WorldWideScience

Sample records for water partial pressure

  1. Partial pressure gauges

    CERN Document Server

    Peter, G J

    2007-01-01

    The determination of partial pressures in vacuum systems is usually performed by mass spectrometers. The most common type is the QMS. Quadrupole mass spectrometers were developed decades ago and have been used by vacuum specialists as a diagnostic tool since then. In the first part of the paper the principles of these mass spectrometers are briefly reviewed together with the key features of the instruments. This is necessary to operate these instruments. In the second part the boundary conditions which arise from the application as residual gas analyser in UHV/XHV plants are described. These lead to special versions of mass spectrometers. Results obtained with these instruments and typical artefacts in mass spectra obtained in the UHV are discussed.

  2. Thin film oxygen partial pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortman, J. J.; Harrison, J. W.; Honbarrier, H. L.; Yen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The development is described of a laboratory model oxygen partial pressure sensor using a sputtered zinc oxide thin film. The film is operated at about 400 C through the use of a miniature silicon bar. Because of the unique resistance versus temperature relation of the silicon bar, control of the operational temperature is achieved by controlling the resistance. A circuit for accomplishing this is described. The response of sputtered zinc oxide films of various thicknesses to oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, and water vapor caused a change in the film resistance. Over a large range, film conductance varied approximately as the square root of the oxygen partial pressure. The presence of water vapor in the gas stream caused a shift in the film conductance at a given oxygen partial pressure. A theoretical model is presented to explain the characteristic features of the zinc oxide response to oxygen.

  3. Oxidation of X20 in Water Vapour: The Effect of Temperature and Oxygen Partial Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Anette Nørgaard; Montgomery, Melanie; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidation behaviour of X20 in various mixtures of water, oxygen and hydrogen was investigated at temperatures between 500 C and 700 C (time: 336 h). The samples were characterised using reflected light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy....... Double-layered oxides developed during oxidation under all conditions. The morphology of the oxide layers was strongly influenced by temperature, whereas the influence of the oxidising environment appeared to be less pronounced, as long as it contained water vapour. The inner layer consisted of converted...... M23C6 embedded in Fe–Cr spinel after oxidation at 500 and 600 C, while alternating layers of Cr-rich and Cr-poor oxide were observed after oxidation at 700 C. An internal oxidation zone developed during oxidation at 500 and 600 C, with its depth influenced by the oxidising environments. The results...

  4. Oxidation of uranium in low partial pressures of oxygen and water vapor at 100/sup 0/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weirick, L J

    1984-06-01

    Oxygen isotope studies indicate that a previously proposed theory describing the oxidation of uranium is incorrect. This theory had proposed that the uranium reacted directly with water vapor to form uranium dioxide and hydrogen and the hydrogen subsequently reacted with the free oxygen to form water. This study shows that oxygen reacts directly with uranium, the role of water vapor being to affect the uranium oxide structure which is formed. The reaction rate of uranium with water vapor in the absence of oxygen was linear and proportional to the water vapor pressure for water vapor pressures between 2 and 20 Torr. Hydrogen was produced by the reaction at a rate of almost two moles for every one mole of uranium dioxide formed. The oxide was identified as UO/sub 2/ /sub 0/. The reaction of uranium with water vapor in the presence of oxygen showed three separate regions of reaction response. In one region, at low oxygen pressure, the reaction was the same as with no oxygen, a second region at oxygen pressures between 0.05 and 1 Torr was a transition stage and in the third region, at oxygen pressures above 1 Torr, the reaction rate was linear and independent of both oxygen and water vapor pressure. The oxide formed was identified as nominally U/sub 4/O/sub 9/. Only a small amount of hydrogen was produced.

  5. Simultaneous visualization of oxygen partial pressure, current density, and water droplets in serpentine fuel cell during power generation for understanding reaction distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanohashi, Kazuhiro; Suga, Takeo; Uchida, Makoto; Ueda, Toshihide; Nagumo, Yuzo; Inukai, Junji; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the reaction distributions inside a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is essential for the higher performance and durability. We have developed a new see-through cell and visualized the distributions of oxygen partial pressure and current density inside a running PEFC at the temperature of 40 and 80 °C and the relative humidity of 53%. The oxygen utilization was changed from 0% to 80% by changing the current density. At higher oxygen utilizations, the current density was higher and therefore the water generation. Generated water droplets in the flow channel were also visualized, allowing for the simultaneous visualization of the distribution of the oxygen partial pressure, current density, and water droplets. By combining the observations of all three parameters, the reactions inside a membrane-electrode assembly were discussed.

  6. Mathematical Modelling of Intraretinal Oxygen Partial Pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of our present work is to develop a simple steady state model for intraretinal oxygen partial pressure distribution and to investigate the effect of various model parameters on the partial pressure distribution under adapted conditions of light and darkness.. Method: A simple eight-layered mathematical model ...

  7. Mathematical Modelling of Intraretinal Oxygen Partial Pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Purpose: The aim of our present work is to develop a simple steady state model for intraretinal oxygen partial pressure distribution and to investigate the effect of various model parameters on the partial pressure distribution under adapted conditions of light and darkness.. Method: A simple eight-layered mathematical model ...

  8. Global Ocean Surface Water Partial Pressure of CO2 Database: Measurements Performed During 1968-2007 (Version 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyr, Alex [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

    2008-09-30

    More than 4.1 million measurements of surface water partial pressure of CO2 obtained over the global oceans during 1968-2007 are listed in the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) database, which includes open ocean and coastal water measurements. The data assembled include only those measured by equilibrator-CO2 analyzer systems and have been quality-controlled based on the stability of the system performance, the reliability of calibrations for CO2 analysis, and the internal consistency of data. To allow re-examination of the data in the future, a number of measured parameters relevant to pCO2 measurements are listed. The overall uncertainty for the pCO2 values listed is estimated to be ± 2.5 µatm on the average. For simplicity and for ease of reference, this version is referred to as 2007, meaning that data collected through 31 December 2007 has been included. It is our intention to update this database annually. There are 37 new cruise/ship files in this update. In addition, some editing has been performed on existing files so this should be considered a V2007 file. Also we have added a column reporting the partial pressure of CO2 in seawater in units of Pascals. The data presented in this database include the analyses of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), pressure of the equilibration, and barometric pressure in the outside air from the ship’s observation system. The global pCO2 data set is available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of the oceanographic data files and this printed documentation, which describes the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  9. Mathematical Modelling of Intraretinal Oxygen Partial Pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    retina. This pressure is regulated through the balance of oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption in the retina2. Besides, retinal blood flow is strongly dependent on the partial pressure of oxygen. Most of the oxygen delivered by choroidal circulation to the outer retina is consumed by photoreceptor segments because this.

  10. Estimation of vapour pressure and partial pressure of subliming ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    temperature curves are calculated at 80, 160 and 1000 mbar for salicylic acid and vanadyl bis-2,4- pentanedionate, a precursor used for chemical vapour deposition of vanadium oxides. Using a modification of the Langmuir equation, the partial pressure of these materials at different total pressures is also determined.

  11. psychrometry: from partial pressures to mole fractions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    1980-03-01

    Mar 1, 1980 ... ABSTRACT. This study uses the viria1 and interaction coefficients of the normal air components in deriving compressibility factors and thereafter a simple iterative formulation for mole fractions. Conversion from partial pressures to mole fractions now becomes tractable by means of determinate multipliers.

  12. Measuring Negative Pore Pressures in Partially Frozen Saturated Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Holten, Johannes Gaspar

    2017-01-01

    Freezing of soil is an issue which has many implications on modern infrastructure, in which frost heave plays a pivotal role. During freezing the behavior of the soil and the flow of water is altered. In an engineering perspective, it is important to grasp the driving forces behind these behavioral changes. The main contributor to frost heave is the development of a large negative pore pressure in the unfrozen water in partially frozen fine-grained soil, termed cryosuction. The suction leads...

  13. Reduced atmospheric pressure in Radish: Alteration of NCER and transpiration at decreased oxygen partial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Stasiak, Michael; Wheeler, Raymond; Dixon, Mike

    Fundamental to the future of space exploration is the development of advanced life support systems capable of maintaining crews for significant periods without re-supply from Earth. Significant research is focused on the development of bioregenerative life support systems to be used in conjunction with the current physico-chemical methods. These bioregenerative life support systems harness natural ecosystem processes and employ plant photosynthesis and transpiration to produce food, oxygen and regenerate water while consuming carbon dioxide. The forthcoming exploration of the Moon and Mars has prompted interest into the effects of hypobaria on plant development. Reduced atmospheric pressures will lessen the pressure gradient between the structure and the local environment thereby decreasing gas leakage and possibly the structural mass of the plant growth facility. In order to establish the optimal specifications for reduced pressure plant growth structures it is essential to determine the atmospheric pressure limits required for conventional plant development and growth. Due to its physiological importance, oxygen will compose a significant portion of these minimal environments. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that reduced atmospheric pressure and decreased oxygen partial pressures had no effect on radish productivity. Radishes (Raphanus sativa L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) were grown from seed in the University of Guelph's Hypobaric Plant Growth Chambers for a period of 21 days. Treatments included total pressures of 10, 33, 66 and 96 kPa and oxygen partial pressures of 2, 7, 14 and 20 kPa. Experiments demonstrated that reduced partial pressures of oxygen had a greater effect on radish growth than hypobaria. Results showed a reduction in net carbon exchange rate and transpiration with decreasing oxygen partial pressures leading to diminished productivity. Keywords: hypobaric, radish, oxygen partial pressure, variable pressure chamber

  14. Investigation of the kinetics of water uptake into partially saturated shales

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roshan, H; Andersen, M. S; Rutlidge, H; Marjo, C. E; Acworth, R. I

    2016-01-01

    .... This study describes novel hydraulic experiments to quantitatively investigate the kinetics of water uptake into partially saturated shale through investigating the pressure response of injecting fluids...

  15. A system for incubations at high gas partial pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Patrick; Glombitza, Clemens; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2012-01-01

    High-pressure is a key feature of deep subsurface environments. High partial pressure of dissolved gasses plays an important role in microbial metabolism, because thermodynamic feasibility of many reactions depends on the concentration of reactants. For gases, this is controlled by their partial ....... Furthermore we demonstrated the applicability of the system for studies of microbial activity, using samples from the Isis mud volcano. We could detect an increase in sulfate reduction rate upon the addition of methane to the sample....

  16. Report on ISS Oxygen Production, Resupply, and Partial Pressure Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaezler, Ryan; Ghariani, Ahmed; Leonard, Daniel; Lehman, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The majority of oxygen used on International Space Station (ISS) is for metabolic support and denitrogenation procedures prior to Extra-Vehicular Activities. Oxygen is supplied by various visiting vehicles such as the Progress and Shuttle in addition to oxygen production capability on both the United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) and Russian Segment (RS). To maintain a habitable atmosphere the oxygen partial pressure is controlled between upper and lower bounds. The full range of the allowable oxygen partial pressure along with the increased ISS cabin volume is utilized as a buffer allowing days to pass between oxygen production or direct addition of oxygen to the atmosphere from reserves. This paper summarizes amount of oxygen supplied and produced from all of the sources and describes past experience of managing oxygen partial pressure along with the range of management options available to the ISS.

  17. Measurement of partial pressures in vacuum technology and vacuum physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, W. K.

    1986-01-01

    It is pointed out that the measurement of gaseous pressures of less than 0.0001 torr is based on the ionization of gas atoms and molecules due to collisions with electrons. The particle density is determined in place of the pressure. The ionization cross sections for molecules of various gases are discussed. It is found that the true pressure in a vacuum system cannot be determined with certainty if it is unknown which gas is present. Effects of partial pressure determination on the condition of the vacuum system are discussed together with ion sources, systems of separation, and ion detection.

  18. Water Pressure. Water in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Carly Sporer

    The Water in Africa Project was realized over a 2-year period by a team of Peace Corps volunteers. As part of an expanded, detailed design, resources were collected from over 90 volunteers serving in African countries, photos and stories were prepared, and standards-based learning units were created for K-12 students. This unit, "Water…

  19. Evaporation from partially covered water surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, S.; Narkis, K.; Or, D.

    2010-10-01

    Evaporative losses from large water bodies may exceed 20% of water used in irrigated agriculture, with losses from reservoirs estimated at 50% of storage capacity. Prominent among proposed methods to curtail these evaporative losses are various forms of partial covers placed over water surfaces. Studies show that evaporation through perforated covers and from partially covered water surfaces exhibit nonlinear behavior, where rates of water loss are not proportional to uncovered surface fraction and are significantly affected by opening size and relative spacing. We studied evaporation from small water bodies under various perforated covers, extending the so-called diameter law to opening sizes in the range of 10-5 to 10-1 m. Contradicting claims concerning effects of openings and their arrangement on performance of evaporation barriers are analyzed on per opening and on per area mass losses. Our results help reconcile some classical findings invoking detailed pore-scale diffusion and simple temperature-based energetic behaviors. For fixed relative spacing, area-averaged evaporative flux density remains nearly constant across several orders of magnitude variations in opening size. For the scale of the experimental setup, we predict relative evaporation reduction efficiency for various configurations of perforated evaporation barriers.

  20. A system for incubations at high gas partial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Patrick; Glombitza, Clemens; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2012-01-01

    High-pressure is a key feature of deep subsurface environments. High partial pressure of dissolved gasses plays an important role in microbial metabolism, because thermodynamic feasibility of many reactions depends on the concentration of reactants. For gases, this is controlled by their partial pressure, which can exceed 1 MPa at in situ conditions. Therefore, high hydrostatic pressure alone is not sufficient to recreate true deep subsurface in situ conditions, but the partial pressure of dissolved gasses has to be controlled as well. We developed an incubation system that allows for incubations at hydrostatic pressure up to 60 MPa, temperatures up to 120°C, and at high gas partial pressure. The composition and partial pressure of gasses can be manipulated during the experiment. To keep costs low, the system is mainly made from off-the-shelf components with only very few custom-made parts. A flexible and inert PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) incubator sleeve, which is almost impermeable for gases, holds the sample and separates it from the pressure fluid. The flexibility of the incubator sleeve allows for sub-sampling of the medium without loss of pressure. Experiments can be run in both static and flow-through mode. The incubation system described here is usable for versatile purposes, not only the incubation of microorganisms and determination of growth rates, but also for chemical degradation or extraction experiments under high gas saturation, e.g., fluid-gas-rock-interactions in relation to carbon dioxide sequestration. As an application of the system we extracted organic compounds from sub-bituminous coal using H(2)O as well as a H(2)O-CO(2) mixture at elevated temperature (90°C) and pressure (5 MPa). Subsamples were taken at different time points during the incubation and analyzed by ion chromatography. Furthermore we demonstrated the applicability of the system for studies of microbial activity, using samples from the Isis mud volcano. We could

  1. A system for incubations at high gas partial pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eSauer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available High-pressure is a key feature of deep subsurface environments. High partial pressure of dissolved gasses plays an important role in microbial metabolism, because thermodynamic feasibility of many reactions depends on the concentration of reactants. For gases, this is controlled by their partial pressure, which can exceed one MPa at in-situ conditions. Therefore, high hydrostatic pressure alone is not sufficient to recreate true deep subsurface in-situ conditions, but the partial pressure of dissolved gasses has to be controlled as well.We developed an incubation system that allows for incubations at hydrostatic pressure up to 60 MPa, temperatures up to 120° C and at high gas partial pressure. The composition and partial pressure of gasses can be manipulated during the experiment. The system is mainly made from off-the-shelf components with only very few custom-made parts. A flexible and inert PVDF incubator sleeve, which is almost impermeable for gases, holds the sample and separates it from the pressure fluid. The flexibility of the incubator sleeve allows for sub-sampling of the medium without loss of pressure. Experiments can be run in both static and flow through mode. The incubation system described here is usable for versatile purposes, not only the incubation of microorganisms and determination of growth rates, but also for chemical degradation or extraction experiments under high gas saturation, e.g. fluid-gas-rock-interactions in relation to carbon dioxide sequestration.As an application of the system we extracted organic acids from sub-bituminous coal using H2O as well as a H2O-CO2 mixture at elevated temperature (90°C and pressure (5 MPa. Subsamples were taken during the incubation and analysed by ion chromatography. Furthermore we demonstrated the applicability of the system for studies of microbial activity, using samples from the Isis mud volcano. We could detect an increase in sulphate reduction rate upon the addition of

  2. Using Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures to Determine the Vapor Pressure of a Volatile Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgeman, Fred R.; Bertrand, Gary; Wilson, Brent

    2007-01-01

    This experiment, designed for a general chemistry laboratory, illustrates the use of Dalton's law of partial pressures to determine the vapor pressure of a volatile liquid. A predetermined volume of air is injected into a calibrated tube filled with a liquid whose vapor pressure is to be measured. The volume of the liquid displaced is greater than…

  3. Global Ocean Surface Water Partial Pressure of CO2 Database: Measurements Performed During 1957-2016 (LDEO Database Version 2016) (NCEI Accession 0160492)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Approximately 10.8 million measurements of surface water pCO2 made over the global oceans during 1957-2016 have been processed to make a uniform data file in this...

  4. Psychometry: From Partial Pressures to Mole Fractions | Ezeilo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study uses the viria1 and interaction coefficients of the normal air components in deriving compressibility factors and thereafter a simple iterative formulation for mole fractions. Conversion from partial pressures to mole fractions now becomes tractable by means of determinate multipliers. The results obtained compare ...

  5. The Effect of Hydrogen Partial Pressure on Methylcyclopentane Ring Opening.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Vaarkamp, M.; Dijkstra, P.; Grondelle, J. van; Miller, J.T.; Modica, F.S.; Sante, R.A. van

    1995-01-01

    The ring opening of methylcyclopentane (MCP) over well-characterized Pt/SiO{2}(EUROPT-1), Pt/@c-Al{2}O{3}, and Pt/K-LTL catalysts was studied as a function of hydrogen partial pressure and reduction temperature. The MCP ring opening selectivity did not change in the range of H{2}:MCP ratios studied

  6. Design and control of the oxygen partial pressure of UO{sub 2} in TGA using the humidification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.; Knight, T.W., E-mail: knighttw@cec.sc.edu; Roberts, E.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We focus on measurement of oxygen partial pressure and change of O/M ratio under specific conditions produced by the humidification system. • This shows that the humidification system is stable, accurate, and reliable enough to be used for experiments of the oxygen partial pressure measurement for the oxide fuels. • The humidification system has benefits of easy control and flexibility for producing various oxygen partial pressures with fixed hydrogen gas flow rate. - Abstract: The oxygen to uranium (O/U) ratio of UO{sub 2±x} is determined by the oxygen content of the sample and is affected by oxygen partial pressure (pO{sub 2}) of the surrounding gas. Oxygen partial pressure is controllable by several methods. A common method to produce different oxygen partial pressures is the use of equilibria of different reaction gases. There are two common methods: H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2} reaction and CO{sub 2}/CO reaction. In this work, H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2} reaction using a humidifier was employed and investigated to ensure that this humidification system for oxygen partial pressure is stable and accurate for use in Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) experiments with UO{sub 2}. This approach has the further advantage of flexibility to make a wide range of oxygen partial pressure with fixed hydrogen gas flow rate only by varying temperature of water in the humidifier. The whole system for experiments was constructed and includes the humidification system, TGA, oxygen analyzer, and gas flow controller. Uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) samples were used for experiments and oxygen partial pressure was measured at the equilibrium state of stoichiometric UO{sub 2.0}. Oxygen partial pressures produced by humidification (wet gas) system were compared to the approach using mixed dry gases (without humidification system) to demonstrate that the humidification system provides for more stable and accurate oxygen partial pressure control. This work provides the design, method, and

  7. Managing water pressure for water savings in developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-02

    Apr 2, 2014 ... prediction of the total amount of water savings under reduced pressures, with only 6% difference between measured and estimated volume ... efficiently used for estimating water savings when a calibrated simulation model .... that under high pressure these appliances consume water faster but the volumes ...

  8. Potential hydrogen and oxygen partial pressures in legacy plutonium oxide packages at Oak Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veirs, Douglas K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-07

    An approach to estimate the maximum hydrogen and oxygen partial pressures within sealed containers is described and applied to a set of packages containing high-purity plutonium dioxide. The approach uses experimentally determined maximum hydrogen and oxygen partial pressures and scales the experimentally determined pressures to the relevant packaged material properties. The important material properties are the specific wattage and specific surface area (SSA). Important results from the experimental determination of maximum partial pressures are (1) the ratio of hydrogen to oxygen is stoichiometric, and (2) the maximum pressures increase with increasing initial rates of production. The material properties that influence the rates are the material specific wattage and the SSA. The unusual properties of these materials, high specific wattage and high SSA, result in higher predicted maximum pressures than typical plutonium dioxide in storage. The pressures are well within the deflagration range for mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  9. Managing water pressure for water savings in developing countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many water utilities, particularly in the developing countries, continue to operate inefficient water distribution systems (WDSs) with a significant amount of water and revenue losses. Various factors, manageable to different extents, contribute to water losses, such as poor infrastructure, high pressures, illegal water use, etc.

  10. Changes in Cerebral Partial Oxygen Pressure and Cerebrovascular Reactivity During Intracranial Pressure Plateau Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Erhard W; Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Smielewski, Peter; Pickard, John; Czosnyka, Marek

    2015-08-01

    Plateau waves in intracranial pressure (ICP) are frequently recorded in neuro intensive care and are not yet fully understood. To further investigate this phenomenon, we analyzed partial pressure of cerebral oxygen (pbtO2) and a moving correlation coefficient between ICP and mean arterial blood pressure (ABP), called PRx, along with the cerebral oxygen reactivity index (ORx), which is a moving correlation coefficient between cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and pbtO2 in an observational study. We analyzed 55 plateau waves in 20 patients after severe traumatic brain injury. We calculated ABP, ABP pulse amplitude (ampABP), ICP, CPP, pbtO2, heart rate (HR), ICP pulse amplitude (ampICP), PRx, and ORx, before, during, and after each plateau wave. The analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc test was used to compare the differences in the variables before, during, and after the plateau wave. We considered all plateau waves, even in the same patient, independent because they are separated by long intervals. We found increases for ICP and ampICP according to our operational definitions for plateau waves. PRx increased significantly (p = 0.00026), CPP (p waves. ABP, ampABP, and HR remained unchanged. PRx during the plateau was higher than before the onset of wave in 40 cases (73 %) with no differences in baseline parameters for those with negative and positive ΔPRx (difference during and after). ORx showed an increase during and a decrease after the plateau waves, however, not statistically significant. PbtO2 overshoot after the wave occurred in 35 times (64 %), the mean difference was 4.9 ± 4.6 Hg (mean ± SD), and we found no difference in baseline parameters between those who overshoot and those who did not overshoot. Arterial blood pressure remains stable in ICP plateau waves, while cerebral autoregulatory indices show distinct changes, which indicate cerebrovascular reactivity impairment at the top of the wave. PbtO2 decreases during the waves and may

  11. In vivo near real time imaging of oxygen partial pressures in the glass catfish (Kryptopterus bichirris)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2012-01-01

    the fish with externally-mounted blue light emitting diodes (lip = 470 nm) to image the oxygen partial pressure. This method makes it possible to investigate oxygen partial pressures in the vascular system and different tissues of fish without having to insert any probes into the animal. After injection...... of the microspheres and a recovery period from the anaesthesia, in vivo oxygen partial pressure can be determined by just taking a picture of the live fish exposed to blue light. As no electrodes or sensors are attached, the method allows a wide range of experiments investigating in vivo oxygen levels under different...

  12. Water Evaporation and Conformational Changes from Partially Solvated Ubiquitin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana Prakash Thirumuruganandham

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using molecular dynamics simulation, we study the evaporation of water molecules off partially solvated ubiquitin. The evaporation and cooling rates are determined for a molecule at the initial temperature of 300 K. The cooling rate is found to be around 3 K/ns, and decreases with water temperature in the course of the evaporation. The conformation changes are monitored by studying a variety of intermediate partially solvated ubiquitin structures. We find that ubiquitin shrinks with decreasing hydration shell and exposes more of its hydrophilic surface area to the surrounding.

  13. Pressures of Partial Crystallization of Magmas Along Transforms: Implications for Crustal Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. L.; Zerda, C.; Brown, D.; Ciaramitaro, S. C.; Barton, M.

    2016-12-01

    Plate spreading at mid-ocean ridges is responsible for the creation of most of the crust on earth. The ridge system is very complex and many questions remain unresolved. Among these is the nature of magma plumbing systems beneath transform faults. Pervious workers have suggested that increased conductive cooling along transforms promotes higher pressures of partial crystallization, and that this explains the higher partial pressures of crystallization inferred for magmas erupted along slow spreading ridges compared to magmas erupted along faster spreading ridges. To test this hypothesis, we undertook a detailed analysis of pressures of partial crystallization for magmas erupted at 3 transforms along the fast to intermediate spreading East Pacific Rise(Blanco, Clipperton, and Siqueiros) and 3 transforms along the slow spreading Mid Atlantic Ridge(Famous Transform B, Kane, and 15°20'N). Pressures of partial crystallization were calculated from the compositions of glasses (quenched liquids) lying along the P (and T) dependent olivine, plagioclase, and augite cotectic using the method described by Kelley and Barton (2008). Published analyses of mid-ocean ridge basalt glasses sampled from these transforms and surrounding ridge segments were used as input data. Samples with anomalous chemical compositions and samples that yielded pressures associated with unrealistically large uncertainties were filtered out of the database. The pressures of partial crystallization for the remaining 916 samples ranged from 0 to 520 MPa with the great majority ( 95%) of sample returning pressures of less than 300 MPa. Pressures of 300 MPa) are associated with a small number of samples from the Pacific segments. Except for the Blanco, pressures of partial crystallization do not increase as transforms are approached. These observations contrast with those of previous workers, who reported anomalously high pressures (up to 1000 MPa) for a large number of samples erupted near both Atlantic

  14. Factors governing partial coalescence in oil-in-water emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fredrick, E.; Walstra, P.; Dewettinck, K.

    2010-01-01

    The consequences of the instability mechanism partial coalescence in oil-in-water food emulsions show a discrepancy. On the one hand, it needs to be avoided in order to achieve an extended shelf life in food products like sauces, creams and several milk products. On the other hand, during the

  15. Transition States for Submerged Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Partially-Pinned Air-Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafreshi, Hooman; Hemeda, Ahmed; VCU Team

    2015-11-01

    The pressure at which a superhydrophobic surface transitions from the Cassie state to the Wenzel state is often referred to as the critical pressure. Our mathematical simulations have shown that the Cassie-to-Wenzel transition is a gradual process that takes place over a range of pressures as oppose to an event that happens at a certain pressure. During the transition period, the air-water interface may go through a series pinned, partially-pinned, and de-pinned states that depend on the geometry of the surface asperities. This in turn indicates that the drag-reduction effect produced by a submerged superhydrophobic surface can vary with the hydrostatic pressure, and is highly dependent on sharpness of the surface asperities. The study reported here reviews our recent discoveries in simulating the wetted area and drag reduction effect of superhydrophobic surfaces with different microstructures. National Science Foundation CMM 1029924 and CBET 1402655 programs.

  16. Oxygen partial pressure of UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2}, and MOX fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Shuichiro

    1999-07-01

    Observed data of oxygen partial pressure were compiled and evaluated for UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2}, and MOX fuels to construct the code 'GO2MOX' analyzing the oxygen partial pressure on the basis of the Blackburn model. The resulting code turned out to fail in explaining the composition dependence of oxygen pressure in the uranium-plutonium system. The Blackburn model was then modified by simply introducing a scaling factor into the equilibrium constant of the chemical equilibrium between U{sup 6+} and U{sup 4+}. An improved code based on the modified Blackburn model proved to reproduce satisfactorily observed data for the oxygen partial pressure. (H. Baba)

  17. Water-Pressure Distribution on Seaplane Float

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, F L

    1929-01-01

    The investigation presented in this report was conducted for the purpose of determining the distribution and magnitude of water pressures likely to be experienced on seaplane hulls in service. It consisted of the development and construction of apparatus for recording water pressures lasting one one-hundredth second or longer and of flight tests to determine the water pressures on a UO-1 seaplane float under various conditions of taxiing, taking off, and landing. The apparatus developed was found to operate with satisfactory accuracy and is suitable for flight tests on other seaplanes. The tests on the UO-1 showed that maximum pressures of about 6.5 pounds per square inch occur at the step for the full width of the float bottom. Proceeding forward from the step the maximum pressures decrease in magnitude uniformly toward the bow, and the region of highest pressures narrows toward the keel. Immediately abaft the step the maximum pressures are very small, but increase in magnitude toward the stern and there once reached a value of about 5 pounds per square inch. (author)

  18. Hydrological balance and water transport processes of partially sealed soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Anne; Wessolek, Gerd

    2017-04-01

    With increased urbanisation, soil sealing and its drastic effects on hydrological processes have received a lot of attention. Based on safety concerns, there has been a clear focus on urban drainage and prevention of urban floods caused by storm water events. For this reason, any kind of sealing is often seen as impermeable runoff generator that prevents infiltration and evaporation. While many hydrological models, especially storm water models, have been developed, there are only a handful of empirical studies actually measuring the hydrological balance of (partially) sealed surfaces. These challenge the general assumption of negligible infiltration and evaporation and show that these processes take place even for severe sealing such as asphalt. Depending on the material, infiltration from partially sealed surfaces can be equal to that of vegetated ones. Therefore, more detailed knowledge is needed to improve our understanding and models. In Berlin, two partially sealed weighable lysimeters were equipped with multiple temperature and soil moisture sensors in order to study their hydrological balance, as well as water and heat transport processes within the soil profile. This combination of methods affirms previous observations and offers new insights into altered hydrological processes of partially sealed surfaces at a small temporal scale. It could be verified that not all precipitation is transformed into runoff. Even for a relatively high sealing degree of concrete slabs with narrow seams, evaporation and infiltration may exceed runoff. Due to the lack of plant roots, the hydrological balance is mostly governed by precipitation events and evaporation generally occurs directly after rainfall. However, both surfaces allow for upward water transport from the upper underlying soil layers, sometimes resulting in relatively low evaporation rates on days without precipitation. The individual response of the surfaces differs considerably, which illustrates how

  19. Development of water oak stump sprouts under a partial overstory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile S. Gardiner; Lisa M. Helmig

    1997-01-01

    A 28-year-old water oak (Quercus nigra L.) plantation was thinned from below to either 254 or 462 stems per hectare to determine the influence of a partial canopy on oak stump sprout development. Sprout clump survival, number of living sprouts in a clump, and height and DBH of the dominant sprout in a clump were measured in years l-5 and 7 after harvest. By year 7,...

  20. Effects of oxygen partial pressure on Li-air battery performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk Jae; Lee, Heung Chan; Ko, Jeongsik; Jung, In Sun; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Hyunpyo; Kim, Mokwon; Lee, Dong Joon; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Tae Young; Im, Dongmin

    2017-10-01

    For application in electric vehicles (EVs), the Li-air battery system needs an air intake system to supply dry oxygen at controlled concentration and feeding rate as the cathode active material. To facilitate the design of such air intake systems, we have investigated the effects of oxygen partial pressure (≤1 atm) on the performance of the Li-air cell, which has not been systematically examined. The amounts of consumed O2 and evolved CO2 from the Li-air cell are measured with a custom in situ differential electrochemical gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DEGC-MS). The amounts of consumed O2 suggest that the oxygen partial pressure does not affect the reaction mechanism during discharge, and the two-electron reaction occurs under all test conditions. On the other hand, the charging behavior varies by the oxygen partial pressure. The highest O2 evolution ratio is attained under 70% O2, along with the lowest CO2 evolution. The cell cycle life also peaks at 70% O2 condition. Overall, an oxygen partial pressure of about 0.5-0.7 atm maximizes the Li-air cell capacity and stability at 1 atm condition. The findings here indicate that the appropriate oxygen partial pressure can be a key factor when developing practical Li-air battery systems.

  1. Magnitude of the second gas effect on arterial sevoflurane partial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, Philip J; Horriat, Maryam; Robinson, Gavin J B; Pierce, Robert; Thompson, Bruce R

    2008-03-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated a faster rate of increase in end-expired partial pressure as a fraction of inspired (Pa/Pi) for volatile agents in the presence of high concentrations of nitrous oxide, consistent with the second gas effect. However, no study has demonstrated a similar effect on arterial blood concentrations. The authors compared arterial and end-tidal partial pressures of sevoflurane (Pa/Pisevo and Pa/Pisevo) in 14 patients for 30 min after introduction of either 70% nitrous oxide or nitrous oxide-free gas mixtures to determine the magnitude of the second gas effect. Blood partial pressures were measured using a double headspace equilibration technique. Both Pa/Pisevo and Pa/Pisevo were significantly higher in the nitrous oxide group than in the control group (P analysis of variance). This difference was significantly greater (P gas effect on arterial sevoflurane partial pressures. This effect is two to three times more powerful than the effect on end-expired partial pressures. The authors explain how this is due to the influence of ventilation-perfusion scatter on the distribution of blood flow and gas uptake in the lung.

  2. Two Phase Flow Modeling: Summary of Flow Regimes and Pressure Drop Correlations in Reduced and Partial Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Rame, E.; Kizito, J.; Kassemi, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of state-of-the-art predictions for two-phase flows relevant to Advanced Life Support. We strive to pick out the most used and accepted models for pressure drop and flow regime predictions. The main focus is to identify gaps in predictive capabilities in partial gravity for Lunar and Martian applications. Following a summary of flow regimes and pressure drop correlations for terrestrial and zero gravity, we analyze the fully developed annular gas-liquid flow in a straight cylindrical tube. This flow is amenable to analytical closed form solutions for the flow field and heat transfer. These solutions, valid for partial gravity as well, may be used as baselines and guides to compare experimental measurements. The flow regimes likely to be encountered in the water recovery equipment currently under consideration for space applications are provided in an appendix.

  3. Supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest reactor concepts, single pass core and experimental findings in thermal hydraulics, materials, corrosion, and water chemistry. It highlights research on supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWRs), one of the Generation IV reactors that are studied around the world. This book includes cladding material development and experimental findings on heat transfer, corrosion and water chemistry. The work presented here will help readers to understand the fundamental elements of reactor design and analysis methods, thermal hydraulics, materials and water

  4. High pressure water jet mining machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Clark R.

    1981-05-05

    A high pressure water jet mining machine for the longwall mining of coal is described. The machine is generally in the shape of a plowshare and is advanced in the direction in which the coal is cut. The machine has mounted thereon a plurality of nozzle modules each containing a high pressure water jet nozzle disposed to oscillate in a particular plane. The nozzle modules are oriented to cut in vertical and horizontal planes on the leading edge of the machine and the coal so cut is cleaved off by the wedge-shaped body.

  5. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, T.; Grunwald, G.

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of PWRs during cold water or boron dilution transients is strongly influenced by the distribution of coolant temperature and boron concentration at the core inlet. This distribution is the needed input to 3-dimensional neutron kinetics to calculate the power distribution in the core. It mainly depends on how the plugs of cold or unborated water formed in a single loop are mixed in the downcomer and in the lower plenum. To simulate such mixture phenomena requires the application of 3-dimensional CFD (computational fluid dynamics) codes. The results of the simulation have to be validated against mixture experiments at scaled facilities. Therefore, in the framework of a research project funded by BMBF, the institute creates a 1:5 mixture facility representing first the geometry of a German pressurized water reactor and later the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) geometry. The calculations are based on the CFD Code CFX-4. (orig.)

  6. Construction of water intake facilities from partially drying up watercourses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Evgeniy Vladimirovich

    Full Text Available Partially ephemeral streams are complex objects that can still be used for water supply or irrigation of agricultural land. The problem of such streams is poorly studied, because the influence of various environmental factors complicates carrying out any experiments. Also it is not possible to make their full classification due to their very strong variability not only on a particular geographical belt, but also within separate areas of the river. All this undoubtedly complicates the task of the designers when designing the system. Creation of laboratory models, allowing us to evaluate the possibilities of a spring use for the purpose of water supply, is very promising. These watercourses have a large amount of suspended sediments, so it is not possible to use the standard scheme of water using of the coastal and fluvial water intake structures. It is proposed to organize the fight with the sediments in the flow chart of primary clarifiers, which will perform the function of settling suspensions, to facilitate the work of water treatment facilities. Also the creation of artificial prop is useful in order to achieve the required level of water in a watercourse for water organization. If under the bottom of the river there is underground water, and the permeability of the soil is good, it is possible to arrange the withdrawal of water through infiltration intakes, by setting the filter under the bottom of the watercourse with its connection to filter, from which the water will climb to submersible pumps. Additional filtration through the soil of the river bottom allows not using the scheme sumps, which significantly reduces the cost of epy incoming water treatment.

  7. Releasing H2 molecules with a partial pressure difference without the use of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoonkyung; Huang, Bing; Duan, Wenhui; Ihm, Jisoon

    2010-08-01

    Using the pseudopotential density-functional method as well as equilibrium thermodynamic functions, we explore the process of releasing H2 molecules adsorbed on a transition-metal atom caused by the hydrogen-ammonia partial pressure difference. The H2 molecules bind to a transition-metal atom at H2 pressure- NH3 pressure-temperature 50atm-10-9atm-25°C , and they are released at 3atm-10-6atm-25°C . This process involves the same mechanism responsible for carbon monoxide poisoning of hemoglobin with the O2-CO partial pressure difference. We show that our findings can be applicable to an approach to induce hydrogen desorption on nanostructured hydrogen-storage materials without the need for increasing temperature.

  8. Report on ISS O2 Production, Gas Supply and Partial Pressure Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaezler, Ryan N.; Cook, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is used on International Space Station (ISS) for metabolic support and denitrogenation procedures prior to Extra-Vehicular Activities. Nitrogen is used to maintain total pressure and account for losses associated with leakage and operational losses. Oxygen and nitrogen have been supplied by various visiting vehicles such as the Progress and Shuttle in addition to the on-orbit oxygen production capability. Starting in 2014, new high pressure oxygen/nitrogen tanks are available to launch on commercial cargo vehicles and will replace the high pressure gas source that Shuttle used to provide. To maintain a habitable atmosphere the oxygen and nitrogen partial pressures are controlled between upper and lower bounds. The full range of the allowable partial pressures along with the increased ISS cabin volume are utilized as a buffer allowing days to pass between oxygen production or direct addition of oxygen and nitrogen to the atmosphere from reserves. This paper summarizes the amount of gas supplied and produced from all of the sources and describes past experience of managing partial pressures along with the range of management options available to the ISS.

  9. Water vapor pressure versus environmental lapse rate near the tropopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Antonio; Castanheira, Jose; Gimeno, Luis

    2010-05-01

    The relationship between water vapor pressure and temperature lapse rate in the vicinity of the tropopause was investigated using in situ observations. The water vapor partial pressures and the lapse rates within a vertical distance of ±1.5 km around the first thermal tropopause were calculated from the vertical soundings conducted by the NOAA/CMDL at several locations in the last few decades (GMD Data Archive). A positive non-linear relationship between the two quantities was found to hold across the studied tropopause region at mid-latitudes and polar latitudes. A similar analysis was performed on the 300 and 250 hPa pressure levels (which often intercept the tropopause region), by collecting temperature and humidity observations within 1979-2008 from the Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive (IGRA). A relationship having almost the same shape was detected for statically stable lapse rates at all latitude zones. Given the relevance of water vapor in the radiative transfer in the upper troposphere, the results are an indication of a local influence of water vapor on the thermal structure of the transition layer between the troposphere and stratosphere

  10. Effects of elevated CO2 partial pressure and temperature on the coccolithophore Syracosphaera pulchra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiorini, S.; Middelburg, J.J.; Gattuso, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of elevated partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and temperature on the cocco - lithophore Syracosphaera pulchra were investigated in isolation and in combination. Both the diploid and the haploid life stages were studied. Batch cultures were grown under 4 conditions: 400 μatm and 19°C; 400

  11. Interplay of the influence of oxygen partial pressure and rf power on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-07-25

    Jul 25, 2017 ... electrical and optical properties of rf-magnetron-sputtered aluminium-doped zinc oxide, AZO, thin films is illustrated. The dependence of film electrical resistance and interplanar spacing of film crystallites on rf power seems to be different at higher oxygen partial pressure values than at lower ones.

  12. Interplay of the influence of oxygen partial pressure and rf power on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 40; Issue 4. Interplay of the influence of oxygen ... Thedependence of film electrical resistance and interplanar spacing of film crystallites on rf power seems to be different athigher oxygen partial pressure values than at lower ones. Film preparation was performed at ...

  13. Partial Discharge Measurements in HV Rotating Machines in Dependence on Pressure of Coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kršňák

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the pressure of the coolant used in high voltage rotating machines on partial discharges occurring in stator insulation is discussed in this paper. The first part deals with a theoretical analysis of the topic. The second part deals with the results obtained on a real generator in industrial conditions. Finally, theoretical assumptions and obtained results are compared.

  14. Methane hydrate formation in partially water-saturated Ottawa sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    Bulk properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediment strongly depend on whether hydrate forms primarily in the pore fluid, becomes a load-bearing member of the sediment matrix, or cements sediment grains. Our compressional wave speed measurements through partially water-saturated, methane hydrate-bearing Ottawa sands suggest hydrate surrounds and cements sediment grains. The three Ottawa sand packs tested in the Gas Hydrate And Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument (GHASTLI) contain 38(1)% porosity, initially with distilled water saturating 58, 31, and 16% of that pore space, respectively. From the volume of methane gas produced during hydrate dissociation, we calculated the hydrate concentration in the pore space to be 70, 37, and 20% respectively. Based on these hydrate concentrations and our measured compressional wave speeds, we used a rock physics model to differentiate between potential pore-space hydrate distributions. Model results suggest methane hydrate cements unconsolidated sediment when forming in systems containing an abundant gas phase.

  15. Variability of Equilibrium Partial Pressure of Carbon Dioxide (pCO2 and Concentration of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (TCO2 in the Black Sea Coastal Waters in 2010–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Khoruzhii

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on direct field measurements of pCO2 and TCO2 carried out in 2010–2014 in the Black Sea coastal waters, dynamics of inorganic carbon on different time scales is considered. It is shown that the highest variability of both parameters on a small time scale is observed during the seawater spring warming resulting from the upwelling impact. The diurnal variations of the pCO2 and TCO2 values (in course of the analogous period demonstrate no pronounced tendencies; they are characterized by significant inter-annual variability. In course of summer and autumn-winter hydrological seasons, the diurnal variation of pCO2 and TCO2 is insignificant. The minimum values of TCO2 are observed in summer and autumn-winter, whereas the maximum ones – in spring during upwelling. The pCO2 value in seawater achieves its maximum in late spring and minimum – in late autumn–early winter hydrological season. The results of pCO2 measurements in a warm season prove the previous notions on the Black Sea waters as a source of CO2 emission to the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is assumed to be more intensively bound and transformed into the other forms of inorganic carbon in a cold season. Possible reason of this phenomenon can consist in increase of the suspended matter inflow to the water area due to more frequent storms and growth of the terrigenous runoff volume. In cold season, the lower pCO2 is characteristic of seawater and the higher one – of the atmosphere. Complex character of pCO2 temporal variability testifies to heterogeneity and different intensity of the factors influencing this value in different seasons.

  16. Surface modification of yttria-stabilized-zirconia thin films under various oxygen partial pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, J.S. [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Park, S.-S. [Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Mun, B.S. [Department of Applied Physics, Hanyang University, ERICA, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, S.H.; Hwang, E.S. [Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. [National Core Research Center for Extreme Light Applications, Gwangju Institute Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Huh, J. [Chonnam National University, Yeosu 550-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, H.J.; Kim, J.S. [Research Center for Dielectric and Advanced Matter, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, H.J. [Jeunju Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H.G. [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, S.Y. [Department of Cogno-mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Miryang 627-706 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, J. [Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Park, S., E-mail: psk@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-30

    This report discusses the structural and spectroscopic analysis of yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) thin films grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates. It is found that the changes of oxygen partial pressure during the growth are closely related to the surface chemical compositions and the surface crystal orientations of the thin films. The presence of oxygen partial pressure produces a polycrystalline structure on the thin film while a preferred orientation of crystal structures is formed under no oxygen partial pressure. Difficulty arises in identifying the structure of the thin films due to the broad characteristics of the x-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks; however, the XRD rocking scan suggests the existence of two lateral domain sizes. The chemical analysis of the thin films from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicates the enrichment of surface yttrium-oxide as the oxygen partial pressure increases. The detailed analysis of valence band spectra also suggests that the thin films undergo a surface structural phase transition, i.e., transforming from a single tetragonal structure to a mixed (cubic + monoclinic) structure. Furthermore, the optical data display the small increments of the band gap as the oxygen partial pressure increases, which reflects the presence of the structural phase transition of the thin films. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The rocking scan suggests the existence of two lateral domain sizes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The XPS indicates the enrichment of surface yttrium-oxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The valence band spectra suggest that the thin films exhibit structure transforms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optical data display the small increments of the band gap. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This reflects the presence of the structural phase transition of the thin films.

  17. Quantitative Micro-Raman Spectroscopy for Partial Pressure Measurement in Small Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Sylvain; Gobet, Jean; Overstolz, Thomas; Haesler, Jacques; Lecomte, Steve

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate the quantitative capabilities of Raman confocal microscopy as a nondestructive method to measure the partial pressure of molecular gases in mm3 range sealed volume having an optical access. Thanks to a calibration procedure, we apply this technique for the characterization of the absolute nitrogen partial pressure inside buffered micro electromechanical system (MEMS) atomic vapor cells developed for atomic clocks. Our results are compared with measurements obtained by rubidium hyperfine frequency spectroscopy and a good agreement is demonstrated between the two methods, with a three-sigma detection limit below 10 mbar for a 1 h integration time, using a 33 mW 532 nm excitation laser. These results prove the potential of confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy as a simple and nondestructive method for small-scale pressure measurements.

  18. Partial alignment and measurement of residual dipolar couplings of proteins under high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yinan; Wand, A Joshua

    2013-08-01

    High-pressure NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a complementary approach for investigating various structural and thermodynamic properties of macromolecules. Noticeably absent from the array of experimental restraints that have been employed to characterize protein structures at high hydrostatic pressure is the residual dipolar coupling, which requires the partial alignment of the macromolecule of interest. Here we examine five alignment media that are commonly used at ambient pressure for this purpose. We find that the spontaneous alignment of Pf1 phage, d(GpG) and a C12E5/n-hexnanol mixture in a magnetic field is preserved under high hydrostatic pressure. However, DMPC/DHPC bicelles and collagen gel are found to be unsuitable. Evidence is presented to demonstrate that pressure-induced structural changes can be identified using the residual dipolar coupling.

  19. Partial alignment and measurement of residual dipolar couplings of proteins under high hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yinan; Wand, A. Joshua, E-mail: wand@mail.med.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Johnson Research Foundation (United States)

    2013-08-15

    High-pressure NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a complementary approach for investigating various structural and thermodynamic properties of macromolecules. Noticeably absent from the array of experimental restraints that have been employed to characterize protein structures at high hydrostatic pressure is the residual dipolar coupling, which requires the partial alignment of the macromolecule of interest. Here we examine five alignment media that are commonly used at ambient pressure for this purpose. We find that the spontaneous alignment of Pf1 phage, d(GpG) and a C12E5/n-hexnanol mixture in a magnetic field is preserved under high hydrostatic pressure. However, DMPC/DHPC bicelles and collagen gel are found to be unsuitable. Evidence is presented to demonstrate that pressure-induced structural changes can be identified using the residual dipolar coupling.

  20. Managing water pressure for water savings in developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-03

    Mar 3, 2014 ... The Kotež district is a suburb located in the northern part of the city, on the flatlands on the left bank of the Danube River at an altitude of 71.50 m asl, at the edge of the Belgrade water supply system's lowest pressure zone. The water distribution network in Kotež was constructed during the 1970s and is pre-.

  1. Spatial and Temporal Variations in the Partial Pressure and Emission of CO2 and CH4 in and Amazon Floodplain Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, B. R.; Amaral, J. H.; Barbosa, P.; Kasper, D.; MacIntyre, S.; Cortes, A.; Sarmento, H.; Borges, A. V.; Melack, J. M.; Farjalla, V.

    2015-12-01

    The Amazon floodplain contains a variety of wetland environments which contribute CO2 and CH4 to the regional and global atmospheres. The partial pressure and emission of these greenhouse gases (GHGs) varies: 1) between habitats, 2) seasonally, as the characteristics these habitats changes and 3) diurnally, in response to diurnal stratification. In this study, we investigated the combined influence of these factors on the partial pressure and emission of GHGs in Lago Janauacá, a central Amazon floodplain lake (3o23' S; 60o18' O). All measurements were made between August of 2014 and April of 2015 at two different sites and in three distinct habitats: open water, flooded forest, flooded macrophytes. Concentrations of CO2 and CH4 in air were measured continuously with a cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer, Los Gatos Research´s Ultraportable Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (UGGA). Vertical profiles o pCO2 and pCH4 were measured using the UGGA connected to an electric pump and equilibrator. Diffusive surface emissions were estimated with the UGGA connected to a static floating chamber. To investigate the influence of vertical stratification and mixing on GHG partial pressure and emissions, a meteorological station and submersible sensor chain were deployed at each site. Meteorological sensors included wind speed and direction. The submersible chains included thermistors and oxygen sensors. Depth profiles of partial pressure and diffusive emissions for both CO2 and CH4 varied diurnally, seasonally and between habitats. Both pCO2 and pCH4 were consistently higher in bottom than surface waters with the largest differences occurring at high water when thermal stratification was most stable. Methane emissions and partial pressures were highest at low water while pCO2 and CO2 fluxes were highest during high water periods, with 35% of CO2 fluxes at low water being negative. The highest average surface value of pCO2 (5491 μatm), encountered during rising water, was ~3 times

  2. Suppression of diamagnetism by neutrals pressure in partially ionized, high-beta plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Shunjiro; Kuwahara, Daisuke; Yano, Kazuki; Fruchtman, Amnon

    2016-12-01

    Suppression of diamagnetism in a partially ionized plasma with high beta was experimentally investigated by the use of Langmuir and Hall sensor probes, focusing on a neutrals pressure effect. The plasma beta, which is the ratio of plasma to vacuum magnetic pressures, varied from ˜1% to >100% while the magnetic field varied from ˜120 G to ˜1 G. Here, a uniform magnetized argon plasma was operated mostly in an inductive mode, using a helicon plasma source of the Large Helicon Plasma Device [S. Shinohara et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 057104 (2009)] with a diameter of 738 mm and an axial length of 4860 mm. Electron density varied from 5 × 1015 m-3 to diamagnetic effect was smaller than that expected by the plasma beta. This suppressed diamagnetism is explained by the neutrals pressure replacing magnetic pressure in balancing plasma pressure. Diamagnetism is weakened if neutrals pressure is comparable to the plasma pressure and if the coupling of plasma and neutrals pressures by ion-neutral collisions is strong enough.

  3. Effect of partial sports massage on blood pressure and heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Pystupa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available With the growing popularity and demand for different types of massages (including sports is a growing need for research on specific forms. There is also a need to study the advantages and effects on various body functions. The objective was to study the effect of partial sports massage on blood pressure and heart rate in both men and women. Material and methods. Research has been extended 80 healthy men and women are physically active (age 20-25 years. Blood pressure and heart rate were made on the left arm automatic digital device (model HEM - 907. The device is intended to measure blood pressure. It is established that it is possible to verify the existing beliefs. This promotes more efficient use of massage therapy. Conclusions . Sports massage has an effect on hemodynamic changes, the increase (decrease in blood pressure acceleration (deceleration of the heart rate. It depends on what part of the body exposed to the massage procedure.

  4. Growth of the microalgae Neochloris oleoabundans at high partial oxygen pressures and sub-saturating light intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sousa, C.A.; Winter, de L.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Vermue, M.H.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of partial oxygen pressure on growth of Neochloris oleoabundans was studied at sub-saturating light intensity in a fully-controlled stirred tank photobioreactor. At the three partial oxygen pressures tested (PO2=0.24; 0.63; 0.84 bar), the specific growth rate was 1.38; 1.36 and 1.06

  5. Global Autocorrelation Scales of the Partial Pressure of Oceanic CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Adamec, David; Takahashi, Taro; Sutherland, Stewart C.

    2004-01-01

    A global database of approximately 1.7 million observations of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in surface ocean waters (pCO2) collected between 1970 and 2003 is used to estimate its spatial autocorrelation structure. The patterns of the lag distance where the autocorrelation exceeds 0.8 is similar to patterns in the spatial distribution of the first baroclinic Rossby radius of deformation indicating that ocean circulation processes play a significant role in determining the spatial variability of pCO2. For example, the global maximum of the distance at which autocorrelations exceed 0.8 averages about 140 km in the equatorial Pacific. Also, the lag distance at which the autocorrelation exceed 0.8 is greater in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream than it is near the Kuroshio, approximately 50 km near the Gulf Stream as opposed to 20 km near the Kuroshio. Separate calculations for times when the sun is north and south of the equator revealed no obvious seasonal dependence of the spatial autocorrelation scales. The pCO2 measurements at Ocean Weather Station (OWS) 'P', in the eastern subarctic Pacific (50 N, 145 W) is the only fixed location where an uninterrupted time series of sufficient length exists to calculate a meaningful temporal autocorrelation function for lags greater than a few days. The estimated temporal autocorrelation function at OWS 'P', is highly variable. A spectral analysis of the longest four pCO2 time series indicates a high level of variability occurring over periods from the atmospheric synoptic to the maximum length of the time series, in this case 42 days. It is likely that a relative peak in variability with a period of 3-6 days is related to atmospheric synoptic period variability and ocean mixing events due to wind stirring. However, the short length of available time series makes identifying temporal relationships between pCO2 and atmospheric or ocean processes problematic.

  6. Optimizing the physical ergonomics indices for the use of partial pressure suits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Li, Xianxue; Hedge, Alan; Hu, Huimin; Feathers, David; Qin, Zhifeng; Xiao, Huajun; Xue, Lihao; Zhou, Qianxiang

    2015-03-01

    This study developed an ergonomic evaluation system for the design of high-altitude partial pressure suits (PPSs). A total of twenty-one Chinese males participated in the experiment which tested three types of ergonomics indices (manipulative mission, operational reach and operational strength) were studied using a three-dimensional video-based motion capture system, a target-pointing board, a hand dynamometer, and a step-tread apparatus. In total, 36 ergonomics indices were evaluated and optimized using regression and fitting analysis. Some indices that were found to be linearly related and redundant were removed from the study. An optimal ergonomics index system was established that can be used to conveniently and quickly evaluate the performance of different pressurized/non-pressurized suit designs. The resulting ergonomics index system will provide a theoretical basis and practical guidance for mission planners, suit designers and engineers to design equipment for human use, and to aid in assessing partial pressure suits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Stabilization of partially folded states in protein folding/misfolding transitions by hydrostatic pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.T. Ferreira

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, hydrostatic pressure has been extensively used in the study of both protein folding and misfolding/aggregation. Compared to other chemical or physical denaturing agents, a unique feature of pressure is its ability to induce subtle changes in protein conformation, which allow the stabilization of partially folded intermediate states that are usually not significantly populated under more drastic conditions (e.g., in the presence of chemical denaturants or at high temperatures. Much of the recent research in the field of protein folding has focused on the characterization of folding intermediates since these species appear to be involved in a variety of disease-causing protein misfolding and aggregation events. The exact mechanisms of these biologicalphenomena, however, are still poorly understood. Here, we review recent examples of the use of hydrostatic pressure as a tool to obtain insight into the forces and energetics governing the productive folding or the misfolding and aggregation of proteins.

  8. Experimental and numerical analysis of pressure pulses characteristics in a Francis turbine with partial load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yexiang, X; Zhengwei, W; Zongguo, Y; Jin, Z, E-mail: xiaoyex@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering and Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2010-08-15

    This study experimentally and numerically investigates the pressure pulses characteristics and unsteady flow behavior in a Francis turbine with partial load. Unsteady wall pressure measurements with partial load condition are performs to investigate thoroughly pressure fields in the spiral case, runner head cover and straight draft tube dynamically. The unsteady Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the k-{omega}based SST turbulence model were used to model the unsteady flow within the entire flow passage of the Francis turbine. The dominate frequency of the predicted pressure pulses at runner inlet agree with the experimental results in the head cover. The influence of the blade passing frequency causes the simulated peak-to-peak amplitudes in the runner inlet to be larger than in the head cover. The measured and predicted pressure pulses at different positions along the runner are comparable. The predicted pressure fluctuations in the draft tube agree well with the experimental results. However the peak-to-peak amplitudes in the spiral case are not as well predicted so the calculation domain and the inlet boundary conditions need to be improved. At the most unstable operating condition, the pulse in the flow passage are due to the rotor-stator interference (RSI) between the runner and the guide vanes, the blade channel vortex in the runner blade passage and the vortex rope in the draft tube. The unsteady flow patterns in the turbine, including the blade channel vortex in the runner and the helical vortex rope in the draft tube, are classified numerically.

  9. Experimental and numerical analysis of pressure pulses characteristics in a Francis turbine with partial load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yexiang, X.; Zhengwei, W.; Zongguo, Y.; Jin, Z.

    2010-08-01

    This study experimentally and numerically investigates the pressure pulses characteristics and unsteady flow behavior in a Francis turbine with partial load. Unsteady wall pressure measurements with partial load condition are performs to investigate thoroughly pressure fields in the spiral case, runner head cover and straight draft tube dynamically. The unsteady Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the k-ωbased SST turbulence model were used to model the unsteady flow within the entire flow passage of the Francis turbine. The dominate frequency of the predicted pressure pulses at runner inlet agree with the experimental results in the head cover. The influence of the blade passing frequency causes the simulated peak-to-peak amplitudes in the runner inlet to be larger than in the head cover. The measured and predicted pressure pulses at different positions along the runner are comparable. The predicted pressure fluctuations in the draft tube agree well with the experimental results. However the peak-to-peak amplitudes in the spiral case are not as well predicted so the calculation domain and the inlet boundary conditions need to be improved. At the most unstable operating condition, the pulse in the flow passage are due to the rotor-stator interference (RSI) between the runner and the guide vanes, the blade channel vortex in the runner blade passage and the vortex rope in the draft tube. The unsteady flow patterns in the turbine, including the blade channel vortex in the runner and the helical vortex rope in the draft tube, are classified numerically.

  10. Pressure distribution of implant-supported removable partial dentures with stress-breaking attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Kentaro; Kurihara, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yasunori; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2014-04-01

    This in vitro study investigated the pressure distribution of the implant-supported removable partial dentures (RPDs) with the stress-breaking attachments under the occlusal force. The experimental model of bilateral missing premolars and molars was modified from a commercial simulation model. Five pressure sensors were embedded near the bilateral first molars, first premolars, and medio-lingual alveolar crest. Two implants were placed near the second molars, and they were connected to the denture base using the following conditions: complete separation between the denture base and implant with cover screws (CRPD), flexible connection with a stress-breaking ball (SBB) attachment, and rigid connection without stress breaking with healing caps (HC). The pressure at five different areas of the soft tissue and the displacement of the RPDs were simultaneously measured, loading up to 50 N. The coefficient of variation (CV) for each connection was calculated from all data of the pressure at five areas to evaluate the pressure distribution. The pressure on medio-lingual alveolar crest and molars of the HC was less than SBB and CRPD. In contrast, the pressure on premolars of SBB was greater than for the HC and CRPD. The CV of SBB was less than that of HC and CRPD. Denture displacement of HC and SBB was less than for CRPD. Within the in vitro limitations, precise denture settlements and pressure distribution under the denture base could be controlled using an SBB attachment. An SBB attachment might be able to protect the implant from harmful force. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of pressure on colloidal behavior in hydrothermal water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Swapan K; Tsujii, Kaoru

    2008-06-12

    The pressure dependence of the colloidal phenomena of nanoparticles in hydrothermal water was investigated by both experiment and theory. Dynamic light scattering experiments show that diamond nanoparticles, which are highly stable in ambient water, easily aggregate in high-temperature and high-pressure water. Although the stability of nanoparticles in ambient pure water does not depend on pressure, it is interestingly found that at constant temperature particles aggregate faster in the hydrothermal regime when the pressure is higher. A theoretical interpretation is proposed to predict the stability of colloids in water as a function of temperature and pressure. Numerical analysis shows that the repulsive interparticle potential barrier, which stabilizes particles in the dispersion, decreases dramatically in high-temperature and high-pressure water. The decrease in the potential barrier arises from the temperature and the pressure dependencies of the dielectric constant (epsilon) and the ion product (p K w) of water. Numerical analysis shows that the pressure dependence of epsilon is negligible in the temperature range of 20-300 degrees C, whereas the pressure dependence of p K w is significant at temperatures of T > 150 degrees C. The theory reveals that the pressure dependence of the rate of size increment in the hydrothermal regime results from the pressure dependence of p K w. An increase in pressure in the hydrothermal water enhances the ionization of water molecules which reduces the surface potential of the particles. This effect lowers the interparticle repulsive potential barrier, which accelerates aggregation of the particles.

