WorldWideScience

Sample records for water outer continental

  1. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Natural Gas Pipelines - Gulf of Mexico Region NAD 27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This polyline data set contains the locations of oil and gas pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf federal waters that are associated with the oil...

  2. Outer Continental Shelf Lease Blocks - Alaska Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Outer Continental Shelf block outlines in ArcGIS shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. OCS blocks are used to define small geographic...

  3. Climatic Atlas of the Outer Continental Shelf Waters and Coastal Regions of Alaska. Volume 2. Bering Sea. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Water. the north Aleutian coast. Typically, this current wind, tide, estuarian, and thermohaline effects. The current is thought to bifurcate at the...is similar to the stretch The only storm surges discovered in this area shallow, with a gently sloping sea floor that is from the Kuskokwim River to

  4. Grain Size Data from the NOAA Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains grain size data from samples acquired under the NOAA Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from the Outer...

  5. Potential alternative energy technologies on the Outer Continental Shelf.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Assessment

    2007-04-20

    This technical memorandum (TM) describes the technology requirements for three alternative energy technologies for which pilot and/or commercial projects on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are likely to be proposed within the next five to seven years. For each of the alternative technologies--wind, wave, and ocean current--the TM first presents an overview. After each technology-specific overview, it describes the technology requirements for four development phases: site monitoring and testing, construction, operation, and decommissioning. For each phase, the report covers the following topics (where data are available): facility description, electricity generated, ocean area (surface and bottom) occupied, resource requirements, emissions and noise sources, hazardous materials stored or used, transportation requirements, and accident potential. Where appropriate, the TM distinguishes between pilot-scale (or demonstration-scale) facilities and commercial-scale facilities.

  6. 77 FR 75656 - Research Lease for Renewable Energy on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Virginia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Research Lease for Renewable Energy on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS... Wind Power Development on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Virginia-- Call for Information.... The EA and FONSI can be found at: http://www.boem.gov/Renewable-Energy-Program/Smart-from-the-Start...

  7. 75 FR 82055 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Massachusetts...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... and Enforcement [Docket No. BOEM-2010-0063] Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental..., Regulation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: RFI in Commercial Wind Energy Leasing Offshore Massachusetts... more commercial leases for the construction of a wind energy project(s) on the Outer Continental Shelf...

  8. 78 FR 33897 - Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 2 (ATLW2) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts-- Final Sale...) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts... for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Rhode Island and...

  9. Biotopes of the Oregon outer continental shelf (OCS) proposed wind farm site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This biotope raster is part of a data release of the Oregon outer continental shelf (OCS) proposed wind farm map site. The biotopes mapped in this area have been...

  10. 77 FR 39508 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... comments on the EA. The EA can be found online at http://www.boem.gov/Renewable-Energy-Program/Smart-from...

  11. 78 FR 33908 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy...-Program/Smart-from-the-Start/Index.aspx . Authority: This notice is published pursuant to 43 CFR 46.305...

  12. Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Sand and Gravel Borrow Areas (Lease Areas)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — Federal outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Sand and Gravel Borrow Areas (Lease Areas) are polygons which are maintained by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM),...

  13. BLM/OCS South Texas Outer Continental Shelf (STOCS) Project Sediment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The South Texas Outer Continental Shelf Project (STOCS) conducted by the University of Texas and the USGS with funding from BLM/NOAA. The USGS produced geochemical...

  14. Seafloor character of the Oregon outer continental shelf (OCS) proposed wind farm site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This seafloor-character raster is part of a data release of the Oregon outer continental shelf (OCS) proposed wind farm map site. The substrate classes mapped in...

  15. Outer Continental Shelf Lease Blocks - Pacific Region - West Coast NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Outer Continental Shelf block outlines in ArcGIS shape file format for the BOEM Pacific Region. OCS blocks are used to define small geographic...

  16. BLM/OCS Southern California Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Baseline Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data in this file were produced by Science Applications, Inc., prime contractor on the Bureau of Land Management/Outer Continental Shelf - Southern California...

  17. 77 FR 57572 - Notice of Arrival on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Notice of Arrival on the Outer Continental Shelf AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... proposed changes to the computer application for electronic Notice of Arrival (NOA) on the Outer..., facilities, and Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODUs) operating on the OCS. This information is currently...

  18. Diversity and Distribution Patterns of Cetaceans in the Subtropical Southwestern Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf and Slope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Couto Di Tullio

    Full Text Available Temporal and spatial patterns of cetacean diversity and distribution were investigated through eight ship-based surveys carried out during spring and autumn between 2009 and 2014 on the outer continental shelf (~150m and slope (1500m off southeastern and southern Brazil (~23°S to ~34°S. The survey area was divided into southeast and south areas according to their oceanographic characteristics. Twenty-one species were observed in 503 sightings. The overall number of species was similar between the two areas, though it was higher in the spring in the south area. Five species were dominant and diversity varied more seasonally than spatially. ANOVA and kernel analyses showed that overall cetacean densities were higher in spring compared to autumn. Physeter macrocephalus, the most frequent species, concentrated throughout the south area at depths over 1000m in both seasons. Despite the overlapped occurrence at a broader scale, small delphinids presented latitudinal and in-offshore gradients as well as seasonal variation in distribution patterns, which could indicate habitat partitioning between some species. Delphinus delphis was only recorded in the south and its density decreased in areas where the presence of Stenella frontalis increased, mainly beyond the 250m isobath. Densities of S. longirostris and S. attenuata increased in lower latitudes and beyond the shelf break. The large delphinids Tursiops truncatus and Globicephala melas formed mixed groups in many occasions and were observed along the study area around depths of 500m. Grampus griseus was twice as frequent in the south area and densities increased in waters deeper than 600m. As expected, densities of both small and large migratory whales were higher during spring, over the continental slope, in the southeast area. The results presented here provided strong evidence on the importance of the outer continental shelf and slope to a diverse community of cetaceans occurring in the

  19. Diversity and Distribution Patterns of Cetaceans in the Subtropical Southwestern Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf and Slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tullio, Juliana Couto; Gandra, Tiago B R; Zerbini, Alexandre N; Secchi, Eduardo R

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of cetacean diversity and distribution were investigated through eight ship-based surveys carried out during spring and autumn between 2009 and 2014 on the outer continental shelf (~150m) and slope (1500m) off southeastern and southern Brazil (~23°S to ~34°S). The survey area was divided into southeast and south areas according to their oceanographic characteristics. Twenty-one species were observed in 503 sightings. The overall number of species was similar between the two areas, though it was higher in the spring in the south area. Five species were dominant and diversity varied more seasonally than spatially. ANOVA and kernel analyses showed that overall cetacean densities were higher in spring compared to autumn. Physeter macrocephalus, the most frequent species, concentrated throughout the south area at depths over 1000m in both seasons. Despite the overlapped occurrence at a broader scale, small delphinids presented latitudinal and in-offshore gradients as well as seasonal variation in distribution patterns, which could indicate habitat partitioning between some species. Delphinus delphis was only recorded in the south and its density decreased in areas where the presence of Stenella frontalis increased, mainly beyond the 250m isobath. Densities of S. longirostris and S. attenuata increased in lower latitudes and beyond the shelf break. The large delphinids Tursiops truncatus and Globicephala melas formed mixed groups in many occasions and were observed along the study area around depths of 500m. Grampus griseus was twice as frequent in the south area and densities increased in waters deeper than 600m. As expected, densities of both small and large migratory whales were higher during spring, over the continental slope, in the southeast area. The results presented here provided strong evidence on the importance of the outer continental shelf and slope to a diverse community of cetaceans occurring in the subtropical Southwestern

  20. 77 FR 5552 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Maryland-Call for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf...), Interior. ] ACTION: Call for Information and Nominations for Commercial Leases for Wind Power on the Outer... obtaining commercial wind leases in an area on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) offshore Maryland. Based on...

  1. 75 FR 18404 - Safety Zone; FRONTIER DISCOVERER, Outer Continental Shelf Drillship, Chukchi and Beaufort Sea...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... DRILLSHIP will significantly reduce the threat of allisions, oil spills, and releases of natural gas, and... reduction of risk of allisions, oil spills, and releases of natural gas, and thereby protect the safety of... drilling vessels is an excellent idea. The Coast Guard issues safety zones for Outer Continental Shelf...

  2. 77 FR 5830 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Massachusetts AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM..., and the public in the Department of the Interior's (DOI) ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy initiative offshore Massachusetts. The purpose of the ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy initiative is to...

  3. 76 FR 7226 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Characterization Activities; Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ... Characterization Activities; Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore NJ, DE, MD, and VA AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... developers, and the public in the Department of the Interior's (DOI) ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy... Salazar announced the ``Smart from the Start'' renewable energy initiative to accelerate responsible...

  4. 77 FR 74218 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore North Carolina AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM... Department of the Interior's (DOI) ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy initiative offshore North Carolina. The ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy initiative is designed to identify areas that appear to be...

  5. 77 FR 5560 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia AGENCY: Bureau...: http://www.boem.gov/Renewable-Energy-Program/Smart-from-the-Start/Index.aspx . Authority: This NOA of... of the Interior Ken Salazar announced the ``Smart from the Start'' renewable energy initiative to...

  6. 77 FR 5545 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power Development on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Leasing for Wind Power Development on the Outer Continental... lessee to propose the construction of a wind energy project(s) on the OCS offshore Virginia. Although the... specific interest in the acquisition of commercial wind lease(s) in some or all of the area and to...

  7. 78 FR 59263 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ..., Nitrogen dioxide, Nitrogen oxides, Outer continental shelf, Ozone, Particulate matter, Permits, Reporting... Production and Separation (Adopted 07/19/01) Rule 326 Storage of Reactive Organic Compound Liquids (Adopted... Impact Analysis and Modeling (Adopted 04/17/97) Rule 808 New Source Review for Major Sources of Hazardous...

  8. 76 FR 13205 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Interior... of Restricted Joint Bidders'' that contained an error. We are correcting the name of an oil company...

  9. 77 FR 24980 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY... Group II. Shell Oil Company Shell Offshore Inc. SWEPI LP Shell Frontier Oil & Gas Inc. SOI Finance Inc... Alaska, Inc. Phillips Pt. Arguello Production Company Burlington Resources Oil & Gas Company LP...

  10. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. 76 FR 55090 - Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... Renewable Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management... will use Form 0008 to issue commercial renewable energy leases on the Outer Continental Shelf. In the preamble to the April 29, 2009, Final Rule, ``Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on...

  12. 77 FR 24980 - Record of Decision for Authorizing the Use of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Sand Resources in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Record of Decision for Authorizing the Use of Outer Continental Shelf... agreement for the purpose of making sand available from a shoal on the OCS for placement on the beach in... the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (OCSLA) (43 U.S.C. 1337(k)(2)). Under OCSLA, BOEM can convey, on...

  13. 75 FR 68824 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Maryland-Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... Enforcement [Docket No. BOEM-2010-0038] Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS... Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: RFI in Commercial Wind Energy Leasing Offshore Maryland, and Invitation for... leases for the construction of a wind energy project(s) on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) offshore...

  14. Evaluation of environmental impacts of outer continental shelf petroleum development in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellinger, P. J.; Anderson, J. W.; Vanderhorst, J. R.

    1979-06-01

    The scope of this report is to: describe the development of petroleum reserves on the Oregon, Washington, and Alaskan outer continental shelves (OCS); characterize the technology applicable to OCS development; identify the routine discharges to the marine and estuarine environment resulting from the petroleum resource development of the OCS; and discuss any possible ecological impact from these routine discharges. Components of the routine discharges to the marine environment from OCS development include metals in produced water, drilling muds, and borehole cuttings and chemicals in drilling mud. Hydrocarbons and oils are discharged to the oceans from ships' bilges and produced water and to the atmosphere as combustion products from ships and platform power generation sources and as evaporation products from offshore and land-based storage tanks. The number of discharged species is large and they occur as dissolved species, or suspended or settleable solids. Offshore technologies do exist to assure that the concentrations of discharged pollutants to the oceans and atmosphere are kept to a level that complies to regulatory limits. Where sufficient effluent data exist, it is concluded that long-term ecological effects from routine discharges have not been detected and appear not to occur. However, no environmental data gathered to date are sensitive enough to test a scientific hypothesis of the nature or magnitude of impact that would occur to a site-specific population or ecosystem from this type of release. Short-term effects are localized and short-lived and are therefore ecologically insignificant.

  15. Drifting buoy and other data as part of the Outer Continental Drifting buoy and other data as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 June 1976 to 01 October 1976 (NODC Accession 7700020)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy and other data was collected by the University of Washington (UW) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP)....

  16. Oceanographic Time Series Data: Northeast Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf, Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank Marine Sanctuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Time-series oceanographic data for the Northeast Atlantic outer continental shelf, Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or...

  17. Coastal and Marine Ecological Classifcation Standard (CMECS) geoforms of the Oregon outer continental shelf (OCS) proposed wind farm site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This polygon shapefile is part of a data release of the Oregon outer continental shelf (OCS) proposed wind farm map site. The polygons have attribute values for...

  18. Heavy minerals in the sediments on the outer continental shelf between Vengurla and Mangalore on the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kidwai, R.M.; Nair, R.R.; Hashimi, N.H.

    Fifty-eight sediment samples from the outer continental shelf between Vengurla and Mangalore were analysed for heavy minerals consist of principally opaques, hornblende, epidote, garnet, sillimanite, hypersthene and zircon, with minor amounts...

  19. 76 FR 19122 - Record of Decision (ROD) for Authorizing the Use of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Sand Resources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... resources in National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Wallops Flight Facility (WFF... the Use of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Sand Resources in National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Wallops Flight Facility Shoreline Restoration and Infrastructure Protection Program AGENCY...

  20. Sediments, structural framework, petroleum potential, environmental conditions, and operational considerations of the United States South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The area designated for possible oil and gas lease sale in Bureau of Land Management memorandum 3310 #43 (722) and referred to therein as part of the United States South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) contains about 98,000 square kilometres of the continental margin seaward of the 3 mile offshore limit and within the 600 metre isobath. The designated area, offshore of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, encompasses parts of three physiographic provinces: the Continental Shelf, the Florida-Hatteras Slope, and the Blake Plateau. The structural framework of the U.3. South Atlantic region is dominated by the Southeast Georgia Embayment --an east-plunging depression recessed into the Atlantic Coastal Plain and shelf between Cape Fear, North Carolina and Jacksonville, Florida. The embayment is bounded to the north by the Cape Fear Arch and to southeast by the Peninsular Arch. Refraction data indicate a minor basement(?) ridge beneath the outer shelf between 30? and 32?N at 80?W. Drill hole data also suggest a gentle fold or accretionary structure (reef?) off the east coast of Florida. Several other structural features have been identified by refraction and reflection techniques and drilling. These are the Yamacraw Uplift, Burton High, Stone Arch, and the Suwannee Channel. Gravity and magnetic anomalies within the area probably result from emplacement of magma bodies along linear features representing fundamental crustal boundaries. Of these anomalies, the most prominent, is a segment of the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly which crosses the coast at Brunswick, Georgia. This anomaly has been interpreted as representing an ancient continental boundary where two formerly separate continental plates collided and were welded together. There may be as much as 5,000 m of sedimentary rocks in the Southeast Georgia Embayment out to the 600 m isobath. Basement rocks beneath the Southeast Georgia Embayment are expected to be similar to those exposed in the

  1. Seasonal variability of living benthic foraminifera from the outer continental shelf of the Bay of Biscay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchemin, Gérald; Jorissen, Frans J.; Le Loc'h, François; Andrieux-Loyer, Françoise; Hily, Christian; Thouzeau, Gérard

    2008-08-01

    Living benthic foraminiferal faunas of six stations from the continental shelf of the Bay of Biscay have been investigated during three successive seasons (spring, summer and autumn 2002). For the three investigated stations, bottom water oxygen concentration, oxygen penetration into the sediment and sediment organic carbon contents are all relatively similar. Therefore, we think that the density and the composition of the foraminiferal faunas is mainly controlled by the quantity and quality of organic input resulting from a succession of phytoplankton bloom events, occurring from late February to early September. The earliest blooms are positioned at the shelf break, late spring and early summer blooms occur off Brittany, whereas in late summer and early autumn, only coastal blooms appear, often in the vicinity of river outlets. In spring, the benthic foraminiferal faunas of central (B, C and D) and outer (E) continental shelf stations are characterised by strong dominance in the first area and strong presence in the second area of Nonionella iridea. In fact, station E does not serve as a major depocenter for the remains of phytoplankton blooms. If station E is not considered, the densities of this taxon show a clear gradient from the shelf-break, where the species dominates the assemblages, to the coast, where it attains very low densities. We explain this gradient as a response to the presence, in early spring, of an important phytoplankton bloom, mainly composed of coccolithophorids, over the shelf break. This observation is supported by the maximum particles flux values at stations close to the shelf break (18.5 g m - 2 h - 1 ) and lower values in a station closer to the coast (6.8 g m - 2 h - 1 ). In summer, the faunal density is maximum at station A, relatively close to more varied phytoplancton blooms that occur off Brittany until early June. We suggest that the dominant species, Nonion fabum, Cassidulina carinata and Bolivina ex. gr. dilatata respond to

  2. 76 FR 11079 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Safety and Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf--Safety and Environmental Management Systems; Public Workshop... and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) for oil and gas and sulphur operations in the Outer... pertaining to implementation, and describe BOEMRE audit methodologies for compliance reviews. DATES: The...

  3. 78 FR 44150 - Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 1 (ATLW1) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 1 (ATLW1) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on... Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Final Sale Notice for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer... Proposed Sale Notice (PSN) for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS...

  4. Coral forests diversity in the outer shelf of the south Sardinian continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, Alessandro; Moccia, Davide; Follesa, Maria Cristina; Alvito, Andrea; Canese, Simonepietro; Angiolillo, Michela; Cuccu, Danila; Bo, Marzia; Cannas, Rita

    2017-04-01

    Ecological theory predicts that heterogeneous habitats allow more species to co-exist in a given area, but to date, knowledge on relationships between habitat heterogeneity and biodiversity of coral forests in the outer shelf and upper slope along continental margins is rather limited. We investigated biodiversity of coral forests from 8 sites spread over two different geomorphological settings (namely, pinnacles vs. canyons) in the outer shelf along Sardinian continental margin. Using a combination of multivariate statistical analyses, we show here that differences in the composition of coral assemblages among contrasting geomorphological settings were not statistically significant, whereas significant differences emerged among sites within similar geomorphologies (i.e. among pinnacles and among canyons). Our results reveal that environmental and bathymetric factors such as sediment coverage, slope of the substrate, terrain ruggedness, bathymetric positioning index and aspect were important drivers of the observed patterns of coral biodiversity, in both settings. Spatial variability of coral forests' biodiversity is affected by environmental factors that act at the scale of each geomorphological setting (i.e. within each pinnacle and canyon) rather than by the contrasting geomorphological settings themselves. This result allows us to suggest that simple categorization of benthic communities according topographically defined habitat is unlikely to be sufficient for addressing conservation purposes.

  5. Mississippi-Alabama outer continental shelf topographic features formed during the late Pleistocene-Holocene transgression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, William W.; Schroeder, William W.; Laswell, J. Scott; Davis, Kenneth S.; Rezak, Richard; Gittings, Stephen R.

    1992-03-01

    A geophysical survey of the outer Missisippi-Alabama continental shelf revealed three types of topographic features: 1) reef-like mounds (RLM), 2) isobath-parallel ridges, and 3) shallow depressions. RLM appear to be bioherms. Their bases cluster in two isobath bands, 105 to 120 m and 74 to 82 m, implying the late Pleistocene-Holocene transgression was nonuniform. The deeper RLM probably formed during a slow sea level rise at the beginning of the deglaciation. An 11 ka BP C14 age was obtained from the summit of one, at a depth of 90 m. Depth relationships suggest the shallower RLM and most ridges formed about the time of the mid-deglacial Younger Dryas cooling episode.

  6. 77 FR 5529 - Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on.... SUMMARY: The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) will use Form 0008 to issue commercial renewable..., ``Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf,'' BOEM stated...

  7. 77 FR 67394 - Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) Lease Sale 233...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) Lease Sale 233 and Central Planning Area (CPA) Lease Sale 231, Oil and Gas Lease Sales... planning areas in the Gulf of Mexico OCS Oil and Gas Lease Sales: Western Planning Area Lease Sales 229...

  8. 75 FR 63504 - Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management...

  9. 77 FR 40081 - Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) and Central Planning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) and Central Planning Area (CPA), Oil and Gas Lease Sales for 2012-2017 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... effort to better understand the environmental impacts resulting from the Deepwater Horizon event, BOEM...

  10. 78 FR 62660 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease Sales Eastern Planning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... scientific data, gathered information, and interviewed personnel from academic institutions and Federal... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease... environmental effects of oil and natural gas leasing, exploration, development, and production in the EPA. The...

  11. 76 FR 28178 - Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf-Acquire a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-16

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 285 RIN 1010-AD71 Renewable... acquisition of an Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) renewable energy lease. We are taking this action because... for an OCS renewable energy lease, where BOEMRE is required to publish only a single notice. The final...

  12. 75 FR 72679 - Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf-Acquire a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 285 RIN 1010-AD71 Renewable... an Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) renewable energy lease. We are taking this action because the current regulations covering noncompetitive leasing of an OCS renewable energy lease and an unsolicited...

  13. 76 FR 8962 - Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf-Acquire a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 285 RIN 1010-AD71 Renewable... acquisition of an Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) renewable energy lease. We are taking this action because the current regulations governing the noncompetitive acquisition of an OCS renewable energy lease initiated by...

  14. 75 FR 21653 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Delaware-Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Delaware--Request for Interest (RFI... proposal. In June 2008, Bluewater Wind Delaware LLC announced that it signed a 25-year power purchase agreement with Delmarva Power to sell up to 200 megawatts (MW) of power to the utility from an offshore wind...

  15. 76 FR 22130 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore New Jersey-Call for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the... Nominations for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore New Jersey. SUMMARY... the potential from offshore wind power to other electric power sources, including fossil, nuclear and...

  16. 78 FR 760 - Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental... the proposal submitted to BOEM by the New York Power Authority (NYPA) to acquire an OCS wind lease; (2... wind power project of at least 350 MW nameplate capacity within the proposed lease area. Any request...

  17. 77 FR 47877 - Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Maine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental...), Interior. ACTION: Public Notice of an Unsolicited Request for a Commercial OCS Wind Lease, Request for... proposal submitted to BOEM by Statoil North America (Statoil NA) to acquire an OCS wind lease; (2) solicit...

  18. 78 FR 8190 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore North Carolina...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS... Information and Nominations for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power Offshore North Carolina (Call), published on... obtaining a commercial wind lease in one or more, or any portion of, the Call Areas, postmarked by March 7...

  19. 78 FR 59968 - Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Oregon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental... received an unsolicited request from Principle Power for a commercial wind lease on the OCS offshore Oregon. Principle ] Power's proposed project, the ``WindFloat Pacific Project,'' would consist of a floating wind...

  20. 75 FR 20271 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Oil and Gas Production...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... Minerals Management Service 30 CFR Part 250 RIN 1010-AD12 Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf--Oil and Gas Production Requirements AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The MMS is amending the regulations regarding oil and natural gas production...

  1. 78 FR 59632 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations on the Outer Continental Shelf-Oil and Gas Production Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement 30 CFR Part 250 RIN 1014-AA10 Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations on the Outer Continental Shelf--Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems AGENCY: Bureau of Safety and... amend and update the regulations regarding oil and natural gas production by addressing issues such as...

  2. 78 FR 45557 - Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) Oil and Gas Lease Sale...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... (WPA) Oil and Gas Lease Sale 233 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION... WPA Lease Sale 233 on the Gulf of Mexico OCS Oil and Gas Lease Sales: 2013-2014; Western Planning Area... second WPA lease sale scheduled in the Proposed Final Outer Continental Shelf Oil & Gas Leasing Program...

  3. Sedimentology and geochemistry of surface sediments, outer continental shelf, southern Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J.V.; Dean, W.E.; Vallier, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    Present-day sediment dynamics, combined with lowerings of sea level during the Pleistocene, have created a mixture of sediments on the outer continental shelf of the southern Bering Sea that was derived from the Alaskan Mainland, the Aleutian Islands, and the Pribilof ridge. Concentrations of finer-grained, higher-organic sediments in the region of the St. George basin have further modified regional distribution patterns of sediment composition. Q-mode factor analysis of 58 variables related to sediment size and composition - including content of major, minor, and trace elements, heavy and light minerals, and clay minerals - reveals three dominant associations of sediment: 1. (1) The most significant contribution, forming a coarse-grained sediment scattered over most of the shelf consists of felsic sediment derived from the generally quartz-rich rocks of the Alaskan mainland. This sediment contains relatively high concentrations of Si, Ba, Rb, quartz, garnet, epidote, metamorphic rock fragments, potassium feldspar, and illite. 2. (2) The next most important group, superimposed on the felsic group consists of andesitic sediment derived from the Aleutian Islands. This more mafic sediment contains relatively high concentrations of Na, Ca, Ti, Sr, V, Mn, Cu, Fe, Al, Co, Zn, Y, Yb, Ga, volcanic rock fragments, glass, clinopyroxene, smectite, and vermiculite. 3. (3) A local group of basaltic sediment, derived from rocks of the Pribilof Islands, is a subgroup of the Aleutian andesite group. Accumulation of fine-grained sediment in St. George basin has created a sediment group containing relatively high concentrations of C, S, U, Li, B, Zr, Ga, Hg, silt, and clay. Sediment of the Aleutian andesite group exhibits a strong gradient, or "plume", with concentrations decreasing away from Unimak Pass and toward St. George basin. The absence of present-day currents sufficient to move even clay-size material as well as the presence of Bering submarine canyon between the Aleutian

  4. Net Heterotrophy in the Amazon Continental Shelf Changes Rapidly to a Sink of CO2 in the Outer Amazon Plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Lefèvre

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Amazon continental shelf and adjacent oceanic area were sampled for inorganic and organic carbon parameters in order to improve data coverage and understanding of carbon cycling dynamics within this important region. Seasonal coverage of the Amazon plume on the French Guiana continental shelf further north, was provided by CO2 monitoring using a merchant ship sailing from France to French Guiana (2006–2016. Salinity ranged from 1 to 36 (transects in April 2013, and May 2014. At salinity below 10, strong outgassing was observed with fugacity of CO2 (fCO2 over 2,000 μatm. This region displayed net heterotrophy, fueled by organic matter with terrestrial origin, as shown by δ13C and δ15N values of suspended particles. A δ13C cross shelf average of −31% was measured during May 2014, contrasting with oceanic values in excess of −20%. The reactivity of this terrestrial material resulted in the local production of dissolved inorganic and organic carbon as well as fluorescent humic compounds. Further offshore, the dilution of freshwater by ocean waters created a sink for CO2, enhanced by biological activity. The strongest CO2 drawdowns, associated with high chlorophyll a concentrations, were observed on the French Guiana continental shelf in the outer Amazon plume, with fCO2 values below 150 μatm. Here, a CO2 sink was present almost throughout the year, with a seasonal maximum of −9.2 mmol CO2 m−2d−1 observed in June 2015. However, both the CO2 and salinity distributions could vary significantly within a few days, confirming the presence of many eddies in this region. The Amazon continental shelf hence behaved as a transition zone between an inshore source of CO2 to the atmosphere and an offshore sink. Some marine phytoplankton production was detected but occurred mainly close to the French Guiana shelf. A mean net CO2 outgassing of 44 ± 43.6 mmol m−2d−1 was estimated for the area. Quantifying the CO2 flux for the entire Amazon

  5. Sea-floor features on Mississippi and Alabama outer Continental Shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezak, R.; Sager, W.W.; Laswell, J.S.; Gittings, S.R. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Approximately 400 mi{sup 2} were surveyed on the Alabama outer continental shelf during October 1987 and March 1988 using an Edo-Western 4 kHz High Resolution Subbottom Profiler, an EG and G Model 260 Seafloor Mapping System and Starfix Navigation. The mapping is part of a larger project, The Mississippi-Alabama Marine Ecosystems Study, funded by the US Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service, Gulf of Mexico Regional Office. Bathymetric maps and side-scan mosaics are being prepared from the raw data. Sea-floor features recognized on the side-scan and subbottom records include: (1) low topographic features - possibly bed-rock outcrops, and an enigmatic feature the authors are calling footprints, (2) moderate topographic features - low reefs or bed-rock outcrops, (3) major topographic features - pinnacles and large reefal masses, (4) pox - patches of closely spaced strong reflections with no relief, (5) ridges - closely spaced outcrops along clearly defined features such as shorelines and scarps (possibly truncated dunes or beach ridges), (6) patch reefs, closely spaced, which look like pox but have relief, (7) wave fields - closely spaced sand or gravel waves, and (8) wrecks - sunken rigs or platforms. Except for the wave fields, they believe that the remaining sea-floor features are relict and related to the post-Pleistocene rise of sea level.

