, Olga; Szpitalak, Malwina

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the relationships between relaxability and various aspects of suggestibility and influenceability. The Jacobson Progressive Muscle Relaxation procedure was used to induce relaxation. Tests of direct suggestibility, relating to the susceptibility of overt suggestions, and indirect suggestibility, referring to indirect hidden influence, as well as self-description questionnaires on suggestibility and the tendency to comply were used. Thayer's Activation-Deactivation Adjective Check List, measuring various kinds of activation and used as a pre- and posttest, determined the efficacy of the relaxation procedure. Indirect, direct, and self-measured suggestibility proved to be positively related to the ability to relax, measured by Thayer's subscales relating to emotions. Compliance was not related to relaxability. The results are discussed in terms of the aspects of relaxation training connected with suggestibility.

  6. Proton NMR study of α-MnH 0.06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloninin, A. V.; Skripov, A. V.; Buzlukov, A. L.; Antonov, V. E.; Antonova, T. E.

    2004-07-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation rates for the solid solution α-MnH 0.06 have been measured over the temperature range 11-297 K and the resonance frequency range 20-90 MHz. A considerable shift and broadening of the proton NMR line and a sharp peak of the spin-lattice relaxation rate are observed near 130 K. These effects are attributed to the onset of antiferromagnetic ordering below the Néel temperature TN≈130 K. The proton NMR line does not disappear in the antiferromagnetic phase; this suggests a small magnitude of the local magnetic fields at H-sites in α-MnH 0.06. The spin-lattice relaxation rate in the paramagnetic phase is dominated by the effects of spin fluctuations.

  7. Hydrogen bond network relaxation in aqueous polyelectrolyte solutions: the effect of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarti, S; Bordi, F; Truzzolillo, D

    2012-01-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy data over the range 100 MHz-40 GHz allow for a reliable analysis of two of the major relaxation phenomena for polyelectrolytes (PE) in water. Within this range, the dielectric relaxation of pure water is dominated by a near-Debye process at ν = 18.5 GHz corresponding to a relaxation time of τ = 8.4 ps at 25 °C. This mode is commonly attributed to the cooperative relaxation specific to liquids forming a hydrogen bond network (HBN) and arising from long range H-bond-mediated dipole-dipole interactions. The presence of charged polymers in water partially modifies the dielectric characteristics of the orientational water molecule relaxation due to a change of the dielectric constant of water surrounding the charges on the polyion chain. We report experimental results on the effect of the presence of a standard flexible polyelectrolyte (sodium polyacrylate) on the HBN relaxation in water for different temperatures, showing that the HBN relaxation time does not change by increasing the polyelectrolyte density in water, even if relatively high concentrations are reached (0.02 monomol l -1 ≤ C ≤ 0.4 monomol l -1 ). We also find that the effect of PE addition on the HBN relaxation is not even a broadening of its distribution, rather a decrease of the spectral weight that goes beyond the pure volume fraction effect. This extra decrease is larger at low T and less evident at high T, supporting the idea that the correlation length of the water is less affected by the presence of charged flexible chains at high temperatures. (paper)

  8. Monitoring of organic contaminants in sediments using low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Rupert, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    The effective monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts. Recent geophysical methods such as electrical resistivity, complex conductivity, and ground penetrating radar have been successfully applied to characterize organic contaminants in the subsurface and to monitor remediation process both in laboratory and in field. Low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a geophysical tool sensitive to the molecular-scale physical and chemical environment of hydrogen-bearing fluids in geological materials and shows promise as a novel method for monitoring contaminant remediation. This laboratory research focuses on measurements on synthetic samples to determine the sensitivity of NMR to the presence of organic contaminants and improve understanding of relationships between NMR observables, hydrological properties of the sediments, and amount and state of contaminants in porous media. Toluene, a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) has been selected as a representative organic contaminant. Three types of porous media (pure silica sands, montmorillonite clay, and various sand-clay mixtures with different sand/clay ratios) were prepared as synthetic sediments. NMR relaxation time (T2) and diffusion-relaxation (D - T2) correlation measurements were performed in each sediment saturated with water and toluene mixed fluid at assorted concentrations (0% toluene and 100% water, 1% toluene and 99% water, 5% toluene and 95% water, 25% toluene and 75% water, and 100% toluene and 0% water) to 1) understand the effect of different porous media on the NMR responses in each fluid mixture, 2) investigate the role of clay content on T2 relaxation of each fluid, 3) quantify the amount hydrocarbons in the presence of water in each sediment, and 4) resolve hydrocarbons from water in D - T2 map. Relationships between the compositions of porous media, hydrocarbon concentration, and hydraulic

  9. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  10. Effect of cholesterol solubilised in membranes on the interfacial water structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maitra, A.; Patanjali, P.