  12. Sensor for measuring hydrogen partial pressure in parabolic trough power plant expansion tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatzmaier, Greg C.; Cooney, Daniel A.

    2017-06-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Acciona Energy North America are working together to design and implement a process system that provides a permanent solution to the issue of hydrogen buildup at parabolic trough power plants. We are pursuing a method that selectively removes hydrogen from the expansion tanks that serve as reservoirs for the heat transfer fluid (HTF) that circulates in the collector field and power block components. Our modeling shows that removing hydrogen from the expansion tanks at a design rate reduces and maintains dissolved hydrogen in the circulating HTF to a selected target level. Our collaborative work consists of several tasks that are needed to advance this process concept to a development stage, where it is ready for implementation at a commercial power plant. Our main effort is to design and evaluate likely process-unit operations that remove hydrogen from the expansion tanks at a specified rate. Additionally, we designed and demonstrated a method and instrumentation to measure hydrogen partial pressure and concentration in the expansion-tank headspace gas. We measured hydrogen partial pressure in the headspace gas mixture using a palladium-alloy membrane, which is permeable exclusively to hydrogen. The membrane establishes a pure hydrogen gas phase that is in equilibrium with the hydrogen in the gas mixture. We designed and fabricated instrumentation, and demonstrated its effectiveness in measuring hydrogen partial pressures over a range of three orders of magnitude. Our goal is to install this instrument at the Nevada Solar One power plant and to demonstrate its effectiveness in measuring hydrogen levels in the expansion tanks under normal plant operating conditions.

  13. Sensor for Measuring Hydrogen Partial Pressure in Parabolic Trough Power Plant Expansion Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatzmaier, Greg C.; Cooney, Daniel A.

    2017-06-27

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Acciona Energy North America are working together to design and implement a process system that provides a permanent solution to the issue of hydrogen buildup at parabolic trough power plants. We are pursuing a method that selectively removes hydrogen from the expansion tanks that serve as reservoirs for the heat transfer fluid (HTF) that circulates in the collector field and power block components. Our modeling shows that removing hydrogen from the expansion tanks at a design rate reduces and maintains dissolved hydrogen in the circulating HTF to a selected target level. Our collaborative work consists of several tasks that are needed to advance this process concept to a development stage, where it is ready for implementation at a commercial power plant. Our main effort is to design and evaluate likely process-unit operations that remove hydrogen from the expansion tanks at a specified rate. Additionally, we designed and demonstrated a method and instrumentation to measure hydrogen partial pressure and concentration in the expansion-tank headspace gas. We measured hydrogen partial pressure in the headspace gas mixture using a palladium-alloy membrane, which is permeable exclusively to hydrogen. The membrane establishes a pure hydrogen gas phase that is in equilibrium with the hydrogen in the gas mixture. We designed and fabricated instrumentation, and demonstrated its effectiveness in measuring hydrogen partial pressures over a range of three orders of magnitude. Our goal is to install this instrument at the Nevada Solar One power plant and to demonstrate its effectiveness in measuring hydrogen levels in the expansion tanks under normal plant operating conditions.

  14. Pressure of Partial Crystallization of Katla Magmas: Implications for Magma Chamber Depth and for the Magma Plumbing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenison, A.; Kelley, D. F.; Barton, M.

    2012-12-01

    . The raw data were filtered to remove non basalts and to exclude basalt samples with anomalous chemical compositions. Pressures of partial crystallization were calculated by quantitatively comparing the compositions of the glasses with those of experimental liquids in equilibrium with olivine, plagioclase, and augite at different pressures and temperatures using the approach described by Yang and co-workers (1996). The results for samples that yielded pressures associated with unrealistically large uncertainties were filtered out of the database. Pressures for the remaining samples were converted to depths assuming an average crustal density of 2900 kg/m3. The results indicate that most magmas partially crystallized over a range of pressures corresponding to a range of depths from 20 to 25 km. We conclude that one or more magma chamber occur in this depth range, or at slightly shallower depths if the effects of water on calculated pressures of partial crystallization are taken into account. Most erupted basalts have ascended from this depth directly to the surface, presumably via dikes. The Katla plumbing system is thus similar to that at other major volcanoes (Hekla, Bardarbunga, Grimsvotn) in the eastern volcanic zone inasmuch as the majority of the erupted magmas are supplied from chambers in the middle and lower crust at depths of 10 to 30 km.

  15. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low

  16. Influence of the oxygen partial pressure on the phase evolution during Bi-2212 wire melt processing

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C.; Rikel, M.O.; Kadar, J.; Doerrer, C.; Di Michiel, M.; Ballarino, A.; Bottura, L.; Jiang, J.; Kametani, F.; Hellstrom, E.E.; Larbalestier, D.C.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the influence of the oxygen partial pressure pO2 up to 5.5 bar on the phase changes that occur during melt processing of a state-of-the-art Bi-2212 multifilamentary wire. Phase changes have been monitored in situ by high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). We found that the stability of Bi-2212 phase is reduced with increasing pO2. For pO2>1 bar a significant amount of Bi-2212 phase decomposes upon heating in the range 400 to 650 °C. The extent of decomposition strongly increases with increasing pO2, and at pO2=5.5 bar Bi-2212 decomposes completely in the solid state. Textured Bi-2212 can be formed during solidification when pO2 is reduced to 0.45 bar when the precursor is molten. Since the formation of current limiting second phases is very sensitive to pO2 when it exceeds 1 bar, we recommend to reduce the oxygen partial pressure below the commonly used pO2=1 bar, in order to increase the pO2 margins and to make the overpressure process more robust.

  17. SrRuO3 thin films grown on MgO substrates at different oxygen partial pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Zou, Bin

    2013-01-08

    A comprehensive study of SrRuO3 thin films growth on (001) MgO substrates by pulsed laser deposition in a wide oxygen pressure range from 10 to 300 mTorr was carried out. The experimental results showed a correlation between the lattice constants, resistivity, and oxygen partial pressures used. Ru deficiency detected only in films deposited at lower oxygen pressures (<50 mTorr), resulted in an elongation of the in-plane and out-of-plane lattice constants and an increase in the film resistivity. When deposited with oxygen partial pressure of 50 mTorr, SrRuO3 films had lattice parameters matching those of bulk SrRuO3 material and exhibited room temperature resistivity of 320 μΩ·cm. The resistivity of SrRuO 3/MgO films decreased with increasing oxygen partial pressure. Copyright © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  18. Effect of partial water deprivation on the performance and carcass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, in the second experiment, when the birds were exposed to longer period of water deprivation (5 weeks), body weight and water consumption were significantly affected (P<0.05) by treatments. But weight gain, feed intake, EFU, water/feed ratio and efficiency of water utilization were not affected. Depriving birds of ...

  19. Determining Atmospheric Pressure Using a Water Barometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick, II; Larson, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The atmosphere is an envelope of compressible gases that surrounds Earth. Because of its compressibility and nonuniform heating by the Sun, it is in constant motion. The atmosphere exerts pressure on Earth's surface, but that pressure is in constant flux. This experiment allows students to directly measure atmospheric pressure by measuring the…

  20. Hydro-isomerization of n-hexane on bi-functional catalyst: Effect of total and hydrogen partial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoa, Dao Thi Kim; Loc, Luu Cam

    2017-09-01

    The effect of both total pressure and hydrogen partial pressure during n-hexane hydro-isomerization over platinum impregnated on HZSM-5 was studied. n-Hexane hydro-isomerization was conducted at atmospheric pressure and 0.7 MPa to observe the influence of total pressure. In order to see the effect of hydrogen partial pressure, the reaction was taken place at different partial pressure of hydrogen varied from 307 hPa to 718 hPa by dilution with nitrogen to keep the total pressure at 0.1 MPa. Physico-chemical characteristics of catalyst were determined by the methods of nitrogen physi-sorption BET, SEM, XRD, TEM, NH3-TPD, TPR, and Hydrogen Pulse Chemi-sorption. Activity of catalyst in the hydro-isomerization of n-hexane was studied in a micro-flow reactor in the temperature range of 225-325 °C; the molar ratio H2/ hydrocarbon: 5.92, concentration of n-hexane: 9.2 mol.%, GHSV 2698 h-1. The obtained catalyst expressed high acid density, good reducing property, high metal dispersion, and good balance between metallic and acidic sites. It is excellent contact for n-hexane hydro-isomerization. At 250 °C, n-hexane conversion and selectivity were as high as 59-76 % and 85-99 %, respectively. It was found that catalytic activity was promoted either by total pressure or hydrogen partial pressure. At total pressure of 0.7 MPa while hydrogen partial pressure of 718 hPa, catalyst produced 63 RON liquid product containing friendly environmental iso-paraffins which is superior blending stock for green gasoline. Hydrogen did not only preserve catalyst actives by depressing hydrocracking and removing coke precursors but also facilitated hydride transfer step in the bi-functional bi-molecular mechanism.

  1. The role of hydrogen partial pressure on the annealing of copper substrates for graphene CVD synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Welyson T. S.; Cunha, Thiago H. R.; Barcelos, Ingrid D.; Miquita, Douglas R.; Ferrari, Gustavo A.; de Oliveira, Sergio; Seara, Luciana M.; Silva Neto, Eliel G.; Ferlauto, Andre S.; Lacerda, Rodrigo G.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of hydrogen utilized during the thermal treatment of copper substrates on the subsequent graphene growth is investigated. It is known that various parameters such as nature of the carbon precursor, temperature and pressure strongly affect the quality of the graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. Another important parameter is the hydrogen partial pressure adjusted during the growth stage and in the pre-growth annealing of the substrate. In attempts to elucidate the role of hydrogen assisted thermal annealing on the copper substrate morphology and on the subsequent graphene growth, we subjected Cu foils to thermal annealing under H2 atmosphere at different pressures. The copper surface was characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy whereas graphene films and grains were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and SEM. Our findings suggest that hydrogen not only affect the Cu surface but also diffuses into the substrate, being stored in the bulk material during the thermal treatment of the substrate. The release of hydrogen species in the subsequent stages of growth can result in damage to the graphene layer or induce the nucleation of additional layers depending on the growth and pre-growth conditions. Therefore, the use of hydrogen during the annealing of ‘low purity Cu foils’ should be carefully planned in order to obtain high quality graphene via LPCVD.

  2. Effect of CO2 partial pressure and different CO2 phases on carbon steel corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlobo, MGR; Premlall, K.; Olubambi, PA

    2017-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is the recent promising technology aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emission. Like many other developed technologies, CCS is faced with great challenges such as pipeline transportation failure due to corrosion. There are many factors contributing to steel corrosion during the pipeline transportation of carbon dioxide (CO2). This study focuses on CO2 partial pressure and different phases of CO2 as some of the factors contributing to steel corrosion. Carbon steel was used as a testing specimen. High pressure reactor was used in this study to compress CO2 from low to high pressures ultimately changing the CO2 from gaseous phase to gas/liquid phase (subcritical) and to dense phase (supercritical). Weight loss method was employed to determine the corrosion rate while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray diffraction (XRD) were used to study the carbon steel morphology and phase analysis. Using low magnification digital camera, the type of corrosion that took place on the carbon steel surface was identified.

  3. Evaluation of pressure transducers under turbid natural waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desa, E.; Desa, E.; Smith, D.; Peshwe, V.B.; VijayKumar, K.; Desa, J.A.E.

    , the use of rho sub(eff) in contrast to the bulk density, significantly improves the measurement accuracy. For celar waters, precision density measurements made on discrete water samples agreed with rho sub(eff) values derived from pressure measurements...

  4. Experimental investigation of gas hydrate formation, plugging and transportability in partially dispersed and water continuous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayamohan, Prithvi

    As oil/gas subsea fields mature, the amount of water produced increases significantly due to the production methods employed to enhance the recovery of oil. This is true especially in the case of oil reservoirs. This increase in the water hold up increases the risk of hydrate plug formation in the pipelines, thereby resulting in higher inhibition cost strategies. A major industry concern is to reduce the severe safety risks associated with hydrate plug formation, and significantly extending subsea tieback distances by providing a cost effective flow assurance management/safety tool for mature fields. Developing fundamental understanding of the key mechanistic steps towards hydrate plug formation for different multiphase flow conditions is a key challenge to the flow assurance community. Such understanding can ultimately provide new insight and hydrate management guidelines to diminish the safety risks due to hydrate formation and accumulation in deepwater flowlines and facilities. The transportability of hydrates in pipelines is a function of the operating parameters, such as temperature, pressure, fluid mixture velocity, liquid loading, and fluid system characteristics. Specifically, the hydrate formation rate and plugging onset characteristics can be significantly different for water continuous, oil continuous, and partially dispersed systems. The latter is defined as a system containing oil/gas/water, where the water is present both as a free phase and partially dispersed in the oil phase (i.e., entrained water in the oil). Since hydrate formation from oil dispersed in water systems and partially dispersed water systems is an area which is poorly understood, this thesis aims to address some key questions in these systems. Selected experiments have been performed at the University of Tulsa flowloop to study the hydrate formation and plugging characteristics for the partially dispersed water/oil/gas systems as well as systems where the oil is completely dispersed

  5. Highly pressurized partially miscible liquid-liquid flow in a micro-T-junction. II. Theoretical justifications and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ning; Wen, John Z.; Ren, Carolyn L.

    2017-04-01

    This is the second part of a two-part study on a partially miscible liquid-liquid flow (carbon dioxide and deionized water) that is highly pressurized and confined in a microfluidic T-junction. In the first part of this study, we reported experimental observations of the development of flow regimes under various flow conditions and the quantitative characteristics of the drop flow including the drop length, after-generation drop speed, and periodic spacing development between an emerging drop and the newly produced one. Here in part II we provide theoretical justifications to our quantitative studies on the drop flow by considering (1) C O2 hydration at the interface with water, (2) the diffusion-controlled dissolution of C O2 molecules in water, and (3) the diffusion distance of the dissolved C O2 molecules. Our analyses show that (1) the C O2 hydration at the interface is overall negligible, (2) a saturation scenario of the dissolved C O2 molecules in the vicinity of the interface will not be reached within the contact time between the two fluids, and (3) molecular diffusion does play a role in transferring the dissolved molecules, but the diffusion distance is very limited compared with the channel geometry. In addition, mathematical models for the drop length and the drop spacing are developed based on the observations in part I, and their predictions are compared to our experimental results.

  6. Adaptive Reference Control for Pressure Management in Water Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Carsten; Jensen, Tom Nørgaard; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    Water scarcity is an increasing problem worldwide and at the same time a huge amount of water is lost through leakages in the distribution network. It is well known that improved pressure control can lower the leakage problems. In this work water networks with a single pressure actuator and several....... Subsequently, these relations are exploited in an adaptive reference control scheme for the actuator pressure that ensures constant pressure at the critical points. Numerical experiments underpin the results. © Copyright IEEE - All rights reserved....

  7. Relating oxygen partial pressure, saturation and content: the haemoglobin–oxygen dissociation curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie-Ann Collins

    2015-09-01

    The delivery of oxygen by arterial blood to the tissues of the body has a number of critical determinants including blood oxygen concentration (content, saturation (SO2 and partial pressure, haemoglobin concentration and cardiac output, including its distribution. The haemoglobin–oxygen dissociation curve, a graphical representation of the relationship between oxygen satur­ation and oxygen partial pressure helps us to understand some of the principles underpinning this process. Historically this curve was derived from very limited data based on blood samples from small numbers of healthy subjects which were manipulated in vitro and ultimately determined by equations such as those described by Severinghaus in 1979. In a study of 3524 clinical specimens, we found that this equation estimated the SO2 in blood from patients with normal pH and SO2 >70% with remarkable accuracy and, to our knowledge, this is the first large-scale validation of this equation using clinical samples. Oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2 is nowadays the standard clinical method for assessing arterial oxygen saturation, providing a convenient, pain-free means of continuously assessing oxygenation, provided the interpreting clinician is aware of important limitations. The use of pulse oximetry reduces the need for arterial blood gas analysis (SaO2 as many patients who are not at risk of hypercapnic respiratory failure or metabolic acidosis and have acceptable SpO2 do not necessarily require blood gas analysis. While arterial sampling remains the gold-standard method of assessing ventilation and oxygenation, in those patients in whom blood gas analysis is indicated, arterialised capillary samples also have a valuable role in patient care. The clinical role of venous blood gases however remains less well defined.

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship Bell M. Shimada in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary and others from 2012-02-20 to 2012-09-16 (NODC Accession 0115714)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115714 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from NOAA Ship Bell M. Shimada in the Coastal Waters of SE...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship Bell M. Shimada in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary and others from 2011-06-27 to 2011-08-31 (NODC Accession 0115710)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115710 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from NOAA Ship Bell M. Shimada in the Coastal Waters of SE...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship McARTHUR II in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary and others from 2007-06-05 to 2007-07-26 (NODC Accession 0109934)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109934 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from NOAA Ship McARTHUR II in the Coastal Waters of SE...

  11. Transport of water and ions in partially water-saturated porous media. Part 1. Constitutive equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.

    2017-05-01

    I developed a model of cross-coupled flow in partially saturated porous media based on electrokinetic coupling including the effect of ion filtration (normal and reverse osmosis) and the multi-component nature of the pore water (wetting) phase. The model also handles diffusion and membrane polarization but is valid only for saturations above the irreducible water saturation. I start with the local Nernst-Planck and Stokes equations and I use a volume-averaging procedure to obtain the generalized Ohm, Fick, and Darcy equations with cross-coupling terms at the scale of a representative elementary volume of the porous rock. These coupling terms obey Onsager's reciprocity, which is a required condition, at the macroscale, to keep the total dissipation function of the system positive. Rather than writing the electrokinetic terms in terms of zeta potential (the double layer electrical potential on the slipping plane located in the pore water), I developed the model in terms of an effective charge density dragged by the flow of the pore water. This effective charge density is found to be strongly controlled by the permeability and the water saturation. I also developed an electrical conductivity equation including the effect of saturation on both bulk and surface conductivities, the surface conductivity being associated with electromigration in the electrical diffuse layer coating the grains. This surface conductivity depends on the CEC of the porous material.

  12. Development of pressurized coal partial combustor; Kaatsu sekitan bubun nenshoro gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T. [Center for Coal Utilization, Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Kawamura, K. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan); Tanaka, T. [Chubu Electric Power Co. Inc., Nagoya (Japan); Muramatsu, T. [Electric Power Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    The coal partial combustor (CPC) uses a combustion technology with which coal is burned at elevated temperatures and under revolution, the constituents are captured on the furnace wall and removed as molten slag from the furnace. This is a combustion technology to reduce load of ash on subsequent devices. To generate a molten condition, it is necessary to raise the combustion temperature as high as possible (to about 1600 degC in the furnace), but this is effective for a gas turbine composite power generation system. An efficiency of higher than 45% may be expected at the power transmission terminal. As an operation on subsidy from the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, the normal-pressure CPC technology has already been established, and a research on pressurized CPC is being progressed since fiscal 1991. The research is in progress with a schedule that elemental tests for 7 tons per day production are conducted until fiscal 1995, a 25 tons per day pilot plant will be completed by November 1997, and verification tests for long-term continuous operation will be implemented until 1998. The 7 tons per day elemental tests have identified gasification performance and slag extraction performance using five types of coal having different properties. 7 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Partial melting of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks during continental collision: Evidence, time, mechanism, and effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Xiang; Zhou, Kun; Gao, Xiao-Ying

    2017-09-01

    Partial melting of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks during continental collision has been increasingly found in nature. More and more studies have devoted to the evidence, time, mechanism and effect of crustal anataxis at mantle to lower crust depths. This is particularly so for UHP rocks from the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt, whereas similar studies on these issues are relatively minor for other UHP terranes. The petrological evidence, especially microstructural observations and multiphase solid inclusion analyses, have been accumulated for the partial melting of UHP metamorphic rocks in collisional orogens. The results indicate that this is a kind of low-degree crustal anataxis at convergent plate margins due to decompressional dehydration of the UHP rocks themselves. Thus it has great bearing on intracrustal differentiation and crust-mantle interaction in continental subduction channels. Zircon may grow through peritectic reactions due to the breakdown of hydrous minerals. By dating of the peritectic zircons that contain coesite or diamond inclusions, the time of crustal anatexis under UHP conditions can be directly determined. In general, the partial melting of UHP rocks mainly took place at the stage of their early exhumation, partly still in the UHP regime and partly in the subsequent high-pressure (HP) regime. The crustal anatexis still at mantle depths is common in many UHP terranes, possibly facilitating exhumation of deeply subducted continental slices toward shallower levels. Petrological and geochemical studies indicate that phengite dehydration-driven melting during exhumation is the common mechanism for the anatexis of UHP rocks, though the other hydrous minerals were also involved in this process. The resulted HP to UHP melts may occur at different spatial scales and show significant fractionation in melt-mobile incompatible trace elements such as LILE and LREE. These melts are enriched in LILE to large extent and LREE and Th to small extent

  14. Volume analysis of supercooled water under high pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Duki, Solomon F.; Tsige, Mesfin

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental findings on the volume of supercooled water at high pressure [O. Mishima, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 144503 (2010)] we performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations study of bulk water in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. Cooling and heating cycles at different isobars and isothermal compression at different temperatures are performed on the water sample with pressures that range from 0 to 1.0 GPa. The cooling simulations are done at temperatures that range from...

  15. Pressure dependence of the electro-optic response function in partially exposed polymer dispersed ferroelectric liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, D. S.; Holmes, H. K.

    1993-01-01

    Ferroelectric liquid crystals in a new configuration, termed partially exposed polymer dispersed ferroelectric liquid crystal (PEPDFLC), respond to external pressures and demonstrate pressure-induced electro-optic switching response. When the PEPDFLC thin film is sandwiched between two transparent conducting electrodes, one a glass plate and the other a flexible sheet such as polyvenylidene fluoride, the switching characteristics of the thin film are a function of the pressure applied to the flexible transparent electrode and the bias voltage across the electrodes. Response time measurements reveal a linear dependence of the change in electric field with external pressure.

  16. Lattuce growth and water use in closed, low pressure environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, P.; Rygalov, V.; Wheeler, R.; Bucklin, R.; Schumacher, N.

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cv. Waldmann's Green plants were grown in a clear, hemispherical enclosure at a reduced atmospheric pressure to study the potential for using low pressure greenhouses on planetary missions. The atmosphere was maintained at 25 kPa total pressure, with ˜20 kPa of N_2, ˜5 kPa of O_2, and between 0.1 and 0.2 kPa of CO_2, supplied by CO_2 injection and a feed-back control system. A closed water cycle was maintained inside the low pressure greenhouse by recycling condensed humidity back to the plants, and only adding external water to offset water vapor leakage and uptake in the plant tissue. All plants were grown in a granular, arcillite medium (calcined clay chips), with nutrients supplied by adding time-release fertilizer (Osmocote 20-20-20). Plants were harvested after 45 days, averaging 237 g fresh mass, and 23.7 g dry mass. No obvious adverse effects were noted on the plants, with the exception of some minor "tip-burn" injury to some leaves. Additional studies are planned to compare growth and water flux (evapotranspiration) rates at higher pressures. Preliminary results suggest that water fluxes should be lower at the higher pressures provided equal vapor pressure deficits can be maintained. The results suggest that vegetative crops such as lettuce should grow well at reduced pressures if adequate water, nutrients, and CO_2 are provided.

  17. Improved niobate nanoscroll photocatalysts for partial water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Troy K; Sabio, Erwin M; Browning, Nigel D; Osterloh, Frank E

    2011-02-18

    Layered K(4)Nb(6)O(17) is a known UV-light-driven photocatalyst for overall water splitting, with a band gap of 3.5 eV. Following ion exchange and exfoliation with tetrabutylammonium hydroxide, the layered material separates into nanosheets that coil into 1.0±0.5 μm long and 10±5 nm wide nanoscrolls to reduce their surface energy. Pt and IrO(x) (x=1.5-2) nanoparticles were photochemically deposited onto the surface of the nanoscrolls to produce two- and three-component photocatalysts. Under UV irradiation, the nanostructures produced H(2) from pure water and aqueous methanol, with turnover numbers ranging from 2.3 and 18.5 over a 5 h period. The activity of the catalysts for H(2) evolution can be directly correlated with the varying overpotentials for water reduction (210-325 mV). From water, no oxygen is evolved. Instead, the formation of surface-bound peroxides in a 1:1 stoichiometry with H(2) is observed. Slow photochemical oxygen evolution can be achieved with the sacrificial electron acceptor AgNO(3), and under an electrochemical bias. The electrochemical water oxidation overpotentials are ca. 600 mV across the series of scrolls. From the photo onset potential the conduction band edge for the unmodified scrolls is estimated as -0.75 V at pH 7. Deposition of a co-catalyst is found to depress this value by 58 mV (IrO(x)), 148 mV (Pt/IrO(x)), and 242 mV (Pt). However, because water oxidation remains rate-limiting, this does not affect the overall performance of the catalysts. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Water quality in hybrid catfish ponds after partial fish harvest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intensification of United States catfish aquaculture involves hybrid catfish ('channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus x ' blue catfish I. furcatus) grown in ponds with abundant aeration and high feeding rates. High feeding rates cause water quality deterioration because most of the nitrogen, phosphorus...

  19. High-pressure-induced water penetration into 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagae, Takayuki; Kawamura, Takashi [Nagoya University, (Japan); Chavas, Leonard M. G. [High Energy Research Organization (KEK), (Japan); Niwa, Ken; Hasegawa, Masashi [Nagoya University, (Japan); Kato, Chiaki [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), (Japan); Watanabe, Nobuhisa, E-mail: nobuhisa@nagoya-u.jp [Nagoya University, (Japan); Nagoya University, (Japan)

    2012-03-01

    Structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase were determined at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa. Comparison of these structures gives a detailed picture of the swelling of a cavity at the dimer interface and the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface, which are accompanied by water penetration. Hydrostatic pressure induces structural changes in proteins, including denaturation, the mechanism of which has been attributed to water penetration into the protein interior. In this study, structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were determined at about 2 Å resolution under pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Although most of the protein cavities are monotonically compressed as the pressure increases, the volume of one particular cavity at the dimer interface increases at pressures over 340 MPa. In parallel with this volume increase, water penetration into the cavity could be observed at pressures over 410 MPa. In addition, the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface accompanied by water penetration could also be observed at pressures over 580 MPa. These water-penetration phenomena are considered to be initial steps in the pressure-denaturation process of IPMDH.

  20. Transport of water and ions in partially water-saturated porous media. Part 2. Filtration effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.

    2017-05-01

    A new set of constitutive equations describing the transport of the ions and water through charged porous media and considering the effect of ion filtration is applied to the problem of reverse osmosis and diffusion of a salt. Starting with the constitutive equations derived in Paper 1, I first determine specific formula for the osmotic coefficient and effective diffusion coefficient of a binary symmetric 1:1 salt (such as KCl or NaCl) as a function of a dimensionless number Θ corresponding to the ratio between the cation exchange capacity (CEC) and the salinity. The modeling is first carried with the Donnan model used to describe the concentrations of the charge carriers in the pore water phase. Then a new model is developed in the thin double layer approximation to determine these concentrations. These models provide explicit relationships between the concentration of the ionic species in the pore space and those in a neutral reservoir in local equilibrium with the pore space and the CEC. The case of reverse osmosis and diffusion coefficient are analyzed in details for the case of saturated and partially saturated porous materials. Comparisons are done with experimental data from the literature obtained on bentonite. The model predicts correctly the influence of salinity (including membrane behavior at high salinities), porosity, cation type (K+ versus Na+), and water saturation on the osmotic coefficient. It also correctly predicts the dependence of the diffusion coefficient of the salt with the salinity.

  1. Assessment of water pipes durability under pressure surge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham Ha, Hai; Minh, Lanh Pham Thi; Tang Van, Lam; Bulgakov, Boris; Bazhenova, Soafia

    2017-10-01

    Surge phenomenon occurs on the pipeline by the closing valve or pump suddenly lost power. Due to the complexity of the water hammer simulation, previous researches have only considered water hammer on the single pipe or calculation of some positions on water pipe network, it have not been analysis for all of pipe on the water distribution systems. Simulation of water hammer due to closing valve on water distribution system and the influence level of pressure surge is evaluated at the defects on pipe. Water hammer on water supply pipe network are simulated by Water HAMMER software academic version and the capacity of defects are calculated by SINTAP. SINTAP developed from Brite-Euram projects in Brussels-Belgium with the aim to develop a process for assessing the integrity of the structure for the European industry. Based on the principle of mechanical fault, indicating the size of defects in materials affect the load capacity of the product in the course of work, the process has proposed setting up the diagram to fatigue assessment defect (FAD). The methods are applied for water pipe networks of Lien Chieu district, Da Nang city, Viet Nam, the results show the affected area of wave pressure by closing the valve and thereby assess the greatest pressure surge effect to corroded pipe. The SINTAP standard and finite element mesh analysis at the defect during the occurrence of pressure surge which will accurately assess the bearing capacity of the old pipes. This is one of the bases to predict the leakage locations on the water distribution systems. Amount of water hammer when identified on the water supply networks are decreasing due to local losses at the nodes as well as the friction with pipe wall, so this paper adequately simulate water hammer phenomena applying for actual water distribution systems. The research verified that pipe wall with defect is damaged under the pressure surge value.

  2. Spectroscopic study of partially-ordered semiconductor heterojunction under high pressure and high magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, P.Y.; Martinez, G.; Zeman, J.; Uchida, K.

    2000-12-31

    Photoluminescence upconversion (PLU) is a phenomenon in which a sample emits photons with energy higher than that of the excitation photon. This effect has been observed in many materials including rare earth ions doped in insulating hosts and semiconductor heterostructures without using high power lasers as the excitation source. Recently, this effect has been observed also in partially CuPt-ordered GaInP{sub 2} epilayers grown on GaAs substrates. As a spectroscopic technique photoluminescence upconversion is particularly well suited for studying band alignment at heterojunction interface. The value of band-offset has been determined with meV precision using magneto-photoluminescence. Using the fact that the pressure coefficient of electrons in GaAs is higher than those in GaInP{sub 2} they have been able to manipulate the band-offset at the GaInP/GaAs interface. By converting the band-offset from Type I to Type II they were able to demonstrate that the efficiency of the upconversion process is greatly enhanced by a Type II band-offset.

  3. Measurement of the oxygen partial pressure and thermodynamic modeling of the U-Nd-O system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Min; Knight, Travis W.; McMurray, Jacob W.; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2016-05-01

    Fission products greatly impact the properties of fuel necessitating a thorough understanding of the thermochemical properties of oxide fuels with fission products. However, thermochemical data for the U-Nd-O system is insufficient even though neodymium is a major fission product. As neodymium will likely be present as a solute in UO2, this research focuses on the study of (U1-yNdy)O2±x. Experimental measurements and analyses of the oxygen partial pressure (pO2)-temperature-oxygen to metal ratio (O/M ratio) relationships were performed using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and an oxygen analyzer. Thermodynamic computational modeling was performed using the CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagrams) method with the FactSage software. The Gibbs energy of the (U1-yNdy)O2±x solid solution was described by the compound energy formalism (CEF), which is based on earlier thermodynamic modeling data of the binary U-O system from Guéneau et al.. The thermodynamic and phase diagram data of the U-Nd-O system produced in this work show good agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Highly pressurized partially miscible liquid-liquid flow in a micro-T-junction. I. Experimental observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ning; Wen, John Z.; Ren, Carolyn L.

    2017-04-01

    This is the first part of a two-part study on a partially miscible liquid-liquid flow (liquid carbon dioxide and deionized water) which is highly pressurized and confined in a microfluidic T-junction. Our main focuses are to understand the flow regimes as a result of varying flow conditions and investigate the characteristics of drop flow distinct from coflow, with a capillary number, C ac , that is calculated based on the continuous liquid, ranging from 10-3 to 10-2 (10-4 for coflow). Here in part I, we present our experimental observation of drop formation cycle by tracking drop length, spacing, frequency, and after-generation speed using high-speed video and image analysis. The drop flow is chronologically composed of a stagnating and filling stage, an elongating and squeezing stage, and a truncating stage. The common "necking" time during the elongating and squeezing stage (with C ac˜10-3 ) for the truncation of the dispersed liquid stream is extended, and the truncation point is subsequently shifted downstream from the T-junction corner. This temporal postponement effect modifies the scaling function reported in the literature for droplet formation with two immiscible fluids. Our experimental measurements also demonstrate the drop speed immediately following their generations can be approximated by the mean velocity from averaging the total flow rate over the channel cross section. Further justifications of the quantitative analysis by considering the mass transfer at the interface of the two partially miscible fluids are provided in part II.

  5. Performance Evaluation of Pressure Transducers for Water Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Stegall, David E.; Treadway, Sean

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is being designed for water landings. In order to benchmark the ability of engineering tools to predict water landing loads, test programs are underway for scale model and full-scale water impacts. These test programs are predicated on the reliable measurement of impact pressure histories. Tests have been performed with a variety of pressure transducers from various manufacturers. Both piezoelectric and piezoresistive devices have been tested. Effects such as thermal shock, pinching of the transducer head, and flushness of the transducer mounting have been studied. Data acquisition issues such as sampling rate and anti-aliasing filtering also have been studied. The response of pressure transducers have been compared side-by-side on an impulse test rig and on a 20-inch diameter hemisphere dropped into a pool of water. The results have identified a range of viable configurations for pressure measurement dependent on the objectives of the test program.

  6. Bridge pressure flow scour for clear water conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The equilibrium scour at a bridge caused by pressure flow with critical approach velocity in clear-water simulation conditions was studied both analytically and experimentally. The flume experiments revealed that (1) the measured equilibrium scour pr...

  7. Capital Cost: Pressurized Water Reactor Plant Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139-MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume includes in addition to the foreword and summary, the plant description and the detailed cost estimate.

  8. Experimental Study and Engineering Practice of Pressured Water Coupling Blasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. X. Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Overburden strata movement in large space stope is the major reason that induces the appearance of strong mining pressure. Presplitting blasting for hard coal rocks is crucial for the prevention and control of strong pressure in stope. In this study, pressured water coupling blasting technique was proposed. The process and effect of blasting were analyzed by orthogonal test and field practice. Results showed that the presence of pressure-bearing water and explosive cartridges in the drill are the main influence factors of the blasting effect of cement test block. The high load-transmitting performance of pore water and energy accumulation in explosive cartridges were analyzed. Noxious substances produced during the blasting process were properly controlled because of the moistening, cooling, and diluting effect of pore water. Not only the goal of safe and static rock fragmentation by high-explosive detonation but also a combination of superdynamic blast loading and static loading effect of the pressured water was achieved. Then the practice of blasting control of hard coal rocks in Datong coal mine was analyzed to determine reasonable parameters of pressured water coupling blasting. A good presplitting blasting control effect was achieved for the hard coal rocks.

  9. LEFT LATERAL POSITIONING WITH HEAD ELEVATION INCREASE THE PARTIAL PRESSURE OF OXYGEN ON PATIENTS WITH MECHANICAL VENTILATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmiza Karmiza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breathing literally means the movement of oxygen from the atmosphere and reach the cells and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Partial pressure of oxygen (pO2 is one of the important components in the process of respiration, especially in patients with mechanical ventilation. There are several interventions that can be performed in an effort to improve the ventilation, one of them is patients positioning: left lateral position with 30 degrees head elevation. This study aimed to determine the effect of left lateral position with 30 degrees head elevation to the value of partial pressure of oxygen in patients with mechanical ventilation in intensive care unit RSUP DR. M. Djamil Padang. Method: This study was Pra Experiments with one group pretest posttest design. 15 samples taken by purposive sampling method. Data obtained by blood gasses analysis and it was conducted since May 8th untill June 5th, 2013. Univariate data presented in frequency distribution table, while the bivariate data using the paired T test. Result: Univariate analysis showed the value of the partial pressure of oxygen ( pO2 before intervention between 119-228 mmHg , while the value of the partial pressure of oxygen ( pO2 after intervention between 132-269 mmHg . Paired T test results showed a signifi cant difference between the value of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2 before and after intervention (p = 0.040, p < 0.05 . Discussion: The left lateral position with 30 degrees head elevation could increase the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2 in patients with mechanical ventilation. The results of this study can be used for increasing the nursingcare quality of patients with mechanical ventilation in order to reduce the time of hospitalization. Further research on these positioning interventions can be developed for patients with primary respiratory problems or lung disease. Keywords: left lateral position, partial pressure of oxygen (pO2, mechanical ventilation

  10. Impact of water quality change on corrosion scales in full and partially replaced lead service lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    BackgroundChanges in water qualities have been associated with an increase in lead release from full and partial lead service lines (LSLs), such as the cases of Washington D.C. or more recently of Flint (Mi). Water qualities affect the mineralogy of the scales. Furthermore, follo...

  11. Partial hydrophilic modification of biaxially oriented polypropylene film by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet with the allylamine monomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W. X.; Yu, J. S.; Hu, W.; Chen, G. L.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the partial modification of the biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) film for potential biological and packaging applications was achieved via hydrophilic modification using atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). In the APPJ system, the allylamine (ALA) monomer was polymerized on the BOPP surface by either the Ar/O2 or the He/O2 plasma. The results showed that plasmatic modification created many micro/nano sized holes on the BOPP film, which increased the surface roughness dramatically and the increased roughness enhanced the combining intensity between the BOPP film and the ALA polymer. However, such a plasmatic modification increased the water vapor permeability. The FTIR and XPS characterizations showed that the amine groups were grafted onto the BOPP film, and the contact angle of the BOPP film decreases from 98.5° to 8°. Compared with the BOPP films treated by the Ar or He plasma, the barrier property of the modified BOPP film increased significantly when the ALA polymer was incorporated. The bio-affinity/toxicity of ALA polymer was illustrated by the attachment of the cultured SMMC-7721 hepatoma cells on the modified BOPP film. The significant enhancement in the cell density indicated that modified BOPP film was highly bio-compatible and non-toxic, especially treated with the Ar/O2/ALA plasma.

  12. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Bourcier, W L; Wolfe, T; Haussmann, C

    2010-02-19

    Can we use the pressure associated with sequestration to make brine into fresh water? This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). Possible products are: Drinking water, Cooling water, and Extra aquifer space for CO{sub 2} storage. The conclusions are: (1) Many saline formation waters appear to be amenable to largely conventional RO treatment; (2) Thermodynamic modeling indicates that osmotic pressure is more limiting on water recovery than mineral scaling; (3) The use of thermodynamic modeling with Pitzer's equations (or Extended UNIQUAC) allows accurate estimation of osmotic pressure limits; (4) A general categorization of treatment feasibility is based on TDS has been proposed, in which brines with 10,000-85,000 mg/L are the most attractive targets; (5) Brines in this TDS range appear to be abundant (geographically and with depth) and could be targeted in planning future CCS operations (including site selection and choice of injection formation); and (6) The estimated cost of treating waters in the 10,000-85,000 mg/L TDS range is about half that for conventional seawater desalination, due to the anticipated pressure recovery.

  13. Cavitation nuclei in water exposed to transient pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2015-01-01

    A model of skin-stabilized interfacial cavitation nuclei and their response to tensile and compressive stressing is presented. The model is evaluated in relation to experimental tensile strength results for water at rest at the bottom of an open water-filled container at atmospheric pressure...... and room temperature. These results are obtained by recording the initial growth of cavities generated by a short tensile pulse applied to the bottom of the container. It is found that the cavitation nuclei shift their tensile strength depending on their pressure history. Static pressurization...

  14. Pressures of Partial Crystallization along the East Pacific Rise: Preliminary Results and Evidence for Deep Crustal Chambers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerda, C.; Scott, J. L.; Barton, M.

    2013-12-01

    The fast spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) between 8°N and 14°N is characterized by ~20 ridge axis discontinuities. Previous work has suggested that magmas erupted at some of these discontinuities, specifically at transform faults, partially crystallize at higher pressures than magmas erupted along 'normal' ridge segments. In order to evaluate the factors that control the plumbing systems of MORB, we have determined the pressures (P) of partial crystallization of magmas beneath the EPR from 8°N to 14°N using 2,837 published chemical analyses of basalt glasses. Pressures were calculated using the two different methods described by Herzberg, 2004 (H) and Kelley and Barton, 2008 (KB). These two methods are expected to yield minimum and maximum values for calculated pressures. However, for the samples used in this work both methods yield virtually identical pressures for the entire data set (average pressures: H=182.3×143.6 MPa and KB=200.9×153.3 MPa) and we elected to use results obtained with the KB method for detailed analysis of the results. Based on sample frequency, the EPR was divided into 10 sections that include 'normal' segments lacking axial discontinuities and segments that include discontinuities such as a transform fault, an overlapping spreading center (OSC), or a deviation from axial linearity, or one or more of these features. The average pressure of partial crystallization for 'normal' segments is 145.6×59.9 MPa, and is essentially constant along the whole length of the ridge studied. These results are consistent with crystallization at depths of ~ 5km near the base of the crust and, as with results obtained for the Juan da Fuca and Reykjanes ridge, provide no evidence for crystallization in the upper mantle along 'normal' ridge segments. The pressures of partial crystallization of magmas at or near axial discontinuities show a wider range than those for magmas erupted along normal ridge segments. The maximum pressures for samples from the

  15. Effect of CH4 on the CO2 breakthrough pressure and permeability of partially saturated low-permeability sandstone in the Ordos Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Yu, Qingchun

    2018-01-01

    The behavior of CO2 that coexists with CH4 and the effect of CH4 on the CO2 stream need to be deeply analyzed and studied, especially in the presence of water. Our previous studies investigated the breakthrough pressure and permeability of pure CO2 in five partially saturated low-permeability sandstone core samples from the Ordos Basin, and we concluded that rocks with a small pore size and low permeability show considerable sealing capacity even under unsaturated conditions. In this paper, we selected three of these samples for CO2-CH4 gas-mixture breakthrough experiments under various degrees of water saturation. The breakthrough experiments were performed by increasing the gas pressure step by step until breakthrough occurred. Then, the effluent gas mixture was collected for chromatographic partitioning analysis. The results indicate that CH4 significantly affects the breakthrough pressure and permeability of CO2. The presence of CH4 in the gas mixture increases the interfacial tension and, thus, the breakthrough pressure. Therefore, the injected gas mixture that contains the highest (lowest) mole fraction of CH4 results in the largest (smallest) breakthrough pressure. The permeability of the gas mixture is greater than that for pure CO2 because of CH4, and the effective permeability decreases with increased breakthrough pressure. Chromatographic partitioning of the effluent mixture gases indicates that CH4 breaks through ahead of CO2 as a result of its weaker solubility in water. Correlations are established between (1) the breakthrough pressure and water saturation, (2) the effective permeability and water saturation, (3) the breakthrough pressure and effective permeability, and (4) the mole fraction of CO2/CH4 in the effluent mixture gases and water saturation. These results deepen our understanding of the multi-phase flow behavior in the porous media under unsaturated conditions, which have implications for formulating emergency response plans for gas

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway, discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from PELICAN in the Coastal Waters of Louisiana, Coastal Waters of Texas and Gulf of Mexico from 2013-09-09 to 2013-09-22 (NCEI Accession 0157461)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157461 includes Surface underway, chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical and profile data collected from PELICAN in the Coastal Waters...

  17. Influence of oxygen partial pressure on the characteristics of human hepatocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenifer Trepiana

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the in vitro studies using liver cell lines have been performed under atmospheric oxygen partial pressure (21% O2. However, the oxygen concentrations in the liver and cancer cells are far from this value. In the present study, we have evaluated the influence of oxygen on 1 the tumor cell lines features (growth, steady-state ROS levels, GSH content, activities of antioxidant enzymes, p66 Shc and SOD expressions, metalloproteinases secretion, migration, invasion, and adhesion of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines, and b the response of the cells to an oxidant stimulus (aqueous leaf extract of the V. baccifera plant species. For this purpose, three hepatocarcinoma cell lines with different p53 status, HepG2 (wild-type, Huh7 (mutated, and Hep3B (deleted, were cultured (6–30 days under atmospheric (21% and more physiological (8% pO2. Results showed that after long-term culturing at 8% versus 21% O2, the cellular proliferation rate and the steady-state levels of mitochondrial O2- were unaffected. However, the intracellular basal ROS levels were higher independently of the characteristics of the cell line. Moreover, the lower pO2 was associated with lower glutathione content, the induction of p66 Shc and Mn-SOD proteins, and increased SOD activity only in HepG2. This cell line also showed a higher migration rate, secretion of active metalloproteinases, and a faster invasion. HepG2 cells were more resistant to the oxidative stress induced by V. baccifera. Results suggest that the long-term culturing of human hepatoma cells at a low, more physiological pO2 induces antioxidant adaptations that could be mediated by p53, and may alter the cellular response to a subsequent oxidant challenge. Data support the necessity of validating outcomes from studies performed with hepatoma cell cultures under ambient O2.

  18. Undermoderated spectrum MOX core study. Supercritical pressure light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Kosizuka, Seiichi [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1998-09-01

    The supercritical pressure light water cooling reactor is a nuclear reactor concept with the once through type and the direct cycle reactor cooled with supercritical pressure water. The cooling water controlled with the feed pump flows directly to the turbine and a recirculation is never done by the nuclear reactor of this type. Therefore, this system isn`t equipped with the recirculation system and the steam separator, the system becomes simple. As for this system, it is expected that the cost performance improves. Here, the outline of former study is described. (author)

  19. Pressure caused by underwater discharge near the surface of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, K.; Uchiyama, M.; Isuzugawa, Kohji

    2001-04-01

    Spark discharge in water generates a spherical shock wave and a bubble that contains water vapor, with each center at a gap between electrodes. The bubble repeats the movement of the expansion and contraction. An impulsive pressure wave also arises at each transition from the contraction to the expansion of the bubble. In case that a rigid wall exists near the bubble, the bubble moves toward it keeping the expansion and contraction and then a water jet is formed toward the wall. The jet exerts the impulsive pressure on the wall. In case that the bubble is near the surface of water, it moves as if a rigid wall existed just below it and then the downward water jet is also formed. We are interested in the relationship of the movement of the bubble to the effect of the pressure caused by the under-water discharge near the surface of water. We are also interested in whether there are some differences between the following two cases as to the effect of pressure; one case is that the bubble exists near the surface of water and its movement is affected by the surface, another case the movement of the bubble is not affected by the surface of water for the sake of enough large distance between the bubble and the surface. In this study, impulsive pressure waves caused by the under-water discharge in above two cases are observed by means of a transducer or their schlieren photographs are taken with an image converter camera, and observations are examined.

  20. Glycerin Reformation in High Temperature and Pressure Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    hygroscopic, while ethanol is renewable and non-toxic (94). Water has a detrimental effect on the reaction because soaps can be formed, which cause...Lavric, V. (2005) Delocalized organic pollutant destruction through a self-sustaining supercritical water oxidation process, Energy Conversion and...2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Glycerin Reformation in High Temperature and Pressure Water

  1. Water Pressure Distribution on a Twin-Float Seaplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, F L

    1930-01-01

    This is the second of a series of investigations to determine water pressure distribution on various types of seaplane floats and hulls, and was conducted on a twin-float seaplane. It consisted of measuring water pressures and accelerations on a TS-1 seaplane during numerous landing and taxiing maneuvers at various speeds and angles. The results show that water pressures as great as 10 lbs. per sq. in.may occur at the step in various maneuvers and that pressures of approximately the same magnitude occur at the stern and near the bow in hard pancake landings with the stern way down. At the other parts of the float the pressures are less and are usually zero or slightly negative for some distance abaft the step. A maximum negative pressure of 0.87 lb. Per square inch was measured immediately abaft the step. The maximum positive pressures have a duration of approximately one-twentieth to one-hundredth second at any given location and are distributed over a very limited area at any particular instant.

  2. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y; Fowler, Philip A; Metz, Joannah M; Wheeler, Raymond M; Bucklin, Ray A

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from ~1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (~1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  3. Influence of N{sub 2} partial pressure on structural and microhardness properties of TiN/ZrN multilayers deposited by Ar/N{sub 2} vacuum arc discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naddaf, M., E-mail: ascientific24@aec.org.sy [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS), P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Abdallah, B. [Department of Physics, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Ahmad, M. [IBA Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); A-Kharroub, M. [Department of Physics, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2016-08-15

    The influence of N{sub 2} partial pressure on structural, mechanical and wetting properties of multilayered TiN/ZrN thin films deposited on silicon substrates by vacuum arc discharge of (N{sub 2} + Ar) gas mixtures is investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that the average texturing coefficient of (1 1 1) orientation and the grain size of both TiN and ZrN individual layers increase with increasing the N{sub 2} partial pressure. The Rutherford back scattering (RBS) measurements and analysis reveal that incorporation of the nitrogen in the film increases with increasing the N{sub 2} partial pressure and both TiN and ZrN individual layers have a nitrogen over-stoichiometry for N{sub 2} partial pressure ⩾50%. The change in the film micro-hardness is correlated to the changes in crystallographic texture, grain size, stoichiometry and the residual stress in the film as a function of the N{sub 2} partial pressure. In particular, stoichiometry of ZrN and TiN individual is found to play the vital role in determining the multilayer hardness. The multilayer film deposited at N{sub 2} partial pressure of 25% has the best stoichiometric ratio of both TiN and ZrN layers and the highest micro-hardness of about 32 GPa. In addition, water contact angle (WCA) measurements and analysis show a decrease in the work of adhesion on increasing the N{sub 2} partial pressure.

  4. Effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure on Water Absorption of Adzuki Beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeaki Ueno

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP treatment on dried soybean, adzuki bean, and kintoki kidney bean, which are low-moisture-content cellular biological materials, was investigated from the viewpoint of water absorption. The samples were vacuum-packed with distilled water and pressurized at 200 MPa and 25 °C for 10 min. After the HHP treatment, time courses of the moisture contents of the samples were measured, and the dimensionless moisture contents were estimated. Water absorption in the case of soybean could be fitted well by a simple water diffusion model. High pressures were found to have negligible effects on water absorption into the cotyledon of soybean and kintoki kidney bean. A non-linear least square method based on the Weibull equation was applied for the adzuki beans, and the effective water diffusion coefficient was found to increase significantly from 8.6 × 10−13 to 6.7 × 10−10 m2/s after HHP treatment. Approximately 30% of the testa of the adzuki bean was damaged upon HHP treatment, which was comparable to the surface area of the testa in the partially peeled adzuki bean sample. Thus, HHP was confirmed to promote mass transfer to the cotyledon of legumes with a tight testa.

  5. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaksono, Umar; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman

    2016-02-01

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor.

  6. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijaksono, Umar, E-mail: umar.wijaksono@student.upi.edu; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman [Electrical Power System Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering Education, Jl. Dr. Setiabudi No. 207 Bandung, Indonesia 40154 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor.

  7. Underwater partial polarization signatures from the shallow water real-time imaging polarimeter (SHRIMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James S., Jr.; Davis, P. S.; Wolff, Lawrence B.

    2003-09-01

    Research has shown that naturally occurring light outdoors and underwater is partially linearly polarized. The polarized components can be combined to form an image that describes the polarization of the light in the scene. This image is known as the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) image or partial polarization image. These naturally occurring polarization signatures can provide a diver or an unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) with more information to detect, classify, and identify threats such as obstacles and/or mines in the shallow water environment. The SHallow water Real-time IMaging Polarimeter (SHRIMP), recently developed under sponsorship of Dr. Tom Swean at the Office of Naval Research (Code 321OE), can measure underwater partial polarization imagery. This sensor is a passive, three-channel device that simultaneously measures the three components of the Stokes vector needed to determine the partial linear polarization of the scene. The testing of this sensor has been completed and the data has been analyzed. This paper presents performance results from the field-testing and quantifies the gain provided by the partial polarization signature of targets in the Very Shallow Water (VSW) and Surf Zone (SZ) regions.

  8. Measurements of Pressure Distributions and Force Coefficients in a Squeeze Film Damper. Part 2: Partially Sealed Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, S. Y.; Sanandres, Luis A.; Vance, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results from a partially sealed squeeze film damper (SFD) test rig, executing a circular centered orbit are presented and discussed. A serrated piston ring is installed at the damper exit. This device involves a new sealing concept which produces high damping values while allowing for oil flow to cool the damper. In the partially sealed damper, large cavitation regions are observed in the pressure fields at orbit radii epsilon equals 0.5 and epsilon equals 0.8. The cavitated pressure distributions and the corresponding force coefficients are compared with a cavitated bearing solution. The experimental results show the significance of fluid inertia and vapor cavitation in the operation of squeeze film dampers. Squeeze film Reynolds numbers tested reach up to Re equals 50, spanning the range of contemporary applications.

  9. Measurement of Local Partial Pressure of Oxygen in the Brain Tissue under Normoxia and Epilepsy with Phosphorescence Lifetime Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Zhang

    Full Text Available In this work a method for measuring brain oxygen partial pressure with confocal phosphorescence lifetime microscopy system is reported. When used in conjunction with a dendritic phosphorescent probe, Oxyphor G4, this system enabled minimally invasive measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO2 in cerebral tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution during 4-AP induced epileptic seizures. Investigating epileptic events, we characterized the spatio-temporal distribution of the "initial dip" in pO2 near the probe injection site and along nearby arterioles. Our results reveal a correlation between the percent change in the pO2 signal during the "initial dip" and the duration of seizure-like activity, which can help localize the epileptic focus and predict the length of seizure.

  10. Experiments on aerosol removal by high-pressure water spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corno, Ada del, E-mail: delcorno@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Technologies and Materials Dept, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Morandi, Sonia, E-mail: morandi@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Technologies and Materials Dept, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Parozzi, Flavio, E-mail: parozzi@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Technologies and Materials Dept, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Araneo, Lucio, E-mail: lucio.araneo@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, via Lambruschini 4A, I-20156 Milano (Italy); CNR-IENI, via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Casella, Francesco, E-mail: francesco2.casella@mail.polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, via Lambruschini 4A, I-20156 Milano (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Experimental research to measure the efficiency of high-pressure sprays in capturing aerosols if applied to a filtered containment venting system in case of severe accident. • Cloud of monodispersed SiO{sub 2} particles with sizes 0.5 or 1.0 μm and initial concentration in the range 2–90 mg/m{sup 3}. • Carried out in a chamber 0.5 × 1.0 m and 1.5 m high, with transparent walls equipped with a high pressure water spray with single nozzle. • Respect to low-pressure sprays, removal efficiency turned out significant: the half-life for 1 μm particles with a removal high-pressure spray system is orders of magnitude shorter than that with a low-pressure sprays system. - Abstract: An experimental research was managed in the framework of the PASSAM European Project to measure the efficiency of high-pressure sprays in capturing aerosols when applied to a filtered containment venting system in case of severe accident. The campaign was carried out in a purposely built facility composed by a scrubbing chamber 0.5 × 1.0 m and 1.5 m high, with transparent walls to permit the complete view of the aerosol removal process, where the aerosol was injected to form a cloud of specific particle concentration. The chamber was equipped with a high pressure water spray system with a single nozzle placed on its top. The test matrix consisted in the combination of water pressure injections, in the range 50–130 bar, on a cloud of monodispersed SiO{sub 2} particles with sizes 0.5 or 1.0 μm and initial concentration ranging between 2 and 99 mg/m{sup 3}. The spray was kept running for 2 min and the efficiency of the removal was evaluated, along the test time, using an optical particle sizer. With respect to low-pressure sprays, the removal efficiency turned out much more significant: the half-life for 1 μm particles with a removal high-pressure spray system is orders of magnitude shorter than that with a low-pressure spray system. The highest removal rate was

  11. Supercritical water gasification with decoupled pressure and heat transfer modules

    KAUST Repository

    Dibble, Robert

    2017-09-14

    The present invention discloses a system and method for supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of biomass materials wherein the system includes a SCWG reactor and a plurality of heat exchangers located within a shared pressurized vessel, which decouples the function of containing high pressure from the high temperature function. The present invention allows the heat transfer function to be conducted independently from the pressure transfer function such that the system equipment can be designed and fabricated in manner that would support commercial scaled-up SCWG operations. By using heat exchangers coupled to the reactor in a series configuration, significant efficiencies are achieved by the present invention SCWG system over prior known SCWG systems.

  12. Methodology for surge pressure evaluation in a water injection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meliande, Patricia; Nascimento, Elson A. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Civil; Mascarenhas, Flavio C.B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Hidraulica Computacional; Dandoulakis, Joao P. [SHELL of Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Predicting transient effects, known as surge pressures, is of high importance for offshore industry. It involves detailed computer modeling that attempts to simulate the complex interaction between flow line and fluid in order to ensure efficient system integrity. Platform process operators normally raise concerns whether the water injection system is adequately designed or not to be protected against possible surge pressures during sudden valve closure. This report aims to evaluate the surge pressures in Bijupira and Salema water injection systems due to valve closure, through a computer model simulation. Comparisons among the results from empirical formulations are discussed and supplementary analysis for Salema system were performed in order to define the maximum volumetric flow rate for which the design pressure was able to withstand. Maximum surge pressure values of 287.76 bar and 318.58 bar, obtained in Salema and Bijupira respectively, using empirical formulations have surpassed the operating pressure design, while the computer model results have pointed the greatest surge pressure value of 282 bar in Salema system. (author)

  13. Efficient absorption of SO2 with low-partial pressures by environmentally benign functional deep eutectic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Ren, Shuhang; Hou, Yucui; Wu, Weize

    2017-02-15

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from the burning of fossil fuels is one of the main air contaminants. In this work, we found that environmentally benign solvents, deep eutectic solvents (DESs) could be designed with a function to absorb low-partial pressure SO2 from simulated flue gas. Two kinds of biodegradable functional DESs based on betaine (Bet) and l-carnitine (L-car) as hydrogen bond accepters (HBA) and ethylene glycol (EG) as a hydrogen bond donor (HBD) were prepared with mole ratios of HBA to HBD from 1:3 to 1:5, and they were investigated to absorb SO2 with different partial pressures at various temperatures. The results showed that the two DESs could absorb low-partial pressure SO2 efficiently. SO2 absorption capacities of the DESs with HBA/HBD mole ratio of 1:3 were 0.332mol SO2/mol HBA for Bet+EG DES and 0.820mol SO2/mol HBA for L-car+EG DES at 40°C with a SO2 partial pressure of 0.02atm. In addition, the regeneration experiments demonstrated that the absorption capacities of DESs did not change after five absorption and desorption cycles. Furthermore, the absorption mechanism of SO2 by DESs was studied by FT-IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra. It was found that there are strong acid-base interactions between SO2 and -COO(-) on HBA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fracture analysis of axially cracked pressure tube of pressurized heavy water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, S.; Bhasin, V.; Mahajan, S.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Three Dimensional (313) finite element elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for through wall axially cracked thin pressure tubes of 220 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. The analysis was done for Zr-2 and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes operating at 300{degrees}C and subjected to 9.5 Mpa internal pressure. Critical crack length was determined based on tearing instability concept. The analysis included the effect of crack face pressure due to the leaking fluid from tube. This effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. The available formulae for calculating J (for axially cracked tubes) do not take into account the effect of crack face pressure. 3D finite element analysis also gives insight into variation of J across the thickness of pressure tube. It was observed that J is highest at the mid-surface of tube. The results have been presented in the form of across the thickness average J value and a peak factor on J. Peak factor on J is ratio of J at mid surface to average J value. Crack opening area for different cracked lengths was calculated from finite element results. The fracture assessment of pressure tubes was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board R-6 method. Ductile tearing was considered.