  6. Methane hydrate resource assessment of the outer continental shelf : in-place Gulf of Mexico results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frye, M. [Minerals Mangement Service, Herndon, VA (United States); Grace, J. [Earth Science Associates, Long Beach, CA (United States); Hunt, J.; Shedd, W. [Minerals Management Service, New Orleans, LA (United States); Kaufman, G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Boston, MA (United States); Schuenemeyer, J. [Southwest Statistical Consulting, Cortez, CO (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The Minerals Management Service (MMS) is division of the United States (U.S.) Department of the Interior. Its mandate is to manage natural gas, oil, and other mineral resources on the U.S. outer continental shelf (OCS). The MMS launched a project in order to provide an assessment of the natural gas hydrate resource potential across the entire OCS, including the Alaskan, Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific margins. The purpose of this ongoing project is to provide a probabilistic evaluation of in-place, technically recoverable, and economically recoverable gas hydrate resources. This paper provided an overview of the project, including a preliminary assessment of in-place gas hydrate resources in the Gulf of Mexico. The paper described the probabilistic model that was built on a mass balance approach to assessment. The model provided a high degree of spatial resolution and supported detailed mapping. The model produced a Monte Carlo distribution of in-place resources that ranged from 314 trillion to 974 trillion cubic meters (TCM) with a mean value of 607 TCM. The paper also provided a link to the full report which included the model methodology, underlying assumptions, and input datasets. Additional work on the development of a technically recoverable model component is currently underway. 1 fig.

  7. Bathymetric map of Lydonia Canyon, U.S. Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, Bradford; Moody, John A.

    1984-01-01

    Lydonia Canyon is one of several large submarine canyons that indent the eastern U.S. Continental Shelf along the southern flank of Georges Bank (Index map).  This bathymetric map of the upper part of Lydonia Canyon (water depths shallower than about 2,00 m) was prepared as part of a study of the physical oceanography and geology of Lydonia Canyon (Butman and others, 1983; Twichell, 1983).  An accurate map of the canyon at a scale of at least 1:50,000 was needed for placement of current-meter morrings, for location of hydrographic and sediment sampling stations, and for interpretation of current-meter and geologic data. The map covers the area from 40°10'N. to 40°40'N. and from 67°28'W. to 67°50'W. 

  8. Atlantic Offshore Seabird Dataset Catalog, Atlantic Coast and Outer Continental Shelf, from 1938-01-01 to 2013-12-31 (NODC Accession 0115356)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Several bureaus within the Department of Interior compiled available information from seabird observation datasets from the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf into a...

  9. Intertidal organism and habitat data as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 05 August 1975 to 07 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7700087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Intertidal organism and habitat data were collected as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP). Data were collected by Western...

  10. Drifting buoy and other data as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 17 May 1976 to 23 December 1976 (NODC Accession 7800105)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected by the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment...

  11. Intertidal organism and habitat data as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 05 August 1975 to 07 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7700086)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Intertidal organism and habitat data were collected as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP). Data were collected by Western...

  12. The spin-off of marine data acquired for establishing the outer limits of the continental shelf of Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Harald; Sand, Morten; Løvås, Olvar; Rune Sandstå, Nils

    2017-04-01

    In 2006 and 2009, respectively, Norway made two partial submissions regarding the outer limits of the continental shelf beyond 200 nautical miles. The first submission was made in respect of the northern areas, i.e. the continental shelf in the Arctic Ocean, the Barents Sea and the Norwegian Sea. The second submission was made in respect of the southern areas, the continental shelf in the Southern Atlantic Ocean and the Southern Ocean. For the specific purpose of preparing these submissions, Norway carried out a ten-year program for acquiring bathymetric, geophysical and geological data. In the northern areas, this program amounted to 10 500 km of multi-channel seismic, 270 000 km2 of multi-beam bathymetry and 1000 km of icebreaker seismic data in addition to supporting scientific programs in the relevant areas. In the southern areas, the program amounted to about 8000 km of multi-channel seismic and more than 11 000 line km of multi-bema bathymetry data, as well as seabed rock samples. These data, which would not otherwise have been acquired at this stage, have proven very useful multiple purposes in addition to the mapping of the outer limits of the continental shelf. The overall effect has been to increase the geological knowledge of the continental margins in all of the ocean areas involved. To a large degree, this is because the data have been released for scientific studies and publication. In particular, the data have been the basis for a number of Master and PhD thesis at the universities. The data from the Southern Ocean has been submitted to the SDLS A major part of the results in this regard has scientific n the areas outside of the Southern Oceans, the data have been submitted to the database of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR). In the areas outside of the Southern Ocean, the data has also been essential in initiating further research and in the exploration for deep sea resources. Examples of these spin-off uses of the data will be

  13. 77 FR 19321 - Geological and Geophysical Exploration on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Geological and Geophysical Exploration on the Atlantic Outer... environmental effects of multiple Geological and Geophysical (G&G) activities in the Mid- and South Atlantic...-sonar surveys, electromagnetic surveys, geological and geochemical sampling, and remote sensing. The...

  14. Trophic model of the outer continental shelf and upper slope demersal community of the southeastern Brazilian Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela C. Nascimento

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly recognized that demersal communities are important for the functioning of continental shelf and slope ecosystems around the world, including tropical regions. Demersal communities are most prominent in areas of high detritus production and transport, and they link benthic and pelagic biological communities. To understand the structure and role of the demersal community on the southeastern Brazilian Bight, we constructed a trophodynamic model with 37 functional groups to represent the demersal community of the outer continental shelf and upper slope of this area, using the Ecopath with Ecosim 6 (EwE approach and software. The model indicates high production and biomass of detritus and benthic invertebrates, and strong linkages of these components to demersal and pelagic sub-webs. The level of omnivory indexes in this ecosystem was high, forming a highly connected trophic web reminiscent of tropical land areas. Although high levels of ascendency may indicate resistance and resilience to disturbance, recent and present fisheries trends are probably degrading the biological community and related ecosystem services.

  15. 76 FR 71595 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Eastern Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales for Years 2012-2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... this area. Comments are also sought on potential conflicts between future OCS oil and gas activities.... Finally, comments may be used to assess potential conflicts between offshore gas and oil activities and... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Eastern Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas...

  16. Water and Volatiles in the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasset, O.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Guillot, T.; Fletcher, L. N.; Tosi, F.

    2017-10-01

    Space exploration and ground-based observations have provided outstanding evidence of the diversity and the complexity of the outer solar system. This work presents our current understanding of the nature and distribution of water and water-rich materials from the water snow line to the Kuiper Belt. This synthesis is timely, since a thorough exploration of at least one object in each region of the outer solar system has now been achieved. Next steps, starting with the Juno mission now in orbit around Jupiter, will be more focused on understanding the processes at work than on describing the general characteristics of each giant planet systems. This review is organized in three parts. First, the nature and the distribution of water and volatiles in giant and intermediary planets are described from their inner core to their outer envelopes. A special focus is given to Jupiter and Saturn, which are much better understood than the two ice giants (Uranus and Neptune) thanks to the Galileo and Cassini missions. Second, the icy moons will be discussed. Space missions and ground-based observations have revealed the variety of icy surfaces in the outer system. While Europa, Enceladus, and maybe Titan present past or even active tectonic and volcanic activities, many other moons have been dead worlds for more than 3 billion years. Ice compositions found at these bodies are also complex and it is now commonly admitted that icy surfaces are never composed of pure ices. A detailed review of the distribution of non-ice materials on the surfaces and in the tenuous atmospheres of the moons is proposed, followed by a more focused discussion on the nature and the characteristics of the liquid layers trapped below the cold icy crusts that have been suggested in the icy Galilean moons, and in Enceladus, Dione, and Titan at Saturn. Finally, the recent observations collected by Dawn at Ceres and New Horizons at Pluto, as well as the state of knowledge of other transneptunian objects

  17. Sediments, structural framework, petroleum potential, environmental conditions, and operational considerations of the United States North Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The area designated for possible oil and gas lease sale as modified from BLM memorandum 3310 #42 (722) and referred to therein as the North Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) contains about 58,300 sq km of shelf beneath water depths of less than 200 m and lies chiefly within the Georges Bank basin. The oldest sediments drilled or dredged on the bordering Continental Slope are sandstone, clay, and silt of Upper Cretaceous age. In Upper Cretaceous exposures, on Marthas Vineyard and nearby New England islands, the predominant lithology appears to be clay. About 125 km northeast of the eastern tip of Georges Bank, the Shell B-93 well penetrated clays and silts of Upper and Lower Cretaceous age above dense Jurassic carbonate rocks which overlie a basement of lower Paleozoic slate, schist, quartzite, and granite. Structurally, the Georges Bank basin is a westerly trending trough which opens to the west-southwest. Post-Paleozoic sediments are more than 8 km thick in parts of the basin. Major structural features appear to be directly related to basement structures. Local anticlines, probably caused by differential compaction over basement flexures and horst blocks or by later uplift along basement faults are reflected principally in Lower Cretaceous and older sediments, though some of these features continue upward to within 0.7 of a second (about 650 m) of the seafloor. Tertiary deposits in the Georges Bank basin are probably up to a kilometre thick and are made up of poorly consolidated sand, silt, and clay. The Cretaceous section is inferred to be up to 3.5 km thick and to be mainly clastics -- shale, siltstone, calcareous shale, changing to limestone in the lowest part of the system. Jurassic rocks in the deepest part of the basin appear to be about 3.6 to 4.0 km thick and probably consist mainly of dense carbonates. Potential source rocks in the Georges Bank basin may include organic-rich Cretaceous shale and carbonaceous Jurassic limestone. By analogy with the

  18. Organic matter diagenesis and hydrocarbon generation on outer Continental Margin of northwestern Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, P.A.; Snowdon, L.R.; Heggie, D.; Bent, A.

    1989-03-01

    Organic geochemical analyses of sediments and rocks obtained from drill sites on the Exmouth and Wombat Plateaus and the Argo Abyssal Plain on the northwestern margin of Australia were done onboard the JOIDES Resolution during Ocean Drilling Program Legs 122 and 123. These analyses provide information about the sources of organic matter to these offshore locations from Triassic to Holocene times and also indicate the degree of postdepositional diagenesis and maturation the organic matter has experienced. Because this margin has interest to petroleum explorationists, these data have practical as well as fundamental significance. Triassic claystones (equivalent to the onshore Mungeroo Formation) from the Wombat Plateau contain up to several percent of land-derived organic carbon. Neocomian siltstones and claystones (equivalent to the Barrow Group and Muderong Shale) from the Exmouth Plateau hold similar organic matter but at lower concentrations. Younger sediments are generally very lean in organic matter. Gas chromatographic analysis of extractable hydrocarbons shows a large and often dominant contribution of continental components, notably n-alkanes with a strong odd/even ratio and tricyclic diterpanes. Both Rock-Eval and hydrocarbon results agree in indicating low to moderate levels of thermal maturity. Locations on the Exmouth Plateau typically contain large amounts of thermogenic gaseous hydrocarbons dominated by methane. Concentrations peak in Senonian chalk sequences. In Neocomian siltstones and claystones, methane-ethane ratios diminish as concentrations decrease. The source of these hydrocarbons is likely to be the Triassic coals and coaly material below the Dingo claystone, which was not drilled during these legs but has been characterized from industry wells on this passive margin.

  19. 78 FR 27427 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Geological and Geophysical Exploration Activities in the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration... and gas exploration and development, siting for potential renewable energy projects, and marine... energy, and marine minerals) could include survey areas that include Federal and State waters; and (3...

  20. 77 FR 72744 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... Control of Oxides of Nitrogen (NO X ) From Boilers, Steam Generators and Process Heaters) (Adopted 04/17... Large Water Heaters and Small Boilers (Adopted 10/17/02) Rule 361 Small Boilers, Steam Generators, and...

  1. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Natural Gas Wells - Atlantic Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains surface locations for oil and gas wells located in the Atlantic federal waters. All wells in the Atlantic Region were completed and abandoned...

  2. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Natural Gas Wells - Gulf of Mexico Region NAD 27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains surface locations for oil and gas wells located in the Gulf of Mexico federal waters. Note: Wells are being added or modified continuously;...

  3. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Natural Gas Platforms - Gulf of Mexico Region NAD 27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains point locations for oil and gas platforms (structures) located in the Gulf of Mexico federal waters. Note: Platforms are being added or...

  4. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Natural Gas Wells - Pacific OCS Region NAD 83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains surface locations for oil and gas wells located in the Pacific Coast federal waters. Note: Wells are being added or modified continuously;...

  5. 76 FR 15898 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; Consistency Update for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... Storage of Reactive Organic Compound Liquids (Adopted 01/ 18/01) Rule 327 Organic Liquid Cargo Tank Vessel... Liquid Cargo Vessels (Adopted 01/18/01) Rule 352 Natural Gas-Fired Fan-Type Central Furnaces and Residential Water Heaters (Adopted 09/16/99) Rule 353 Adhesives and Sealants (Adopted 08/19/99) Rule 359...

  6. 77 FR 52630 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... Type Central Furnaces and Small Water Heaters. 353 Adhesives and Sealants. 6/21/12 The District also... Separation (Adopted 07/19/01) Rule 326 Storage of Reactive Organic Compound Liquids (Adopted 01/ 18/01) Rule 327 Organic Liquid Cargo Tank Vessel Loading (Adopted 12/16/85) Rule 328 Continuous Emission...

  7. 76 FR 70156 - Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Study (PEIS) for Proposed 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... the Wilda Marston Theatre, 3600 Denali Street, Anchorage, AK; December 12, 2011, Kotzebue at the NW... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Headquarters, 381 Elden Street, Herndon... Renaissance Mobile Riverview Plaza Hotel, 64 South Water Street, Mobile, AL 36602; and December 8, 2011, New...

  8. 77 FR 30551 - Commercial Renewable Energy Transmission on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... received an application from Deepwater Wind for a ROW grant on the OCS offshore Rhode Island. Deepwater... that the BITS would serve two purposes: (1) Transmit electrical power from Deepwater Wind's proposed 30 megawatt (MW) offshore wind energy project located in Rhode Island State waters off Block Island to the...

  9. Observed Oceanic Response over the Upper Continental Slope and Outer Shelf during Hurricane Ivan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    1000 m quency-dependent pressure response factor ( Dean and [Mll-M14, line 4 (LA)] (Fig. 1). These moorings con- Dalrymple 1991) that compensates for...Oceanogr., 35, nental shelf during Hurricane Andrew. J. Waterway, Port, 976-990. Coastal, Ocean Eng. ASCE, 128, 249-257. Dean , R. G., and R. A... Dalrymple , 1991: Water Wave Mechanics Kunze, E., 1985: Near-inertial wave propagation in geostrophic for Engineers and Scientists. World Scientific, 353

  10. Malvinas-slope water intrusions on the northern Patagonia continental shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Piola

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Patagonia continental shelf located off southeastern South America is bounded offshore by the Malvinas Current, which extends northward from northern Drake Passage (~55° S to nearly 38° S. The transition between relatively warm-fresh shelf waters and Subantarctic Waters from the western boundary current is characterized by a thermohaline front extending nearly 2500 km. We use satellite derived sea surface temperature, and chlorophyll-a data combined with hydrographic and surface drifter data to document the intrusions of slope waters onto the continental shelf near 41° S. These intrusions create vertically coherent localized negative temperature and positive salinity anomalies extending onshore about 150 km from the shelf break. The region is associated with a center of action of the first mode of non-seasonal sea surface temperature variability and also relatively high chlorophyll-a variability, suggesting that the intrusions are important in promoting the local development of phytoplankton. The generation of slope water penetrations at this location may be triggered by the inshore excursion of the 100 m isobath, which appears to steer the Malvinas Current waters over the outer shelf.

  11. Uncertainty in Analyzed Water and Energy Budgets at Continental Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Robertson, F. R.; Mocko, D.; Chen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Operational analyses and retrospective-analyses provide all the physical terms of mater and energy budgets, guided by the assimilation of atmospheric observations. However, there is significant reliance on the numerical models, and so, uncertainty in the budget terms is always present. Here, we use a recently developed data set consisting of a mix of 10 analyses (both operational and retrospective) to quantify the uncertainty of analyzed water and energy budget terms for GEWEX continental-scale regions, following the evaluation of Dr. John Roads using individual reanalyses data sets.

  12. Intertidal organism and habitat data from the Beaufort Sea from aircraft as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 17 July 1976 to 30 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7800562)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Intertidal organism and habitat data were collected in the Beaufort Sea from aircraft as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP)....

  13. Intertidal organism and habitat data from the Gulf of Alaska from the HUMDINGER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 April 1976 to 24 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7800272)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Intertidal organism and habitat data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the HUMDINGER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program...

  14. Intertidal organism and habitat data from the Beaufort Sea from aircraft and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 22 April 1976 to 24 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7800670)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Intertidal organism and habitat data were collected in the Beaufort Sea from aircraft and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment...

  15. Intertidal organism and other data from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-04-20 to 1975-06-11 (NCEI Accession 7601861)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Intertidal organism and other data were collected from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment...

  16. Drifting buoy and other data from the Arctic Ocean in support of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 June 1976 to 27 November 1976 (NODC Accession 7700205)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data were collected from the Arctic Ocean by the University of Washington in support of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program...

  17. Drifting buoy and other data from the Bering Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 27 May 1977 to 07 January 1978 (NODC Accession 7800692)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Bering Sea by the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf...

  18. Drifting buoy and other data from the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 21 October 1976 to 11 November 1976 (NODC Accession 7700740)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Gulf of Alaska by the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf...

  19. Drifting buoy and other data from the Beaufort Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 05 November 1975 to 01 October 1976 (NODC Accession 7700019)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy and other data was collected from the Beaufort Sea by the University of Washington (UW) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment...

  20. Drifting buoy and other data from drifting platforms in the Bering Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 17 January 1981 to 20 June 1981 (NODC Accession 8200120)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from drifting platforms in the Bering Sea by the Flow Research Company as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental...

  1. Drifting buoy and other data from the Bering Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 13 September 1975 to 25 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7600632)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Bering Sea by the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf...

  2. Drifting buoy and other data from the Beaufort Sea and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 April 1977 to 03 July 1977 (NODC Accession 7700780)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Beaufort Sea by the University of Washington (UW) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program...

  3. Drifting buoy and other data from the Arctic Ocean and Beaufort Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 November 1975 to 01 October 1976 (NODC Accession 7700114)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Arctic Ocean and Beaufort Sea by the University of Washington (UW) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental...

  4. Drifting buoy and other data from the Arctic Ocean and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 02 November 1975 to 03 June 1976 (NODC Accession 7601626)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected by the University of Washington - Seattle (UW) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP)....

  5. Drifting buoy and other data from the Chukchi Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 27 June 1977 to 07 November 1977 (NODC Accession 7800005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Chukchi Sea by the University of Washington (UW) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program...

  6. Drifting buoy and other data from the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 26 October 1980 to 27 March 1981 (NODC Accession 8200115)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Gulf of Alaska by the Science Application INC (SAI) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program...

  7. Drifting buoy and other data from the Beaufort Sea and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 March 1977 to 05 April 1977 (NODC Accession 7700543)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Beaufort Sea and other locations by the University of Washington (UW) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental...

  8. Intertidal organism and habitat data from the Beaufort Sea as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 06 August 1975 to 06 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7700085)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Intertidal organism and habitat data were collected from the Beaufort Sea as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP). Data were...

  9. Intertidal organism and habitat data from the Seward Peninsula from aircraft and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 19 July 1976 to 31 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7800497)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Intertidal organism and habitat data were collected from the Seward Peninsula from aircraft and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental...

  10. Marine bird sighting and other data from the SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 September 1976 to 02 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7800704)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from the SURVEYOR as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP). Data were...

  11. Marine bird sighting and other data from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-06-05 to 1976-08-20 (NODC Accession 7800486)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms. Data were collected as part of the Outer Continental Shelf...

  12. Herring spawning and other data from aircraft from the Bering Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 07 May 1977 to 28 October 1978 (NODC Accession 8100538)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Herring spawning and other data were collected from aircraft from the Bering Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP)....

  13. Herring spawning and other data from aircraft from Bristol Bay and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 12 April 1976 to 12 July 1976 (NODC Accession 7601910)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Herring spawning and other data were collected from aircraft from Bristol Bay and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment...

  14. Herring spawning and other data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 12 April 1976 to 12 July 1976 (NODC Accession 7601911)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Herring spawning and other data were collected from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP). Data were collected...

  15. From hyperextended rift to convergent margin types: mapping the outer limit of the extended Continental Shelf of Spain in the Galicia area according UNCLOS Art. 76

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza, Luis; Medialdea, Teresa; Vázquez, Juan T.; González, Francisco J.; León, Ricardo; Palomino, Desiree; Fernández-Salas, Luis M.; Rengel, Juan

    2017-04-01

    Spain presented on 11 May 2009 a partial submission for delimiting the extended Continental Shelf in respect to the area of Galicia to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS). The Galicia margin represents an example of the transition between two different types of continental margins (CM): a western hyperpextended margin and a northern convergent margin in the Bay of Biscay. The western Galicia Margin (wGM 41° to 43° N) corresponds to a hyper-extended rifted margin as result of the poly-phase development of the Iberian-Newfoundland conjugate margin during the Mesozoic. Otherwise, the north Galicia Margin (nGM) is the western end of the Cenozoic subduction of the Bay of Biscay along the north Iberian Margin (NIM) linked to the Pyrenean-Mediterranean collisional belt Following the procedure established by the CLCS Scientific and Technical Guidelines (CLCS/11), the points of the Foot of Slope (FoS) has to be determined as the points of maximum change in gradient in the region defined as the Base of the continental Slope (BoS). Moreover, the CLCS guidelines specify that the BoS should be contained within the continental margin (CM). In this way, a full-coverage multibeam bathymetry and an extensive dataset of up 4,736 km of multichannel seismic profiles were expressly obtained during two oceanographic surveys (Breogham-2005 and Espor-2008), aboard the Spanish research vessel Hespérides, to map the outer limit of the CM.In order to follow the criteria of the CLCS guidelines, two types of models reported in the CLCS Guidelines were applied to the Galicia Margin. In passive margins, the Commission's guidelines establish that the natural prolongation is based on that "the natural process by which a continent breaks up prior to the separation by seafloor spreading involves thinning, extension and rifting of the continental crust…" (para. 7.3, CLCS/11). The seaward extension of the wGM should include crustal continental blocks and the so

  16. 77 FR 29682 - Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf, Central Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 216/222

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... operations, except: (1) Blocks that were previously included within the GOM's Eastern Planning Area (EPA) and... Continental Shelf, Central Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 216/222 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy... and Gas Lease Sale: 2012 Central Planning Area (CPA) Lease Sale 216/222 Authority: This NOA is...

  17. Circulation, Water Temperature, and Larval Settlement Over the Inner Continental Shelves of the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewings, M. R.; Washburn, L.; Ohlmann, C.; Blanchette, C.; Caselle, J.; Gotschalk, C.

    2008-12-01

    We use seven-year time series of wind stress, water velocity, and temperature in 15-18 m water depth to describe the circulation and water temperature over the inner continental shelves of the Channel Islands and California mainland in the Santa Barbara Basin. This area is strongly influenced by the California Current upwelling system. In turn, the water circulation in the Santa Barbara Basin influences the local marine ecosystem by affecting the water temperature and the supply of nutrients and larval fish and invertebrates. Larvae and nutrients traveling from the coast to the open ocean and back again must somehow pass through the inner shelf. The water circulation over the inner continental shelf of the Northern Channel Islands has not been described. Due to the shallowness of the water, an inner shelf has different physical dynamics than either the surfzone or the middle and outer continental shelf. We discuss the relative importance of upwelling- favorable along-shelf winds and of cross-shelf winds as forcing mechanisms for coastal upwelling circulations over the inner shelf; test whether the cross-shelf wind stress and surface gravity waves are important for cross-shelf circulation in the Santa Barbara Basin; and describe the subtidal patterns of water temperature, stratification, and velocity around the Channel Islands and their relation to observed larval settlement patterns. Cross-shelf circulation and the movement of water masses into and out of the Basin have implications for settlement and recruitment of many coastal species, including the economically important kelp rockfish, kelp bass, and sea urchin. Understanding the circulation of the Santa Barbara Basin and its inner shelves is a precursor to determining the source locations of the planktonic larvae. That information on source locations is essential for the design, siting, and assessment of existing and future marine protected areas in California and elsewhere.

  18. Integrating remotely sensed surface water extent into continental scale hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Wanders, Niko; Burek, Peter; Salamon, Peter; de Roo, Ad

    2016-12-01

    In hydrological forecasting, data assimilation techniques are employed to improve estimates of initial conditions to update incorrect model states with observational data. However, the limited availability of continuous and up-to-date ground streamflow data is one of the main constraints for large-scale flood forecasting models. This is the first study that assess the impact of assimilating daily remotely sensed surface water extent at a 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution derived from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) into a global rainfall-runoff including large ungauged areas at the continental spatial scale in Africa and South America. Surface water extent is observed using a range of passive microwave remote sensors. The methodology uses the brightness temperature as water bodies have a lower emissivity. In a time series, the satellite signal is expected to vary with changes in water surface, and anomalies can be correlated with flood events. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is a Monte-Carlo implementation of data assimilation and used here by applying random sampling perturbations to the precipitation inputs to account for uncertainty obtaining ensemble streamflow simulations from the LISFLOOD model. Results of the updated streamflow simulation are compared to baseline simulations, without assimilation of the satellite-derived surface water extent. Validation is done in over 100 in situ river gauges using daily streamflow observations in the African and South American continent over a one year period. Some of the more commonly used metrics in hydrology were calculated: KGE', NSE, PBIAS%, R 2 , RMSE, and VE. Results show that, for example, NSE score improved on 61 out of 101 stations obtaining significant improvements in both the timing and volume of the flow peaks. Whereas the validation at gauges located in lowland jungle obtained poorest performance mainly due to the closed forest influence on the satellite signal retrieval. The conclusion is that

  19. 78 FR 76643 - Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 3 (ATLW3) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 3 (ATLW3) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on... Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Proposed Sale Notice for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer... grid) relative to the wind facility's generation at continuous full power operation at nameplate...

  20. 75 FR 32273 - Safety Zone; DEEPWATER HORIZON at Mississippi Canyon 252 Outer Continental Shelf MODU in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 147 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; DEEPWATER HORIZON at Mississippi Canyon 252... DEEPWATER HORIZON, a Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU), at Mississippi Canyon 252 in the Outer... impacted by the oil spill. Basis and Purpose The Coast Guard is establishing a safety zone in the deepwater...

  1. Global multi-scale segmentation of continental and coastal waters from the watersheds to the continental margins

    KAUST Repository

    Laruelle, G. G.

    2013-05-29

    Past characterizations of the land-ocean continuum were constructed either from a continental perspective through an analysis of watershed river basin properties (COSCATs: COastal Segmentation and related CATchments) or from an oceanic perspective, through a regionalization of the proximal and distal continental margins (LMEs: large marine ecosystems). Here, we present a global-scale coastal segmentation, composed of three consistent levels, that includes the whole aquatic continuum with its riverine, estuarine and shelf sea components. Our work delineates comprehensive ensembles by harmonizing previous segmentations and typologies in order to retain the most important physical characteristics of both the land and shelf areas. The proposed multi-scale segmentation results in a distribution of global exorheic watersheds, estuaries and continental shelf seas among 45 major zones (MARCATS: MARgins and CATchments Segmentation) and 149 sub-units (COSCATs). Geographic and hydrologic parameters such as the surface area, volume and freshwater residence time are calculated for each coastal unit as well as different hypsometric profiles. Our analysis provides detailed insights into the distributions of coastal and continental shelf areas and how they connect with incoming riverine fluxes. The segmentation is also used to re-evaluate the global estuarine CO2 flux at the air-water interface combining global and regional average emission rates derived from local studies. © 2013 Author(s).

  2. Global multi-scale segmentation of continental and coastal waters from the watersheds to the continental margins

    KAUST Repository

    Laruelle, G. G.

    2012-10-04

    Past characterizations of the land–ocean continuum were constructed either from a continental perspective through an analysis of watershed river basin properties (COSCATs: COastal Segmentation and related CATchments) or from an oceanic perspective, through a regionalization of the proximal and distal continental margins (LMEs: large marine ecosystems). Here, we present a global-scale coastal segmentation, composed of three consistent levels, that includes the whole aquatic continuum with its riverine, estuarine and shelf sea components. Our work delineates comprehensive ensembles by harmonizing previous segmentations and typologies in order to retain the most important physical characteristics of both the land and shelf areas. The proposed multi-scale segmentation results in a distribution of global exorheic watersheds, estuaries and continental shelf seas among 45 major zones (MARCATS: MARgins and CATchments Segmentation) and 149 sub-units (COSCATs). Geographic and hydrologic parameters such as the surface area, volume and freshwater residence time are calculated for each coastal unit as well as different hypsometric pro- files. Our analysis provides detailed insights into the distributions of coastal and continental shelf areas and how they connect with incoming riverine fluxes. The segmentation is also used to re-evaluate the global estuarine CO2 flux at the air–water interface combining global and regional average emission rates derived from local studies.