    1987-01-01

    Cholesterol solubilised in the reverse micellar system of Aerosol OT in isooctane has been found to decrease the hydrophilicity of the surfactant molecule. This has been studied in detail by water proton NMR relaxation measurements in water-Aerosol OT-isooctane with and without cholesterol. It is concluded that the intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the 3β-OH group of cholesterol and the carbonyl ester of Aerosol OT is responsible for the decrease in hydrogen bonding capacity of the latter. (author). 23 refs.; 2 figs

  11. Proton-beam radiation therapy dosimetry standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall, K.P.

    1995-01-01

    Beams of protons have been used for radiation therapy applications for over 40 years. In the last decade the number of facilities treating patients and the total number of patients being treated has begun go grow rapidly. Due to the limited and experimental nature of the early programs, dosimetry protocols tended to be locally defined. With the publication of the AAPM Task Group 20 report open-quotes Protocol for Dosimetry of Heavy Charged Particlesclose quotes and the open-quotes European Code of Practice for Proton-Beam Dosimetryclose quotes the practice of determining dose in proton-beam therapy was somewhat unified. The ICRU has also recently commissioned a report on recommendations for proton-beam dosimetry. There have been three main methods of determining proton dose; the Faraday cup technique, the ionization chamber technique, and the calorimeter technique. For practical reasons the ionization chamber technique has become the most widely used. However, due to large errors in basic parameters (e.g., W-value) is also has a large uncertainty for absolute dose. It has been proposed that the development of water calorimeter absorbed dose standards would reduce the uncertainty in absolute proton dose as well as the relative dose between megavoltage X-ray beams and proton beams. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  12. SU-C-207A-05: Feature Based Water Equivalent Path Length (WEPL) Determination for Proton Radiography by the Technique of Time Resolved Dose Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R; Jee, K; Sharp, G; Flanz, J; Lu, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Studies show that WEPL can be determined from modulated dose rate functions (DRF). However, the previous calibration method based on statistics of the DRF is sensitive to energy mixing of protons due to scattering through different materials (termed as range mixing here), causing inaccuracies in the determination of WEPL. This study intends to explore time-domain features of the DRF to reduce the effect of range mixing in proton radiography (pRG) by this technique. Methods: An amorphous silicon flat panel (PaxScan™ 4030CB, Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA) was placed behind phantoms to measure DRFs from a proton beam modulated by a specially designed modulator wheel. The performance of two methods, the previously used method based on the root mean square (RMS) and the new approach based on time-domain features of the DRF, are compared for retrieving WEPL and RSP from pRG of a Gammex phantom. Results: Calibration by T_8_0 (the time point for 80% of the major peak) was more robust to range mixing and produced WEPL with improved accuracy. The error of RSP was reduced from 8.2% to 1.7% for lung equivalent material, with the mean error for all other materials reduced from 1.2% to 0.7%. The mean error of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of retrieved inserts was decreased from 25.85% to 5.89% for the RMS and T_8_0 method respectively. Monte Carlo simulations in simplified cases also demonstrated that the T_8_0 method is less sensitive to range mixing than the RMS method. Conclusion: WEPL images have been retrieved based on single flat panel measured DRFs, with inaccuracies reduced by exploiting time-domain features as the calibration parameter. The T_8_0 method is validated to be less sensitive to range mixing and can thus retrieve the WEPL values in proximity of interfaces with improved numerical and spatial accuracy for proton radiography.

  13. Temperature dependence of 1H NMR relaxation time, T2, for intact and neoplastic plant tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewa, Czesław J.; Lewa, Maria

    Temperature dependences of the spin-spin proton relaxation time, T2, have been shown for normal and tumorous tissues collected from kalus culture Nicotiana tabacum and from the plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana. For neoplastic plant tissues, time T2 was increased compared to that for intact plants, a finding similar to that for animal and human tissues. The temperature dependences obtained were compared to analogous relations observed with animal tissues.