  15. Development of in vivo measuring system of the pressure distribution under the denture base of removable partial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Kei; Kawata, Tetsuo; Suenaga, Hanako; Yoda, Nobuhiro; Shigemitsu, Ryuji; Ogawa, Toru; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    To develop a system to measure the pressure distribution under the base of a removable partial denture (RPD) and to apply it in vivo. A tactile sensor sheet with 100 sensing points and a measuring system (I-SCAN, Nitta, Osaka, Japan) were used. The sensor was calibrated before being applied in vivo. A subject with a mandibular RPD (Kennedy class II, division 1) participated in this study, and the RPD was duplicated as the experimental denture. The basal surface at distal extension was accommodated to the sensor in a manner similar to direct relining. Measurements were performed with three patterns of occlusal rest design (mesial and distal rests, mesial rest only, and without a rest) during maximal voluntary clenching (MVC) and gum chewing. The calibration measurements showed that the output value from each sensing point and total output of sensing points were positively correlated with the applied load. The pressures recorded in vivo varied depending on the locations of sensing points on the basal surface of the denture. During MVC the pressure distribution changed with the clenching level, and the highest pressure was registered near the residual ridge crest. The pressure distribution also changed according to the number of occlusal rests. The load center shifted about 2mm during MVC and about 4mm during gum chewing. The measuring system developed here enabled us to measure the pressure distribution under the denture base of RPD. The pressure distribution varied along with the design of the occlusal rest.

  16. Disjoining pressure isotherms of water-in-bitumen emulsion films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Shawn D; Czarnecki, Jan; Masliyah, Jacob

    2002-08-01

    In the oil sands industry, undesirable water-in-oil emulsions are often formed during the bitumen recovery process where water is used to liberate bitumen from sand grains. Nearly all of the water is removed except for a small percentage (approximately 1 to 2%), which remains in the solvent-diluted bitumen as micrometer-sized droplets. Knowledge of the colloidal forces that stabilized these water droplets would help to increase our understanding of how these emulsions are stabilized. In this study, the thin liquid film-pressure balance technique has been used to measure isotherms of disjoining pressure in water/toluene-diluted bitumen/water films at five different toluene-bitumen mass ratios. Even though a broad range of mass ratios was studied, only two isotherms are obtained, indicating a possible change in the molecular orientation of surfactant molecules at the bitumen/water interfaces. At low toluene-bitumen mass ratios, the film stability appears to be due to a strong, short-range steric repulsion created by a surfactant bilayer. Similar isotherms were obtained for water/toluene-diluted asphaltene/water films, indicating that the surface active material at the interface probably originated from the asphaltene fraction of the bitumen. However, unlike the bitumen films, films of toluene-diluted asphaltenes often formed very rigid interfaces similar to the "protective skin" described by other researcher.

  17. A study of water pressure influence on failure of large diameter water pipelines

    OpenAIRE

    Rathnayaka, Suranji Uditha Priyankara

    2017-01-01

    This research is part of a large research project investigating how, when, and where critical pipes (diameter≥300mm) fail in water supply networks. The failure of large- diameter pipe is critical, as it may have devastating consequences for both the public and the water utility. Factors contributing to pipe failure, such as internal pressure, external load, and corrosion, are examined in this research. The objective of the study is to understand the contribution of internal water pressur...

  18. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING/FEASIBILTY SUDIES FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPRITZER.M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The key potential advantage of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reacting and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carried out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an activated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical

  19. Efficient absorption of SO{sub 2} with low-partial pressures by environmentally benign functional deep eutectic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai; Ren, Shuhang [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, 100029 (China); Hou, Yucui [Department of Chemistry, Taiyuan Normal University, Taiyuan, 030031 (China); Wu, Weize, E-mail: wzwu@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, 100029 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Environmentally benign deep eutectic solvents (DESs) based on betaine or L-carnitine with ethylene glycol were designed with a function and used to efficiently capture SO{sub 2} with low partial pressures. - Highlights: • Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were designed with a function to absorb low-conc. SO{sub 2}. • Betaine(Bet) and L-carnitine(L-car) with a functional group were used as H-bond acceptor. • Bet + ethylene glycol (EG) DES and L-car + EG DES are environmentally benign. • L-car + EG DES can absorb 0.644 mol SO{sub 2} per mole L-car (0.37% SO{sub 2}). • L-car + EG DES is a promising absorbent for SO{sub 2} capture. - Abstract: Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emitted from the burning of fossil fuels is one of the main air contaminants. In this work, we found that environmentally benign solvents, deep eutectic solvents (DESs) could be designed with a function to absorb low-partial pressure SO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas. Two kinds of biodegradable functional DESs based on betaine (Bet) and L-carnitine (L-car) as hydrogen bond accepters (HBA) and ethylene glycol (EG) as a hydrogen bond donor (HBD) were prepared with mole ratios of HBA to HBD from 1:3 to 1:5, and they were investigated to absorb SO{sub 2} with different partial pressures at various temperatures. The results showed that the two DESs could absorb low-partial pressure SO{sub 2} efficiently. SO{sub 2} absorption capacities of the DESs with HBA/HBD mole ratio of 1:3 were 0.332 mol SO{sub 2}/mol HBA for Bet + EG DES and 0.820 mol SO{sub 2}/mol HBA for L-car + EG DES at 40 °C with a SO{sub 2} partial pressure of 0.02 atm. In addition, the regeneration experiments demonstrated that the absorption capacities of DESs did not change after five absorption and desorption cycles. Furthermore, the absorption mechanism of SO{sub 2} by DESs was studied by FT-IR, {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 13}C NMR spectra. It was found that there are strong acid–base interactions between SO{sub 2} and

  20. Ultra-high pressure water jet: Baseline report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology was being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology acts as a cutting tool for the removal of surface substrates. The Husky{trademark} pump feeds water to a lance that directs the high pressure water at the surface to be removed. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure. These were dust and noise. The dust exposure was found to be minimal, which would be expected due to the wet environment inherent in the technology, but noise exposure was at a significant level. Further testing for noise is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, fall hazards, slipping hazards, hazards associated with the high pressure water, and hazards associated with air pressure systems.

  1. Ultra-high pressure water jet: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology was being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology acts as a cutting tool for the removal of surface substrates. The Husky{trademark} pump feeds water to a lance that directs the high pressure water at the surface to be removed. The technologies being tested for concrete decontamination are targeted for alpha contamination. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  2. Pressure effect on water dynamics in tert-butyl alcohol/water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandrini, Vania; Deriu, Antonio; Onori, Giuseppe; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Telling, Mark T. F.

    2006-09-01

    We report here a quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) investigation of the effect of pressure on the diffusivity properties of water in a dilute aqueous solution of hydrophobic molecules (tert-butyl alcohol, TBA). The experiment was performed at fixed TBA concentration (0.02 molar fraction) by varying pressure from 1 to 2000 bar at two different temperatures (268 and 278 K). The quasi-elastic line-shapes have been analysed in terms of a model based on the memory function formalism. Our data indicate that, on increasing pressure up to 2000 bar, the diffusion coefficient of water in the TBA/water mixture exhibits a relative increase larger than that of pure water under the same thermodynamic conditions. The extent of this effect increases with decreasing temperature. The observed behaviour is described in terms of pressure-induced distortions of the H-bonded random network of liquid water.

  3. Fracturing Pressure of Shallow Sediment in Deep Water Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanliang Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The shallow sediment in deep water has weak strength and easily gets into plastic state under stress concentration induced by oil and gas drilling. During drilling, the formation around a wellbore can be divided into elastic zone and plastic zone. The unified strength theory was used after yielding. The radius of the plastic zone and the theoretical solution of the stress distribution in these two zones were derived in undrained condition. The calculation model of excess pore pressure induced by drilling was obtained with the introduction of Henkel’s excess pore pressure theory. Combined with hydraulic fracturing theory, the fracturing mechanism of shallow sediment was analyzed and the theoretical formula of fracturing pressure was given. Furthermore, the influence of the parameters of unified strength theory on fracturing pressure was analyzed. The theoretical calculation results agreed with measured results approximately, which preliminary verifies the reliability of this theory.

  4. High conversion pressurized water reactor with boiling channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margulis, M., E-mail: maratm@post.bgu.ac.il [The Unit of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shwageraus, E., E-mail: es607@cam.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, CB2 1PZ Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Conceptual design of partially boiling PWR core was proposed and studied. • Self-sustainable Th–{sup 233}U fuel cycle was utilized in this study. • Seed-blanket fuel assembly lattice optimization was performed. • A coupled Monte Carlo, fuel depletion and thermal-hydraulics studies were carried out. • Thermal–hydraulic analysis assured that the design matches imposed safety constraints. - Abstract: Parametric studies have been performed on a seed-blanket Th–{sup 233}U fuel configuration in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) with boiling channels to achieve high conversion ratio. Previous studies on seed-blanket concepts suggested substantial reduction in the core power density is needed in order to operate under nominal PWR system conditions. Boiling flow regime in the seed region allows more heat to be removed for a given coolant mass flow rate, which in turn, may potentially allow increasing the power density of the core. In addition, reduced moderation improves the breeding performance. A two-dimensional design optimization study was carried out with BOXER and SERPENT codes in order to determine the most attractive fuel assembly configuration that would ensure breeding. Effects of various parameters, such as void fraction, blanket fuel form, number of seed pins and their dimensions, on the conversion ratio were examined. The obtained results, for which the power density was set to be 104 W/cm{sup 3}, created a map of potentially feasible designs. It was found that several options have the potential to achieve end of life fissile inventory ratio above unity, which implies potential feasibility of a self-sustainable Thorium fuel cycle in PWRs without significant reduction in the core power density. Finally, a preliminary three-dimensional coupled neutronic and thermal–hydraulic analysis for a single seed-blanket fuel assembly was performed. The results indicate that axial void distribution changes drastically with burnup. Therefore

  5. Structural analysis of fuel rod applied to pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Danilo P.; Pinheiro, Andre Ricardo M.; Lotto, André A., E-mail: danilo.pinheiro@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The design of fuel assemblies applied to Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has several requirements and acceptance criteria that must be attended for licensing. In the case of PWR fuel rods, an important mechanical structural requirement is to keep the radial stability when submitted to the coolant external pressure. In the framework of the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program new materials have been studied to replace zirconium based alloys as cladding, including iron-based alloys. In this sense, efforts have been made to evaluate the behavior of these materials under PWR conditions. The present work aims to evaluate the collapse cold pressure of a stainless steel thin-walled tube similar to that used as cladding material of fuel rods by means of the comparison of numeric data, and experimental results. As a result of the simulations, it was observed that the collapse pressure has a value intermediate value between those found by regulatory requirements and analytical calculations. The experiment was carried out for the validation of the computational model using test specimens of thin-walled tubes considering empty tube. The test specimens were sealed at both ends by means of welding. They were subjected to a high pressure device until the collapse of the tubes. Preliminary results obtained from experiments with the empty test specimens indicate that the computational model can be validated for stainless steel cladding, considering the difference between collapse pressure indicated in the regulatory document and the actual limit pressure concerning to radial instability of tubes with the studied characteristics. (author)

  6. [Efficacy observation on application of negative pressure therapy in the treatment of superficial partial-thickness scald wound in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chuan-an; Chai, Jia-ke; Tuo, Xiao-ye; Cai, Jian-hua; Li, Dong-jie; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Hua; Cai, Jin-dong

    2013-02-01

    To observe the effect of negative pressure therapy in the treatment of superficial partial-thickness scald in children. Three hundred and seven children with superficial partial-thickness scald hospitalized from August 2009 to May 2012 were divided into negative pressure therapy group (NPT, n = 145) and control group (C, n = 162) according to the random number table. Patients in group NPT were treated with negative pressure from within post injury day (PID) 3 to PID 9 (with -16 kPa pressure), while traditional occlusive dressing method was used in group C. Changes in body temperature, wound healing condition, frequency of dressing change were compared between group NPT and group C. Bacterial culture results of wounds were compared before and after treatment in group NPT. Volume of drained transudate per one percent of wound area was recorded in group NPT on PID 1 to PID 3. Data were processed with t test or chi-square test. The incidence of high fever was significantly lower in group NPT (26.9%, 39/145) than in group C (63.6%, 103/162, χ(2) = 41.419, P PID 9, complete wound epithelization was observed in 138 patients in group NPT, and in 7 patients there were a few residual wounds which healed after dressing change for 2 days. The wound healing time of patients in group NPT [(9.2 ± 0.6) d] was obviously shorter than that in group C [(10.1 ± 1.6) d, t = 6.895, P PID 1, 2, and 3. NPT can decrease times of dressing change, and alleviate infection and inflammatory response by drainage of transudate, which promotes wound healing at last. NPT is proved to be a safe and effective approach for treatment of children with superficial partial-thickness scald.

  7. Contribution of Water to Pressure and Cold Denaturation of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Valentino; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms of cold and pressure denaturation of proteins are matter of debate and are commonly understood as due to water-mediated interactions. Here, we study several cases of proteins, with or without a unique native state, with or without hydrophilic residues, by means of a coarse-grain protein model in explicit solvent. We show, using Monte Carlo simulations, that taking into account how water at the protein interface changes its hydrogen bond properties and its density fluctuations is enough to predict protein stability regions with elliptic shapes in the temperature-pressure plane, consistent with previous theories. Our results clearly identify the different mechanisms with which water participates to denaturation and open the perspective to develop advanced computational design tools for protein engineering.

  8. Non-contact measurement of partial gas pressure and distribution of elemental composition using energy-resolved neutron imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tremsin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron resonance absorption imaging is a non-destructive technique that can characterize the elemental composition of a sample by measuring nuclear resonances in the spectrum of a transmitted beam. Recent developments in pixelated time-of-flight imaging detectors coupled with pulsed neutron sources pose new opportunities for energy-resolved imaging. In this paper we demonstrate non-contact measurements of the partial pressure of xenon and krypton gases encapsulated in a steel pipe while simultaneously passing the neutron beam through high-Z materials. The configuration was chosen as a proof of principle demonstration of the potential to make non-destructive measurement of gas composition in nuclear fuel rods. The pressure measured from neutron transmission spectra (∼739 ± 98 kPa and ∼751 ± 154 kPa for two Xe resonances is in relatively good agreement with the pressure value of ∼758 ± 21 kPa measured by a pressure gauge. This type of imaging has been performed previously for solids with a spatial resolution of ∼ 100 μm. In the present study it is demonstrated that the high penetration capability of epithermal neutrons enables quantitative mapping of gases encapsulate within high-Z materials such as steel, tungsten, urania and others. This technique may be beneficial for the non-destructive testing of bulk composition of objects (such as spent nuclear fuel assemblies and others containing various elements opaque to other more conventional imaging techniques. The ability to image the gaseous substances concealed within solid materials also allows non-destructive leak testing of various containers and ultimately measurement of gas partial pressures with sub-mm spatial resolution.

  9. Water use optimisation based on the concept of Partial Rootzone Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa El-Sadek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Partial Rootzone Drying (PRD is the creation of simultaneous wet and dry (or drying areas within the root zone. Only part of the root zone is irrigated and kept moist at any one time. This new irrigation strategy allows the exploitation of drought-induced abscisic acid (ABA based root to stomata signaling system to water saving. In this research, the PRD technique is examined and simulated for wheat and maize crops in the Mashtul Pilot Area (MPA, Egypt using Saltmed model. The technique causes the stimulation of physiological responses which are normally associated with water stress and this result in a significant reduction in water use through the production of chemical signals in drying roots. The results confirmed an increase in irrigation water productivity using PRD comparing with conventional flood irrigation. The research highly recommends applying the PRD method in new reclaimed areas in Egypt to save water and improve crop quality.

  10. Partial root zone drying (PRD) sustains yield of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) at reduced water supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahnazari, Ali; Andersen, Mathias Neumann; Liu, Fulai

    2008-01-01

    subsurface drip irrigation treatments ((1) Full Irrigation (FI) receiving 100% of evaporative demand; and (2) PRD receiving 70% water of FI) on potato yield, tuber size, leaf water relations and irrigation water use efficiency (IWUE). The PRD treatment was started just after the end of tuber initiation......Partial root zone drying (PRD) is a new water-saving irrigation strategy being tested in many crop species. Until now it has not been investigated in potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.). A field experiment on sandy soil in Denmark was conducted under a mobile rainout shelter to study effects of two...... for two months during tuber bulking and maturing stage and was shifted from one side to the other side of the plants every 5-10 days when FI plants had used 20-25 mm. Compared to FI plants, stomatal conductance was generally lower in the PRD-treated plants, whereas leaf water potential tended to be lower...

  11. Integrated solar combined cycles using gas turbines with partial recuperation and solar integration at different pressure levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, Antonio; Sánchez, Consuelo; Fernández, Santiago; Muñoz, Marta; Barbero, Rubén

    2017-06-01

    This work studies and compares two alternatives to improve the solar-to-electricity energy conversion efficiency in integrated solar combined cycle power plants (ISCC), which are based on the use of combined cycles including partial recuperative gas turbines. Each alternative has been integrated into dual and triple pressure levels with reheat heat recovery steam generators (HRSG). Partial recuperation conveys lower heat recovery at the steam generator than in conventional plants, because each MW exchanged in the recuperator is not available at the HRSG. This thermal power decrease at the HRSG may be overcome by the integration of solar energy that is implemented using parabolic trough collectors. Moreover, with such an implementation each solar thermal MW integrated allows a MW of heat recuperation and, thus a MW of fossil fuel saving, thus the solar heat-to-electricity energy conversion rate may reach values up to 50 %, which makes the proposal interesting.

  12. Pressure of a partially ionized hydrogen gas : numerical results from exact low temperature expansions

    OpenAIRE

    Alastuey, Angel; Ballenegger, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    8 pages; International audience; We consider a partially ionized hydrogen gas at low densities, where it reduces almost to an ideal mixture made with hydrogen atoms in their ground-state, ionized protons and ionized electrons. By performing systematic low-temperature expansions within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential, exact formulae for the first five leading corrections to the ideal Saha equation ...

  13. Influence of Oxygen Partial Pressure during Processing on the Thermoelectric Properties of Aerosol-Deposited CuFeO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöcker, Thomas; Exner, Jörg; Schubert, Michael; Streibl, Maximilian; Moos, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    In the field of thermoelectric energy conversion, oxide materials show promising potential due to their good stability in oxidizing environments. Hence, the influence of oxygen partial pressure during synthesis on the thermoelectric properties of Cu-Delafossites at high temperatures was investigated in this study. For these purposes, CuFeO2 powders were synthetized using a conventional mixed-oxide technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were conducted to determine the crystal structures of the delafossites associated with the oxygen content during the synthesis. Out of these powders, films with a thickness of about 25 µm were prepared by the relatively new aerosol-deposition (AD) coating technique. It is based on a room temperature impact consolidation process (RTIC) to deposit dense solid films of ceramic materials on various substrates without using a high-temperature step during the coating process. On these dense CuFeO2 films deposited on alumina substrates with electrode structures, the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductivity were measured as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. We compared the thermoelectric properties of both standard processed and aerosol deposited CuFeO2 up to 900 °C and investigated the influence of oxygen partial pressure on the electrical conductivity, on the Seebeck coefficient and on the high temperature stability of CuFeO2. These studies may not only help to improve the thermoelectric material in the high-temperature case, but may also serve as an initial basis to establish a defect chemical model. PMID:28773351

  14. Seed storage at elevated partial pressure of oxygen, a fast method for analysing seed ageing under dry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, S P C; Surki, A A; de Vos, R C H; Kodde, J

    2012-11-01

    Despite differences in physiology between dry and relative moist seeds, seed ageing tests most often use a temperature and seed moisture level that are higher than during dry storage used in commercial practice and gene banks. This study aimed to test whether seed ageing under dry conditions can be accelerated by storing under high-pressure oxygen. methods: Dry barley (Hordeum vulgare), cabbage (Brassica oleracea), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and soybean (Glycine max) seeds were stored between 2 and 7 weeks in steel tanks under 18 MPa partial pressure of oxygen. Storage under high-pressure nitrogen gas or under ambient air pressure served as controls. The method was compared with storage at 45 °C after equilibration at 85 % relative humidity and long-term storage at the laboratory bench. Germination behaviour, seedling morphology and tocopherol levels were assessed. The ageing of the dry seeds was indeed accelerated by storing under high-pressure oxygen. The morphological ageing symptoms of the stored seeds resembled those observed after ageing under long-term dry storage conditions. Barley appeared more tolerant of this storage treatment compared with lettuce and soybean. Less-mature harvested cabbage seeds were more sensitive, as was the case for primed compared with non-primed lettuce seeds. Under high-pressure oxygen storage the tocopherol levels of dry seeds decreased, in a linear way with the decline in seed germination, but remained unchanged in seeds deteriorated during storage at 45 °C after equilibration at 85 % RH. Seed storage under high-pressure oxygen offers a novel and relatively fast method to study the physiology and biochemistry of seed ageing at different seed moisture levels and temperatures, including those that are representative of the dry storage conditions as used in gene banks and commercial practice.

  15. Seed storage at elevated partial pressure of oxygen, a fast method for analysing seed ageing under dry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, S. P. C.; Surki, A. A.; de Vos, R. C. H.; Kodde, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite differences in physiology between dry and relative moist seeds, seed ageing tests most often use a temperature and seed moisture level that are higher than during dry storage used in commercial practice and gene banks. This study aimed to test whether seed ageing under dry conditions can be accelerated by storing under high-pressure oxygen. Methods Dry barley (Hordeum vulgare), cabbage (Brassica oleracea), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and soybean (Glycine max) seeds were stored between 2 and 7 weeks in steel tanks under 18 MPa partial pressure of oxygen. Storage under high-pressure nitrogen gas or under ambient air pressure served as controls. The method was compared with storage at 45 °C after equilibration at 85 % relative humidity and long-term storage at the laboratory bench. Germination behaviour, seedling morphology and tocopherol levels were assessed. Key Results The ageing of the dry seeds was indeed accelerated by storing under high-pressure oxygen. The morphological ageing symptoms of the stored seeds resembled those observed after ageing under long-term dry storage conditions. Barley appeared more tolerant of this storage treatment compared with lettuce and soybean. Less-mature harvested cabbage seeds were more sensitive, as was the case for primed compared with non-primed lettuce seeds. Under high-pressure oxygen storage the tocopherol levels of dry seeds decreased, in a linear way with the decline in seed germination, but remained unchanged in seeds deteriorated during storage at 45 °C after equilibration at 85 % RH. Conclusions Seed storage under high-pressure oxygen offers a novel and relatively fast method to study the physiology and biochemistry of seed ageing at different seed moisture levels and temperatures, including those that are representative of the dry storage conditions as used in gene banks and commercial practice. PMID:22967856

  16. Effects of sample storage time, temperature and syringe type on blood gas tensions in samples with high oxygen partial pressures.

    OpenAIRE

    Pretto, J. J.; Rochford, P D

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Although plastic arterial sampling syringes are now commonly used, the effects of sample storage time and temperature on blood gas tensions are poorly described for samples with a high oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) taken with these high density polypropylene syringes. METHODS--Two ml samples of tonometered whole blood (PaO2 86.7 kPa, PaCO2 4.27 kPa) were placed in glass syringes and in three brands of plastic blood gas syringes. The syringes were placed either at room temperature...

  17. Investigation of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy for its application as primary standard for partial pressure measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jousten, K; Bock, T [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany); Padilla-VIquez, G [Laboratorio Costarricense de MetrologIa (Lacomet), Ciudad de la Investigacion de la UCR, San Pedro de Montes de Oca (Costa Rica)], E-mail: Karl.jousten@ptb.de

    2008-03-01

    Partial pressures in vacuum systems can be quite accurately measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy in the infrared. To examine the possibility for its application as primary standard, for CO{sub 2} in the 2-{mu}m-region we made full traceability to the respective SI unit for each input quantity of the model, evaluated the results according to the ISO guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement, and validated the method successfully by comparison with gravimetrically produced samples of CO{sub 2} in N{sub 2}.

  18. Partial oxidation of n-hexadecane through decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in supercritical water

    KAUST Repository

    Alshammari, Y.M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. This work reports the experimental analysis of partial oxidation of n-hexadecane under supercritical water conditions. A novel reactor flow system was developed which allows for total decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in a separate reactor followed partial oxidation of n-hexadecane in a gasification reactor instead of having both reactions in one reactor. The kinetics of hydrothermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was studied in order to confirm its full conversion into water and oxygen under the desired partial oxidation conditions, and the kinetic data were found in a good agreement with previously reported literature. The gas yield and gasification efficiency were investigated under different operating parameters. Furthermore, the profile of C-C/C=C ratio was studied which showed the favourable conditions for maximising yields of n-alkanes via hydrogenation of their corresponding 1-alkenes. Enhanced hydrogenation of 1-alkenes was observed at higher O/C ratios and higher residence times, shown by the increase in the C-C/C=C ratio to more than unity, while increasing the temperature has shown much less effect on the C-C/C=C ratio at the current experimental conditions. In addition, GC-MS analysis of liquid samples revealed the formation of heavy oxygenated compounds which may suggest a new addition reaction to account for their formation under the current experimental conditions. Results show new promising routes for hydrogen production with in situ hydrogenation of heavy hydrocarbons in a supercritical water reactor.

  19. Biomethanation Of Syngas Using Anaerobic Sludge: Shift In The Catabolic Routes With The CO Partial Pressure Increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Sancho-Navarro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Syngas generated by thermal gasification of biomass or coal can be steam reformed and purified into methane, which could be used locally for energy needs, or re-injected in the natural gas grid. As an alternative to chemical catalysis, the main components of the syngas (CO, CO2, and H2 can be used as substrates by a wide range of microorganisms, to be converted into gas biofuels, including methane. This study evaluates the carboxydotrophic (CO-consuming methanogenic potential present in an anaerobic sludge from an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB reactor treating waste water, and elucidates the CO conversion routes to methane at 35±3˚C. Kinetic activity tests under CO at partial pressures (pCO varying from 0.1 to 1.5 atm (0.09-1.31 mmol/L in the liquid phase showed a significant carboxydotrophic activity potential for growing conditions on CO alone. A maximum methanogenic activity of 1 mmol CH4 per g of volatile suspended solid and per day was achieved at 0.2 atm of CO (0.17 mmol/L, and then the rate decreased with the amount of CO supplied. The intermediary metabolites such as acetate, H2 and propionate started to accumulate at higher CO concentrations. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES, fluoroacetate, and vancomycin showed that in a mixed culture CO was converted mainly to acetate by acetogenic bacteria, which was further transformed to methane by acetoclastic methanogens, while direct methanogenic CO conversion was negligible. Methanogenesis was totally blocked at high pCO in the bottles (≥ 1 atm. However it was possible to achieve higher methanogenic potential under a 100% CO atmosphere after acclimation of the sludge to CO. This adaptation to high CO concentrations led to a shift in the archaeal population, then dominated by hydrogen-utilizing methanogens, which were able to take over acetoclastic methanogens, while syntrophic acetate oxidizing (SAO bacteria oxidized acetate into CO2 and H2. The disaggregation

  20. Brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen predicts the outcome of severe traumatic brain injury under mild hypothermia treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun H

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hongtao Sun,1,* Maohua Zheng,2,* Yanmin Wang,1 Yunfeng Diao,1 Wanyong Zhao,1 Zhengjun Wei1 1Sixth Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Logistics University of People’s Armed Police Force, Tianjin, 2Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance and changes of brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen (PbtO2 in the course of mild hypothermia treatment (MHT for treating severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI. Methods: There were 68 cases with sTBI undergoing MHT. PbtO2, intracranial pressure (ICP, jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2, and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP were continuously monitored, and clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Results: Of 68 patients with sTBI, PbtO2, SjvO2, and CPP were obviously increased, but decreased ICP level was observed throughout the MHT. PbtO2 and ICP were negatively linearly correlated, while there was a positive linear correlation between PbtO2 and SjvO2. Monitoring CPP and SjvO2 was performed under normal circumstances, and a large proportion of patients were detected with low PbtO2. Decreased PbtO2 was also found after MHT. Conclusion: Continuous PbtO2 monitoring could be introduced to evaluate the condition of regional cerebral oxygen metabolism, thereby guiding the clinical treatment and predicting the outcome. Keywords: severe traumatic brain injury, hypothermia, brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen, therapy

  1. Theoretical study of flashing and water hammer in a supercritical water cycle during pressure drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imre, A.R., E-mail: imre@aeki.kfki.h [Simulator Laboratory, MTA KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest, POB 49, H-1525 (Hungary); Barna, I.F.; Ezsoel, G. [Thermohydraulics Laboratory, MTA KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest, POB 49, H-1525 (Hungary); Hazi, G. [Simulator Laboratory, MTA KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest, POB 49, H-1525 (Hungary); Kraska, T. [Institute for Physical Chemistry, University of Cologne, Luxemburger Str. 116, D-50939 Koeln (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    During a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) the pressure of the coolant can drop significantly in the vicinity of the leak. It will be shown that unlike in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) where this pressure drop can cause only sudden vaporization - also called flashing - in supercritical water cooled reactors (SCWRs) it can cause sudden condensation (condensation-induced water hammer), too. The reason is that from supercritical state the system can go to metastable liquid as well as to metastable vapour state after LOCA. Relaxation from metastable fluid states is a fast process, followed by a local positive or negative pressure-jump, which might increase the damage around the leak. Conservative estimation will be given for the magnitude of these pressure jumps caused by the flashing or water hammer by assuming various initial pressure losses. In our calculations, three different equations of state are used: the simple van der Waals EoS; the Redlich-Kwong as an empirical development; and the more sophisticated non-cubic Deiters equation of state. These equations are able to describe metastable states qualitatively but with different accuracy. These calculations can help us to map the local immediate effect of any sudden pressure drop and therefore it can help to design better safety protocols.

  2. Exact and Approximate Solutions of Fractional Partial Differential Equations for Water Movement in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninghu Su

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents solutions of the fractional partial differential equation (fPDE for analysing water movement in soils. The fPDE explains processes equivalent to the concept of symmetrical fractional derivatives (SFDs which have two components: the forward fractional derivative (FFD and backward fractional derivative (BFD of water movement in soils with the BFD representing the micro-scale backwater effect in porous media. The distributed-order time-space fPDE represents water movement in both swelling and non-swelling soils with mobile and immobile zones with the backwater effect operating at two time scales in large and small pores. The concept of flux-concentration relation is now updated to account for the relative fractional flux of water movement in soils.

  3. Drinking water fluoride and blood pressure? An environmental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Hassan; Taghavi Shahri, Seyed Mahmood; Amini, Mohamad; Ramezani Mehrian, Majid; Mokhayeri, Yaser; Yunesian, Masud

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between intakes of fluoride (F) from drinking water and blood pressure has not yet been reported. We examined the relationship of F in ground water resources (GWRs) of Iran with the blood pressure of Iranian population in an ecologic study. The mean F data of the GWRs (as a surrogate for F levels in drinking water) were derived from a previously conducted study. The hypertension prevalence and the mean of systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP & DBP) of Iranian population by different provinces and genders were also derived from the provincial report of non-communicable disease risk factor surveillance of Iran. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between the mean concentrations of F in the GWRs and the hypertension prevalence of males (r = 0.48, p = 0.007), females (r = 0.36, p = 0.048), and overall (r = 0.495, p = 0.005). Also, statistically significant positive correlations between the mean concentrations of F in the GWRs and the mean SBP of males (r = 0.431, p = 0.018), and a borderline correlation with females (r = 0.352, p = 0.057) were found. In conclusion, we found the increase of hypertension prevalence and the SBP mean with the increase of F level in the GWRs of Iranian population.

  4. Two Regimes of Bandgap Red Shift and Partial Ambient Retention in Pressure-Treated Two-Dimensional Perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Gang [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203, China; Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015, United States; Kong, Lingping [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203, China; Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015, United States; Guo, Peijun [Center; Stoumpos, Constantinos C. [Department; Hu, Qingyang [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203, China; Liu, Zhenxian [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015, United States; Cai, Zhonghou [Advanced; Gosztola, David J. [Center; Mao, Ho-kwang [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203, China; Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015, United States; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G. [Department; Schaller, Richard D. [Center; Department

    2017-10-09

    The discovery of elevated environmental stability in two-dimensional (2D) Ruddlesden–Popper hybrid perovskites represents a significant advance in low-cost, high-efficiency light absorbers. In comparison to 3D counterparts, 2D perovskites of organo-lead-halides exhibit wider, quantum-confined optical bandgaps that reduce the wavelength range of light absorption. Here, we characterize the structural and optical properties of 2D hybrid perovskites as a function of hydrostatic pressure. We observe bandgap narrowing with pressure of 633 meV that is partially retained following pressure release due to an atomic reconfiguration mechanism. We identify two distinct regimes of compression dominated by the softer organic and less compressible inorganic sublattices. Our findings, which also include PL enhancement, correlate well with density functional theory calculations and establish structure–property relationships at the atomic scale. These concepts can be expanded into other hybrid perovskites and suggest that pressure/strain processing could offer a new route to improved materials-by-design in applications.

  5. Dual sources of water overprinting on the low zircon δ18O metamorphic country rocks: Disequilibrium constrained through inverse modelling of partial reequilibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chun-Sheng; Zhao, Zi-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Since water is only composed of oxygen and hydrogen, δ18O and δ2H values are thus utilized to trace the origin of water(s) and quantify the water-rock interactions. While Triassic high pressure (HP) and ultrahigh pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks across the Dabie-Sulu orogen in central-eastern China have been well documented, postcollisional magmatism driven hydrothermal systems are little known. Here we show that two sources of externally derived water interactions were revealed by oxygen isotopes for the gneissic country rocks intruded by the early Cretaceous postcollisional granitoids. Inverse modellings indicate that the degree of disequilibrium (doD) of meteoric water interactions was more evident than that of magmatic one (-65 ± 1o vs. -20 ± 2°) the partial reequilibration between quartz and alkali feldspar oxygen isotopes with magmatic water was achieved at 340 °C with a water/rock (W/R) ratio of about 1.2 for an open-hydrothermal system; two-stage meteoric water interactions were unraveled with reequilibration temperatures less than 300 °C and W/R ratios around 0.4. The lifetime of fossil magmatic hydrothermal system overprinted on the low zircon δ18O orthogneissic country rocks was estimated to maintain up to 50 thousand years (Kyr) through oxygen exchange modellings. Four-stage isotopic evolutions were proposed for the magmatic water interacted gneiss.

  6. Anomalies in bulk supercooled water at negative pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallares, Gaël; El Mekki Azouzi, Mouna; González, Miguel A.; Aragones, Juan L.; Abascal, José L. F.; Valeriani, Chantal; Caupin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Water anomalies still defy explanation. In the supercooled liquid, many quantities, for example heat capacity and isothermal compressibility κT, show a large increase. The question arises if these quantities diverge, or if they go through a maximum. The answer is key to our understanding of water anomalies. However, it has remained elusive in experiments because crystallization always occurred before any extremum is reached. Here we report measurements of the sound velocity of water in a scarcely explored region of the phase diagram, where water is both supercooled and at negative pressure. We find several anomalies: maxima in the adiabatic compressibility and nonmonotonic density dependence of the sound velocity, in contrast with a standard extrapolation of the equation of state. This is reminiscent of the behavior of supercritical fluids. To support this interpretation, we have performed simulations with the 2005 revision of the transferable interaction potential with four points. Simulations and experiments are in near-quantitative agreement, suggesting the existence of a line of maxima in κT (LMκT). This LMκT could either be the thermodynamic consequence of the line of density maxima of water [Sastry S, Debenedetti PG, Sciortino F, Stanley HE (1996) Phys Rev E 53:6144–6154], or emanate from a critical point terminating a liquid–liquid transition [Sciortino F, Poole PH, Essmann U, Stanley HE (1997) Phys Rev E 55:727–737]. At positive pressure, the LMκT has escaped observation because it lies in the “no man’s land” beyond the homogeneous crystallization line. We propose that the LMκT emerges from the no man’s land at negative pressure. PMID:24843177

  7. Anomalies in bulk supercooled water at negative pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallares, Gaël; El Mekki Azouzi, Mouna; González, Miguel A; Aragones, Juan L; Abascal, José L F; Valeriani, Chantal; Caupin, Frédéric

    2014-06-03

    Water anomalies still defy explanation. In the supercooled liquid, many quantities, for example heat capacity and isothermal compressibility κT, show a large increase. The question arises if these quantities diverge, or if they go through a maximum. The answer is key to our understanding of water anomalies. However, it has remained elusive in experiments because crystallization always occurred before any extremum is reached. Here we report measurements of the sound velocity of water in a scarcely explored region of the phase diagram, where water is both supercooled and at negative pressure. We find several anomalies: maxima in the adiabatic compressibility and nonmonotonic density dependence of the sound velocity, in contrast with a standard extrapolation of the equation of state. This is reminiscent of the behavior of supercritical fluids. To support this interpretation, we have performed simulations with the 2005 revision of the transferable interaction potential with four points. Simulations and experiments are in near-quantitative agreement, suggesting the existence of a line of maxima in κT (LMκT). This LMκT could either be the thermodynamic consequence of the line of density maxima of water [Sastry S, Debenedetti PG, Sciortino F, Stanley HE (1996) Phys Rev E 53:6144-6154], or emanate from a critical point terminating a liquid-liquid transition [Sciortino F, Poole PH, Essmann U, Stanley HE (1997) Phys Rev E 55:727-737]. At positive pressure, the LMκT has escaped observation because it lies in the "no man's land" beyond the homogeneous crystallization line. We propose that the LMκT emerges from the no man's land at negative pressure.

  8. Processing of water level derived from water pressure data at the Time Series Station Spiekeroog

    OpenAIRE

    Holinde, L.; Badewien, T. H.; Freund, J. A.; E. V. Stanev; Zielinski, O.

    2015-01-01

    The quality of water level time series data strongly varies with periods of high- and low-quality sensor data. In this paper we are presenting the processing steps which were used to generate high-quality water level data from water pressure measured at the Time Series Station (TSS) Spiekeroog. The TSS is positioned in a tidal inlet between the islands of Spiekeroog and Langeoog in the East Frisian Wadden Sea (southern North Sea). The processing steps will cover sensor drift...

  9. Controlling mechanisms of surface partial pressure of CO2 in Jiaozhou Bay during summer and the influence of heavy rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunxiao; Yang, Xufeng; Han, Ping; Xue, Liang; Zhang, Longjun

    2017-09-01

    Due to the combined effects of natural processes and human activities, carbon source/sink processes and mechanisms in the coastal ocean are becoming more and more important in current ocean carbon cycle research. Based on differences in the ratio of total alkalinity (TA) to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) associated with terrestrial input, biological process (production and respiration), calcium carbonate (CaCO3) process (precipitation and dissolution) and CO2 evasion/invasion, we discuss the mechanisms controlling the surface partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in Jiaozhou Bay (JZB) during summer and the influence of heavy rain, via three cruises performed in mid-June, early July and late July of 2014. In mid-June and in early July, without heavy rain or obvious river input, sea surface pCO2 ranged from 521 to 1080 μatm and from 547 to 998 μatm, respectively. The direct input of DIC from sewage and the intense respiration produced large DIC additions and the highest pCO2 values in the northeast of the bay near the downtown of Qingdao. However, in the west of the bay, significant CaCO3 precipitation led to DIC removal but no obvious increase in pCO2, which was just close to that in the central area. Due to the shallow depth and longer water residence time in this region, this pattern may be related to the sustained release of CO2 into the atmosphere. In late July, heavy rain promoted river input in the western and eastern portions of JZB. Strong primary production led to a significant decrease in pCO2 in the western area, with the lowest pCO2 value of 252 μatm. However, in the northeastern area, the intense respiration remained, and the highest pCO2 value was 1149 μatm. The average air-sea CO2 flux in mid-June and early July was 20.23 mmol m- 2 d- 1 and 23.56 mmol m- 2 d- 1, respectively. In contrast, in late July, sources became sinks for atmospheric CO2 in the western and central areas of the bay, halving the average air-sea CO2 flux to a value of 10.58 mmol m- 2

  10. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-15

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8{approx}2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4{approx}2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure.

  11. Solubility of natural gases in water under high pressure; Solubilite des gaz naturels dans l`eau a pression elevee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhima, A.

    1998-10-08

    Under high pressure (up to 1200 bar) and high temperature (up to 200 deg C) petroleum reservoir conditions the hydrocarbon-water mutual solubilities may become important. Under such conditions, the prediction of hydrocarbon water solubilities is a challenge for petroleum engineers. Indeed, very few studies have been done ar pressures higher that 700 bars. New solubility data for methane, ethane, n-butane, CO{sub 2} and their mixtures in pure water were obtained at 344.25 K and from 2.5 to 100 MPa. The results agree very well with those of the literature in the case of pure hydrocarbons in water, but differ for the hydrocarbon mixtures. A rigorous thermodynamic analysis allows the elaboration of a model that combines a cubic equation of state (Peng-Robinson with k{sub ij} given in literature) with the Henry`s law approach. The (P,T) functional form of Henry`s constant is given by the Krichevsky-Kasarnovsky equation which involves two important parameters: partial molar volume at infinite dilution and Henry`s constant at the vapour pressure of water. For a given solute both parameters are only functions of temperature. A critical selection of binary solubility data for a large number of solutes has been used as a basis for a new correlation for calculating both this partial molar volume and the corresponding Henry`s constants as a function of temperature. (author) 169 refs.

  12. Culinary and pressure irrigation water system hydroelectric generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, Cory [Water Works Engineers, Pleasant Grove City, UT (United States)

    2016-01-29

    Pleasant Grove City owns and operates a drinking water system that included pressure reducing stations (PRVs) in various locations and flow conditions. Several of these station are suitable for power generation. The City evaluated their system to identify opportunities for power generation that can be implemented based on the analysis of costs and prediction of power generation and associated revenue. The evaluation led to the selection of the Battle Creek site for development of a hydro-electric power generating system. The Battle Creek site includes a pipeline that carries spring water to storage tanks. The system utilizes a PRV to reduce pressure before the water is introduced into the tanks. The evaluation recommended that the PRV at this location be replaced with a turbine for the generation of electricity. The system will be connected to the utility power grid for use in the community. A pelton turbine was selected for the site, and a turbine building and piping system were constructed to complete a fully functional power generation system. It is anticipated that the system will generate approximately 440,000 kW-hr per year resulting in $40,000 of annual revenue.

  13. ENERGY RECOVERY POTENTIAL FROM EXCESS PRESSURE in WATER SUPPLY and DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Ethem Karadirek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability of water supply systems has started to become an important issue besides continuous and hygienic supply of water. Sustainable water supply systems require improvement of energy efficiency, reduction of energy and water losses in water distribution systems and reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. Pressure is one of the main design parameters for gravity water supply systems and water distribution networks. Therefore, pressure has to be between certain limits. An excess pressure occurs during water transmission from high elevations of water resources to low elevations. By use of break pressure tanks, water storage tanks or pressure reducing valves (PRV excess pressure is reduced and damages on transmission pipes are prevented. However, energy recovery from excess pressure is possible at this stage by using turbines. Similarly, PRVs are used at certain locations of water distribution networks to control excess water pressure and to reduce it down to optimum operational levels. Energy recovery from excess pressure is also possible at this stage although energy recovery will be low. High pressure at water supply systems causes both energy and water losses. In Turkey, allowable water pressure at water distribution networks is between 20-60 m water column but excess pressure is commonly observed. At low pressure levels, water cannot reach water subscribers and this causes customer dissatisfaction. On the other side, at high pressure levels, water losses and pipe bursts increase which causes indirect increase in energy losses. For sustainable operation of water distribution networks, it is recommended to divide the network into smaller and independent subzones (District Metered Area, DMA. By placing a flow meter and a pressure meter at the entrance of a DMA, flow rate and pressure could be monitored on-line. However, in order to monitor spatial and temporal variations of flow rate and pressure at all pipes in the network, a hydraulic

  14. High pressure supercritical water - still an open field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franck, E.U. [Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    A selected group of thermophysical phenomena of aqueous systems is presented and discussed. Emphasis is given to temperatures well above the critical temperature of water and to pressures extending in some cases to 3000 bar. Special attention is given to homogeneous supercritical binary mixture systems. The viscosity of water to 1000 C is discussed as well as the thermal conductivity and the static dielectric constant. As an example for dense water-molten salt systems, measurements of density and electrolytic conductivity up to the pure molten sodium hydroxide are shown. - Above its critical temperature the dense water is miscible also with nonpolar partners. Sveral of these have practical interest, for example H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O-CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}O-H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O-O{sub 2}. Critical curves are demonstrated and discussed with phase diagrams of ternary systems to 2500 bar. ''Hydrothermal'' diffusion flames in dense H{sub 2}O-CH{sub 4} mixtures to 1000 bar can be produced and are presented. For the first time a phase diagram of the ternary water-oxyhydrogen system is shown, calculated to 350 C and 2500 bar. Also for hydrogen fluoride the molar volume V = (p,T) is shown for the first time to 2000 bar and 600 C. (orig.)

  15. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, A.; Dufour, Ph; Golfier, H.; Grouiller, J. P.; Guillet, J. L.; Poinot, Ch; Youinou, G.; Zaetta, A.

    2003-06-01

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h) -1. More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate.

  16. Oxidation behavior of V-Cr-Ti alloys in low-partial-pressure oxygen environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Uz, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-09-01

    A test program is in progress at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the effect of pO{sub 2} in the exposure environment on oxygen uptake, scaling kinetics, and scale microstructure in V-Cr-Ti alloys. The data indicate that the oxidation process follows parabolic kinetics in all of the environments used in the present study. From the weight change data, parabolic rate constants were evaluated as a function of temperature and exposure environment. The temperature dependence of the parabolic rate constants was described by an Arrhenius relationship. Activation energy for the oxidation process was fairly constant in the oxygen pressure range of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} torr for both the alloys. The activation energy for oxidation in air was significantly lower than in low-pO{sub 2} environments, and for oxidation in pure O{sub 2} at 760 torr was much lower than in low-pO{sub 2} environments. X-ray diffraction analysis of the specimens showed that VO{sub 2} was the dominant phase in low-pO{sub 2} environments, while V{sub 2}O{sub 5} was dominant in air and in pure oxygen at 76f0 torr.

  17. Soil Water Thermodynamic to Unify Water Retention Curve by Pressure Plates and Tensiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eBraudeau

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The pressure plate method is a standard method for measuring the pF curves, also called soil water retention curves, in a large soil moisture range from saturation to a dry state corresponding to a tension pressure of near 1500 kPa. However, the pressure plate can only provide discrete water retention curves represented by a dozen measured points. In contrast, the measurement of the soil water retention curves by tensiometer is direct and continuous, but limited to the range of the tensiometer reading: from saturation to near 70-80 kPa. The two methods stem from two very different concepts of measurement and the compatibility of both methods has never been demonstrated. The recently established thermodynamic formulation of the pedostructure water retention curve, will allow the compatibility of the two curves to be studied, both theoretically and experimentally. This constitutes the object of the present article. We found that the pressure plate method provides accurate measurement points of the pedostructure water retention curve h(W, conceptually the same as that accurately measured by the tensiometer. However, contrarily to what is usually thought, h is not equal to the applied air pressure on the sample, but rather, is proportional to its logarithm, in agreement with the thermodynamic theory developed in the article. The pF curve and soil water retention curve, as well as their methods of measurement are unified in a same physical theory. It is the theory of the soil medium organization (pedostructure and its interaction with water. We show also how the hydrostructural parameters of the theoretical curve equation can be estimated from any measured curve, whatever the method of measurement. An application example using published pF curves is given.

  18. Instrumentation and control strategies for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several vendors have recently been actively pursuing the development of integral pressurized water reactors (iPWRs that range in power levels from small to large reactors. Integral reactors have the features of minimum vessel penetrations, passive heat removal after reactor shutdown, and modular construction that allow fast plant integration and a secure fuel cycle. The features of an integral reactor limit the options for placing control and safety system instruments. The development of instrumentation and control (I&C strategies for a large 1,000 MWe iPWR is described. Reactor system modeling—which includes reactor core dynamics, primary heat exchanger, and the steam flashing drum—is an important part of I&C development and validation, and thereby consolidates the overall implementation for a large iPWR. The results of simulation models, control development, and instrumentation features illustrate the systematic approach that is applicable to integral light water reactors.

  19. Water-Energy balance in pressure irrigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Raúl; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Juana, Luis; Laguna, Francisco V.; Castañón, Guillermo; Gil, María; Benitez, Javier

    2013-04-01

    Modernization of irrigation schemes, generally understood as transformation of surface irrigation systems into pressure -sprinkler and trickle- irrigation systems, aims at, among others, improving irrigation efficiency and reduction of operation and maintenance efforts made by the irrigators. Automation techniques become easier after modernization, and operation management plays an important role in energy efficiency issues. Modern systems use to include elevated water reservoirs with enough capacity to irrigate during peak water demand period about 16 to 48 h. However, pressure irrigation systems, in contrast, carry a serious energy cost. Energy requirements depend on decisions taken on management strategies during the operation phase, which are conditioned by previous decisions taken on the design project of the different elements which compose the irrigation system. Most of the countries where irrigation activity is significant bear in mind that modernization irrigation must play a key role in the agricultural infrastructure policies. The objective of this study is to characterize and estimate the mean and variation of the energy consumed by common types of irrigation systems according to their management possibilities. Also is an objective to estimate the fraction of the water reservoirs available along the irrigation campaign for storing the energy from renewable sources during their availability periods. Simulation taking into account all elements comprising the irrigation system has been used to estimate the energy requirements of typical irrigation systems of several crop production systems. The simulation of various types of irrigation systems and management strategies, in the framework imposed by particular cropping systems, would help to develop criteria for improving the energy balance in relation to the irrigation water supply productivity and new opportunities in the renewable energy field.

  20. The Synthesis of Calcium Salt from Brine Water by Partial Evaporation and Chemical Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalasari, L. H.; Widowati, M. K.; Natasha, N. C.; Sulistiyono, E.; Prasetyo, A. B.

    2017-02-01

    In this study would be investigated the effects of partial evaporation and chemical precipitation in the formation of calcium salt from brine water resources. The chemical reagents used in the study was oxalate acid (C2H2O4), ammonium carbonate (NH4)2CO3) and ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) with reagent concentration of 2 N, respectively. The procedure was 10 liters brine water evaporated until 20% volume and continued with filtration process to separate brine water filtrate from residue (salt). Salt resulted from evaporation process was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. Filtrate then was reacted with C2H2O4, (NH4)2CO3 and NH4OH reagents to get salt products in atmospheric condition and variation ratio volume brine water/chemicals (v/v) [10/1; 10/5; 10/10; 10/20; 10/30; 10:50; 20/1; 20/5; 20/10; 20/20; 20/30; 20:50]. The salt product than were filtered, dried, measured weights and finally characterized by SEM/EDS and XRD techniques. The result of experiment showed the chemical composition of brine water from Tirta Sanita, Bogor was 28.87% Na, 9.17% Mg, 2.94% Ca, 22.33% O, 0.71% Sr, 30.02% Cl, 1.51% Si, 1.23% K, 0.55% S, 1.31% Al. The chemical composition of salt resulted by partial evaporation was 53.02% Ca, 28.93%O, 9.50% Na, 2.10% Mg, 1.53% Sr, 1.20% Cl, 1.10% Si, 0.63% K, 0.40% S, 0.39% Al. The salt resulted by total evaporation was indicated namely as NaCl. Whereas salt resulted by partial evaporation was CaCO3 with a purity of 90 % from High Score Plus analysis. In the experiment by chemical precipitation was reported that the reagents of ammonium carbonate were more reactive for synthesizing calcium salt from brine water compared to reagents of oxalate acid and ammonium hydroxide. The salts precipitated by NH4OH, (NH4)2CO3, and H2C2O4 reagents were indicated as NaCl, CaCO3 and CaC2O4.H2O, respectively. The techniques of partial evaporation until 20% volume sample of brine water and

  1. Shortcut nitrification/partial nitritation start-up for reject water treatment in a SBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszyński-Huhajło, Mateusz; Miodoński, Stanisław

    2017-11-01

    For many wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), side-stream treatment of reject water from digested sludge dewatering is a feasible opportunity to improve N-removal efficiency without costly plant expansion. Biological nitrogen removal over nitrite or combined partial nitritation (PN)-Anammox process has recently become a popular treatment method for such ammonium-rich streams. Shortcut nitrification and PN start-ups were successfully performed in a pilot-scale SBR treating real reject water. In all performed experiments, effective nitrate production inhibition occurred in less than 20 days due to operational conditions selection and without advanced control system. pH adjustment in the PN reactor allowed to achieve NO2-N /NH4-N ratio suitable for Anammox process (1.24±0.07).

  2. Intra-abdominal pressure correlates with extracellular water content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Dąbrowski

    Full Text Available Secondary increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP may result from extra-abdominal pathology, such as massive fluid resuscitation, capillary leak or sepsis. All these conditions increase the extravascular water content. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between IAP and body water volume.Adult patients treated for sepsis or septic shock with acute kidney injury (AKI and patients undergoing elective pharyngolaryngeal or orthopedic surgery were enrolled. IAP was measured in the urinary bladder. Total body water (TBW, extracellular water content (ECW and volume excess (VE were measured by whole body bioimpedance. Among critically ill patients, all parameters were analyzed over three consecutive days, and parameters were evaluated perioperatively in surgical patients.One hundred twenty patients were studied. Taken together, the correlations between IAP and VE, TBW, and ECW were measured at 408 time points. In all participants, IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE. In critically ill patients, IAP correlated with ECW and VE. In surgical patients, IAP correlated with ECW and TBW. IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE in the mixed population. IAP also correlated with VE in critically ill patients. ROC curve analysis showed that ECW and VE might be discriminative parameters of risk for increased IAP.IAP strongly correlates with ECW.

  3. Application of principal component regression and partial least squares regression in ultraviolet spectrum water quality detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangtong; Luo, Yongdao; Dai, Honglin

    2018-01-01

    Water is the source of life and the essential foundation of all life. With the development of industrialization, the phenomenon of water pollution is becoming more and more frequent, which directly affects the survival and development of human. Water quality detection is one of the necessary measures to protect water resources. Ultraviolet (UV) spectral analysis is an important research method in the field of water quality detection, which partial least squares regression (PLSR) analysis method is becoming predominant technology, however, in some special cases, PLSR's analysis produce considerable errors. In order to solve this problem, the traditional principal component regression (PCR) analysis method was improved by using the principle of PLSR in this paper. The experimental results show that for some special experimental data set, improved PCR analysis method performance is better than PLSR. The PCR and PLSR is the focus of this paper. Firstly, the principal component analysis (PCA) is performed by MATLAB to reduce the dimensionality of the spectral data; on the basis of a large number of experiments, the optimized principal component is extracted by using the principle of PLSR, which carries most of the original data information. Secondly, the linear regression analysis of the principal component is carried out with statistic package for social science (SPSS), which the coefficients and relations of principal components can be obtained. Finally, calculating a same water spectral data set by PLSR and improved PCR, analyzing and comparing two results, improved PCR and PLSR is similar for most data, but improved PCR is better than PLSR for data near the detection limit. Both PLSR and improved PCR can be used in Ultraviolet spectral analysis of water, but for data near the detection limit, improved PCR's result better than PLSR.

  4. Tibiofemoral contact pressures in radial tears of the meniscus treated with all-inside repair, inside-out repair and partial meniscectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Alan L; Miller, Stephanie L; Coughlin, Dezba G; Lotz, Jeffrey C; Feeley, Brian T

    2015-10-01

    To test contact pressures in the knee after treatment of a radial meniscus tear with an all-inside meniscal repair technique and compare the results with inside-out repair and partial meniscectomy. Six non-paired cadaveric knees were analyzed with intra-compartment pressures measured at loads of 250 N, 500 N and 1000 N at 0°, eight degrees, 15°, and 30° of knee flexion. Compartmental contact pressures were measured for the intact medial meniscus, radial tear in the posterior horn, all-inside repair using the NovoStitch suture passer device (Ceterix Orthopaedics Inc., Menlo Park, CA), inside-out repair method, and partial meniscectomy. One-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. The greatest differences in peak pressures between treatments were observed under 1000 N load at 30° flexion (0.8± (SD) 0.1 MPa (intact meniscus), 0.8± (SD) 0.1 MPa (all-inside), 0.9± (SD) 0.1 MPa (inside-out) and 1.6± (SD) 0.2 MPa (partial meniscectomy)). Treatment with partial meniscectomy resulted in the highest peak pressures compared to all other states (pinside technique as well as the inside-out technique resulted in significantly decreased compartment pressures compared to partial meniscectomies (pinside or inside-out techniques. An all-inside repair technique using the NovoStitch suture passer can decrease contact pressures for a radial meniscus tear similarly to the inside-out repair technique when compared to partial meniscectomy. This novel arthroscopic suture passer warrants further analysis in the clinical setting as it may be a reliable method for repair of radial meniscal tears through an arthroscopic all-inside technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CAPE HATTERAS in the Coastal Waters of Florida and North Atlantic Ocean from 2005-01-05 to 2006-05-27 (NODC Accession 0051983)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0051983 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CAPE HATTERAS in the Coastal Waters of Florida and North...

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Coastal Waters of Florida, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and others from 2012-07-21 to 2012-08-13 (NCEI Accession 0157303)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157303 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Coastal Waters of...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from WEATHERBIRD II in the Coastal Waters of Florida and Gulf of Mexico from 2012-05-08 to 2012-08-12 (NCEI Accession 0157334)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157334 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from WEATHERBIRD II in the Coastal Waters of Florida and Gulf...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using gas chromatograph and other instruments from the LILLOOET in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Coral Sea and others from 1988-02-04 to 1988-02-20 (NODC Accession 0000439)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0000439 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from LILLOOET in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Coral Sea,...

  9. Ozone decomposition kinetics on alumina: effects of ozone partial pressure, relative humidity and repeated oxidation cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Sullivan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The room temperature kinetics of gas-phase ozone loss via heterogeneous interactions with thin alumina films has been studied in real-time using 254nm absorption spectroscopy to monitor ozone concentrations. The films were prepared from dispersions of fine alumina powder in methanol and their surface areas were determined by an in situ procedure using adsorption of krypton at 77K. The alumina was found to lose reactivity with increasing ozone exposure. However, some of the lost reactivity could be recovered over timescales of days in an environment free of water, ozone and carbon dioxide. From multiple exposures of ozone to the same film, it was found that the number of active sites is large, greater than 1.4x1014 active sites per cm2 of surface area or comparable to the total number of surface sites. The films maintain some reactivity at this point, which is consistent with there being some degree of active site regeneration during the experiment and with ozone loss being catalytic to some degree. The initial uptake coefficients on fresh films were found to be inversely dependent on the ozone concentration, varying from roughly 10-6 for ozone concentrations of 1014 molecules/cm3 to 10-5 at 1013 molecules/cm3. The initial uptake coefficients were not dependent on the relative humidity, up to 75%, within the precision of the experiment. The reaction mechanism is discussed, as well as the implications these results have for assessing the effect of mineral dust on atmospheric oxidant levels.

  10. Effect of administration of water enriched in O2 by injection or electrolysis on transcutaneous oxygen pressure in anesthetized pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charton A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Antoine Charton,1 François Péronnet,2 Stephane Doutreleau,3 Evelyne Lonsdorfer,3 Alexis Klein,4 Liliana Jimenez,4 Bernard Geny,3 Pierre Diemunsch,1 Ruddy Richard5 1Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, and EA 3072, Hôpital de Hautepierre; University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France; 2Department of Kinesiology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3CHRU of Strasbourg, Physiology and Functional Explorations Department, New Civil Hospital, Strasbourg, France and University of Strasbourg, Faculty of Medicine, Physiology Department, Strasbourg, France; 4Danone Research, Palaiseau, France; 5Department of Sport Medicine and Functional Explorations, CHU Clermont-Ferrand and INRA UMR 1019, CRNH-Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France Background: Oral administration of oxygenated water has been shown to improve blood oxygenation and could be an alternate way for oxygen (O2 supply. In this experiment, tissue oxygenation was compared in anesthetized pigs receiving a placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or a new electrolytic process. Methods: Forty-two pigs randomized in three groups received either mineral water as placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or the electrolytic process (10 mL/kg in the stomach. Hemodynamic parameters, partial pressure of oxygen in the arterial blood (PaO2, skin blood flow, and tissue oxygenation (transcutaneous oxygen pressure, or TcPO2 were monitored during 90 minutes of general anesthesia. Absorption and tissue distribution of the three waters administered were assessed using dilution of deuterium oxide. Results: Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, PaO2, arteriovenous oxygen difference, and water absorption from the gut were not significantly different among the three groups. The deuterium to protium ratio was also similar in the plasma, skin, and muscle at the end of the protocol. Skin blood flow decreased in the three groups. TcPO2 slowly decreased over the last 60 minutes of the experiment in

  11. Properties of alumina films prepared by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition at atmospheric pressure in hte presence of small amounts of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; van Corbach, H.D.; Rem, J.B.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Thin alumina films were deposited on stainless steel, type AISI 304. The deposition process was carried out in nitrogen with low partial pressures of water (0–2.6 × 10−2 kPa (0−0.20 mmHg)) by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) with aluminium-tri-sec-butoxide (ATSB) as the precursor.