  3. Applicability of NASA contract quality management and failure mode effect analysis procedures to the USGS Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas lease management program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, M. K.; Little, D. G.; Hoard, E. G.; Taylor, A. C.; Campbell, R.

    1972-01-01

    An approach that might be used for determining the applicability of NASA management techniques to benefit almost any type of down-to-earth enterprise is presented. A study was made to determine the following: (1) the practicality of adopting NASA contractual quality management techniques to the U.S. Geological Survey Outer Continental Shelf lease management function; (2) the applicability of failure mode effects analysis to the drilling, production, and delivery systems in use offshore; (3) the impact on industrial offshore operations and onshore management operations required to apply recommended NASA techniques; and (4) the probable changes required in laws or regulations in order to implement recommendations. Several management activities that have been applied to space programs are identified, and their institution for improved management of offshore and onshore oil and gas operations is recommended.

  4. Temporal variability of the Circumpolar Deep Water inflow onto the Ross Sea continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagno, Pasquale; Falco, Pierpaolo; Dinniman, Michael S.; Spezie, Giancarlo; Budillon, Giorgio

    2017-02-01

    The intrusion of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) is the primary source of heat, salt and nutrients onto Antarctica's continental shelves and plays a major role in the shelf physical and biological processes. Different studies have analyzed the processes responsible for the transport of CDW across the Ross Sea shelf break, but until now, there are no continuous observations that investigate the timing of the intrusions. Also, few works have focused on the effect of the tides that control these intrusions. In the Ross Sea, the CDW intrudes onto the shelf in several locations, but mostly along the troughs. We use hydrographic observations and a mooring placed on the outer shelf in the middle of the Drygalski Trough in order to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of CDW inflow onto the shelf. Our data span from 2004 to the beginning of 2014. In the Drygalski Trough, the CDW enters as a 150 m thick layer between 250 and 400 m, and moves upward towards the south. At the mooring location, about 50 km from the shelf break, two main CDW cores can be observed: one on the east side of the trough spreading along the west slope of Mawson Bank from about 200 m to the bottom and the other one in the central-west side from 200 m to about 350 m depth. A signature of this lighter and relatively warm water is detected by the instruments on the mooring at bottom of the Drygalski Trough. High frequency periodic CDW intrusion at the bottom of the trough is related to the diurnal and spring/neap tidal cycles. At lower frequency, a seasonal variability of the CDW intrusion is noticed. A strong inflow of CDW is observed every year at the end of December, while the CDW inflow is at its seasonal minimum during the beginning of the austral fall. In addition an interannual variability is also evident. A change of the CDW intrusion before and after 2010 is observed.

  5. Evidence of a dense water vein along the Libyan continental margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Gasparini

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available For the first time it was possible to investigate a still poorly known region of the eastern Mediterranean Sea, the Libyan continental margin. An oceanographic cruise, performed during summer 2006, revealed an important and novel feature: a dense vein flowing along the continental slope. The paper describes the vein evolution with some insights on its dynamic and furnishes an estimate of its transport, which results to be comparable with the Adriatic Deep Water production rate. The cascading into a steep canyon which incises the continental shelf suggests that the vein may play an important role in ventilating the deep layers of the Ionian Sea.

  6. Effects of internal waves on sound propagation in the shallow waters of the continental shelves

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Ming Yi

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Sound waves propagating through the oceans are refracted by internal waves. In the shallow waters of the continental shelves, an additional downward refraction of sound waves due to internal waves can cause them to interact more often with the seabed, resulting in additional energy from the sound waves being dissipated into the seabed. This study investigates how internal waves affect sound propagation on the continental shelves. It fi...

  7. 77 FR 18260 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Cook Inlet Planning Area, Proposed Oil and Gas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... approximately 60 nautical miles offshore, in water depths from about 30 feet to approximately 650 feet. A map of... Alaska currently has active oil and gas leases with two drill operations preparing for the 2012 drill... active Federal OCS leases in Cook Inlet. The BOEM document ``Assessment of Undiscovered Technically...

  8. Chemical and microscopic characterization of outer seed coats of fossil and extant water plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Bergen, P.F. van; Goni, M.; Barrie, P.J.; Collinson, M.E.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1995-01-01

    Sclerotic outer seed coat layers (testae) of three fossil and two extant water plant species were analyzed using scanning electron and light microscopy in addition to Curie-point pyrolysis, solid state 13C NMR, and CuO oxidation. Comparison between the chemical results from the fossil and extant

  9. Distribution of marine birds on the mid- and North-Atlantic US outer continental shelf. Technical progress report, January 1978-July 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, K.D.; Pittman, G.L.; Fitch, S.J.

    1980-09-01

    The species composition, distribution, and abundance of marine birds on continental shelf waters from Cape Hatteras to the Bay of Fundy were examined using ships-of-opportunity. Northern Fulmar, Cory's Shearwater, Greater Shearwater, Sooty Shearwater, Wilson's Storm-Petrel, Gannet, Red Phalarope, Great Black-backed Gull, Herring Gull, and Black-legged Kittiwake were the most abundant and common species. These species were ecologically dominant within the bird community in numbers and biomass. Georges Bank and Gulf of Marine regions generally had greatest estimates of standing stock and biomass; whereas, in the Middle Atlantic region these estimates were consistently lowest. Species diversity throughout the study area was greatest in spring and least in fall. Oceanic fronts at the continental shelf break and at Nantucket Shoals influenced the distribution of Wilson's Storm-Petrels and Red Phalaropes. Fishing activities were particularly important to Larus gull distribution. Fishes, squids, and crustaceans were the most important groups of prey items in diets of nine bird species. An oiled bird or pollution index was developed. According to the index, frequency of oiled birds was greatest in winter and spring, and gulls made up the majority of species with oiled plumages.

  10. Search for Water in Outer Main Belt Based on AKARI Asteroid Catalog (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Fumihiko

    2012-01-01

    We propose a program to search water ice and/or aqueously altered silicates on the surface of asteroids in outer main belt regions, which have high albedo measured with AKARI. The distribution of water in the main belt provides important information to understanding the formation and evolution of the solar system, because water is a good indicator of temperature in the early solar nebula, and it may be linked to the origin of Earth's water. The existence of water ice is a hot topic in the solar system studies today. Water ice is recently found in the outer region of the main asteroid belt and some of them are related with the main belt comets. Brand-new albedo data brought by AKARI opens the possibility of detection of water ice on asteroids like C-type and D-type, which contain primitive materials. Here we propose to make the spectroscopic observations with the Subaru telescope in the near-infrared wavelengths to detect water ice on these high-albedo C-type and D-type asteroids. Thanks to a large aperture of Subaru telescope and a high altitude of Mauna Kea, it can be only possible to observe a weak signal of the existence of water on the surface of asteroids with a certain S/N (typically, > 30 is required).

  11. Intertidal organism, habitat, fish survey, fishing duration, and other data from the Outer Kenai Peninsula from the HUMDINGER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 30 July 1975 to 31 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7700542)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Intertidal organism, habitat, fish survey, fishing duration, and other data were collected from the Outer Kenai Peninsula from the HUMDINGER as part of Outer...

  12. Nature of the observed oscillatory flows in shelf waters of the western continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Antony, M.K.; Sundar, D.

    Time series data on currents obtained from three Aanderaa current meters moored at a station depth of 92 m in the waters of the western continental shelf of India during May 1984 indicated the presence of oscillatory flows. The spectral computations...

  13. Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) and the Continental-scale International Project (GCIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vane, Deborah

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the objectives of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) and the Continental-scale International Project (GCIP) is presented in vugraph form. The objectives of GEWEX are as follows: determine the hydrological cycle by global measurements; model the global hydrological cycle; improve observations and data assimilation; and predict response to environmental change. The objectives of GCIP are as follows: determine the time/space variability of the hydrological cycle over a continental-scale region; develop macro-scale hydrologic models that are coupled to atmospheric models; develop information retrieval schemes; and support regional climate change impact assessment.

  14. geochemical characterization the waters of foggaras the continental

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. Benaricha, A. Khaldi, A. Elouissi, S. Mouassa, M. Zaagane

    2017-01-01

    sodic facies. These are the chlorides predominate in these waters, as well as sodium and potassium cations, resulting in the dissolution of evaporite salt formations. a. Right dissolution of halite b. Right dissolution of gypsum ...

  15. Transport and transfer rates in the waters of the continental shelf. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biscaye, P.E.

    1980-09-01

    The goal of govern project is to understand and quantify the processes that the transport and dispersal of energy-related pollutants introduced to the waters of the continental shelf and slope. The report is divided into sections dealing with processes associated with suspended solids; processes associated with sediments sinks for radionuclides and other pollutants; and spreading of water characteristics and species in solution. (ACR)

  16. Numerical simulation of the geographical sources of water for Continental Scale Experiments (CSEs) Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Sud, Yogesh; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Walker, Gregory K.

    2003-01-01

    There are several important research questions that the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) is actively pursuing, namely: What is the intensity of the water cycle and how does it change? And what is the sustainability of water resources? Much of the research to address these questions is directed at understanding the atmospheric water cycle. In this paper, we have used a new diagnostic tool, called Water Vapor Tracers (WVTs), to quantify the how much precipitation originated as continental or oceanic evaporation. This shows how long water can remain in the atmosphere and how far it can travel. The model-simulated data are analyzed over regions of interest to the GEWEX community, specifically, their Continental Scale Experiments (CSEs) that are in place in the United States, Europe, Asia, Brazil, Africa and Canada. The paper presents quantitative data on how much each continent and ocean on Earth supplies water for each CSE. Furthermore, the analysis also shows the seasonal variation of the water sources. For example, in the United States, summertime precipitation is dominated by continental (land surface) sources of water, while wintertime precipitation is dominated by the Pacific Ocean sources of water. We also analyze the residence time of water in the atmosphere. The new diagnostic shows a longer residence time for water (9.2 days) than more traditional estimates (7.5 days). We emphasize that the results are based on model simulations and they depend on the model s veracity. However, there are many potential uses for the new diagnostic tool in understanding weather processes and large and small scales.

  17. Distribution of marine birds on the mid- and north-Atlantic U. S. outer continental shelf. Technical progress report, September 1978-August 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, K.D.; Pittman, G.L.; Burrell, G.C.

    1979-10-01

    The scope of the project was not changed since the last annual report, but the study area was extended south to Cape Hatteras. The objectives were to determine spatial and temporal distributions of marine birds in mid- and north-Atlantic U.S. continental shelf waters; to identify marine bird food habits and distribution of prey items; and (3) to develop a marine bird data retrieval bank. Data from 1978-79 indicated that Georges Bank and its adjacent waters support an abundant and diverse bird population throughout the year. Species composition changed seasonally but diversity usually remained high. In contrast, the mid-Atlantic Bight demonstrated only a seasonal importance to birds. In all areas surveyed greatest bird densities were found at upwellings and in association with fishing activities. A stomach contents analysis of specimens collected in August 1978 indicated that Cory's, Greater and Sooty Shearwaters were feeding on squid and fish. Great Black-backed and Herring Gulls were utilizing fish, insects, birds, and crustaceans. All MBO seabird data collected prior to July 1979 have been keypunched. No data retrieval programs were developed.

  18. Taxonomy and bathymetric distribution of the outer neritic/upper bathyal ostracodes (Crustacea: Ostracoda) from the southernmost Brazilian continental margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergue, Cristianini Trescastro; Coimbra, João Carlos; Ramos, Maria Inês Feijó

    2016-02-10

    Sixty-five ostracode species belonging to 41 genera and 17 families were recorded in the outer shelf and upper slope off Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina states, southernmost Brazil, between 100 and 586 m water depth interval. The ostracode occurrences are hypothesized to be influenced by both, the coastal waters and the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW). The taxonomy of some species of Bradleya Hornibrook, 1952, Legitimocythere Coles & Whatley, 1989 and Henryhowella Puri, 1957 previously described in the same study area is revised. Bradleya gaucha sp. nov., Legitimocythere megapotamica sp. nov., Apatihowella acelos sp. nov., Apatihowella capitulum sp. nov., Apatihowella besnardi sp. nov., Apatihowella convexa sp. nov., and Aversovalva tomcronini sp. nov. are herein proposed. Trachyleberis aorata Bergue & Coimbra, 2008 is reassigned to the genus Legitimocythere and Bradleya pseudonormani Ramos et al., 2009 has its diagnosis emended. Bythocypris praerenis Brandão, 2008 is considered a junior synonym of Bythocypris kyamos Whatley et al., 1998a. Apatihowella Jellinek & Swanson, 2003 and Legitimocythere species have well-defined bathymetric distributions and are potential paleoceanographic markers for the Quaternary in the Southern Brazilian Margin.

  19. Upper ocean variability in west Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf waters as measured using instrumented seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Daniel P.; Klinck, John M.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Dinniman, Michael S.; Burns, Jennifer M.

    2008-02-01

    Temperature profile data for the west Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) continental shelf waters, collected from freely ranging instrumented seals (crabeater, Lobodon carcinophagus and leopard, Hydrurga leptonyx), were used to demonstrate that these platforms can be used to supplement traditional oceanographic sampling methods to investigate the physical properties of the upper water column. The seal-derived profiles were combined with temperature profiles obtained from ship-based CTD measurements and from a numerical circulation model developed for the WAP to describe changes in temperature structure, heat content, and heat flux in the upper ocean waters of the WAP continental shelf. The seal-derived data documented the fall-to-winter transition of the surface waters and the shelf-wide presence of modified Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) below 150-200 m on the WAP continental shelf. The heat content of the upper 200 m calculated from the seal-derived temperature profiles ranged between 1000 and 1500 MJ m -2; similar estimates were obtained from simulated temperature distributions. The seal-derived temperature measurements provided broader space and time resolution than was possible using any other currently available oceanographic sampling method. As such, the seal-derived measurements provided a valuable dataset for evaluation of temperature fields obtained from a numerical circulation model.

  20. Impact of Water Withdrawals from Groundwater and Surface Water on Continental Water Storage Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doell, Petra; Hoffmann-Dobrev, Heike; Portmann, Felix T.; Siebert, Stefan; Eicker, Annette; Rodell, Matthew; Strassberg, Gil

    2011-01-01

    Humans have strongly impacted the global water cycle, not only water flows but also water storage. We have performed a first global-scale analysis of the impact of water withdrawals on water storage variations, using the global water resources and use model WaterGAP. This required estimation of fractions of total water withdrawals from groundwater, considering five water use sectors. According to our assessment, the source of 35% of the water withdrawn worldwide (4300 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002) is groundwater. Groundwater contributes 42%, 36% and 27% of water used for irrigation, households and manufacturing, respectively, while we assume that only surface water is used for livestock and for cooling of thermal power plants. Consumptive water use was 1400 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002. It is the sum of the net abstraction of 250 cubic km/yr of groundwater (taking into account evapotranspiration and return flows of withdrawn surface water and groundwater) and the net abstraction of 1150 km3/yr of surface water. Computed net abstractions indicate, for the first time at the global scale, where and when human water withdrawals decrease or increase groundwater or surface water storage. In regions with extensive surface water irrigation, such as Southern China, net abstractions from groundwater are negative, i.e. groundwater is recharged by irrigation. The opposite is true for areas dominated by groundwater irrigation, such as in the High Plains aquifer of the central USA, where net abstraction of surface water is negative because return flow of withdrawn groundwater recharges the surface water compartments. In intensively irrigated areas, the amplitude of seasonal total water storage variations is generally increased due to human water use; however, in some areas, it is decreased. For the High Plains aquifer and the whole Mississippi basin, modeled groundwater and total water storage variations were compared with estimates of groundwater storage variations based on

  1. Derivation of a three dimensional numerical water quality model for estuary and continental shelf application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, M.

    1973-01-01

    A derivation is given for a three dimensional mass transport equation which is appropriate for numerical modeling of estuary and continental shelf water quality variations for both the time dependent and steady state cases. A finite difference approximation to the derived equation is presented and a solution scheme for the resulting equations outlined. Preliminary results are obtained using the model for the extremely simple problems which have analytical solutions. The numerical model, as presented, will provide a scheme to study water quality problems in coastal waters for both steady state and time dependent cases.

  2. Enrichment of 88Sr in continental waters due to calcium carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Netta; Gavrieli, Ittai; Halicz, Ludwik; Sandler, Amir; Stein, Mordechai; Lazar, Boaz

    2017-02-01

    δ88/86Sr data published over the last few years suggest that continental waters are enriched with 88Sr as compared to the rocks in their drainage basins. In an attempt to understand this phenomenon, this study established the fractionation in the 88Sr/86Sr ratio during precipitation of continental carbonates (i.e., carbonates precipitated on land from surface, pedogenic, or ground waters), and evaluated the contribution of this process to the 88Sr-enrichment in rivers. For this, stable and radiogenic Sr isotopes (88Sr, 87Sr and 86Sr) were measured in calcite samples and their precipitating waters collected in various continental environments, such as soil, cave, streams and groundwater. The results indicate that continental carbonates are 88Sr-depleted relative to their precipitating waters, placing them as one of the most 88Sr-depleted reservoirs on earth. The average difference in δ88/86Sr values between waters and solid CaCO3 (tufas or speleothems) that they precipitate is Δcarb-water = - 0.218 ± 0.014 ‰ (1SD). An even larger fractionation (εcarb-water = - 0.285 ± 0.02 ‰) was measured in groundwater with particularly high carbonate-alkalinity and high carbonate precipitation rate that depleted ∼65% of the Sr in the groundwater, resulting in substantial 88Sr-enrichment in the residual dissolved Sr (δ88/86Sr = 0.656 ‰). Results also suggest that pedogenic carbonate precipitation in soil profile removes 50-85% of the Sr from the recharging soil-water, thereby increasing the δ88/86Sr value of the soil-water from ∼ 0.18 ‰ to 0.3 ‰- 0.6 ‰. Similar 88Sr-enrichment was observed in drip water from a karst cave. A maximum removal flux of Sr into continental carbonates of about 20 Gmol(Sr)ṡy-1 is required to yield the reported 88Sr-enrichment in global rivers (δ88/86Sr = 0.32 ‰) relative to their rock sources when using the fractionation factor derived in this study, Δcarb-water = - 0.218 ‰, and the published δ88/86Sr composition of marine

  3. NEWS Climatology Project: The State of the Water Cycle at Continental to Global Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matthew; LEcuyer, Tristan; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; Olson, Bill

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project is to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project is a multiinstitutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe results of the first stage of the water budget analysis, whose goal was to characterize the current state of the water cycle on mean monthly, continental scales. We examine our success in closing the water budget within the expected uncertainty range and the effects of forcing budget closure as a method for refining individual flux estimates.

  4. Radium isotopes in the Polish Outer Carpathian mineral waters of various chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Nguyen Dinh; Lucyna, Rajchel; Jakub, Nowak; Paweł, Jodłowski

    2012-10-01

    The paper presents the activity concentrations of radium isotopes ((226)Ra, (228)Ra) and chemical compositions of above 70 mineral water samples collected from several dozens of springs and boreholes localized in the Polish Outer Carpathians. The activity concentrations of both radium isotopes clearly increase with the increase of water TDS, but decrease when the SO(4)(2-) content increases. These concentrations vary in the broad interval from a few to near 1000 mBq/L. The coefficient of the linear correlation between concentrations of these isotopes amounts to 0.85, and the activity ratio (226)Ra/(228)Ra is >1 for chloride-sodium waters, being ≈1 for hydrogen-carbonate and <1 for the sulfate ones. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High-resolution Continental Scale Land Surface Model incorporating Land-water Management in United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, S.; Pokhrel, Y. N.

    2016-12-01

    Land surface models have been used to assess water resources sustainability under changing Earth environment and increasing human water needs. Overwhelming observational records indicate that human activities have ubiquitous and pertinent effects on the hydrologic cycle; however, they have been crudely represented in large scale land surface models. In this study, we enhance an integrated continental-scale land hydrology model named Leaf-Hydro-Flood to better represent land-water management. The model is implemented at high resolution (5km grids) over the continental US. Surface water and groundwater are withdrawn based on actual practices. Newly added irrigation, water diversion, and dam operation schemes allow better simulations of stream flows, evapotranspiration, and infiltration. Results of various hydrologic fluxes and stores from two sets of simulation (one with and the other without human activities) are compared over a range of river basin and aquifer scales. The improved simulations of land hydrology have potential to build consistent modeling framework for human-water-climate interactions.

  6. Chemical and microscopic characterization of outer seed coats of fossil and extant water plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergen, P. F.; Goñi, M.; Collinson, M. E.; Barrie, P. J.; Damsté, J. S. Sinninghe; De Leeuw, J. W.

    1994-09-01

    Sclerotic outer seed coat layers (testae) of three fossil and two extant water plant species were analyzed using scanning electron and light microscopy in addition to Curie-point pyrolysis, solid state 13C NMR, and CuO oxidation. Comparison between the chemical results from the fossil and extant samples reveals that the original resistant constituents in the sclerotic testae are native lignin-celluloses which are transformed to polyphenol macromolecules recognized in the fossil samples. The combination of microscopic and chemical data provides new insights regarding the early diagenetic processes by which lignin-cellulose-containing plant remains may have been transformed. In particular, the unaltered morphology in combination with major chemical modifications is used as the basis to postulate the timing and nature of lignin transformations. The combination of pyrolysis, solid state 13C NMR, and CuO oxidation is shown to be a powerful tool to characterize the chemical structure of testae of fossil and extant water plants.

  7. Marine bird specimen and other data as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 29 June 1975 to 25 August 1979 (NODC Accession 8100481)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird specimen and other data were collected from 29 June 1975 to 25 August 1979. Data were collected by the University of California (UC) as part of the Outer...

  8. Relating Ctenophore Population to Water Mass Indices in the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Sparks

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ctenophores exist throughout the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf Ecosystem, but the underlying mechanisms that control ctenophore populations at this scale are not clear. Ctenophore population data over the last 30 years coincides with changes in several water masses on the shelf, but discovering which water mass was most influential was problematic without mechanistic clarity. This paper strives to identify the relationship between oceanography and ctenophore populations over the last 30 years. Using a numerical modeling approach, we found a strong relationship between the North Atlantic Oscillation index, percent Labrador Subarctic Slope Water, and ctenophore population. We suggest these results might inform future efforts to develop a predictive capability for major changes in ctenophore population.

  9. Hydrochemical and water quality assessment of groundwater in Doon Valley of Outer Himalaya, Uttarakhand, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudeja, Divya; Bartarya, Sukesh Kumar; Biyani, A K

    2011-10-01

    The present study discusses ion sources and assesses the chemical quality of groundwater of Doon Valley in Outer Himalayan region for drinking and irrigational purposes. Valley is almost filled with Doon gravels that are main aquifers supplying water to its habitants. Recharged only by meteoric water, groundwater quality in these aquifers is controlled essentially by chemical processes occurring between water and lithology and locally altered by human activities. Seventy-six water samples were collected from dug wells, hand pumps and tube wells and were analysed for their major ion concentrations. The pH is varying from 5.6 to 7.4 and electrical conductivity from 71 to 951 μmho/cm. Groundwater of Doon valley is dominated by bicarbonate contributing 83% in anionic abundance while calcium and magnesium dominate in cationic concentrations with 88%. The seasonal and spatial variation in ionic concentration, in general, is related to discharge and lithology. The high ratio of (Ca + Mg)/(Na + K), i.e. 10, low ratio of (Na + K)/TZ+, i.e.0.2 and also the presence of carbonate lithology in the northern part of valley, is indicative of carbonate dissolution as the main controlling solute acquisition process in the valley. The low abundance of silica content and high HCO₃/H₄SiO₄ ratio also supports carbonate dissolution and less significant role of silicate weathering as the major source for dissolved ions in Doon Valley. The analytical results computed for various indices show that water is of fairly good quality, although, hard but have moderate dissolved solid content. It is free from sodium hazard lying in C₁-S₁ and C₂-S₁ class of USSL diagram and in general suitable for drinking and irrigation except few locations having slightly high salinity hazard.

  10. Water masses transform at mid-depths over the Antarctic Continental Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead Silvester, Jess; Lenn, Yueng-Djern; Polton, Jeffrey; Phillips, Helen E.; Morales Maqueda, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    The Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) controls the oceans' latitudinal heat distribution, helping to regulate the Earth's climate. The Southern Ocean is the primary place where cool, deep waters return to the surface to complete this global circulation. While water mass transformations intrinsic to this process predominantly take place at the surface following upwelling, recent studies implicate vertical mixing in allowing transformation at mid-depths over the Antarctic continental slope. We deployed an EM-Apex float near Elephant Island, north of the Antarctic Peninsula's tip, to profile along the slope and use potential vorticity to diagnose observed instabilities. The float captures direct heat exchange between a lens of Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW) and surrounding Lower Circumpolar Deep Waters (LCDW) at mid-depths and over the course of several days. Heat fluxes peak across the top and bottom boundaries of the UCDW lens and peak diffusivities across the bottom boundary are associated with shear instability. Estimates of diffusivity from shear-strain finestructure parameterisation and heat fluxes are found to be in reasonable agreement. The two-dimensional Ertel potential vorticity is elevated both inside the UCDW lens and along its bottom boundary, with a strong contribution from the shear term in these regions and instabilities are associated with gravitational and symmetric forcing. Thus, shear instabilities are driving turbulent mixing across the lower boundary between these two water masses, leading to the observed heat exchange and transformation at mid-depths over the Antarctic continental slope. This has implications for our understanding of the rates of upwelling and ocean-atmosphere exchanges of heat and carbon at this critical location.

  11. Clay sediment accumulation rates on the monsoon-dominated western continental shelf and slope region of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Borole, D.V.

    Clay accumulation rates shown in sediment cores from the nearshore to outer continental shelf and slope regions in water depths of 10-1246 m on the western continental margins of India were determined by the 210Pb dating technique. The 210Pb excess...

  12. Chemical and microscopic characterization of outer seed coats of fossil and extant water plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergen, P.F. van; Goni, M.; Collinson, M.E.; Barrie, P.J.; Damste, J.S.S.; Leeuw, J.W. de (Netherlands Institute of Sea Research, Den Burg (Netherlands). Division of Marine Biogeochemistry)

    1994-09-01

    Sclerotic outer seed coat layers (testae) of three fossil and two extant water plant species were analyzed using scanning electron and light microscopy in addition to Curie-point pyrolysis, solid state [sup 13]C NMR, and CuO oxidation. Comparison between the chemical results from the fossil and extant samples reveals that the original resistant constituents in the sclerotic testae are native lignin-celluloses which are transformed to polyphenol macromolecules recognized in the fossil samples. The combination of microscopic and chemical data provides new insights regarding the early diagenetic processes by which lignin-cellulose-containing plant remains may have been transformed. In particular, the unaltered morphology in combination with major chemical modification is used as the basis to postulate the timing and nature of lignin transformations. The combination of pyrolysis, solid state [sup 13]C NMR, and CuO oxidation is shown to be a powerful tool to characterize the chemical structure of testae of fossil and extant water plants.

  13. Transport and transfer rates in the waters of the continental shelf. [Atlantic Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biscaye, P.E.

    1979-08-01

    Samples and data from previous cruises were analyzed with a view to understanding those biological, chemical, and physical processes which affect energy-related pollutants in the marine environment of the continental margin. Two cruises designed to expand the sample base, measure the time variability of several transfer processes, and to test specific hypotheses on the mechanisms for processes which effect exchange of continental margin with open ocean waters were carried out. Progress was made in understanding the relative roles of nutrients and light in controlling the productivity of important primary biomass (and hence, particle) producers. Progress was also made in understanding the influences of phytoplankton populations on distribution of inorganic nutrients, dissolved oxygen and particulate organic matter. In addition, preliminary results from field work support the hypothesis that most diatom production on the shelf sinks to the bottom where it enters benthic food chains or provides seed populations for subsequent blooms. Radionuclides were studied in water columns and in sediments to develop an understanding of processes associated with suspended solids and with sediments as sinks for radionuclides and other pollutants. Major progress was made on the analysis of hydrographic data from all previous cruises and to evolve a comprehensive picture of the stratification of the waters of the New York Bight. The Co/sub 2/-H/sub 2/0 equilibration system required for the preparation of samples for oxygen isotope analysis was completed. Work has continued in the use of radon as a tracer of small scale water motions and mixing in the definition of the source function needed for modelling the data, in actual modelling of the data, and in defining the range of variability of the radon distributions. (JGB)

  14. Debris Flows and Water Tracks in Continental Antarctica: Water as a geomorphic agent in a hyperarid polar desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauber, E.; Sassenroth, C.; De Vera, J.-P.; Schmitz, N.; Reiss, D.; Hiesinger, H.; Johnsson, A.