  14. Curie-type paramagnetic NMR relaxation in the aqueous solution of Ni(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareš, Jiří; Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Lounila, Juhani; Vaara, Juha

    2014-04-21

    Ni(2+)(aq) has been used for many decades as a model system for paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) relaxation studies. More recently, its magnetic properties and also nuclear magnetic relaxation rates have been studied computationally. We have calculated electron paramagnetic resonance and NMR parameters using quantum-mechanical (QM) computation of molecular dynamics snapshots, obtained using a polarizable empirical force field. Statistical averages of hyperfine coupling, g- and zero-field splitting tensors, as well as the pNMR shielding terms, are compared to the available experimental and computational data. In accordance with our previous work, the isotropic hyperfine coupling as well as nuclear shielding values agree well with experimental measurements for the (17)O nuclei of water molecules in the first solvation shell of the nickel ion, whereas larger deviations are found for (1)H centers. We report, for the first time, the Curie-type contribution to the pNMR relaxation rate using QM calculations together with Redfield relaxation theory. The Curie relaxation mechanism is analogous to chemical shift anisotropy relaxation, well-known in diamagnetic NMR. Due to the predominance of other types of paramagnetic relaxation mechanisms for this system, it is possible to extract the Curie term only computationally. The Curie mechanism alone would result in around 16 and 20 s(-1) of relaxation rates (R1 and R2 respectively) for the (1)H nuclei of water molecules bonded to the Ni(2+) center, in a magnetic field of 11.7 T. The corresponding (17)O relaxation rates are around 33 and 38 s(-1). We also report the Curie contribution to the relaxation rate for molecules beyond the first solvation shell in a 1 M solution of Ni(2+) in water.

  15. Proton Fast Ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M H; Freeman, R R; Hatchett, S P; MacKinnon, A J; Patel, P K; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R B

    2006-04-01

    Fast ignition (FI) by a laser generated ballistically focused proton beam is a more recently proposed alternative to the original concept of FI by a laser generated beam of relativistic electrons. It has potential advantages in less complex energy transport into dense plasma. Recent successful target heating experiments motivate further investigation of the feasibility of proton fast ignition. The concept, the physics and characteristics of the proton beams, the recent experimental work on focusing of the beams and heating of solid targets and the overall prospects for proton FI are discussed

  16. Ultrasonic relaxations in borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angelo, G.; Tripodo, G.; Carini, G.; Cosio, E.; Bartolotta, A.; Di Marco, G.

    2004-01-01

    The attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves of frequencies in the range from 10 to 70 MHz have been measured in M 2 O-B 2 O 3 borate glasses (M: Li or Ag) as a function of temperature between 15 and 350 K. The velocity of sound waves decreases with increasing temperature in all the glasses, the decrease as the temperature is increased is larger in glasses containing silver than in those with lithium. A broad relaxation peak characterises the attenuation behaviour of the lithium and silver borate glasses at temperatures below 100 K and is paralleled by a corresponding dispersive behaviour of the sound velocity. Above 100 K, the ultrasonic velocity shows a nearly linear behaviour regulated by the vibrational anharmonicity, which decreases with increasing content of modifier oxide and is smaller in lithium than in silver borates. These results suggest that the relaxation of structural defects and the anharmonicity of borate glasses are strongly affected by two parameters: the number of bridging bonds per network forming ion and the polarising power of network modifier ions which occupy sites in the existing interstices

  17. Statistical mechanics of violent relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    We reexamine the foundations of Lynden-Bell's statistical mechanical discussion of violent relaxation in collisionless stellar systems. We argue that Lynden-Bell's formulation in terms of a continuum description introduces unnecessary complications, and we consider a more conventional formulation in terms of particles. We then find the exclusion principle discovered by Lynden-Bell to be quantitatively important only at phase densities where two-body encounters are no longer negligible. Since the edynamical basis for the exclusion principle vanishes in such cases anyway, Lynden-Bell statistics always reduces in practice to Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics when applied to stellar systems. Lynden-Bell also found the equilibrium distribution function generally to be a sum of Maxwellians with velocity dispersions dependent on the phase density at star formation. We show that this difficulty vanishes in the particulate description for an encounterless stellar system as long as stars of different masses are initially well mixed in phase space. Our methods also demonstrate the equivalence between Gibbs's formalism which uses the microcanonical ensemble and Boltzmann's formalism which uses a coarse-grained continuum description. In addition, we clarify the concept of irreversible behavior on a macroscopic scale for an encounterless stellar system. Finally, we comment on the use of unusual macroscopic constraints to simulate the effects of incomplete relaxation