  12. Effect of administration of water enriched in O2 by injection or electrolysis on transcutaneous oxygen pressure in anesthetized pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charton, Antoine; Péronnet, François; Doutreleau, Stephane; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Klein, Alexis; Jimenez, Liliana; Geny, Bernard; Diemunsch, Pierre; Richard, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    Oral administration of oxygenated water has been shown to improve blood oxygenation and could be an alternate way for oxygen (O2) supply. In this experiment, tissue oxygenation was compared in anesthetized pigs receiving a placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or a new electrolytic process. Forty-two pigs randomized in three groups received either mineral water as placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or the electrolytic process (10 mL/kg in the stomach). Hemodynamic parameters, partial pressure of oxygen in the arterial blood (PaO2), skin blood flow, and tissue oxygenation (transcutaneous oxygen pressure, or TcPO2) were monitored during 90 minutes of general anesthesia. Absorption and tissue distribution of the three waters administered were assessed using dilution of deuterium oxide. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, PaO2, arteriovenous oxygen difference, and water absorption from the gut were not significantly different among the three groups. The deuterium to protium ratio was also similar in the plasma, skin, and muscle at the end of the protocol. Skin blood flow decreased in the three groups. TcPO2 slowly decreased over the last 60 minutes of the experiment in the three groups, but when compared to the control group, the values remained significantly higher in animals that received the water enriched in O2 by electrolysis. In this protocol, water enriched in O2 by electrolysis lessened the decline of peripheral tissue oxygenation. This observation is compatible with the claim that the electrolytic process generates water clathrates which trap O2 and facilitate O2 diffusion along pressure gradients. Potential applications of O2-enriched water include an alternate method of oxygen supply.

  13. Effect of administration of water enriched in O2 by injection or electrolysis on transcutaneous oxygen pressure in anesthetized pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charton, Antoine; Péronnet, François; Doutreleau, Stephane; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Klein, Alexis; Jimenez, Liliana; Geny, Bernard; Diemunsch, Pierre; Richard, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral administration of oxygenated water has been shown to improve blood oxygenation and could be an alternate way for oxygen (O2) supply. In this experiment, tissue oxygenation was compared in anesthetized pigs receiving a placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or a new electrolytic process. Methods Forty-two pigs randomized in three groups received either mineral water as placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or the electrolytic process (10 mL/kg in the stomach). Hemodynamic parameters, partial pressure of oxygen in the arterial blood (PaO2), skin blood flow, and tissue oxygenation (transcutaneous oxygen pressure, or TcPO2) were monitored during 90 minutes of general anesthesia. Absorption and tissue distribution of the three waters administered were assessed using dilution of deuterium oxide. Results Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, PaO2, arteriovenous oxygen difference, and water absorption from the gut were not significantly different among the three groups. The deuterium to protium ratio was also similar in the plasma, skin, and muscle at the end of the protocol. Skin blood flow decreased in the three groups. TcPO2 slowly decreased over the last 60 minutes of the experiment in the three groups, but when compared to the control group, the values remained significantly higher in animals that received the water enriched in O2 by electrolysis. Conclusions In this protocol, water enriched in O2 by electrolysis lessened the decline of peripheral tissue oxygenation. This observation is compatible with the claim that the electrolytic process generates water clathrates which trap O2 and facilitate O2 diffusion along pressure gradients. Potential applications of O2-enriched water include an alternate method of oxygen supply. PMID:25210438

  14. The effect of head-down tilt and water immersion on intracranial pressure in nonhuman primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Lanny C.; Mckeever, Kenneth H.; Skidmore, Michael G.; Hines, John; Severs, Walter B.

    1992-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is investigated in primates during and after -6-deg head-down tilt (HDT) and immersion in water to examine the effects of the headward fluid shift related to spaceflight. Following the HDT the primates are subjected to head-out thermoneutral water immersion, and the ICP is subsequently measured. ICP is found to increase from 3.8 +/- 1.1 to 5.3 +/- 1.3 mm Hg during the horizontal control period. ICP stabilizes at -6.3 +/- 1.3 mm Hg and then increases to -2.2 +/- 1.9 mm Hg during partial immersion, and ICP subsequently returns to preimmersion levels after immersion. These data indicate that exposure to HDT or water immersion lead to an early sharp increase in ICP, and water immersion alone leads to higher ICP levels. A significant conclusion of the work is that the ICP did not approach pathological levels, and this finding is relevant to human spaceflight research.

  15. Investigation of the coupled effects of temperature and partial pressure on catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes using a modified growth rate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal, M. T.; Mohd Yasin, M. F.; Wahid, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    An accurate modelling of catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is needed to model the physics of carbon adsorption and diffusion into the catalyst surface along with the catalyst deactivation. The model should be able to provide a physical response towards the change of temperature and partial pressure. Though the effects of temperature and partial pressure on the growth rate has been studied individually, the coupled effects of the two parameters has yet to be emphasized. A modified growth rate model that unified the terms from previously developed models successfully captured the essential physics during the growth and provided physical response towards the change of temperature and partial pressure. The model validation was done against a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) experiment that employed acetylene and cobalt as the carbon source and the catalyst respectively where the modified model managed to predict the CNT terminal length more accurately compared to the standard model with 5% maximum error. A comprehensive parametric study on the effects of temperature and partial pressure on the growth rate and terminal length successfully reveals the minimum partial pressure of 5 Torr for a given operating condition below which the growth rate is significantly low regardless of any increase of temperature. Three regions of growth in the partial pressure-temperature domain are identified based on the magnitude of terminal length. The model can serve as a guideline for the determination and optimisation of the baseline operating conditions in future experiments on catalytic growth of CNT, with emphasis on the CVD and flame synthesis techniques.

  16. Detecting pin diversion from pressurized water reactors spent fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Young S.; Sitaraman, Shivakumar

    2017-01-10

    Detecting diversion of spent fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) by determining possible diversion including the steps of providing a detector cluster containing gamma ray and neutron detectors, inserting the detector cluster containing the gamma ray and neutron detectors into the spent fuel assembly through the guide tube holes in the spent fuel assembly, measuring gamma ray and neutron radiation responses of the gamma ray and neutron detectors in the guide tube holes, processing the gamma ray and neutron radiation responses at the guide tube locations by normalizing them to the maximum value among each set of responses and taking the ratio of the gamma ray and neutron responses at the guide tube locations and normalizing the ratios to the maximum value among them and producing three signatures, gamma, neutron, and gamma-neutron ratio, based on these normalized values, and producing an output that consists of these signatures that can indicate possible diversion of the pins from the spent fuel assembly.

  17. Dominant accident sequences in Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dearing, J F; Henninger, R J; Nassersharif, B

    1985-04-01

    A set of dominant accident sequences in the Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor was selected using probabilistic risk analysis methods. Because some accident scenarios were similar, a subset of four accident sequences was selected to be analyzed with the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to further our insights into similar types of accidents. The sequences selected were loss-of-feedwater, small-small break loss-of-coolant, loss-of-feedwater-initiated transient without scram, and interfacing systems loss-of-coolant accidents. The normal plant response and the impact of equipment availability and potential operator actions were also examined. Strategies were developed for operator actions not covered in existing emergency operator guidelines and were tested using TRAC simulations to evaluate their effectiveness in preventing core uncovery and maintaining core cooling.

  18. Analytical study on water hammer pressure in pressurized conduits with a throttled surge chamber for slow closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-liang Zhang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical investigation of water hammer in a hydraulic pressurized pipe system with a throttled surge chamber located at the junction between a tunnel and a penstock, and a valve positioned at the downstream end of the penstock. Analytical formulas of maximum water hammer pressures at the downstream end of the tunnel and the valve were derived for a system subjected to linear and slow valve closure. The analytical results were then compared with numerical ones obtained using the method of characteristics. There is agreement between them. The formulas can be applied to estimating water hammer pressure at the valve and transmission of water hammer pressure through the surge chamber at the junction for a hydraulic pipe system with a surge chamber.

  19. Basal interstitial water pressure in laboratory debris flows over a rigid bed in an open channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hotta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the interstitial water pressure of debris flows under various conditions gives essential information on the flow stress structure. This study measured the basal interstitial water pressure during debris flow routing experiments in a laboratory flume. Because a sensitive pressure gauge is required to measure the interstitial water pressure in shallow laboratory debris flows, a differential gas pressure gauge with an attached diaphragm was used. Although this system required calibration before and after each experiment, it showed a linear behavior and a sufficiently high temporal resolution for measuring the interstitial water pressure of debris flows. The values of the interstitial water pressure were low. However, an excess of pressure beyond the hydrostatic pressure was observed with increasing sediment particle size. The measured excess pressure corresponded to the theoretical excess interstitial water pressure, derived as a Reynolds stress in the interstitial water of boulder debris flows. Turbulence was thought to induce a strong shear in the interstitial space of sediment particles. The interstitial water pressure in boulder debris flows should be affected by the fine sediment concentration and the phase transition from laminar to turbulent debris flow; this should be the subject of future studies.

  20. Water-bearing, high-pressure Ca-silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Péter; Leinenweber, Kurt; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Groy, Thomas; Domanik, Kenneth J.; Kovács, István J.; Kovács, Judit S.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2017-07-01

    Water-bearing minerals provide fundamental knowledge regarding the water budget of the mantle and are geophysically significant through their influence on the rheological and seismic properties of Earth's interior. Here we investigate the CaO-SiO2-H2O system at 17 GPa and 1773 K, corresponding to mantle transition-zone condition, report new high-pressure (HP) water-bearing Ca-silicates and reveal the structural complexity of these phases. We document the HP polymorph of hartrurite (Ca3SiO5), post-hartrurite, which is tetragonal with space group P4/ncc, a = 6.820 (5), c = 10.243 (8) Å, V = 476.4 (8) Å3, and Z = 4, and is isostructural with Sr3SiO5. Post-hartrurite occurs in hydrous and anhydrous forms and coexists with larnite (Ca2SiO4), which we find also has a hydrous counterpart. Si is 4-coordinated in both post-hartrurite and larnite. In their hydrous forms, H substitutes for Si (4H for each Si; hydrogrossular substitution). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows broad hydroxyl absorption bands at ∼3550 cm-1 and at 3500-3550 cm-1 for hydrous post-hartrurite and hydrous larnite, respectively. Hydrous post-hartrurite has a defect composition of Ca2.663Si0.826O5H1.370 (5.84 weight % H2O) according to electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA), and the Si deficiency relative to Ca is also observed in the single-crystal data. Hydrous larnite has average composition of Ca1.924Si0.851O4H0.748 (4.06 weight % H2O) according to EPMA, and it is in agreement with the Si occupancy obtained using X-ray data collected on a single crystal. Superlattice reflections occur in electron-diffraction patterns of the hydrous larnite and could indicate crystallographic ordering of the hydroxyl groups and their associated cation defects. Although textural and EPMA-based compositional evidence suggests that hydrous perovskite may occur in high-Ca-containing (or low silica-activity) systems, the FTIR measurement does not show a well-defined hydroxyl absorption band for this

  1. Modeling of a Piezoelectric MEMS Micropump Dedicated to Insulin Delivery and Experimental Validation Using Integrated Pressure Sensors: Application to Partial Occlusion Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fournier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model based on equivalent electrical networks has been built to simulate the dynamic behavior of a positive-displacement MEMS micropump dedicated to insulin delivery. This device comprises a reservoir in direct communication with the inlet check valve, a pumping membrane actuated by a piezo actuator, two integrated piezoresistive pressure sensors, an anti-free-flow check valve at the outlet, and finally a fluidic pathway up to the patient cannula. The pressure profiles delivered by the sensors are continuously analyzed during the therapy in order to detect failures like occlusion. The numerical modeling is a reliable way to better understand the behavior of the micropump in case of failure. The experimental pressure profiles measured during the actuation phase have been used to validate the numerical modeling. The effect of partial occlusion on the pressure profiles has been also simulated. Based on this analysis, a new management of partial occlusion for MEMS micropump is finally proposed.

  2. Layers of air in the water beneath the floating fern Salvinia are exposed to fluctuations in pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayser, Matthias J; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2014-12-01

    Superhydrophobic, hierarchically structured, technical surfaces (Lotus-effect) are of high scientific and economic interest because of their remarkable properties. Recently, the immense potential of air-retaining superhydrophobic surfaces, for example, for low-friction transport of fluids and drag-reducing coatings of ships has begun to be explored. A major problem of superhydrophobic surfaces mimicking the Lotus-effect is the limited persistence of the air retained, especially under rough conditions of flow. However, there are a variety of floating or diving plant and animal species that possess air-retaining surfaces optimized for durable water-repellency (Salvinia-effect). Especially floating ferns of the genus Salvinia have evolved superhydrophobic surfaces capable of maintaining layers of air for months. Apart from maintaining stability under water, the layer of air has to withstand the stresses of water pressure (up to 2.5 bars). Both of these aspects have an application to create permanent air layers on ships' hulls. We investigated the effect of pressure on air layers in a pressure cell and exposed the air layer to pressures of up to 6 bars. We investigated the suppression of the air layer at increasing pressures as well as its restoration during decreases in pressure. Three of the four examined Salvinia species are capable of maintaining air layers at pressures relevant to the conditions applying to ships' hulls. High volumes of air per surface area are advantageous for retaining at least a partial Cassie-Baxter-state under pressure, which also helps in restoring the air layer after depressurization. Closed-loop structures such as the baskets at the top of the "egg-beater hairs" (see main text) also help return the air layer to its original level at the tip of the hairs by trapping air bubbles. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions

  3. Role of composition and oxygen partial pressure on microstructural and crystalline phase evolution in aluminosilicate derived aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscher, Walter G.

    Spherical aggregates, approximately 1mm in diameter, derived from either kaolinite or bauxite are used in tonnage quantities to aid the extraction of oil and natural gas. Aggregates intended for this application are referred to as proppants and key characteristics include low density and high strength, which are influenced by processing temperature and variation in raw ore chemistry. Kaolinite and bauxite ores doped with varying concentrations of K2O and Fe2O3 were sintered at different temperatures to elucidate composition-processing-property relationships. The dopants are known to form low temperature ternary eutectics with Al2O3 and SiO2 and are anticipated to facilitate low temperature densification and enhance mullite formation. In addition, proppants doped with Fe2 O3 were studied under varying oxygen partial pressures to further enhance low temperature densification by manipulating the valence state of iron. Microstructure and crystalline phase assemblage were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively, and correlated with results of density and strength measurements obtained by gas pycnometry and diametral compression, respectively. Results indicate that dopant enhanced densification can simultaneously improve strength and processing economy of proppants by lowering sintering temperatures up to 100°C. Controlled atmosphere studies revealed that manipulating the valence of iron produces unique microstructures that may be useful in a number of different applications. These microstructures include aggregates with metallic coatings and aggregates with core-shell microstructures, which exhibit a porous core enclosed by a relatively dense outer shell.

  4. The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas (Ommastrephidae), living in oxygen minimum zones I: Oxygen consumption rates and critical oxygen partial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueblood, Lloyd A.; Seibel, Brad A.

    2013-10-01

    Dosidicus gigas is a large, metabolically active, epipelagic squid known to undertake diel vertical migrations across a large temperature and oxygen gradient in the Eastern Pacific. Hypoxia is known to cause metabolic suppression in D. gigas. However, the precise oxygen level at which metabolic suppression sets in is unknown. Here we describe a novel ship-board swim tunnel respirometer that was used to measure metabolic rates and critical oxygen partial pressures (Pcrit) for adult squids (2-7kg). Metabolic rate measurements were validated by comparison to the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, citrate synthase, in mantle muscle tissue (2-17kg). We recorded a mean routine metabolic rate of 5.91μmolg-1h-1 at 10°C and 12.62μmolg-1h-1 at 20°C. A temperature coefficient, Q10, of 2.1 was calculated. D. gigas had Pcrits of 1.6 and 3.8kPa at 10 and 20°C, respectively. Oxygen consumption rate (MO2) varied with body mass (M) according to MO2=11.57M-0.12±0.03 at 10°C. Citrate synthase activity varied with body mass according to Y=9.32M-0.19±0.02.

  5. Ionic conductivity ageing investigation of 1Ce10ScSZ in different partial pressures of oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omar, Shobit; Belda, Adriana; Escardino, Agustín

    2011-01-01

    The conductivity and its ageing behaviour has been determined for zirconia co-doped with 10 mol% of Sc2O3 and 1 mol% CeO2 in different partial pressures of oxygen at 600 °C. After 3000 h, samples kept in air, in a humidified mixture of H2/N2 and in humidified H2 exhibited loss in the ionic...... conductivity of 9%, 19% and 25%, respectively. The conductivity degradation rates after the first 1000 h were 1.5%/1000 h in air and 4.3%/1000 h in humidified H2. For all atmospheres, after 3000 h at 600 °C the conductivity value remained above 10 mS/cm, the minimum value required for viable solid oxide fuel...... of the reduction front. The core/shell model was applied on the aged reduced sample, and the conductivity of the reduced region is estimated to be 27% lower than the unaged sample. The conductivity behaviour upon re-oxidation is also investigated in air at 600 °C. The conductivity recovers significantly...

  6. Changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the Mauritanian–Cap Vert upwelling region between 2005 and 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. González-Dávila

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Coastal upwellings along the eastern margins of major ocean basins represent regions of large ecological and economic importance due to the high biological productivity. The role of these regions for the global carbon cycle makes them essential in addressing climate change. The physical forcing of upwelling processes that favor production in these areas are already being affected by global warming, which will modify the intensity of upwelling and, consequently, the carbon dioxide cycle. Here, we present monthly high-resolution surface experimental data for temperature and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in one of the four most important upwelling regions of the planet, the Mauritanian–Cap Vert upwelling region, from 2005 to 2012. This data set provides direct evidence of seasonal and interannual changes in the physical and biochemical processes. Specifically, we show an upwelling intensification and an increase of 0.6 Tg yr−1 in CO2 outgassing due to increased wind speed, despite increased primary productivity. This increase in CO2 outgassing together with the observed decrease in sea surface temperature at the location of the Mauritanian Cap Blanc, 21° N, produced a pH rate decrease of −0.003 ± 0.001 yr−1.

  7. Cognitive dysfunction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA): partial reversibility after continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferini-Strambi, L; Baietto, C; Di Gioia, M R; Castaldi, P; Castronovo, C; Zucconi, M; Cappa, S F

    2003-06-30

    The aims of this study were to assess cognitive function in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients and to evaluate the effect of short- and long-term treatment with continuous positive airway pressure treatment (CPAP). A battery of neuropsychological tests, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the Beck Inventory Scale were administered to 23 patients with severe OSA (age: 56.5+/-6.13; AHI: 54.9+/-13.37) and to 23 age- and education-matched controls. The OSA patients were evaluated in a baseline condition and in two follow-up treatment sessions (after 15 days and 4 months of CPAP, respectively). At baseline, OSA patients had a significant impairment, compared to controls, in tests of sustained attention, visuospatial learning, executive function, motor performance, and constructional abilities. The longitudinal evaluation showed that after a 15-days CPAP treatment attentive, visuospatial learning, and motor performances returned to normal levels. A 4-months CPAP treatment did not result in any further improvement in cognitive tests. Performance on tests evaluating executive functions and constructional abilities was not affected by short- and long-term treatment with CPAP. The findings of this study confirm the hypothesis of partial reversibility of cognitive dysfunction in OSA patients after CPAP.

  8. Is the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood related to the development of retinopathy of prematurity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellen, B; McIntosh, N; McColm, J R; Fleck, B W

    2001-09-01

    To determine the role of carbon dioxide in the development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). This was a retrospective cohort study of 25 consecutive infants admitted to the neonatal unit with continuously recorded physiological data. The daily mean and standard deviation (SD) of transcutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressure (tcPCO(2)) was compared between infants who had stage 1 or 2 ROP and stage 3 ROP. The time spent hypocarbic (10 kPa and >12 kPa) was also compared between these groups. Intermittent arterial carbon dioxide tension was also measured and compared with the simultaneous tcPCO(2) data. There were no significant differences in carbon dioxide variability or time spent hypocarbic and/or hypercarbic between the ROP groups on any day. 86% of transcutaneous values were within 1.5 kPa of the simultaneous arterial value. TcPCO(2) measurement can be a very useful management technique. However, in this cohort neither variable blood carbon dioxide tension nor duration of hypercarbia or hypocarbia in the first 2 weeks of life was associated with the development or severity of ROP.

  9. CO partial pressure dependence of the kinetics of melting of HbS aggregates studied in high concentration phosphate buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroutiounian, Svetlana

    2002-10-01

    Deoxygenated sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) monomers enter the polymer phase either by incorporation into a critical nucleus, through heterogeneous nucleation and or through linear growth of the polymers when the concentration of monomers exceeds the solubility. CO-bound, R-state HbS monomers do not polymerize. Thus, polymer melting is enhanced by binding of carbon monoxide (CO) to HbS polymerized monomers. In our study, the melting of HbS aggregates mediated by dilution and CO binding to polymerized monomers is observed with time-resolved extinction spectroscopy. The CO partial pressure (pCO) dependence of the kinetics of melting is studied for pCO = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1 atm with difference progress curves. A phenomenological description with slow and fast relaxation modes reveals a variable relaxation time near the pCO=0.5 due to competition of kinetic mechanisms. The slow component increases with increasing pCO. It has a positive intercept due to the combined action of dilution of the sample and CO-ligation. The pCO dependence is near linear due to non-cooperative CO binding. Significant slowing down of aged samples, most likely due to gelation, is observed. As possible mechanism for variable relaxation time near pCO=0.5atm the fractional percolation threshold is discussed. This work was supported by NIH grant HL58091 (awarded to Daniel. B. Kim-Shapiro).

  10. Temporal resilience and dynamics of anaerobic methane-oxidizing microbial communities to short-term changes in methane partial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasek, S.; Tiantian, Y.; Torres, M. E.; Colwell, F. S.; Wang, F.; Liang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Marine sediments produce tens to hundreds of teragrams of methane annually, which is released from the seabed at thousands of cold seeps distributed globally along continental margins. Around 80-90% of this methane is consumed in shallower sediment layers before reaching the hydrosphere, in a microbially-mediated process known as anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) However, cold seeps appear to exhibit temporal variation in gas flux intensity, and AOM filter efficiency at cold seeps generally decreases with fluid flow rate. To our knowledge, the degree to which temporal heterogeneity in subsurface methane flux stimulates AOM community growth and adaptation to increased methane concentrations has not been investigated. Static high-pressure bioreactors were used to incubate sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) and methanogenic zone sediments underlying a Mediterranean mud volcano gas flare under in situ temperature and pressure at 8 MPa methane. Sulfide production rates of 0.4 μmol/cm3/day in both sediment regimes after 4 months of incubation suggested the resilience of the marine subsurface methane filter may extend well below the SMTZ (40 cm). Similar incubations of SMTZ samples from below a gas flare off Svalbard at saturating (3.8 MPa) and 0.2 MPa methane are being sampled after 1 week, 4 weeks, and 4 months; sulfide production rates of 8-18 nmol/cm3/day were first observed after 4 weeks of incubation. Sediment samples at all specified time points for both sets of incubations were collected for nucleic acid extraction and cell fixation. Anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are expected dominant taxa in enriched and non-enriched communities. 16S rDNA community analysis is expected to reveal additional microbial players involved in the short-term adaptation to higher methane partial pressures in the marine subsurface. Increased AOM community activity (RNA/DNA ratio) and copy numbers of methane cycling transcripts (mcr

  11. Drinking Water Salinity and Raised Blood Pressure: Evidence from a Cohort Study in Coastal Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Muhammad A.H.; Haines, Andy; Alam, Dewan S.; Hoque, Mohammad A.; Butler, Adrian P.; Khan, Aneire E.; Mojumder, Sontosh K.; Blangiardo, Marta A.G.; Elliott, Paul; Vineis, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Millions of coastal inhabitants in Southeast Asia have been experiencing increasing sodium concentrations in their drinking-water sources, likely partially due to climate change. High (dietary) sodium intake has convincingly been proven to increase risk of hypertension; it remains unknown, however, whether consumption of sodium in drinking water could have similar effects on health. Objectives: We present the results of a cohort study in which we assessed the effects of drinking-water sodium (DWS) on blood pressure (BP) in coastal populations in Bangladesh. Methods: DWS, BP, and information on personal, lifestyle, and environmental factors were collected from 581 participants. We used generalized linear latent and mixed methods to model the effects of DWS on BP and assessed the associations between changes in DWS and BP when participants experienced changing sodium levels in water, switched from “conventional” ponds or tube wells to alternatives [managed aquifer recharge (MAR) and rainwater harvesting] that aimed to reduce sodium levels, or experienced a combination of these changes. Results: DWS concentrations were highly associated with BP after adjustments for confounding factors. Furthermore, for each 100mg/L reduction in sodium in drinking water, systolic/diastolic BP was lower on average by 0.95/0.57mmHg, and odds of hypertension were lower by 14%. However, MAR did not consistently lower sodium levels. Conclusions: DWS is an important source of daily sodium intake in salinity-affected areas and is a risk factor for hypertension. Considering the likely increasing trend in coastal salinity, prompt action is required. Because MAR showed variable effects, alternative technologies for providing reliable, safe, low-sodium fresh water should be developed alongside improvements in MAR and evaluated in “real-life” salinity-affected settings. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP659 PMID:28599268

  12. Drinking Water Salinity and Raised Blood Pressure: Evidence from a Cohort Study in Coastal Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheelbeek, Pauline FD; Chowdhury, Muhammad A H; Haines, Andy; Alam, Dewan S; Hoque, Mohammad A; Butler, Adrian P; Khan, Aneire E; Mojumder, Sontosh K; Blangiardo, Marta A G; Elliott, Paul; Vineis, Paolo

    2017-05-30

    Millions of coastal inhabitants in Southeast Asia have been experiencing increasing sodium concentrations in their drinking-water sources, likely partially due to climate change. High (dietary) sodium intake has convincingly been proven to increase risk of hypertension; it remains unknown, however, whether consumption of sodium in drinking water could have similar effects on health. We present the results of a cohort study in which we assessed the effects of drinking-water sodium (DWS) on blood pressure (BP) in coastal populations in Bangladesh. DWS, BP, and information on personal, lifestyle, and environmental factors were collected from 581 participants. We used generalized linear latent and mixed methods to model the effects of DWS on BP and assessed the associations between changes in DWS and BP when participants experienced changing sodium levels in water, switched from "conventional" ponds or tube wells to alternatives [managed aquifer recharge (MAR) and rainwater harvesting] that aimed to reduce sodium levels, or experienced a combination of these changes. DWS concentrations were highly associated with BP after adjustments for confounding factors. Furthermore, for each 100 mg/L reduction in sodium in drinking water, systolic/diastolic BP was lower on average by 0.95/0.57 mmHg, and odds of hypertension were lower by 14%. However, MAR did not consistently lower sodium levels. DWS is an important source of daily sodium intake in salinity-affected areas and is a risk factor for hypertension. Considering the likely increasing trend in coastal salinity, prompt action is required. Because MAR showed variable effects, alternative technologies for providing reliable, safe, low-sodium fresh water should be developed alongside improvements in MAR and evaluated in "real-life" salinity-affected settings. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP659.

  13. End-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) can replace methods for measuring partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen

    2017-01-01

    We compared end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) with partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) in domestic pigs anesthetized for neuroscience. There was good agreement between ETCO2 and PCO2 under both hypocapnia, normocapnia, and hypercapnia conditions. ETCO2 saves time by continually providing...

  14. Effects of ambient and acute partial pressures of ozone on leaf net CO sub 2 assimilation of field-grown Vitis vinifera L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roper, T.R.; Williams, L.E. (Univ. of California, Davis (USA) Kearney Agricultural Center, Parlier, CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Mature, field-grown Vitis vinifera L. grapevines grown in open-top chambers were exposed to either charcoal-filtered air or ambient ozone partial pressures throughout the growing season. Individual leaves also were exposed to ozone partial pressures of 0.2, 0.4, or 0.6 micropascals per pascal for 5 hours. No visual ozone damage was found on leaves exposed to any of the treatments. Chronic exposure to ambient O{sub 3} partial pressures reduced net CO{sub 2} assimilation rate (A) between 5 and 13% at various times throughout the season when compared to the filtered treatment. Exposure of leaves to 0.2 micropascals per pascal O{sub 3} for 5 hours had no significant effect on A; however, A was reduced 84% for leaves exposed to 0.6 micropascals per pascal O{sub 3} when compared to the controls after 5 hours. Intercellular CO{sub 2} partial pressure (c{sub i}) was lower for leaves exposed to 0.2 micropascals per pascal O{sub 3} when compared to the controls, while c{sub i} of the leaves treated with 0.6 micropascals per pascal of O{sub 3} increased during the fumigation. The long-term effects of ambient O{sub 3} and short-term exposure to acute levels of O{sub 3} reduced grape leaf photosynthesis due to a reduction in both stomatal and mesophyll conductances.

  15. Effects of occlusal rest design on pressure distribution beneath the denture base of a distal extension removable partial denture-an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suenaga, Hanako; Kubo, Kei; Hosokawa, Ryoichi; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the pressure distribution beneath the denture bases of removable partial dentures (RPDs) with different occlusal rest designs (ORDs) by in vivo measurement. Four types of detachable occlusal rests (mesial and distal, distal, mesial, and nonrest) were placed on the direct abutment teeth of distal extension RPDs in four patients with free-end edentulous mandibles. Pressure measurements were obtained by using thin and flexible tactile sensors. The results showed significant variances with different ORDs in all four patients (P < .05), leading to the conclusion that the pressure distribution on the residual ridge beneath the RPD base was dependent on the ORD.

  16. Long-Term Stroke Risk Due to Partial White-Coat or Masked Hypertension Based on Home and Ambulatory Blood Pressure Measurements: The Ohasama Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Michihiro; Asayama, Kei; Kikuya, Masahiro; Inoue, Ryusuke; Metoki, Hirohito; Hosaka, Miki; Tsubota-Utsugi, Megumi; Obara, Taku; Ishiguro, Aya; Murakami, Keiko; Matsuda, Ayako; Yasui, Daisaku; Murakami, Takahisa; Mano, Nariyasu; Imai, Yutaka; Ohkubo, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic significance of white-coat hypertension (WCHT) is controversial, and different findings on self-measured home measurements and 24-h ambulatory monitoring make identifying WCHT difficult. We examined whether individuals with partially or completely defined WCHT, as well as masked hypertension, as determined by different out-of-office blood pressure measurements, have a distinct long-term stroke risk. We followed 1464 participants (31.8% men; mean age, 60.6±10.8 years) in the general population of Ohasama, Japan, for a median of 17.1 years. A first stroke occurred in 212 subjects. Using sustained normal blood pressure (events/n=61/776) as a reference, adjusted hazard ratios for stroke (95% confidence intervals; events/n) were 1.38 (0.82-2.32; 19/137) for complete WCHT (isolated office hypertension), 2.16 (1.36-3.43; 29/117) for partial WCHT (either home or ambulatory normotension with office hypertension), 2.05 (1.24-3.41; 23/100) for complete masked hypertension (both home and ambulatory hypertension with office normotension), 2.08 (1.37-3.16; 38/180) for partial masked hypertension (either home or ambulatory hypertension with office normotension), and 2.46 (1.61-3.77; 42/154) for sustained hypertension. When partial WCHT and partial masked hypertension groups were further divided into participants only with home hypertension and those only with ambulatory hypertension, all subgroups had a significantly higher stroke risk (adjusted hazard ratio ≥1.84, P≤0.04). In conclusion, impacts of partial WCHT as well as partial masked hypertension for long-term stroke risk were comparable to those of complete masked hypertension or sustained hypertension. We need both home and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurements to evaluate stroke risk accurately. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Assessing the relation between anthropogenic pressure and PAH concentrations in surface water in the Seine River basin using multivariate analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uher, Emmanuelle, E-mail: emmanuelle.uher@irstea.fr [Irstea, UR HBAN Hydrosystèmes et bioprocédés, 1 rue Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, CS 10030, 92761 Antony cedex (France); FIRE, FR-30204 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Mirande-Bret, Cécile [LISA, 61 avenue du général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil (France); Gourlay-Francé, Catherine [Anses, 14 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 94701 Maisons-Alfort Cedex (France)

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the relation between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in freshwater and anthropogenic pressure is fundamental to finding a solution to reduce the presence of PAHs in water, and thus their potential impact on aquatic life. In this paper we propose to gain greater insight into the variability, sources and partitioning of PAHs in labile (or freely dissolved = not associated to the organic matter), dissolved and particulate phases in freshwater. This study was conducted using land use data as a marker of anthropogenic pressure and coupling it with chemical measurements. This study was conducted on 30 sites in the Seine River basin, which is subjected to a strong human impact and exhibits a wide range of land uses. Half of the sites were studied twice. Labile PAHs were measured by semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs), and dissolved and particulate phases by grab samples. Partial least squares regressions were performed between chemical measurements and data of anthropogenic pressure. The results indicate different sources for the dissolved phase and particles. Dissolved and labile phases were more related to the population density of the watershed, while particles were more related to a local pressure. Season and land use data are necessary information to correctly interpret and compare PAH concentrations from different sites. Furthermore, the whole data set of the 45 field deployments comprising labile, dissolved, total and particulate PAH concentrations as well as the physico-chemical parameters is available in the supplementary information. - Highlights: • A large-scale deployment of semi-permeable membrane devices was performed at the Seine Catchment scale • Partial least squares regressions were performed between chemical measurements and data of anthropogenic pressure • The results seem to show a PAHs release from particles to dissolved phase slower than in laboratory work • Dissolved and labile phases were related to a pressure at

  18. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  19. Pressurized-water reactor internals aging degradation study. Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luk, K.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of a Phase I study on the effects of aging degradations on pr internals. Primary stressers for internals an generated by the primary coolant flow in the they include unsteady hydrodynamic forces and pump-generated pressure pulsations. Other stressors are applied loads, manufacturing processes, impurities in the coolant and exposures to fast neutron fluxes. A survey of reported aging-related failure information indicates that fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and mechanical wear are the three major aging-related degradation mechanisms for PWR internals. Significant reported failures include thermal shield flow-induced vibration problems, SCC in guide tube support pins and core support structure bolts, fatigue-induced core baffle water-jet impingement problems and excess wear in flux thimbles. Many of the reported problems have been resolved by accepted engineering practices. Uncertainties remain in the assessment of long-term neutron irradiation effects and environmental factors in high-cycle fatigue failures. Reactor internals are examined by visual inspections and the technique is access limited. Improved inspection methods, especially one with an early failure detection capability, can enhance the safety and efficiency of reactor operations.

  20. Dangerous Pressurization and Inappropriate Alarms during Water Occlusion of the Expiratory Circuit of Commonly Used Infant Ventilators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Hinder

    Full Text Available Non-invasive continuous positive airways pressure is commonly a primary respiratory therapy delivered via multi-purpose ventilators in premature newborns. Expiratory limb occlusion due to water accumulation or 'rainout' from gas humidification is a frequent issue. A case of expiratory limb occlusion due to rainout causing unexpected and excessive repetitive airway pressurisation in a Draeger VN500 prompted a systematic bench test examination of currently available ventilators.To assess neonatal ventilator response to partial or complete expiratory limb occlusion when set to non-invasive continuous positive airway pressure mode.Seven commercially available neonatal ventilators connected to a test lung using a standard infant humidifier circuit with partial and/or complete expiratory limb occlusion were examined in a bench test study. Each ventilator was set to deliver 6 cmH2O in non-invasive mode and respiratory mechanics data for 75%, 80% and 100% occlusion were collected.Several ventilators responded inappropriately with complete occlusion by cyclical pressurisation/depressurisation to peak pressures of between 19·4 and 64·6 cm H2O at rates varying between 2 to 77 inflations per minute. Tidal volumes varied between 10·1 and 24·3mL. Alarm responses varied from 'specific' (tube occluded to 'ambiguous' (Safety valve open. Carefusion Avea responded by continuing to provide the set distending pressure and displaying an appropriate alarm message. Draeger Babylog 8000 did not alarm with partial occlusions and incorrectly displayed airways pressure at 6·1cmH2O compared to the measured values of 13cmH2O.This study found a potential for significant adverse ventilator response due to complete or near complete expiratory limb occlusion in CPAP mode.

  1. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-09-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  2. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez, N.

    2016-09-06

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  3. Effects of Oxygen Partial Pressure on Oxidation Behavior of CMnSi TRIP Steel in an Oxidation-Reduction Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong-Hwan; Huh, Joo-Youl [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung-Soo; Kim, Jong-Sang [POSCO Technical Research Laboratories, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    An oxidation-reduction scheme is an alternative approach for improving the galvanizability of advanced high-strength steel in the continuous hot-dip galvanizing process. Here, we investigated the effect of oxygen partial pressure (Po{sub 2}) on the oxidation behavior of a transformation-induced plasticity steel containing 1.5 wt% Si and 1.6 wt% Mn during heating to and holding for 60 s at 700 ℃ under atmospheres with various Po{sub 2} values. Irrespective of Po{sub 2}, a thin amorphous Si-rich layer of Si-Mn-O was formed underneath the Fe oxide scale (a Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} bilayer) in the heating stage. In contrast to Si, Mn tended to segregate at the scale surface as (Fe,Mn){sub 2}O{sub 3}. The multilayered structure of (Fe,Mn){sub 2}O{sub 3}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/amorphous Si-Mn-O remained even after extended oxidizing at 700 ℃ for 60 s. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was the dominantly growing oxide phase in the scale. The enhanced growth rate of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with increasing Po{sub 2} resulted in the formation of more Kirkendall voids in the amorphous Si-rich layer and a less Mn segregation at the scale surface. The mechanisms underlying the absence of FeO and the formation of Kirkendall voids are discussed.

  4. Pressure dependence of viscosity in supercooled water and a unified approach for thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lokendra P.; Issenmann, Bruno; Caupin, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The anomalous decrease of the viscosity of water with applied pressure has been known for over a century. It occurs concurrently with major structural changes: The second coordination shell around a molecule collapses onto the first shell. Viscosity is thus a macroscopic witness of the progressive breaking of the tetrahedral hydrogen bond network that makes water so peculiar. At low temperature, water at ambient pressure becomes more tetrahedral and the effect of pressure becomes stronger. However, surprisingly, no data are available for the viscosity of supercooled water under pressure, in which dramatic anomalies are expected based on interpolation between ambient pressure data for supercooled water and high pressure data for stable water. Here we report measurements with a time-of-flight viscometer down to 244K and up to 300MPa, revealing a reduction of viscosity by pressure by as much as 42%. Inspired by a previous attempt [Tanaka H (2000) J Chem Phys 112:799–809], we show that a remarkably simple extension of a two-state model [Holten V, Sengers JV, Anisimov MA (2014) J Phys Chem Ref Data 43:043101], initially developed to reproduce thermodynamic properties, is able to accurately describe dynamic properties (viscosity, self-diffusion coefficient, and rotational correlation time) as well. Our results support the idea that water is a mixture of a high density, “fragile” liquid, and a low density, “strong” liquid, the varying proportion of which explains the anomalies and fragile-to-strong crossover in water. PMID:28404733

  5. Partial oxidation of landfill leachate in supercritical water: Optimization by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanmeng; Wang, Shuzhong; Xu, Haidong; Guo, Yang; Tang, Xingying

    2015-09-01

    To achieve the maximum H2 yield (GYH2), TOC removal rate (TRE) and carbon recovery rate (CR), response surface methodology was applied to optimize the process parameters for supercritical water partial oxidation (SWPO) of landfill leachate in a batch reactor. Quadratic polynomial models for GYH2, CR and TRE were established with Box-Behnken design. GYH2, CR and TRE reached up to 14.32mmol·gTOC(-1), 82.54% and 94.56% under optimum conditions, respectively. TRE was invariably above 91.87%. In contrast, TC removal rate (TR) only changed from 8.76% to 32.98%. Furthermore, carbonate and bicarbonate were the most abundant carbonaceous substances in product, whereas CO2 and H2 were the most abundant gaseous products. As a product of nitrogen-containing organics, NH3 has an important effect on gas composition. The carbon balance cannot be reached duo to the formation of tar and char. CR increased with the increase of temperature and oxidation coefficient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Partial oxidation of municipal sludge with activited carbon catalyst in supercritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Wang, Shuzhong; Gong, Yanmeng; Xu, Donghai; Tang, Xingying; Ma, Honghe

    2010-08-15

    The partial oxidation (POX) characteristics of municipal sludge in supercritical water (SCW) were investigated by using batch reactor. Effects of reaction parameters such as oxidant equivalent ratio (OER), reaction time and temperature were investigated. Activated carbon (AC) could effectively improve the mole fraction of H(2) in gas product at low OER. However, high OER (greater than 0.3) not only led to the combustion reaction of CO and H(2), but also caused corrosion of reactor inner wall. Hydrogenation and polymerization of the intermediate products are possible reasons for the relative low COD removal rate in our tests. Metal oxide leached from the reactor inner wall and the main components of the granular sludge were deposited in the AC catalyst. Reaction time had more significant effect on BET surface area of AC than OER had. Long reaction time led to the methanation reaction following hydrolysis and oxidation reaction of AC in SCW in the presence of oxygen. Correspondingly, the possible reaction mechanisms were proposed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Simulating the Response of Urban Water Quality to Climate and Land Use Change in Partially Urbanized Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, N.; Yearsley, J. R.; Nijssen, B.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Urban stream quality is particularly susceptible to extreme precipitation events and land use change. Although the projected effects of extreme events and land use change on hydrology have been resonably well studied, the impacts on urban water quality have not been widely examined due in part to the scale mismatch between global climate models and the spatial scales required to represent urban hydrology and water quality signals. Here we describe a grid-based modeling system that integrates the Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM) and urban water quality module adpated from EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) and Soil and water assessment tool (SWAT). Using the model system, we evaluate, for four partially urbanized catchments within the Puget Sound basin, urban water quality under current climate conditions, and projected potential changes in urban water quality associated with future changes in climate and land use. We examine in particular total suspended solids, toal nitrogen, total phosphorous, and coliform bacteria, with catchment representations at the 150-meter spatial resolution and the sub-daily timestep. We report long-term streamflow and water quality predictions in response to extreme precipitation events of varying magnitudes in the four partially urbanized catchments. Our simulations show that urban water quality is highly sensitive to both climatic and land use change.

  8. Dual temperature dual pressure water-hydrogen chemical exchange for water detritiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Takahiko, E-mail: t-sugiyama@nucl.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya University, Fro-cho 1, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Takada, Akito; Morita, Youhei [Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya University, Fro-cho 1, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kotoh, Kenji [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Moto-oka 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Munakata, Kenzo [Faculty of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, Tegata-gakuen-machi 1-1, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Taguchi, Akira [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Kawano, Takao; Tanaka, Masahiro; Akata, Naofumi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Experimental and analytical studies on hydrogen-tritium isotope separation by a dual temperature dual pressure catalytic exchange (DTDP-CE) with liquid phase chemical exchange columns were carried out in order to apply it to a part of the water detritiation system for DEMO fuel cycle. A prototype DTDP-CE apparatus was successfully operated and it was confirmed that tritium was separated by the apparatus as significantly distinguishable. A calculation code was developed based on the channeling stage model. The values of separation factors and the effects of some operating parameters were well predicted by the separative analyses with the code.

  9. Anomalous dependence of the heat capacity of supercooled water on pressure and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Stepanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In some papers, dependences of the isobaric heat capacity of water versus pressure and temperature were obtained. It is shown that these dependences contradict both the dependence of heat capacity on temperature for supercooled water, and an important thermodynamic equation for the dependence of heat capacity on pressure. A possible explanation for this contradiction is proposed.

  10. Adequacy of prescribing positive airway pressure therapy by mask for sleep apnea on the basis of a partial-night trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, M H; Kern, N B; Costantino, J P; Stiller, R A; Studnicki, K; Coates, J; Orris, S; Schimerman, S

    1993-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a prescription for positive-pressure therapy (including pressure level, patient-device interface, and positive-pressure modality, e.g., CPAP or BiPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can be developed on the same night as the polysomnographic (PSG) diagnosis is made. Fifty consecutive patients with OSA in whom a partial-night PSG diagnosis was made (PSGD) underwent a therapeutic trial of positive-pressure therapy during the remainder of the night (PSG-PPP). The average apnea index during PSGD was 54.96 +/- 36.3 (mean +/- SD). On a subsequent full-night PSG (PSG-PPF), the prescription was tested. Thirty-one of the 50 patients were satisfactorily treated with CPAP, without variation of the interface during both PSG-PPP and PSG-PPF. In these patients the average pressure prescription while receiving PSG-PPF was statistically higher than during PSG-PPP (11.77 +/- 3.6 versus 10.56 +/- 3.6 cm H2O, respectively, p = 0.002). In 14 of these 31 patients (45%) some alteration in pressure requirement was necessary during PSG-PPF. Eleven patients required 2.5 cm H2O higher pressure and three patients required 5 cm H2O higher pressure during PSG-PPF than during PSG-PPP. There was a change of interface across the two therapeutic trials in 15 patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. The Cumulative Partial Pressure of Arterial Oxygen Is Associated With Neurological Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest Treated With Targeted Temperature Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Chun Song; Park, Kyu Nam; Kim, Soo Hyun; Lee, Byung Kook; Oh, Sang Hoon; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Choi, Seung Pill

    2017-12-19

    Hyperoxia could lead to a worse outcome after cardiac arrest. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the cumulative partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) and neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest treated with targeted temperature management. Retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort. An academic tertiary care hospital. A total of 187 consecutive patients treated with targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest. None. The area under the curve of PaO2 for different cutoff values of hyperoxia (≥ 100, ≥ 150, ≥ 200, ≥ 250, and ≥ 300 mm Hg) with different time intervals (0-24, 0-6, and 6-24 hr after return of spontaneous circulation) was calculated for each patient using the trapezoidal method. The primary outcome was the neurologic outcome, as defined by the cerebral performance category, at 6 months after cardiac arrest. Of 187 subjects, 77 (41%) had a good neurologic outcome at 6 months after cardiac arrest. The median age was 54 (43-69) years, and 128 (68%) were male. The area under the curve of PaO2 with cutoff values of greater than or equal to 200, greater than or equal to 250, and greater than or equal to 300 was higher in the poor outcome group at 0-6 and 0-24 hours. The adjusted odds ratios of area under the curve of PaO2 greater than or equal to 200 mm Hg were 1.659 (95% CI, 1.194-2.305) for 0-24 hours after return of spontaneous circulation and 1.548 (95% CI, 1.086-2.208) for 0-6 hours after return of spontaneous circulation. With a higher cumulative exposure to oxygen tension, we found significant increasing trends in the adjusted odds ratio for poor neurologic outcomes. In a new method for PaO2 analysis, cumulative exposure to hyperoxia was associated with neurologic outcomes in a dose-dependent manner. Greater attention to oxygen supply during the first 6 hours appears to be important for outcome after cardiac arrest.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of water on a hydrophilic silica surface at high air pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, H.A.; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, R.L.

    2014-01-01

    Wepresent a force field forMolecular Dynamics (MD) simulations ofwater and air in contactwith an amorphous silica surface. We calibrate the interactions of each species present in the systemusing dedicated criteria such as the contact angle of a water droplet on a silica surface, and the solubility...... of air in water at different pressures. Using the calibrated force field, we conduct MD simulations to study the interface between a hydrophilic silica substrate and water surrounded by air at different pressures. We find that the static water contact angle is independent of the air pressure imposed...

  13. [Generation of Superoxide Radicals by Complex III in Heart Mitochondria and Antioxidant Effect of Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes at Different Partial Pressure of Oxygen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudylina, A L; Ivanova, M V; Shumaev, K B; Ruuge, E K

    2016-01-01

    The EPR spin-trapping technique and EPR-oximetry were used to study generation of superoxide radicals in heart mitochondria isolated from Wistar rats under conditions of variable oxygen concentration. Lithium phthalocyanine and TEMPONE-15N-D16 were chosen to determine oxygen content in a gas-permeable capillary tube containing mitochondria. TIRON was used as a spin trap. We investigated the influence of different oxygen concentrations in incubation mixture and demonstrated that heart mitochondria can generate superoxide in complex III at different partial pressure of oxygen as well as under the conditions of deep hypoxia (< 5% O2). Dinitrosyl iron complexes with glutathione (the pharmaceutical drug "Oxacom") exerted an antioxidant effect, regardless of the value of the partial pressure of oxygen, but the magnitude and kinetic characteristics of the effect depended on the concentration of the drug.

  14. The initial responses of hot liquid water released under low atmospheric pressures: Experimental insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargery, Alistair Simon; Lane, Stephen J.; Barrett, Alexander; Wilson, Lionel; Gilbert, Jennie S.

    2010-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to simulate the shallow ascent and surface release of water and brines under low atmospheric pressure. Atmospheric pressure was treated as an independent variable and water temperature and vapor pressure were examined as a function of total pressure variation down to low pressures. The physical and thermal responses of water to reducing pressure were monitored with pressure transducers, temperature sensors and visible imaging. Data were obtained for pure water and for solutions with dissolved NaCl or CO 2. The experiments showed the pressure conditions under which the water remained liquid, underwent a rapid phase change to the gas state by boiling, and then solidified because of removal of latent heat. Liquid water is removed from phase equilibrium by decompression. Solid, liquid and gaseous water are present simultaneously, and not at the 611 Pa triple point, because dynamic interactions between the phases maintain unstable temperature gradients. After phase changes stop, the system reverts to equilibrium with its surroundings. Surface and shallow subsurface pressure conditions were simulated for Mars and the icy satellites of the outer Solar System. Freezing by evaporation in the absence of wind on Mars is shown to be unlikely for pure water at pressures greater than c. 670 Pa, and for saline solutions at pressures greater than c. 610 Pa. The physical nature of ice that forms depends on the salt content. Ice formed from saline water at pressures less than c. 610 Pa could be similar to terrestrial sea ice. Ice formed from pure water at pressures less than c. 100 Pa develops a low thermal conductivity and a 'honeycomb' structure created by sublimation. This ice could have a density as low as c. 450 kg m -3 and a thermal conductivity as low as 1.6 W m -1 K -1, and is highly reflective, more akin to snow than the clear ice from which it grew. The physical properties of ice formed from either pure or saline water at low pressures will

  15. Effects of water availability and pest pressures on tea (Camellia sinensis) growth and functional quality

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Selena; Orians, Colin M.; Griffin, Timothy S; Buckley, Sarabeth; Unachukwu, Uchenna; Stratton, Anne Elise; Stepp, John Richard; Robbat, Albert; Cash, Sean; Kennelly, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    Extreme shifts in water availability linked to global climate change are impacting crops worldwide. The present study examines the direct and interactive effects of water availability and pest pressures on tea (Camellia sinensis; Theaceae) growth and functional quality. Manipulative greenhouse experiments were used to measure the effects of variable water availability and pest pressures simulated by jasmonic acid (JA) on tea leaf growth and secondary metabolites that determine tea quality. Wa...

  16. Construction management of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohra, S.A. [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, Vikram Sarabhai Bhavan, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)]. E-mail: sabohra@npcil.co.in; Sharma, P.D. [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, Vikram Sarabhai Bhavan, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2006-04-15

    Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru and Dr. Homi J. Bhabha, the visionary architects of Science and Technology of modern India foresaw the imperative need to establish a firm base for indigenous research and development in the field of nuclear electricity generation. The initial phase has primarily focused on the technology development in a systematic and structured manner, which has resulted in establishment of strong engineering, manufacturing and construction base. The nuclear power program started with the setting up of two units of boiling light water type reactors in 1969 for speedy establishment of nuclear technology, safety culture, and development of operation and maintenance manpower. The main aim at that stage was to demonstrate (to ourselves, and indeed to the rest of the world) that India, inspite of being a developing country, with limited industrial infrastructure and low capacity power grids, could successfully assimilate the high technology involved in the safe and economical operation of nuclear power reactors. The selection of a BWR was in contrast to the pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR), which was identified as the flagship for the first stage of India's nuclear power program. The long-term program in three stages utilizes large reserves of thorium in the monazite sands of Kerala beaches in the third stage with first stage comprising of series of PHWR type plants with a base of 10,000 MW. India has at present 14 reactors in operation 12 of these being of PHWR type. The performance of operating units of 2720 MW has improved significantly with an overall capacity factor of about 90% in recent times. The construction work on eight reactor units with installed capacity of 3960 MW (two PHWRs of 540 MW each, four PHWRs of 220 MW each and two VVERs of 1000 MW each) is proceeding on a rapid pace with project schedules of less than 5 years from first pour of concrete. This is being achieved through advanced construction technology and management. Present

  17. The Effect of Sintering Oxygen Partial Pressure on a SmBiO3 Buffer Layer for Coated Conductors via Chemical Solution Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Zhu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of high-temperature YBa2Cu3O7−δ (YBCO superconducting material is a considerable prospect for the growing energy shortages. Here, SmBiO3 (SBO films were deposited on (100-orientated yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ simple crystal substrates via the chemical solution deposition (CSD approach for coated conductors, and the effects of sintering oxygen partial pressure on SBO films were studied. The crystalline structures and surface morphologies of SBO films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and atomic force microscope (AFM. The optimized growth temperature, the intensity ratios of the SBO (200 peak to the SBO (111 peak, and the crystallinities of SBO films increased with the sintering oxygen partial pressure. The SEM and AFM images displayed a smooth and well-distributed surface in the argon atmosphere. The subsequent YBCO films with superconducting transition temperatures (Tc = 89.5 K, 90.2 K, and 86.2 K and critical current densities (Jc = 0.88 MA/cm2, 1.69 MA/cm2, and 0.09 MA/cm2; 77 K, self-field were deposited to further check the qualities of the SBO layer. These results indicated that sintering oxygen partial pressure had an effect on the epitaxial growth of the SBO buffer layer and YBCO superconducting properties. The experimental results may be a usable reference for the epitaxial growth of YBCO-coated conductors and other oxides.

  18. Investigation of the effect of different oxygen partial pressure to LaAlO{sub 3} thin film properties and resistive switching characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kou-Chen, E-mail: jacobliu@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 33302, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Wen-Hsien [Institute of Electronics, Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, HsinChu 30010, Taiwan (China); Chang, Kow-Ming [Institute of Electronics, Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, HsinChu 30010, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, I-Shou University, No. 1, Sec. 1, Syuecheng Rd., Kaohsiung 840, Taiwan (China); Huang, Jiun-Jie [Institute of Electronics, Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, HsinChu 30010, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yun-Ju; Yeh, Ping-Hung [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tansui 251, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pang-Shiu [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Minghsin University of Science and Technology, Hsinchu 340, Taiwan (China); Lee, Heng-Yuan; Chen, Frederick; Tsai, Ming-Jinn [Electronics and Optoelectronics Research Laboratory, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 310, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-01

    The pulsed laser deposition and growth of a high-k dielectric lanthanum aluminate LaAlO{sub 3} (LAO) thin film on indium tin oxide/glass substrate at different oxygen partial pressure was studied. Based on the pulsed laser deposition growth mechanism, we explain how a difference in the oxygen partial pressure influences the surface roughness, formation of an interfacial layer, and the transparent resistive switching characteristics of LAO thin films. The micro-structure and oxygen concentration difference inside LAO thin films may be the main reason for the difference in electrical and resistive switching properties. Films grown at higher oxygen partial pressure displayed more reliable resistive switching performance, due to the formation of the interfacial layer and a lower concentration of oxygen vacancies. The interfacial layer serves as a good oxygen reservoir and the involvement of more oxygen ions ensures the switching reliability. The migration of oxygen ions between the interfacial layer and the LAO film under applied bias may be the switching mechanism.

  19. Review of Water Resource Exploitation and Landuse Pressure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, changes in climate regime, due to increasing temperature and reduced rainfall conditions, contribute to the reduced water supply. ... methods and 4- application of modern innovative techniques of water storage such as Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) in preference to surface water storage systems.

  20. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Nesbitt, Loyd B.

    1997-01-01

    A system for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs.

  1. Simulation and experiment research on the proportional pressure control of water-assisted injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Chen, Yinglong; Zhang, Zengmeng; Yang, Huayong

    2012-05-01

    Water-assisted injection molding (WAIM), a newly developed fluid-assisted injection molding technology has drawn more and more attentions for the energy saving, short cooling circle time and high quality of products. Existing research for the process of WAIM has shown that the pressure control of the injecting water is mostly important for the WAIM. However, the proportional pressure control for the WAIM system is quite complex due to the existence of nonlinearities in the water hydraulic system. In order to achieve better pressure control performance of the injecting water to meet the requirements of the WAIM, the proportional pressure control of the WAIM system is investigated both numerically and experimentally. A newly designed water hydraulic system for WAIM is first modeled in AMEsim environment, the load characteristics and the nonlinearities of water hydraulic system are both considered, then the main factors affecting the injecting pressure and load flow rate are extensively studied. Meanwhile, an open-loop model-based compensation control strategy is employed to regulate the water injection pressure and a feedback proportional integrator controller is further adopted to achieve better control performance. In order to verify the AMEsim simulation results WAIM experiment for particular Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) parts is implemented and the measured experimental data including injecting pressure and flow rate results are compared with the simulation. The good coincidence between experiment and simulation shows that the AMEsim model is accurate, and the tracking performance of the load pressure indicates that the proposed control strategy is effective for the proportional pressure control of the nonlinear WAIM system. The proposed proportional pressure control strategy and the conclusions drawn from simulation and experiment contribute to the application of water hydraulic proportional control and WAIM technology.

  2. Assessment of partial coalescence in whippable oil-in-water food emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrut, Raul Flaviu; Danthine, Sabine; Blecker, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Partial coalescence influences to a great extent the properties of final food products such as ice cream and whipped toppings. In return, the partial coalescence occurrence and development are conditioned, in such systems, by the emulsion's intrinsic properties (e.g. solid fat content, fat crystal shape and size), formulation (e.g. protein content, surfactants presence) and extrinsic factors (e.g. cooling rate, shearing). A set of methods is available for partial coalescence investigation and quantification. These methods are critically reviewed in this paper, balancing the weaknesses of the methods in terms of structure alteration (for turbidity, dye dilution, etc.) and assumptions made for mathematical models (for particle size determination) with their advantages (good repeatability, high sensitivity, etc.). With the methods proposed in literature, the partial coalescence investigations can be conducted quantitatively and/or qualitatively. Good correlation were observed between some of the quantitative methods such as dye dilution, calorimetry, fat particle size; while a poor correlation was found in the case of solvent extraction method with other quantitative methods. The most suitable way for partial coalescence quantification was implied to be the fat particle size method, which would give results with a high degree of confidence if used in combination with a microscopic technique for the confirmation of partial coalescence as the main destabilization mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Negative Pressures and Spallation in Water Drops Subjected to Nanosecond Shock Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Claudiu A; Willmott, Philip R; Stone, Howard A; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L; Robinson, Joseph S; Gumerlock, Karl L; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G; Boutet, Sébastien; Guillet, Serge A H; Curtis, Robin H; Vetter, Sharon L; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-06-02

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below -100 MPa were reached in the drops. We model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.