    2017-09-01

    Most studies using Antarctica as a Mars analogue have focused on the McMurdo Dry Valleys, which are among the coldest and driest places on Earth. However, other ice-free areas in continental Antarctica also display landforms that can inform the study of the possible geomorphic impact of water in a polar desert. Here we present a new analogue site in the interior of the Transantarctic Mountains in Northern Victoria Land. Gullies show unambiguous evidence for debris flows, and water tracks act as shallow subsurface pathways of water on top of the permafrost tale. Both processes are driven by meltwater from glacier ice and snow in an environ-ment which never experiences rainfall and in which the air temperatures probably never exceed 0°C.

  15. The assemblage composition and structure of swimming crabs (Portunoidea) in continental shelf waters of southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, L. S.; Frameschi, I. F.; Costa, R. C.; Castilho, A. L.; Fransozo, A.

    2015-02-01

    Three regions along the Brazilian coast characterized by the occurrence of contrasting natural phenomena, such as upwellings and continental input, were surveyed to determine the composition and structure of the assemblage of swimming crabs. Twelve monthly collections were undertaken (July 2010 to June 2011) in Macaé, Rio de Janeiro (MAC); Ubatuba, São Paulo (UBA); and São Francisco do Sul, Santa Catarina (SFS). The lowest values ​​of the phi sediment grain size measure, bottom temperature and the highest values of organic matter and salinity were measured in MAC. In all, 10,686 individuals were collected, belonging to six species of Portunoidea: Arenaeus cribrarius, Callinectes danae, Callinectes ornatus, Callinectes sapidus, Achelous spinicarpus and Achelous spinimanus. A Multiple Response Permutation Procedure (MRPP) test indicated that the species composition differed significantly among the sampling sites, showing substantial heterogeneity in the composition and abundance of species among regions. The results suggest that C. danae was more abundant in waters with lower salinity and lower organic matter content. In contrast, A. spinimanus is positively correlated with these factors, showing a greater abundance under the opposite conditions. Callinectes ornatus appeared not to show strong selectivity for particular habitat characteristics. We conclude from these findings that areas affected by different phenomena produce changes in the composition and abundance of the assemblage of Portunoidea. Although the strength of eutrophication differs between UBA and MAC, the substantial continental inflow affecting SFS favors the development of species that complete their life cycle in the estuary.

  16. Decision-centric adaptation appraisal for water management across Colorado’s Continental Divide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N. Yates

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step decision support process was developed and applied to the physically and legally complex case of water diversions from the Upper Colorado River across the Continental Divide to serve cities and farms along Colorado’s Front Range. We illustrate our approach by simulating the performance of an existing drought-response measure, the Shoshone Call Relaxation Agreement (SCRA [the adaptation measure], using the Water Evaluation and Planning (WEAP tool [the hydrologic cycle and water systems model]; and the Statistical DownScaling Model (SDSM-DC [the stochastic climate scenario generator]. Scenarios relevant to the decision community were analyzed and results indicate that this drought management measure would provide only a small storage benefit in offsetting the impacts of a shift to a warmer and drier future climate coupled with related environmental changes. The analysis demonstrates the importance of engaging water managers in the development of credible and computationally efficient decision support tools that accurately capture the physical, legal and contractual dimensions of their climate risk management problems.

  17. The role of deep-water sedimentary processes in shaping a continental margin: The Northwest Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, David C.; Campbell, D.C.; Gardner, J.V.; Piper, D.J.W.; Chaytor, Jason; Rebesco, M.

    2017-01-01

    The tectonic history of a margin dictates its general shape; however, its geomorphology is generally transformed by deep-sea sedimentary processes. The objective of this study is to show the influences of turbidity currents, contour currents and sediment mass failures on the geomorphology of the deep-water northwestern Atlantic margin (NWAM) between Blake Ridge and Hudson Trough, spanning about 32° of latitude and the shelf edge to the abyssal plain. This assessment is based on new multibeam echosounder data, global bathymetric models and sub-surface geophysical information.The deep-water NWAM is divided into four broad geomorphologic classifications based on their bathymetric shape: graded, above-grade, stepped and out-of-grade. These shapes were created as a function of the balance between sediment accumulation and removal that in turn were related to sedimentary processes and slope-accommodation. This descriptive method of classifying continental margins, while being non-interpretative, is more informative than the conventional continental shelf, slope and rise classification, and better facilitates interpretation concerning dominant sedimentary processes.Areas of the margin dominated by turbidity currents and slope by-pass developed graded slopes. If sediments did not by-pass the slope due to accommodation then an above grade or stepped slope resulted. Geostrophic currents created sedimentary bodies of a variety of forms and positions along the NWAM. Detached drifts form linear, above-grade slopes along their crests from the shelf edge to the deep basin. Plastered drifts formed stepped slope profiles. Sediment mass failure has had a variety of consequences on the margin morphology; large mass-failures created out-of-grade profiles, whereas smaller mass failures tended to remain on the slope and formed above-grade profiles at trough-mouth fans, or nearly graded profiles, such as offshore Cape Fear.

  18. Expression pattern of INNER NO OUTER homologue in Nymphaea (water lily family, Nymphaeaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toshihiro; Ito, Motomi; Kato, Masahiro

    2003-10-01

    Two homologues of INNER NO OUTER ( INO) in Nymphaea alba and N. colorata (Nymphaeaceae) were isolated and the expression pattern of the N. alba INO homologue NaINO was examined by in situ hybridization. The INO homologues obtained have a portion similar to INO in the predicted amino acid sequences between the conserved zinc finger-like and YABBY domains. In an in situ hybridization analysis, NaINO is expressed in the outer epidermis of the outer integument, inner integument, and the tip of the nucellus. The pattern observed in the outer integument is very similar to that of Arabidopsis thaliana, while the expression in the inner integument and nucellus is not observed in A. thaliana.

  19. Intense biological phosphate uptake onto particles in subeuphotic continental margin waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoll, S.; Ferdelman, T. G.; Holtappels, M.; Goldhammer, T.; Littmann, S.; Iversen, M. H.; Kuypers, M. M. M.

    2017-03-01

    Elucidating the processes that affect particulate phosphorus (P) export from the euphotic zone and burial in sediments is important for models of global phosphorus, nitrogen, and carbon cycling. We investigated dissolved inorganic Pi incorporation into particles (>0.2 µm) in the subeuphotic zone and benthic boundary layer of high-productivity Mauritanian and Namibian shelf waters, using 33PO43- tracer experiments combined with a sequential chemical extraction analysis. Pi uptake (5.4 to 19.9 nmol P L-1 d-1) by particulate matter was biologically mediated ( 50% into the organic fraction) and similar to estimated rates of heterotrophic growth. Thus, a substantial fraction of Pi must be recycled through a particle-associated microbial pool. Rapid adsorption of 33P in the anoxic waters of Namibia indicated the additional existence of a large pool of surface exchangeable P. Particle-associated Pi recycling and adsorption may influence the export flux and ultimate fate of particle bound P in continental shelf waters.

  20. Connecting seas : western Palaearctic continental flyway for water birds in the perspective of changing land use and climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eerden, MR; Drent, RH; Stahl, J; Bakker, JP

    The western Palaearctic continental flyway that connects the tundra and taiga belts of Russia with north-west Europe is the major migratory avenue for an estimated 9.3 million herbivorous water birds ( swans, geese and ducks). Agricultural practices together with protection measures subsidize the

  1. Freshwater Vulnerability beyond Local Water Stress: Heterogeneous Effects of Water-Electricity Nexus Across the Continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ranran; Zimmerman, Julie B; Wang, Chunyan; Font Vivanco, David; Hertwich, Edgar G

    2017-09-05

    Human health and economic prosperity are vulnerable to freshwater shortage in many parts of the world. Despite a growing literature that examines the freshwater vulnerability in various spatiotemporal contexts, existing knowledge has been conventionally constrained by a territorial perspective. On the basis of spatial analyses of monthly water and electricity flows across 2110 watersheds and three interconnected power systems, this study investigates the water-electricity nexus (WEN)'s transboundary effects on freshwater vulnerability in the continental United States in 2014. The effects are shown to be considerable and heterogeneous across time and space. For at least one month a year, 58 million people living in water-abundant watersheds were exposed to additional freshwater vulnerability by relying on electricity generated by freshwater-cooled thermal energy conversion cycles in highly stressed watersheds; for 72 million people living in highly stressed watersheds, their freshwater vulnerability was mitigated by using imported electricity generated in water-abundant watersheds or power plants running dry cooling or using nonfreshwater for cooling purposes. On the country scale, the mitigation effects were the most significant during September and October, while the additional freshwater vulnerability was more significant in February, March, and December. Due to the WEN's transboundary effects, overall, the freshwater vulnerability was slightly worsened within the Eastern Interconnection, substantially improved within the Western Interconnection, and least affected within the ERCOT Interconnection.

  2. Numerical modeling of the response of Ceará continental shelf waters to wind stress forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacyra Soares

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceará shelf waters response to steady and transicnt wind forcing, from Ponta Cajuais (04°42'S, 37°19.5'W to Ponta de Itapagé (02°50.5'S, 40000'W, was studied using a hydrodynamic numerical model. The finitc difference model was based upon the equations for a barotropic ocean in general form: advective and quadratic surface and bottom stress terms were included. Seasonal differences in the shelf waters response were characterized by simulation of summer and winter forcing. Such experiments wcre conducted for both f and equatorial beta plane domains, without significative differences in the results. Transient shelf waters response were investigated using surface winds from the Fortaleza airport , during the period extending from 14/03 to 25/03n9. Model results were compared to current data collected during the same period; modeled currents were able to roughly describe observed current pattem, but not current intensity.A resposta das águas da plataforma continental do Ceará, de Ponta Cajuais (04°42'S, 37° 19,5'W, à forçante do vento estacionária e transiente foi estudada através de um modelo numérico hidrodinâmico. O modelo, na forma de diferenças finitas, utiliza as equações do movimento e da continuidade de massa para um oceano barotr6pico no caso mais geral: estão incluídos os termos advectivos, bem como o atrito com o fundo e a tensão de cisalhamento do vento, ambos parametrizados na forma quadrática. Variações sazonais na resposta estacionária das águas da plataforma continental, da área estudada, foram caracterizadas pela simulação das condições de verão e inverno da região. Os experimentos foram realizados no plano f e no plano p equatorial sem diferenças significativas nos resultados. A resposta transiente das águas da plataforma continental, da região escolhida, foi investigada usando uma série temporal de vento de superfície do Aeroporto de Fortaleza do período de 14 à 25 de março. O per

  3. Climatic Atlas of the Outer Continental Shelf Waters and Coastal Regions of Alaska. Volume I. Gulf of Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    fC LC IE M- -(9) % I- In - %b OTh.g oa6h - b. -d 1. d..,n. 1h.. --. .1 O h.-n d-.o,,1-, Son , h. 4 --N.ob., .1 -b d - . -. h. ,,i ad-d a--n hO4. - --18...995 3184 September 7 Cloud cover/wind direction 310 io- 4noo- A-A Marine~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ AnchorageAe 0MrieAr@E ain re LOJD* -’UT NEG TSCLO MU T NEIG ...34--yoo (I". -toIo Son . ,ot.ooo w,- .4 - A~ooo -d b. -Iml oh ,.. I..,, BLd AC LINE4 P.-~I io.-, oI -d wood4 :10 kno, (512 nwh). ce -~o. Speed io (c boo

  4. Climatic Atlas of the Outer Continental Shelf Waters and Coastal Regions of Alaska. Volume 3. Chukchi-Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    development. Column 8: Number of days entire sea route to Prudhoe Bay less than/equal to five-tenths ice concentration LANDSAT imagery was used to...were -9l%.) PEL ATIVE HUMIDITY %) The observation count for the graph reflects those observations containing both dry and wet bulb temperatures; both...80 40󈧄 20 5203040 eT+ 1 8132 52. 1I 233 25 2 1 4+110+ I - - N w + 1 4 3 3 5.. N 1 + + N + 3 1 + + TOA 1 A3 13 14 5 3 1 + C, A 22 15 20 13 TOA

  5. Age & reproduction in three reef - dwelling serranid fishes of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf: Pronotogrammus martinicensis, Hemanthias vivanus & Serranus phoebe (with preliminary observations on the Pomacentrid fish, Chromis enchrysurus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Paul E.; McBride, Richard S.; Sulak, Kenneth J.; Dennis, George D.

    2004-01-01

    Specimens of the four study species were collected during cruises to outer-continental shelf reefs of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Age was estimated for all serranid species using whole otoliths and C. enchrysurus ages were determined from transverse sections of sagittal otoliths. Ring structure observed on otoliths was validated as having an annual periodicity for P. martinicensis using marginal increment analysis. Ring structure on remaining species was assumed to correspond to age (years). Pronotogrammus martinicensis, H. vivanus, S. phoebe, and C. enchrysurus exhibited maximum ages of 9, 8, 5, and 11, respectively. Spatial variations in size-at-age were observed in P. martinicensis populations. Individuals inhabiting reefs in the Madison-Swanson Reserve area on the West Florida Shelf edge exhibited the fastest growth rates, while the slowest growing P. martinicensis were collected from the Alabama Alps Reef, the farthest west study reef. Pronotogrammus martinicensis and H. vivanus are both protogynous hermaphrodites. Evidence of active spawning was observed in the months from February through July for P. martinicensis, and March and May for H. vivanus. Serranus phoebe was observed to be a simultaneous hermaphroditic capable of spawning year-round. Batch fecundity estimates for P. martinicensis ranged from 149-394 oocytes per fish. Size selectivity was evident in our primary sampling method, hook and line using small tandem bait hooks. Smaller size-classes of all species examined were under-represented in our samples, hindering accurate growth modeling. Due to the protogynous nature of P. martinicensis and H. vivanus, hook and line sampling also tended to select for males. Future descriptions of the reproductive biology of both protogynous species would be more complete if less selective sampling methods could be successfully employed. The data presented here contribute to a better assessment of the fish community of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Little

  6. Trends in summer bottom-water temperatures on the northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf from 1985 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R Eugene; Rabalais, Nancy N; Justić, Dubravko

    2017-01-01

    We quantified trends in the 1985 to 2015 summer bottom-water temperature on the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM) continental shelf for data collected at 88 stations with depths ranging from 3 to 63 m. The analysis was supplemented with monthly data collected from 1963 to 1965 in the same area. The seasonal summer peak in average bottom-water temperature varied concurrently with air temperature, but with a 2- to 5-month lag. The summer bottom-water temperature declined gradually with depth from 30 oC at stations closest to the shore, to 20 oC at the offshore edge of the study area, and increased an average 0.051 oC y-1 between1963 and 2015. The bottom-water warming in summer for all stations was 1.9 times faster compared to the rise in local summer air temperatures, and 6.4 times faster than the concurrent increase in annual global ocean sea surface temperatures. The annual rise in average summer bottom-water temperatures on the subtropical nGOM continental shelf is comparable to the few published temperature trend estimates from colder environments. These recent changes in the heat storage on the nGOM continental shelf will affect oxygen and carbon cycling, spatial distribution of fish and shrimp, and overall species diversity.

  7. Trends in summer bottom-water temperatures on the northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf from 1985 to 2015.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Eugene Turner

    Full Text Available We quantified trends in the 1985 to 2015 summer bottom-water temperature on the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM continental shelf for data collected at 88 stations with depths ranging from 3 to 63 m. The analysis was supplemented with monthly data collected from 1963 to 1965 in the same area. The seasonal summer peak in average bottom-water temperature varied concurrently with air temperature, but with a 2- to 5-month lag. The summer bottom-water temperature declined gradually with depth from 30 oC at stations closest to the shore, to 20 oC at the offshore edge of the study area, and increased an average 0.051 oC y-1 between1963 and 2015. The bottom-water warming in summer for all stations was 1.9 times faster compared to the rise in local summer air temperatures, and 6.4 times faster than the concurrent increase in annual global ocean sea surface temperatures. The annual rise in average summer bottom-water temperatures on the subtropical nGOM continental shelf is comparable to the few published temperature trend estimates from colder environments. These recent changes in the heat storage on the nGOM continental shelf will affect oxygen and carbon cycling, spatial distribution of fish and shrimp, and overall species diversity.

  8. Distribution of water masses and meltwater on the continental shelf near the Totten and Moscow University ice shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvano, Alessandro; Rintoul, Stephen R.; Peña-Molino, Beatriz; Williams, Guy D.

    2017-03-01

    Warm waters flood the continental shelf of the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas in West Antarctica, driving rapid basal melt of ice shelves. In contrast, waters on the continental shelf in East Antarctica are cooler and ice shelves experience relatively low rates of basal melt. An exception is provided by the Totten and Moscow University ice shelves on the Sabrina Coast, where satellite-derived basal melt rates are comparable to West Antarctica. Recent oceanographic observations have revealed that relatively warm (˜-0.4°C) modified Circumpolar Deep Water (mCDW) enters the cavity beneath the Totten Ice Shelf through a 1100 m deep trough, delivering sufficient heat to drive rapid basal melt. Here we use observations from a recent summer survey to show that mCDW is widespread on the continental shelf of the Sabrina Coast, forming a warm (up to 0.3°C) and saline (34.5-34.6) bottom layer overlaid by cold (˜freezing point) and fresh (salinity ˜34.3) Winter Water. Dense Shelf Water is not observed. A 1000 deep m trough allows water at -1.3°C to reach the Moscow University ice-shelf cavity to drive basal melt. Freshening by addition of glacial meltwater is widespread on the southern shelf at depths above 300-400 m, with maximum meltwater concentrations up to 4-5 ml L-1 observed in outflows from the ice-shelf cavities. Our observations indicate that the ocean properties on the Sabrina Coast more resemble those found on the continental shelf of the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas than those typical of East Antarctica.Plain Language SummaryThe Totten Glacier drains more ice from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet than any other glacier. The Totten holds a volume of ice equivalent to more than 3.5m of global sea level rise, so changes in the glacier could have significant consequences. East Antarctic ice shelves, including the Totten, were thought to be largely isolated from warm ocean waters and therefore stable. An Australian voyage in 2015 obtained the first oceanographic

  9. Monthly climatology of the continental shelf waters of the South Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Brian O.; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo; Werner, Francisco E.; Seim, Harvey E.

    2003-08-01

    Monthly circulation of the South Atlantic Bight is diagnosed using a 3-D, shallow water, finite element model forced with monthly wind stress and hydrographic climatology. Temperature and salinity observations from the period 1950-1999 are objectively interpolated onto the model domain, and Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) wind velocities from 1975-1999 are used to prescribe the model surface wind stress. The resulting monthly temperature and salinity fields compare favorably to existing shelf climatology. River discharge maxima are evident in the spring temperature and salinity fields, and the rapid heating and cooling of the shelf are captured. The diagnostic circulation is largely wind-driven in the inner and mid-shelf, and the Gulf Stream is apparent in the solutions on the outer shelf. We present the monthly fields, including the temporal and spatial distribution of available hydrographic data, the regional COADS data that provide surface wind stress forcing, the objective analysis, and the model response to these forcings. The hydrographic and velocity fields provide best-prior-estimates of the circulation for data assimilation studies in the region, as well as initial conditions for process-oriented prognostic model studies in the Georgia coastal region.

  10. French Extended Continental Shelf Mapping: example of new continental margin understanding offshore French Guiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roest, Walter; Loubrieu, Benoit; Loncke, Lies; Basile, Christophe; Graindorge, David; Shipboard Party, Guyaplac

    2017-04-01

    Under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, Coastal States can extend sovereign rights over the natural resources of the Continental Shelf beyond 200 nautical miles (M) if they can demonstrate that their continental margin extends beyond this distance from the coast. Article 76 of the Convention defines the continental shelf and includes geomorphological and geological criteria to claim such a shelf beyond 200 M. Since 2006, France has filed 7 submissions for a total of 10 distinct geographic regions to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf that was established by the Convention to examine those claims, and make recommendations with respect to the justification of the outer limits of the continental shelf. To support the French submissions, a significant effort was employed in acquiring new marine geophysical and geological data and compiling existing data along the deep water parts of the continental margins offshore all the French overseas territories. In this presentation, we will discuss the example of French Guiana, where the data collected for the purpose of fulfilling the obligation under the Convention to submit data and information to the Commission within a 10 year time frame have led to new understanding of the transform continental margin and the Demerara Plateau located to the north of French Guiana and Surinam. In addition, the data collected for this purpose have led to new scientific questions and have encouraged new and enhanced scientific collaboration between French government organizations and the academic community. Follow up research and scientific cruises that will be presented in separate communications have addressed sedimentary processes including contourites, giant comet tail like depressions probably associated with the strong bottom currents observed along the continental slope and potentially related to pockmarks, as well as giant submarine landslides. Most recently, multichannel reflection and wide angle

  11. Deglacial changes in the strength of deep southern component water and sediment supply at the Argentine continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warratz, Grit; Henrich, Rüdiger; Voigt, Ines; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Kuhn, Gerhard; Lantzsch, Hendrik

    2017-08-01

    The deep southern component water (SCW), comprising Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW) and Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), is a major component of the global oceanic circulation. It has been suggested that the deep Atlantic water mass structure changed significantly during the last glacial/interglacial cycle. However, deep SCW source-proximal records remain sparse. Here we present three coherent deep SCW paleocurrent records from the deep Argentine continental margin shedding light on deep water circulation and deep SCW flow strength in the Southwest Atlantic since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Based on increased sortable silt values, we propose enhanced deep SCW flow strength from 14 to 10 cal ka B.P. relative to the early deglacial/LGM and the Holocene. We propose a direct influence of deep northern component water (NCW) on deep SCW flow strength due to vertical narrowing of deep SCW spreading, concurrent with a migration of the high-energetic LCDW/AABW interface occupying our core sites. We suggest a shoaled NCW until 13 cal ka B.P., thereby providing space for deep SCW spreading that resulted in reduced carbonate preservation at our core sites. Increased carbonate content from 13 cal ka B.P. indicates that the NCW expanded changing deep water properties at our core sites in the deep Southwest Atlantic. However, southern sourced terrigenous sediments continued to be deposited at our core sites, suggesting that deep SCW flow was uninterrupted along the Argentine continental margin since the LGM.

  12. Arrival of the Fukushima radioactivity plume in North American continental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John N; Brown, Robin M; Williams, William J; Robert, Marie; Nelson, Richard; Moran, S Bradley

    2015-02-03

    The large discharge of radioactivity into the northwest Pacific Ocean from the 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor accident has generated considerable concern about the spread of this material across the ocean to North America. We report here the first systematic study to our knowledge of the transport of the Fukushima marine radioactivity signal to the eastern North Pacific. Time series measurements of (134)Cs and (137)Cs in seawater revealed the initial arrival of the Fukushima signal by ocean current transport at a location 1,500 km west of British Columbia, Canada, in June 2012, about 1.3 y after the accident. By June 2013, the Fukushima signal had spread onto the Canadian continental shelf, and by February 2014, it had increased to a value of 2 Bq/m(3) throughout the upper 150 m of the water column, resulting in an overall doubling of the fallout background from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. Ocean circulation model estimates that are in reasonable agreement with our measured values indicate that future total levels of (137)Cs (Fukushima-derived plus fallout (137)Cs) off the North American coast will likely attain maximum values in the 3-5 Bq/m(3) range by 2015-2016 before declining to levels closer to the fallout background of about 1 Bq/m(3) by 2021. The increase in (137)Cs levels in the eastern North Pacific from Fukushima inputs will probably return eastern North Pacific concentrations to the fallout levels that prevailed during the 1980s but does not represent a threat to human health or the environment.

  13. Spatially Resolving Ocean Color and Sediment Dispersion in River Plumes, Coastal Systems, and Continental Shelf Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurin, Dirk Alexander; Mannino, Antonio; Franz, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of ocean color in dynamic coastal, inland, and nearshorewaters is impeded by high variability in optical constituents, demands specialized atmospheric correction, and is limited by instrument sensitivity. To accurately detect dispersion of bio-optical properties, remote sensors require ample signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to sense small variations in ocean color without saturating over bright pixels, an atmospheric correction that can accommodate significantwater-leaving radiance in the near infrared (NIR), and spatial and temporal resolution that coincides with the scales of variability in the environment. Several current and historic space-borne sensors have met these requirements with success in the open ocean, but are not optimized for highly red-reflective and heterogeneous waters such as those found near river outflows or in the presence of sediment resuspension. Here we apply analytical approaches for determining optimal spatial resolution, dominant spatial scales of variability ("patches"), and proportions of patch variability that can be resolved from four river plumes around the world between 2008 and 2011. An offshore region in the Sargasso Sea is analyzed for comparison. A method is presented for processing Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Aqua and Terra imagery including cloud detection, stray lightmasking, faulty detector avoidance, and dynamic aerosol correction using short-wave- and near-infrared wavebands in extremely turbid regions which pose distinct optical and technical challenges. Results showthat a pixel size of approx. 520 mor smaller is generally required to resolve spatial heterogeneity in ocean color and total suspended materials in river plumes. Optimal pixel size increases with distance from shore to approx. 630 m in nearshore regions, approx 750 m on the continental shelf, and approx. 1350 m in the open ocean. Greater than 90% of the optical variability within plume regions is resolvable with

  14. Retrospective Snow Analysis Across the Continental United States for the National Water Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, L. R.; Gochis, D.; Dugger, A. L.; McCreight, J. L.; Barlage, M. J.; Fall, G. M.; Olheiser, C.

    2016-12-01

    For large portions of the United States, snow plays a vital role in hydrologic prediction. This is particularly true in the mountain west where snowmelt contributes up to 80% of total streamflow runoff. The Office of Water Prediction (OWP) will begin running the National Water Model (NWM) during the second half of 2016, which is a continental-scale implementation of the WRF-Hydro community hydrologic modeling framework. Assessing and benchmarking the performance of the snow component of the NWM is important for future research-to-operations activities and for forecasters to better understand NWM output. For this study, WRF-Hydro was ran using the same domain and physics options as the NWM (1 km LSM, 250m overland routing, and NHDPlus Version 2.1 channel network). The land surface component chosen is Noah-MP land surface model. Forcing from the National Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS-2) was downscaled from the native 0.125 degree resolution to the 1 km modeling domain to drive the model. The model was ran over a 5-year retrospective period to gauge multi-year performance of the snow states. Output was analyzed against both in-situ observations, such as SNOTEL, and the Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS). In addition, gridded snow states and SNODAS grids were aggregated to Omernik-derived ecological regions. This was done in order to break up snow analysis by regions that share similar ecological and physiographic characteristics. Results show WRF-Hydro is able to capture peak timing across most of the mountain west fairly well. In terms of magnitudes, the model struggles across portions of the west with a low bias. This is especially true in the Cascades, which could be traced back to precipitation partitioning issues in the model. Across the central Rockies, the model exhibits a lower dry bias showing improved performance there. Previous literature suggests a dry bias in the precipitation out west may be contributing to model performance. East of the

  15. Shallow water tides over the European continental shelf : what improvments can we expect from satellite altimetry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, T.; Le Provost, C.; Lyard, F.

    2003-04-01

    Ocean tides have been intensively studied at the global scale during the last decade. Their knowledge has been greatly improved thanks to satellite altimetry and assimilation of these data in new hydrodynamic models. Over the continental shelves and coastal areas, however, larger uncertainties remains in the description of the tides. The accuracy of the main constituents (M2, S2, N2, ...) is still limited to a ten of cm, by contrast to the cm level reached for the deep ocean. For the non linear constituents, only a few studies have addressed the question: how spatial altimetry data can be used to improve our knowledge over the major shallow water areas of the world ocean? Our aim is here to investigate these questions by focusing on the European shelf. We have now more than ten years of Topex/Poseidon data, followed by JASON1, and ERS+ENVISAT altimetric mission. From these data sets, we have performed along track and cross over analyses to investigate the accuracy of the tidal constituents, especially non linear constituents. It has been demonstrated, among other things, how this accuracy can be improved by using more elaborated "inverse barometer" correction based on a hydrodynamic model simulating the response of the sea level to high frequency atmospheric forcing. Over the shallow water areas, the horizontal scales of the non linear tidal components are greatly reduced, as the square root of the depth in relation with their propagation speed, and proportionally to their time period for the higher constituents (M4, MS4, ...). The spatial resolution of the altimetric mission is then a limiting factor for precise description of these constituents. Hence the interest of assimilating these data in a hydrodynamic model. Following the approach developed by our group for the global ocean (the "FES" Finite Element ocean tide Solutions series, that have been produced over the recent years), such assimilation exercises have been performed and qualified. The portability of

  16. National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS): A USGS-Boem Partnership to Provide Free and Easy Access to Previously Proprietary Seismic Reflection Data on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triezenberg, P. J.; Hart, P. E.; Childs, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS) was established by the USGS in 2004 in an effort to rescue marine seismic reflection profile data acquired largely by the oil exploration industry throughout the US outer continental shelf (OCS). It features a Web interface for easy on-line geographic search and download. The commercial value of these data had decreased significantly because of drilling moratoria and newer acquisition technology, and large quantities were at risk of disposal. But, the data still had tremendous value for scientific research and education purposes, and an effort was undertaken to ensure that the data were preserved and publicly available. More recently, the USGS and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) have developed a partnership to make similarly available a much larger quantity of 2D and 3D seismic data acquired by the U.S. government for assessment of resources in the OCS. Under Federal regulation, BOEM is required to publicly release all processed geophysical data, including seismic profiles, acquired under an exploration permit, purchased and retained by BOEM, no sooner than 25 years after issuance of the permit. Data acquired prior to 1989 are now eligible for release. Currently these data are distributed on CD or DVD, but data discovery can be tedious. Inclusion of these data within NAMSS vastly increases the amount of seismic data available for research purposes. A new NAMSS geographical interface provides easy and intuitive access to the data library. The interface utilizes OpenLayers, Mapnik, and the Django web framework. In addition, metadata capabilities have been greatly increased using a PostgresSQL/PostGIS database incorporating a community-developed ISO-compliant XML template. The NAMSS database currently contains 452 2D seismic surveys comprising 1,645,956 line km and nine 3D seismic surveys covering 9,385 square km. The 2D data holdings consist of stack, migrated and depth sections, most in SEG-Y format.