  18. Quantitative Study of Longitudinal Relaxation (T 1) Contrast Mechanisms in Brain MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xu

    Longitudinal relaxation (T1) contrast in MRI is important for studying brain morphology and is widely used in clinical applications. Although MRI only detects signals from water hydrogen ( 1H) protons (WPs), T1 contrast is known to be influenced by other species of 1H protons, including those in macromolecules (MPs), such as lipids and proteins, through magnetization transfer (MT) between WPs and MPs. This complicates the use and quantification of T1 contrast for studying the underlying tissue composition and the physiology of the brain. MT contributes to T1 contrast to an extent that is generally dependent on MT kinetics, as well as the concentration and NMR spectral properties of MPs. However, the MP spectral properties and MT kinetics are both difficult to measure directly, as the signal from MPs is generally invisible to MRI. Therefore, to investigate MT kinetics and further quantify T1 contrast, we first developed a reliable way to indirectly measure the MP fraction and their exchange rate with WPs, with minimal dependence on the spectral properties of MPs. For this purpose, we used brief, highpower radiofrequency (RF) NMR excitation pulses to almost completely saturate the magnetization of MPs. Based on this, both MT kinetics and the contribution of MPs to T1 contrast through MT were studied. The thus obtained knowledge allowed us to subsequently infer the spectral properties of MPs by applying low-power, frequencyselective off-resonance RF pulses and measuring the offset-frequency dependent effect of MPs on the WP MRI signal. A two-pool exchange model was used in both cases to account for direct effects of the RF pulse on WP magnetization. Consistent with earlier works using MRI at low-field and post-mortem analysis of brain tissue, our novel measurement approach found that MPs constitute an up to 27% fraction of the total 1H protons in human brain white matter, and their spectrum follows a super-Lorentzian line with a T2 of 9.6+/-0.6 mus and a resonance

  19. Influence of different environments on the excited-state proton transfer and dual fluorescence of fisetin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guharay, Jayanti; Dennison, S. Moses; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    1999-05-01

    The influence of different protic and aprotic solvent environments on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) leading to a dual fluorescence behaviour of a biologically important, naturally occurring, polyhydroxyflavone, fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), has been investigated. The normal fluorescence band, in particular, is extremely sensitive to solvent polarity with νmax shifting from 24 510 cm -1 in dioxane ( ET(30)=36.0) to 20 790 cm -1 in methanol ( ET(30)=55.5). This is rationalized in terms of solvent dipolar relaxation process, which also accounts for the red edge excitation shifts (REES) observed in viscous environments such as glycerol at low temperatures. Significant solvent dependence of the tautomer fluorescence properties ( νmax, yield and decay kinetics) reveals the influence of external hydrogen bonding perturbation on the internal hydrogen bond of the molecule. These excited-state relaxation phenomena and their relevant parameters have been used to probe the microenvironment of fisetin in a membrane mimetic system, namely AOT reverse micelles in n-heptane at different water/surfactant molar ratio ( w0).

  20. Paramagnetic relaxation effects in perturbed angular correlations for arbitrary electronic relaxation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopin, C.; Spanjaard, D.; Hartmann-Boutron, F.