  4. Effects of a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident on a Mark I Boiling Water Reactor pressure-suppression system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitts, J.H.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-12-22

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a boiling-water-reactor (BWR) power plant has never occurred. However, because this type of accident could be particularly severe, it is used as a principal theoretical basis for design. A series of consistent, versatile, and accurate air-water tests that simulate LOCA conditions has been completed on a /sup 1///sub 5/-scale Mark I BWR pressure-suppression system. Results from these tests are used to quantify the vertical-loading function and to study the associated fluid dynamics phenomena. Detailed histories of vertical loads on the wetwell are shown. In particular, variation of hydrodynamic-generated vertical loads with changes in drywell-pressurization rate, downcomer submergence, and the vent-line loss coefficient are established. Initial drywell overpressure, which partially preclears the downcomers of water, substantially reduces the peak vertical loads. Scaling relationships, developed from dimensional analysis and verified by bench-top experiments, allow the /sup 1///sub 5/-scale results to be applied to a full-scale BWR power plant. This analysis leads to dimensionless groupings that are invariant. These groupings show that, if water is used as the working fluid, the magnitude of the forces in a scaled facility is reduced by the cube of the scale factor and occurs in a time reduced by the square root of the scale factor.

  5. Response of the water status of soybean to changes in soil water potentials controlled by the water pressure in microporous tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, S. L.; Henninger, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Water transport through a microporous tube-soil-plant system was investigated by measuring the response of soil and plant water status to step change reductions in the water pressure within the tubes. Soybeans were germinated and grown in a porous ceramic 'soil' at a porous tube water pressure of -0.5 kpa for 28 d. During this time, the soil matric potential was nearly in equilibrium with tube water pressure. Water pressure in the porous tubes was then reduced to either -1.0, -1.5 or -2.0 kPa. Sap flow rates, leaf conductance and soil, root and leaf water potentials were measured before and after this change. A reduction in porous tube water pressure from -0.5 to -1.0 or -1.5 kPa did not result in any significant change in soil or plant water status. A reduction in porous tube water pressure to -2.0 kPa resulted in significant reductions in sap flow, leaf conductance, and soil, root and leaf water potentials. Hydraulic conductance, calculated as the transpiration rate/delta psi between two points in the water transport pathway, was used to analyse water transport through the tube-soil-plant continuum. At porous tube water pressures of -0.5 to-1.5 kPa soil moisture was readily available and hydraulic conductance of the plant limited water transport. At -2.0 kPa, hydraulic conductance of the bulk soil was the dominant factor in water movement.

  6. China's coal-fired power plants impose pressure on water resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Liu, Junguo; Tang, Yu; Zhao, Xu; Yang, Hong; Gerbens-Leenes, P.W.; Vliet, van Michelle T.H.; Yan, Jinyue

    2017-01-01

    Coal is the dominant fuel for electricity generation around the world. This type of electricity generation uses large amounts of water, increasing pressure on water resources. This calls for an in-depth investigation in the water-energy nexus of coal-fired electricity generation. In China,

  7. Gray water recycle: Effect of pretreatment technologies on low pressure reverse osmosis treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray water can be a valuable source of water when properly treated to reduce the risks associated with chemical and microbial contamination to acceptable levels for the intended reuse application. In this study, the treatment of gray water using low pressure reverse osmosis (RO) filtration after pre...

  8. Semi-empirical lake level (SELL) model for mapping lake water depths from partially clouded satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpuri, N.; Senay, G. B.

    2011-12-01

    Information on the variability in surface water is critical to understand the impact of climate change and global water cycle. Surface water features such as lakes, or reservoirs can affect local weather and regional climate. Hence, there is a widespread demand for accurate and quantitative global observations of surface water variability. Satellite imagery provides a direct way to monitor variations in surface water. However, estimating accurate surface area from satellite imagery can be a problem due to clouds. Hence, the use of optical imagery for operational implementation has been a challenge for monitoring variations in surface water. In this research, a semi-empirical lake level (SELL) model is developed to derive lake/reservoir water levels from partially covered satellite imagery. SRTM elevation combined with bathymetry was used to derive the relationships between lake depth vs. surface area and shore line (L). Using these relationships, lake level/depth (D) was estimated from the surface area (A) and/or shore line (L) delineated from Landsat and MODIS data. The SELL model was applied on Lake Turkana, one of the rift valley lakes in East Africa. First, Lake Turkana water levels were delineated using cloud-free or partially clouded Landsat and MODIS imagery over 1993-2009 and 2002-2009 time periods respectively. Historic lake depths were derived using 1972-1992 Landsat imagery. Lake depths delineated using this approach were validated using TOPEX/Poseidon/Jason satellite altimetry data. It was found that lake depths derived using SELL model matched reasonably well with the satellite altimetry data. The approach presented in this research can be used to (a) simulate lake water level variations in data scarce regions (b) increase the frequency of observation in regions where cloud cover is a problem (c) operationally monitor lake water levels in ungauged basins (d) derive historic lake level information using satellite data.

  9. Soak Feet Warm Water Therapy Effective To Reduce Blood Pressure In The Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yessi harnani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a heart and blood vessels disease that is manifested by rising blood pressure. Untreated hypertension will lead to complication such as stroke and heart failure. Soak feet warm water is one of the complementary therapy that can reduce blood pressure. The purpose of this research is to find out the effecveness of soak feet warm water therapy to reduce blood pressure in the elderly. This research was a quantave by using the pre-experimental design and pretest and posest approach. The Sample were elderly with hypertension in working area of Puskesmas Simpang Tiga Pekanbaru. The sampling technique was used purposive sampling. The data collection techniques were used observation and measuring blood pressure by using sphignomanometer. The data analyzed was used Wilcoxon test. The Results showed that generally elderly with hypertension were on stage II. Stasc result showed that mean blood pressure post soak feet warm water therapy was 74,00 and standard deviaon was 5, 026, with the sistolic P value was 0.000 (<0.05 and diastolic P value was 0.000 (<0.05. So, it could be stated that soak feet warm water therapy effecve to reduce blood pressure in elderly. It is recommended to elderly with hypertension to always controlling their blood pressure, if there is a rising of blood pressure they could using soak feet warm water therapy to treat hypertension as a complementary therapy, cheap and easy to do indenpendently.

  10. Vapour pressures, aqueous solubilities, Henry's law constants, partition coefficients between gas/water (Kgw), n-octanol/water (Kow) and gas/n-octanol (Kgo) of 106 polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz; Ballschmiter

    1999-02-01

    Modelling the environmental fate of persistent organic pollutants like polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDE) requires the knowledge of a number of fundamental physico-chemical properties of these compounds. We report here the physico-chemical properties of 106 PCDEs, which are over 50% of all possible congeners. Vapour pressures P(OL), water solubilities S(H2O), and n-octanol/water partition coefficients K(OW) were determined with chromatographic methods. With these experimental data the Henry's law constants H, gas/water K(GW) and gas/n-octanol K(GO) partition coefficients were calculated. Vapour pressures and water solubilities and n-octanol/water partition coefficients of the PCDEs are close to those of similar groups of organochlorine compounds like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs). A similar environmental fate can be predicted and was partially already been observed.

  11. Adaptive Equalizer Using Selective Partial Update Algorithm and Selective Regressor Affine Projection Algorithm over Shallow Water Acoustic Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumeh Soflaei; Paeiz Azmi

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important problems of reliable communications in shallow water channels is intersymbol interference (ISI) which is due to scattering from surface and reflecting from bottom. Using adaptive equalizers in receiver is one of the best suggested ways for overcoming this problem. In this paper, we apply the family of selective regressor affine projection algorithms (SR-APA) and the family of selective partial update APA (SPU-APA) which have low computational complexity that is one ...

  12. Complex cooling water systems optimization with pressure drop consideration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gololo, KV

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available -integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) structure. The cooling tower model is used to predict the exit conditions of the cooling towers, given the inlet conditions from the cooling water network model. The case studies showed that the circulating cooling water flow...

  13. Troubled waters: Growing climate and population pressures in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-04-09

    Apr 9, 2014 ... Rapid urbanization is squeezing India's limited water resources. While climate change may compound the problem, research in two southern watersheds points to industrial pollution, unregulated extraction, and changes in land use as the greatest threats to water quality and availability.

  14. Embolized Stems Recover Overnight in Zea mays: The Role of Soil Water, Root Pressure, and Nighttime Transpiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M. Gleason

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It is not currently well-understood how much xylem conductance is lost in maize plants during the day, if conductance is recovered during the night, or what soil water conditions are required for recovery to take place. To answer these questions we designed a greenhouse experiment whereby two genetically dissimilar maize genotypes were subjected to a level of water stress commonly experienced in the field (Ψxylem ∼-2 MPa. We then measured the loss of stem-specific conductivity associated with this level of stress, as well as the overnight recovery following three re-watering treatments: Ψsoil ∼ 0 MPa, Ψsoil ∼-0.40 MPa, and Ψsoil ∼-1.70 MPa. Mid-day leaf water potentials of -1.98 MPa resulted in stem-specific conductivity (KS values that were 31.5% of maximal (i.e., 68% loss. Returning soils to field capacity (Ψsoil ∼ 0 MPa overnight allowed for the significant recovery of KS (76% of maximal, whereas partial watering (Ψsoil ∼-0.40 MPa resulted KS values that were 51.7% of maximal values, whereas not watering resulted in no recovery (35.4% of maximal; Ψsoil ∼-1.7 MPa. Recovery of KS was facilitated by the generation of root pressure and low rates of nighttime transpiration.

  15. Analysis of External Water Pressure for a Tunnel in Fractured Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-jun Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available External water pressure around tunnels is a main influential factor in relation to the seepage safety of underground chambers and powerhouses which make managing external water pressure crucial to water conservation and hydropower projects. The equivalent continuous medium model and the discrete fracture network (DFN model were, respectively, applied to calculate the seepage field of the study domain. Calculations were based on the integrity and permeability of rocks, the extent of fracture development, and the combination of geological and hydrogeological conditions in the Huizhou pump-storage hydropower station. The station generates electricity from the upper reservoir and stores power by pumping water from the lower to the upper reservoir. In this paper, the external water pressure around the cavern and variations in pressure with only one operational and one venting powerhouse were analyzed to build a predictive model. The results showed that the external water pressure was small with the current anti-seepage and drainage system that normal operation of the reservoir can be guaranteed. The results of external water pressure around the tunnels provided sound scientific evidence for the future design of antiseepage systems.

  16. Study on the pressure self-adaptive water-tight junction box in underwater vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haocai Huang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Underwater vehicles play a very important role in underwater engineering. Water-tight junction box (WJB is one of the key components in underwater vehicle. This paper puts forward a pressure self-adaptive water-tight junction box (PSAWJB which improves the reliability of the WJB significantly by solving the sealing and pressure problems in conventional WJB design. By redundancy design method, the pressure self-adaptive equalizer (PSAE is designed in such a way that it consists of a piston pressure-adaptive compensator (PPAC and a titanium film pressure-adaptive compensator (TFPAC. According to hydro-mechanical simulations, the operating volume of the PSAE is more than or equal to 11.6 % of the volume of WJB liquid system. Furthermore, the required operating volume of the PSAE also increases as the gas content of oil, hydrostatic pressure or temperature difference increases. The reliability of the PSAWJB is proved by hyperbaric chamber tests.

  17. Assessing the relation between anthropogenic pressure and PAH concentrations in surface water in the Seine River basin using multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Emmanuelle; Mirande-Bret, Cécile; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the relation between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in freshwater and anthropogenic pressure is fundamental to finding a solution to reduce the presence of PAHs in water, and thus their potential impact on aquatic life. In this paper we propose to gain greater insight into the variability, sources and partitioning of PAHs in labile (or freely dissolved=not associated to the organic matter), dissolved and particulate phases in freshwater. This study was conducted using land use data as a marker of anthropogenic pressure and coupling it with chemical measurements. This study was conducted on 30 sites in the Seine River basin, which is subjected to a strong human impact and exhibits a wide range of land uses. Half of the sites were studied twice. Labile PAHs were measured by semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs), and dissolved and particulate phases by grab samples. Partial least squares regressions were performed between chemical measurements and data of anthropogenic pressure. The results indicate different sources for the dissolved phase and particles. Dissolved and labile phases were more related to the population density of the watershed, while particles were more related to a local pressure. Season and land use data are necessary information to correctly interpret and compare PAH concentrations from different sites. Furthermore, the whole data set of the 45 field deployments comprising labile, dissolved, total and particulate PAH concentrations as well as the physico-chemical parameters is available in the supplementary information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. High-Pressure Water-Rinse Cleaning of Copper(LCC-0067)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, R

    2003-11-06

    Copper, niobium and stainless steel surfaces were cleaned by high-pressure water-rinsing spray (HPWR). Surface chemical and topographic analyses show that the HPWR process is neither a contaminating nor a significantly eroding process.

  19. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description.

  20. Exploration of Impinging Water Spray Heat Transfer at System Pressures Near the Triple Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golliher, Eric L.; Yao, Shi-Chune

    2013-01-01

    The heat transfer of a water spray impinging upon a surface in a very low pressure environment is of interest to cooling of space vehicles during launch and re-entry, and to industrial processes where flash evaporation occurs. At very low pressure, the process occurs near the triple point of water, and there exists a transient multiphase transport problem of ice, water and water vapor. At the impingement location, there are three heat transfer mechanisms: evaporation, freezing and sublimation. A preliminary heat transfer model was developed to explore the interaction of these mechanisms at the surface and within the spray.

  1. The use of β-glucan as a partial salt replacer in high pressure processed chicken breast meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omana, Dileep A; Plastow, Graham; Betti, Mirko

    2011-12-01

    The effect of various ingredients such as sodium chloride (NaCl), sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) and β-glucan (BG) on the biochemical properties of chicken breast proteins during temperature assisted high pressure processing was studied. Total protein solubility revealed that 600MPa pressure and 40(o)C are critical for the denaturation of proteins in STPP samples. Increase in reactive sulfhydryl groups with pressure indicate the exposure of buried sulfhydryl groups. Hydrophobicity and sulfhydryl contents revealed that hydrophobic interaction and disulphide bond formation are responsible for gel formation. The study revealed that 40(o)C and 400/600MPa pressure is optimum for high pressure processing of chicken breast meat. Addition of β-glucan with reduced NaCl and in the absence of sodium tripolyphosphate could produce gels with similar properties to those with 2.5% NaCl addition. Hence it is proposed that β-glucan can be used to reduce NaCl content of chicken products produced by temperature assisted high pressure processing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules, Thermal-Hydraulics, TH-1: Pressurized Water Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihman, Thomas C.

    This learning module is concerned with the temperature field, the heat transfer rates, and the coolant pressure drop in typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. As in all of the modules of this series, emphasis is placed on developing the theory and demonstrating its use with a simplified model. The heart of the module is the PWR…

  3. Development of a quasi-adiabatic calorimeter for the determination of the water vapor pressure curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokdad, S; Georgin, E; Hermier, Y; Sparasci, F; Himbert, M

    2012-07-01

    Progress in the knowledge of the water saturation curve is required to improve the accuracy of the calibrations in humidity. In order to achieve this objective, the LNE-CETIAT and the LNE-CNAM have jointly built a facility dedicated to the measurement of the saturation vapor pressure and temperature of pure water. The principle is based on a static measurement of the pressure and the temperature of pure water in a closed, temperature-controlled thermostat, conceived like a quasi-adiabatic calorimeter. A copper cell containing pure water is placed inside a temperature-controlled copper shield, which is mounted in a vacuum-tight stainless steel vessel immersed in a thermostated bath. The temperature of the cell is measured with capsule-type standard platinum resistance thermometers, calibrated with uncertainties below the millikelvin. The vapor pressure is measured by calibrated pressure sensors connected to the cell through a pressure tube whose temperature is monitored at several points. The pressure gauges are installed in a thermostatic apparatus ensuring high stability of the pressure measurement and avoiding any condensation in the tubes. Thanks to the employment of several technical solutions, the thermal contribution to the overall uncertainty budget is reduced, and the remaining major part is mainly due to pressure measurements. This paper presents a full description of this facility and the preliminary results obtained for its characterization.

  4. Effects of altitude on transpiration, leaf vapor pressure deficit and leaf water potential in oriental beech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Bayraktar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the effect of altitude on transpiration, leaf vapor pressure deficit and leaf water potential in oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky. The study area was located in Ortaköy, Artvin, and the experimental area had the same soil structure and aspect. The study showed that transpiration and leaf vapor pressure deficit increased but leaf water potential decreased by altitudinal gradient

  5. Liquid sinusoidal pressure measurement by laser interferometry based on the refractive index of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Fan, Shangchun; Li, Cheng; Guo, Zhanshe; Li, Bo; Shi, Bo

    2016-12-01

    A new method with laser interferometry is used to enhance the traceability for sinusoidal pressure calibration in water. The laser vibrometer measures the dynamic pressure based on the acousto-optic effect. The relation of the refractive index of water and the optical path length with the pressure's change is built based on the Lorentz-Lorenz equation, and the conversion coefficients are tested by static calibration in situ. A device with a piezoelectric transducer and resonant pressure pipe with water is set up to generate sinusoidal pressure up to 20 kHz. With the conversion coefficients, the reference sinusoidal pressure is measured by the laser interferometer for pressure sensors' dynamic calibration. The experiment results show that under 10 kHz, the measurement results between the laser vibrometer and a piezoelectric sensor are in basic agreement and indicate that this new method and its measurement system are feasible in sinusoidal pressure calibration. Some disturbing components including small amplitude, temperature change, pressure maldistribution, and glass windows' vibration are also analyzed, especially for the dynamic calibrations above 10 kHz.

  6. EFFECTS OF PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE ON ULTRAFILTRATION HOLLOW FIBER MEMBRANE IN MOBILE WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSDIANAH RAMLI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In Sabah, Malaysia, there are still high probability of limited clean water access in rural area and disaster site. Few villages had been affected in Pitas due to improper road access, thus building a water treatment plant there might not be feasible. Recently, Kundasang area had been affected by earthquake that caused water disruption to its people due to the damage in the underground pipes and water tanks. It has been known that membrane technology brought ease in making mobile water treatment system that can be transported to rural or disaster area. In this study, hollow fiber membrane used in a mobile water treatment system due to compact and ease setup. Hollow fiber membrane was fabricated into small module at 15 and 30 fibers to suit the mobile water treatment system for potable water production of at least 80 L/day per operation. The effects of transmembrane pressure (TMP and feed water temperature were investigated. It was found that permeate flux increases by more than 96% for both 15 and 30 fiber bundles with increasing pressure in the range of 0.25 to 3.0 bar but dropped when the pressure reached maximum. Lower temperature of 17 to 18˚C increase the water viscosity by 15% from normal temperature of water at 24˚C, making the permeate flux decreases. The fabricated modules effectively removed 96% turbidity of the surface water sample tested.

  7. Water pressure and ground vibrations induced by water guns at a backwater pond on the Illinois River near Morris, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebel, Carolyn M.; Egly, Rachel M.

    2016-09-27

    Three different geophysical sensor types were used to characterize the underwater pressure waves and ground velocities generated by the underwater firing of seismic water guns. These studies evaluated the use of water guns as a tool to alter the movement of Asian carp. Asian carp are aquatic invasive species that threaten to move into the Great Lakes Basin from the Mississippi River Basin. Previous studies have identified a threshold of approximately 5 pounds per square inch (lb/in2) for behavioral modification and for structural limitation of a water gun barrier.Two studies were completed during August 2014 and May 2015 in a backwater pond connected to the Illinois River at a sand and gravel quarry near Morris, Illinois. The August 2014 study evaluated the performance of two 80-cubic-inch (in3) water guns. Data from the 80-in3 water guns showed that the pressure field had the highest pressures and greatest extent of the 5-lb/in2 target value at a depth of 5 feet (ft). The maximum recorded pressure was 13.7 lb/in2, approximately 25 ft from the guns. The produced pressure field took the shape of a north-south-oriented elongated sphere with the 5-lb/in2 target value extending across the entire study area at a depth of 5 ft. Ground velocities were consistent over time, at 0.0067 inches per second (in/s) in the transverse direction, 0.031 in/s in the longitudinal direction, and 0.013 in/s in the vertical direction.The May 2015 study evaluated the performance of one and two 100-in3 water guns. Data from the 100-in3 water guns, fired both individually and simultaneously, showed that the pressure field had the highest pressures and greatest extent of the 5-lb/in2 target value at a depth of 5 ft. The maximum pressure was 57.4 lb/in2, recorded at the underwater blast sensor closest to the water guns (at a horizontal distance of approximately 3 ft), as two guns fired simultaneously. Pressures and extent of the 5-lb/in2 target value decrease above and below this 5-ft depth

  8. Water, partial melting and the origin of the seismic low velocity and high attenuation zone in the upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karato, Shun-ichiro; Jung, Haemyeong

    1998-04-01

    The common belief that the seismic low velocity and high attenuation zone (the asthenosphere) is caused by the presence of a small amount of melt is not supported by recent mineral physics and seismological observations. A review of recent mineral physics observations suggests that water significantly reduces seismic wave velocities through anelastic relaxation and hence, at a small melt fraction expected in most of the Earth's upper mantle, partial melting will increase seismic wave velocities through the removal of water from minerals such as olivine. Therefore the asthenosphere, in this model, is a layer where no significant partial melting occurs and hence a high water content is retained. We apply this model to calculate seismic wave velocities and attenuation in the upper mantle with a range of water contents. The seismic structures calculated from this model depend on geotherm, the mode of partial melting (batch or fractional melting) and the geometry of upwelling flow (passive flow or dynamic upwelling). The sharp velocity change around 60-80 km (the Gutenberg discontinuity) can be attributed to a sharp change in water content due to partial melting, if the temperature there is relatively high as implied by the plate model and if melting occurs as fractional melting but not by batch melting. However, the significant increase in seismic wave velocity with age in young oceanic upper mantle suggests rapid cooling as predicted by a cooling half-space model. Thus, the present model suggests fast cooling in the early stage but slow cooling in the later stage of evolution of the oceanic upper mantle, the latter being caused presumably by some additional heat in the old oceanic upper mantle. The seismic structures of typical oceanic upper mantle with a fast spreading rate (e.g., the Pacific) is consistent with passive spreading, whereas the greater depth of the G-discontinuity and the weaker seismic anisotropy in back-arc regions (e.g., the Philippine Sea) suggest

  9. Modeling Soluble and Particulate Lead Release into Drinking Water from Full and Partially Replaced Lead Service Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abokifa, Ahmed A; Biswas, Pratim

    2017-03-21

    Partial replacement of lead service lines (LSLs) often results in the excessive long-term release of lead particulates due to the disturbance of pipe scale and galvanic corrosion. In this study, a modeling approach to simulate the release and transport of particulate and dissolved lead from full and partially replaced LSLs is developed. A mass-transfer model is coupled with a stochastic residential water demand generator to investigate the effect of normal household usage flow patterns on lead exposure. The model is calibrated by comparing simulation results against experimental measurements from pilot-scale setups where lead release under different flow rates and water chemistry scenarios was reported. Applying the model within a Monte Carlo simulation framework, partial replacement of the LSL was predicted to result in releasing spikes with significantly high concentrations of particulate lead (1011.9 ± 290.3 μg/L) that were five times higher than those released from the simulated full LSL. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the intensity of flow demands significantly affects particulate lead release, while dissolved lead levels are more dependent on the lengths of the stagnation periods. Preflushing of the LSL prior to regulatory sampling was found to underestimate the maximum monthly exposure to dissolved lead by 19%, while sampling at low flow rates (<5.2 LPM) was found to consistently suppress the high spikes induced by particulate lead mobilization.

  10. Influence of Nitrogen Partial Pressure on Microstructure and Tribological Properties of Mo-Cu-V-N Composite Coatings with High Cu Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijuan Mei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Mo-Cu-V-N composite coatings with high Cu content of ~18 at.% were deposited on 316L stainless steel and YT14 cemented carbide substrates by high power impulse magnetron sputtering in Ar–N2 gas mixtures. The influence of N2 partial pressure was investigated with respect to the microstructure and tribological properties of the coatings. The results indicated that the Mo-Cu-V-N composite coatings exhibited FCC B1-MoN phase with a strong (200 preferred orientation, and Cu phase was found to exist as metallic species. As the N2 partial pressure increased from 0.11 to 0.35 Pa, the peak intensity of (200 plane decreased gradually and simultaneous peak broadening was observed, which was typical for grain refinement. With increasing the N2 partial pressure, the columnar microstructure became much coarser, which led to the decrease of residual stress and hardness. The Mo-Cu-V-N composite coatings with high Cu content exhibited a relatively low wear rate of 10−8 mm3/N·m at 25 °C, which was believed to be attributed to the mixed lubricious oxides of MoO2, CuO and V2O5 formed during tribo-oxidation, which cannot be formed in the coatings with low Cu content. When the wear temperature was increased up to 400 °C, the wear rate increased sharply up to 10−6 mm3/N·m despite the formation of lubricious oxides of MoO3/CuMoO4 and V2O5. This could be due to the loss of nitrogen and pronounced oxidation at high temperatures, which led the wear mechanism to be transformed from mild oxidation wear to severe oxidation wear.

  11. High pressure water electrolysis for space station EMU recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Nick; Puskar, Michael; Moulthrop, Lawrence; Zagaja, John

    1988-01-01

    A high pressure oxygen recharge system (HPORS), is being developed for application on board the Space Station. This electrolytic system can provide oxygen at up to 6000 psia without a mechanical compressor. The Hamilton standard HPORS based on a solid polymer electrolyte system is an extension of the much larger and succesful 3000 psia system of the U.S. Navy. Cell modules have been successfully tested under conditions beyond which spacecraft may encounter during launch. The control system with double redundancy and mechanical backups for all electronically controlled components is designed to ensure a safe shutdown.

  12. Plant and environment interactions: Growth and yield response of commercial bearing-age {open_quote}Casselman{close_quote} plum trees to various ozone partial pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retzlaff, W.A.; Williams, L.E. [Univ. of California, Parlier, CA (United States); DeJong, T.M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Nursery stock of plum (Prunus salicina Lindel., cv. Casselman) was planted 1 Apr. 1988 in an experimental orchard at the Univ. of California Kearney Agricultural Center near Fresno, CA. Trees in this study were enclosed in open-top fumigation chambers on 1 May 1989, and exposed to three atmospheric ozone partial pressures (charcoal filtered air, ambient air, and ambient air + ozone) during the 1989 through 1992 growing seasons (typically 1 Apr. - 1 Nov.). A nonchamber treatment plot was used to assess chamber effects on tree performance. This study details the results of the exposures during the initial commercial bearing period (1991 through 1993) in this orchard. The mean 12-h (0800-2000 h Pacific Daylight Time [PDT]) ozone partial pressures during the experimental periods in the charcoal filtered, ambient, ambient + ozone, and nonchamber treatments averaged 0.031, 0.048, 0.091, and 0.056 {mu}Pa Pa{sup {minus}1} in 1991 and 1992, respectively. Fruit number per tree decreased as atmospheric ozone partial pressure increased from the charcoal filtered to ambient + ozone treatment, significantly affecting yield. Yield of plum trees averaged 23.6, 19.8, 13.7, and 17.9 kg tree{sup {minus}1} in 1991 and 1992 in the charcoal filtered, ambient, ambient + ozone, and nonchamber treatments, respectively. Only one out of the five original treatment plots was exposed to ozone treatments during the 1993 growing season. Yield of plum trees in this single replicate in 1993 was reduced by increased atmospheric ozone partial pressure. Yield of plum trees in the four remaining unexposed treatment plots in 1993 was 16.7, 17.9, and 16.0 kg tree{sup {minus}1} in the previous charcoal filtered, ambient, and ambient + ozone treatments respectively. The similarity in yield of the post-chamber treatments indicates that a change in air quality in the current growing season can affect yield of Casselman plum trees. 26 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Water vaporization promotes coseismic fluid pressurization and buffers temperature rise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Jianye|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370819071; Niemeijer, André|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370832132; Yao, Lu; Ma, Shengli

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the frictional properties of carbonate-rich gouge layers at a slip rate of 1.3 m/s, under dry and water-saturated conditions, while monitoring temperature at different locations on one of the gouge-host rock interfaces. All experiments showed a peak frictional strength of 0.4–0.7,

  14. Failure Mode of the Water-filled Fractures under Hydraulic Pressure in Karst Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Water-filled fractures continue to grow after the excavation of karst tunnels, and the hydraulic pressure in these fractures changes along with such growth. This paper simplifies the fractures in the surrounding rock as flat ellipses and then identifies the critical hydraulic pressure values required for the occurrence of tensile-shear and compression-shear failures in water-filled fractures in the case of plane stress. The occurrence of tensile-shear fracture requires a larger critical hydraulic pressure than compression-shear failure in the same fracture. This paper examines the effects of fracture strike and lateral pressure coefficient on critical hydraulic pressure, and identifies compression-shear failure as the main failure mode of water-filled fractures. This paper also analyses the hydraulic pressure distribution in fractures with different extensions, and reveals that hydraulic pressure decreases along with the continuous growth of fractures and cannot completely fill a newly formed fracture with water. Fracture growth may be interrupted under the effect of hydraulic tensile shear.

  15. Two innovative pore pressure calculation methods for shallow deep-water formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Song; Fan, Honghai; Liu, Yuhan; He, Yanfeng; Zhang, Shifeng; Yang, Jing; Fu, Lipei

    2017-11-01

    There are many geological hazards in shallow formations associated with oil and gas exploration and development in deep-water settings. Abnormal pore pressure can lead to water flow and gas and gas hydrate accumulations, which may affect drilling safety. Therefore, it is of great importance to accurately predict pore pressure in shallow deep-water formations. Experience over previous decades has shown, however, that there are not appropriate pressure calculation methods for these shallow formations. Pore pressure change is reflected closely in log data, particularly for mudstone formations. In this paper, pore pressure calculations for shallow formations are highlighted, and two concrete methods using log data are presented. The first method is modified from an E. Philips test in which a linear-exponential overburden pressure model is used. The second method is a new pore pressure method based on P-wave velocity that accounts for the effect of shallow gas and shallow water flow. Afterwards, the two methods are validated using case studies from two wells in the Yingqiong basin. Calculated results are compared with those obtained by the Eaton method, which demonstrates that the multi-regression method is more suitable for quick prediction of geological hazards in shallow layers.

  16. Pressurized hydrogenotrophic denitrification reactor for small water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epsztein, Razi; Beliavski, Michael; Tarre, Sheldon; Green, Michal

    2017-03-15

    The implementation of hydrogenotrophic denitrification is limited due to safety concerns, poor H2 utilization and low solubility of H2 gas with the resulting low transfer rate. The current paper presents the main research work conducted on a pressurized hydrogenotrophic reactor for denitrification that was recently developed. The reactor is based on a new concept suggesting that a gas-liquid equilibrium is achieved in the closed headspace of denitrifying reactor, further produced N2 gas is carried out by the effluent and gas purging is not required. The feasibility of the proposed reactor was shown for two effluent concentrations of 10 and 1 mg NO3--N/L. Hydrogen gas utilization efficiencies of 92.8% and 96.9% were measured for the two effluent concentrations, respectively. Reactor modeling predicted high denitrification rates above 4 g NO3--N/(Lreactor·d) at reasonable operational conditions. Hydrogen utilization efficiency was improved up to almost 100% by combining the pressurized reactor with a following open-to-atmosphere polishing unit. Also, the potential of the reactor to remove ClO4- was shown. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pressure-induced volume phase transition of polyacrylamide gels in acetone-water mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Eiji

    2000-07-01

    Equilibrium swelling curves of ionized polyacrylamide gels immersed in acetone-water mixtures were measured as a function of pressure up to pressures of 300 MPa. The gels, which shrank at atmospheric pressure, underwent an abrupt volume change (pressure-induced volume phase transition) from a shrunken state to a swollen state at the transition pressure. The transition pressure increased with an increase of acetone concentration. The pressure-induced volume phase transition can be interpreted by taking account of the free-energy change ΔVṡP between swollen (hydrated) and shrunken (dehydrated) states. The ΔV represents the difference between the molar volume of water structured around hydrophilic groups of polyacrylamide chains and that of free water in the bulk mixtures. The estimated value of ΔV is -3.3 mL/mol, which qualitatively agrees with that obtained from the experiments of denaturation of proteins. The pressure-induced volume phase transition is generally expected in many hydrogels.

  18. Optimization of pressure gauge locations for water distribution systems using entropy theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Do Guen; Chang, Dong Eil; Jun, Hwandon; Kim, Joong Hoon

    2012-12-01

    It is essential to select the optimal pressure gauge location for effective management and maintenance of water distribution systems. This study proposes an objective and quantified standard for selecting the optimal pressure gauge location by defining the pressure change at other nodes as a result of demand change at a specific node using entropy theory. Two cases are considered in terms of demand change: that in which demand at all nodes shows peak load by using a peak factor and that comprising the demand change of the normal distribution whose average is the base demand. The actual pressure change pattern is determined by using the emitter function of EPANET to reflect the pressure that changes practically at each node. The optimal pressure gauge location is determined by prioritizing the node that processes the largest amount of information it gives to (giving entropy) and receives from (receiving entropy) the whole system according to the entropy standard. The suggested model is applied to one virtual and one real pipe network, and the optimal pressure gauge location combination is calculated by implementing the sensitivity analysis based on the study results. These analysis results support the following two conclusions. Firstly, the installation priority of the pressure gauge in water distribution networks can be determined with a more objective standard through the entropy theory. Secondly, the model can be used as an efficient decision-making guide for gauge installation in water distribution systems.

  19. Partialization losses of ON/OFF operation of waterto- water refrigeration/heat-pump units

    OpenAIRE

    Corberán, José M.; D.Donadello; Martínez Galván, Israel Octavio; Montagud, C

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental campaign for the characterization of the dynamic behavior of a water-to-water refrigeration/heat-pump unit under ON/OFF operation. The unit was previously tested at different water inlet temperatures under steady state conditions, and a very good agreement was found between the instantaneous dynamic performance of the heat pump and the corresponding quasi-steady state operation. In parallel, a series of tests were carried out to quan...

  20. Revisiting the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock Studies of an Aging Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; Malik, S.N.M.; Simonen, F.A.

    1999-08-01

    The Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) studies were a series of studies performed in the early-mid 1980s as part of an NRC-organized comprehensive research project to confirm the technical bases for the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) rule, and to aid in the development of guidance for licensee plant-specific analyses. The research project consisted of PTS pilot analyses for three PWRs: Oconee Unit 1, designed by Babcock and Wilcox; Calvert Cliffs Unit 1, designed by Combustion Engineering; and H.B. Robinson Unit 2, designed by Westinghouse. The primary objectives of the IPTS studies were (1) to provide for each of the three plants an estimate of the probability of a crack propagating through the wall of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) due to PTS; (2) to determine the dominant overcooling sequences, plant features, and operator actions and the uncertainty in the plant risk due to PTS; and (3) to evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective actions. The NRC is currently evaluating the possibility of revising current PTS regulatory guidance. Technical bases must be developed to support any revisions. In the years since the results of IPTS studies were published, the fracture mechanics model, the embrittlement database, embrittlement correlation, inputs for flaw distributions, and the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) computer code have been refined. An ongoing effort is underway to determine the impact of these fracture-technology refinements on the conditional probabilities of vessel failure calculated in the IPTS Studies. This paper discusses the results of these analyses performed for one of these plants.

  1. Effect of oxygen partial pressure on structural and optical properties of pulsed laser deposited CaBi4Ti4O15 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emani, Sivanagi Reddy; Raju, K. C. James

    2017-03-01

    The influence of oxygen partial pressure (OPP) on the structural and optical properties of CaBi4Ti4O15 (CBTi) thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition have been investigated in the range of 0.1 mbar to 7.8 × 10-3 mbar. The structural properties show all the films are polycystlline in nature with orthorombic structure. The optical transmission of the films is in the range of 60-90%. A slight shift in transmission threshold towards higher wavelength region with an increase in O2 pressure reveals the systematic reduction in the optical band gap energy (3.69 to 3.59 eV) of the films. Raman studies confirm the phase formation and presence of stresses in the films. It is suggested that the OPP played a key role in controlling crystallinity, morphology, chemical composition and optical properties in CBTi thin films.

  2. Capillary pressure as a unique function of electric permittivity and water saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plug, W.J.; Slob, E.; Van Turnhout, J.; Bruining, J.

    2007-01-01

    The relation between capillary pressure (Pc) and interfacial area has been investigated by measuring Pc and the electric permittivity at 100 kHz simultaneously as function of the water saturation, (Sw). Drainage and imbibition experiments have been conducted for sand-distilled water-gas (CO2/N2)

  3. Pressure loss in channel flow resulting from a sudden change in boundary condition from no-slip to partial-slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chiu-On; Sun, Rui

    2017-10-01

    A semi-analytical model is presented for pressure-driven flow through a channel, where local pressure loss is incurred at a sudden change in the boundary condition: from no-slip to partial-slip. Assuming low-Reynolds-number incompressible flow and periodic stick-slip wall patterning, the problems for parallel-plate and circular channels are solved using the methods of eigenfunction expansion and point match. The present study aims to examine in detail how the flow will evolve, on passing through the cross section at which the change in the slip condition occurs, from a no-slip parabolic profile to a less sheared profile with a boundary slip. The present problem is germane to, among other applications, flow through a channel bounded by superhydrophobic surfaces, which intrinsically comprise an array of no-slip and partial-slip segments. Results are presented to show that the sudden change in the boundary condition will result in additional resistance to the flow. Near the point on the wall where a slip change occurs is a region of steep pressure gradient and intensive vorticity. The acceleration of near-wall fluid particles in combination with the no-slip boundary condition leads to a very steep velocity gradient at the wall, thereby a sharp increase in the wall shear stress, shortly before the fluid enters the channel with a slippery wall. Results are also presented to show the development of flow in the entrance region in the slippery channel. The additional pressure loss can be represented by a dimensionless loss parameter, which is a pure function of the slip length for channels much longer than the entrance length.

  4. Undermoderated spectrum MOX core study. Pressurized water-type breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochihara, Hiroshi; Komano, Yasuo [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this development is the advance of the PWR core. The conversion ratio (the breeding ratio) are examined. In the case of heavy water as the coolant, the breeding ratio can be achieved about 1.1 with using a hexagonal lattice and space about 1 mm assembly fuel. In the case of light water coolant, the breeding ratio becomes about 1.0, using a hexagonal lattice and fuel space about 0.5 mm fuel assembly. Here, it reports on the situation of the examination such as the nucleus design of core, the design of fuel assembly, the heat hydraulics design of the core, the structure design and so on. (author)

  5. Impact of partially treated sewage effluent on the water quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    Key Words: Malaysian Water Quality Index, Sewage, Wastewater treatment plant, Epie Creek, Fallout point, ... effluent/wastewater treatment facilities. Wastewater from industries includes employees' sanitary waste, process wastes, hydrotest water from pipelines and ..... as pesticides and metals tend to adsorb to them or.

  6. Water pressure and ground vibrations induced by water guns near Bandon Road Lock and Dam and Lemont, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ryan F.; Koebel, Carolyn M.; Morrow, William S.

    2018-02-13

    Multiple geophysical sensors were used to characterize the underwater pressure field and ground vibrations of a seismic water gun and its suitability to deter the movement of Asian carps (particularly the silver [Hypophthalmichthys molitrix] and bighead [Hypophthalmichthys nobilis] carps) while ensuring the integrity of surrounding structures. The sensors used to collect this information were blast-rated hydrophones, surface- and borehole-mounted geophones, and fixed accelerometers.Results from two separate studies are discussed in this report. The Brandon Road study took place in May 2014, in the Des Plaines River, in a concrete-walled channel downstream of the Brandon Road Lock and Dam near Joliet, Illinois. The Lemont study took place in June 2014, in a segment of the dolomite setblock-lined Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal near Lemont, Illinois.Two criteria were evaluated to assess the potential deterrence to carp migration, and to minimize the expected effect on nearby structures from discharge of the seismic water gun. The first criterion was a 5-pound-per-square-inch (lb/in2) limit for dynamic underwater pressure variations. The second criterion was a maximum velocity and acceleration disturbance of 0.75 inch per second (in/s) for sensitive machinery (such as the lock gates and pumps) and 2.0 in/s adjacent to canal walls, respectively. The criteria were based on previous studies of fish responses to dynamic pressure variations, and effects of vibrations on the structural integrity of concrete walls.The Brandon Road study evaluated the magnitude and extent of the pressure field created by two water gun configurations in the concrete-walled channel downstream of the lock where channel depths ranged from 11 to 14 feet (ft). Data from a single 80-cubic-inch (in³) water gun set at 6 ft below water surface (bws) produced a roughly cylindrical 5-lb/in2 pressure field 20 ft in radius, oriented vertically, with the radius decreasing to less than 15 ft at the water

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Water Nanodroplets on Silica Surfaces at High Air Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Jaffe, Richard Lawrence; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    Silicon dioxides-water systems are abundant in nature and play fundamental roles in a diversity of novel science and engineering applications. Although extensive research has been devoted to study the nature of the interaction between silica and water a complete understanding of the system has...... e.g., nanobubbles. In the present work we study the role of air on the wetting of hydrophilic systems. We conduct molecular dynamics simulations of a water nanodroplet on an amorphous silica surface at different air pressures. The interaction potentials describing the silica, water, and air...... are obtained from the literature. The silica surface is modeled by a large 32 ⨯ 32 ⨯ 2 nm amorphous SiO2 structure consisting of 180000 atoms. The water consists of 18000 water molecules surrounded by N2 and O2 air molecules corresponding to air pressures of 0 bar (vacuum), 50 bar, 100 bar and 200 bar. We...

  8. Experimental apparatus for measurement of density of supercooled water at high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peukert Pavel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic behavior of supercooled water (metastable fluid water existing transiently below the equilibrium freezing point at high pressures was subject to many recent theoretical studies. Some of them assume that a second critical point of water exists, related to two liquid phases of supercooled water: the low-density liquid and the high-density liquid. To test these theories, an original experimental cryogenic apparatus is being developed. The volume changes are measured optically in custom-treated fused-silica capillary tubes. The capillaries are placed in a metal vessel designed for pressures up to 200 MPa. The vessel is connected to a circulation thermostat enabling a rapid change of temperature to prevent freezing. A new high-vacuum device was developed for degassing of the ultrapure water sample and filling it into the measuring capillaries. The experiments will contribute to fundamental understanding of the anomalous behavior of water and to applications in meteorology, aerospace engineering, cryobiology etc.

  9. Drilling Performance of Rock Drill by High-Pressure Water Jet under Different Configuration Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the rock drilling progress, the resistant force results in tools failure and the low drilling efficiency; thus, it is necessary to reduce the tools failure and enhance the drilling efficiency. In this paper, different configuration modes of drilling performance assisted with water jet are explored based on the mechanism and experiment analysis of rock drilling assisted with water jet. Moreover, the rotary sealing device with high pressure is designed to achieve the axial and rotation movement simultaneously as well as good sealing effect under high-pressure water jet. The results indicate that the NDB and NFB have better effects on drilling performance compared with that of NSB. Moreover, the high-pressure water jet is helpful not only to reduce the drill rod deflection, but also to reduce the probability of drill rod bending and improve the drill rod service life.

  10. Partial discharges and breakdown in SF6 in the pressure range 25-150 kPa in non-uniform background fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, M.; Clemen, M.

    2014-01-01

    The partial discharge (PD) and electric breakdown mechanisms in SF6 at a plug contact in the pressure range 25-150 kPa were investigated at ambient temperature in a plug-plate arrangement. This parameter range has similar particle number densities as in the previous investigation of the dielectric recovery in a high-voltage circuit breaker (Seeger et al 2012 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 395204), where optical access was limited and the relevant parameters of pressure and temperature could only be determined indirectly by computational fluid dynamic simulations. The present investigation did not have these limitations, since the pressure and temperature were well defined. Optical observation by an image intensified high speed camera in combination with a photo multiplier tube allowed an understanding of the various mechanisms for the PDs and breakdown to be gained. The breakdown fields and PD parameters could be well described by a simple leader model in the pressure range 75-150 kPa for negative polarity and above 25 kPa for positive polarity. Discrepancies with the model are observed below 75 kPa for negative polarity and at 25 kPa for positive polarity. This could be explained by a slow, repetitive heating mechanism which has not been reported so far.

  11. Combining leaf physiology, hyperspectral imaging and partial least squares-regression (PLS-R) for grapevine water status assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, Tal; Hochberg, Uri; Shoshany, Maxim; Karnieli, Arnon; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2015-11-01

    Physiological measurements are considered to be the most accurate way of assessing plant water status, but they might also be time-consuming, costly and intrusive. Since visible (VIS)-to-shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging spectrometers are able to monitor various bio-chemical alterations in the leaf, such narrow-band instruments may offer a faster, less expensive and non-destructive alternative. This requires an intelligent downsizing of broad and noisy hyperspectra into the few most physiologically-sensitive wavelengths. In the current study, hyperspectral signatures of water-stressed grapevine leaves (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Cabernet Sauvignon) were correlated to values of midday leaf water potential (Ψl), stomatal conductance (gs) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) under controlled conditions, using the partial least squares-regression (PLS-R) technique. It was found that opposite reflectance trends at 530-550 nm and around 1500 nm - associated with independent changes in photoprotective pigment contents and water availability, respectively - were indicative of stress-induced alterations in Ψl, gs and NPQ. Furthermore, combining the spectral responses at these VIS and SWIR regions yielded three normalized water balance indices (WABIs), which were superior to various widely-used reflectance models in predicting physiological values at both the leaf and canopy levels. The potential of the novel WABI formulations also under field conditions demonstrates their applicability for water status monitoring and irrigation scheduling.

  12. Fatigue crack growth behavior of pressure vessel steels and submerged arc weldments in a high-temperature pressurized water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, P. K.; Logsdon, W. A.; Begley, J. A.

    1989-10-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties of SA508 C1 2a and SA533 Gr A C1 2 pressure vessel steels and the corresponding automatic submerged are weldments were developed in a high-temperature pressurized water (HPW) environment at 288 °C (550°F) and 7.2 MPa (1044 psi) at load ratios of 0.02 and 0.50. The HPW enviromment FCGR properties of these pressure vessel steels and submerged arc weldments were generally conservative, compared with the approrpriate American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section XI water environmental reference curve. The growth rate of fatigue cracks in the base materials, however, was considerably faster in the HPW environment than in a corresponding 288°C (550°F) base line air environment. The growth rate of fatigue cracks in the two submerged are weldments was also accelerated in the HPW environment but to a significantly lesser degree than that demonstrated by the corresponding base materials. In the air environment, fatigue striations were observed, independent of material and load ratio, while in the HPW environment, some intergranular facets were present. The greater environmental effect on crack growth rates displayed by the base materials, as compared with the weldments, was attributed to a different sulfide composition and morphology.

  13. Analysis of the Pressure Rise in a Partially Filled Liquid Tank in Microgravity with Low Wall Heat Flux and Simultaneous Boiling and Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments performed with Freon 113 in the space shuttle have shown that in a pro- cess of very slow heating, high liquid superheats can be sustained for a long period in microgravity. In a closed system explosive vaporization of superheated liquid resulted in pressure spikes of varying magnitudes. In this paper, we analyze the pressure rise in a partially lled closed tank in which a large vapor bubble (i.e., ullage) is initially present, and the liquid is subjected to a low wall heat ux. The liquid layer adjacent to the wall becomes superheated until the temperature for nucleation of the bubbles (or the incipience of boiling) is achieved. In the absence of the gravity-induced convection large quantities of superheated liquid can accumulate over time near the heated surface. Once the incipience temperature is attained, explosive boiling occurs and the vapor bubbles that are produced on the heater surface tend to quickly raise the tank pressure. The liquid-vapor saturation temperature increases as well. These two e ects tend to induce condensation of the large ullage bubble that is initially present, and tends to mitigate the tank pressure rise. As a result, the tank pressure is predicted to rise sharply, attain a maximum, and subsequently decay slowly. The predicted pressure rise is compared with experimental results obtained in the microgravity environments of the space shuttle for Freon 113. The analysis is appli- cable, in general to heating of liquid in closed containers in microgravity and to cryogenic fuel tanks, in particular where small heat leaks into the tank are unavoidable.

  14. Tensile Strength of Water Exposed to Pressure Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2012-01-01

    at an extended water-solid interface by imposing a tensile stress pulse which easily causes cavitation. Next, a compressive pulse of duration ~1 ms and a peak intensity of a few bar is imposed prior to the tensile stress pulse. A dramatic increase of the tensile strength is observed immediately after...... the compressive pulse, but the effect is shortlived. We presume that diffusion of non-condensable gas from the cavitation nuclei into the liquid at compression, and back again later, is responsible for the changes of tensile strength....

  15. Development of a pressurized bipolar alkaline water electrolyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves Junior, Newton Pimenta; Pinto, Edgar A. de Godoi Rodrigues; Silva, Ennio Peres da; Rapelli, Rubia; Pinto, Cristiano da Silva [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DFA/ IFGW/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Gleb Wataghin. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada], Email: nevesjr@unicamp.br; Marin Neto, Antonio Jose; Lopes, Daniel Gabriel; Camargo, Joao Carlos; Ferreira, Paulo F.P. [Hydrogen Technology (HyTron), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Furlan, Andre Luis [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DE/FEC/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports the actual development status of a bipolar alkaline water electrolyzer with maximum production capacity of 1 m3/h of hydrogen and controlled by a PLC (Programmable Logic Controller), which also interfaces the electrolytic system with operators and other equipment, such as gas storage tanks, fuel cells and photovoltaic panels. The project also includes the construction of an electrolysis test bench to record electrical parameters (cathode, anode, separator and electrolyte potentials), the amount of produced gases and gas quality determined by gas chromatography. (author)

  16. Oxygen partial pressure dependence of thermoelectric power factor in polycrystalline n-type SrTiO3: Consequences for long term stability in thermoelectric oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Peter A.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan J.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.

    2017-04-01

    The Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity have been measured as functions of oxygen partial pressure over the range of 10-22 to 10-1 atm at 1173 K for a 10% niobium-doped SrTiO3 ceramic with a grain size comparable to the oxygen diffusion length. Temperature-dependent measurements performed from 320 to 1275 K for as-prepared samples reveal metallic-like conduction and good thermoelectric properties. However, upon exposure to progressively increasing oxygen partial pressure, the thermoelectric power factor decreased over time scales of 24 h, culminating in a three order of magnitude reduction over the entire operating range. Identical measurements on single crystal samples show negligible changes in the power factor so that the instability of ceramic samples is primarily tied to the kinetics of grain boundary diffusion. This work provides a framework for understanding the stability of thermoelectric properties in oxides under different atmospheric conditions. The control of the oxygen atmosphere remains a significant challenge in oxide thermoelectrics.

  17. Capillary pressure-saturation relationships for diluted bitumen and water in gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, S. Zubair; Mumford, Kevin G.

    2017-08-01

    Spills of diluted bitumen (dilbit) to rivers by rail or pipeline accidents can have serious long-term impacts on environment and ecology due to the submergence and trapping of oil within the river bed sediment. The extent of this problem is dictated by the amount of immobile oil available for mass transfer into the water flowing through the sediment pores. An understanding of multiphase (oil and water) flow in the sediment, including oil trapping by hysteretic drainage and imbibition, is important for the development of spill response and risk assessment strategies. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure capillary pressure-saturation (Pc-Sw) relationships for dilbit and water, and air and water in gravel using a custom-made pressure cell. The Pc-Sw relationships obtained using standard procedures in coarse porous media are height-averaged and often require correction. By developing and comparing air-water and dilbit-water Pc-Sw curves, it was found that correction was less important in dilbit-water systems due to the smaller difference in density between the fluids. In both systems, small displacement pressures were needed for the entry of non-wetting fluid in gravel. Approximately 14% of the pore space was occupied by trapped dilbit after imbibition, which can serve as a source of long-term contamination. While air-water data can be scaled to reasonably predict dilbit-water behaviour, it cannot be used to determine the trapped amount.

  18. Indirect desalination of Red Sea water with forward osmosis and low pressure reverse osmosis for water reuse

    KAUST Repository

    Yangali-Quintanilla, Victor

    2011-10-01

    The use of energy still remains the main component of the costs of desalting water. Forward osmosis (FO) can help to reduce the costs of desalination, and extracting water from impaired sources can be beneficial in this regard. Experiments with FO membranes using a secondary wastewater effluent as a feed water and Red Sea water as a draw solution demonstrated that the technology is promising. FO coupled with low pressure reverse osmosis (LPRO) was implemented for indirect desalination. The system consumes only 50% (~1.5 kWh/m3) of the energy used for high pressure seawater RO (SWRO) desalination (2.5-4 kWh/m3), and produces a good quality water extracted from the impaired feed water. Fouling of the FO membranes was not a major issue during long-term experiments over 14 days. After 10 days of continuous FO operation, the initial flux declined by 28%. Cleaning the FO membranes with air scouring and clean water recovered the initial flux by 98.8%. A cost analysis revealed FO per se as viable technology. However, a minimum average FO flux of 10.5 L/m2-h is needed to compete with water reuse using UF-LPRO, and 5.5 L/m2-h is needed to recover and desalinate water at less cost than SWRO. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  19. 78 FR 18629 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Partial Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... the sewer system by September 2016, and implement an improved Storm Water Management Plan for the... Natural Resources Division, and should refer to United States v. Unified Government of Wyandotte County... Resources Division. BILLING CODE 4410-15-P ...

  20. A conceptual model of daily water balance following partial clearing from forest to pasture

    OpenAIRE

    Bari, M. A.; K. R. J. Smettem

    2006-01-01

    A simple conceptual water balance model representing the streamflow generation processes on a daily time step following land use change is presented. The model consists of five stores: (i) Dry, Wet and Subsurface Stores for vertical and lateral water flow, (ii) a transient Stream zone Store (iii) a saturated Goundwater Store. The soil moisture balance in the top soil Dry and Wet Stores are the most important components of the model and characterize the dynamically varying saturated areas resp...

  1. A conceptual model of daily water balance following partial clearing from forest to pasture

    OpenAIRE

    Bari, M. A.; K. R. J. Smettem

    2006-01-01

    International audience; A simple conceptual water balance model representing the streamflow generation processes on a daily time step following land use change is presented. The model consists of five stores: (i) Dry, Wet and Subsurface Stores for vertical and lateral water flow, (ii) a transient Stream zone Store (iii) a saturated Goundwater Store. The soil moisture balance in the top soil Dry and Wet Stores are the most important components of the model and characterize the dynamically vary...

  2. Experimental Study on Peak Pressure of Shock Waves in Quasi-Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxiong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the similarity laws of the explosion, this research develops similarity requirements of the small-scale experiments of underwater explosions and establishes a regression model for peak pressure of underwater shock waves under experimental condition. Small-scale experiments are carried out with two types of media at the bottom of the water and for different water depths. The peak pressure of underwater shock waves at different measuring points is acquired. A formula consistent with the similarity law of explosions is obtained and an analysis of the regression precision of the formula confirms its accuracy. Significance experiment indicates that the influence of distance between measuring points and charge on peak pressure of underwater shock wave is the greatest and that of water depth is the least within the range of geometric parameters. An analysis of data from experiments with different media at the bottom of the water reveals an influence on the peak pressure, as the peak pressure of a shock wave in a body of water with a bottom soft mud and rocks is about 1.33 times that of the case where the bottom material is only soft mud.

  3. Development of Extended Period Pressure-Dependent Demand Water Distribution Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judi, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mcpherson, Timothy N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-20

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has used modeling and simulation of water distribution systems for N-1 contingency analyses to assess criticality of water system assets. Critical components considered in these analyses include pumps, tanks, and supply sources, in addition to critical pipes or aqueducts. A contingency represents the complete removal of the asset from system operation. For each contingency, an extended period simulation (EPS) is run using EPANET. An EPS simulates water system behavior over a time period, typically at least 24 hours. It assesses the ability of a system to respond and recover from asset disruption through distributed storage in tanks throughout the system. Contingencies of concern are identified as those in which some portion of the water system has unmet delivery requirements. A delivery requirement is defined as an aggregation of water demands within a service area, similar to an electric power demand. The metric used to identify areas of unmet delivery requirement in these studies is a pressure threshold of 15 pounds per square inch (psi). This pressure threshold is used because it is below the required pressure for fire protection. Any location in the model with pressure that drops below this threshold at any time during an EPS is considered to have unmet service requirements and is used to determine cascading consequences. The outage area for a contingency is the aggregation of all service areas with a pressure below the threshold at any time during the EPS.

  4. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular hydrogen dissolved in water at pressures up to 200 MPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysow, Jacek; del Rosso, Leonardo; Celli, Milva; Moraldi, Massimo; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2014-04-28

    We have measured the Raman Q-branch of hydrogen in a solution with water at a temperature of about 280 K and at pressures from 20 to 200 MPa. From a least-mean-square fitting analysis of the broad Raman Q-branch, we isolated the contributions from the four lowest individual roto-vibrational lines. The vibrational lines were narrower than the pure rotational Raman lines of hydrogen dissolved in water measured previously, but significantly larger than in the gas. The separations between these lines were found to be significantly smaller than in gaseous hydrogen and their widths were slightly increasing with pressure. The lines were narrowing with increasing rotational quantum number. The Raman frequencies of all roto-vibrational lines were approaching the values of gas phase hydrogen with increasing pressure. Additionally, from the comparison of the integrated intensity signal of Q-branch of hydrogen to the integrated Raman signal of the water bending mode, we have obtained the concentration of hydrogen in a solution with water along the 280 K isotherm. Hydrogen solubility increases slowly with pressure, and no deviation from a smooth behaviour was observed, even reaching thermodynamic conditions very close to the transition to the stable hydrogen hydrate. The analysis of the relative hydrogen concentration in solution on the basis of a simple thermodynamic model has allowed us to obtain the molar volume for the hydrogen gas/water solution. Interestingly, the volume relative to one hydrogen molecule in solution does not decrease with pressure and, at high pressure, is larger than the volume pertinent to one molecule of water. This is in favour of the theory of hydrophobic solvation, for which a larger and more stable structure of the water molecules is expected around a solute molecule.

  5. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular hydrogen dissolved in water at pressures up to 200 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borysow, Jacek, E-mail: jborysow@mtu.edu; Rosso, Leonardo del; Celli, Milva; Ulivi, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.ulivi@isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Moraldi, Massimo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2014-04-28

    We have measured the Raman Q-branch of hydrogen in a solution with water at a temperature of about 280 K and at pressures from 20 to 200 MPa. From a least-mean-square fitting analysis of the broad Raman Q-branch, we isolated the contributions from the four lowest individual roto-vibrational lines. The vibrational lines were narrower than the pure rotational Raman lines of hydrogen dissolved in water measured previously, but significantly larger than in the gas. The separations between these lines were found to be significantly smaller than in gaseous hydrogen and their widths were slightly increasing with pressure. The lines were narrowing with increasing rotational quantum number. The Raman frequencies of all roto-vibrational lines were approaching the values of gas phase hydrogen with increasing pressure. Additionally, from the comparison of the integrated intensity signal of Q-branch of hydrogen to the integrated Raman signal of the water bending mode, we have obtained the concentration of hydrogen in a solution with water along the 280 K isotherm. Hydrogen solubility increases slowly with pressure, and no deviation from a smooth behaviour was observed, even reaching thermodynamic conditions very close to the transition to the stable hydrogen hydrate. The analysis of the relative hydrogen concentration in solution on the basis of a simple thermodynamic model has allowed us to obtain the molar volume for the hydrogen gas/water solution. Interestingly, the volume relative to one hydrogen molecule in solution does not decrease with pressure and, at high pressure, is larger than the volume pertinent to one molecule of water. This is in favour of the theory of hydrophobic solvation, for which a larger and more stable structure of the water molecules is expected around a solute molecule.

  6. On the Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Lean Partially Premixed Combustion, Burning Speed, Flame Instability and Plasma Formation of Alternative Fuels at High Temperatures and Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Omid

    This dissertation investigates the combustion and injection fundamental characteristics of different alternative fuels both experimentally and theoretically. The subjects such as lean partially premixed combustion of methane/hydrogen/air/diluent, methane high pressure direct-injection, thermal plasma formation, thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon/air mixtures at high temperatures, laminar flames and flame morphology of synthetic gas (syngas) and Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) fuels were extensively studied in this work. These subjects will be summarized in three following paragraphs. The fundamentals of spray and partially premixed combustion characteristics of directly injected methane in a constant volume combustion chamber have been experimentally studied. The injected fuel jet generates turbulence in the vessel and forms a turbulent heterogeneous fuel-air mixture in the vessel, similar to that in a Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Direct-Injection (DI) engines. The effect of different characteristics parameters such as spark delay time, stratification ratio, turbulence intensity, fuel injection pressure, chamber pressure, chamber temperature, Exhaust Gas recirculation (EGR) addition, hydrogen addition and equivalence ratio on flame propagation and emission concentrations were analyzed. As a part of this work and for the purpose of control and calibration of high pressure injector, spray development and characteristics including spray tip penetration, spray cone angle and overall equivalence ratio were evaluated under a wide range of fuel injection pressures of 30 to 90 atm and different chamber pressures of 1 to 5 atm. Thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon/air plasma mixtures at ultra-high temperatures must be precisely calculated due to important influence on the flame kernel formation and propagation in combusting flows and spark discharge applications. A new algorithm based on the statistical thermodynamics was developed to calculate the ultra-high temperature plasma

  7. The initiation of boiling during pressure transients. [water boiling on metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, J.; Bussell, G.; Jashnani, I. L.; Hsieh, T.