  17. Outer Continental Shelf Active Renewable Energy Leases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — Active renewable energy leasing areas on the Atlantic OCS - currently Cape Wind offshore Cape Cod Massachusetts, Rhode Island / Massachusetts (RIMA), Delaware,...

  18. Sea?level fingerprint of continental water and ice mass change from GRACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riva, R.E.M.; Bamber, J.L.; Lavallée, D.A.; Wouters, B.

    2010-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellites (GRACE) provide, for the first time, a method to directly measure mass exchange between the land and oceans over time. The dominant components of this exchange are due to continental ice loss/gain and land hydrology. Here, we determine the

  19. Trophic Ecology and Movement Patters of Tiger Sharks (Galeocerdo Cuvier) off the Western North Atlantic Coastal and Continental Shelf Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, G.; Edman, R.; Frazier, B.; Bubley, W.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the trophic dynamics and habitat utilization of apex predators is central to inferring their influence on different marine landscapes and to help design effective management plans for these animals. Tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) are abundant in shelf and offshore Gulf Stream waters of the western North Atlantic Ocean, and based on movements from individuals captured in Florida and Bahamas, seem to avoid coastal and shelf waters off South Carolina and Georgia. This contradicts reports of tiger sharks regularly being caught nearshore by anglers in these states, indicating that separate sub-populations may exist in the western North Atlantic. In the present study we captured Tiger Sharks in coastal waters off South Carolina in 2014 and 2015 in order to describe their movement patterns through acoustic and satellite tagging, and trophic dynamics through stable isotope analyses. Movement data show that these tiger sharks repeatedly visit particular inshore areas and mainly travel over the continental shelf, but rarely venture offshore beyond the continental shelf edge. Ongoing C and N stable isotope analyses of muscle, blood and skin tissues from adult and juvenile tiger sharks, as well as from potential prey species and primary producers, will help determine if their diets are based on inshore, shelf or offshore based food webs. Tiger sharks exploiting nearshore environments and shelf waters have much higher probabilities of interacting with humans than individuals occupying far offshore Gulf Stream habitats.

  20. Isotopic equilibrium between precipitation and water vapor: evidence from continental rains in central Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, K.; Gerlein, C.; Kemeny, P. C.; Caylor, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    An accurate understanding of the relationships between the isotopic composition of liquid water and that of water vapor in the environment can help describe hydrologic processes across many scales. One such relationship is the isotopic equilibrium between falling raindrops and the surrounding vapor. The degree of equilibration is used to model the isotopic composition of precipitation in isotope-enable general circulation models and land-atmosphere exchange models. Although this equilibrium has been a topic of isotope hydrology research for more than four decades, few studies have included vapor measurements to validate modeling efforts. Recent advances in laser technology have allowed for in situ vapor measurements at high temporal resolution (e.g., >1 Hz). Here we present concomitant rain and vapor measurements for a series of 17 rain events during the 'Continental' rainy season (June through August) at Mpala Research Center in central Kenya. Rain samples (n=218) were collected at intervals of 2 to 35 minutes (median of 3 minutes) depending on the rain rate (0.4 to 10.5 mm/hr). The volume-weighted mean rain values for δ18O, δ2H and D-excess (δ2H - 8* δ18O) were 0.1 ‰, 10.7 ‰, and 10.1 ‰. These values are more enriched than the annual weighted means reported for the area (-2.2 ‰, -7.6 ‰, and 11.0 ‰, respectively). Vapor was measured continuously at ~2Hz (DLT-100, Los Gatos Research), with an inverted funnel intake 4m above the ground surface. The mean vapor isotopic composition during the rain events was -10.0 +/- 1.2 ‰ (1 σ) for δ18O and -73.9 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. The difference between the rain sample isotopic composition and that of liquid in isotopic equilibrium with the corresponding vapor at the ambient temperature was 0.8 +/- 2.2 ‰ for δ18O and 6.2 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. This disequilibrium was found to correlate with the natural log of rain rate (R2 of 0.26 for δ18O and 0.46 for δ2H), with lower rain rates having larger

  1. Variability of interleaving structure of Atlantic Water during its propagation along the Eurasian basin (Arctic Ocean) continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhurbas, Nataliya; Kuzmina, Natalia; Lyzhkov, Dmitry; Ostapchuk, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    In order to give detailed description of the interleaving structure in the Eurasian basin results of observations carried out during NABOS 2008 and Polarstern cruise in 1996 were analyzed. The study was focused on interleaving parameters (structure and vertical scale of intrusions) variability in the upper (150-300 meters) and intermediate (300-700 meters) layers of the ocean. Based on θ,S/θ,σ-diagrams (θ, S and σ are the potential temperature, salinity and potential density, correspondingly) analysis two main results were obtained. First of all it was shown that intrusive layers carried by the mean current along the Eurasian Basin continental margin become deeper relatively isopycnals and thus stimulate ventilation of pycnocline. Second, the area in Eurasian Basin thermocline was found where intrusive layers of large and small scale were absent. This distinctive feature can be explained by intensive mixing between two branches of Atlantic Water, one of which propagates along Eurasian basin continental margin and the other spreads across the basin due to large scale interleaving processes. Among others, one of the possible methods of integral estimation of Atlantic water masses heat and salt contents variations during their expansion along basin continental margin was proposed. Thus it is reasonable to assess variation of square under the θ(S)-diagrams, which illustrate the data obtained from two CTD-stations located on diametrically opposite sides of Eurasian Basin, taking 0.5°C isotherm as a reference value. For verification of the introduced approach the estimates of heat and salt contents variations were made by different methods. Detailed discussion of the results is presented. Work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Grant No 15-05-01479-a).

  2. Water mass stability reconstructions from greenhouse (Eocene) to icehouse (Oligocene) for the northern Gulf Coast continental shelf (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashi, Takuro; Grossman, Ethan L.; Dockery, David T.; Ivany, Linda C.

    2004-03-01

    Shallow water mass characteristics such as temperature and density profile play a critical role in the climate system. We have developed a new method by which to reconstruct the ancient shallow water mass stability on the continental shelf using oxygen isotope variation within mollusc shells and fish otoliths and applied the method to an important interval in Earth history, the most recent transition from Greenhouse (Eocene) to Icehouse (Oligocene) climate modes. We define the slope of summer temperature (density) versus the seasonal range in temperature (density) as an indicator of water mass stability. In addition, extrapolation of the regression to zero seasonality is a proxy for temperature at the bottom of the seasonal thermocline (TBST). During the greenhouse world (the early Eocene and middle Eocene) the water mass plot shows an unstable water mass, agreeing with previous planktonic foraminiferal studies showing that temperature gradients at this time were much smaller than at present. During the middle to late Eocene transition, a substantial increase in water mass stability occurred. Significant cooling (˜5°C) of the TBST at this transition indicates that the greater cooling of deeper water relative to surface water caused the increase in water mass stability. The changes in water column structure at this transition were the most likely cause of a major extinction of planktonic foraminifera from warm to cold water taxa. The late Eocene T-ΔT profile is very similar to modern profiles, suggesting that shallow water mass structure became similar to that of the modern Gulf Coastal shelf by the late Eocene. At the Eocene/Oligocene (E/O) boundary, no major change in water mass structure is identified. This agrees with the observation that no major extinction of planktonic foraminifera is found at the E/O boundary.

  3. The Deposition and Accumulation of Microplastics in Marine Sediments and Bottom Water from the Irish Continental Shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jake; Lusher, Amy; Thompson, Richard C; Morley, Audrey

    2017-09-07

    Microplastics are widely dispersed throughout the marine environment. An understanding of the distribution and accumulation of this form of pollution is crucial for gauging environmental risk. Presented here is the first record of plastic contamination, in the 5 mm-250 μm size range, of Irish continental shelf sediments. Sixty-two microplastics were recovered from 10 of 11 stations using box cores. 97% of recovered microplastics were found to reside shallower than 2.5 cm sediment depth, with the area of highest microplastic concentration being the water-sediment interface and top 0.5 cm of sediments (66%). Microplastics were not found deeper than 3.5 ± 0.5 cm. These findings demonstrate that microplastic contamination is ubiquitous within superficial sediments and bottom water along the western Irish continental shelf. Results highlight that cores need to be at least 4-5 cm deep to quantify the standing stock of microplastics within marine sediments. All recovered microplastics were classified as secondary microplastics as they appear to be remnants of larger items; fibres being the principal form of microplastic pollution (85%), followed by broken fragments (15%). The range of polymer types, colours and physical forms recovered suggests a variety of sources. Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms influencing microplastic transport, deposition, resuspension and subsequent interactions with biota.

  4. 76 FR 52006 - Information Collection Activity: Leasing of Minerals Other Than Oil, Gas and Sulphur in the Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... Minerals Other Than Oil, Gas and Sulphur in the Outer Continental Shelf, Extension of a Collection... Leasing of Minerals Other than Oil, Gas and Sulphur in the Outer Continental Shelf (OMB No. 1010- 0082... Other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur in the Outer Continental Shelf. OMB Control Number: 1010-0082. Abstract...

  5. Survival Of Magnetic Paleoclimatic Signals From Shallow To Deep Water Marine Redoxomorphic Sediments Across The Northwest Iberian Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Falcon, K. J.; Rey, D.; Rubio, B.

    2013-05-01

    The magnetic properties of marine sediments on the North Atlantic Iberian continental Margin are strongly dependent on the organic matter input to the sediments and the onset of reductive diagenesis. An onshore-offshore gradient in the intensity of early diagenesis was recently described for the Ría de Vigo, matched by similar patterns in the adjacent rias of Pontevedra and Muros. In the ria environments of NW Iberia, early diagenetic dissolution of magnetic minerals can lead to magnetite half-lives of a few decades, and virtually obliterates any paleoenvironmental signal carried by magnetic minerals, rendering magnetic properties especially useful for the study of early diagenesis dynamics. Early diagenesis has also been identified in sediments of the adjacent continental shelf and deeper environments of the Galician Bank and Iberian Abyssal Plain. However, in these settings, slower dissolution of magnetic minerals allows the preservation of paleoclimatic signatures on different temporal scales. For instance, magnetic properties of continental shelf sediments reveal periods of enhanced rainfall and continental sediment input to the shelf, coincident with the Roman Warm Period and Medieval Climatic Optimum. On the contrary, cold periods are associated with less detrital input. Furthermore, levels of intensified diagenesis are also recorded during cold periods, which have been interpreted as periods of intensified coastal upwelling probably related to long-term North Atlantic Oscillation positive state. At the Galician Bank and Iberian Abyssal Plain sediments early diagenesis is also pervasive, although a paleoceanographic record of changes in the concentration of magnetic minerals transported by water masses flowing from the Portuguese Margin can still be identified. In addition to the progressive dissolution of magnetic minerals with depth, bulk magnetic properties in these deep marine settings show strong dependence on the pelagic carbonate sedimentation and low

  6. Recent Developments and Applications of the WRF-Hydro Modeling System for Continental Scale Water Cycle Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochis, D. J.; Yu, W.; Dugger, A. L.; McCreight, J. L.; Yates, D. N.; Clark, M. P.; Wood, A. W.; Sampson, K. M.; Rasmussen, R.

    2014-12-01

    The translation of weather and climate forcing through complex landscapes to drive terrestrial hydrologic processes is a true multi-scale problem. Model architectures that attempt to capture these processes and feedbacks in a physically realistic way must be able to bridge spatial scales from meters to kilometers. To represent these processes across continental domains modeling systems must fully embrace high performance computing. Also, because there are both scientific and computational trade-offs in modeling many terrestrial hydrologic and land-atmosphere exchange processes, it is often highly advantageous to support multiple physics options in order to test competing hypotheses and apply scale-appropriate parameterizations for different prediction problems. In this talk we provide an update of new developments to the WRF-Hydro system in meeting these needs from both a process representation and high performance computing perspective. A key feature of these developments centers on new multi-scale modeling capabilities recently added to WRF-Hydro. We will discuss prediction and computational performance metrics for several recent large river basin and continental scale applications of the WRF-Hydro system over the coterminous U.S. and over Mexico in modes both coupled and uncoupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. We will also provide updates on new developments to the WRF-Hydro system in the areas of water management applications and hydrologic data assimilation.

  7. Changes in water clarity in response to river discharges on the Great Barrier Reef continental shelf: 2002-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabricius, K. E.; Logan, M.; Weeks, S. J.; Lewis, S. E.; Brodie, J.

    2016-05-01

    Water clarity is a key factor for the health of marine ecosystems. The Australian Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is located on a continental shelf, with >35 major seasonal rivers discharging into this 344,000 km2 tropical to subtropical ecosystem. This work investigates how river discharges affect water clarity in different zones along and across the GBR. For each day over 11 years (2002-2013) we calculated 'photic depth' as a proxy measure of water clarity (calibrated to be equivalent to Secchi depth), for each 1 km2 pixel from MODIS-Aqua remote sensing data. Long-term and seasonal changes in photic depth were related to the daily discharge volumes of the nearest rivers, after statistically removing the effects of waves and tides on photic depth. The relationships between photic depths and rivers differed across and along the GBR. They typically declined from the coastal to offshore zones, and were strongest in proximity to rivers in agriculturally modified catchments. In most southern inner zones, photic depth declined consistently throughout the 11-year observation period; such long-term trend was not observed offshore nor in the northern regions. Averaged across the GBR, photic depths declined to 47% of local maximum values soon after the onset of river floods, and recovery to 95% of maximum values took on average 6 months (range: 150-260 days). The river effects were strongest at latitude 14.5°-19.0°S, where river loads are high and the continental shelf is narrow. Here, even offshore zones showed a >40% seasonal decline in photic depth, and 17-24% reductions in annual mean photic depth in years with large river nutrients and sediment loads. Our methodology is based on freely available data and tools and may be applied to other shelf systems, providing valuable insights in support of ecosystem management.

  8. Fluoride in drinking water and osteosarcoma incidence rates in the continental United States among children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael; Leclerc, Bernard-Simon

    2012-04-01

    It has been suggested that fluoride in drinking water may increase the risk of osteosarcoma in children and adolescents, although the evidence is inconclusive. We investigated the association between community water fluoridation (CWF) and osteosarcoma in childhood and adolescence in the continental U.S. We used the cumulative osteosarcoma incidence rate data from the CDC Wonder database for 1999-2006, categorized by age group, sex and states. States were categorized as low (≤30%) or high (≥85%) according to the percentage of the population receiving CWF between 1992 and 2006. Confidence intervals for the incidence rates were calculated using the Gamma distribution and the incidence rates were compared between groups using Poisson regression models. We found no sex-specific statistical differences in the national incidence rates in the younger groups (5-9, 10-14), although 15-19 males were at higher risk to osteosarcoma than females in the same age group (pfluoridation status. We also compared sex and age specific osteosarcoma incidence rates cumulated from 1973 to 2007 from the SEER 9 Cancer Registries for single age groups from 5 to 19. There were no statistical differences between sexes for 5-14 year old children although incidence rates for single age groups for 15-19 year old males were significantly higher than for females. Our ecological analysis suggests that the water fluoridation status in the continental U.S. has no influence on osteosarcoma incidence rates during childhood and adolescence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Water permeability and reflection coefficient of the outer part of young rice roots are differently affected by closure of water channels (aquaporins) or blockage of apoplastic pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranathunge, Kosala; Kotula, Lukasz; Steudle, Ernst; Lafitte, Renee

    2004-02-01

    The relative contribution of the apoplastic and cell-to-cell paths to the overall hydraulic conductivity of the outer part of rice roots (LpOPR) was estimated using a pressure perfusion technique for 30-d-old rice plants (lowland cultivar, IR64, and upland cultivar, Azucena). The technique was based on the perfusion of aerenchyma of root segments from two different zones (20-50 mm and 50-100 mm from the root apex) with aerated nutrient solution using precise pump rates. The outer part of roots (OPR) comprised an outermost rhizodermis, an exodermis, sclerenchyma fibre cells, and the innermost unmodified cortical cell layer. No root anatomical differences were observed for the two cultivars used. Development of apoplastic barriers such as Casparian bands and suberin lamellae in the exodermis were highly variable. On average, matured apoplastic barriers were observed at around 50-70 mm from the root apex. Lignification of the exodermis was completed earlier than that of sclerenchyma cells. Radial water flow across the OPR was impeded either by partially blocking off the porous apoplast with China ink particles (diameter 50 nm) or by closing water channels (aquaporins) in cell membranes with 50 micro M HgCl2. The reduction of LpOPR was relatively larger in the presence of an apoplastic blockage with ink ( approximately 30%) than in the presence of the water channel blocker ( approximately 10%) suggesting a relatively larger apoplastic water flow. The reflection coefficient of the OPR (sigmasOPR) for mannitol significantly increased during both treatments. It was larger when pores of the apoplast were closed, but absolute values were low (overall range of sigmasOPR=0.1-0.4), which also suggested a large contribution of the non-selective, apoplastic path to overall water flow. The strongest evidence in favour of a predominantly apoplastic water transport came from the comparison between diffusional (PdOPR, measured with heavy water, HDO) and osmotic water permeability

  10. Effects of Internal Waves on Sound Propagation in the Shallow Waters of the Continental Shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    changes are small in the experiment area as there was no introduction of fresh water into the region. An average salinity of 34.44 psu was used for the...14  E.  INTERNAL WAVE FRONTS IN THE EXPERIMENT AREA ........15  F.  TRANSLATING WATER ...For this study, a constant salinity throughout the water column was assumed, as there was no introduction of fresh water into the region. Hence

  11. Hydrocarbon prospectivity of the Argentine Continental Slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, M.P.R.; Keeley M.L.; Maslanyj, M.P.; Urien, C.M.; Hoggs, S.L.

    1993-02-01

    A rift basin containing stratigraphic and structural closures is developed along the Argentine slope over a distance of some 1000 km and area of 50,000 km[sup 2] in potentially exploitable water depths of 200 to 1500 m. No wells exist on this part of the continental margin. Rifting began during the Late Triassic/Jurassic and ended in Early Cretaceous. The first marine seaways flooded the Rift alluvial plains and lake. In Hauterian-Barrenian time, low circulation marine conditions with oxygen deficiency prevailed up to Rio Grande/Walvis Ridge flooding in part the coastal pull-apart basins. A major marine transgression in the Maastrichtian formed a widespread seal over the entire shelf and slope area. Four play types were identified: (1) a major north-east trending elongate delta system sourced inland from the San Julien (N. Malvinas) Basin and deposited on the southern Patagonian shelf and rise, (2) reworked deltaic barrier sands accumulated along the crest of the Outer Basement Ridge, (3) The Outer Basement Ridge, a major structural closure 400 km long, and (4) a series of margin-parallel rift systems in the offshore region between the 200 m and 1500 m isobaths. Regional seismic data and geological correlations suggest that oil prone source rocks are likely in the Middle and Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous formations. Source rocks are probably mature east and west of the Outer Basement Ridge and in the easterndepocenter of the Colorado Basin. Eastward migration from Jurassic age lacustrine source rocks in the Colorado Basin may have charged traps along the crest of the Outer Basement Ridge. Westward directed migration from deeply buried Aptian age marine source rocks in the Atlantic basins has probably charged prospective stratigraphic and structural traps in a suite of coast-parallel grabens developed on the Argentine continental shelf and slope. The Argentine offshore region, therefore, offers significant encouragement as a productive hydrocarbon province.

  12. The spatial and interannual dynamics of the surface water carbonate system and air–sea CO2 fluxes in the outer shelf and slope of the Eurasian Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Pipko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is undergoing dramatic changes which cover the entire range of natural processes, from extreme increases in the temperatures of air, soil, and water, to changes in the cryosphere, the biodiversity of Arctic waters, and land vegetation. Small changes in the largest marine carbon pool, the dissolved inorganic carbon pool, can have a profound impact on the carbon dioxide (CO2 flux between the ocean and the atmosphere, and the feedback of this flux to climate. Knowledge of relevant processes in the Arctic seas improves the evaluation and projection of carbon cycle dynamics under current conditions of rapid climate change. Investigation of the CO2 system in the outer shelf and continental slope waters of the Eurasian Arctic seas (the Barents, Kara, Laptev, and East Siberian seas during 2006, 2007, and 2009 revealed a general trend in the surface water partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 distribution, which manifested as an increase in pCO2 values eastward. The existence of this trend was defined by different oceanographic and biogeochemical regimes in the western and eastern parts of the study area; the trend is likely increasing due to a combination of factors determined by contemporary change in the Arctic climate, each change in turn evoking a series of synergistic effects. A high-resolution in situ investigation of the carbonate system parameters of the four Arctic seas was carried out in the warm season of 2007; this year was characterized by the next-to-lowest historic sea-ice extent in the Arctic Ocean, on satellite record, to that date. The study showed the different responses of the seawater carbonate system to the environment changes in the western vs. the eastern Eurasian Arctic seas. The large, open, highly productive water area in the northern Barents Sea enhances atmospheric CO2 uptake. In contrast, the uptake of CO2 was strongly weakened in the outer shelf and slope waters of the East Siberian Arctic seas under the 2007

  13. The spatial and interannual dynamics of the surface water carbonate system and air-sea CO2 fluxes in the outer shelf and slope of the Eurasian Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipko, Irina I.; Pugach, Svetlana P.; Semiletov, Igor P.; Anderson, Leif G.; Shakhova, Natalia E.; Gustafsson, Örjan; Repina, Irina A.; Spivak, Eduard A.; Charkin, Alexander N.; Salyuk, Anatoly N.; Shcherbakova, Kseniia P.; Panova, Elena V.; Dudarev, Oleg V.

    2017-11-01

    The Arctic is undergoing dramatic changes which cover the entire range of natural processes, from extreme increases in the temperatures of air, soil, and water, to changes in the cryosphere, the biodiversity of Arctic waters, and land vegetation. Small changes in the largest marine carbon pool, the dissolved inorganic carbon pool, can have a profound impact on the carbon dioxide (CO2) flux between the ocean and the atmosphere, and the feedback of this flux to climate. Knowledge of relevant processes in the Arctic seas improves the evaluation and projection of carbon cycle dynamics under current conditions of rapid climate change. Investigation of the CO2 system in the outer shelf and continental slope waters of the Eurasian Arctic seas (the Barents, Kara, Laptev, and East Siberian seas) during 2006, 2007, and 2009 revealed a general trend in the surface water partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) distribution, which manifested as an increase in pCO2 values eastward. The existence of this trend was defined by different oceanographic and biogeochemical regimes in the western and eastern parts of the study area; the trend is likely increasing due to a combination of factors determined by contemporary change in the Arctic climate, each change in turn evoking a series of synergistic effects. A high-resolution in situ investigation of the carbonate system parameters of the four Arctic seas was carried out in the warm season of 2007; this year was characterized by the next-to-lowest historic sea-ice extent in the Arctic Ocean, on satellite record, to that date. The study showed the different responses of the seawater carbonate system to the environment changes in the western vs. the eastern Eurasian Arctic seas. The large, open, highly productive water area in the northern Barents Sea enhances atmospheric CO2 uptake. In contrast, the uptake of CO2 was strongly weakened in the outer shelf and slope waters of the East Siberian Arctic seas under the 2007 environmental conditions

  14. Incorporating soil variability in continental soil water modelling: a trade-off between data availability and model complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, L.; Crosbie, R. S.; Doble, R.; van Dijk, A. I. J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Developing a continental land surface model implies finding a balance between the complexity in representing the system processes and the availability of reliable data to drive, parameterise and calibrate the model. While a high level of process understanding at plot or catchment scales may warrant a complex model, such data is not available at the continental scale. This data sparsity is especially an issue for the Australian Water Resources Assessment system, AWRA-L, a land-surface model designed to estimate the components of the water balance for the Australian continent. This study focuses on the conceptualization and parametrization of the soil drainage process in AWRA-L. Traditionally soil drainage is simulated with Richards' equation, which is highly non-linear. As general analytic solutions are not available, this equation is usually solved numerically. In AWRA-L however, we introduce a simpler function based on simulation experiments that solve Richards' equation. In the simplified function soil drainage rate, the ratio of drainage (D) over storage (S), decreases exponentially with relative water content. This function is controlled by three parameters, the soil water storage at field capacity (SFC), the drainage fraction at field capacity (KFC) and a drainage function exponent (β). [ ] D- -S- S = KF C exp - β (1 - SFC ) To obtain spatially variable estimates of these three parameters, the Atlas of Australian Soils is used, which lists soil hydraulic properties for each soil profile type. For each soil profile type in the Atlas, 10 days of draining an initially fully saturated, freely draining soil is simulated using HYDRUS-1D. With field capacity defined as the volume of water in the soil after 1 day, the remaining parameters can be obtained by fitting the AWRA-L soil drainage function to the HYDRUS-1D results. This model conceptualisation fully exploits the data available in the Atlas of Australian Soils, without the need to solve the non

  15. Textures of water-rich mud sediments from the continental margin offshore Costa Rica (IODP expeditions 334 and 344)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Rebecca; Stipp, Michael; Leiss, Bernd

    2017-04-01

    During sedimentation and burial at continental margins, clay-rich sediments develop crystallographic preferred orientations (textures) depending on the ongoing compaction as well as size distribution and shape fabrics of the grains. Such textures can control the deformational properties of these sediments and hence the strain distribution in active continental margins and also the frictional behavior along and around the plate boundary. Strain-hardening and discontinuous deformation may lead to earthquake nucleation at or below the updip limit of the seismogenic zone. We want to investigate the active continental margin offshore Costa Rica where the oceanic Cocos plate is subducted below the Caribbean plate at a rate of approximately 9 cm per year. The Costa Rica trench is well-known for shallow seismogenesis and tsunami generation. As it is an erosive continental margin, both the incoming sediments from the Nazca plate as well as the slope sediments of the continental margin can be important for earthquake nucleation and faulting causing sea-floor breakage. To investigate texture and composition of the sediments and hence their deformational properties we collected samples from varying depth of 7 different drilling locations across the trench retrieved during IODP expeditions 334 and 344 as part of the Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project (CRISP). Texture analysis was carried out by means of synchrotron diffraction, as only this method is suitable for water-bearing samples. As knowledge on the sediment composition is required as input parameter for the texture data analysis, additional X-ray powder diffraction analysis on the sample material has been carried out. Samples for texture measurements were prepared from the original drill cores using an internally developed cutter which allows to produce cylindrical samples with a diameter of about 1.5 cm. The samples are oriented with respect to the drill core axis. Synchrotron texture measurements were conducted at the

  16. Ingestion of marine litter by loggerhead sea turtles, Caretta caretta, in Portuguese continental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau, Lídia; Marçalo, Ana; Ferreira, Marisa; Sá, Sara; Vingada, José; Eira, Catarina

    2016-02-15

    The accumulation of litter in marine and coastal environments is a major threat to marine life. Data on marine litter in the gastrointestinal tract of stranded loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta, found along the Portuguese continental coast was presented. Out of the 95 analysed loggerheads, litter was present in 56 individuals (59.0%) and most had less than 10 litter items (76.8%) and less than 5 g (dm) (96.8%). Plastic was the main litter category (frequency of occurrence=56.8%), while sheet (45.3%) was the most relevant plastic sub-category. There was no influence of loggerhead stranding season, cause of stranding or size on the amount of litter ingested (mean number and dry mass of litter items per turtle). The high ingested litter occurrence frequency in this study supports the use of the loggerhead turtle as a suitable tool to monitor marine litter trends, as required by the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Physical and other data from CTD casts from the MOANA WAVE as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 29 May 1976 to 18 June 1976 (NODC Accession 7601627)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from CTD casts from the MOANA WAVE. Data were collected by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) as part of Outer...