    1975-01-01

    Previous perturbation treatments of paramagnetic relaxation effects in γγ PAC were limited to the case of very short electronic relaxation times. This limitation is circumvented by invoking a new perturbation theory recently elaborated by Hirst and others for handling relaxation effects in Moessbauer spectra. Under the assumption of spherical electronic relaxation the perturbation factors are computed as functions of certain relaxation parameters which are directly related to the microscopic relaxation Hamiltonian. The results are compared to those of the stochastic theory of Scherer and Blume [fr

  1. Moving protons with pendant amines: proton mobility in a nickel catalyst for oxidation of hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Molly; Shaw, Wendy J; Raugei, Simone; Chen, Shentan; Yang, Jenny Y; Kilgore, Uriah J; DuBois, Daniel L; Bullock, R Morris

    2011-09-14

    Proton transport is ubiquitous in chemical and biological processes, including the reduction of dioxygen to water, the reduction of CO(2) to formate, and the production/oxidation of hydrogen. In this work we describe intramolecular proton transfer between Ni and positioned pendant amines for the hydrogen oxidation electrocatalyst [Ni(P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2)H)(2)](2+) (P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2) = 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-dicyclohexyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane). Rate constants are determined by variable-temperature one-dimensional NMR techniques and two-dimensional EXSY experiments. Computational studies provide insight into the details of the proton movement and energetics of these complexes. Intramolecular proton exchange processes are observed for two of the three experimentally observable isomers of the doubly protonated Ni(0) complex, [Ni(P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2)H)(2)](2+), which have N-H bonds but no Ni-H bonds. For these two isomers, with pendant amines positioned endo to the Ni, the rate constants for proton exchange range from 10(4) to 10(5) s(-1) at 25 °C, depending on isomer and solvent. No exchange is observed for protons on pendant amines positioned exo to the Ni. Analysis of the exchange as a function of temperature provides a barrier for proton exchange of ΔG(‡) = 11-12 kcal/mol for both isomers, with little dependence on solvent. Density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations support the experimental observations, suggesting metal-mediated intramolecular proton transfers between nitrogen atoms, with chair-to-boat isomerizations as the rate-limiting steps. Because of the fast rate of proton movement, this catalyst may be considered a metal center surrounded by a cloud of exchanging protons. The high intramolecular proton mobility provides information directly pertinent to the ability of pendant amines to accelerate proton transfers during catalysis of hydrogen oxidation. These results may also have broader implications for proton movement in

  2. Proton decay: spectroscopic probe beyond the proton drip line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seweryniak, D; Davids, C N; Robinson, A; Woods, P J; Blank, B; Carpenter, M P; Davinson, T; Freeman, S J; Hammond, N; Hoteling, N; Janssens, R V F; Khoo, T L; Liu, Z; Mukherjee, G; Shergur, J; Sinha, S; Sonzogni, A A; Walters, W B; Woehr, A

    2005-01-01

    Proton decay has been transformed in recent years from an exotic phenomenon into a powerful spectroscopic tool. The frontiers of experimental and theoretical proton-decay studies will be reviewed. Different aspects of proton decay will be illustrated with recent results on the deformed proton emitter 135 Tb, the odd-odd deformed proton emitter 130 Eu, the complex fine structure in the odd-odd 146 Tm nucleus and on excited states in the transitional proton emitter 145 Tm

  3. Review of inelastic proton-proton reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Douglas Robert Ogston

    1973-01-01

    The most important new results on inelastic proton-proton scattering obtained with the new machines, I.S.R. and N.A.L., are: (1) The inelastic cross-section increases monotonically with energy from threshold to 1500 GeV/c. Above 6 GeV/c the energy variation has a s /sup +0.04/ behaviour. (2) Scaling is observed at I.S.R. energies in pion production. Confirmation is obtained of the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation. (3) The results are in general, consistent with the two-component model-one class of events being produced by diffraction dissociation and the other by a short-range-order process (e.g. the multiperipheral model). (4) There are indications that the protons have a granular structure; this from observation of secondaries of large transverse momenta. (33 refs).

  4. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Cross relaxation, and mI-dependence of the intrinsic electron spin-lattice relaxation rate We, are incorporated explicitly into the rate equations for the electron-spin population differences that govern the saturation behaviour of 14N- and 15N-nitroxide spin labels. Both prove important in spin......-label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We, the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from...... the hyperfine line pumped or observed follows directly from solution of the rate equations including cross relaxation, even when the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate We is mI-dependent....

  5. Structural relaxation in annealed hyperquenched basaltic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, John C.; Potuzak, M.