    1973-01-01

    The initiation of boiling of water on metal surfaces during pressure transients has been investigated. The data were obtained by a new technique in which light beam fluctuations and a pressure signal were simultaneously recorded on a dual beam oscilloscope. The results obtained agreed with those obtained using high speed photography. It was found that, for water temperatures between 90-150 C, the wall superheat required to initiate boiling during a rapid pressure transient was significantly higher than required when the pressure was slowly reduced. This result is explained by assuming that a finite time is necessary for vapor to fill the cavity at which the bubble originates. Experimental measurements of this time are in reasonably good agreement with calculations based on the proposed theory. The theory includes a new procedure for estimating the coefficient of vaporization.

  8. Experimental study of the ecological impact of hot water/high pressure cleaning on rocky shores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menot, L.; Chasse, C.; Kerambrun, L. [CEDRE, Plouzane (France)

    1998-09-01

    The efficiency of high pressure/hot water washing for cleaning oiled rocky shores was determined. The study also highlighted the level of tolerance towards high pressure/hot water of different intertidal biota and proposed some operational recommendations for using this technique in regards with the biota sensitivity range. The study showed that pressure, higher than 170 g/m{sup 2} on the substratum, had the most detrimental effects on intertidal biota. Temperatures between 25 and 53 degrees C had only minor effects. The most sensitive taxa were the foliaceous lichens and the barnacles. Crustose lichens and algae were found to be tolerant to both pressure and temperature. Seaweeds protected the underneath epifauna. 12 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  9. Probabilistic Structural Integrity Analysis of Boiling Water Reactor Pressure Vessel under Low Temperature Overpressure Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsoung-Wei Chou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The probabilistic structural integrity of a Taiwan domestic boiling water reactor pressure vessel has been evaluated by the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. First, the analysis model was built for the beltline region of the reactor pressure vessel considering the plant specific data. Meanwhile, the flaw models which comprehensively simulate all kinds of preexisting flaws along the vessel wall were employed here. The low temperature overpressure transient which has been concluded to be the severest accident for a boiling water reactor pressure vessel was considered as the loading condition. It is indicated that the fracture mostly happens near the fusion-line area of axial welds but with negligible failure risk. The calculated results indicate that the domestic reactor pressure vessel has sufficient structural integrity until doubling of the present end-of-license operation.

  10. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common

  11. Crop yields response to water pressures in the Ebro basin in Spain: risk and water policy implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Quiroga

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing pressure on water systems in the Mediterranean enhances existing water conflicts and threatens water supply for agriculture. In this context, one of the main priorities for agricultural research and public policy is the adaptation of crop yields to water pressures. This paper focuses on the evaluation of hydrological risk and water policy implications for food production. Our methodological approach includes four steps. For the first step, we estimate the impacts of rainfall and irrigation water on crop yields. However, this study is not limited to general crop production functions since it also considers the linkages between those economic and biophysical aspects which may have an important effect on crop productivity. We use statistical models of yield response to address how hydrological variables affect the yield of the main Mediterranean crops in the Ebro river basin. In the second step, this study takes into consideration the effects of those interactions and analyzes gross value added sensitivity to crop production changes. We then use Montecarlo simulations to characterize crop yield risk to water variability. Finally we evaluate some policy scenarios with irrigated area adjustments that could cope in a context of increased water scarcity. A substantial decrease in irrigated land, of up to 30% of total, results in only moderate losses of crop productivity. The response is crop and region specific and may serve to prioritise adaptation strategies.

  12. The effect of magnesium on partial sulphate removal from mine water as gypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2015-08-15

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of magnesium on the removal efficiency of sulphate as gypsum from mine water. The precipitation conditions were simulated with MINEQL + software and the simulation results were compared with the results from laboratory jar test experiments. Both the simulation and the laboratory results showed that magnesium in the mine water was maintaining sulphate in a soluble form as magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) at pH 9.6. Thus magnesium was preventing the removal of sulphate as gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). However, change in the lime precipitation pH from 9.6 to 12.5 resulted in magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2) precipitation and improved sulphate removal. Additionally, magnesium hydroxide could act as seed crystals for gypsum precipitation or co-precipitate sulphate further enhancing the removal of sulphate from mine water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitrogen Removal from Digested Black Water by One-stage Partial Nitritation and Anammox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaeminck, S.E.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the technical feasibility to treat digested black water from vacuum toilets (> 1000 mg NH4+-N L-1) in a lab-scale oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification/denitrification (OLAND) rotating biological contactor. After an adaptation period of 2.5 months, a stable. nitrogen removal...... rate of ca. 700 mg N L-1 d(-1) was reached over the subsequent 5 months. Suppression of the nitrite oxidizing bacteria at free ammonia levels above 3 mg N L-1 resulted in a nitrogen removal efficiency of 76%. The favorable ratios of both organic and inorganic carbon to nitrogen guaranteed endured...... conversion was very low, in contrast to the high specific AnAOB activity. DGGE analysis showed that the dominant AerAOB and AnAOB species were resistant to the transition from synthetic medium to digested black water. This study demonstrates high-rate nitrogen removal from digested black water by one...

  14. Acute and chronic toxicity studies on partially purified hypoglycemic preparation from water extract of bark ofFicus bengalensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Shukla, R; Prabhu, K M; Aggrawal, S; Rusia, U; Murthy, P S

    2002-01-01

    Acute and chronic toxicity studies were conducted to assess toxicity of a partially purified preparation from the water extract of the bark ofFicus bengalensis, which was demonstrated in our earlier studies to have significant hypoglycemic and hypocholesteroiemic effect on alloxan induced, mild and severe diabetes in rabbits. LD(50) of this preparation was found to be ∼1 gm/kg in rats when given orally. For chronic toxicity studies 3 doses of aqueous preparation were given to 3 groups of rats. First group received 5 times ED(50) (50 mg/kg), second group 10 times ED(50) (100 mg/kg) and the third group 15 times ED(50) (150 mg/kg) for 3 months. Fourth group which served as control was given water. After three months, blood was collected for studying biochemical and hematological parameters. Blood glucose, serum cholesterol, liver and kidney function tests, haemoglobin, total and differential leukocyte count were determined. Animals were sacrificed and histopathological examination of liver, heart and kidneys was carried out. Results of the study showed that partially purified preparation fromFicus bengalensis is not toxic by all the above mentioned parameters.

  15. Ultra-high pressure water jetting for coating removal and surface preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Spencer T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper shall examine the basics of water technology with particular attention paid to systems currently in use and some select new applications. By providing an overview of commercially available water jet systems in the context of recent case histories, potential users may evaluate the process for future applications. With the on going introduction of regulations prohibiting the use of chemical paint strippers, manual scrapping and dry abrasive media blasting, the need for an environmentally compliant coating removal process has been mandated. Water jet cleaning has been a traditional part of many industrial processed for year, although it has only been in the last few years that reliable pumping equipment capable of ultra-high pressure operation have become available. With the advent of water jet pumping equipment capable of sustaining pressures in excess of 36,000 psi. there has been shift away from lower pressure, high water volume systems. One of the major factors in driving industry to seek higher pressures is the ability to offer higher productivity rates while lowering the quantity of water used and subsequently reprocessed. Among benefits of the trend toward higher pressure/lower volume systems is the corresponding reduction in water jet reaction forces making hand held water jetting practical and safe. Other unique applications made possible by these new generation pumping systems include the use of alternative fluids including liquid ammonia for specialized and hazardous material removal applications. A review of the equipment used and the required modifications will be presented along with the conclusions reached reached during this test program.

  16. Water Transport with Ultralow Friction through Partially Exfoliated g-C3 N4 Nanosheet Membranes with Self-Supporting Spacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjie; Li, Libo; Wei, Yanying; Xue, Jian; Chen, Huang; Ding, Li; Caro, Jürgen; Wang, Haihui

    2017-07-24

    Two-dimensional (2D) graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) nanosheets show brilliant application potential in numerous fields. Herein, a membrane with artificial nanopores and self-supporting spacers was fabricated by assembly of 2D g-C3 N4 nanosheets in a stack with elaborate structures. In water purification the g-C3 N4 membrane shows a better separation performance than commercial membranes. The g-C3 N4 membrane has a water permeance of 29 L m-2  h-1  bar-1 and a rejection rate of 87 % for 3 nm molecules with a membrane thickness of 160 nm. The artificial nanopores in the g-C3 N4 nanosheets and the spacers between the partially exfoliated g-C3 N4 nanosheets provide nanochannels for water transport while bigger molecules are retained. The self-supported nanochannels in the g-C3 N4 membrane are very stable and rigid enough to resist environmental challenges, such as changes to pH and pressure conditions. Permeation experiments and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that a novel nanofluidics phenomenon takes place, whereby water transport through the g-C3 N4 nanosheet membrane occurs with ultralow friction. The findings provide new understanding of fluidics in nanochannels and illuminate a fabrication method by which rigid nanochannels may be obtained for applications in complex or harsh environments. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Pressurized water extraction of isoflavones by experimental design from soybean flour and Soybean Protein Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moras, Benjamin; Rey, Stéphane; Vilarem, Gérard; Pontalier, Pierre-Yves

    2017-01-01

    A Doehlert experimental design was conducted and surface response methodology was used to determine the effect of temperature, contact time and solid liquid ratio on isoflavone extraction from soybean flour or Soybean Protein Isolate in pressurized water system. The optimal conditions conducted gave an extraction yield of 85% from soybean flour. For Soybean Protein Isolate compared to soybean flour, the isoflavone extraction yield is 61%. This difference could be explained by higher aglycon content, while aglycon appears to be the least extracted isoflavone by pressurized water. The solid liquid ratio in the ASE cell was the overriding factor in obtaining high yields with both soybean products, while temperature has less influence. A high temperature causes conversion of the malonyls-glucosides and glucosides isoflavone derivatives into glucosides or aglycons forms. pressurized water extraction showed a high solubilization of protein material up to 95% of inserted Soybean Protein Isolate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of water availability and pest pressures on tea (Camellia sinensis) growth and functional quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Selena; Orians, Colin M; Griffin, Timothy S; Buckley, Sarabeth; Unachukwu, Uchenna; Stratton, Anne Elise; Stepp, John Richard; Robbat, Albert; Cash, Sean; Kennelly, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    Extreme shifts in water availability linked to global climate change are impacting crops worldwide. The present study examines the direct and interactive effects of water availability and pest pressures on tea (Camellia sinensis; Theaceae) growth and functional quality. Manipulative greenhouse experiments were used to measure the effects of variable water availability and pest pressures simulated by jasmonic acid (JA) on tea leaf growth and secondary metabolites that determine tea quality. Water treatments were simulated to replicate ideal tea growing conditions and extreme precipitation events in tropical southwestern China, a major centre of tea production. Results show that higher water availability and JA significantly increased the growth of new leaves while their interactive effect was not significant. The effect of water availability and JA on tea quality varied with individual secondary metabolites. Higher water availability significantly increased total methylxanthine concentrations of tea leaves but there was no significant effect of JA treatments or the interaction of water and JA. Water availability, JA treatments or their interactive effects had no effect on the concentrations of epigallocatechin 3-gallate. In contrast, increased water availability resulted in significantly lower concentrations of epicatechin 3-gallate but the effect of JA and the interactive effects of water and JA were not significant. Lastly, higher water availability resulted in significantly higher total phenolic concentrations but there was no significant impact of JA and their interaction. These findings point to the fascinating dynamics of climate change effects on tea plants with offsetting interactions between precipitation and pest pressures within agro-ecosystems, and the need for future climate studies to examine interactive biotic and abiotic effects.

  19. [Identification of partially deuterated exometabolites during culture of tea fungi in heavy water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyshenko, V P; Iurkevich, D I

    2000-01-01

    Exometabolites of tea fungus during the cultivation on heavy water were studied by methods of high-resolution proton and deuterium exchange. Is was shown that, depending on the degree of exchange of proton for deuterium in the methyl group of acetate, three isotopomers exist: -CH3, -CH2D, and -CHD2. Ethanol is represented by six isotopomers: -CHD-CH3, -CD2-CH3, -CD2-CH2D, -CD2-CHD2, -CHD-CH2D, and -CHD-CHD2. Relative concentration of these isotopomers and the percent content of deuterium were determined. Based on these data, the kinetics of metabolism of the object cultivated on heavy water was analyzed. It was show that the efficiency of glucose utilization is the same as during cultivation on light water with the exception that the time of utilization is significantly greater. At the same time, the parameters of utilization of ethanol and its conversion into acetic acid in the life activity of the tea fungus in heavy and light water are very similar.

  20. Total dissolved gas, barometric pressure, and water temperature data, lower Columbia River, Oregon and Washington, 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Dwight Q.; Harrison, Howard E.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1996-01-01

    Increased levels of total dissolved gas pressure can cause gas-bubble trauma in fish downstream from dams on the Columbia River. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Geological Survey collected data on total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen pressure at 11 stations on the lower Columbia River from the John Day forebay (river mile 215.6) to Wauna Mill (river mile 41.9) from March to September 1996. Methods of data collection, review, and processing are described in this report. Summaries of daily minimum, maximum, and mean hourly values are presented for total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, and water temperature. Hourly values for these parameters are presented graphically. Dissolved oxygen data are not presented in this report because the quality-control data show that the data have poor precision and high bias. Suggested changes to monitoring procedures for future studies include (1) improved calibration procedures for total dissolved gas and dissolved oxygen to better define accuracy at elevated levels of supersaturation and (2) equipping dissolved oxygen sensors with stirrers because river velocities at the shoreline monitoring stations probably cannot maintain an adequate flow of water across the membrane surface of the dissolved oxygen sensor.

  1. Simulation of Pressure-swing Distillation for Separation of Ethyl Acetate-Ethanol-Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Zhou, Menglin; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Xi; Wu, Gang

    2017-12-01

    In the light of the azeotrope of ethyl acetate-ethanol-water, a process of pressure-swing distillation is proposed. The separation process is simulated by Aspen Plus, and the effects of theoretical stage number, reflux ratio and feed stage about the pressure-swing distillation are optimized. Some better process parameters are as follows: for ethyl acetate refining tower, the pressure is 500.0 kPa, theoretical stage number is 16, reflux ratio is 0.6, feed stage is 5; for crude ethanol tower, the pressure is 101.3 kPa, theoretical stage number is 15, reflux ratio is 0.3, feed stage is 4; for ethanol tower, the pressure is 101.3 kPa, theoretical stage number is 25, reflux ratio is 1.2, feed stage is 10. The mass fraction of ethyl acetate in the bottom of the ethyl acetate refining tower reaches 0.9990, the mass fraction of ethanol in the top of the ethanol tower tower reaches 0.9017, the mass fraction of water in the bottom of the ethanol tower tower reaches 0.9622, and there is also no ethyl acetate in the bottom of the ethanol tower. With laboratory tests, experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation results, which indicates that the separation of ethyl acetate ethanol water can be realized by the pressure-swing distillation separation process. Moreover, it has certain practical significance to industrial practice.

  2. The effects of pulse pressure from seismic water gun technology on Northern Pike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jackson A.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Wilmoth, Siri K.; Wagner, Tristany L.; Shields, Patrick A; Fox, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of sound pressure pulses generated from a water gun for controlling invasive Northern Pike Esox lucius. Pulse pressures from two sizes of water guns were evaluated for their effects on individual fish placed at a predetermined random distance. Fish mortality from a 5,620.8-cm3 water gun (peak pressure source level = 252 dB referenced to 1 μP at 1 m) was assessed every 24 h for 168 h, and damage (intact, hematoma, or rupture) to the gas bladder, kidney, and liver was recorded. The experiment was replicated with a 1,966.4-cm3 water gun (peak pressure source level = 244 dB referenced to 1 μP at 1 m), but fish were euthanized immediately. The peak sound pressure level (SPLpeak), peak-to-peak sound pressure level (SPLp-p), and frequency spectrums were recorded, and the cumulative sound exposure level (SELcum) was subsequently calculated. The SPLpeak, SPLp-p, and SELcum were correlated, and values varied significantly by treatment group for both guns. Mortality increased and organ damage was greater with decreasing distance to the water gun. Mortality (31%) by 168 h was only observed for Northern Pike exhibiting the highest degree of organ damage. Mortality at 72 h and 168 h postexposure was associated with increasing SELcum above 195 dB. The minimum SELcum calculated for gas bladder rupture was 199 dB recorded at 9 m from the 5,620.8-cm3 water gun and 194 dB recorded at 6 m from the 1,966.4-cm3water gun. Among Northern Pike that were exposed to the large water gun, 100% of fish exposed at 3 and 6 m had ruptured gas bladders, and 86% exposed at 9 m had ruptured gas bladders. Among fish that were exposed to pulse pressures from the smaller water gun, 78% exhibited gas bladder rupture. Results from these initial controlled experiments underscore the potential of water guns as a tool for controlling Northern Pike.

  3. Pressure of drinking water network on the Meyrin site to be boosted

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    In the framework of the refurbishment of CERN's drinking water supply system, the final part of the network on the Meyrin site is to be connected to the pumping station operated by Services Industriels de Genève, bringing about a significant increase in the network pressure of up to 5 bar. This means that from January 2005 onwards, the water pressure in buildings will be increased from 2 - 4 bar to 7 - 9 bar. The TS Department will be checking and upgrading the drinking water supply equipment in toilets and washrooms. All users with devices connected to the water supply system are kindly requested to check that these are compatible with the new pressure levels. More information on the buildings affected, the new pressure levels and the dates on which the changes will come into effect can be found at: https://edms.cern.ch/document/525717/1 Should any equipment under your responsibility be incompatible with the future pressure levels, please contact the Technical Control Room on 72201.

  4. Managing risks from virus intrusion into water distribution systems due to pressure transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; LeChevallier, Mark W; Teunis, Peter F M; Xu, Minhua

    2011-06-01

    Low or negative pressure transients in water distribution systems, caused by unexpected events (e.g. power outages) or routine operation/maintenance activities, are usually brief and thus are rarely monitored or alarmed. Previous studies have shown connections between negative pressure events in water distribution systems and potential public health consequences. Using a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) model previously developed, various factors driving the risk of viral infection from intrusion were evaluated, including virus concentrations external to the distribution system, maintenance of a disinfectant residual, leak orifice sizes, the duration and the number of nodes drawing negative pressures. The most sensitive factors were the duration and the number of nodes drawing negative pressures, indicating that mitigation practices should be targeted to alleviate the severity of low/negative pressure transients. Maintaining a free chlorine residual of 0.2 mg/L or above is the last defense against the risk of viral infection due to negative pressure transients. Maintaining a chloramine residual did not appear to significantly reduce the risk. The effectiveness of ensuring separation distances from sewer mains to reduce the risk of infection may be system-specific. Leak detection/repair and cross-connection control should be prioritized in areas vulnerable to negative pressure transients.

  5. Franco-German nuclear cooperation: from the `common product` to the first European pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignon, D. [Societe Franco-Americaine de Constructions Atomiques (FRAMATOME), 92 - Paris-la-Defense (France)

    1999-01-01

    It has now been 10 years since Framatome and Siemens decided to collaborate on the design and sales of an advanced nuclear power plant (NPP) model based on pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Originally called the `common product`, this model was renamed the European pressurized water reactor when Electricite de France (EDF) and the German electric utilities joined this cooperative development effort in 1992. Since the beginning, this cooperation has been formalized in the framework of an agreement that led to the founding of a joint and equally owned subsidiary, Nucler Power International (NPI), which is reponsible for leading the development of the new model and later handling its export sales.

  6. Methodology for Calculation of Pressure Impulse Distribution at Gas-Impulse Regeneration of Water Well Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ivashechkin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a mathematical model for process of pressure impulse distribution in a water well which appear as a result of underwater gas explosions in cylindrical and spherical explosive chambers with elastic shells and in a rigid cylindrical chamber which is open from the bottom. The proposed calculation methodology developed on the basis of the mathematical model makes it possible to determine pressure in the impulse on a filter wall and at any point of a water well pre-filter zone. 

  7. The analysis of energy efficiency in water electrolysis under high temperature and high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourng, L. W.; Tsai, T. T.; Lin, M. Y.

    2017-11-01

    This paper aims to analyze the energy efficiency of water electrolysis under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on four different kinds of reaction mechanisms, namely, reversible voltage, activation polarization, ohmic polarization, and concentration polarization, are investigated in details. Results show that the ohmic and concentration over-potentials are increased as temperature is increased, however, the reversible and activation over-potentials are decreased as temperature is increased. Therefore, the net efficiency is enhanced as temperature is increased. The efficiency of water electrolysis at 350°C/100 bars is increased about 17%, compared with that at 80°C/1bar.

  8. Energetic behavior of the pure silica ITQ-12 (ITW) zeolite under high pressure water intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khay, Ismail; Tzanis, Lydie; Daou, T Jean; Nouali, Habiba; Ryzhikov, Andrey; Patarin, Joël

    2013-12-14

    Experimental water intrusion-extrusion isotherms were obtained at room temperature on pure silica ITW-type zeolites (ITQ-12 zeosil). The water intrusion is obtained by applying a high hydraulic pressure corresponding to the intrusion step. When the pressure is released, the water extrusion occurs at a similar pressure to that of the intrusion one. Therefore, the "ITW zeosil-water" system behaves like a spring and the phenomenon is reproducible over several cycles. Several characterization techniques have been performed before and after water intrusion-extrusion experiments in order to reveal the presence or the lack of defects after such experiments. Structural modifications at the long range order cannot be observed by XRD analysis after three water intrusion-extrusion cycles. However, solid state NMR spectroscopy provides evidence of the presence of Q3 groups revealing the breaking of some siloxane bridges after the intrusion step. The "ITW zeosil-water" system can restore 100% of the stored energy corresponding to about 8 J g(-1).

  9. Roll-to-roll processed polymer tandem solar cells partially processed from water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod; Andersen, Thomas Rieks; Andreasen, Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    Large area polymer tandem solar cells completely processed using roll-to-roll (R2R) coating and printing techniques are demonstrated. A stable tandem structure was achieved by the use of orthogonal ink solvents for the coating of all layers, including both active layers. Processing solvents...... included water, alcohols and chlorobenzene. Open-circuit voltages close to the expected sum of sub cell voltages were achieved, while the overall efficiency of the tandem cells was found to be limited by the low yielding back cell, which was processed from water based ink. Many of the challenges associated...... with upscaling the multilayer tandem cells were identified giving valuable information for future experiments and development....

  10. Performance of Partially-Hydrolyzed Polyacrylamide in Water Based Drilling Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Nasiri*

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluid properties with constant improvement in efficiency have been noticeable as important criteria in drilling operation. The main drilling fluid properties highly depend on utilization of new polymers with high efficiency in drilling fluid composition. In this paper, the performance of a new polymer, called partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide polymer (PHPA, is studied which has recently entered the drilling fluids industry in Iran. Hence viscosity property, fluid loss control and shale inhibition of this polymer have been evaluated based on an international standard method of API-13-I by considering the drilling and operational priorities of thecountry. Then the thermal effect, salt contaminants such as sodium chloride, calcium chloride, magnesium chloride and pH tolerance effect as major pollution indicators are also investigated in relation to polymeric fluid properties. The results obtained by the tests show that furthermore polymer PHPA increases rheological properties (apparent viscosity, plastic fluidity and yield point and it plays important role in increases in fluid loss. This polymer has also demonstrated acceptable resistance toward sodium chloride contaminants, but its efficiency decreases toward calcium and magnesium ion contaminants. The thermal tests show that polymer PHPA has high thermal stability up to 150°C. This polymer improves shale inhibition property and by encapsulation mechanism prevents dispersion of shale cuttings into the drilling fluid system as it stops any changes in fluid properties which will finally results inwellbore stability.

  11. Durable Suit Bladder with Improved Water Permeability for Pressure and Environment Suits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant C.; Kuznetz, Larry; Orndoff, Evelyne; Tang, Henry; Aitchison, Lindsay; Ross, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Water vapor permeability is shown to be useful in rejecting heat and managing moisture accumulation in launch-and-entry pressure suits. Currently this is accomplished through a porous Gortex layer in the Advanced Crew and Escape Suit (ACES) and in the baseline design of the Constellation Suit System Element (CSSE) Suit 1. Non-porous dense monolithic membranes (DMM) that are available offer potential improvements for water vapor permeability with reduced gas leak. Accordingly, three different pressure bladder materials were investigated for water vapor permeability and oxygen leak: ElasthaneTM 80A (thermoplastic polyether urethane) provided from stock polymer material and two custom thermoplastic polyether urethanes. Water vapor, carbon dioxide and oxygen permeability of the DMM's was measured in a 0.13 mm thick stand-alone layer, a 0.08 mm and 0.05 mm thick layer each bonded to two different nylon and polyester woven reinforcing materials. Additional water vapor permeability and mechanical compression measurements were made with the reinforced 0.05 mm thick layers, further bonded with a polyester wicking and overlaid with moistened polyester fleece thermal underwear .This simulated the pressure from a supine crew person. The 0.05 mm thick nylon reinforced sample with polyester wicking layer was further mechanically tested for wear and abrasion. Concepts for incorporating these materials in launch/entry and Extravehicular Activity pressure suits are presented.

  12. Analysis of a Partial MOX Core Design with Tritium Targets for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anistratov, Dmitriy Y. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Adams, Marvin L. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1998-04-19

    This report constitutes tangible and verifiable deliverable associated with the task To study the effects of using WG MOX fuel in tritium-producing LWR” of the subproject Water Reactor Options for Disposition of Plutonium. The principal investigators of this subproject are Naeem M. Abdurrahman of the University of Texas at Austin and Marvin L. Adams of Texas A&M University. This work was sponsored by the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium.

  13. A conceptual model of daily water balance following partial clearing from forest to pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple conceptual water balance model representing the streamflow generation processes on a daily time step following land use change is presented. The model consists of five stores: (i Dry, Wet and Subsurface Stores for vertical and lateral water flow, (ii a transient Stream zone Store (iii a saturated Goundwater Store. The soil moisture balance in the top soil Dry and Wet Stores are the most important components of the model and characterize the dynamically varying saturated areas responsible for surface runoff, interflow and deep percolation. The Subsurface Store describes the unsaturated soil moisture balance, extraction of percolated water by vegetation and groundwater recharge. The Groundwater Store controls the baseflow to stream (if any and the groundwater contribution to the stream zone saturated areas. The daily model was developed following a downward approach by analysing data from Ernies (control and Lemon (53% cleared catchments in Western Australia and elaborating a monthly model. The daily model performed very well in simulating daily flow generation processes for both catchments. Most of the model parameters were incorporated a priori from catchment attributes such as surface slope, soil depth, porosity, stream length and initial groundwater depth, and some were calibrated by matching the observed and predicted hydrographs. The predicted groundwater depth, and streamflow volumes across all time steps from daily to monthly to annual were in close agreement with observations for both catchments.

  14. Partial Molar Volumes of Aqua Ions from First Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, Julia; Bruneval, Fabien; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2017-08-08

    Partial molar volumes of ions in water solution are calculated through pressures obtained from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The correct definition of pressure in charged systems subject to periodic boundary conditions requires access to the variation of the electrostatic potential upon a change of volume. We develop a scheme for calculating such a variation in liquid systems by setting up an interface between regions of different density. This also allows us to determine the absolute deformation potentials for the band edges of liquid water. With the properly defined pressures, we obtain partial molar volumes of a series of aqua ions in very good agreement with experimental values.

  15. Habitual Coffee Consumption Does Not Correlate with Blood Pressure, Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction but Partially Correlates with Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erizal Sugiono

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coffee is the most widely consumed beverage in the world and has been known to have effects on cardiovascular system. Many researchers have examined the effects of coffee consumption on blood pressure (BP and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD, but their results were inconsistent and still remain a subject of controversy. Oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction have been known as risk factors of hypertension and CVD. Those factors are also known to be affected by coffee consumption. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the effects of habitual coffee consumption on BP and to examine the role of oxidative stress (F2 isoprostane, inflammation (high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP and endothelial dysfunction (asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study in which 47 healthy, non-smoking men aged 30-60 years with varying coffee-drinking habits were enrolled. BP and blood/urine analysis of biomarkers were measured in the morning before activity. Coffee consumption was assessed using a questionnaire. The differences among variables were analyzed using ANOVA and the correlations between variables were analyzed using Kendall’s Tau correlation analysis. RESULTS: Habitual coffee consumption did not correlate with systolic/diastolic BP (r=-0.02; p=0.856 and r=0.15; p=0.230, respectively. Concentrations of ADMA and hsCRP were also not correlated with coffee consumption (r=0.03; p=0.764 and r=0.04; p=0.701, respectively. Coffee consumption only showed significant correlation with F2 isoprostane (r=0.34; p=0.004. CONCLUSIONS: BP was not affected by coffee consumption although coffee consumption has a significant correlation with F2 isoprostane. These findings suggest that correlation between coffee consumption and BP might be explained by other factors that were not included in this study. KEYWORDS: coffee, caffeine, cardiovascular disease, blood pressure, oxidative

  16. Monitoring Process Water Quality Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Partial Least Squares Regression with Prediction Uncertainty Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skou, Peter B; Berg, Thilo A; Aunsbjerg, Stina D; Thaysen, Dorrit; Rasmussen, Morten A; van den Berg, Frans

    2017-03-01

    Reuse of process water in dairy ingredient production-and food processing in general-opens the possibility for sustainable water regimes. Membrane filtration processes are an attractive source of process water recovery since the technology is already utilized in the dairy industry and its use is expected to grow considerably. At Arla Foods Ingredients (AFI), permeate from a reverse osmosis polisher filtration unit is sought to be reused as process water, replacing the intake of potable water. However, as for all dairy and food producers, the process water quality must be monitored continuously to ensure food safety. In the present investigation we found urea to be the main organic compound, which potentially could represent a microbiological risk. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in combination with multivariate modeling has a long-standing reputation as a real-time measurement technology in quality assurance. Urea was quantified Using NIRS and partial least squares regression (PLS) in the concentration range 50-200 ppm (RMSEP = 12 ppm, R(2 )= 0.88) in laboratory settings with potential for on-line application. A drawback of using NIRS together with PLS is that uncertainty estimates are seldom reported but essential to establishing real-time risk assessment. In a multivariate regression setting, sample-specific prediction errors are needed, which complicates the uncertainty estimation. We give a straightforward strategy for implementing an already developed, but seldom used, method for estimating sample-specific prediction uncertainty. We also suggest an improvement. Comparing independent reference analyses with the sample-specific prediction error estimates showed that the method worked on industrial samples when the model was appropriate and unbiased, and was simple to implement.

  17. Water surface elevations recorded by submerged pressure transducers along the upper Willamette River, Oregon, Spring, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Greg D.; Wellman, Roy E.; Mangano, Joseph F.

    2017-01-01

    Water-surface elevations were recorded by submerged pressure transducers in Spring, 2015 along the upper Willamette River, Oregon, between Eugene and Corvallis. The water-surface elevations were surveyed by using a real-time kinematic global positioning system (RTK-GPS) at each pressure sensor location. These water-surface elevations were logged over a small range of discharges, from 4,600 cubic feet per second to 10,800 cubic feet per second at Harrisburg, OR. These datasets were collected for equipment calibration and validation for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission. This is one of multiple datasets that will be released for this effort.

  18. Room Temperature Optical Constants and Band Gap Evolution of Phase Pure M1-VO2 Thin Films Deposited at Different Oxygen Partial Pressures by Reactive Magnetron Sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopic ellipsometry study was employed for phase pure VO2(M1 thin films grown at different oxygen partial pressures by reactive magnetron sputtering. The optical constants of the VO2(M1 thin films have been determined in a photon energy range between 0.73 and 5.05 eV. The near-infrared extinction coefficient and optical conductivity of VO2(M1 thin films rapidly increase with decreasing O2-Ar ratios. Moreover, two electronic transitions can be uniquely assigned. The energy gaps correlated with absorption edge (E1 at varied O2-Ar ratios are almost the same (~2.0 eV; consequently, the absorption edge is not significantly changed. However, the optical band gap corresponding to semiconductor-to-metal phase transition (E2 decreases from 0.53 to 0.18 eV with decreasing O2-Ar ratios.

  19. MFI and FAU-Type Zeolites as Trapping Materials for Light Hydrocarbons Emission Control at Low Partial Pressure and High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortunato Migliardini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of light hydrocarbons (C2–C5 olefins and paraffins, toluene on HZSM-5, silicalite, and HY was studied for application in treatment of exhaust streams of the petrochemical industry and of vehicles under cold start conditions. At this aim the trapping capability was evaluated on hydrated zeolites by breakthrough curves at low hydrocarbon partial pressure (0-1 kPa, in the temperature range 298–523 K and at space velocity of 30000 h−1. The basic adsorption properties of materials were also verified for three selected hydrocarbons (ethylene, isobutene, and toluene by equilibrium isotherms on dehydrated zeolites at 298 K. The role of physicochemical characteristics of adsorbent materials was discussed in relation with their trapping capability of different types of hydrocarbons.

  20. Fabrication of lead-free piezoelectric Li2CO3-added (Ba,Ca)(Ti,Sn)O3 ceramics under controlled low oxygen partial pressure and their properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noritake, Kouta; Sakamoto, Wataru; Yuitoo, Isamu; Takeuchi, Teruaki; Hayashi, Koichiro; Yogo, Toshinobu

    2018-02-01

    Reduction-resistant lead-free (Ba,Ca)(Ti,Sn)O3 piezoceramics with high piezoelectric constants were fabricated by optimizing the amount of Li2CO3 added. Oxygen partial pressure was controlled during the sintering of (Ba,Ca)(Ti,Sn)O3 ceramics in a reducing atmosphere using H2–CO2 gas. Enhanced grain growth and a high-polarization state after poling treatment were achieved by adding Li2CO3. Optimizing the amount of Li2CO3 added to (Ba0.95Ca0.05)(Ti0.95Sn0.05)O3 ceramics sintered under a low oxygen partial pressure resulted in improved piezoelectric properties while maintaining the high sintered density. The prepared Li2CO3-added ceramic samples had homogeneous microstructures with a uniform dispersion of each major constituent element. However, the residual Li content in the 3 mol % Li2CO3-added (Ba0.95Ca0.05)(Ti0.95Sn0.05)O3 ceramics after sintering was less than 0.3 mol %. Sintered bodies of this ceramic prepared in a CO2 (1.5%)–H2 (0.3%)/Ar reducing atmosphere (PO2 = 10‑8 atm at 1350 °C), exhibited sufficient electrical resistivity and a piezoelectric constant (d 33) exceeding 500 pC/N. The piezoelectric properties of this nonreducible ceramic were comparable or superior to those of the same ceramic sintered in air.

  1. Negative Pressures and the First Water Siphon Taller than 10.33 Meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Francisco; Rivera, Rodrigo; Romero-Maltrana, Diego; Villanueva, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    A siphon is a device that is used to drain a container, with water rising inside a hose in the form of an inverted U and then going down towards a discharge point placed below the initial water level. The siphon is the first of a number of inventions of the ancients documented about 2.000 years ago by Hero of Alexandria in his treatise Pneumatics, and although the explanation given by Hero was essentially correct, there is nowadays a controversy about the underlying mechanism that explains the working of this device. Discussions concerning the physics of a siphon usually refer to concepts like absolute negative pressures, the strength of liquid's cohesion and the possibility of a siphon working in vacuum or in the presence of bubbles. Torricelli understood the working principle of the barometer and the impossibility of pumping water out of wells deeper than 10.33 m. Following Torricelli's ideas it would also not be possible to build a siphon that drives pure water to ascend higher than 10.33 m. In this work, we report the first siphon that drives water (with surfactant) to ascend higher than the Torricellian limit. Motivated by the rising of sap in trees, we built a 15.4 m siphon that shows that absolute negative pressures are not prohibited, that cohesion plays an important role in transmitting forces through a fluid, and that surfactants can help to the transport of water in a metastable regime of negative pressures.

  2. Negative Pressures and the First Water Siphon Taller than 10.33 Meters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Vera

    Full Text Available A siphon is a device that is used to drain a container, with water rising inside a hose in the form of an inverted U and then going down towards a discharge point placed below the initial water level. The siphon is the first of a number of inventions of the ancients documented about 2.000 years ago by Hero of Alexandria in his treatise Pneumatics, and although the explanation given by Hero was essentially correct, there is nowadays a controversy about the underlying mechanism that explains the working of this device. Discussions concerning the physics of a siphon usually refer to concepts like absolute negative pressures, the strength of liquid's cohesion and the possibility of a siphon working in vacuum or in the presence of bubbles. Torricelli understood the working principle of the barometer and the impossibility of pumping water out of wells deeper than 10.33 m. Following Torricelli's ideas it would also not be possible to build a siphon that drives pure water to ascend higher than 10.33 m. In this work, we report the first siphon that drives water (with surfactant to ascend higher than the Torricellian limit. Motivated by the rising of sap in trees, we built a 15.4 m siphon that shows that absolute negative pressures are not prohibited, that cohesion plays an important role in transmitting forces through a fluid, and that surfactants can help to the transport of water in a metastable regime of negative pressures.

  3. BALANCE OF WATER AND ENERGY FOR EUCALYPTUS PLANTATIONS WITH PARTIAL SOIL COVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Gonçalves dos Reis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509813329Eucalyptus plots with initial development ages presented discontinuity in soil cover, resulting in greaterexposure of the leaves to wind and solar radiation, which alters soil-plant-atmosphere interactions. Theobjective of this study was to study the components of the water and energy balances along the first yearof eucalyptus development in the Brazilian coastal plain region. The experimental site is located in anarea belonging to the company Fibria in the municipality of Aracruz, Espírito Santo state, Brazil. Thespace between the planted eucalyptus trees in the area studied was 3 x 3 m and the data of planting wason August 15th , 2004. The period of study lasted from the planting date until the plot reached an ageof 19 months. It was verified that there was a greater availability of energy during the summer and theprecipitation directly influenced the energy balance where during the period of study the energy available necessary for evapotranspiration was always greater than the fraction necessary for heating the soil-plantatmospheresystem, presenting a λE/Rn ratio of 59.57%. It was also observed that the water balance with themodeled evapotranspiration showed a good correspondence with the observed moisture content, presentinga determination coefficient of 0,94. In the majority of trees, greater indices of leaf and root system areasfavored evapotranspiration, indicating that most energy available was utilized for changing the phase ofwater

  4. Low-pressure membrane integrity tests for drinking water treatment: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H; Wyart, Y; Perot, J; Nauleau, F; Moulin, P

    2010-01-01

    Low-pressure membrane systems, including microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes, are being increasingly used in drinking water treatments due to their high level of pathogen removal. However, the pathogen will pass through the membrane and contaminate the product if the membrane integrity is compromised. Therefore, an effective on-line integrity monitoring method for MF and UF membrane systems is essential to guarantee the regulatory requirements for pathogen removal. A lot of works on low-pressure membrane integrity tests have been conducted by many researchers. This paper provides a literature review about different low-pressure membrane integrity monitoring methods for the drinking water treatment, including direct methods (pressure-based tests, acoustic sensor test, liquid porosimetry, etc.) and indirect methods (particle counting, particle monitoring, turbidity monitoring, surrogate challenge tests). Additionally, some information about the operation of membrane integrity tests is presented here. It can be realized from this review that it remains urgent to develop an alternative on-line detection technique for a quick, accurate, simple, continuous and relatively inexpensive evaluation of low-pressure membrane integrity. To better satisfy regulatory requirements for drinking water treatments, the characteristic of this ideal membrane integrity test is proposed at the end of this paper.

  5. Water cycle and its management for plant habitats at reduced pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and mathematical models were developed for describing and testing temperature and humidity parameters for plant production in bioregenerative life support systems. A factor was included for analyzing systems operating at low (10-101.3 kPa) pressure to reduce gas leakage and structural mass (e.g., inflatable greenhouses for space application). The expected close relationship between temperature and relative humidity was observed, along with the importance of heat exchanger coil temperature and air circulation rate. The presence of plants in closed habitats results in increased water flux through the system. Changes in pressure affect gas diffusion rates and surface boundary layers, and change convective transfer capabilities and water evaporation rates. A consistent observation from studies with plants at reduced pressures is increased evapotranspiration rates, even at constant vapor pressure deficits. This suggests that plant water status is a critical factor for managing low-pressure production systems. The approach suggested should help space mission planners design artificial environments in closed habitats.

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Coastal Waters of Florida, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and others from 2012-02-15 to 2012-08-27 (NODC Accession 0109926)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0109926 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Coastal Waters of...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING CoastalMS_88W_30N in the Coastal Waters of Louisiana and Gulf of Mexico from 2009-05-12 to 2014-05-03 (NODC Accession 0100068)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0100068 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING CoastalMS_88W_30N in the Coastal Waters of Louisiana...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Dabob_122W_478N in the Coastal Waters of Southeast Alaska and British Columbia from 2011-06-10 to 2016-01-13 (NODC Accession 0116715)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0116715 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from Dabob_122W_478N in the Coastal Waters of Southeast Alaska and...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from WEATHERBIRD II in the Coastal Waters of Florida and Gulf of Mexico from 2008-08-11 to 2011-06-30 (NCEI Accession 0144622)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144622 includes Surface underway data collected from WEATHERBIRD II in the Coastal Waters of Florida and Gulf of Mexico from 2008-08-11 to...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, pH, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING_CHEECA_80W_25N in the Coastal Waters of Florida, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and North Atlantic Ocean from 2011-12-07 to 2015-03-22 (NCEI Accession 0157417)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157417 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING_CHEECA_80W_25N in the Coastal Waters of Florida,...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING_TWANOH_123W_47N in the Coastal Waters of Southeast Alaska and British Columbia from 2009-08-22 to 2015-07-02 (NCEI Accession 0157600)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157600 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING_TWANOH_123W_47N in the Coastal Waters of Southeast...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING_SOUTHEAST_AK_56N_134W in the Coastal Waters of Southeast Alaska and British Columbia from 2013-03-29 to 2016-02-03 (NCEI Accession 0157601)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157601 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING_SOUTHEAST_AK_56N_134W in the Coastal Waters of...

  13. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Coastal Waters of Southeast Alaska and British Columbia, Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary and others from 2016-01-05 to 2016-07-07 (NCEI Accession 0157306)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157306 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Coastal Waters of...

  14. Sustainability Assessment and Identification of Determinants in Community-Based Water Supply Projects using Partial Least Squares Path Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir H. Ibrahim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the current paper, the sustainability of community-based water supply projects in four different states in Sudan was assessed using a set of multidimensional indicators. A sustainability index was developed using a set of sustainability criteria including technical, reliability/risk, social, organisational, financial as well as sustainability. Basic sustainability criteria were selected based on literature review and stakeholders discussion. For each criterion a set of observable indicators was identified, in total 23 indicators were identified. Furthermore, a detailed statistical analysis and model development was carried out to identify main sustainability determinants for community-based water supply projects in Sudan. Partial least squares-path modelling was used to determine and quantify relationships between the sustainability criteria. The results showed that although all analyzed projects were relatively young projects (1 to 4 years, all projects showed low sustainability performance. This was mainly due to organizational as well as financial aspects, which also was confirmed by path modeling analysis, the sustainability of community-based water supply projects was directly related to organizational aspects, but indirectly related to financial issues. There is a need to give more attention to the communities’ organizational and financial abilities and to leverage their ability through governmental and/or non-governmental organization support especially after project implementation phase.

  15. Biodegradation of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide by bacteria isolated from production water after polymer flooding in an oil field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao Mutai, E-mail: mtbao@ouc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Chen Qingguo; Li Yiming [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Jiang Guancheng [College of Petroleum Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) in production water after polymer flooding in oil filed causes environmental problems, such as increases the difficulty in oil-water separation, degrades naturally to produce toxic acrylamide and endanger local ecosystem. Biodegradation of HPAM may be an efficient way to solve these problems. The biodegradability of HPAM in an aerobic environment was studied. Two HPAM-degrading bacterial strains, named PM-2 and PM-3, were isolated from the produced water of polymer flooding. They were subsequently identified as Bacillus cereus and Bacillus sp., respectively. The utilization of HPAM by the two strains was explored. The amide group of HPAM could serve as a nitrogen source for the two microorganisms, the carbon backbone of these polymers could be partly utilized by microorganisms. The HPAM samples before and after bacterial biodegradation were analyzed by the infrared spectrum, high performance liquid chromatography and scanning electronic microscope. The results indicated that the amide group of HPAM in the biodegradation products had been converted to a carboxyl group, and no acrylamide monomer was found. The HPAM carbon backbone was metabolized by the bacteria during the course of its growth. Further more, the hypothesis about the biodegradation of HPAM in aerobic bacterial culture is proposed.

  16. Biodegradation of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide by bacteria isolated from production water after polymer flooding in an oil field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Mutai; Chen, Qingguo; Li, Yiming; Jiang, Guancheng

    2010-12-15

    Partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) in production water after polymer flooding in oil filed causes environmental problems, such as increases the difficulty in oil-water separation, degrades naturally to produce toxic acrylamide and endanger local ecosystem. Biodegradation of HPAM may be an efficient way to solve these problems. The biodegradability of HPAM in an aerobic environment was studied. Two HPAM-degrading bacterial strains, named PM-2 and PM-3, were isolated from the produced water of polymer flooding. They were subsequently identified as Bacillus cereus and Bacillus sp., respectively. The utilization of HPAM by the two strains was explored. The amide group of HPAM could serve as a nitrogen source for the two microorganisms, the carbon backbone of these polymers could be partly utilized by microorganisms. The HPAM samples before and after bacterial biodegradation were analyzed by the infrared spectrum, high performance liquid chromatography and scanning electronic microscope. The results indicated that the amide group of HPAM in the biodegradation products had been converted to a carboxyl group, and no acrylamide monomer was found. The HPAM carbon backbone was metabolized by the bacteria during the course of its growth. Further more, the hypothesis about the biodegradation of HPAM in aerobic bacterial culture is proposed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermally induced gelling of oil-in-water emulsions comprising partially crystallized droplets: the impact of interfacial crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thivilliers, Florence; Laurichesse, Eric; Saadaoui, Hassan; Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Schmitt, Véronique

    2008-12-02

    We produced triglyceride-in-water emulsions comprising partially crystallized droplets, stabilized by a mixture of protein and low molecular weight surfactant. The emulsions were emulsified in the melted state of the oil phase and stored at low temperature (4 degrees C) right after fabrication to induce oil crystallization. The systems were then warmed to room temperature for a short period of time and cooled again to 4 degrees C. Owing to this treatment referred to as temperature cycling or "tempering", the initially fluid emulsions turned into hard gels. We followed the bulk rheological properties of the materials during and after tempering. The storage modulus, G', exhibited a dramatic increase when tempering was applied. We showed that the systems evolved following two distinct regimes that depend on the average droplet size and on the surfactant-to-protein molar ratio. Gelling may involve partial coalescence of the droplets, i.e., film rupturing with no further shape relaxation because of the solid nature of the droplets. Alternatively, gelling may occur without film rupturing, and is reminiscent of a jamming transition induced by surface roughness. We discussed the origin of these two mechanisms in terms of the properties (size and protuberance) of the interfacial oil crystals.

  18. Formation of genotoxic compounds by medium pressure ultra violet treatment of nitrate rich water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martijn, A.J.; Boersma, M.G.; Vervoort, Jacques; Rietjens, I.; Kruithof, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Genotoxic compounds were produced by full-scale medium pressure (MP) ultraviolet hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2) treatment of nitrate-rich pretreated surface water. It was hypothesized that this formation was caused by the reaction of nitrate photolysis intermediates with natural organic matter (NOM).

  19. Creep and stick-slip in subglacial granular beds forced by variations in water pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David Lundbek; Beem, Lucas H.

    of grain and fluid dynamics to show that rapid rearrangements of load-bearing force chains within the granular sediments drive mechanical transitions between stability and failure. Cyclic variations in driving stresses or pore-water pressure give rise to strain-rate dependent creeping motion at stress...

  20. An investigation of rock fall and pore water pressure using LIDAR in Highway 63 rock cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this research work is compare LIDAR scanning measurements of rock fall with the natural changes in groundwater level to determining the effect of water pressures (levels) on rock fall. To collect the information of rock cut volume chan...

  1. 77 FR 23513 - Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... COMMISSION Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water... Management Criteria for PWR Reactor Vessel Internal Components.'' The original notice provided the ADAMS... published a notice requesting public comments on draft LR-ISG-2011-04, ``Updated Aging Management Criteria...

  2. 77 FR 16270 - Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... COMMISSION Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water... license renewal interim staff guidance (LR-ISG), LR-ISG-2011-04, ``Updated Aging Management Criteria for... Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report for the aging management of stainless steel structures and...

  3. Low pressure water vapour plasma treatment of surfaces for biomolecules decontamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fumagalli, F; Kylian, O; Amato, Letizia

    2012-01-01

    Decontamination treatments of surfaces are performed on bacterial spores, albumin and brain homogenate used as models of biological contaminations in a low-pressure, inductively coupled plasma reactor operated with water-vapour-based gas mixtures. It is shown that removal of contamination can...... vapour plasma process are discussed for practical applications in medical devices decontamination....

  4. An improved film evaporation correlation for saline water at sub-atmospheric pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Shahzada, Muhammad Wakil

    2011-10-03

    This paper presents an investigation of heat transfer correlation in a falling-film evaporator working with saline water at sub-atmospheric pressures. The experiments are conducted at different salinity levels ranging from 15000 to 90000 ppm, and the pressures were maintained between 0.92 to 2.81 kPa (corresponds to saturation temperatures of 5.9 – 23 0C). The effect of salinity, saturation pressures and chilled water temperatures on the heat transfer coefficient are accounted in the modified film evaporation correlations. The results are fitted to the Han & Fletcher\\'s and Chun & Seban\\'s falling-film correlations which are used in desalination industry. We modify the said correlations by adding salinity and saturation temperature corrections with respective indices to give a better agreement to our measured data.

  5. An improved film evaporation correlation for saline water at sub-atmospheric pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzada, Muhammad Wakil; Ng, Kim Choon; Thu, Kyaw; Myat, Aung; Gee, Chun Won

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation of heat transfer correlation in a falling-film evaporator working with saline water at sub-atmospheric pressures. The experiments are conducted at different salinity levels ranging from 15000 to 90000 ppm, and the pressures were maintained between 0.92 to 2.81 kPa (corresponds to saturation temperatures of 5.9 - 23 0C). The effect of salinity, saturation pressures and chilled water temperatures on the heat transfer coefficient are accounted in the modified film evaporation correlations. The results are fitted to the Han & Fletcher's and Chun & Seban's falling-film correlations which are used in desalination industry. We modify the said correlations by adding salinity and saturation temperature corrections with respective indices to give a better agreement to our measured data.

  6. Sensitivity of total stress to changes in externally applied water pressure in KBS-3 buffer bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, J.F.; Birchall, D.J. [British Geological Survey, Chemical and Biological Hazards Programme, Kingsley Dunham Centre (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    In the current Swedish repository design concept, composite copper and steel canisters containing spent nuclear fuel will be placed in large diameter disposal boreholes drilled into the floor of the repository tunnels. The space around each canister will be filled with pre-compacted bentonite which over time will draw in the surrounding ground water and swell, closing up any construction joints. However, for the purposes of performance assessment, it is necessary to consider the effect of glacial loading of a future repository and its impact on the mechanical behaviour of the bentonite, in particular, the sensitivity of total stress to changes in porewater pressure (backpressure). Two experimental histories have been undertaken using a custom-designed constant volume and radial flow (CVRF) apparatus. In both tests backpressure was varied in a number of incremental and decremental cycles while total stress, porewater pressure and volumetric flow rate were continuously monitored. The swelling pressure of the buffer clay at dry densities of 1.8 Mg/m{sup 3} and 1.61 Mg/m{sup 3} was determined to be around 5.5 MPa and 7.2 MPa respectively. For initial ascending porewater pressure histories the average proportionality factor {alpha} ranged from 0.86 and 0.92. Data exhibited a general trend of increasing {alpha} with increasing backpressure. In test Mx80-11 this was supported by analysis of the water inflow data which indicated a reduction in system compressibility. Asymptotic values of porewater pressure within the clay are in good agreement with externally applied backpressure values. Inspection of data provides no evidence for the development of hydraulic thresholds within the clay, subject to the boundary conditions of this test geometry. Analysis of the stress data demonstrates significant hysteresis between ascending and descending porewater pressure histories. The amount of hysteresis appears to be linked to the magnitude of the backpressure applied to the specimen

  7. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    A boiling water reactor having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit.

  8. Application of pressure assisted forward osmosis for water purification and reuse of reverse osmosis concentrate from a water reclamation plant

    KAUST Repository

    Jamil, Shazad

    2016-07-26

    The use of forward osmosis (FO) is growing among the researchers for water desalination and wastewater treatment due to use of natural osmotic pressure of draw solute. In this study pressure assisted forward osmosis (PAFO) was used instead of FO to increase the water production rate. In this study a low concentration of draw solution (0.25 M KCl) was applied so that diluted KCl after PAFO operation can directly be used for fertigation. The performance of PAFO was investigated for the treatment of reverse osmosis concentrate (ROC) from a water reclamation plant. The water production in PAFO was increased by 9% and 29% at applied pressure of 2 and 4 bars, respectively, to feed side based on 90 h of experiments. Granular activated carbon (GAC) pretreatment and HCl softening were used to reduce organic fouling and scaling prior to application of PAFO. It reduced total organic carbon (TOC) and total inorganic carbon (TIC) by around 90% and 85%, respectively from untreated ROC. Subsequently, this led to an increase in permeate flux. In addition, GAC pretreatment adsorbed 12 out of 14 organic micropollutants tested from ROC to below detection limit. This application enabled to minimise the ROC volume with a sustainable operation and produced high quality and safe water for discharge or reuse. The draw solution (0.25 M KCl) used in this study was diluted to 0.14 M KCl, which is a suitable concentration (10 kg/m3) for fertigation, due to water transport from feed solution. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Effect of renal venous pressure elevation on tubular sodium and water reabsorption in the dog kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, U; Amtorp, O; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1988-01-01

    of [51Cr]EDTA was used as a measure of the rate of glomerular filtration (GFR). GFR, urinary excretion rates of sodium and water, and lithium clearance were used for assessing the absolute and fractional reabsorption rates of sodium and water in the proximal as well as in more distal segments......This study was performed in order to quantify the effects of renal venous pressure (RVP) elevation on absolute and fractional reabsorption rates of sodium and water in proximal and distal segments of the nephron in dog kidneys. Renal blood flow (RBF) was measured electromagnetically. Clearance...

  10. Licensing assessment of the Candu Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. Preliminary safety information document. Volume II. [USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    ERDA has requested United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) to evaluate the design of the Canadian natural uranium fueled, heavy water moderated (CANDU) nuclear reactor power plant to assess its conformance with the licensing criteria and guidelines of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) for light water reactors. This assessment was used to identify cost significant items of nonconformance and to provide a basis for developing a detailed cost estimate for a 1140 MWe, 3-loop Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) located at the Middletown, USA Site.

  11. Pressure in a tank due to water-ice phase transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexcellent, C.; Vigoureux, D.; Vigoureux, J.-M.

    2017-11-01

    Our aim is to show the surprising force of hydrogen bonds in ice. When a tank completely filled with water is cooled, ice formation can generate a pressure which can cause its breaking. This phenomenon is due to the fact that water has a higher density in its liquid phase than in its solid state. Such a breaking is all the more surprising in that hydrogen bonds between water molecules are known as being weak chemical bonds. We show here that in the case of a total phase change, even the best steels or alloys could not prevent its breakage.

  12. Water Flow Testing and Unsteady Pressure Analysis of a Two-Bladed Liquid Oxidizer Pump Inducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jordan B.; Mulder, Andrew; Zoladz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The unsteady fluid dynamic performance of a cavitating two-bladed oxidizer turbopump inducer was characterized through sub-scale water flow testing. While testing a novel inlet duct design that included a cavitation suppression groove, unusual high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed. With potential implications for inducer blade loads, these high-frequency components were analyzed extensively in order to understand their origins and impacts to blade loading. Water flow testing provides a technique to determine pump performance without the costs and hazards associated with handling cryogenic propellants. Water has a similar density and Reynolds number to liquid oxygen. In a 70%-scale water flow test, the inducer-only pump performance was evaluated. Over a range of flow rates, the pump inlet pressure was gradually reduced, causing the flow to cavitate near the pump inducer. A nominal, smooth inducer inlet was tested, followed by an inlet duct with a circumferential groove designed to suppress cavitation. A subsequent 52%-scale water flow test in another facility evaluated the combined inducer-impeller pump performance. With the nominal inlet design, the inducer showed traditional cavitation and surge characteristics. Significant bearing loads were created by large side loads on the inducer during synchronous cavitation. The grooved inlet successfully mitigated these loads by greatly reducing synchronous cavitation, however high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed over a range of frequencies. Analytical signal processing techniques showed these oscillations to be created by a rotating, multi-celled train of pressure pulses, and subsequent CFD analysis suggested that such pulses could be created by the interaction of rotating inducer blades with fluid trapped in a cavitation suppression groove. Despite their relatively low amplitude, these high-frequency pressure oscillations posed a design concern due to their sensitivity to flow conditions and

  13. Integration of a Water Scrubbing Technique and Two-Stage Pressurized Anaerobic Digestion in One Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lemmer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-stage pressurized anaerobic digestion is a promising technology. This technology integrates in one process biogas production with upgrading and pressure boosting for grid injection. To investigate whether the efficiency of this novel system could be further increased, a water scrubbing system was integrated into the methanogensis step. Therefore, six leach-bed reactors were used for hydrolysis/acidification and a 30-L pressurized anaerobic filter operated at 9 bar was adopted for acetogenesis/methanogenesis. The fermentation liquid of the pressurized anaerobic filter was circulated periodically via a flash tank, operating at atmospheric pressure. Due to the pressure drop, part of dissolved carbon dioxide was released from the liquid phase into the flash tank. The depressurized fermentation liquid was then recycled to the pressurized reactor. Three different flow rates (0 L·day−1, 20 L·day−1 and 40 L·day−1 were tested with three repetitions. As the daily recycled flashed liquid flow was increased from 0 to 40 L, six times as much as the daily feeding, the methane content in the biogas increased from 75 molar percent (mol% to 87 mol%. The pH value of the substrate in the methane reactor rose simultaneously from 6.5 to 6.7. The experimental data were verified by calculation.

  14. Acrylic resin water sorption under different pressure, temperature and time conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzatti-Barbosa Célia Marisa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to analyze water sorption by polymerized acrylic resins under different pressure, temperature and time treatments. A thermo-cured acrylic resin was used as the denture base (Classico Ltda. and ethylene glycol di-methacrylate as a cross-linking agent, with processing carried out in a water bath at 73 °C for nine hours. Forty-five samples were prepared following the criteria and dimensions of specification # 12 of the American Dental Association (ADA, using a matrix in the shape of a stainless steel disc with 50 ± 1 mm diameter and 0.5 ± 0.05 mm thickness. The control group samples were stored in distilled water for 30 days, while groups GII to GIX were placed in a polymerization device with adjustable pressure, time and temperature. An analysis of the variance of the results revealed the influence of different factors on water sorption only, with significant factors being temperature, time, pressure and the interaction between time and temperature. Other interactions exerted no significant influence on water sorption. Neither additional treatments nor the control group (GI showed any significant difference in comparison to the averages of other treatments.