  18. Marine bird sighting and other data from platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 06 June 1977 to 23 September 1977 (NODC Accession 7900213)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from platforms from 06 June 1977 to 23 September 1977. Data were collected by LGL LTD. as part of the Outer...

  19. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 06 March 1975 to 21 March 1976 (NODC Accession 7900039)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft and other platforms. Data were collected by the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) as part of the Outer...

  20. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 09 January 1975 to 09 December 1975 (NODC Accession 7800865)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft and other platforms. Data were collected by the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) as part of the Outer...

  1. Benthic organism and other data from bottom grabs from Helicopters in the Beaufort Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 26 October 1975 to 19 March 1976 (NODC Accession 7601417)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Beaufort Sea from helicopters by the Oregon Stare University (OSU). Data were collected as part of the Outer...

  2. Benthic organism and other data from the Beaufort Sea from the GLACIER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 19 August 1971 to 22 August 1972 (NODC Accession 7700213)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Beaufort Sea from the GLACIER by Oregon State University (OSU). Data were collected as part of the Outer...

  3. Evaluation of forest interception estimation in the continental scale Australian Water Resources Assessment - Landscape (AWRA-L) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jim; Macfarlane, Craig; McJannet, Dave; Ellis, Tim; Grigg, Andrew; van Dijk, Albert

    2013-08-01

    The AWRA-L model is a core component of the joint Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) and CSIRO Australian Water Resources Assessment (AWRA) system which integrates hydrological models and a variety of observations and satellite products to produce a National Water Accounting system for Australia. AWRA-L is a continental scale sub-model which provides surface water balance component estimates for all landscape types, including forests ranging from sparse woody vegetation in dry climates to dense tropical rainforest in wet climates. This paper describes the AWRA-L interception sub-routine, which is based on the widely used Gash model, and considers how its predictions compare with measurements of interception in tropical rainforests in north Queensland and sparse jarrah forests in Western Australia. The results demonstrate the importance of having accurate estimates of the three parameters which dominate the interception loss (as a fraction of rainfall), i.e. canopy water holding capacity, S, the average wet canopy evaporation rate, E, and the average rainfall rate, R. The current ‘default’ values of these parameters used in AWRA-L lead to significant errors in interception, which will also be reflected in the AWRA stream flow estimates. Analysis of how E and R values vary across the Australian continent have led to recommendations for how the interception calculations made by the AWRA-L model can be improved using values of E and R calculated from forest height and latitude. Revisions of the canopy storage parameters based on regressions derived from measured values at the rainforest and jarrah sites are also evaluated. Overall, the adoption of both updated canopy storage and E/R ratios outlined in this paper does provide a measurable improvement to the performance of the AWRA-L interception model. The approach developed in this study also has direct relevance to other applications of interception models for water balance modelling at large spatial scales.

  4. Evaluation of using Smart Water to enhance oil recovery from Norwegian Continental Shelf sandstone reservoirs.

    OpenAIRE

    Piotrowska, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering. Recently, the scale of studies on smart water – one of EOR method - has increased. From decades, water flooding is one of the most used methods to increase oil recovery. However, more effective in sandstone reservoirs is injecting low salinity brine. Due to changing wettability, improved oil mobility in pores can be reached. The studies show, that the significant increase of oil recovery might be achieved. Main objective of the thesis is to answ...

  5. Kinematic reconstruction of a thin-skinned, deep-water fold and thrust belt: the case of the Outer Tuscan Nappe (Umbria, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carboni, Filippo; Barchi, Massimiliano; Brozzetti, Francesco; Cruciani, Francesco; Ercoli, Maurizio; Mirabella, Francesco; Porreca, Massimiliano

    2017-04-01

    Fold-and-Thrust Belts occur worldwide in a variety of tectonic settings. Most of them develop in a deepwater environment (Deep Water Fold-and-Thrust Belts, DWFTBs), at both continental passive and active margins, driven by gravity (near-field stresses) and tectonic forces (far-field stresses) respectively. Here we present a multidisciplinary geological study of the Outer Tuscan Nappe (OTN), an imbricate thrust system in the Northern Apennines of Italy, emplaced in Early Miocene times in deep water environment. Despite the wide scientific literature, the geometry and the kinematic evolution of the OTN were never reconstructed in detail. Furthermore, its total amount of shortening and then its shortening rate, were never measured and calculated through proper restoration techniques. The OTN involves a 2000 m thick, Late Cretaceous-Tertiary "Tuscan" succession, consisting of arenaceous turbidites (Macigno Fm.), overlying a thick level of marls and calcarenites (Scaglia Toscana Fm.), which form the major basal décollement of the imbricate system. Along this basal décollement, the OTN overthrusts eastward younger turbidite units (Mt. Rentella and Marnoso-Arenacea successions). In this study we interpreted a set of 2D seismic reflection profiles calibrated with a deep borehole, crossing transversally (WSW-ENE) and longitudinally (NNW-SSE) the OTN. To better constrain the interpretation, selected controls of key outcrops was performed, mainly aimed at reconstructing: i) the actual transport direction during the OTN emplacement; ii) the position of the subsequent, NNW-SSE trending, extensional faults dissecting the tectonic wedge; iii) the role of transversal faults, longitudinally segmenting the thrust system. Combining the aforesaid data, we drew an integrated 20 km long geological cross section showing the internal geometry of the imbricate thrust system, down to the main basal décollement. The integrated section was successively restored in 2D using the software

  6. Importance of Rain Evaporation and Continental Convection in the Tropical Water Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, John; Noone, David; Bowman, Kevin; Beer, R.; Eldering, A.; Fisher, B.; Gunson, M.; Goldman, Aaron; Kulawik, S. S.; Lampel, Michael; hide

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric moisture cycling is an important aspect of the Earth's climate system, yet the processes determining atmospheric humidity are poorly understood. For example, direct evaporation of rain contributes significantly to the heat and moisture budgets of clouds, but few observations of these processes are available. Similarly, the relative contributions to atmospheric moisture over land from local evaporation and humidity from oceanic sources are uncertain. Lighter isotopes of water vapour preferentially evaporate whereas heavier isotopes preferentially condense and the isotopic composition of ocean water is known. Here we use this information combined with global measurements of the isotopic composition of tropospheric water vapour from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard the Aura spacecraft, to investigate aspects of the atmospheric hydrological cycle that are not well constrained by observations of precipitation or atmospheric vapour content. Our measurements of the isotopic composition of water vapour near tropical clouds suggest that rainfall evaporation contributes significantly to lower troposphere humidity, with typically 20% and up to 50% of rainfall evaporating near convective clouds. Over the tropical continents the isotopic signature of tropospheric water vapour differs significantly from that of precipitation, suggesting that convection of vapour from both oceanic sources and evapotranspiration are the dominant moisture sources. Our measurements allow an assessment of the intensity of the present hydrological cycle and will help identify any future changes as they occur.

  7. A water column study of methane around gas flares located at the West Spitsbergen continental margin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentz, Torben; Damm, Ellen; von Deimling, Jens Schneider

    2014-01-01

    the fate of the released gas due to dissolution of methane from gas bubbles and subsequent mixing, transport and microbial oxidation. The oceanographic data indicated a salinity-controlled pycnocline situated ∼20 m above the seafloor. A high resolution sampling program at the pycnocline at the active gas...... ebullition flare area revealed that the methane concentration gradient is strongly controlled by the pycnocline. While high methane concentrations of up to 524 nmol L1 were measured below the pycnocline, low methane concentrations of less than 20 nmol L1 were observed in the water column above. Variations...... in the δ13CCH4 values point to a 13C depleted methane source (∼ –60‰ VPDB) being mainly mixed with a background values of the ambient water (∼–37.5‰ VPDB). A gas bubble dissolution model indicates that ∼80% of the methane released from gas bubbles into the ambient water takes place below the pycnocline...

  8. Environmental Risk Assessment of Produced Water Discharges on the Dutch Continental Shelf

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de P.; Karman, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    The OSPAR Offshore Industry Committee (OIC) has decided, in its meeting of 2008, to evaluate the possibility of implementing a risk based approach towards produced water management. Currently, Norway has made most progress in this field as it has fully implemented the Environmental Impact Factor as

  9. Spatial Variability of Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Particulate Material from Northwest Atlantic Continental Shelf Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human encroachment on the coastal zone has led to a rise in the delivery of nitrogen (N) to estuarine and near-shore waters. Potential routes of anthropogenic N inputs include export from estuaries, atmospheric deposition, and dissolved N inputs from groundwater outflow. Stable...

  10. Submarine weathering of silicate minerals and the extent of pore water freshening at active continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Florian; Hensen, Christian; Schmidt, Mark; Geersen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate how submarine weathering processes may affect the water balance of sediments at convergent plate margins, six sediment cores were retrieved off Central Chile at water depth between ˜800 and 4000 m. The sediment solid phase was analyzed for its major element composition and the pore fluids were analyzed for dissolved sulfate, sulfide, total alkalinity, major cations, chloride, bromide, iodide, hydrocarbons as well as the carbon isotopic composition of methane. Because of negligible weathering on land, surface sediments off Central Chile are rich in reactive silicate minerals and have a bulk composition similar to volcanic rocks in the adjacent Andes. Deep-sourced fluxes of alkalinity, cations and chloride indicate that silicate minerals are subject to weathering in the forearc during burial. Comparison of deep-sourced signals with data from nearby Ocean Drilling Program Sites reveals two different types of weathering processes: In shallow (tens of meters), methanic sediments of slope basins with high organic carbon burial rates, reactive silicate minerals undergo incongruent dissolution through reaction with CO2 from methanogenesis. At greater burial depth (hundreds of meters), silicate weathering is dominated by authigenic smectite formation. This process is accompanied by uptake of water into the clay interlayers thus leading to elevated salinities in the surrounding pore water. Deep-seated smectite formation is more widespread than shallow silicate dissolution, as it is independent from the availability of CO2 from methanogenesis. Although solute transport is not focused enough to form cold seeps in the proper sense, tectonically induced, diffuse fluid flow transfers the deep-seated signal of smectite formation into the shallow sediments. The temperature-controlled conversion of smectite to illite is considered the most important dehydration process in marine forearc environments (depth of kilometers). However, in agreement with other

  11. Low methane concentrations in sediment along the continental slope north of Siberia: Inference from pore water geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C.; Dickens, G. R.; Jakobsson, M.; Koshurnikov, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Eastern Siberian Margin (ESM), a vast region of the Arctic, potentially holds large amounts of methane in sediments as gas hydrate and free gas. Although this CH4 has become a topic of discussion, primarily because of rapid regional climate change, the ESM remains sparingly explored. Here we present pore water chemistry results from 32 cores taken during Leg 2 of the 2014 SWERUS-C3 expedition. The cores come from depth transects across the continental slope of the ESM between Wrangel Island and the New Siberian Islands. Upward CH4 flux towards the seafloor, as inferred from profiles of dissolved sulfate (SO42-), alkalinity, and the δ13C-dissolved inorganic Carbon (DIC), is negligible at all stations east of where the Lomonosov Ridge abuts the ESM at about 143°E. In the upper eight meters of these cores, downward sulfate flux never exceeds 9.2 mol/m2-kyr, the upward alkalinity flux never exceeds 6.8 mol/m2-kyr, and δ13C-DIC only slowly decreases with depth (-3.6‰/m on average). Additionally, dissolved H2S was not detected in these cores, and nutrient and metal profiles reveal that metal oxide reduction by organic carbon dominates the geochemical environment. A single core on Lomonosov Ridge differs, as diffusive fluxes for SO42- and alkalinity were 13.9 and 11.3 mol/m2-kyr, respectively, the δ13C-DIC gradient was 5.6‰/m, and Mn2+ reduction terminated within 1.3 m of the seafloor. These are among the first pore water results generated from this vast climatically sensitive region, and they imply that significant quantities of CH4, including gas hydrates, do not exist in any of our investigated depth transects spread out along much of the ESM continental slope. This contradicts previous assumptions and hypothetical models and discussion, which generally have assumed the presence of substantial CH4.

  12. Global, continental and regional water balance estimates from HYPE catchment modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arheimer, Berit; Andersson, Jafet; Crochemore, Louise; Donnelly, Chantal; Gustafsson, David; Hasan, Abdoulghani; Isberg, Kristina; Pechlivanidis, Ilias; Pimentel, Rafael; Pineda, Luis

    2017-04-01

    In the past, catchment modelling mainly focused on simulating the lumped hydrological cycle at local to regional domains with high precision in a specific point of a river. Today, the level of maturity in hydrological process descriptions, input data and methods for parameter constraints makes it possible to apply these models also for multi-basins over large domains, still using the catchment modellers approach with high demands on agreement with observed data. HYPE is a process-oriented, semi-distributed and open-source model concept that is developed and used operationally in Sweden since a decade. Its finest calculation unit is hydrological response units (HRUs) in a catchment and these are assumed to give the same rainfall-runoff response. HRUs are normally made up of similar land cover and management, combined with soil type or elevation. Water divides are retrieved from topography and calculations are integrated for catchments, which can be of different spatial resolution and are coupled along the river network. In each catchment, HYPE calculates the water balance of a given time-step separately for various hydrological storages, such glaciers, active soil, groundwater, river channels, wetlands, floodplains, and lakes. The model is calibrated in a step-wise manner (following the water path-ways) against various sources additional data sources, including in-situ observations, Earth Observation products, soft information and expert judgements (Arheimer et al., 2012; Donnelly et al, 2016; Pechlivanidis and Arheimer 2015). Both the HYPE code and the model set-ups (i.e. input data and parameter values) are frequently released in new versions as they are continuously improved and updated. This presentation will show the results of aggregated water-balance components over large domains, such as the Arctic basin, the European continent, the Indian subcontinent and the Niger River basin. These can easily be compared to results from other kind of large-scale modelling

  13. Pleistocene water cycle and eastern boundary current processes along the California continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Mitchell; Heusser, Linda; Ravelo, Christina; Andreasen, Dyke; Olivarez Lyle, Annette; Diffenbaugh, Noah

    2010-11-01

    Coastal marine sediments contain mixtures of terrestrial and marine paleoclimate proxies that record how the coastal water cycle has behaved over long time frames. We explore a 600 kyr marine record from ODP Site 1018, located due west of Santa Cruz, California, to identify coastal wet and dry periods and to associate them with oceanographic processes. Wet periods in central California, identified by increased tree pollen relative to pollen from grasslands and scrublands, are found on every major deglaciation in the last 600 kyr. Sea surface temperature (SST) data were collected for the last two deglaciations. Wet periods are associated with a rapid rise in SST off central California. SST gradients along the California margin and changes in biogenic deposition show that wet periods in central California are associated with a weakening of the California Current and weakened coastal upwelling. High carbonate production suggests that there was significant curl-of-wind stress upwelling offshore. We propose that wet periods in central California are associated with a meteorological connection to the tropical Pacific and weakened southward flow in the California Current that shunted temperate Pacific water northward into the Alaska gyre. We do not observe evidence for a south-shifted westerly storm track at the last glacial maximum but find that wet periods are diachronous along the California margin. The wettest period around the Santa Barbara Basin peaked at 16 ka, preceding the wet peak in central and northern California by 4 kyr.

  14. Algorithm Development and Validation of CDOM Properties for Estuarine and Continental Shelf Waters Along the Northeastern U.S. Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Antonio; Novak, Michael G.; Hooker, Stanford B.; Hyde, Kimberly; Aurin, Dick

    2014-01-01

    An extensive set of field measurements have been collected throughout the continental margin of the northeastern U.S. from 2004 to 2011 to develop and validate ocean color satellite algorithms for the retrieval of the absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (aCDOM) and CDOM spectral slopes for the 275:295 nm and 300:600 nm spectral range (S275:295 and S300:600). Remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) measurements computed from in-water radiometry profiles along with aCDOM() data are applied to develop several types of algorithms for the SeaWiFS and MODIS-Aqua ocean color satellite sensors, which involve least squares linear regression of aCDOM() with (1) Rrs band ratios, (2) quasi-analytical algorithm-based (QAA based) products of total absorption coefficients, (3) multiple Rrs bands within a multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis, and (4) diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd). The relative error (mean absolute percent difference; MAPD) for the MLR retrievals of aCDOM(275), aCDOM(355), aCDOM(380), aCDOM(412) and aCDOM(443) for our study region range from 20.4-23.9 for MODIS-Aqua and 27.3-30 for SeaWiFS. Because of the narrower range of CDOM spectral slope values, the MAPD for the MLR S275:295 and QAA-based S300:600 algorithms are much lower ranging from 9.9 and 8.3 for SeaWiFS, respectively, and 8.7 and 6.3 for MODIS, respectively. Seasonal and spatial MODIS-Aqua and SeaWiFS distributions of aCDOM, S275:295 and S300:600 processed with these algorithms are consistent with field measurements and the processes that impact CDOM levels along the continental shelf of the northeastern U.S. Several satellite data processing factors correlate with higher uncertainty in satellite retrievals of aCDOM, S275:295 and S300:600 within the coastal ocean, including solar zenith angle, sensor viewing angle, and atmospheric products applied for atmospheric corrections. Algorithms that include ultraviolet Rrs bands provide a better fit to field measurements than

  15. Development of a three dimensional numerical water quality model for continental shelf applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, M.; Hunter, D.

    1975-01-01

    A model to predict the distribution of water quality parameters in three dimensions was developed. The mass transport equation was solved using a non-dimensional vertical axis and an alternating-direction-implicit finite difference technique. The reaction kinetics of the constituents were incorporated into a matrix method which permits computation of the interactions of multiple constituents. Methods for the computation of dispersion coefficients and coliform bacteria decay rates were determined. Numerical investigations of dispersive and dissipative effects showed that the three-dimensional model performs as predicted by analysis of simpler cases. The model was then applied to a two dimensional vertically averaged tidal dynamics model for the Providence River. It was also extended to a steady state application by replacing the time step with an iteration sequence. This modification was verified by comparison to analytical solutions and applied to a river confluence situation.

  16. Physical (Hydrography), chemical (CTD), and biological (Water Quality) processes of the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf, 2013 (NCEI Accession 0162440)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Two sets of CTD data were taken during the 2013 Shelfwide Hypoxia cruise off the Louisiana continental shelf. Hydrographic data were obtained with the LUMCON SeaBird...

  17. Water Column Methane Bubble Stream Data Analysis and Visualization from a Survey of the U.S. Cascadia Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, S. G.; Embley, R. W.; Raineault, N.; Johnson, H. P.; Sampaga, E.; Baumberger, T.; Lau, T. K. A.

    2016-12-01

    A major objective of cruise NA072 on the E/V Nautilus (operated by Ocean Exploration Trust Inc.), in June 2016, was to begin developing a baseline of methane bubble streams rising from the seafloor along the U. S. Cascadia continental margin (Washington, Oregon and northern California). The E/V Nautilus is equipped with a Kongsberg EM302 system (30 kHz) that collects seafloor bathymetry and backscatter data and concurrently insonifies the water column, allowing the detection and mapping of gas bubble streams rising from the seafloor. Preliminary analysis of the water column data detected more than 450 (presumptive) methane bubble streams, the large majority of which were not previously known. Newly-discovered methane bubble stream emission sites range in depth from 125 to 1640 meters. Water column data were analyzed using the QPS Fledermaus FMMidwater software using several modes. The FMMidwater method allowed for subjectively hand-picking ("geo-picking") bubble stream positions directly from the 2D display. The second method was the creation of geo-referenced 3D point cluster objects that could be loaded into the Fledermaus program and overlain on seafloor bathymetry or backscatter data. The point cluster objects were interactively created by threshold filtering based on acoustic amplitude values of the bubbles in the water column data. The third, a more automated method, used the FMMidwater Feature Detection plugin to create 3D point cluster objects that could be located in batch mode analysis. The three methods of data analysis are compared in this study. A small portion of the EM302 data collected on the E/V Nautilus will be compared to data collected in the same area with an EM710 (70 kHz) system on the NOAA ship Rainier in May 2016. That analysis examines the effect of the sonar frequency on bubble plume detection. Examples of the variety of methane bubble plumes discovered on the E/V Nautilus expedition will be presented in 2D and 3D visualizations.

  18. Recent reconstruction of deep-water macrofaunal communities recorded in Continental Margin sediments in the Balearic Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartes, J. E.; Schirone, A.; Barsanti, M.; Delbono, I.; Martínez-Aliaga, A.; Lombarte, A.

    2017-07-01

    We present an initial reconstruction of recent (last few centuries) mud-bottom faunal communities on the upper slope (398-667 m) of the continental margin off Catalonia (western Mediterranean), including periods free of any trawling impact. Radiometric dating of marine sediments and identification of faunal remains (e.g., fish otoliths, pteropod shells, coral sclerites) were performed to obtain a sediment geochronology in a 56 cm sediment core (MC4) taken at 398 m off the Ebro Delta in 2011. Core MC4 was especially rich in faunal remains, including, for example, 247 identifiable otoliths. A fine-scale chronology of MC4 was not possible due to sediment mixing. However, the depth of 210Pbxs penetration (20-22 cm) identified sediments older (below 22 cm depth) and younger (from core top to 22 cm) than ca. 100 years. Mass Accumulation Rate (MAR) from the 210Pbxs profile was estimated as 0.23±0.02 g cm-2 y-1. A significant peak of sclerites of the bamboo coral Isidella elongata was found between 4 and 8 cm in MC4, with remains of the axes and bases of Isidella colonies exclusively found at core depths >8-10 cm, which would correspond (MAR results) to the period 1980-1985. Such structures were not found in the 0-8 cm layer, likely an effect of trawling that started in the area in the 1980s. Other changes both in benthos (corals and cirripedes) and zooplankton (pteropods) seemed to be related with Ebro river discharge, with changes coinciding with massive damming of the Ebro and tributary rivers in the 1950s and until 1965. Mesopelagic fish also showed temporal oscillations in MC4. Abundance of some myctophid remains (Lampanyctus croccodilus and Benthosema glaciale) was related with positive NAO periods and with rather high temperature in Levantine Intermediate Waters. By contrast, periods of higher dominance of Ceratoscopelus maderensis off Catalonian coasts could indicate lower salinity during the past and a progressive degree of eutrophication in intermediate waters

  19. Continental impacts of water development on waterbirds, contrasting two Australian river basins: Global implications for sustainable water use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsford, Richard T; Bino, Gilad; Porter, John L

    2017-11-01

    The world's freshwater biotas are declining in diversity, range and abundance, more than in other realms, with human appropriation of water. Despite considerable data on the distribution of dams and their hydrological effects on river systems, there are few expansive and long analyses of impacts on freshwater biota. We investigated trends in waterbird communities over 32 years, (1983-2014), at three spatial scales in two similarly sized large river basins, with contrasting levels of water resource development, representing almost a third (29%) of Australia: the Murray-Darling Basin and the Lake Eyre Basin. The Murray-Darling Basin is Australia's most developed river basin (240 dams storing 29,893 GL) while the Lake Eyre Basin is one of the less developed basins (1 dam storing 14 GL). We compared the long-term responses of waterbird communities in the two river basins at river basin, catchment and major wetland scales. Waterbird abundances were strongly related to river flows and rainfall. For the developed Murray-Darling Basin, we identified significant long-term declines in total abundances, functional response groups (e.g., piscivores) and individual species of waterbird (n = 50), associated with reductions in cumulative annual flow. These trends indicated ecosystem level changes. Contrastingly, we found no evidence of waterbird declines in the undeveloped Lake Eyre Basin. We also modelled the effects of the Australian Government buying up water rights and returning these to the riverine environment, at a substantial cost (>3.1 AUD billion) which were projected to partly (18% improvement) restore waterbird abundances, but projected climate change effects could reduce these benefits considerably to only a 1% or 4% improvement, with respective annual recovery of environmental flows of 2,800 GL or 3,200 GL. Our unique large temporal and spatial scale analyses demonstrated severe long-term ecological impact of water resource development on prominent

  20. Pore water geochemistry along continental slopes north of the East Siberian Sea: inference of low methane concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Miller

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Continental slopes north of the East Siberian Sea potentially hold large amounts of methane (CH4 in sediments as gas hydrate and free gas. Although release of this CH4 to the ocean and atmosphere has become a topic of discussion, the region remains sparingly explored. Here we present pore water chemistry results from 32 sediment cores taken during Leg 2 of the 2014 joint Swedish–Russian–US Arctic Ocean Investigation of Climate–Cryosphere–Carbon Interactions (SWERUS-C3 expedition. The cores come from depth transects across the slope and rise extending between the Mendeleev and the Lomonosov ridges, north of Wrangel Island and the New Siberian Islands, respectively. Upward CH4 flux towards the seafloor, as inferred from profiles of dissolved sulfate (SO42−, alkalinity, and the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, is negligible at all stations east of 143° E longitude. In the upper 8 m of these cores, downward SO42− flux never exceeds 6.2 mol m−2 kyr−1, the upward alkalinity flux never exceeds 6.8 mol m−2 kyr−1, and δ13C composition of DIC (δ13C-DIC only moderately decreases with depth (−3.6 ‰ m−1 on average. Moreover, upon addition of Zn acetate to pore water samples, ZnS did not precipitate, indicating a lack of dissolved H2S. Phosphate, ammonium, and metal profiles reveal that metal oxide reduction by organic carbon dominates the geochemical environment and supports very low organic carbon turnover rates. A single core on the Lomonosov Ridge differs, as diffusive fluxes for SO42− and alkalinity were 13.9 and 11.3 mol m−2 kyr−1, respectively, the δ13C-DIC gradient was 5.6 ‰ m−1, and Mn2+ reduction terminated within 1.3 m of the seafloor. These are among the first pore water results generated from this vast climatically sensitive region, and they imply that abundant CH4, including gas hydrates, do not characterize the East Siberian Sea slope or rise along the investigated

  1. Pore water geochemistry along continental slopes north of the East Siberian Sea: inference of low methane concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Clint M.; Dickens, Gerald R.; Jakobsson, Martin; Johansson, Carina; Koshurnikov, Andrey; O'Regan, Matt; Muschitiello, Francesco; Stranne, Christian; Mörth, Carl-Magnus

    2017-06-01

    Continental slopes north of the East Siberian Sea potentially hold large amounts of methane (CH4) in sediments as gas hydrate and free gas. Although release of this CH4 to the ocean and atmosphere has become a topic of discussion, the region remains sparingly explored. Here we present pore water chemistry results from 32 sediment cores taken during Leg 2 of the 2014 joint Swedish-Russian-US Arctic Ocean Investigation of Climate-Cryosphere-Carbon Interactions (SWERUS-C3) expedition. The cores come from depth transects across the slope and rise extending between the Mendeleev and the Lomonosov ridges, north of Wrangel Island and the New Siberian Islands, respectively. Upward CH4 flux towards the seafloor, as inferred from profiles of dissolved sulfate (SO42-), alkalinity, and the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), is negligible at all stations east of 143° E longitude. In the upper 8 m of these cores, downward SO42- flux never exceeds 6.2 mol m-2 kyr-1, the upward alkalinity flux never exceeds 6.8 mol m-2 kyr-1, and δ13C composition of DIC (δ13C-DIC) only moderately decreases with depth (-3.6 ‰ m-1 on average). Moreover, upon addition of Zn acetate to pore water samples, ZnS did not precipitate, indicating a lack of dissolved H2S. Phosphate, ammonium, and metal profiles reveal that metal oxide reduction by organic carbon dominates the geochemical environment and supports very low organic carbon turnover rates. A single core on the Lomonosov Ridge differs, as diffusive fluxes for SO42- and alkalinity were 13.9 and 11.3 mol m-2 kyr-1, respectively, the δ13C-DIC gradient was 5.6 ‰ m-1, and Mn2+ reduction terminated within 1.3 m of the seafloor. These are among the first pore water results generated from this vast climatically sensitive region, and they imply that abundant CH4, including gas hydrates, do not characterize the East Siberian Sea slope or rise along the investigated depth transects. This contradicts previous modeling and discussions, which

  2. mizuRoute version 1: A river network routing tool for a continental domain water resources applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Naoki; Clark, Martyn P.; Sampson, Kevin; Nijssen, Bart; Mao, Yixin; McMillan, Hilary; Viger, Roland; Markstrom, Steven; Hay, Lauren E.; Woods, Ross; Arnold, Jeffrey R.; Brekke, Levi D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the first version of a stand-alone runoff routing tool, mizuRoute. The mizuRoute tool post-processes runoff outputs from any distributed hydrologic model or land surface model to produce spatially distributed streamflow at various spatial scales from headwater basins to continental-wide river systems. The tool can utilize both traditional grid-based river network and vector-based river network data. Both types of river network include river segment lines and the associated drainage basin polygons, but the vector-based river network can represent finer-scale river lines than the grid-based network. Streamflow estimates at any desired location in the river network can be easily extracted from the output of mizuRoute. The routing process is simulated as two separate steps. First, hillslope routing is performed with a gamma-distribution-based unit-hydrograph to transport runoff from a hillslope to a catchment outlet. The second step is river channel routing, which is performed with one of two routing scheme options: (1) a kinematic wave tracking (KWT) routing procedure; and (2) an impulse response function – unit-hydrograph (IRF-UH) routing procedure. The mizuRoute tool also includes scripts (python, NetCDF operators) to pre-process spatial river network data. This paper demonstrates mizuRoute's capabilities to produce spatially distributed streamflow simulations based on river networks from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Geospatial Fabric (GF) data set in which over 54 000 river segments and their contributing areas are mapped across the contiguous United States (CONUS). A brief analysis of model parameter sensitivity is also provided. The mizuRoute tool can assist model-based water resources assessments including studies of the impacts of climate change on streamflow.