    2012-01-01

    The enthalpy relaxation behavior of hyperquenched (HQ) and annealed hyperquenched (AHQ) basaltic glass is investigated through calorimetric measurements. The results reveal a common onset temperature of the glass transition for all the HQ and AHQ glasses under study, indicating that the primary...... relaxation is activated at the same temperature regardless of the initial departure from equilibrium. The analysis of secondary relaxation at different annealing temperatures provides insights into the enthalpy recovery of HQ glasses....

  6. Giving Protons a Boost

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first of LHC's superconducting radio-frequency cavity modules has passed its final test at full power in the test area of building SM18. These modules carry an oscillating electric field that will accelerate protons around the LHC ring and help maintain the stability of the proton beams.

  7. On the proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonda, L.; Ghirardi, G.C.; Weber, T.

    1983-07-01

    The problem of the proton decay is considered taking into account that in actual experiments there is an interaction of the proton with its environment which could imply an increase of its theoretical lifetime. It is seen that, by application of the time-energy uncertainty relation, no prolongation of the lifetime is obtained in this case. (author)

  8. PS proton source

    CERN Multimedia

    1959-01-01

    The first proton source used at CERN's Proton Synchrotron (PS) which started operation in 1959. This is CERN's oldest accelerator still functioning today (2018). It is part of the accelerator chain that supplies proton beams to the Large Hadron Collider. The source is a Thonemann type. In order to extract and accelerate the protons at high energy, a high frequency electrical field is used (140Mhz). The field is transmitted by a coil around a discharge tube in order to maintain the gas hydrogen in an ionised state. An electrical field pulse, in the order of 15kV, is then applied via an impulse transformer between anode and cathode of the discharge tube. The electrons and protons of the plasma formed in the ionised gas in the tube, are then separated. Currents in the order of 200mA during 100 microseconds have benn obtained with this type of source.

  9. Relaxing Chosen-Ciphertext Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canetti, Ran; Krawczyk, Hugo; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2003-01-01

    Security against adaptive chosen ciphertext attacks (or, CCA security) has been accepted as the standard requirement from encryption schemes that need to withstand active attacks. In particular, it is regarded as the appropriate security notion for encryption schemes used as components within...... general protocols and applications. Indeed, CCA security was shown to suffice in a large variety of contexts. However, CCA security often appears to be somewhat too strong: there exist encryption schemes (some of which come up naturally in practice) that are not CCA secure, but seem sufficiently secure...... “for most practical purposes.” We propose a relaxed variant of CCA security, called Replayable CCA (RCCA) security. RCCA security accepts as secure the non-CCA (yet arguably secure) schemes mentioned above; furthermore, it suffices for most existing applications of CCA security. We provide three...

  10. Water oxidation by photosystem II: H(2)O-D(2)O exchange and the influence of pH support formation of an intermediate by removal of a proton before dioxygen creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerencsér, László; Dau, Holger

    2010-11-30

    Understanding the chemistry of photosynthetic water oxidation requires deeper insight into the interrelation between electron transfer (ET) and proton relocations. In photosystem II membrane particles, the redox transitions of the water-oxidizing Mn complex were initiated by nanosecond laser flashes and monitored by absorption spectroscopy at 360 nm (A(360)). In the oxygen evolution transition (S(3) + hν → S(0) + O(2)), an exponential decrease in A(360) (τ(O(2)) = 1.6 ms) can be assigned to Mn reduction and O(2) formation. The corresponding rate-determining step is the ET from the Mn complex to a tyrosine radical (Y(Z)(ox)). We find that this A(360) decrease is preceded by a lag phase with a duration of 170 ± 40 μs (τ(lag) at pH 6.2), indicating formation of an intermediate before ET and O-O bond formation and corroborating results obtained by time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy. Whereas τ(O(2)) exhibits a minor kinetic isotope effect and negligible pH dependence, formation of the intermediate is slowed significantly both in D(2)O (τ(lag) increase of ∼140% in D(2)O) and at low pH (τ(lag) of 30 ± 20 μs at pH 7.0 vs τ(lag) of 470 ± 80 μs at pH 5.5). These findings support the fact that in the oxygen evolution transition an intermediate is created by deprotonation and removal of a proton from the Mn complex, after Y(Z)(ox) formation but before the onset of electron transfer and O-O bond formation.