  15. Robust aqua material. A pressure-resistant self-assembled membrane for water purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Erez; Weissman, Haim; Rybtchinski, Boris [Department of Organic Chemistry, Weizmann Institute of Science, 234 Herzl Street, Rehovot, 7610001 (Israel); Shimoni, Eyal; Kaplan-Ashiri, Ifat [Department of Chemical Research Support, Weizmann Institute of Science, 234 Herzl Street, Rehovot, 7610001 (Israel); Werle, Kai; Wohlleben, Wendel [Department of Material Physics, Materials and Systems Research, BASF SE, 67056, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2017-02-13

    ''Aqua materials'' that contain water as their major component and are as robust as conventional plastics are highly desirable. Yet, the ability of such systems to withstand harsh conditions, for example, high pressures typical of industrial applications has not been demonstrated. We show that a hydrogel-like membrane self-assembled from an aromatic amphiphile and colloidal Nafion is capable of purifying water from organic molecules, including pharmaceuticals, and heavy metals in a very wide range of concentrations. Remarkably, the membrane can sustain high pressures, retaining its function. The robustness and functionality of the water-based self-assembled array advances the idea that aqua materials can be very strong and suitable for demanding industrial applications. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Effect of supplementation of water-soluble vitamins on oxidative stress and blood pressure in prehypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talikoti, Prashanth; Bobby, Zachariah; Hamide, Abdoul

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of water-soluble vitamins on oxidative stress and blood pressure in prehypertensives. Sixty prehypertensives were recruited and randomized into 2 groups of 30 each. One group received water-soluble vitamins and the other placebo for 4 months. Further increase in blood pressure was not observed in the vitamin group which increased significantly in the placebo group at the end of 4 months. Malonedialdehyde and protein carbonylation were reduced during the course of treatment with vitamins whereas in the placebo group there was an increase in the level of malondialdehyde. In conclusion, supplementation of water-soluble vitamins in prehypertension reduces oxidative stress and its progression to hypertension.

  17. Weak interactions between water and clathrate-forming gases at low pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurmer, Konrad; Yuan, Chunqing; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Kay, Bruce D.; Smith, R. Scott

    2015-11-01

    Using scanning probe microscopy and temperature programed desorption we examined the interaction between water and two common clathrate-forming gases, methane and isobutane, at low temperature and low pressure. Water co-deposited with up to 10-1 mbar methane or 10-5 mbar isobutane at 140 K onto a Pt(111) substrate yielded pure crystalline ice, i.e., the exposure to up to ~107 gas molecules for each deposited water molecule did not have any detectable effect on the growing films. Exposing metastable, less than 2 molecular layers thick, water films to 10-5 mbar methane does not alter their morphology, suggesting that the presence of the Pt(111) surface is not a strong driver for hydrate formation. This weak water-gas interaction at low pressures is supported by our thermal desorption measurements from amorphous solid water and crystalline ice where 1 ML of methane desorbs near ~43 K and isobutane desorbs near ~100 K. Similar desorption temperatures were observed for desorption from amorphous solid water.

  18. Environmental response nanosilica for reducing the pressure of water injection in ultra-low permeability reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peisong; Niu, Liyong; Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhijun

    2017-12-01

    The super-hydrophobic silica nanoparticles are applied to alter the wettability of rock surface from water-wet to oil-wet. The aim of this is to reduce injection pressure so as to enhance water injection efficiency in low permeability reservoirs. Therefore, a new type of environmentally responsive nanosilica (denote as ERS) is modified with organic compound containing hydrophobic groups and "pinning" groups by covalent bond and then covered with a layer of hydrophilic organic compound by chemical adsorption to achieve excellent water dispersibility. Resultant ERS is homogeneously dispersed in water with a size of about 4-8 nm like a micro-emulsion system and can be easily injected into the macro or nano channels of ultra-low permeability reservoirs. The hydrophobic nanosilica core can be released from the aqueous delivery system owing to its strong dependence on the environmental variation from normal condition to injection wells (such as pH and salinity). Then the exposed silica nanoparticles form a thin layer on the surface of narrow pore throat, leading to the wettability from water-wet to oil-wet. More importantly, the two rock cores with different permeability were surface treated with ERS dispersion with a concentration of 2 g/L, exhibit great reduce of water injection pressure by 57.4 and 39.6%, respectively, which shows great potential for exploitation of crude oil from ultra-low permeability reservoirs during water flooding. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. An independent, general method for checking consistency between diffraction data and partial radial distribution functions derived from them: the example of liquid water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Steinczinger

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There are various routes for deriving partial radial distribution functions of disordered systems from experimental diffraction (and/or EXAFS data. Due to limitations and errors of experimental data, as well as to imperfections of the evaluation procedures, it is of primary importance to confirm that the end result (partial radial distribution functions and the primary information (diffraction data are consistent with each other. We introduce a simple approach, based on Reverse Monte Carlo modelling, that is capable of assessing this dilemma. As a demonstration, we use the most frequently cited set of "experimental" partial radial distribution functions on liquid water and investigate whether the 3 partials (O-O, O-H and H-H are consistent with the total structure factor of pure liquid D2O from neutron diffraction and that of H2O from X-ray diffraction. We find that while neutron diffraction on heavy water is in full agreement with all the 3 partials, the addition of X-ray diffraction data clearly shows problems with the O-O partial radial distribution function. We suggest that the approach introduced here may also be used to establish whether partial radial distribution functions obtained from statistical theories of the liquid state are consistent with the measured structure factors.

  20. The magnesium sulfate-water system at pressures to 4 kilobars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenboom, D. L.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Ganasan, J. P.; Lewis, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrated magnesium sulfate constitutes up to 1/6 of the mass of carbonaceous chondrites, and probably is important in many icy asteroids and satellites. It occurs naturally in meteorites mostly as epsomite. MgSO4, considered anhydrously, comprises nearly 3/4 of the highly soluble fraction of C1 chondrites. Thus, MgSO4 is probably an important solute in cryovolcanic brines erupted on certain icy objects in the outer solar system. While the physiochemical properties of the water-magnesium sulfate system are well known at low pressures, planetological applications of these data are hindered by a dearth of useful published data at elevated pressures. Accordingly, solid-liquid phase equilibria was recently explored in this chemical system at pressures extending to about 4 kilobars. The water magnesium sulfate system in the region of the eutectic exhibits qualitatively constant behavior between pressures of 1 atm and 2 kbar. The eutectic melting curve closely follows that for water ice, with a freezing point depression of about 4 K at 1 atm decreasing to around 3.3 K at 2 kbars. The eutectic shifts from 17 pct. MgSO4 at 1 atm to about 15.3 pct at 2 kbars. Above 2 kbars, the eutectic melting curve again tends to follow ice.

  1. ANNEALING OF POLYCRYSTALLINE THIN FILM SILICON SOLAR CELLS IN WATER VAPOUR AT SUB-ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pikna

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thin film polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si solar cells were annealed in water vapour at pressures below atmospheric pressure. PN junction of the sample was contacted by measuring probes directly in the pressure chamber filled with steam during passivation. Suns-VOC method and a Lock-in detector were used to monitor an effect of water vapour to VOC of the solar cell during whole passivation process (in-situ. Tested temperature of the sample (55°C – 110°C was constant during the procedure. Open-circuit voltage of a solar cell at these temperatures is lower than at room temperature. Nevertheless, voltage response of the solar cell to the light flash used during Suns-VOC measurements was good observable. Temperature dependences for multicrystalline wafer-based and polycrystalline thin film solar cells were measured and compared. While no significant improvement of thin film poly-Si solar cell parameters by annealing in water vapour at under-atmospheric pressures was observed up to now, in-situ observation proved required sensitivity to changing VOC at elevated temperatures during the process.

  2. Removal of barometric pressure effects and earth tides from observed water levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, Nathanial J; Rasmussen, Todd C

    2007-01-01

    The effects of barometric pressure and earth tide changes are often observed in ground water level measurements. These disturbances can make aquifer test interpretation difficult by masking the small changes induced by aquifer testing at late times and great distances. A computer utility is now available that automatically removes the effects of barometric pressure and earth tides from water level observations using regression deconvolution. This procedure has been shown to remove more noise then traditional constant barometric efficiency techniques in both confined and unconfined aquifers. Instead of a single, instantaneous barometric efficiency, the procedure more correctly accounts for the lagged responses caused by barometric pressure and earth tide changes. Simultaneous measurements of water levels (or total heads) and nearby barometric pressures are required. As an additional option, the effects of earth tides can also be removed using theoretical earth tides. The program is demonstrated for two data sets collected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico. The program is available free by request at http://www.hydrology.uga.edu/tools.html.

  3. Real-time adjustment of pressure to demand in water distribution systems: Parameter-less P-controller algorithm

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Page, Philip R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Remote real-time control is currently the most advanced form of pressure management. Here the parameters describing pressure control valves (or pumps) are changed in real-time in such a way to provide the most optimal pressure in the water...

  4. Adaptive Equalizer Using Selective Partial Update Algorithm and Selective Regressor Affine Projection Algorithm over Shallow Water Acoustic Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Soflaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems of reliable communications in shallow water channels is intersymbol interference (ISI which is due to scattering from surface and reflecting from bottom. Using adaptive equalizers in receiver is one of the best suggested ways for overcoming this problem. In this paper, we apply the family of selective regressor affine projection algorithms (SR-APA and the family of selective partial update APA (SPU-APA which have low computational complexity that is one of the important factors that influences adaptive equalizer performance. We apply experimental data from Strait of Hormuz for examining the efficiency of the proposed methods over shallow water channel. We observe that the values of the steady-state mean square error (MSE of SR-APA and SPU-APA decrease by 5.8 (dB and 5.5 (dB, respectively, in comparison with least mean square (LMS algorithm. Also the families of SPU-APA and SR-APA have better convergence speed than LMS type algorithm.

  5. 46 CFR 52.01-110 - Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges (modifies PG-60). 52.01-110 Section 52.01-110 Shipping COAST... § 52.01-110 Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure.... (Modifies PG-60.3.) Gage glasses and gage cocks shall be connected directly to the head or shell of a boiler...

  6. Risks assessment of water pollution by pesticides at local scale (PESTEAUX project): study of polluting pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Stéphanie; Billo Bah, Boubacar

    2009-01-01

    Pollution of water resources (surface waters and ground waters) by pesticide uses is one of the key point of the European policy with the implementation of the Water Frame Work Directive (2000/60/EC) and the thematic Strategy on the Sustainable use of pesticides. According to this legislation, the Member States must initiate measures to limit environmental and toxicological effects caused by pesticide uses. The Agricultural Research Centre of Wallonia (CRA-W) emphasized the need of a tool for spatial risk analysis and develOPs it within the framework of PESTEAUX project. The originality of the approach proposed by the CRA-W is to generate maps to identify the risk of pollution at locale scale (agricultural parcel). The risk will be assessed according to the study of different factors, grouped under 3 data's layers: polluting pressure, vulnerability of the physical environment (soil) and meteorological data. This approach is directly based on the risk's definition which takes into account the polluting pressure, linked to the human activities, and the vulnerability of the soil, defined by factors of physical environment which characterize the water flow in the parcel. Moreover, meteorological data influence the intensity and likelihood flow of water, and indirectly pesticide by leaching or runoff. The PESTEAUX's approach to study the pollution is based on the model "source-vector-target". The source is the polluting pressure, in other words, the pesticides which could reach the targets. The main vector is the water which vehicles the pesticide on and trough the soil until the target which are the surface waters or ground waters. In this paper we introduce the factors contributing to the polluting pressure. These factors are linking to the human activities and more precisely, to the pesticide uses. The factors considered have an influence on pesticide's transport by water (in its solid state or in dissolved state by leaching, run-off, or erosion) but also on a set of

  7. New method for control of biological fouling in pipelines based on elevated partial pressures of carbon dioxide or combustion exhaust gases.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.J. Watten; R.E. Sears; R.F. Bumgardner [U.S. Geological Survey - Leetown Science Center, Kearneysville, WV (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea) are major macro fouling species of water conduits used in industrial and power station raw water/condensor systems. Control typically involves manual scraping and use of thermal treatment, deoxygenation or biocides. The costs of control and system damage resulting from fouling in the United States alone have been estimated at $1 billion/year. There is a pressing need for new economical and safe control strategies. Aquatic species in general are intolerant to increases in PCO{sub 2} given its effect on water, blood and hemolymph pH. These species are also sensitive to increases in elevated total dissolved gas pressure. The gas bubble disease that develops following exposure can, as with CO{sub 2} exposure, lead to mortality. We are exploiting this sensitivity by developing a control method based on manipulation of PCO{sub 2} or power plant exhaust gas (CO{sub 2}, 14%; SO{sub 2}, 0.3%), i.e., the supersaturation of hemolymph and tissues with gas followed by an induced (short term) pressure release designed to induce formation of gas emboli. SO{sub 2} present in stack gas acts with CO{sub 2} to reduce water and hemolymph pH so as to reduce required exposure periods. System effluents are degassed, CO{sub 2} recovered and pH adjusted if needed with alkaline reagents. Test results indicate the new process is effective at controlling C. fluminea as well as other target species, including crustaceans and fish. Required exposure periods (LT50) are short and decrease with increasing gas supersaturation levels. Gas recovery and reuse methods developed have reduced gas requirements by 85% making the method attractive economically and environmentally. 40 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Tissue fusion bursting pressure and the role of tissue water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezo, James; Kramer, Eric; Taylor, Kenneth; Ferguson, Virginia; Rentschler, Mark

    2013-02-01

    Tissue fusion is a complex, poorly understood process which bonds collagenous tissues together using heat and pressure. The goal of this study is to elucidate the role of hydration in bond efficacy. Hydration of porcine splenic arteries (n=30) was varied by pre-fusion treatments: 24-48 hour immersion in isotonic, hypotonic, or hypertonic baths. Treated arteries were fused in several locations using Conmed's Altrus thermal fusion device and the bursting pressure was then measured for each fused segment. Artery sections were then weighed before and after lyophilization, to quantify water content. Histology (HE, EVG staining) enabled visualization of the bonding interface. Bursting pressure was significantly greater (p=4.17 E-ll) for the hypotonic group (607.6 +/- 83.2mmHg), while no significant difference existed between the isotonic (332.6 +/- 44.7mmHg) and hypertonic (348.7 +/- 44.0mmHg) treatment groups. Total water content varied (p=8.80 E-24) from low water content in the hypertonic samples (72.5% weight +/- 0.9), to high water content in the hypotonic samples (83.1% weight +/- 1.9), while the isotonic samples contained 78.8% weight +/- 1.1. Strength differences between the treated vessels imply that bound water driven from the tissue during fusion may reveal available collagen crosslinking sites to facilitate bond formation during the fusion process. Thus when the tissue contains greater bound water volumes, more crosslinking sites may become available during fusion, leading to a stronger bond. This study provides an important step towards understanding the chemistry underlying tissue fusion and the mechanics of tissue fusion as a function of bound water within the tissue.

  9. Pressure impact of autoclave treatment on water sorption and pectin composition of flax cellulosic-fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alix, S; Colasse, L; Morvan, C; Lebrun, L; Marais, S

    2014-02-15

    The tensile properties of flax fibres might permit them to be used in composites as reinforcement in organic resin, as long as their mechanical properties are reproducible and their water sorption are reduced. In this study, to minimise the variability of mechanical properties, several samples of flax fibres were blended as a non-woven fabric. In order to reduce the water absorption of this non-woven technical fibres, an autoclave treatment was performed which was expected to remove the pectins and then to reduce the water sorption on their negative charges. The impact of autoclave pressure (0.5, 1 and 2 bars) on water sorption was investigated by using a gravimetric static equilibrium method. The Park model based on the three sorption modes: Langmuir, Henry's law and clustering, was successfully used to simulate the experimental sorption data. The lowest pressure treatments impacted only the Langmuir contribution while the 2 bar autoclave-treatment positively impacted the water resistance in the core of fibres by reducing Henry's absorption rate. This was shown to be related to the chemical modifications at the surface and in the core of fibres. A schematic model is presented relating the water sorption and the pectic composition of the fabric. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Attenuation of wave-induced groundwater pressure in shallow water. Part 2. Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław R. Massel

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In this Part 2 of the paper (Part 1 was published by Massel et al. 2004 an exact close-form solution for the pore-water pressure component and velocity circulation pattern induced by surface waves is developed. This comprehensive theoretical model, based on Biot's theory, takes into account soil deformations, volume change and pore-water flow. The calculations indicate that for the stiffness ratio G/E'w ≥ 100, the vertical distribution of the pore pressure becomes very close to the Moshagen & Tørum (1975 approach, when the soil is rigid and the fluid is incompressible.     The theoretical results of the paper have been compared with the experimental data collected during the laboratory experiment in the Large Wave Channel in Hannover (see Massel et al. 2004 and showed very good agreement. The apparent bulk modulus of pore water was not determined in the experiment but was estimated from the best fit of the experimental pore-water pressure with the theoretical one. In the paper only a horizontal bottom is considered and the case of an undulating bottom will be dealt with in another paper.

  11. Molecular dynamics of equilibrium and pressure-driven transport properties of water through LTA-type zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgman-Cohen, Salomon; Araque, Juan C; Hoek, Eric M V; Escobedo, Fernando A

    2013-10-08

    We consider an atomistic model to investigate the flux of water through thin Linde type A (LTA) zeolite membranes with differing surface chemistries. Using molecular dynamics, we have studied the flow of water under hydrostatic pressure through a fully hydrated LTA zeolite film (~2.5 nm thick) capped with hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties. Pressure drops in the 50-400 MPa range were applied across the membrane, and the flux of water was monitored for at least 15 ns of simulation time. For hydrophilic membranes, water molecules adsorb at the zeolite surface, creating a highly structured fluid layer. For hydrophobic membranes, a depletion of water molecules occurs near the water/zeolite interface. For both types of membranes, the water structure is independent of the pressure drop established in the system and the flux through the membranes is lower than that observed for the bulk zeolitic material; the latter allows an estimation of surface barrier effects to pressure-driven water transport. Mechanistically, it is observed that (i) bottlenecks form at the windows of the zeolite structure, preventing the free flow of water through the porous membrane, (ii) water molecules do not move through a cage in a single-file fashion but rather exhibit a broad range of residence times and pronounced mixing, and (iii) a periodic buildup of a pressure difference between inlet and outlet cages takes place which leads to the preferential flow of water molecules toward the low-pressure cages.

  12. Molecular Dynamics of Equilibrium and Pressure-Driven Transport Properties of Water through LTA-Type Zeolites

    KAUST Repository

    Turgman-Cohen, Salomon

    2013-10-08

    We consider an atomistic model to investigate the flux of water through thin Linde type A (LTA) zeolite membranes with differing surface chemistries. Using molecular dynamics, we have studied the flow of water under hydrostatic pressure through a fully hydrated LTA zeolite film (∼2.5 nm thick) capped with hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties. Pressure drops in the 50-400 MPa range were applied across the membrane, and the flux of water was monitored for at least 15 ns of simulation time. For hydrophilic membranes, water molecules adsorb at the zeolite surface, creating a highly structured fluid layer. For hydrophobic membranes, a depletion of water molecules occurs near the water/zeolite interface. For both types of membranes, the water structure is independent of the pressure drop established in the system and the flux through the membranes is lower than that observed for the bulk zeolitic material; the latter allows an estimation of surface barrier effects to pressure-driven water transport. Mechanistically, it is observed that (i) bottlenecks form at the windows of the zeolite structure, preventing the free flow of water through the porous membrane, (ii) water molecules do not move through a cage in a single-file fashion but rather exhibit a broad range of residence times and pronounced mixing, and (iii) a periodic buildup of a pressure difference between inlet and outlet cages takes place which leads to the preferential flow of water molecules toward the low-pressure cages. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  13. Structural phase diagram and equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of YBa2Cu3O6+x

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, N.H.; Lebech, B.; Poulsen, H.F.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental technique by which in-situ gas volumetric measurements are carried out on a neutron powder diffractometer, is presented and used for simultaneous studies of oxygen equilibrium partial pressure and the structural phase diagram of YBa2Cu3O6 + x. Experimental data was collected under...... of the ordering of oxygen. Oxygen equilibrium partial pressure shows significant variations with temperature and concentration which indicate that x = 0.15 and x = 0.92 are minimum and maximum oxygen concentrations. Measurements of oxygen in-diffusion flow show relaxation type behaviour: View the MathML source...

  14. Association of partial pressure of carbon dioxide in expired gas and arterial blood at three different ventilation states in apneic chickens (Gallus domesticus) during air sac insufflation anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Monique; Ludders, John W; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-05-01

    To test whether partial pressure of CO2 in expired gas (PĒCO2) predicts the partial pressure of CO2 in arterial blood (PaCO2) in apneic chickens during air sac insufflation anesthesia at three different ventilation states. To determine the PĒCO2 at which apnea occurs during air sac insufflation anesthesia. Randomized cross-over study. Twenty-three healthy male white leghorn chickens. Chickens were anesthetized via mask with isoflurane in oxygen and an air sac cannula was placed in the right abdominal air sac. Delivery of isoflurane in O2 was transferred from the mask to the air sac cannula. The birds were maintained at a surgical plane of anesthesia and apnea was induced by adjusting gas flow; the PĒCO2 at apnea was recorded. The birds were then paralyzed and gas flow was adjusted to achieve three different PĒCO2 s in random order: 43 mmHg (5.6 kPa) [hypoventilation]; 33 mmHg (4.3 kPa) [normoventilation]; and 23 mmHg (3.0 kPa) [hyperventilation]. After maintaining the target expired isoflurane concentration (EIso; 1.85 or 1.90%) and PĒCO2 for 15 minutes, arterial blood gas analysis was performed to determine the PaCO2 . The chickens were euthanized at the end of the experiment. Based on Bland-Altman comparisons, PĒCO2 was not strongly associated with PaCO2 during the three ventilation states. The PĒCO2 at which apnea occurred varied {median (minimum, maximum): 35 (30, 48) mmHg [4.6 (3.9, 6.2) kPa]}. Measured PĒCO2 cannot be used in a simple linear fashion to predict PaCO2 in birds during air sac insufflation anesthesia. The PĒCO2 at which apnea occurs during air sac insufflation anesthesia is not predictable. Arterial blood gases should be used to monitor CO2 during air sac insufflation anesthesia to verify appropriate patient ventilation. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  15. Impact of climate change and anthropogenic pressure on the water resources of India: challenges in management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadananan Nair, K.

    2016-10-01

    Freshwater resources of India are getting fast degraded and depleted from the changing climate and pressure of fast rising population. Changing intensity and seasonality of rainfall affect quantity and quality of water. Most of the rivers are polluted far above safety limits from the untreated domestic, industrial and agricultural effluents. Changes in the intensity, frequency and tracks of storms salinate coastal aquifers. Aquifers are also under the threat from rising sea level. Groundwater in urban limits and industrial zones are far beyond safety limits. Large-scale destruction of wetlands for industries and residential complexes has affected the quality of surface and groundwater resources in most parts of India. Measures to maintain food security and the new developments schemes such as river linking will further deteriorate the water resources. Falling water availability leads to serious health issues and various socio-economic issues. India needs urgent and appropriate adaptation strategies in the water sector.

  16. Impact of climate change and anthropogenic pressure on the water resources of India: challenges in management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shadananan Nair

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater resources of India are getting fast degraded and depleted from the changing climate and pressure of fast rising population. Changing intensity and seasonality of rainfall affect quantity and quality of water. Most of the rivers are polluted far above safety limits from the untreated domestic, industrial and agricultural effluents. Changes in the intensity, frequency and tracks of storms salinate coastal aquifers. Aquifers are also under the threat from rising sea level. Groundwater in urban limits and industrial zones are far beyond safety limits. Large-scale destruction of wetlands for industries and residential complexes has affected the quality of surface and groundwater resources in most parts of India. Measures to maintain food security and the new developments schemes such as river linking will further deteriorate the water resources. Falling water availability leads to serious health issues and various socio-economic issues. India needs urgent and appropriate adaptation strategies in the water sector.

  17. Interfacing systems LOCA (loss-of-coolant accidents): Pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozoki, G.; Kohut, P.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    1989-02-01

    This report summarizes a study performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Reactor and Plant Safety Issues Branch, Division of Reactor and Plant Systems, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This study was requested by the NRC in order to provide a technical basis for the resolution of Generic Issue 105 ''Interfacing LOCA at LWRs.'' This report deals with pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A parallel report was also accomplished for boiling water reactors. This study focuses on three representative PWRs and extrapolates the plant-specific findings for their generic applicability. In addition, a generic analysis was performed to investigate the cost-benefit aspects of imposing a testing program that would require some minimum level of leak testing of the pressure isolation valves on plants that presently have no such requirements. 28 refs., 31 figs., 64 tabs.

  18. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided.

  19. Welding residual stress distributions for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Ju Hee; Bae, Hong Yeol; OH, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyungsoo [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Tae Kwang [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    In pressurized water nuclear reactors, dissimilar metal welds are susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking. To access this problem, accurate estimation of welding residual stresses is important. This paper provides general welding residual stress profiles in dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds using finite element analysis. By introducing a simplified shape for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds, changes in the welding residual stress distribution can be seen using a geometry variable. Based on the results, a welding residual stress profile for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds is proposed that modifies the existing welding residual stress profile for austenitic pipe butt welds.

  20. Pressure induced by the interaction of water waves with nearly equal frequencies and nearly opposite directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pellet

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We present second-order expressions for the free-surface elevation, velocity potential and pressure resulting from the interaction of surface waves in water of arbitrary depth. When the surface waves have nearly equal frequencies and nearly opposite directions, a second-order pressure can be felt all the way to the sea bottom. There are at least two areas of applications: reflective structures and microseisms. Microseisms generated by water waves in the ocean are small vibrations of the ground resulting from pressure oscillations associated with the coupling of ocean surface gravity waves and the sea floor. They are recorded on land-based seismic stations throughout the world and they are divided into primary and secondary types, as a function of spectral content. Secondary microseisms are generated by the interaction of surface waves with nearly equal frequencies and nearly opposite directions. The efficiency of microseism generation thus depends in part on ocean wave frequency and direction. Based on the second-order expressions for the dynamic pressure, a simple theoretical analysis that quantifies the degree of nearness in amplitude, frequency, and incidence angle, which must be reached to observe the phenomenon, is presented.

  1. The flooding incident at the Aagesta pressurized heavy water nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlgren, C. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1996-03-01

    This work is an independent investigation of the consequences of the flooding incident at the Aagesta HPWR, Stockholm in May 1969. The basis for the report is an incident in which, due to short circuits in the wiring because of flooding water, the ECCS is momentarily subjected to a pressure much higher than designed for. The hypothetical scenario analyzed here is the case in which the ECCS breaks due to the high pressure. As a consequence of the break, the pressure and the water level in the reactor vessel decrease. The report is divided into three parts; First the Aagesta HPWR is described as well as the chronology of the incident, an analysis of the effects of a hypothetical break in the ECCS is then developed. The second part is a scoping analysis of the incident, modeling the pressure decrease and mass flow rate out of the break. The heat-up of the core, and the core degradation was modeled as well. The third part is formed by a RELAP5/MOD3.1 modeling of the Aagesta HPWR. 18 refs.

  2. Borehole water level response to barometric pressure as an indicator of aquifer vulnerability

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein, MEA; Odling, NE; Clark, RA

    2013-01-01

    The response of borehole water levels to barometric pressure changes in semiconfined aquifers can be used to determine barometric response functions from which aquifer and confining layer properties can be obtained. Following earlier work on barometric response functions and aquifer confinement, we explore the barometric response function as a tool to improve the assessment of groundwater vulnerability in semiconfined aquifers, illustrated through records from two contrasting boreholes in the...

  3. REFERENCE ON THERMOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES: DENSITY AND VISCOSITY OF WATER FOR ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Yusibani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A reference on thermophysical properties, density and viscosity, for water at atmospheric pressure has been developed in MS Excel (as a macros. Patterson’s density equations and Kestin’s viscosity equations have been chosen as a basic equation in the VBA programming as a user-defined function. These results have been compared with REFPROF as a wellknow standart reference

  4. Optimal pressure sensor placement in water distribution networks minimizing leak location uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Nejjari, Fatiha; Sarrate, Ramon; Blesa, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    In this paper an optimal sensor placement strategy based on pressure sensitivity matrix analysis and an exhaustive search strategy that maximizes some diagnosis specifications for a water distribution network is presented. An average worst leak expansion distance as a new leak location performance measure has been proposed. This metric is later used to assess the leak location uncertainty provided by a sensor configuration. The method is combined with a clustering technique in order to reduce...

  5. Densities and volume properties of (water + tert-butanol) over the temperature range of (274.15 to 348.15) K at pressure of 0.1 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, Gennadiy I., E-mail: gie@isc-ras.r [Laboratory of Structure and Dynamics of Molecular and Ion-Molecular Solutions, Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Akademicheskaya Street, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Makarov, Dmitriy M. [Laboratory of Structure and Dynamics of Molecular and Ion-Molecular Solutions, Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Akademicheskaya Street, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-15

    The densities of {l_brace}water (1) + tert-butanol (2){r_brace} binary mixture were measured over the temperature range (274.15 to 348.15) K at atmospheric pressure using 'Anton Paar' digital vibrating-tube densimeter. Density measurements were carried out over the whole concentration range at (308.15 to 348.15) K. The following volume parameters were calculated: excess molar volumes and thermal isobaric expansivities of the mixture, partial molar volumes and partial molar thermal isobaric expansivities of the components. Concentration dependences of excess molar volumes were fitted with Redlich-Kister equation. The results of partial molar volume calculations using four equations were compared. It was established that for low alcohol concentrations at T {<=} 208 K the inflection points at x{sub 2} {approx} 0.02 were observed at concentration dependences of specific volume. The concentration dependences of partial molar volumes of both water and tert-butanol had extremes at low alcohol content. The temperature dependence of partial molar volumes of water had some inversion at x{sub 2} {approx} 0.65. The temperature dependence of partial molar volumes of tert-butanol at infinite dilution had minimum at {approx}288 K. It was discovered that concentration dependences of thermal isobaric expansivities of the mixture at small alcohol content and low temperatures passed through minimum.

  6. Water ingestion affects orthostatic challenge-induced blood pressure and heart rate responses in young healthy subjects: gender implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, L A; Aaron, A O; Micheal, O S; Oyeyipo, I P

    2011-11-23

    Evidence exists that women have lower orthostatic tolerance than men during quiescent standing. Water ingestion has been demonstrated to improve orthostatic tolerance in patients with severe autonomic dysfunction. We therefore sought to test the hypothesis that water ingestion would improve orthostatic tolerance in healthy young women more than in aged-matched men. Thirty seven (22 men and 15 women) healthy subjects aged 22.5± 1.7 and 21.5±1.4 (means±SD) respectively, ingested 50ml (control) and 500ml of water 40min before orthostatic challenge on two separate days of appointment in a randomized controlled, cross-over design. Seated and standing blood pressure and heart rate were determined. Orthostatic tolerance was assessed as the time to presyncope during standing. Ingesting 500ml of water significantly improves orthostatic tolerance by 22% (32.0 ± 5.2 vs 26.2 ± 2.4min; pwater, seated systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure rose significantly in men while only systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure rose significantly in women. However ingesting 500ml of water did not have significant effect on seated heart rate in both men and women. Ingestion of 500ml of water significantly attenuated both the orthostatic challenge-induced increased heart rate and decreased pulse pressure responses especially in women. Diastolic blood pressure tended to be positively correlated with orthostatic tolerance strongly in men than in women. Pulse pressure correlated positively while heart rate correlated negatively to orthostatic tolerance in women but not in men independent of other correlates. Water ingestion is associated with orthostatic tolerance strongly in women but weakly in men independent of other correlates. In conclusion, the findings in the present study demonstrated that water ingestion caused improvement strongly in young women than in young men. This improvement is associated with increased pulse pressure

  7. Evaluation of low degree polynomial kernel support vector machines for modelling Pore-water pressure responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babangida Nuraddeen Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pore-water pressure (PWP is influenced by climatic changes, especially rainfall. These changes may affect the stability of, particularly unsaturated slopes. Thus monitoring the changes in PWP resulting from climatic factors has become an important part of effective slope management. However, this monitoring requires field instrumentation program, which is resource and labour expensive. Recently, soft computing modelling has become an alternative. Low degree polynomial kernel support vector machine (SVM was evaluated in modelling the PWP changes. The developed model used pore-water pressure and rainfall data collected from an instrumented slope. Wrapper technique was used to select input features and k-fold cross validation was used to calibrate the model parameters. The developed model showed great promise in modelling the pore-water pressure changes. High correlation, with coefficient of determination of 0.9694 between the predicted and observed changes was obtained. The one degree polynomial SVM model yielded competitive result, and can be used to provide lead time records of PWP which can aid in better slope management.

  8. Neuroprotection of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in sub-acute traumatic brain injury: not by immediately improving cerebral oxygen saturation and oxygen partial pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-chun Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy can promote the recovery of neural function in patients who have suffered traumatic brain injury (TBI, the underlying mechanism is unclear. We hypothesized that hyperbaric oxygen treatment plays a neuroprotective role in TBI by increasing regional transcranial oxygen saturation (rSO2 and oxygen partial pressure (PaO2. To test this idea, we compared two groups: a control group with 20 healthy people and a treatment group with 40 TBI patients. The 40 patients were given 100% oxygen of HBO for 90 minutes. Changes in rSO2 were measured. The controls were also examined for rSO2 and PaO2 , but received no treatment. rSO2 levels in the patients did not differ significantly after treatment, but levels before and after treatment were significantly lower than those in the control group. PaO2 levels were significantly decreased after the 30-minute HBO treatment. Our findings suggest that there is a disorder of oxygen metabolism in patients with sub-acute TBI. HBO does not immediately affect cerebral oxygen metabolism, and the underlying mechanism still needs to be studied in depth.

  9. Internal stress and opto-electronic properties of ZnO thin films deposited by reactive sputtering in various oxygen partial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyaerts, Romain; Poncelet, Olivier; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Proost, Joris

    2017-10-01

    In this article, we propose ZnO thin films as a suitable material for piezoresistors in transparent and flexible electronics. ZnO thin films have been deposited by DC reactive magnetron sputtering at room temperature at various oxygen partial pressures. All the films have a wurtzite structure with a strong (0002) texture measured by XRD and are almost stoichiometric as measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The effect of oxygen concentration on grain growth has been studied by in-situ multi-beam optical stress sensor, showing internal stress going from 350 MPa to -1.1 GPa. The transition between tensile and compressive stress corresponds to the transition between metallic and oxidized mode of reactive sputtering. This transition also induces a large variation in optical properties—from absorbent to transparent, and in the resistivity—from 4 × 10 - 2 Ω .cm to insulating. Finally, the piezoresistance of the thin film has been studied and showed a gauge factor (ΔR/R)/ɛ comprised between -5.8 and -8.5.

  10. Effects of CaO, Al2O3 and MgO on liquidus temperatures of copper smelting and converting slags under controlled oxygen partial pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase equilibria of silicate slags relevant to the copper smelting/converting operations have been experimentally studied over a wide range of slag compositions, temperatures and atmospheric conditions. Selected systems are of industrial interest and fill the gaps in fundamental information required to systematically characterise and describe copper slag chemistry. The experimental procedures include equilibration of synthetic slag at high temperatures, rapid quenching of resulting phases, and accurate measurement of phase compositions using electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA. The effects of CaO, Al2O3 and MgO on the phase equilibria of this slag system have been experimentally investigated in the temperature range 1200 to 1300 oC and oxygen partial pressures between 10-5 and 10-9 atm. It was found that spinel and silica are major primary phases in the composition range related to copper smelting/converting slags. In addition, olivine, diopside and pyroxene also appear at certain conditions. The presence of CaO, MgO and Al2O3 in the slag increases the spinel liquidus and decreases the silica liquidus. Liquidus temperatures in silica primary phase field are not sensitive to Po2; Liquidus temperatures in spinel primary phase field increase with increasing Po2. At 1300 oC and low Po2, the spinel (Fe2+,Mg2+O.(Al3+,Fe3+ primary phase field can be replaced by wustite (Fe2+,Mg2+O.

  11. Liquidus and phase equilibria in CaO-Al2O3-FeOx-SiO2 system under intermediate oxygen partial pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase equilibria of silicate slags relevant to the copper smelting/converting operations have been experimentally studied over a wide range of slag compositions, temperatures and atmospheric conditions. Selected systems are of industrial interest and fill the gaps in fundamental information required to systematically characterise and describe copper slag chemistry. The experimental procedures include equilibration of synthetic slag at high temperatures, rapid quenching of resulting phases, and accurate measurement of phase compositions using electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA. The effects of CaO, Al2O3 and MgO on the phase equilibria of this slag system have been experimentally investigated in the temperature range 1200 to 1300 oC and oxygen partial pressures between 10-5 and 10-9 atm. It was found that spinel and silica are major primary phases in the composition range related to copper smelting/converting slags. In addition, olivine, diopside and pyroxene also appear at certain conditions. The presence of CaO, MgO and Al2O3 in the slag increases the spinel liquidus and decreases the silica liquidus. Liquidus temperatures in silica primary phase field are not sensitive to Po2; Liquidus temperatures in spinel primary phase field increase with increasing Po2. At 1300ºC and low Po2, the spinel (Fe2+,Mg2+O.(Al3+,Fe3+ primary phase field can be replaced by wustite (Fe2+,Mg2+O.

  12. End-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide and acute mountain sickness in the first 24 hours upon ascent to Cusco Peru (3326 meters).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Danielle J; Schoene, Robert B

    2010-06-01

    To explore the association of end-title partial pressure (Petco(2)) and oxygen saturation (Spo(2)) with the development of AMS in travelers rapidly ascending to Cusco, Peru (3326 m). Using the 715 TIDAL WAVE Sp handheld, portable capnometer/oximeter, we measured Spo(2) and Petco(2) in 175 subjects upon ascent to Cusco, Peru (3326 m) from Lima (sea level) (a mean time of 3.9 hours.) Symptoms of AMS were recorded at the same initial time on arrival to altitude and 24 hours later using the Environmental Symptoms Questionnaire (ESQ). This study showed that no subjects with the lowest Petco(2) of 23 to 30 mm Hg had AMS (P <.044). The data also demonstrate that subjects with a higher Petco(2) (36-40 mm Hg) and lower Sao(2) (72%-86%) have a higher incidence of AMS. The most important finding of this study is that Petco(2) upon ascent was found to have a more significant effect than Spo(2) on a subject's ultimate ESQ score. This study demonstrates that those individuals with a brisk ventilatory response upon ascent to moderate altitude, as measured by Petco(2), did not develop AMS, whereas a blunted ventilatory response, as reflected in the highest Petco(2), was related to the subsequent development of AMS. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Analysis of structural phase transition of Nd{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+{delta}} by scanning thermal measurement under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, E., E-mail: e-niwa@phys.chs.nihon-u.ac.jp [The Institute of Natural Sciences, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-8-1 Sakurajousui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Department of Integrated Sciences in Physics and Biology, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-8-1 Sakurajousui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Nakamura, T.; Mizusaki, J. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Hashimoto, T. [Department of Integrated Sciences in Physics and Biology, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-8-1 Sakurajousui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2011-08-20

    Highlights: {yields} P(O{sub 2}) dependence of the phase transition behavior of Nd{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+{delta}} was investigated. {yields} Variation of thermodynamic functions by the phase transition was determined. {yields} Ellingham diagrams of the phase transition was prepared by thermal analyses. {yields} {Delta}H{sup o} and {Delta}S{sup o} from the diagrams agreed well with the results of thermal analyses. - Abstract: The dependence of the structural phase transition behavior of Nd{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+{delta}} between the tetragonal and orthorhombic phases on the oxygen partial pressure, P(O{sub 2}), has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, and thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, TG-DTA. The structural phase transition temperature, T{sub P}, decreased with decreasing P(O{sub 2}), while the variations of enthalpy, {Delta}H, entropy, {Delta}S, estimated from the peak area of DSC signals and oxygen content at the phase transition, {Delta}{delta}, determined from TG curves, exhibited little dependence on P(O{sub 2}). From the relationship between T{sub p} and P(O{sub 2}), the variations of standard enthalpy, {Delta}H{sup o}, and entropy, {Delta}S{sup o}, at the phase transition have been evaluated. By considering {Delta}{delta}, {Delta}H{sup o} and {Delta}S{sup o} exhibited fair agreement with {Delta}H and {Delta}S evaluated by DSC.

  14. Acute combined pressure and temperature exposures on a shallow-water crustacean: novel insights into the stress response and high pressure neurological syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J P; Thatje, S; Ravaux, J; Shillito, B; Fernando, D; Hauton, C

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the ecological and physiological processes governing depth distribution limits in species. Temperature and hydrostatic pressure are considered to be two dominant factors. Research has shown that some marine ectotherms are shifting their bathymetric distributions in response to rapid anthropogenic ocean surface warming. Shallow-water species unable to undergo latitudinal range shifts may depend on bathymetric range shifts to seek refuge from warming surface waters. As a first step in constraining the molecular basis of pressure tolerance in shallow water crustaceans, we examined differential gene expression in response to acute pressure and temperature exposures in juveniles of the shallow-water shrimp Palaemonetes varians. Significant increases in the transcription of genes coding for an NMDA receptor-regulated protein, an ADP ribosylation factor, β-actin, two heat shock protein 70 kDa isoforms (HSP70), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were found in response to elevated pressure. NMDA receptors have been implicated in pathways of excitotoxic damage to neurons and the onset of high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) in mammals. These data indicate that the sub-lethal effects of acute barotrauma are associated with transcriptional disturbances within the nervous tissue of crustaceans, and cellular macromolecular damage. Such transcriptional changes lead to the onset of symptoms similar to that described as HPNS in mammals, and may act as a limit to shallow water organisms' prolonged survival at depth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Investigation on Flexural Toughness of Partially Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Immersed by Simulated Sea-Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng GAO

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the corrosive resistance of partially steel fiber reinforced concrete (PSFRC, the flexural toughness experiment of nine specimens subjected to corrosion by alternating wet and dry cycles in a simulated marine environment were conducted, which aims at investigating the effect of corrosion time, steel fiber volume fraction and SFRC thickness on PSFRC toughness. The experimental results showed that both the mechanical and ductile characteristics of PSFRC got worse due to corrosion even if increasing the steel fiber volume. Additionally, the effect of steel fiber content on the toughness and ultimate load are greater than PSFRC thickness (t. The increase of 56.6% and 171% could be obtained in the mean ultimate load and I10 if the increase of steel fiber volume is from 0.5 % to 2.0%, respectively. This paper could offer a reference to the application of PSFRC in sea-water environment.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.4.17049

  16. Plasma-water interactions at atmospheric pressure in a dc microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jenish; Němcová, Lucie; Mitra, Somak; Graham, William; Maguire, Paul; Švrček, Vladimir; Mariotti, Davide

    2013-09-01

    Plasma-liquid interactions generate a variety of chemical species that are very useful for the treatment of many materials and that makes plasma-induced liquid chemistry (PiLC) very attractive for industrial applications. The understanding of plasma-induced chemistry with water can open up a vast range of plasma-activated chemistry in liquid with enormous potential for the synthesis of chemical compounds, nanomaterials synthesis and functionalization. However, this basic understanding of the chemistry occurring at the plasma-liquid interface is still poor. In the present study, different properties of water are analysed when processed by plasma at atmospheric-pressure with different conditions. In particular, pH, temperature and conductivity of water are measured against current and time of plasma processing. We also observed the formation of molecular oxygen (O2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for the same plasma conditions. The current of plasma processing was found to affect the water properties and the production of hydrogen peroxide in water. The relation between the number of electrons injected from plasma in water and the number of H2O2 molecules was established and based on these results a scenario of reactions channels activated by plasma-water interface is concluded.

  17. Hydrostatic pressure effect on PNIPAM cononsolvency in water-methanol solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Andrea; Graziano, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    When methanol is added to water at room temperature and 1atm, poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), PNIPAM, undergoes a coil-to-globule collapse transition. This intriguing phenomenon is called cononsolvency. Spectroscopic measurements have shown that application of high hydrostatic pressure destroys PNIPAM cononsolvency in water-methanol solutions. We have developed a theoretical approach that identifies the decrease in solvent-excluded volume effect as the driving force of PNIPAM collapse on increasing the temperature. The same approach indicates that cononsolvency, at room temperature and P=1atm, is caused by the inability of PNIPAM to make all the attractive energetic interactions that it could be engaged in, due to competition between water and methanol molecules. The present analysis suggests that high hydrostatic pressure destroys cononsolvency because the coil state becomes more compact, and the quantity measuring PNIPAM-solvent attractions increases in magnitude due to the solution density increase, and the ability of small water molecules to substitute methanol molecules on PNIPAM surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction Failure Threshold for Reactivity Initiated Accidents for Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Carl E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Kenneth J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been requested by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the reactivity initiated accident (RIA) tests that have recently been performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) and CABRI (French research reactor) on uranium dioxide (UO2) and mixed uranium and plutonium dioxide (MOX) fuels, and to propose pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) failure thresholds for RIA events. This report discusses how PNNL developed PCMI failure thresholds for RIA based on least squares (LSQ) regression fits to the RIA test data from cold-worked stress relief annealed (CWSRA) and recrystallized annealed (RXA) cladding alloys under pressurized water reactor (PWR) hot zero power (HZP) conditions and boiling water reactor (BWR) cold zero power (CZP) conditions.

  19. Structure and Dynamics of Low-Density and High-Density Liquid Water at High Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanetti, Samuele; Lapini, Andrea; Pagliai, Marco; Citroni, Margherita; Di Donato, Mariangela; Scandolo, Sandro; Righini, Roberto; Bini, Roberto

    2014-01-02

    Liquid water has a primary role in ruling life on Earth in a wide temperature and pressure range as well as a plethora of chemical, physical, geological, and environmental processes. Nevertheless, a full understanding of its dynamical and structural properties is still lacking. Water molecules are associated through hydrogen bonds, with the resulting extended network characterized by a local tetrahedral arrangement. Two different local structures of the liquid, called low-density (LDW) and high-density (HDW) water, have been identified to potentially affect many different chemical, biological, and physical processes. By combining diamond anvil cell technology, ultrafast pump-probe infrared spectroscopy, and classical molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the liquid structure and orientational dynamics are intimately connected, identifying the P-T range of the LDW and HDW regimes. The latter are defined in terms of the speeding up of the orientational dynamics, caused by the increasing probability of breaking and reforming the hydrogen bonds.

  20. Feasibility study of underground energy storage using high-pressure, high-temperature water. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, J.L.; Frost, G.P.; Gore, L.A.; Hammond, R.P.; Rawson, D.L.; Ridgway, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    A technical, operational and economic feasibility study on the storage of energy as heated high pressure water in underground cavities that utilize the rock overburden for containment is presented. Handling peak load requirements of electric utility power networks is examined in some detail. The cavity is charged by heating water with surplus steaming capacity during periods of low power requirement. Later this hot water supplies steam to peaking turbines when high load demands must be met. This system can be applied to either new or existing power plants of nuclear or fossil fuel type. The round trip efficiency (into storage and back) is higher than any other system - over 90%. Capital costs are competitive and the environmental impact is quite benign. Detailed installation and design problems are studied and costs are estimated. The continental United States is examined for the most applicable geology. Formations favorable for these large cavities exist in widespread areas.

  1. Salinity of injection water and its impact on oil recovery absolute permeability, residual oil saturation, interfacial tension and capillary pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mohammad Salehi

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents laboratory investigation of the effect of salinity injection water on oil recovery, pressure drop, permeability, IFT and relative permeability in water flooding process. The experiments were conducted at the 80 °C and a net overburden pressure of 1700 psi using core sample. The results of this study have been shown oil recovery increases as the injected water salinity up to 200,000 ppm and appointment optimum salinity. This increase has been found to be supported by a decrease in the IFT. This effect caused a reduction in capillary pressure increasing the tendency to reduce the residual oil saturation.

  2. STUDY OF WATER HAMMERS IN THE FILLING OF THE SYSTEM OF PRESSURE COMPENSATION IN THE WATER-COOLED AND WATER-MODERATED POWER REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Korolyev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research presented in the article conforms to the severe accident that took place at the Three Mail Island nuclear power plant in the USA. The research is focused on improving the reliability of the pressure compensator that is an important equipment of the primary circuit. In order to simulate such a situation, the stand has been developed to simulate the design of the pressurizer of the PWR-440 reactor, in particular an elliptical shape of the upper lid which has a steam outlet pipe at the top of the construction that creates conditions for occurrence of such water hammers. For the experiments, an installation has been created that makes it possible to measure and record the water hammering that occur when the tanks are filled. Measurement of the amplitude of the water hammering was carried out by a specially developed piezoelectric sensor, and the registration – by a light-beam oscilloscope. The technique of carrying out the experiment is described and the results of an experimental study of the water hammers arising when the vessels are completely filled are presented. Quantitative data were obtained on the amplitudes of the hydraulic impacts depending on the rate of filling of the vessel and the diameter of the outlet, the maximum pressure of the hydraulic shock was 7–9 atm. Comparison of calculated and experimental data has been performed. The allowable discrepancy is explained by the calculated value of the system stiffness coefficient, which did not take into account the presence of welded seams in the tank that imparts the system with additional rigidity. The calculated relationships are obtained, that make it possible to estimate the amplitudes of the water hammers through the acceleration of the water level in front of the outlet from a vessel with an elliptical bottom. The possibility of a water hammer in the pressure compensator is demonstrated by experiment and by theoretical calculations. Based on the experimental data, a

  3. Effect of Leaf Water Potential on Internal Humidity and CO2 Dissolution: Reverse Transpiration and Improved Water Use Efficiency under Negative Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesala, Timo; Sevanto, Sanna; Grönholm, Tiia; Salmon, Yann; Nikinmaa, Eero; Hari, Pertti; Hölttä, Teemu

    2017-01-01

    The pull of water from the soil to the leaves causes water in the transpiration stream to be under negative pressure decreasing the water potential below zero. The osmotic concentration also contributes to the decrease in leaf water potential but with much lesser extent. Thus, the surface tension force is approximately balanced by a force induced by negative water potential resulting in concavely curved water-air interfaces in leaves. The lowered water potential causes a reduction in the equilibrium water vapor pressure in internal (sub-stomatal/intercellular) cavities in relation to that over water with the potential of zero, i.e., over the flat surface. The curved surface causes a reduction also in the equilibrium vapor pressure of dissolved CO2, thus enhancing its physical solubility to water. Although the water vapor reduction is acknowledged by plant physiologists its consequences for water vapor exchange at low water potential values have received very little attention. Consequences of the enhanced CO2 solubility to a leaf water-carbon budget have not been considered at all before this study. We use theoretical calculations and modeling to show how the reduction in the vapor pressures affects transpiration and carbon assimilation rates. Our results indicate that the reduction in vapor pressures of water and CO2 could enhance plant water use efficiency up to about 10% at a leaf water potential of −2 MPa, and much more when water potential decreases further. The low water potential allows for a direct stomatal water vapor uptake from the ambient air even at sub-100% relative humidity values. This alone could explain the observed rates of foliar water uptake by e.g., the coastal redwood in the fog belt region of coastal California provided the stomata are sufficiently open. The omission of the reduction in the water vapor pressure causes a bias in the estimates of the stomatal conductance and leaf internal CO2 concentration based on leaf gas exchange

  4. COMPARISON OF VENTED AND ABSOLUTE PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS FOR WATER-LEVEL MONITORING IN HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCDONALD JP

    2011-09-08

    Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The

  5. Effects of Temperature and O[sub 2] Pressure on Laser-induced Partial Oxidation of Cyclohexane in the Liquid Phase. Rezakoyuki shikurohikesan'eki sobubun sankahanno no kouka to ondokoka to sansoatsuryoku koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaowen.; Oshima, Yoshio.; Koda, Seiichiro. (The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). School of Enginerring)

    1999-03-01

    Laser-induced partial oxidation of cyclohexane in the liquid phase was carried out in order to investigate the effect of reaction temperature and oxygen pressure on product selectivities and quantum yield. The total amount of the products slightly increased with increase of oxygen partial pressure, and cyclohexanone was only product whose yield showed a dependence on the oxygen pressure,. The quantum yield gradually decreased with increase of oxygen partial pressure, and it became constant with oxygen pressure above 2.0 MPa. The quantum yield was also dependent on the reaction temperature, and activation energy of the overall reaction was estimated to be 16[+-] 4 kj/mol. At higher temperatures, the yield of cyclohexanol was relatively high, and the quantum yoeld was close to unity. Based on these results, a plausible reaction mechanism was proposed, in which the radical-radical reactions play an important role in the product distribution and quantum yiekd. AAlthough a radical chain reaction with high quantum yield could not be achieved in this system, the author's knowledge of the chemistry at high radical concentrations could be applied to a novel reaction-control technique. (author)

  6. Effects of Temperature and O{sub 2} Pressure on Laser-induced Partial Oxidation of Cyclohexane in the Liquid Phase; Rezakoyuki shikurohikesan`eki sobubun sankahanno no kouka to ondokoka to sansoatsuryoku koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaowen.; Oshima, Yoshio.; Koda, Seiichiro. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). School of Enginerring

    1999-03-01

    Laser-induced partial oxidation of cyclohexane in the liquid phase was carried out in order to investigate the effect of reaction temperature and oxygen pressure on product selectivities and quantum yield. The total amount of the products slightly increased with increase of oxygen partial pressure, and cyclohexanone was only product whose yield showed a dependence on the oxygen pressure,. The quantum yield gradually decreased with increase of oxygen partial pressure, and it became constant with oxygen pressure above 2.0 MPa. The quantum yield was also dependent on the reaction temperature, and activation energy of the overall reaction was estimated to be 16{+-} 4 kj/mol. At higher temperatures, the yield of cyclohexanol was relatively high, and the quantum yoeld was close to unity. Based on these results, a plausible reaction mechanism was proposed, in which the radical-radical reactions play an important role in the product distribution and quantum yiekd. AAlthough a radical chain reaction with high quantum yield could not be achieved in this system, the author`s knowledge of the chemistry at high radical concentrations could be applied to a novel reaction-control technique. (author)

  7. Evaluation of an accident management strategy of emergency water injection using fire engines in a typical pressurized water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Yong Park

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the Fukushima accident, a special safety inspection was conducted in Korea. The inspection results show that Korean nuclear power plants have no imminent risk for expected maximum potential earthquake or coastal flooding. However long- and short-term safety improvements do need to be implemented. One of the measures to increase the mitigation capability during a prolonged station blackout (SBO accident is installing injection flow paths to provide emergency cooling water of external sources using fire engines to the steam generators or reactor cooling systems. This paper illustrates an evaluation of the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire trucks during a potential extended SBO accident in a 1,000 MWe pressurized water reactor. With regard to the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire engines, the strategies are judged to be very feasible for a long-term SBO, but are not likely to be effective for a short-term SBO.

  8. Water Treatment Plants, File name = UTILITIES - PARTIAL Data is incomplete. Contains electric trans lines, electric substations, sewer plants, sewer pumpstations, water plants, water tanks http://www.harfordcountymd.gov/gis/Index.cfm, Published in 2011, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Harford County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Water Treatment Plants dataset current as of 2011. File name = UTILITIES - PARTIAL Data is incomplete. Contains electric trans lines, electric substations, sewer...

  9. Water Pumping Stations, File name = UTILITIES - PARTIAL Data is incomplete. Contains electric trans lines, electric substations, sewer plants, sewer pumpstations, water plants, water tanks http://www.harfordcountymd.gov/gis/Index.cfm, Published in 2011, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Harford County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Water Pumping Stations dataset current as of 2011. File name = UTILITIES - PARTIAL Data is incomplete. Contains electric trans lines, electric substations, sewer...

  10. Nonlinear Creep Model for Deep Rock under High Stress and High Pore Water Pressure Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Yuanguang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Conventional triaxial compression creep experiments for deep sandstone under high confining pressure and high pore water pressure were carried out, in order to predict the creep response of deep rock under these conditions. A nonlinear viscoelastic-plastic creep constitutive model was proposed based on the experimental results. The theory of component model was used as a basis for the formulation of this model. First, by using mathematical fitting and analogy, a new nonlinear viscous component was introduced based on the properties of the creep curves during the tertiary stage. Second, a timer component to judge whether the creep can get into the tertiary stage was presented. Finally, a nonlinear creep model was proposed. Results showed good agreement between theory curves from the nonlinear creep model and experimental data. This model can be applied to predict deep rock creep responses under high stress and high pore water pressure conditions. Hence, the obtained conclusions in this study are beneficial to deep rock engineering.

  11. Hydrothermal Treatment of Cellulose in Hot-Pressurized Water for the Production of Levulinic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASLI YUKSEL

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, hot-pressurized water, operating above boiling point and below critical point of water (374. 15 °C and 22.1 MPa, was used as a reaction medium for the decomposition of cellulose to high-value chemicals, such levulinic acid. Effects of reaction temperature, pressure, time, external oxidant type and concentration on the cellulose degradation and product distribution were evaluated. In order to compare the cellulose decomposition and yields of levulinic acid, experiments were performed with and without addition of oxidizing agents (H2SO4 and H2O2. Analysis of the liqueur was monitored by HPLC and GC-MS at different temperatures (150 - 280 °C, pressures (5-64 bars and reaction times (30 - 120 mins. Levulinic acid, 5-HMF and formic acid were detected as main products. 73% cellulose conversion was achieved with 38% levulinic acid yield when 125 mM of sulfuric acid was added to the reaction medium at 200 °C for 60 min reaction time.

  12. Existence for a global pressure formulation of water-gas flow in porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim Amaziane

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider a model of water-gas flow in porous media with an incompressible water phase and a compressible gas phase. Such models appear in gas migration through engineered and geological barriers for a deep repository for radioactive waste. The main feature of this model is the introduction of a new global pressure and it is fully equivalent to the original equations. The system is written in a fractional flow formulation as a degenerate parabolic system with the global pressure and the saturation potential as the main unknowns. The major difficulties related to this model are in the nonlinear degenerate structure of the equations, as well as in the coupling in the system. Under some realistic assumptions on the data, including unbounded capillary pressure function and non-homogeneous boundary conditions, we prove the existence of weak solutions of the system. Furthermore, it is shown that the weak solution has certain desired properties, such as positivity of the saturation. The result is proved with the help of an appropriate regularization and a time discretization of the coupled system. We use suitable test functions to obtain a priori estimates and a compactness result in order to pass to the limit in nonlinear terms.

  13. Countercurrent Air-Water Flow in a Scale-Down Model of a Pressurizer Surge Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Futatsugi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Steam generated in a reactor core and water condensed in a pressurizer form a countercurrent flow in a surge line between a hot leg and the pressurizer during reflux cooling. Characteristics of countercurrent flow limitation (CCFL in a 1/10-scale model of the surge line were measured using air and water at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The experimental results show that CCFL takes place at three different locations, that is, at the upper junction, in the surge line, and at the lower junction, and its characteristics are governed by the most dominating flow limitation among the three. Effects of inclination angle and elbows of the surge line on CCFL characteristics were also investigated experimentally. The effects of inclination angle on CCFL depend on the flow direction, that is, the effect is large for the nearly horizontal flow and small for the vertical flow at the upper junction. The presence of elbows increases the flow limitation in the surge line, whereas the flow limitations at the upper and lower junctions do not depend on the presence of elbows.