  3. A study on the applicability of the ecosystem model on water quality prediction in urban river outer moats of Yedo Castle, Nihonbashi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinuma, Daiki; Tsushima, Yuki; Ohdaira, Kazunori; Yamada, Tadashi

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the study is to elucidate the waterside environment in the outer moats of Yedo Castle and the downstream of Nihonbashi River in Tokyo. Scince integrated sewage system has been installed in the area around the outer moats of Yedo Castle and the Nihon River basin, when rainfall exceeds more than the sewage treatment capacity, overflowed untreated wastewater is released into the moats and the river. Because the moats is a closed water body, pollutants are deposited to the bottom without outflowing. While reeking offensive odors due to the decomposition, blue-green algae outbreaks affected by the residence time and eluted nutrient causes problems. Scince the Nihonbashi River is a typical tidal river in urban area, the water pollution problems in the river is complicated. This study clarified the characteristics of the water quality in terms of dissolved oxygen saturation through on-site observations. In particular, dissolved oxygen saturation in summer, it is clarified that variations from a supersaturated state due to the variations of horizontal insolation intensity and water temperature up to hypoxic water conditions in the moats. According to previous studies on the water quality of Nihonbashi River, it is clarified that there are three types of variations of dissolved oxygen which desided by rainfall scale. The mean value of dissolved oxygen saturation of all layers has decreased by about 20% at the spring tide after dredging, then it recoveres gradually and become the value before dredging during about a year. Further more, in places where sewage inflows, it is important to developed a ecosystem medel and the applicability of the model. 9 variables including cell quota (intracellular nutrients of phytoplankton) of phosphorus and nitrogen with considerring the nitrification of ammonia nitrogen are used in the model. This model can grasp the sections (such as oxygen production by photosynthesis of phytoplankton, oxygen consumption by respiration of

  4. Net primary productivity (NPP) and associated parameters for the U.S. outer continental shelf waters, 1998-2009 (NODC Accession 0071184)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession consists of monthly net primary productivity (NPP) estimates for 1998-2009 derived from the Vertically Generalized Production Model (VGPM) for the 26...

  5. Flux of energy and essential elements through the continental shelf ecosystem. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1981-11-30

    There are three distinct but not mutually exclusive areas of research in this contract, studies of intrusions of the west wall of the Gulf Stream onto the outer continental shelf, studies of the flux of materials across nearshore density fronts, and advances in understanding of the planktonic food web of the continental shelf. Studies of frontal events on the outer and inner continental shelf involve distinctive physical and chemical regimes and have proven to require distinctive biological approaches. The studies of the food web run through our work on both of the frontal regimes, but certain aspects have become subjects in their own right. We have developed a simulation model of the flux of energy through the continental shelf food web which we believe to be more realistic than previous ones of its type. We have examined several of the many roles of dissolved organic compounds in sea water which originate either from release by phytoplankton, digestive processes or metabolites of zooplankton, or extracellular digestion of microorganisms. Methods have been developed under this contract to measure both the chelating capacity of naturally occurring organic materials and the copper concentration in the water. It has been possible to characterize the effects, both toxic and stimulatory, of copper on photosynthesis of naturally occurring phytoplankton populations. It is possible to characterize in considerable detail the course of biological events associated with meanders of the Gulf Stream. We are now in a position to explain the limits to biological productivity of the outer continental shelf of the southeastern US and the reasons why that biological production moves through the food web in the characteristic way that it does.

  6. On the effect of topography and wind on warm water inflow—An idealized study of the southern Weddell Sea continental shelf system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daae, K.; Hattermann, T.; Darelius, E.; Fer, I.

    2017-03-01

    An idealized eddy-resolving numerical model, with topographic features common to the southern Weddell Sea, is constructed to study mechanisms through which warm deep water enters a wide continental shelf with a trough. The open ocean, represented by a 1700 m deep channel, is connected to a 400 m deep shelf with a continental slope. The shelf is narrow (50 km) in the east but widens to 300 km at the center of the model domain. Over the narrow shelf, the slope front is balanced by wind-driven Ekman downwelling and counteracting eddy overturning, favoring on-shelf transport of warm water in summer scenarios when fresher surface water is present. Over the wide shelf, the Ekman downwelling ceases, and the mesoscale eddies relax the front. Inflow of warm water is sensitive to along-shelf salinity gradients and is most efficient when denser water over the wide shelf favors up-slope eddy transport along isopycnals of the V-shaped slope front. Inflow along the eastern side of the trough cannot penetrate the sill region due to potential vorticity constraints, while along the western trough flank, eddy-induced inflow crosses the sill and reaches the ice front. The warm inflow into the trough is sensitive to the density of the outflowing dense shelf water. For weaker winds, absence of the dense water outflow leads to a reversal of the trough circulation and a strong inflow of warm water, while for stronger winds, baroclinic effects become less important and the inflow is similar to experiments including dense water outflow.

  7. Particle flux across the mid-European continental margin

    CERN Document Server

    Antia, A N; Peinert, R

    1999-01-01

    Results are presented from particle flux studies using sediment trap and current meter moorings along a transect at the European continental margin at 49 degrees N within the Ocean Margin Exchange (OMEX) project. Two moorings were placed, at the mid- and outer slope in water depths of 1500 and 3660 m, with traps at 600 and 1050 m and at 580, 1440 and 3220 m, respectively. Residual currents at the mid- slope follow the slope contour, whereas seasonal off-slope flow was registered at the outer slope. At 600 m on the slope fluxes are similar to those in the abyssal North Atlantic. The flux of all components (bulk dry weight, particulate organic and inorganic carbon, lithogenic matter and opal) increased with water depth. Highest fluxes were recorded at 1440 m at the outer slope, where off- slope residual currents mediate particle export. The injection of biogenic and lithogenic particles below the depth of winter mixing results in the export of particles from shallower waters. Calculated lateral fluxes of partic...

  8. Effects of temperature on stress corrosion cracking behavior of stainless steel and outer oxide distribution in cracks due to exposure to high-temperature water containing hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Junichi; Sato, Tomonori; Kato, Chiaki; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Tsukada, Takashi; Kaji, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Cracking growth tests were conducted in high-temperature water containing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at 561-423 K to evaluate the effects of H2O2 on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of stainless steel (SS) at temperature lower than the boiling water reactor (BWR) operating temperature. Small compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from thermally sensitized type 304 SS. Despite the observation of only a small portion intergranular SCC (IGSCC) near the side groove of the CT specimen at 561 K in high-temperature water containing 100 ppb H2O2, the IGSCC area expanded to the central region of the CT specimens at 423 and 453 K. Effects of H2O2 on SCC appeared intensely at temperature lower than the BWR operating temperature because of a reduction in the thermal decomposition of H2O2. To estimate the environment in the cracks, outer oxide distribution on the fracture surface and the fatigue pre-crack were examined by laser Raman spectroscopy and thermal equilibrium calculation was performed.

  9. Final Scientific/Technical Report: Characterizing the Response of the Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrate Reservoir to Bottom Water Warming Along the Upper Continental Slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, Evan A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Johnson, H. Paul [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Salmi, Marie [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Whorley, Theresa [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-11-10

    The objective of this project is to understand the response of the WA margin gas hydrate system to contemporary warming of bottom water along the upper continental slope. Through pre-cruise analysis and modeling of archive and recent geophysical and oceanographic data, we (1) inventoried bottom simulating reflectors along the WA margin and defined the upper limit of gas hydrate stability, (2) refined margin-wide estimates of heat flow and geothermal gradients, (3) characterized decadal scale temporal variations of bottom water temperatures at the upper continental slope of the Washington margin, and (4) used numerical simulations to provide quantitative estimates of how the shallow boundary of methane hydrate stability responds to modern environmental change. These pre-cruise results provided the context for a systematic geophysical and geochemical survey of methane seepage along the upper continental slope from 48° to 46°N during a 10-day field program on the R/V Thompson from October 10-19, 2014. This systematic inventory of methane emissions along this climate-sensitive margin corridor and comprehensive sediment and water column sampling program provided data and samples for Phase 3 of this project that focused on determining fluid and methane sources (deep-source vs. shallow; microbial, thermogenic, gas hydrate dissociation) within the sediment, and how they relate to contemporary intermediate water warming. During the 2014 research expedition, we sampled nine seep sites between ~470 and 520 m water depth, within the zone of predicted methane hydrate retreat over the past 40 years. We imaged 22 bubble plumes with heights commonly rising to ~300 meters below sea level with one reaching near the sea surface. We collected 22 gravity cores and 20 CTD/hydrocasts from the 9 seeps and at background locations (no acoustic evidence of seepage) within the depth interval of predicted downslope retreat of the methane hydrate stability zone. Approximately 300 pore water

  10. From the subtropics to the equator in the Southwest Pacific: Continental material fluxes quantified using neodymium data along modeled thermocline water pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Mélanie; Jeandel, Catherine; Cravatte, Sophie

    2014-06-01

    The southwestern tropical Pacific, part of a major pathway for waters feeding the Equatorial Undercurrent, is a region of important geochemical enrichment through land-ocean boundary exchange. Here we develop an original method based on the coupling between dynamical modeling and geochemical tracer data to identify regions of enrichment along the water pathways from the subtropics to the equator, and to allow a refined quantification of continental material fluxes. Neodymium data are interpreted with the help of modeled Lagrangian trajectories of an Ocean General Circulation Model. We reveal that upper and lower thermocline waters have different pathways together with different geochemical evolutions. The upper thermocline waters entering the Solomon Sea mainly originate from the central subtropical gyre, enter the Coral Sea in the North Vanuatu Jet and likely receive radiogenic neodymium from the basaltic island margins encountered along their route. The lower thermocline waters entering the Solomon Sea mainly originate from northeast of New Zealand and enter the Coral Sea in the North Caledonian Jet. Depletion of their neodymium content likely occurs when flowing along the Australian and Papua coasts. Downstream from the Solomon Sea, waters flowing along the Papua New Guinea margins near the Sepik river mouth become surprisingly depleted in their neodymium content in the upper thermocline while enriched in the lower thermocline. This coupled approach is proposed as strong support to interpret the origin of the equatorial Pacific natural fertilization through a better understanding of the circulation, important objectives of the international GEOTRACES and SPICE programs, respectively.

  11. The holocene sequence of the central continental shelf of the State of Bahia, Brazil; A sequencia holocenica da plataforma continental central do Estado da Bahia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Antonio Fernando Menezes; Dominguez, Jose Maria Landim [PETROBRAS S.A., BA (Brazil). Unidade de Negocios de Exploracao e Producao da Bahia. Ativo de Exploracao Avaliacao e Acompanhamento Geologico]. E-mail: fernandofreire@petrobras.com.br

    2006-05-15

    Fifty cores were recovered from the sea bottom in the central portion of the continental shelf of the State of Bahia, between the Marau Peninsula and the city of Olivenca. Thirty six of these cores were collected by divers at up to 40 m deep waters. Fourteen cores were collected by piston cores in areas ranging from the continental shelf to the upper slope. All cores were described, photographed and sampled for grain size and bio stratigraphic analysis. These data were used to prepare textural and facies maps of the continental shelf. The piston cores were run parallel to sub-bottom profiling surveys. Results show that there is a strong reflector located 3 - 4 m below the sediment- water interface, which limited the penetration of the piston cores. This reflector represents a sequence boundary separating the holocene from the pleistocene sequences. A transgressive system tract has been deposited on the top of this surface along with the early stages of the high stand system tract, particularly on the inner shelf. Because of the starved character of this shelf, notably on its external portion, a detailed application of sequence stratigraphy concepts has not been possible. Only at the inner shelf/shore face there is evident pro gradation of siliciclastics over carbonates. Several submarine valleys dissect the outer shelf/upper slope, thus acting as channels that transport continental shelf sediments to the deeper portions of the basin. (author)

  12. High-efficiency removal of NOx using dielectric barrier discharge nonthermal plasma with water as an outer electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, ZHAO; Feng, YU; Amin, ZHOU; Cunhua, MA; Bin, DAI

    2018-01-01

    With the rapid increase in the number of cars and the development of industry, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions have become a serious and pressing problem. This work reports on the development of a water-cooled dielectric barrier discharge reactor for gaseous NOx removal at low temperature. The characteristics of the reactor are evaluated with and without packing of the reaction tube with 2 mm diameter dielectric beads composed of glass, ZnO, MnO2, ZrO2, or Fe2O3. It is found that the use of a water-cooled tube reduces the temperature, which stabilizes the reaction, and provides a much greater NO conversion efficiency (28.8%) than that obtained using quartz tube (14.1%) at a frequency of 8 kHz with an input voltage of 6.8 kV. Furthermore, under equivalent conditions, packing the reactor tube with glass beads greatly increases the NO conversion efficiency to 95.85%. This is because the dielectric beads alter the distribution of the electric field due to the influence of polarization at the glass bead surfaces, which ultimately enhances the plasma discharge intensity. The presence of the dielectric beads increases the gas residence time within the reactor. Experimental verification and a theoretical basis are provided for the industrial application of the proposed plasma NO removal process employing dielectric bead packing.

  13. Flux of energy and essential elements through the continental shelf ecosystem. Progress report, May 31, 1980-May 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomeroy, L R

    1981-02-01

    There are three distinct areas of research reported, studies of intrusions of the west wall of the Gulf Stream onto the outer continental shelf, studies of the flux of materials across near-shore density fronts, and advances in the understanding of the planktonic food web of the continental shelf. Studies of frontal events on the outer and inner continental shelf involve distinctive physical and chemical regimes and have proven to required distinctive biological approaches. A simulation model of the flux of energy through the continental shelf food web was developed. It represents realistically both details of the energy transfers within the plankton community and the termanal production of fishes. It was discovered that the fecal ribbons of pelagic tunicates break up into flocculent material visually and chemically identical with the flocculent organic aggregates present in sea water. Subsequent experimental work with tunicate fecal matter indicates that some of the naturally occurring aggregates are indeed fecal. This makes it possible to understand and quantify for the first time the production and fate of that population of seston. An examination was made of several of the many roles of dissolved organic compounds in sea water which originate either from release by phytoplankton, digestive processes or metabolites of zooplankton, or extracellular digestion of microorganisms.

  14. Contribution of Outer-shelf Deep Water to the nutrient inventories in the euphotic zone of Changjiang River plume during summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianfang

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient supply to the euphotic zone of high productivity area in the Changjiang Estuary,East China Sea is crucial in understanding algal bloom and hypoxia in this area. Previous studies suggested that Changjiang Diluted Water (CDW) and Outer-shelf Deep Water (ODW) are two main sources for nutrient supply while quantitative estimation of each nutrient species to the euphotic zone remains unknown. Based on a field survey and end-member mixing model, the nutrient inventories of ODW, and its contribution to the model-predicted nutrient inventory in the euphotic zone of Changjiang River plume-impacted area were assessed. Upwelling of ODW was identified, indicating that it significantly contributed to nutrient inventories in the upper layer. The nutrient inventory estimation suggested that the area-integrated nutrient inventories of ODW were higher than that of CDW in the euphotic zone of plume-impacted area. As inferred from the mixing model, the contributions of ODW to DIN and silicate inventories in the euphotic zone were 18.2% and 28.1%, respectively, much lower than that of CDW. However, 37.6% and 39.1% of the phosphate inventory were from ODW and CDW, respectively, indicating that ODW phosphate contribution was comparable with that of CDW in the euphotic zone, while DIN and silicate brought by ODW were less

  15. Molecular Gut Content Profiling to Investigate the In Situ Grazing and Selectivity of Dolioletta gegenbauri in Summer Continental Shelf Intrusion Waters of the South Atlantic Bight, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, T. L.; Frazier, L.; Gibson, D. M.; Paffenhofer, G. A.; Frischer, M. E.

    2016-02-01

    Gelatinous metazooplankton play a crucial role in marine planktonic food webs and it has been suggested that they may become increasingly important in the Future Ocean. However, largely due to methodological challenges and reliance on laboratory cultivation approaches, the in situ diet of zooplankton with complex life histories and diverse prey choices remains poorly investigated. This is particularly true for the gelatinous zooplankton including the pelagic tunicate, Dolioletta gegenbauri that form large blooms in productive subtropical continental shelf environments. To investigate the diet of D. gegenbauri we developed a molecular gut profiling approach based on the use of a Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) PCR blocker. Using a doliolid-specific PNA blocker, it was possible to enrich the amplification of prey and parasite DNA from whole animal DNA extracts of doliolids. Gut contents from the water column, wild and captive-fed doliolids were profiled after PNA-PCR by denaturing HPLC (dHPLC), clone library and next generation sequencing (NGS) approaches. Studies were conducted during 5 summer cruises in the mid-shelf of the South Atlantic Bight. Comparison of gut profiles to available prey in the water column revealed evidence of prey selection towards larger prey species, including diatoms, dinoflagelletes and also metazoan prey that were likely captured as larvae and eggs. Wild-caught doliolids contained significantly more metazoan sequences than did the captive-fed doliolids. Ingestion of metazoan prey suggests that metazoans may contribute both the nutrition of doliolids and the potential role of doliolids as trophic cascade agents in continental shelf pelagic food webs.

  16. 75 FR 71734 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Scientific Committee (SC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ...) and environmental aspects of the offshore energy and marine minerals programs. The ESP, initiated to... of field and laboratory studies in biology, chemistry, and physical oceanography, as well as studies of the social and economic impacts of OCS energy and marine minerals development. Currently, the work...

  17. Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams - Atlantic Region NAD 83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Official Protraction Diagram (OPD) outlines in ESRI shapefile format. Atlantic Region OPDs are approximately 2 degrees wide by one degree...

  18. Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams - Alaska Region NAD 83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Official Protraction Diagram (OPD) outlines in ESRI shapefile format. At lower latitudes (0-48 degrees) OPDs are 1 degree in latitude by 2...

  19. Outer Continental Shelf Lease Blocks - Atlantic Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains OCS block outlines in ArcGIS shape file format for the BOEM Atlantic Region. OCS blocks are used to define small geographic areas within an...

  20. Methanotroph outer membrane preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Odd A; Berven, Frode S; Jensen, Harald B; Fjellbirkeland, Anne

    2011-01-01

    All presently known methanotrophs are gram-negative bacteria suggesting that they are surrounded by a two-layered membrane: an inner or cytoplasmic membrane and an outer membrane. In the methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), separation of the two membranes has allowed studies on protein and lipid composition of the outer membrane. Its outer membrane can be isolated from purified cell envelopes by selective solubilization of the inner membranes with the detergent Triton X-100. The proteins associated with the outer membrane can further be fractionated into integral and tightly associated proteins and peripheral loosely associated proteins. We present here protocols for this fractionation and show how the proteins associated with the outer leaflet of the outer membrane can be isolated and identified by whole-cell biotin surface labeling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Changes in water properties and flow regime on the continental shelf off the Adélie/George V Land coast, East Antarctica, after glacier tongue calving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, S.; Kobayashi, R.; Rintoul, S. R.; Tamura, T.; Kusahara, K.

    2017-08-01

    Oceanic changes before and after the relocation of iceberg B9B and calving of the Mertz Glacier Tongue (MGT) in February 2010 are examined on the continental shelf off the Adélie Land/George V Land coast, East Antarctica. Summer hydrographic observations, including stable oxygen isotope ratio (δ18O), in 2001/2008 and 2011/2015 and results of a numerical model are used. Along the western flank of the MGT, temperature decreased between 2001 and 2015 for most of the water column in the Adélie Depression. δ18O generally decreased, especially at the MGT draft depths on the northern side. West of the MGT, temperature, salinity, and δ18O decreased in the intermediate layer. East of the MGT, in contrast, temperature increased between 2001 and 2011 at intermediate depths, salinity increased in the intermediate and deep layers, and δ18O slightly decreased in the deep layer but did not change much around 300 dbar. The numerical experiment exhibits a change in ocean circulation, revealing an increase in modified Circumpolar Deep Water (mCDW) inflow in the east and a decrease in the west. The contrasting changes in mCDW intrusion are consistent between the observations and numerical model, and are indicative of the effect of removal of the ice barriers. The contrast is overlain by overall decreases in salinity and δ18O, which suggests an increase in the continental meltwater fraction of 5-20% and might reveal a wide-ranging influence from West Antarctica. The oxygen isotope ratio is, hence, effective in monitoring the increase in continental melt over the Antarctic shelf.Plain Language SummaryAntarctic glaciers, icebergs, and ice sheet have significant impact on the surrounding ocean, and, in turn, are affected by the ocean. The Mertz Glacier, East Antarctica, had been melted from below by the oceanic heat. The seaward extension of the glacier of about 500 m tall obstructed sea ice drift from the east and enabled a large amount of sea ice production there. Dense water

  2. Water in the Lithospheric Mantle Beneath a Phanerozoic Continental Belt: FTIR Analyses of Alligator Lake Xenoliths (Yukon, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelber, McKensie; Peslier, Ann H.; Brandon, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Water in the mantle influences melting, metasomatism, viscosity and electrical conductivity. The Alligator Lake mantle xenolith suite is one of three bimodal peridotite suites from the northern Canadian Cordillera brought to the surface by alkali basalts, i.e., it consists of chemically distinct lherzolites and harzburgites. The lherzolites have equilibration temperatures about 50 C lower than the harzburgites and are thought to represent the fertile upper mantle of the region. The harzburgites might have come from slightly deeper in the mantle and/or be the result of a melting event above an asthenospheric upwelling detected as a seismic anomaly at 400-500 km depth. Major and trace element data are best interpreted as the lherzolite mantle having simultaneously experienced 20-25% partial melting and a metasomatic event to create the harzburgites. Well-characterized xenoliths are being analyzed for water by FTIR. Harzburgites contain 29-52 ppm H2O in orthopyroxene (opx) and (is) approximately140 ppm H2O in clinopyroxene (cpx). The lherzolites have H2O contents of 27-150 ppm in opx and 46-361 ppm in cpx. Despite correlating with enrichments in LREE, the water contents of the harzburgite pyroxenes are low relative to those of typical peridotite xenoliths, suggesting that the metasomatic agents were water-poor, contrarily to what has been suggested before. The water content of cpx is about double that of opx indicating equilibrium. Olivine water contents are low ((is) less than 5 ppm H2O) and out of equilibrium with those of opx and cpx, which may be due to H loss during xenolith ascent. This is consistent with olivines containing more water in their cores than their rims. Olivines exclusively exhibit water bands in the 3400-3000 cm-1 range, which may be indicative of a reduced environment.

  3. Habitat use and preferences of cetaceans along the continental slope and the adjacent pelagic waters in the western Ligurian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzellino, A.; Gaspari, S.; Airoldi, S.; Nani, B.

    2008-03-01

    The physical habitat of cetaceans occurring along the continental slope in the western Ligurian Sea was investigated. Data were collected from two different sighting platforms, one of the two being a whale-watching boat. Surveys, conducted from May to October and from 1996 to 2000, covered an area of approximately 3000 km 2 with a mean effort of about 10,000 km year -1. A total of 814 sightings was reported, including all the species occurring in the area: Stenella coeruleoalba, Balaenoptera physalus, Physeter macrocephalus, Globicephala melas, Grampus griseus, Ziphius cavirostris, Tursiops truncatus, Delphinus delphis. A Geographic Information System was used to integrate sighting data to a set of environmental characteristics, which included bottom gradient, area between different isobaths, and length and linearity of the isobaths within a cell unit. Habitat use was analysed by means of a multi-dimensional scaling, MDS, analysis. Significant differences were found in the habitat preference of most of the species regularly occurring in the area. Bottlenose dolphin, Risso's dolphin, sperm whale and Cuvier's beaked whale were found strongly associated to well-defined depth and slope gradient characteristics of the shelf-edge and the upper and lower slope. The hypothesis of habitat segregation was considered for Risso's dolphin, sperm whale and Cuvier's beaked whale. Canonical discriminant functions using depth and slope as predictors outlined clear and not overlapping habitat preferences for Risso's dolphin and Cuvier's beaked whale, whereas a partial overlapping of the habitat of the other two species was observed for sperm whale. Such a partitioning of the upper and lower slope area may be the result of the common feeding habits and suggests a possible competition of these three species. A temporal segregation in the use of the slope area was also observed for sperm whales and Risso's dolphins. Fin whales, and the occasionally encountered common dolphin and long

  4. Continental Divide Trail

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This shapefile was created to show the proximity of the Continental Divide to the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail in New Mexico. This work was done as part...

  5. Hydrogeological Modelling of the Geothermal Waters of Alaşehir in the Continental Rift Zone of the Gediz, Western Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ӧzgür, Nevzat; Bostancı, Yesim; Anilır Yürük, Ezgi

    2017-12-01

    In western Anatolia, Turkey, the continental rift zones of the Büyük Menderes, Küçük Menderes and Gediz were formed by extensional tectonic features striking E-W generally and representing a great number of active geothermal systems, epithermal mineralizations and volcanic rocks from Middle Miocene to recent. The geothermal waters are associated with the faults which strike preferentially NW-SE and NE-SW and locate diagonal to general strike of the rift zones of the Menderes Massif. These NW-SE and NE-SW striking faults were probably generated by compressional tectonic regimes which leads to the deformation of uplift between two extensional rift zones in the Menderes Massif. The one of these rift zones is Gediz which is distinguished by a great number of geothermal waters such as Alaşehir, Kurşunlu, Çamurlu, Pamukkale and Urganlı. The geothermal waters of Alaşehir form the biggest potential in the rift zone of Gediz with a capacity of about 100 to 200 MWe. Geologically, the gneisses from the basement rocks in the study area which are overlain by an Paleozoic to Mesozoic intercalation of mica schists, quartzites and marbles, a Miocene intercalation of conglomerates, sandstones and clay stones and Plio-Quaternary intercalation of conglomerates, sandstones and clay stones discordantly. In the study area, Paleozoic to Mesozoic quartzites and marbles form the reservoir rocks hydrogeologically. The geothermal waters anions with Na+K>Ca>Mg dominant cations and HCO3>Cl> dominant anions are of Na-HCO3 type and can be considered as partial equilibrated waters. According to the results of geochemical thermometers, the reservoir temperatures area of about 185°C in accordance with measured reservoir temperatures. Stabile isotopes of δ18O versus δ2H of geothermal waters of Alaşehir deviate from the meteoric water line showing an intensive water-rock interaction under high temperature conditions. These data are well correlated with the results of the

  6. Silicic acid enrichment of subantarctic surface water from continental inputs along the Patagonian archipelago interior sea (41-56°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rodrigo; Silva, Nelson; Reid, Brian; Frangopulos, Máximo

    2014-12-01

    We estimated Si∗, the surplus or deficit of orthosilicic acid (DSi) relative to nitrate available for diatom growth, in the Chilean Patagonian Archipelago Interior Sea (PAIS). Si∗ and salinity were negatively correlated in the PAIS because of the mixing of high nitrate, low DSi subantarctic surface water and high DSi, low nitrate continental freshwater runoff. Both the slope and the intercept of this relationship decreased from northern to southern Patagonia, which was likely a consequence of reduced DSi inputs from several overlapping hydrological, biological and geological drivers along this gradient. In general, lower freshwater DSi concentrations were expected below 46°S, and a lower total DSi load was expected from reduced runoff below 51°S. The north-south decreasing DSi concentration trend may be linked to dilutions from a higher proportion of runoff in latitudes with higher precipitation rates (45-53°S), the transition to more resistant granitic rocks and glacial melt-water from the Northern and Southern Patagonia Ice Fields (46-51°S) and a reduced density of volcanoes active during the Holocene (48-56°S). The intensification of a southward DSi deficit may be a forcing factor involved in the reported southward reductions in plankton biomass and a more frequent occurrence of non-diatom blooms in southern PAIS.