  11. The role of the umbrella inversion mode in proton diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanali, Ali A.; Giberti, Federico; Sosso, Gabriele C.; Parrinello, Michele

    2014-04-01

    Here, using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations, we elucidate the role of the umbrella inversion mode of the hydronium in proton transfer (PT) in liquid water. The hydrophobic face of the hydronium oxygen experiences asymmetries in the solvent potential along the inversion coordinate and this has a rather drastic effect on the barrier for proton transfer. This behavior is coupled to the fluctuations of voids or cavities in the vicinity of the hydronium in the water network. The peculiar inversion mode can either trap or release the proton from different parts of the water network.

  12. Lactate quantification by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a clinical MRI machine: a basic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, T.; Muraishi, H.; Matsumura, A.; Kawamura, H.; Shibata, Y.; Anno, I.; Minami, M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish quantification method of lactate concentration by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) carried out using a conventional 1.5-T MRI machine. We used a lactate phantom with known concentrations (1, 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 14 mmol/L). As a clinical example, a patient with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) was evaluated. Proton MRS was carried out using a clinical 1.5-T super-conducting magnetic resonance whole-body system. Data were acquired by point resolved spectroscopy. A coupling constant of J = 7.35 Hz (2/7 = 272 ms) and two long in-phase echo time of 272 ms and 544 ms were used to calculate the T2 relaxation time. The tissue water signal was used as an internal standard to quantify lactate. The correlation coefficient R between the calculated lactate concentrations and the known concentration of lactate was 0.99 with a constant factor of 0.32 (1/3.14). In patients with MELAS, the lactate concentration measured by MRS was 6.2 mmol/kg wet weight, which is similar to the value obtained in previous studies. In the present study, we have established a reliable method for lactate quantification in a phantom study and have shown a sample of clinical case of MELAS

  13. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed

  14. Proton MRS in neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonavita, S.; Di Salle, F.; Tedeschi, G

    1999-05-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) permits the acquisition of the signal arising from several brain metabolites. At long echo-time (TE) {sup 1}H MRS can detect N-acetyl-aspartate containing compounds, choline containing compounds, creatine+phosphocreatine and lactate. At short TE, lipids, tryglicerides, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, GABA, scyllo-inositol, glucose, myo-inositol, carnosine and histydine are visible. {sup 1}H MRS can be performed with single-voxel, multivoxel, single slice and multislice techniques. With single voxel {sup 1}H MRS it is possible to measure metabolites relaxation time, which allows the measurement of metabolite concentrations. This technique can be useful in the study of focal lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) such as epilepsy (pre-surgical identification of epileptic focus), brain tumors (evaluation of recurrence and radiation necrosis), stroke, multiple sclerosis, etc. Single slice and multislice {sup 1}H MRS imaging ({sup 1}H MRSI) can be performed only at long TE and permits the mapping of the brain metabolites distribution which makes them particularly useful in studying diffuse diseases and heterogeneous lesions of the CNS. {sup 1}H MRS can also be useful in the evaluation of 'ischemic penumbra' of stroke; developmental (myelin and neuronal dysgenesis); head trauma (evaluation of cerebral damage not visible with MRI); degenerative disorders (identification of microscopic pathology not visible with MRI); and metabolic diseases (metabolic disturbances with specific metabolic patterns)

  15. Study of the iron corrosion at the interface of different media (water, air) submitted to protons irradiation; Etude de la corrosion du fer a l'interface de differents milieux (eau, air) soumis a l'irradiation de protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapuerta, S

    2005-10-15

    During the deep geological disposal, stainless steel containers of the vitrified waste will be put in carbon steel overpacks. After the closing of the storage site, overpacks will be in contact with a humid air and a radioactive medium. After hundred years, overpacks could be in contact with water radiolysis in an anoxic medium. In this context, my PhD work is a fundamental study which is the understanding of the corrosion mechanisms of pure iron under proton irradiation. This corrosion is affected by the contact of iron with different atmospheres (air, nitrogen) and water. In the case of the atmospheric iron corrosion under irradiation, we have studied the influence of the proton beam flux. During this work, we have characterized the structure of the oxides formed at the iron surface. The structure formed does not correspond to iron oxides and hydroxides indexed. However, we have shown that the oxide structure is close to that of lepidocrocite and bernalite. Moreover, we have determined the oxygen diffusion coefficient in iron under irradiation and we have shown that the irradiation accelerates of 6 orders of magnitude the iron corrosion. In addition, the irradiations which were realized in different gas have put in evidence the negligible role of nitrates, and the importance of the O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O coupling on the iron corrosion. Finally, we have shown the influence of the relative humidity, the maximum of the corrosion being observed for a relative humidity close to 45%. In the case of the iron corrosion in aqueous media under irradiation, the influence of the oxygen dissolved in water has been studied using a surface marker. We have put in evidence that the corrosion is twice more significant in aerated medium than in deaerated medium. Moreover, the influence of radicals has been shown. An irradiated sample is more corroded than a sample put in contact with a H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution. Finally, the follow-up of the iron potential under irradiation have shown