  14. Intraocular pressure dynamics with prostaglandin analogs: a clinical application of water-drinking test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özyol P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pelin Özyol,1 Erhan Özyol,1 Ercan Baldemir2 1Ophthalmology Department, 2Biostatistics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Mugla Sitki Kocman University, Mugla, Turkey Aim: To evaluate the clinical applicability of the water-drinking test in treatment-naive primary open-angle glaucoma patients. Methods: Twenty newly diagnosed primary open-angle glaucoma patients and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in this prospective study. The water-drinking test was performed at baseline and 6 weeks and 3 months after prostaglandin analog treatment. Peak and fluctuation of intraocular pressure (IOP measurements obtained with the water-drinking test during follow-up were analyzed. Analysis of variance for repeated measures and paired and unpaired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean baseline IOP values in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma were 25.1±4.6 mmHg before prostaglandin analog treatment, 19.8±3.7 mmHg at week 6, and 17.9±2.2 mmHg at month 3 after treatment. The difference in mean baseline IOP of the water-drinking tests was statistically significant (P<0.001. At 6 weeks of prostaglandin analog treatment, two patients had high peak and fluctuation of IOP measurements despite a reduction in baseline IOP. After modifying treatment, patients had lower peak and fluctuation of IOP values at month 3 of the study. Conclusion: Peak and fluctuation of IOP in response to the water-drinking test were lower with prostaglandin analogs compared with before medication. The water-drinking test can represent an additional benefit in the management of glaucoma patients, especially by detecting higher peak and fluctuation of IOP values despite a reduced mean IOP. Therefore, it could be helpful as a supplementary method in monitoring IOP in the clinical practice. Keywords: glaucoma, intraocular pressure, water-drinking test, prostaglandin analog, intra­ocular pressure fluctuation

  15. Preliminary Study on the High Efficiency Supercritical Pressure Water-Cooled Reactor for Electricity Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yoon Yeong; Park, Jong Kyun; Cho, Bong Hyun and others

    2006-01-15

    This research has been performed to introduce a concept of supercritical pressure water cooled reactor(SCWR) in Korea The area of research includes core conceptual design, evaluation of candidate fuel, fluid systems conceptual design with mechanical consideration, preparation of safety analysis code, and construction of supercritical pressure heat transfer test facility, SPHINX, and preliminary test. As a result of the research, a set of tools for the reactor core design has been developed and the conceptual core design with solid moderator was proposed. The direct thermodynamic cycle has been studied to find a optimum design. The safety analysis code has also been adapted to supercritical pressure condition. A supercritical pressure CO2 heat transfer test facility has been constructed and preliminary test proved the facility works as expected. The result of this project will be good basis for the participation in the international collaboration under GIF GEN-IV program and next 5-year mid and long term nuclear research program of MOST. The heat transfer test loop, SPHINX, completed as a result of this project may be used for the power cycle study as well as further heat transfer study for the various geometries.

  16. An innovative technique for estimating water saturation from capillary pressure in clastic reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeoti, Lukumon; Ayolabi, Elijah Adebowale; James, Logan

    2017-11-01

    A major drawback of old resistivity tools is the poor vertical resolution and estimation of hydrocarbon when applying water saturation (Sw) from historical resistivity method. In this study, we have provided an alternative method called saturation height function to estimate hydrocarbon in some clastic reservoirs in the Niger Delta. The saturation height function was derived from pseudo capillary pressure curves generated using modern wells with complete log data. Our method was based on the determination of rock type from log derived porosity-permeability relationship, supported by volume of shale for its classification into different zones. Leverette-J functions were derived for each rock type. Our results show good correlation between Sw from resistivity based method and Sw from pseudo capillary pressure curves in wells with modern log data. The resistivity based model overestimates Sw in some wells while Sw from the pseudo capillary pressure curves validates and predicts more accurate Sw. In addition, the result of Sw from pseudo capillary pressure curves replaces that of resistivity based model in a well where the resistivity equipment failed. The plot of hydrocarbon pore volume (HCPV) from J-function against HCPV from Archie shows that wells with high HCPV have high sand qualities and vice versa. This was further used to predict the geometry of stratigraphic units. The model presented here freshly addresses the gap in the estimation of Sw and is applicable to reservoirs of similar rock type in other frontier basins worldwide.

  17. A numerical study on high-pressure water-spray cleaning for CSP reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglani, Francesco; Barry, John; Dekkers, Willem

    2016-05-01

    Mirror cleaning for concentrated solar thermal (CST) systems is an important aspect of operation and maintenance (O&M), which affects solar field efficiency. The cleaning process involves soil removal by erosion, resulting from droplet impingement on the surface. Several studies have been conducted on dust accumulation and CSP plant reflectivity restoration, demonstrating that parameters such as nozzle diameter, jet impingement angle, interaxial distance between nozzles, standoff distance, water velocity, nozzle pressure and others factors influence the extent of reflectance restoration. In this paper we aim at identifying optimized cleaning strategies suitable for CST plants, able to restore mirror reflectance by high-pressure water-spray systems through the enhancement of shear stress over reflectors' surface. In order to evaluate the forces generated by water-spray jet impingement during the cleaning process, fluid dynamics simulations have been undertaken with ANSYS CFX software. In this analysis, shear forces represent the "critical phenomena" within the soil removal process. Enhancing shear forces on a particular area of the target surface, varying the angle of impingement in combination with the variation of standoff distances, and managing the interaxial distance of nozzles can increase cleaning efficiency. This procedure intends to improve the cleaning operation for CST mirrors reducing spotted surface and increasing particles removal efficiency. However, turbulence developed by adjacent flows decrease the shear stress generated on the reflectors surface. The presence of turbulence is identified by the formation of "fountain regions" which are mostly responsible of cleaning inefficiency. By numerical analysis using ANSYS CFX, we have modelled a stationary water-spray system with an array of three nozzles in line, with two angles of impingement: θ = 90° and θ = 75°. Several numerical tests have been carried out, varying the interaxial distance of

  18. Experimental Research on Water Boiling Heat Transfer on Horizontal Copper Rod Surface at Sub-Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hua Yu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, water (R718 as a kind of natural refrigerant—which is environmentally-friendly, safe and cheap—has been reconsidered by scholars. The systems of using water as the refrigerant, such as water vapor compression refrigeration and heat pump systems run at sub-atmospheric pressure. So, the research on water boiling heat transfer at sub-atmospheric pressure has been an important issue. There are many research papers on the evaporation of water, but there is a lack of data on the characteristics at sub-atmospheric pressures, especially lower than 3 kPa (the saturation temperature is 24 °C. In this paper, the experimental research on water boiling heat transfer on a horizontal copper rod surface at 1.8–3.3 kPa is presented. Regression equations of the boiling heat transfer coefficient are obtained based on the experimental data, which are convenient for practical application.

  19. Relative Distribution of Water Clusters at Temperature (300-3000K) and Pressure (1-500MPa)

    CERN Document Server

    Ri, Yong-U; Sin, Kye-Ryong

    2016-01-01

    At 300-3000K and 1-500MPa, variations of relative contents for small water clusters (H2O)n (n=1~6) were calculated by using statistical mechanical methods. First, 9 kinds of small water clusters were selected and their structures were optimized by using ab initio method. In the wide range of temperature (300-3000K) and pressure (1-500MPa), their equilibrium constants of reactions for formation of 9 kinds of water clusters were determined by using molecular partition function. Next, changes of contents (molar fractions) as function of temperature and pressure were estimated. The obtained results for small water clusters can be used to interpret temperature-pressure dependency of the average number for the hydrogen bonds in water clusters and redistribution of the water clusters at the ultrasonic cavitation reactions.

  20. High Pressure Water Jet System Performance Assessment Project A-2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FARWICK, C.C.

    1999-12-03

    Performance assessment for canister cleaning system in the KE Basin. Information obtained from this assessment will be used to design any additional equipment used to clean canisters. After thorough review of the design, maintenance history and operational characteristics of the 105 K East (KE) canister cleaning system, Bartlett recommends that the high pressure water jet system (HPWJS) be modified as outlined in section 5.0, and retained for future use. Further, it is recommended that Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project consider use of a graded approach for canister cleaning, based on individual canister type and characteristics. This approach would allow a simple method to be used on canisters not needing the more rigorous, high-pressure method. Justification is provided in section 5.0. Although Bartlett has provided some preliminary cost estimates, it is recommended that SNF Project perform a detailed cost-benefit analysis to weigh the alternatives presented.

  1. Power supply improvements for ballasts-low pressure mercury/argon discharge lamp for water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhtache, A. Aissa; Zegaoui, A.; Djahbar, A.; Allouache, H.; Hemici, K.; Kessaissia, F. Z.; Bouchrit, M. S.; Aillerie, M.

    2017-02-01

    The low-pressure electrical discharges established in the mercury rare gas mixtures are the basis of many applications both in the field of lighting and for industrial applications. In order to select an efficient high frequency power supply (ECG -based PWM inverter), we present and discuss results obtained in the simulation of three kinds of power supplies delivering a 0.65 A - 50KHz sinusoidal current dedicated to power low pressure UV Mercury - Argon lamp used for effect germicide on water treatment thus allowing maximum UVC radiation at 253.7 nm. Three ballasts half-bridge configurations were compared with criteria based on resulting germicide efficiency, electrical yield and reliability, for example the quality of the sinusoidal current with reduced THD, and finally, we also considered in this analysis the final economic aspect.

  2. Renin, water drinking, walt preference and blood pressure in alcohol preferring and alcohol avoiding rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkola, J; Tikkanen, I; Fyhrquist, F; Rusi, M

    1980-02-01

    Mechanisms controlling fluid volume were studied in alcohol preferring AA (Alko, Alcohol) and alcohol avoiding ANA (Alko, Non-Alcohol) rats. Hypertonic sodium chloride solution (5%) given orally caused a higher dipsogenic response in AA rats than in the ANA's. One hour after ethanol loading (4.8 g/kg, by stomach tube), plasma renin activity of AA rats was four times as high as in ANA rats. ANA rats had higher degree of sodium chloride (0.9%) preference and higher blood pressure. The strain differences in voluntary salt intake and salt metabolism may modulate the consumption of calories and water as well as blood pressure and different reactivity of the renin system in AA and ANA rats.

  3. The Piezo Actuator-Driven Pulsed Water Jet System for Minimizing Renal Damage after Off-Clamp Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Fujii, Shinji; Mitsuzuka, Koji; Kaiho, Yasuhiro; Ito, Akihiro; Abe, Takaaki; Tominaga, Teiji; Arai, Yoichi

    2017-09-01

    In the setting of partial nephrectomy (PN) for renal cell carcinoma, postoperative renal dysfunction might be caused by surgical procedure. The aim of this study was to clarify the technical safety and renal damage after off-clamp laparoscopic PN (LPN) with a piezo actuator-driven pulsed water jet (ADPJ) system. Eight swine underwent off-clamp LPN with this surgical device, while off-clamp open PN was also performed with radio knife or soft coagulation. The length of the removed kidney was 40 mm, and the renal parenchyma was dissected until the renal calyx became clearly visible. The degree of renal degeneration from the resection surface was compared by Hematoxylin-Eosin staining and immunostaining for 1-methyladenosine, a sensitive marker for the ischemic tissue damage. The mRNA levels of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (Ngal), a biomarker for acute kidney injury, were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Off-clamp LPN with ADPJ system was successfully performed while preserving fine blood vessels and the renal calix with little bleeding. In contrast to other devices, the resection surface obtained with the ADPJ system showed only marginal degree of ischemic changes. Indeed, the expression level of Ngal mRNA was lower in the resection surface obtained with the ADPJ system than that with soft coagulation (p = 0.02). Furthermore, using the excised specimens of renal cell carcinoma, we measured the breaking strength at each site of the human kidney, suggesting the applicability of this ADPJ to clinical trials. In conclusion, off-clamp LPN with the ADPJ system could be safely performed with attenuated renal damage.

  4. The hydrothermal synthesis of hydrotalcite by using different partially soluble and insoluble in water mangesium and aluminium components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bankauskaite A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the influence of different partially soluble and insoluble in water Mg and Al components on the formation of hydrotalcite by using only hydrothermal synthesis was examined. Hydrothermal synthesis duration was 4, 24 and 72 h at 200°C and Mg/Al ratio was equal to 3:1. The starting materials were: 4MgCO3•Mg(OH2•5H2O, Mg5(CO34•(OH2•4H2O, Al(OH3 and γ-Al2O3. It was determined that Mg and Al containing compounds have most important influence on the formation of hydrotalcite by hydrothermal conditions. 4MgCO3⋅Mg(OH2⋅5H2O as raw material is not recommendable for the synthesis of hydrotalcite, because even after 24 h of isothermal curing at 200°C temperature hydrotalcite is not formed and magnesium aluminum hydroxide hydrate is dominant in the synthesis products. Besides, initial magnesium containing component is decomposed into magnesium carbonate and hydroxide. It was examined that hydrotalcite is formed already after 4 h of hydrothermal synthesis at 200°C temperature when Mg/Al molar ratio is equal to 3:1 in the Mg5(CO34•(OH2•4H2O - γ-Al2O3/ Al(OH3 - H2O system. However, together with this compound a fair amount of an intermediate compounds (boehmite and magnesium carbonate are formed. The duration of isothermal curing determines the formation of a hexagonal plates which are characteristic to hydrotalcite.

  5. Molecular density functional theory for water with liquid-gas coexistence and correct pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levesque, Maximilien; Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr; Borgis, Daniel

    2015-04-21

    The solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water is special because liquid and gas are almost at coexistence. In the common hypernetted chain approximation to integral equations, or equivalently in the homogenous reference fluid of molecular density functional theory, coexistence is not taken into account. Hydration structures and energies of nanometer-scale hydrophobic solutes are thus incorrect. In this article, we propose a bridge functional that corrects this thermodynamic inconsistency by introducing a metastable gas phase for the homogeneous solvent. We show how this can be done by a third order expansion of the functional around the bulk liquid density that imposes the right pressure and the correct second order derivatives. Although this theory is not limited to water, we apply it to study hydrophobic solvation in water at room temperature and pressure and compare the results to all-atom simulations. The solvation free energy of small molecular solutes like n-alkanes and hard sphere solutes whose radii range from angstroms to nanometers is now in quantitative agreement with reference all atom simulations. The macroscopic liquid-gas surface tension predicted by the theory is comparable to experiments. This theory gives an alternative to the empirical hard sphere bridge correction used so far by several authors.

  6. Numerical investigation on stress corrosion cracking behavior of dissimilar weld joints in pressurized water reactor plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyan Zhao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There have been incidents recently where stress corrosion cracking (SCC observed in the dissimilar metal weld (DMW joints connecting the reactor pressure vessel (RPV nozzle with the hot leg pipe. Due to the complex microstructure and mechanical heterogeneity in the weld region, dissimilar metal weld joints are more susceptible to SCC than the bulk steels in the simulated high temperature water environment of pressurized water reactor (PWR. Tensile residual stress (RS, in addition to operating loads, has a great contribution to SCC crack growth. Limited experimental conditions, varied influence factors and diverging experimental data make it difficult to accurately predict the SCC behavior of DMW joints with complex geometry, material configuration, operating loads and crack shape. Based on the film slip/dissolution oxidation model and elastic-plastic finite element method (EPFEM, an approach is developed to quantitatively predict the SCC growth rate of a RPV outlet nozzle DMW joint. Moreover, this approach is expected to be a pre-analytical tool for SCC experiment of DMW joints in PWR primary water environment.

  7. Optical modeling of nickel-base alloys oxidized in pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clair, A. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Foucault, M.; Calonne, O. [Areva ANP, Centre Technique Departement Corrosion-Chimie, 30 Bd de l' industrie, BP 181, 71205 Le Creusot (France); Finot, E., E-mail: Eric.Finot@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France)

    2012-10-01

    The knowledge of the aging process involved in the primary water of pressurized water reactor entails investigating a mixed growth mechanism in the corrosion of nickel-base alloys. A mixed growth induces an anionic inner oxide and a cationic diffusion parallel to a dissolution-precipitation process forms the outer zone. The in situ monitoring of the oxidation kinetics requires the modeling of the oxide layer stratification with the full knowledge of the optical constants related to each component. Here, we report the dielectric constants of the alloys 600 and 690 measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry and fitted to a Drude-Lorentz model. A robust optical stratification model was determined using focused ion beam cross-section of thin foils examined by transmission electron microscopy. Dielectric constants of the inner oxide layer depleted in chromium were assimilated to those of the nickel thin film. The optical constants of both the spinels and extern layer were determined. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopic ellipsometry of Ni-base alloy oxidation in pressurized water reactor Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurements of the dielectric constants of the alloys Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical simulation of the mixed oxidation process using a three stack model Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scattered crystallites cationic outer layer; linear Ni-gradient bottom layer Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the refractive index of the spinel and the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers.

  8. Neuro-fuzzy modeling to predict physicochemical and microbiological parameters of partially dried cherry tomato during storage: effects on water activity, temperature and storage time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yang; Li, Yong; Zhou, Ruiyun; Chu, Dinh-Toi; Su, Lijuan; Han, Yongbin; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2016-10-01

    In the study, osmotically dehydrated cherry tomatoes were partially dried to water activity between 0.746 and 0.868, vacuum-packed and stored at 4-30 °C for 60 days. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was utilized to predict the physicochemical and microbiological parameters of these partially dried cherry tomatoes during storage. Satisfactory accuracies were obtained when ANFIS was used to predict the lycopene and total phenolic contents, color and microbial contamination. The coefficients of determination for all the ANFIS models were higher than 0.86 and showed better performance for prediction compared with models developed by response surface methodology. Through ANFIS modeling, the effects of storage conditions on the properties of partially dried cherry tomatoes were visualized. Generally, contents of lycopene and total phenolics decreased with the increase in water activity, temperature and storage time, while aerobic plate count and number of yeasts and molds increased at high water activities and temperatures. Overall, ANFIS approach can be used as an effective tool to study the quality decrease and microbial pollution of partially dried cherry tomatoes during storage, as well as identify the suitable preservation conditions.

  9. The effect of temperature and methanol–water mixture on pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) of anti-HIV analogoues from Bidens pilosa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gbashi, S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) technique has recently gain much attention for the extraction of biologically active compounds from plant tissues for analytical purposes, due to the limited use of organic solvents, its cost...

  10. Simulating partially illegal markets of private tanker water providers on the country level: A multi-agent, hydroeconomic case-study of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassert, C. J. A.; Yoon, J.; Gawel, E.; Klauer, B.; Sigel, K.; Talozi, S.; Lachaut, T.; Selby, P. D.; Knox, S.; Gorelick, S.; Tilmant, A.; Harou, J. J.; Mustafa, D.; Medellin-Azuara, J.; Rajsekhar, D.; Avisse, N.; Zhang, H.

    2016-12-01

    In arid countries around the world, markets of private small-scale water providers, mostly delivering water via tanker trucks, have emerged to balance the shortcomings of public water supply systems. While these markets can provide substantial contributions to meeting customers' water demands, they often partially rely on illegal water abstractions, thus imposing an unregulated and unmonitored strain on ground and surface water resources. Despite their important impacts on water users' welfare and resource sustainability, these markets are still poorly understood. We use a multi-agent, hydroeconomic simulation model, developed as part of the Jordan Water Project, to investigate the role of these markets in a country-wide case-study of Jordan. Jordan's water sector is characterized by a severe and growing scarcity of water resources, high intermittency in the public water network, and a strongly increasing demand due to an unprecedented refugee crisis. The tanker water market serves an important role in providing water from rural wells to households and commercial enterprises, especially during supply interruptions. In order to overcome the lack of direct data about this partially illegal market, we simulate demand and supply for tanker water. The demand for tanker water is conceptualized as a residual demand, remaining after a water user has depleted all available cheap and qualitatively reliable piped water. It is derived from residential and commercial demand functions on the basis of survey data. Tanker water supply is determined by farm simulation models calculating the groundwater pumping cost and the agricultural opportunity cost of tanker water. A market algorithm is then used to match rural supplies with users' demands, accounting for survey data on tanker operators' transport costs and profit expectations. The model is used to gain insights into the size of the tanker markets in all 89 subdistricts of Jordan and their responsiveness to various policy

  11. GOZCARDS Source Data for Water Vapor Monthly Zonal Means on a Geodetic Latitude and Pressure Grid V1.01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GOZCARDS Source Data for Water Vapor Monthly Zonal Averages on a Geodetic Latitude and Pressure Grid product (GozSmlpH2O) contains zonal means and related...

  12. GOZCARDS Merged Data for Water Vapor Monthly Zonal Means on a Geodetic Latitude and Pressure Grid V1.01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GOZCARDS Merged Data for Water Vapor Monthly Zonal Averages on a Geodetic Latitude and Pressure Grid product (GozMmlpH2O) contains zonal means and related...

  13. Where do winds come from? A new theory on how water vapor condensation influences atmospheric pressure and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Makarieva, A M; Sheil, D; Nobre, A D; Li, B -L

    2010-01-01

    Phase transitions of atmospheric water play a ubiquitous role in the Earth's climate system, but their direct impact on atmospheric dynamics has escaped wide attention. Here we examine and advance a theory as to how condensation influences atmospheric pressure through the mass removal of water from the gas phase with a simultaneous account of the latent heat release. Building from the fundamental physical principles we show that condensation is associated with a decline in air pressure in the lower atmosphere. This decline occurs up to a certain height, which ranges from 3 to 4 km for surface temperatures from 10 to 30 deg C. We then estimate the horizontal pressure differences associated with water vapor condensation and find that these are comparable in magnitude with the pressure differences driving observed circulation patterns. The water vapor delivered to the atmosphere via evaporation represents a store of potential energy available to accelerate air and thus drive winds. Our estimates suggest that the...

  14. The effect of pressure and temperature on aluminium hydrolysis: Implications to trace metal scavenging in natural waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.

    Removal of aluminium through precipitation/scavenging in natural waters was evaluated based on its hydrolysis at different temperatures and pressures. In general, pH for the occurrence of cation hydrolysis was lowered with hike in temperature which...

  15. Pressure drop correlation for air/water two-phase flow in horizontal helicoidal pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dong, Z.F.; Awwad, A.; Xin, R.C. [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, an experimental investigation is reported for air/water two-phase flow in horizontal helicoidal pipes. The helicoidal pipes are constructed of Tygon tubing with varying inside diameters of 12.7 mm, 19.1 mm, 25.4 mm, and 38.1 mm wrapped around two different cylindrical concrete forms with outside diameters of 304.8 mm and 609.6 mm each. Also, the helix angle of each helicoidal pipe varies up to 20 degrees. The experiments are conducted for superficial water velocity in the range of U{sub L} = 0.008 {minus} 2.2 m/s and superficial air velocity in the range of U{sub G} = 0.2 {minus} 50 m/s. The pressure drop of the two-phase flow is measured and the data are correlated. It was found that the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation for a straight pipe can represent the data for a helicoidal pipe only in the cases of a high rate of flow; nevertheless, the pressure drop relates strongly to the superficial air/water velocity when the flow rate is lower. The helix angle has almost no effect on the pressure drop, although the pipe and coil diameters have certain effects in low rates of flow. Correlations for two-phase flow in each of the horizontal helicoidal pipes have been established based on the present data. Helicoidal pipes are used extensively in compact heat exchangers, boilers, refrigerators, nuclear reactors, chemical plants, as well as the food, drug, and cryogenics industries.

  16. Tissue distribution of CysAP activity and its relationship to blood pressure and water balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Isabel; Villarejo, Ana Belén; Segarra, Ana Belén; Wangensteen, Rosemary; Banegas, Inmaculada; de Gasparo, Marc; Vanderheyden, Patrick; Zorad, Stefan; Vives, Francisco; Ramírez-Sánchez, Manuel

    2015-08-01

    To better understand the functional role of soluble (Sol) and membrane-bound (MB) cystinyl-aminopeptidase (CysAP) activities, we studied differentially their organ distribution in adult male Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR)with or without treatment with captopril.We searched for a possible tissue-specific association of CysAP with water balance and blood pressure. We used twenty WKY rats distributed in ten controls and ten captopril-treated, and sixteen SHR divided in eight controls and eight captopril-treated. Captopril (100 mg/kg/day) was administered in drinking water for 4 weeks. Systolic blood pressure, water intake and diuresis were measured individually. CysAP was assayed fluorometrically using L-cystine-di-β-naphthylamide as substrate. Sol or MB activities were generally higher in SHR compared to WKY notably in hypothalamus and kidney than in the other tissues. Captopril mainly decreased CysAP in SHR whereas it increased in WKY. The distribution of Sol CysAP was more homogeneous among tissues ofWKY than SHR. In contrast, the distribution of MB CysAP was more heterogeneous than Sol CysAP in both WKY and SHR. This suggests that MB CysAP activity acts in a more tissue-specific manner than Sol CysAP. The majority of the significant correlations between tissue activities and the measured physiological parameters were observed mostly in renal medulla and hypothalamus. Sol and MB CysAP activities, acting separately or in concert and mainly in renal medulla, regulate the function of their susceptible endogenous substrates, and may participate meaningfully in the control of blood pressure and fluid balance.

  17. In-Vessel Melt Retention of Pressurized Water Reactors: Historical Review and Future Research Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Weimin; Yuan, Yidan; Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2016-01-01

    A historical review of in-vessel melt retention (IVR) is given, which is a severe accident mitigation measure extensively applied in Generation III pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The idea of IVR actually originated from the back-fitting of the Generation II reactor Loviisa VVER-440 in order to cope with the core-melt risk. It was then employed in the new deigns such as Westinghouse AP1000, the Korean APR1400 as well as Chinese advanced PWR designs HPR1000 and CAP1400. The most influential...

  18. Mesos-scale modeling of irradiation in pressurized water reactor concrete biological shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pape, Yann [ORNL; Huang, Hai [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2016-01-01

    Neutron irradiation exposure causes aggregate expansion, namely radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE). The structural significance of RIVE on a portion of a prototypical pressurized water reactor (PWR) concrete biological shield (CBS) is investigated by using a meso- scale nonlinear concrete model with inputs from an irradiation transport code and a coupled moisture transport-heat transfer code. RIVE-induced severe cracking onset appears to be triggered by the ini- tial shrinkage-induced cracking and propagates to a depth of > 10 cm at extended operation of 80 years. Relaxation of the cement paste stresses results in delaying the crack propagation by about 10 years.

  19. Vibration analysis of land mine detection using high-pressure water jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denier, Robert; Herrick, Thomas J.

    2000-08-01

    The goal of the waterjet-based mine location and identification project is to investigate the use of waterjets to locate and differentiate buried objects. When a buried object is struck with a high-pressure waterjet, the impact will cause characteristic vibrations in the object depending on the object's shape and composition. These vibrations will be transferred to the ground and then to the water stream that is hitting the object. Some of these vibrations will also be transferred to the air via the narrow channel the waterjet cuts in the ground.

  20. Geophysical investigation of the pressure field produced by water guns at a pond site in La Crosse, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ryan F.; Morrow, William S.

    2015-09-03

    Three different geophysical sensor types were used to characterize the underwater pressure waves generated by the underwater firing of a seismic water gun and their suitability for establishing a pressure barrier to potentially direct or prevent the movement of the Asian carps. The sensors used to collect the seismic information were blast rated hydrophones and underwater blast sensors. Specific location information for the water guns and the sensors was obtained using either laser rangefinders or differentially corrected global positioning systems (GPS).

  1. Pressure Drop in Cold Water Flow in Beds Packed with Several Kinds of Crushed Ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanadori, Michio; Ohira, Akiyoshi

    This paper deals with the pressure drop in cold water flow in the beds packed with crushed ice. 1n each case, ice-packed beds were filled with sevral kinds of crushed ice, and friction-loss coefficients were examined. The following results were obtained. (1) The friction factor of rectangular-type ice-packed beds is smaller than that of ideal sphere beds by about 1/4 to 1/2. (2) The friction factor of small-stone-type ice-packed beds is about twice as large as that of ideal sphere beds. (3) It is difficult to compare the flow model of water in restricted channel of particle-type ice-packed beds with that of ideal packed beds.

  2. A jazz-based approach for optimal setting of pressure reducing valves in water distribution networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paola, Francesco; Galdiero, Enzo; Giugni, Maurizio

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a model for valve setting in water distribution networks (WDNs), with the aim of reducing the level of leakage. The approach is based on the harmony search (HS) optimization algorithm. The HS mimics a jazz improvisation process able to find the best solutions, in this case corresponding to valve settings in a WDN. The model also interfaces with the improved version of a popular hydraulic simulator, EPANET 2.0, to check the hydraulic constraints and to evaluate the performances of the solutions. Penalties are introduced in the objective function in case of violation of the hydraulic constraints. The model is applied to two case studies, and the obtained results in terms of pressure reductions are comparable with those of competitive metaheuristic algorithms (e.g. genetic algorithms). The results demonstrate the suitability of the HS algorithm for water network management and optimization.

  3. A Flooding Induced Station Blackout Analysis for a Pressurized Water Reactor Using the RISMC Toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Mandelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: the RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., component/system activation and to perform statistical analyses. In our case, the simulation of the flooding is performed by using an advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics code called NEUTRINO. The obtained results allow the user to investigate and quantify the impact of timing and sequencing of events on system safety. In addition, the impact of power uprate is determined in terms of both core damage probability and safety margins.

  4. Atmospheric-pressure electric discharge as an instrument of chemical activation of water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybkin, V. V.; Shutov, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    Results of experimental studies and numerical simulations of physicochemical characteristics of plasmas generated in different types of atmospheric-pressure discharges (pulsed streamer corona, gliding electric arc, dielectric barrier discharge, glow-discharge electrolysis, diaphragmatic discharge, and dc glow discharge) used to initiate various chemical processes in water solutions are analyzed. Typical reactor designs are considered. Data on the power supply characteristics, plasma electron parameters, gas temperatures, and densities of active particles in different types of discharges excited in different gases and their dependences on the external parameters of discharges are presented. The chemical composition of active particles formed in water is described. Possible mechanisms of production and loss of plasma particles are discussed.

  5. A comparative summary on streamers of positive corona discharges in water and atmospheric pressure gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Kunihide; Motomura, Hideki

    2015-07-01

    From an intention of summarizing present understandings of positive corona discharges in water and atmospheric pressure gases, we tried to observe streamers in those media by reproducing and complementing previously reported results under a common experimental setup. We used a point-to-plane electrode configuration with different combinations of electrode gap (7 and 19 mm length) and pulsed power sources (0.25 and 2.5 ɛs duration). The general features of streamers were similar and the streamer-to-spark transition was also observed in both the media. However, in the details large differences were observed due to inherent nature of the media. The measured propagation speed of streamers in water of 0.035 × 106 ms-1 was much smaller than the speed in gases (air, N2 and Ar) from 0.4 to 1.1 × 106 ms-1 depending on species. In He the discharge looked glow-like and no streamer was observed. The other characteristics of streamers in gases, such as inception voltage, number of branches and thickness did also depend on the species. The thickness and the length of streamers in water were smaller than those in gases. From the volumetric expansion of a streamer in water after the discharge, the molecular density within the streamer medium was estimated to be rarefied from the density of water by about an order of magnitude in the active discharge phase. We derived also the electron density from the analysis of Stark broadened spectral lines of H and O atoms on the order of 1025 m-3 at the earlier time of the streamer propagation. The analyzed background blackbody radiation, rotational temperature of OH band emission and population density of Cu atomic lines yielded a consistent temperature of the streamer medium between 7000 and 10 000 K. Using the present data with a combination of the analysis of static electric field and previously reported results, we discuss the reason for the relatively low streamer inception voltage in water as compared to the large difference in the

  6. Pump schedules optimisation with pressure aspects in complex large-scale water distribution systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Skworcow

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers optimisation of pump and valve schedules in complex large-scale water distribution networks (WDN, taking into account pressure aspects such as minimum service pressure and pressure-dependent leakage. An optimisation model is automatically generated in the GAMS language from a hydraulic model in the EPANET format and from additional files describing operational constraints, electricity tariffs and pump station configurations. The paper describes in details how each hydraulic component is modelled. To reduce the size of the optimisation problem the full hydraulic model is simplified using module reduction algorithm, while retaining the nonlinear characteristics of the model. Subsequently, a nonlinear programming solver CONOPT is used to solve the optimisation model, which is in the form of Nonlinear Programming with Discontinuous Derivatives (DNLP. The results produced by CONOPT are processed further by heuristic algorithms to generate integer solution. The proposed approached was tested on a large-scale WDN model provided in the EPANET format. The considered WDN included complex structures and interactions between pump stations. Solving of several scenarios considering different horizons, time steps, operational constraints, demand levels and topological changes demonstrated ability of the approach to automatically generate and solve optimisation problems for a variety of requirements.

  7. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications.

  8. Changes in Land Surface Water Dynamics since the 1990s and Relation to Population Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, C.; Papa, F.; Aires, F.; Jimenez, C.; Rossow, W. B.; Matthews, E.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a remote sensing approach based on multi-satellite observations, which provides an unprecedented estimate of monthly distribution and area of land-surface open water over the whole globe. Results for 1993 to 2007 exhibit a large seasonal and inter-annual variability of the inundation extent with an overall decline in global average maximum inundated area of 6% during the fifteen-year period, primarily in tropical and subtropical South America and South Asia. The largest declines of open water are found where large increases in population have occurred over the last two decades, suggesting a global scale effect of human activities on continental surface freshwater: denser population can impact local hydrology by reducing freshwater extent, by draining marshes and wetlands, and by increasing water withdrawals. Citation: Prigent, C., F. Papa, F. Aires, C. Jimenez, W. B. Rossow, and E. Matthews (2012), Changes in land surface water dynamics since the 1990s and relation to population pressure, in section 4, insisting on the potential applications of the wetland dataset.

  9. Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge for Point-of-Use Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alexander; Byrns, Brandon; Shannon, Steven; Knappe, Detlef

    2012-10-01

    Treatment of biological and chemical contaminants is an area of growing global interest where atmospheric pressure plasmas can make a significant contribution. Addressing key challenges of volume processing and operational cost, a large volume 162 MHz coaxial air-plasma source has been developed.footnotetextByrns (2012) J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 (2012) 195204 Because of VHF ballasting effects, the electric discharge is maintained at a steady glow, allowing formation of critical non-equilibrium chemistry. High densities, ne = 10^11-10^12, have been recorded. The atmospheric nature of the device permits straightforward and efficient treatment of water samples. [H^+] concentrations in 150 milliliter tap water samples have been shown to increase by 10^5 after five minutes of discharge exposure. Recent literature has demonstrated that increasing acidity is strongly correlated with a solution's ability to deactivate microbial contaminants.footnotetextTraylor (2011) J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 44 (2011) 472001 The work presented here will explore the impact of treatment gas, system configuration, and power density on water disinfection and PFC abatement. An array of plasma diagnostics, including OES and electrical measurements, are combined with post-process water analysis, including GC-MS and QT analysis of coliform and E.coli bacteria. Development of volume processing atmospheric plasma disinfection methods offers promise for point-of-use treatments in developing areas of the world, potentially supplementing or replacing supply and weather-dependent disinfection methods.

  10. Effect of pressure on the anomalous response functions of a confined water monolayer at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Marco G.; Stokely, Kevin; Stanley, H. Eugene; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2012-11-01

    We study a coarse-grained model for a water monolayer that cannot crystallize due to the presence of confining interfaces, such as protein powders or inorganic surfaces. Using both Monte Carlo simulations and mean field calculations, we calculate three response functions: the isobaric specific heat CP, the isothermal compressibility KT, and the isobaric thermal expansivity αP. At low temperature T, we find two distinct maxima in CP, KT, and |αP|, all converging toward a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) with increasing pressure P. We show that the maximum in CP at higher T is due to the fluctuations of hydrogen (H) bond formation and that the second maximum at lower T is due to the cooperativity among the H bonds. We discuss a similar effect in KT and |αP|. If this cooperativity were not taken into account, both the lower-T maximum and the LLCP would disappear. However, comparison with recent experiments on water hydrating protein powders provides evidence for the existence of the lower-T maximum, supporting the hypothesized LLCP at positive P and finite T. The model also predicts that when P moves closer to the critical P the CP maxima move closer in T until they merge at the LLCP. Considering that other scenarios for water are thermodynamically possible, we discuss how an experimental measurement of the changing separation in T between the two maxima of CP as P increases could determine the best scenario for describing water.

  11. The Effect of Water Pressure and Chlorine Concentration on Microbiological Characteristics of Spray Washed Broiler Carcasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pissol AD

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of water pressure and concentration of dichloromethane after the evisceration system under the fecal decontamination of chicken carcasse  surfaces with and without apparent contamination. From a total of  322 carcasses, 50% were intentionally added chicken droppings in an area of more  than 2 cm2 and the rest of carcasses were kept without fecal inoculation. Escherichia coli and Enterobacteriaceae counting was carried out in samples immediately after the inoculation (initial counting and after different treatments. Treatments consisted of water with different pressures (1.5,  3.5 and  5.5 Kgf/cm2, and the addition of a echnological adjuvant (dichloride at the concentrations of 0, 5 and 10 ppm. The results were validated using  40 chicken carcasses for each treatment by means of a  22  factorial statistical design. The results showed no significant differences (P

  12. Characterization of pressurized hot water extracts of grape pomace: chemical and biological antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Salinas, J R; Vergara, Mauricio; Altamirano, Claudia; Gonzalez, Álvaro; Pérez-Correa, J R

    2015-03-15

    Pressurized hot water extracts obtained at different temperatures possess different compositions and antioxidant activities and, consequently, different bioactivities. We characterized two pressurized hot water extracts from grape pomace obtained at 100°C (GPE100) and 200°C (GPE200) in terms of antioxidant activity and composition, as well as protective effect on cell growth and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in a HL-60 cell culture under oxidative conditions. GPE100 extracts were richer in polyphenols and poorer in Maillard reaction products (MRPs) than were GPE200 extracts. Moreover, hydroxymethylfurfural was detected only in GPE200. Both extracts exhibited similar protective effects on cell growth (comparable to the effect of trolox). In addition, GPE100 strongly decreased the Δψm loss, reaching values even lower than those of the control culture. This protective effect may be related to its high polyphenols content. At the highest concentration assessed, both extracts showed strong cytotoxicity, especially GPE200. This cytotoxicity could be related to their MRPs content. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hyperspectral retrieval of phycocyanin in potable water sources using genetic algorithm-partial least squares (GA-PLS) modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kaishan; Li, Lin; Li, Shuai; Tedesco, Lenore; Hall, Bob; Li, Zuchuan

    2012-08-01

    Eagle Creek, Morse and Geist reservoirs, drinking water supply sources for the Indianapolis, Indiana, USA metropolitan region, are experiencing nuisance cyanobacterial blooms. Hyperspectral remote sensing has been proven to be an effective tool for phycocyanin (C-PC) concentration retrieval, a proxy pigment unique to cyanobacteria in freshwater ecosystems. An adaptive model based on genetic algorithm and partial least squares (GA-PLS), together with three-band algorithm (TBA) and other band ratio algorithms were applied to hyperspectral data acquired from in situ (ASD spectrometer) and airborne (AISA sensor) platforms. The results indicated that GA-PLS achieved high correlation between measured and estimated C-PC for GR (RMSE = 16.3 μg/L, RMSE% = 18.2; range (R): 2.6-185.1 μg/L), MR (RMSE = 8.7 μg/L, RMSE% = 15.6; R: 3.3-371.0 μg/L) and ECR (RMSE = 19.3 μg/L, RMSE% = 26.4; R: 0.7-245.0 μg/L) for the in situ datasets. TBA also performed well compared to other band ratio algorithms due to its optimal band tuning process and the reduction of backscattering effects through the third band. GA-PLS (GR: RMSE = 24.1 μg/L, RMSE% = 25.2, R: 25.2-185.1 μg/L; MR: RMSE = 15.7 μg/L, RMSE% = 37.4, R: 2.0-135.1 μg/L) and TBA (GR: RMSE = 28.3 μg/L, RMSE% = 30.1; MR: RMSE = 17.7 μg/L, RMSE% = 41.9) methods results in somewhat lower accuracy using AISA imagery data, which is likely due to atmospheric correction or radiometric resolution. GA-PLS (TBA) obtained an RMSE of 24.82 μg/L (35.8 μg/L), and RMSE% of 31.24 (43.5) between measured and estimated C-PC for aggregated datasets. C-PC maps were generated through GA-PLS using AISA imagery data. The C-PC concentration had an average value of 67.31 ± 44.23 μg/L in MR with a large range of concentration, while the GR had a higher average value 103.17 ± 33.45 μg/L.

  14. Aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-01

    Research is being conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify the significant factors related to occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of concrete containments, and to make recommendations on use of risk models in regulatory decisions; (2) provide NRC reviewers a means of establishing current structural capacity margins for steel containments, and concrete containments as limited by liner integrity; and (3) provide recommendations, as appropriate, on information to be requested of licensees for guidance that could be utilized by NRC reviewers in assessing the seriousness of reported incidences of containment degradation. In meeting these objectives research is being conducted in two primary task areas - pressure boundary condition assessment and root-cause resolution practices, and reliability-based condition assessments. Under the first task area a degradation assessment methodology was developed for use in characterizing the in-service condition of metal and concrete containment pressure boundary components and quantifying the amount of damage that is present. An assessment of available destructive and nondestructive techniques for examining steel containments and liners is ongoing. Under the second task area quantitative structural reliability analysis methods are being developed for application to degraded metallic pressure boundaries to provide assurances that they will be able to withstand future extreme loads during the desired service period with a level of reliability that is sufficient for public safety. To date, mathematical models that describe time-dependent changes in steel due to aggressive environmental factors have been identified, and statistical data supporting their use in time-dependent reliability analysis have been summarized.

  15. Modified water solubility of milk protein concentrate powders through the application of static high pressure treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udabage, Punsandani; Puvanenthiran, Amirtha; Yoo, Jin Ah; Versteeg, Cornelis; Augustin, Mary Ann

    2012-02-01

    The effects of high pressure (HP) treatment (100-400 MPa at 10-60 °C) on the solubility of milk protein concentrate (MPC) powders were tested. The solubility, measured at 20 °C, of fresh MPC powders made with no HP treatment was 66%. It decreased by 10% when stored for 6 weeks at ambient temperature (~20 °C) and continued to decrease to less than 50% of its initial solubility after 12 months of storage. Of the combinations of pressure and heat used, a pressure of 200 MPa at 40 °C applied to the concentrate before spray drying was found to be the most beneficial for improved solubility of MPC powders. This combination of pressure/heat improved the initial cold water solubility to 85%. The solubility was maintained at this level after 6 weeks storage at ambient temperature and 85% of the initial solubility was preserved after 12 months. The improved solubility of MPC powders on manufacture and on storage are attributed to an altered surface composition arising from an increased concentration of non-micellar casein in the milk due to HP treatment prior to drying. The improved solubility of high protein powders (95% protein) made from blends of sodium caseinate and whey protein isolate compared with MPC powders (~85% protein) made from ultrafiltered/diafiltered milk confirmed the detrimental role of micellar casein on solubility. The results suggest that increasing the non-micellar casein content by HP treatment of milk or use of blends of sodium caseinate and whey proteins are strategies that may be used to obtain high protein milk powders with enhanced solubility.

  16. Air humidity and water pressure effects on the performance of air-cathode microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Yongtae

    2014-02-01

    To better understand how air cathode performance is affected by air humidification, microbial fuel cells were operated under different humidity conditions or water pressure conditions. Maximum power density decreased from 1130 ± 30 mW m-2 with dry air to 980 ± 80 mW m -2 with water-saturated air. When the cathode was exposed to higher water pressures by placing the cathode in a horizontal position, with the cathode oriented so it was on the reactor bottom, power was reduced for both with dry (1030 ± 130 mW m-2) and water-saturated (390 ± 190 mW m-2) air. Decreased performance was partly due to water flooding of the catalyst, which would hinder oxygen diffusion to the catalyst. However, drying used cathodes did not improve performance in electrochemical tests. Soaking the cathode in a weak acid solution, but not deionized water, mostly restored performance (960 ± 60 mW m-2), suggesting that there was salt precipitation in the cathode that was enhanced by higher relative humidity or water pressure. These results showed that cathode performance could be adversely affected by both flooding and the subsequent salt precipitation, and therefore control of air humidity and water pressure may need to be considered for long-term MFC operation. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. High-pressure vapor-liquid equilibria of systems containing ethylene glycol, water and methane - Experimental measurements and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Berg, Ole J.; Solbraa, Even

    2007-01-01

    This work presents new experimental phase equilibrium measurements of the binary MEG-methane and the ternary MEG-water-methane system at low temperatures and high pressures which are of interest to applications related to natural gas processing. Emphasis is given to MEG and water solubility...

  18. Improving the oxidation resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water by electropolishing treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Guangdong [Institute of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai, 200072 (China); Lu, Zhanpeng, E-mail: zplu@shu.edu.cn [Institute of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai, 200072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steels, Shanghai University, Shanghai, 200072 (China); Ru, Xiangkun; Chen, Junjie; Xiao, Qian; Tian, Yongwu [Institute of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai, 200072 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The oxidation behavior of 316L stainless steel specimens after emery paper grounding, mechanical polishing, and electropolishing were investigated in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water at 310 °C for 120 and 500 h. Electropolishing afforded improved oxidation resistance especially during the early immersion stages. Duplex oxide films comprising a coarse Fe-rich outer layer and a fine Cr-rich inner layer formed on all specimens after 500 h of immersion. Only a compact layer was observed on the electropolished specimen after 120 h of immersion. The enrichment of chromium in the electropolished layer contributed to the passivity and protectiveness of the specimen. - Highlights: • Duplex oxide films on ground and mechanically polished specimens. • Compact oxide on electropolished specimen after 120 h immersion. • Large spinel outer layer rich in Fe and fine spinel inner layer rich in Cr. • Electropolishing improved oxidation resistance especially at the early stages. • Inhomogeneous Cr-rich inner layer with granular areas affected by surface treatment.

  19. Combined effects of high hydrostatic pressure and sodium nitrite on color, water holding capacity and texture of frankfurter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, G.; Csehi, B.; Palotas, P.; Toth, A.; Kenesei, Gy; Pasztor-Huszar, K.; Friedrich, L.

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium nitrite and high hydrostatic pressure on the color, water holding capacity (WHC) and texture characteristics of frankfurter. Three hundred, 450 and 600 MPa (5 minutes; 20 °C) and 50, 75, 100 and 125 ppm (calculated on weight of meat) sodium nitrite were applied. Parameters were measured right after the pressure treatment. Data were evaluated with two-way analysis of variance (p 0.05) with pressure levels and sodium nitrite amounts as factors. Nitrite reduction significantly increased lightness (L*) and resulted in decreased redness (a*) value. The pressure treatments decreased the lightness at all nitrite concentrations and did not significantly affect the red color of frankfurters. Fifty and 75 ppm nitrite and pressurization at 300 or 450 MPa improved the water holding property of frankfurter. The pressure treatment did not significantly affect the WHC but changing the nitrite amount had significant effect on it. Interactive effect occurred between pressure levels and nitrite concentrations for hardness. The pressure treatment increased and the nitrite reduction decreased hardness. Significant changes were found in cohesiveness at 450 and 600 MPa in frankfurters containing 50 and 75 ppm nitrite: pressure treatment at higher levels and nitrite reduction decreased the value of cohesiveness.

  20. Design of a supercritical water-cooled reactor. Pressure vessel and internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Kai

    2008-08-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a light water reactor with supercritical steam conditions which has been investigated within the 5th Framework Program of the European Commission. Due to the supercritical pressure of 25 MPa, water, used as moderator and as coolant, flows as a single phase through the core and can be directly fed to the turbine. Using the technology of coal fired power plants with supercritical steam conditions, the heat-up in the core is done in several steps to achieve the targeted high steam outlet temperature of 500.C without exceeding available cladding material limits. Based on a first design of a fuel assembly cluster for a HPLWR with a single pass core, the surrounding internals and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are dimensioned for the first time, following the safety standards of the nuclear safety standards commission in Germany. Furthermore, this design is extended to the incorporation of core arrangements with two and three passes. The design of the internals and the RPV are verified using mechanical or, in the case of large thermal deformations, combined mechanical and thermal stress analyses. Additionally, a passive safety component for the feedwater inlet of the RPV of the HPLWR is designed. Its purpose is the reduction of the mass flow rate in case of a LOCA for a feedwater line break until further steps are executed. Starting with a simple vortex diode, several steps are executed to enhance the performance of the diode and adapt it to this application. Then, this first design is further optimized using combined 1D and 3D flow analyses. Parametric studies determine the performance and characteristic for changing mass flow rates for this backflow limiter. (orig.)

  1. Acute blood pressure response in hypertensive elderly women immediately after water aerobics exercise: A crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Raphael Martins; Vilaça-Alves, José; Noleto, Marcelo Vasconcelos; Silva, Juliana Sá; Costa, Andressa Moura; Silva, Christoffer Novais Farias; Póvoa, Thaís Inácio Rolim; Lehnen, Alexandre Machado

    2017-01-01

    Water aerobics exercise is widely recommended for elderly people. However, little is known about the acute effects on hemodynamic variables. Thus, we assessed the effects of a water aerobic session on blood pressure in hypertensive elderly women. Fifty hypertensive elderly women aged 67.8 ± 4.1 years, 1.5 ± 0.6 m high and BMI 28.6 ± 3.9 kg/m(2), participated in a crossover clinical trial. The experiment consisted of a 45-minute water aerobics session (70%-75% HRmax adjusted for the aquatic environment) (ES) and a control session (no exercise for 45 minutes) (CS). Heart rate was monitored using a heart rate monitor and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) measurements were taken using a semi-automatic monitor before and immediately after the sessions, and at 10, 20 and 30 minutes thereafter. It was using a generalized estimating equation (GEE) with Bonferroni's post-hoc test (p exercise, BP declined in ES by a greater magnitude than in CS (SBP 7.5 mmHg, 6.2%, p = 0.005 and DBP 3.8 mmHg, 5.5%, p = 0.013). At 20 minutes after exercise and thereafter, SBP and DBP were similar in both ES and CS. In conclusion, BP returned to control levels within 10-20 minutes remaining unchanged until 30 minutes after exercise, and post-exercise hypotension was not observed. Besides, BP changed after exercise was a safe rise of small magnitude for hypertensive people.

  2. Removal of aqueous nC60 fullerene from water by low pressure membrane filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, R; Nijmeijer, K; Cornelissen, E R

    2016-03-15

    The potential environmental and health risks of engineered nanoparticles such as buckminsterfullerene C60 in water require their removal during the production of drinking water. We present a study focusing on (i) the removal mechanism and (ii) the elucidation of the role of the membrane pore size during removal of nC60 fullerene nanoparticle suspensions in dead-end microfiltration and ultrafiltration mimicking separation in real industrial water treatment plants. Membranes were selected with pore sizes ranging from 18 nm to 500 nm to determine the significance of the nC60 to membrane pore size ratio and the adsorption affinity between nC60 and membrane material during filtration. Experiments were carried out with a dead-end bench-scale system operated at constant flux conditions including a hydraulic backwash cleaning procedure. nC60 nanoparticles can be efficiently removed by low pressure membrane technology with smaller and, unexpectedly, also by mostly similar or larger pores than the particle size, although the nC60 filtration behaviour appeared to be different. The nC60 size to membrane pore size ratio and the ratio of the cake-layer deposition resistance to the clean membrane resistance, both play an important role on the nC60 filtration behaviour and on the efficiency of the backwash procedure recovering the initial membrane filtration conditions. These results become specifically significant in the context of drinking water production, for which they provide relevant information for an accurate selection between membrane processes and operational parameters for the removal of nC60 in the drinking water treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of High Hydrostatic Pressure Combined with Moderate Heat to Inactivate Pressure-Resistant Bacteria in Water-Boiled Salted Duck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Keping; Feng, Yulin; Wang, Kai; Bai, Yun; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of high hydrostatic pressure combined with moderate heat to inactivate pressure-resistant bacteria in water-boiled salted duck meat (WBSDM), and to establish suitable procedures to improve the quality of WBSDM. The conditions (300 MPa/60 °C, 400 MPa/60 °C, and 500 MPa/50 °C) effectively inactivated the pressure-resistant bacteria (Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus warneri) in WBSDM. Although more pressure-resistant than S. warneri, the above treatment conditions inactivated B. cereus more than 10(7) CFU/mL in buffer, and more than 10(6) CFU/g in WBSDM, and did not cause any changes in color, texture, or moisture content of products. The interaction between pressure and temperature is a more significant factor than only pressure in inactivating both B. cereus and S. warneri, the treatment of WBSDM at 400 MPa/ 60 °C/ 10 min is the most practical condition for postprocess of WBSDM after cooking. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  4. Salinity of injection water and its impact on oil recovery absolute permeability, residual oil saturation, interfacial tension and capillary pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Salehi, Mehdi; Omidvar, Pouria; Naeimi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory tests and field applications show that low-salinity water flooding could lead to significant reduction of residual oil saturation. There has been a growing interest with an increasing number of low-salinity water flooding studies. However, there are few quantitative studies on flow and transport behavior of low-salinity IOR processes. This paper presents laboratory investigation of the effect of salinity injection water on oil recovery, pressure drop, permeability, IFT and relat...

  5. Computational investigations of streamers in a single bubble suspended in distilled water under atmospheric pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashish; Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2016-09-01

    We present a computational model of nanosecond streamers generated in helium bubbles immersed in distilled water at the atmospheric pressure conditions. The model is based on the self-consistent, multispecies and the continuum description of plasma and takes into account the presence of water vapor in the gas bubble for a more accurate description of the kinetics of the discharge. We find that the dynamic characteristics of the streamer discharge are completely different at low and high over voltages. We observe that the polarity of the trigger voltage has a substantial effect on initiation, transition and evolution stages of streamers with the volumetric distribution of species in the streamer channel much more uniform for negative trigger voltages due to the presence of multiple streamers. We also find that the presence of water vapor significantly influences the distribution of the dominant species in the streamer trail and has a profound effect on the flux of the dominant species to the bubble wall. The research reported in this publication was supported by Competitive Research Funding from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).

  6. Water adsorption, solvation and deliquescence of alkali halide thin films on SiO2 studied by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arima, Kenta; Jiang, Peng; Deng, Xingyi; Bluhm, Henrik; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-03-31

    The adsorption of water on KBr thin films evaporated onto SiO2 was investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At 30percent RH adsorbed water reaches a coverage of approximately one monolayer. As the humidity continues to increase, the coverage of water remains constant or increases very slowly until 60percent RH, followed by a rapid increase up to 100percent RH. At low RH a significant number of the Br atoms are lost due to irradiation damage. With increasing humidity solvation increases ion mobility and gives rise to a partial recovery of the Br/K ratio. Above 60percent RH the increase of the Br/K ratio accelerates. Above the deliquescence point (85percent RH), the thickness of the water layer continues to increase and reaches more than three layers near saturation. The enhancement of the Br/K ratio at this stage is roughly a factor 2.3 on a 0.5 nm KBr film, indicating a strong preferential segregation of Br ions to the surface of the thin saline solution on SiO2.

  7. Subacute blood pressure response in elderly hypertensive women after a water exercise session : a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Raphael M; Macedo, Camilla B; Araújo, Siomara F M; Santos, Jessica C; Borges, Viviane S; Soares, Ademar A; Ayres, Flávio; Pfrimer, Linda M

    2012-12-01

    There are few studies relating the practice of water exercises and blood pressure responses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the subacute blood pressure behaviour in elderly hypertensive women after a water exercise session. This was a controlled clinical trial, carried out with 16 hypertensive elderly women with the following characteristics (mean ± SD): age 66 ± 2.94 years, body weight 68.43 ± 12.08 kg, height 158 ± 5.34 cm and body mass index 27.32 ± 4.30 kg/m(2). The study occurred on 2 days, 48 hours apart, with an experimental protocol and a control protocol. The experimental protocol underwent a moderately intense and predominantly aerobic 40-minute session with water exercises for the upper and lower limbs. The control protocol did not enter the pool and did not exercise, but all other procedures were similar to those of the experimental protocol. The blood pressure measurements were performed at times before and every 10 minutes for 30 minutes after the protocols. Student's t-test was used to determine if the averages of the two samples were significantly different. Blood pressure increased significantly but not greatly after the water exercise session, but this did not happen with the control protocol. Systolic blood pressure in the experimental protocol decreased significantly only 30 minutes after the exercise session, which did not occur in the control protocol. Diastolic blood pressure, on the other hand, decreased significantly at minutes 10, 20 and 30. This also did not occur with the control protocol, but an intergroup analysis showed that diastolic blood pressure was similar for the two protocols. The results of this study show that a prescription of water exercises can be carried out in relative safety with this group of patients, and that systolic blood pressure tended to decrease, as shown by the measurement at minute 30.

  8. Thermal-Hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactor core by using single heated channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactor as a basis of reactor safety has a very important role in reactor design and control. The thermal-hydraulic analysis provides input data to the reactor-physics analysis, whereas the latter gives information about the distribution of heat sources, which is needed to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study single heated channel model as a very fast model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of pressurized water reactor core has been developed. For verifying the results of this model, we used RELAP5 code as US nuclear regulatory approved thermal hydraulics code. The results of developed single heated channel model have been checked with RELAP5 results for WWER-1000. This comparison shows the capability of single heated channel model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of reactor core.

  9. Pressurized hot water extraction of β-glucans from Cantharellus tubaeformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Seoane, Paula; González-Muñoz, María Jesús; Falqué, Elena; Domínguez, Herminia

    2018-02-20

    Cantharellus tubaeformis was processed by pressurized hot water extraction (80-240 °C) with the aim of maximizing the extraction of oligomeric fractions, β-glucans and the in vitro antioxidant properties of the extracts. Increased severity of treatment enhanced the extraction yields above 62% at temperatures of 210 ºC or higher, corresponding to the maximum β-glucan yields. The highest antioxidant capacity was obtained at 170 ºC, although the highest content of phenolic compounds was obtained at the highest severity studied. This hydrothermal treatment can be considered a suitable process to obtain extracts with antioxidant properties and rich in β-glucans. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Pressurized Hot Water Extraction of anthocyanins from red onion: A study on extraction and degradation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Erik V; Liu, Jiayin; Sjöberg, Per J R; Danielsson, Rolf; Turner, Charlotta

    2010-03-17

    Pressurized Hot Water Extraction (PHWE) is a quick, efficient and environmentally friendly technique for extractions. However, when using PHWE to extract thermally unstable analytes, extraction and degradation effects occur at the same time, and thereby compete. At first, the extraction effect dominates, but degradation effects soon take over. In this paper, extraction and degradation rates of anthocyanins from red onion were studied with experiments in a static batch reactor at 110 degrees C. A total extraction curve was calculated with data from the actual extraction and degradation curves, showing that more anthocyanins, 21-36% depending on the species, could be extracted if no degradation occurred, but then longer extraction times would be required than those needed to reach the peak level in the apparent extraction curves. The results give information about the different kinetic processes competing during an extraction procedure. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Luminescence of mesoporous silicon powders treated by high-pressure water vapor annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelloz, Bernard; Loni, Armando; Canham, Leigh; Koshida, Nobuyoshi

    2012-07-01

    We have studied the photoluminescence of nanocrystalline silicon microparticle powders fabricated by fragmentation of PSi membranes. Several porosities were studied. Some powders have been subjected to further chemical etching in HF in order to reduce the size of the silicon skeleton and reach quantum sizes. High-pressure water vapor annealing was then used to enhance both the luminescence efficiency and stability. Two visible emission bands were observed. A red band characteristic of the emission of Si nanocrystals and a blue band related to localized centers in oxidized powders. The blue band included a long-lived component, with a lifetime exceeding 1 sec. Both emission bands depended strongly on the PSi initial porosity. The colors of the processed powders were tunable from brown to off-white, depending on the level of oxidation. The surface area and pore volume of some powders were also measured and discussed. The targeted applications are in cosmetics and medicine.

  12. Power level effects on thorium-based fuels in pressure-tube heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromley, B.P.; Edwards, G.W.R., E-mail: blair.bromley@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Sambavalingam, P. [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Lattice and core physics modeling and calculations have been performed to quantify the impact of power/flux levels on the reactivity and achievable burnup for 35-element fuel bundles made with Pu/Th or U-233/Th. The fissile content in these bundles has been adjusted to produce on the order of 20 MWd/kg burnup in homogeneous cores in a 700 MWe-class pressure-tube heavy water reactor, operating on a once-through thorium cycle. Results demonstrate that the impact of the power/flux level is modest for Pu/Th fuels but significant for U-233/Th fuels. In particular, high power/flux reduces the breeding and burnup potential of U-233/Th fuels. Thus, there may be an incentive to operate reactors with U-233/Th fuels at a lower power density or to develop alternative refueling schemes that will lower the time-average specific power, thereby increasing burnup.(author)

  13. Pressure effect on the amide I frequency of the solvated {alpha}-helical structure in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takekiyo, T [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Defence Academy, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, 239-8686 (Japan); Yoshimura, Y [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Defence Academy, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, 239-8686 (Japan); Shimizu, A [Department of Environmental Engineering for Symbiosis Factory of Engineering, Soka University, 1-326 Tanjincho, Hachioji, Tokyo, 192-8577 (Japan); Koizumi, T [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Defence Academy, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, 239-8686 (Japan); Kato, M [Department of Applied Chemistry, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Noji-Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577 (Japan); Taniguchi, Y [Department of Applied Chemistry, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Noji-Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577 (Japan)

    2007-10-24

    As a model system of the pressure dependence of the amide I mo