  16. Proton capture by magnetic monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olaussen, K.; Olsen, H.A.; Oeverboe, I.; Osland, P.

    1983-09-01

    In the Kazama-Yang approximation, the lowest monopole-proton bound states have binding energies of 938 MeV, 263 keV, 105 eV, and 0.04 eV. The cross section for radiative capture to these states is for velocities β = 10 -5 - 10 -3 found to be of the order of 10 -28 - 10 -26 cm 2 . For the state that has a binding energy of 263 keV, the capture length in water is 171 x (β/10 -4 )sup(0.48) m. Observation of photons from the capture process would indicate the presence of monopoles. (orig.)

  17. The IMB proton decay detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, R.C.; Gajewski, W.; Kropp, W.R.; Reines, F.; Schultz, J.; Smith, D.W.; Sobel, H.; Wuest, C.; Bionta, R.M.; Cortez, B.G.; Errede, S.; Foster, G.W.; Greenberg, J.; Park, H.S.; Shumard, E.; Sinclair, D.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Velde, J.C. van der; Goldhaber, M.; Blewitt, G.; Lehmann, E.; LoSecco, J.M.; Bratton, C.B.; Learned, J.; Svoboda, R.; Jones, T.W.; Ramana Murthy, P.V.

    1983-01-01

    A description is given of the Irvine-Michigan-Brookhaven proton decay detector which is nearing completion in a salt mine in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A. The detector is a water Cerenkov one with a fiducial volume of 4,000 tons and a threshold of 24 MeV. Initial results indicate that the detector is working according to specification and has a high potential for deep underground cosmic ray applications. I will give a brief account of the IMB detector construction and operation and also its present status and possible cosmic ray applications. (orig.)

  18. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  19. Mitigating IPMC back relaxation through feedforward and feedback control of patterned electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, Maxwell J; Leang, Kam K; Kim, Kwang J

    2012-01-01

    With low driving voltage ( < 5 V) and the ability to be operated in aqueous environments, ionic polymer–metal composite (IPMC) materials are quickly gaining attention for use in many applications including soft bio-inspired actuators and sensors. There are, however, drawbacks to IPMC actuators, including the ‘back relaxation’ effect. Specifically, when subjected to an excessively slow input, the IPMC actuator will slowly relax back toward its original position. There is debate over the physical mechanism of back relaxation, although one prevalent theory describes an initial current, caused by the electrostatic forces of the charging electrodes, which drives water molecules across the ion exchange membrane and deforms the IPMC. Once the electrodes are fully charged, however, the dominant element of the motion is the osmotic pressure, driving the water molecules back to equilibrium, thus causing back relaxation. A new method to mitigate back relaxation is proposed, taking advantage of controlled activation of patterned (sectored) electrodes on the IPMC. By actuating sectors in opposing directions, back relaxation can be effectively canceled out. An integrated feedforward and feedback controller is employed based on this concept, and is shown to minimize back relaxation, while reducing the input voltage required, as compared to the case of the non-sectored IPMC. Experimental results show nearly an order of magnitude reduction in the tracking error compared to the uncompensated case, and that the IPMC’s position can be maintained over a period of 60 and 1200 s with minimal evidence of back relaxation. (paper)

  20. The Effects of Progressive Relaxation and Music on Attention, Relaxation, and Stress Responses: An Investigation of the Cognitive-Behavioral Model of Relaxation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scheufele, Peter

    1999-01-01

    ...) suggested that stress management techniques have specific effects A compromise position suggests that the specific effects of relaxation techniques are superimposed upon a general relaxation response...