  7. Linking flux network measurements to continental scale simulations: ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange capacity under non-water-stressed conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owen, K.E.; Tenhunen, J.; Reichstein, M.; Wang, Q.; Falge, E.; Geyer, R.; Xiao, X.; Stoy, P.; Ammann, C.; Arain, A.; Aubinet, M.; Aurela, M.; Bernhofer, C.; Chojnicki, B.H.; Granier, A.; Gruenwald, T.; Hadley, J.; Heinesch, B.; Hollinger, D.; Knohl, A.; Kutsch, W.; Lohila, A.; Meyers, T.; Moors, E.J.; Moureaux, C.; Pilegaard, K.; Saigusa, N.; Verma, S.; Vesala, T.; Vogel, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines long-term eddy covariance data from 18 European and 17 North American and Asian forest, wetland, tundra, grassland, and cropland sites under non-water-stressed conditions with an empirical rectangular hyperbolic light response model and a single layer two light-class

  8. Combining physical and geochemical methods to investigate lower halocline water formation and modification along the Siberian continental slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkire, Matthew B.; Polyakov, Igor; Rember, Robert; Pnyushkov, Andrey; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ashik, Igor

    2017-11-01

    A series of cross-slope transects were occupied in 2013 and 2015 that extended eastward from St. Anna Trough to the Lomonosov Ridge. High-resolution physical and chemical observations collected along these transects revealed fronts in the potential temperature and the stable oxygen isotopic ratio (δ18O) that were observed north of Severnaya Zemlya (SZ). Using linear regressions, we describe mixing regimes on either side of the front that characterize a transition from a seasonal halocline to a permanent halocline. This transition describes the formation of lower halocline water (LHW) and the cold halocline layer via a mechanism that has been previously postulated by Rudels et al. (1996). Initial freshening of Atlantic Water (AW) by sea-ice meltwater occurs west of SZ, whereas higher influences of meteoric water and brine result in a transition to a separate mixing regime that alters LHW through mixing with overlying waters and shifts the characteristic temperature-salinity bend from higher (34.4 ≤ S ≤ 34.5) toward lower (34.2 ≤ S ≤ 34.3) salinities. These mixing regimes appear to have been robust since at least 2000.

  9. Simulated water budget of a small forested watershed in the continental/maritime hydroclimatic region of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang Wei; Timothy E. Link; Andrew T. Hudak; John D. Marshall; Kathleen L. Kavanagh; John T. Abatzoglou; Hang Zhou; Robert E. Pangle; Gerald N. Flerchinger

    2016-01-01

    Annual streamflows have decreased across mountain watersheds in the Pacific Northwest of the United States over the last ~70 years; however, in some watersheds, observed annual flows have increased. Physically based models are useful tools to reveal the combined effects of climate and vegetation on long-term water balances by explicitly simulating the internal...

  10. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given. ...

  11. Suspended matter in surface waters of the Atlantic continental margin from Cape Cod to the Florida keys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, F. T.; Meade, R.H.; Bond, G.C.

    1970-01-01

    Appreciable amounts of suspended matter (> 1.0 milligram per liter) in surface waters are restricted to within a few kilometers of the Atlantic coast. Particles that escape estuaries or are discharged by rivers into the shelf region tend to travel longshoreward rather than seaward. Suspended matter farther offshore, chiefly amorphous organic particles, totals 0.1 milligram per liter or less. Soot, fly ash, processed cellulose, and other pollutants are widespread.

  12. Estimating total alkalinity for coastal ocean acidification monitoring at regional to continental scales in Australian coastal waters

    KAUST Repository

    Baldry, Kimberlee

    2017-06-01

    Owing to a lack of resources, tools, and knowledge, the natural variability and distribution of Total Alkalinity (TA) has been poorly characterised in coastal waters globally, yet variability is known to be high in coastal regions due to the complex interactions of oceanographic, biotic, and terrestrially-influenced processes. This is a particularly challenging task for the vast Australian coastline, however, it is also this vastness that demands attention in the face of ocean acidification (OA). Australian coastal waters have high biodiversity and endemism, and are home to large areas of coral reef, including the Great Barrier Reef, the largest coral reef system in the world. Ocean acidification threatens calcifying marine organisms by hindering calcification rates, threatening the structural integrity of coral reefs and other ecosystems. Tracking the progression of OA in different coastal regions requires accurate knowledge of the variability in TA. Thus, estimation methods that can capture this variability at synoptic scales are needed. Multiple linear regression is a promising approach in this regard. Here, we compare a range of both simple and multiple linear regression models to the estimation of coastal TA from a range of variables, including salinity, temperature, chlorophyll-a concentration and nitrate concentration. We find that regionally parameterised models capture local variability better than more general coastal or open ocean parameterised models. The strongest contribution to model improvement came through incorporating temperature as an input variable as well as salinity. Further improvements were achieved through the incorporation of either nitrate or chlorophyll-a, with the combination of temperature, salinity, and nitrate constituting the minimum model in most cases. These results provide an approach that can be applied to satellite Earth observation and autonomous in situ platforms to improve synoptic scale estimation of TA in coastal waters.

  13. Climate-driven Shifting in Distribution Patterns of Calanus sinicus Brodsky in the Continental Shelf Waters of the Northwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q.; Liu, H.; Yan, Q. L.; Fan, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Large-scale variations in zooplankton dynamics, including the poleward movements and earlier timing of life cycle events, have been widely observed over recent decades. The biogeographical shifts are often related to the increasing sea surface temperature or the long-term climatological change, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the El Niño Southern Oscillation (NESO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The Copepod Calanus sinicus Brodsky plays an important trophic role in the continental shelf waters of the Northwest Pacific Ocean as a grazer of phytoplankton and main food source for many ecologically and commercially important fish, such as sardine and anchovy. Because of its importance in marine ecosystem dynamics, C. sinicus was selected as one of the "keystone species" in the China-GLOBEC program. In this study, we examined the shifts in spatial patterns of the species within its distribution domain - the Yellow Sea and the northern East China Sea in the 1950s, 1980s and 2010s. We used contour mapping and a mathematical model to locate the geographical distribution center of the species. We found a significant relationship (r=0.594, P<0.05) between the monthly PDO index and the latitudes of the distribution center of C. sinicus, and a lag of two months for copepods to respond the PDO index. Our findings imply a northward shifting in the distribution center, and the northern Yellow Sea is becoming a new distribution center as another possible over-summering site of C. sinicus.

  14. Subduction of hydrated basalt of the oceanic crust: Implications for recycling of water into the upper mantle and continental growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Subduction zones are presently the dominant sites on Earth for recycling and mass transfer between the crust and mantle; they feed hydrated basaltic oceanic crust into the upper mantle, where dehydration reactions release aqueous fluids and/or hydrous melts. The loci for fluid and/or melt generation will be determined by the intersection of dehydration reaction boundaries of primary hydrous minerals within the subducted lithosphere with slab geotherms. For metabasalt of the oceanic crust, amphibole is the dominant hydrous mineral. The dehydration melting solidus, vapor-absent melting phase relationships; and amphibole-out phase boundary for a number of natural metabasalts have been determined experimentally, and the pressure-temperature conditions of each of these appear to be dependent on bulk composition. Whether or not the dehydration of amphibole is a fluid-generating or partial melting reaction depends on a number of factors specific to a given subduction zone, such as age and thickness of the subducting oceanic lithosphere, the rate of convergence, and the maturity of the subduction zone. In general, subduction of young, hot oceanic lithosphere will result in partial melting of metabasalt of the oceanic crust within the garnet stability field; these melts are characteristically high-Al2O3 trondhjemites, tonalites and dacites. The presence of residual garnet during partial melting imparts a distinctive trace element signature (e.g., high La/Yb, high Sr/Y and Cr/Y combined with low Cr and Y contents relative to demonstrably mantle-derived arc magmas). Water in eclogitized, subducted basalt of the oceanic crust is therefore strongly partitioned into melts generated below about 3.5 GPa in 'hot' subduction zones. Although phase equilibria experiments relevant to 'cold' subduction of hydrated natural basalts are underway in a number of high-pressure laboratories, little is known with respect to the stability of more exotic hydrous minerals (e.g., ellenbergite) and

  15. The outer solar system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encrenaz T.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The outer solar system extends beyond a heliocentric distance of 5 AU. It contains the giant planets and their systems (rings and satellites, the Kuiper belt, the comets (except those which approach episodically the inner solar system and, at its outer edge, the Oort cloud. The outer solar system physically corresponds to the region located outside the « snow line » which corresponded to the distance of ice condensation in the protodolar disk, and thus made the frontier between the terrestrial and the giant planets at the time of the planets’ formation. The outer solar system is charaterized by a very large variety of ob jects, even within a given class of ob jects. Each of the giant planet has its own properties, as well as each of the outer satellites and the ring systems ; all are the products of specific conditions which determined their formation and evolution processes. The existence of the Kuiper belt, suspected on theoretical bases since the 1940s, has been confirmed since 1992 with the observation of over 1200 trans-neptunian ob jects. Thanks to the the developments of more and more performing groundbased instrumentation and the use of large telescopes, these ob jects are now studies in a statistical way, both dynamically and physically, and these studies are precious for constraining the early formation models of the solar system.

  16. Freshly brewed continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Caddick, M. J.; Madrigal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's crust is the life-sustaining interface between our planet's deep interior and surface. Basaltic crusts similar to Earth's oceanic crust characterize terrestrial planets in the solar system while the continental masses, areas of buoyant, thick silicic crust, are a unique characteristic of Earth. Therefore, understanding the processes responsible for the formation of continents is fundamental to reconstructing the evolution of our planet. We use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American Land Bridge (Costa Rica and Panama) over the last 70 Ma. We also include new preliminary data from a key turning point (~12-6 Ma) from the evolution from an oceanic arc depleted in incompatible elements to a juvenile continental mass in order to evaluate current models of continental crust formation. We also discovered that seismic P-waves (body waves) travel through the crust at velocities closer to the ones observed in continental crust worldwide. Based on global statistical analyses of all magmas produced today in oceanic arcs compared to the global average composition of continental crust we developed a continental index. Our goal was to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust. We suggest that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone, a process probably more common in the Achaean where most continental landmasses formed, can produce the starting material necessary for juvenile continental crust formation.

  17. different outer cone angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyk Emil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the method of flow separation control is application of axisymmetric valve. It is composed of nozzle with core. Normally the main flow is attached to inner cone and flow by preferential collector to primary flow pipe. If through control nozzle starts flow jet (control jet the main flow is switched to annular secondary collector. In both situation the main flow is deflected to inner or outer cone (placed at the outlet of the valve’s nozzle by Coanda effect. The paper deals with the numerical simulation of this axisymetric annular nozzle with integrated synthetic jet actuator. The aim of the work is influence examination of outer cone angle on deflection on main stream.

  18. Identifying the "Foot of the Continental Slope" of high-latitude continental margins influenced by trough mouth fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverre Laberg, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The continental slope of high-latitude margins often include trough mouth fans, which are sediment fans situated in front of large troughs crossing the continental shelf. The troughs acted as corridors for paleo-ice streams, sectors of fast-flowing ice within the large ice sheets of the last glacial maximum as well as previous glacials. The paleo-ice streams were highly efficient erosional agents, eroding and transporting large volumes of sediments to the continental shelf edge. Here, these sediments were released to move downslope as large debris flows, the "building blocks" of these fans. Due to the very large sediment volume included within these fans, they represent prominent depocenters forming low-gradient sectors (axial gradient often being as low as 1 degree or less) with no clear morphological distinction of the continental slope including its lower limit. Under the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, the criteria provided in Article 76 includes the lower limit or "foot" of the continental slope as one important parameter in the extended Continental Shelf delineation (i.e. beyond the 200 M exclusive economic zone). Because of this, the Norwegian submission regarding the outer limits of the continental shelf in the Norwegian Sea and the Arctic Ocean argued that the origin of the sub-sea floor sediments on the slope needed to be considered when identifying the location of the foot of the continental slope. This was done by mapping the outer limits of the large debris flow deposits of the trough mouth fans, deposits that without doubt have their origin from the continental shelf. Thus, in these cases, the foot of the continental slope coincide with the downslope termination of the large debris flow deposits and the outer limit of the continental shelf lies 60 M beyond this point. The data used for mapping includes swath bathymetry, sub-bottom profiles and short sediment samples (< 10 m), and we present and discuss examples from the Bear Island Trough Mouth

  19. Intra-annual variability of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in suspended organic matter in waters of the western continental shelf of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Maya

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Intra-annual variations of δ13C and δ15N of water-column suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM have been investigated to understand the biogeochemical cycling of C and N in the Western Continental Shelf of India (WCSI. The key issues being addressed are: how the δ15N of SPOM is affected by seasonally varying processes of organic matter production and respiration and how it relates to the δ15N of sedimentary organic matter that appears to show a decreasing trend despite an apparent intensification of seasonal oxygen deficiency over the past few decades? A secondary objective was to evaluate the sources of organic carbon. Elemental carbon and nitrogen concentrations, C/N ratios in SPOM, along with ancillary chemical and biological variables including phytoplankton pigment abundance were also determined on a seasonal basis (from March 2007 to September 2008, with the partial exception of the southwest (SW monsoon period. The results reveal significant shifts in isotopic signatures, especially δ15N, of SPOM before and after the onset of SW monsoon. Very low δ15N values, reaching a minimum of −4.17 ‰, are found during the pre-monsoon period. Our results provide the first direct evidence for the addition of substantial amounts of isotopically light nitrogen by the diazotrophs, especially Trichodesmium, in the region. The δ15N of SPOM is generally lower than the mean value (7.38 ‰ for surficial sediments, presumably because of diagenetic enrichment. The results support the view that sedimentary δ15N may not necessarily reflect denitrification intensity in the overlying waters due to diverse sources of nitrogen and variability of its isotopic composition. The observed intra-annual variability of δ13C of SPOM during the pre-monsoon and post-monsoon periods is generally small. Phytoplankton production and probably species

  20. Dynamics of tidal and non-tidal currents along the southwest continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aruna, C.; Ravichandran, C.; Srinivas, K.; Rasheed, P.A.A; Lekshmi, S.

    The tidal regimes over the continental shelves are often less documented due to lack of coastal water level data. This is of concern since continental shelves rule the global dissipation of tidal energy. The tides along the Southwest Indian shelf...

  1. Aplicação do diagrama T-S estatístico: volumétrico à análise das massas de água da plataforma continental do Rio Grande do Sul The statistical volumetric T-S diagram applied to the analysis of water masses of Rio Grande do Sul continental shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Bruner de Miranda

    1979-06-01

    Full Text Available The general characteristics of the seasonal variation of the thermohaline properties of the continental shelf water off Rio Grande do Sul, under non-conservative and quasi-synoptic conditions were analysed. The method applied - volumetric statistical T-S analysis allows the computation of the water masses budget from the knowledge of their temperature and salinity ranges. The data of 194 hydrographic stations from six oceanographic cruises between April 1968 and March 1969, were used. Water of Tropical and Subtropical origin (47,5% and 64% of the total volume during the winter and summer, respectively was always present during the observation period. Subantarctic water has its maximum and minimum influences during the winter (15% and summer (<3%, respectively. The average minimum and maximum temperature and salinity values of the water masses in the investigated region were observed in June (16,85ºC and 34,72‰, December (35,58‰ and March (20,82ºC.

  2. Saturn's outer satellite - Phoebe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Voyager 2 took these images of Saturn's outer satellite Phoebe, on Sept. 4, 1981, from 2.2 million kilometers (1.36 million miles)away. This pair shows two different hemispheres of the satellite. The left image shows a bright mountain on the upper right edge reflecting the light of the setting sun. This mountain is possibly the central peak of a large impact crater taking up most of the upper right quadrant of Phoebe in this view. The right images shows a hemisphere with an intrinsically bright spot in the top portion of the image as well as the ridges appearing bright in the sunset light of the lower right. These images were processed by the Multimission Image Processing Laboratory of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  3. Spatial and tidal variation in food supply to shallow cold-water coral reefs of the Mingulay Reef complex (Outer Hebrides, Scotland)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duineveld, G.C.A.; Jeffreys, R.M.; Lavaleye, M.S.S.; Davies, A.J.; Bergman, M.J.N.; Watmough, T.; Witbaard, R.

    2012-01-01

    The finding of a previously undescribed cold-water coral reef (Banana Reef) in the Scottish Mingulay reef complex, with denser coverage of living Lophelia pertusa than the principal Mingulay 1 Reef, was the incentive for a comparative study of the food supply to the 2 reefs. Suspended particulate

  4. Topographic features over the continental shelf off Visakhapatnam

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, T.C.S.; Machado, T.; Murthy, K.S.R.

    water depth and the continental shelfedge several interesting topographic features such as Terraces, Karstic structures associated with pinnacles and troughs and smooth dome shaped reef structures are recorded. The nature of these features...

  5. Manganese, Iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cyclin...

  6. Distribuição das espécies de corais azooxantelados na plataforma e talude continental superior do sul do Brasil Distribution of deep-sea azooxanthellate scleractinians from southern Brazilian waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo V. Kitahara

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Dentre os organismos registrados para águas profundas (> 100 m no sul do Brasil, podemos destacar os corais azooxantelados pertencentes a ordem Scleractinia. Através de análises estatísticas, identificação de espécimes depositados em coleções científicas, e compilação de todos os registros pretéritos destes cnidarios ocorrentes no sul e parte do sudeste do Brasil, foi possível constatar que as coordenadas abrangidas no presente estudo representam uma área de transição entre os corais azooxantelados ocorrentes ao norte e as espécies mais características das zonas polares, principalmente em relação às espécies solitárias. Com a análise da distribuição batimétrica, foi observado um significativo aumento no número de espécies entre o setor de plataforma externa e 500 m de profundidade. Finalizando, foi realizada a análise de agrupamento, o que permitiu discriminar a formação de 6 biótopos das associações de corais azooxantelados para a área de estudo. Desta forma, apresentamos a primeira tentativa de se compreender a distribuição desta pouco conhecida fauna da plataforma e talude continental superior, entre 24ºS e 34ºS.Amongst organisms reported in deep waters (> 100 m from southern Brazil, the azooxanthellate scleractinians are of particular importance due to their capacity to form habitats which attract many species of invertebrates and vertebrates. Through statistical analysis of distribution, identification of specimens deposited in scientific collections, and revision of all preterite records of azooxanthellate scleractinians from southern and part of southeastern coast of Brazil, was noted that the coordinates covered by the present study represent an transitional distributional area between the Caribbean and marginal Antarctic fauna, especially for the solitary species. From a vertical distribution analysis, an increase in the number of species in the sector between the external continental shelve and

  7. Saturn's outer satellite, Phoebe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Voyager 2 took this photo of Saturn's outer satellite, Phoebe, on Sept. 4, 1981, from 2.2 million kilometers (1.36 million miles) away. The photo shows that Phoebe is about 200 kilometers (120 miles) in diameter, about twice the size of Earth-based measurements; and dark, with five percent reflectivity -- much darker than any other Saturnian satellite. That, and information from Earth-based observations, indicates Phoebe is almost certainly a captured asteroid, and did not form in the original Saturn nebula as Saturn's other satellites did. Phoebe is the only Saturnian satellite that does not always show the same face to Saturn: Its orbital period is 550 days. Its rotation period (length of day), determined from Voyager 2 observations, is nine to ten hours. Other ground-based observations that indicate that Phoebe is a captured asteroid: It orbits Saturn in the ecliptic plane (the plane in which Earth and most other planets orbit the Sun), rather than in Saturn's equatorial plane as the other Saturn satellites do. And Phoebe's orbit is retrograde -- in the direction opposite to that of the other satellites. Voyager is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  8. 76 FR 51391 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Characterization Activities on the Atlantic Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... Characterization Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts... wind energy developers, and the public in the Department of the Interior's (DOI) ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy initiative. The purpose of the ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy initiative is to...

  9. 76 FR 40925 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Characterization Activities on the Atlantic Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ... Characterization Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland... online at: http://www.boemre.gov/offshore/RenewableEnergy/SmartFromTheStart.htm . Authority: This Notice... November 23, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced the ``Smart from the Start'' renewable...

  10. Effects of bottom water dissolved oxygen variability on copper and lead fractionation in the sediments across the oxygen minimum zone, western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Chakraborty, S.; Jayachandran, S.; Madan, R.; Sarkar, Arindam; Linsy, P.; Nath, B.N.

    .e., stability increased) with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentrations of the bottom water. Decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration increased Cu association with sedimentary organic matter. However, Pb association with Fe/Mn-oxyhydroxide phases...

  11. Megaflutes in a continental shelf setting, Placentia Bay, Newfoundland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, John; Puig, Pere; Han, Guoqi

    2013-05-01

    Megaflutes - erosional scours normally found in deep water on continental slopes - were identified in 1978 on sidescan sonograms and seismic reflection profiles from Placentia Bay on the south coast of Newfoundland, Canada. Data from recent extensive multibeam sonar surveys provide an opportunity to describe the morphology and distribution of the megaflutes in detail, and to consider the formative processes. They occur on the east side of the outer bay, at a depth of ~ 200 m, in a 2-3 km-wide swath that continues to the south into Halibut Channel, over a total distance of ~ 100 km. The megaflutes have been formed by removal of a layer of postglacial mud, exposing underlying glaciomarine sediments and releasing a volume of 4.5 km3. They occur in a range of forms, including single, multiple, and coalescent types, and in some areas at least their inception was related to pre-existing pockmarks. Radiocarbon dates from piston cores are used to demonstrate that megaflute formation post-dated ca. 9 ka. Megaflute formation in Placentia Bay has been attributed to a 'reverse flow' from the tsunami generated by the 1929 Grand Banks earthquake, and this is still the accepted hypothesis. We argue that the return flow from a tsunami did not generate the megaflutes, and suggest instead that they could be formed during south-flowing density currents generated when volumes of cold saline water stored in the deep (> 250 m) basins at the head of Placentia Bay are intermittently displaced and spilled south in a shallow channel at the east side of the bay after intense coastal surface dense water formation events, perhaps during very cold winters.

  12. Late Quaternary Halimeda bioherms and aragonitic faecal pellet-dominated sediments on the carbonate platform of the western continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Veerayya, M.; Nair, R.R.; Dupeuble, P.A.; Lamboy, M.

    The Fifty Fathom Flat is a drowned carbonate platform located on the outer continental shelf of western India. It unique because the carbonate depositional environment prevailed until Early Holocene in spite of its proximity to major siliciclastic...

  13. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  14. A continental-scale hydrology and water quality model for Europe: Calibration and uncertainty of a high-resolution large-scale SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspour, K. C.; Rouholahnejad, E.; Vaghefi, S.; Srinivasan, R.; Yang, H.; Kløve, B.

    2015-05-01

    A combination of driving forces are increasing pressure on local, national, and regional water supplies needed for irrigation, energy production, industrial uses, domestic purposes, and the environment. In many parts of Europe groundwater quantity, and in particular quality, have come under sever degradation and water levels have decreased resulting in negative environmental impacts. Rapid improvements in the economy of the eastern European block of countries and uncertainties with regard to freshwater availability create challenges for water managers. At the same time, climate change adds a new level of uncertainty with regard to freshwater supplies. In this research we build and calibrate an integrated hydrological model of Europe using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) program. Different components of water resources are simulated and crop yield and water quality are considered at the Hydrological Response Unit (HRU) level. The water resources are quantified at subbasin level with monthly time intervals. Leaching of nitrate into groundwater is also simulated at a finer spatial level (HRU). The use of large-scale, high-resolution water resources models enables consistent and comprehensive examination of integrated system behavior through physically-based, data-driven simulation. In this article we discuss issues with data availability, calibration of large-scale distributed models, and outline procedures for model calibration and uncertainty analysis. The calibrated model and results provide information support to the European Water Framework Directive and lay the basis for further assessment of the impact of climate change on water availability and quality. The approach and methods developed are general and can be applied to any large region around the world.

  15. Ocean processes at the Antarctic continental slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Karen J; Schmidtko, Sunke; Heuzé, Céline; Kaiser, Jan; Jickells, Timothy D; Queste, Bastien Y; Stevens, David P; Wadley, Martin; Thompson, Andrew F; Fielding, Sophie; Guihen, Damien; Creed, Elizabeth; Ridley, Jeff K; Smith, Walker

    2014-07-13

    The Antarctic continental shelves and slopes occupy relatively small areas, but, nevertheless, are important for global climate, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. Processes of water mass transformation through sea ice formation/melting and ocean-atmosphere interaction are key to the formation of deep and bottom waters as well as determining the heat flux beneath ice shelves. Climate models, however, struggle to capture these physical processes and are unable to reproduce water mass properties of the region. Dynamics at the continental slope are key for correctly modelling climate, yet their small spatial scale presents challenges both for ocean modelling and for observational studies. Cross-slope exchange processes are also vital for the flux of nutrients such as iron from the continental shelf into the mixed layer of the Southern Ocean. An iron-cycling model embedded in an eddy-permitting ocean model reveals the importance of sedimentary iron in fertilizing parts of the Southern Ocean. Ocean gliders play a key role in improving our ability to observe and understand these small-scale processes at the continental shelf break. The Gliders: Excellent New Tools for Observing the Ocean (GENTOO) project deployed three Seagliders for up to two months in early 2012 to sample the water to the east of the Antarctic Peninsula in unprecedented temporal and spatial detail. The glider data resolve small-scale exchange processes across the shelf-break front (the Antarctic Slope Front) and the front's biogeochemical signature. GENTOO demonstrated the capability of ocean gliders to play a key role in a future multi-disciplinary Southern Ocean observing system.

  16. Arctic Ocean outflow and glacier-ocean interactions modify water over the Wandel Sea shelf (northeastern Greenland)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dmitrenko, Igor A.; Kirillov, Sergey A.; Rudels, Bert

    2017-01-01

    interacted with the warm Atlantic water outflow through the Fram Strait, recorded below 140 m. Over the outer shelf, the halocline shows numerous cold density-compensated intrusions indicating lateral interaction with an ambient polar water mass across the continental slope. At the front of the tidewater...... glacier outlet, colder and turbid water intrusions were observed at the base of the halocline. On the temperature-salinity plots these stations indicate a mixing line that is different from the ambient water and seems to be conditioned by the ocean-glacier interaction. Our observations of Pacific water...

  17. Sonograph patterns of the central western continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.

    knolls. A transition zone with tonal variations is present between 40 and 60 m water depth. Ground-truth data sediment and rock distribution maps indicate depositional (inner shelf), nondepositional or erosional (outer shelf) environments and a...

  18. Mixing on a Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernys, Michael; Dhanak, Manhar

    2000-11-01

    Small scale turbulence measurements over a warm continental shelf during the passage of a cold front over the Eastern Florida coast are described. Over a 22 hour period microstructure velocity shear, conductivity, and temperature, together with background current profiles and CTD were measured using an autonomous underwater vehicle. The aim was to investigate the impact of the front on mixing in the shallow water column. Periodic CTD casts were taken from the boat and surface currents were measured from a shore fixed surface current radar system. The AUV surveyed the water column at 10m depth. A cold front appraoched the region 4/18/2000 with wind speeds of 3-6 m/s, originating from a westerly direction the ambient air temperature being 27^0C. Dissipation rates, O(10-6 W/kg) were measured, with good agreement of the shear spectra with the Nasmyth spectra. As the front progressed, the winds switched to a northerly direction and the air temperature dropped to 22^0C, lower dissipation rates, O(2 × 10-7 W/kg) were observed. The associated mixing rates and values of the flow Richardson number will be described.

  19. Microclimate, Water Potential, Transpiration, and Bole Dielectric Constant of Coniferous and Deciduous Tree Species in the Continental Boreal Ecotone of Central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, R.; McDonald, K.; Way, J.; Oren, R.

    1994-01-01

    Tree canopy microclimate, xylem water flux and xylem dielectric constant have been monitored in situ since June 1993 in two adjacent natural forest stands in central Alaska. The deciduous stand represents a mature balsam poplar site on the Tanana River floodplain, while the coniferous stand consists of mature white spruce with some black spruce mixed in. During solstice in June and later in summer, diurnal changes of xylem water potential were measured to investigate the occurrence and magnitude of tree transpiration and dielectric constant changes in stems.

  20. The cold-water coral community as a hot spot of carbon cycling on continental margins: a food-web analysis from Rockall Bank (northeast Atlantic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oevelen, D.J.; Duineveld, G.; Lavaleye, M.; Mienis, F.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a quantitative food-web analysis of the cold-water coral community, i.e., the assembly of living corals, dead coral branches and sediment beneath, associated with the reef-building Lophelia pertusa on the giant carbonate mounds at ~800-m depth at Rockall Bank. Carbon flows, 140 flows

  1. The continental lithosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina

    2009-01-01

    of the Royal Society of London. Series A, 360, 2475–2491.; Shapiro N.M., Ritzwoller M.H. 2002. Monte-Carlo inversion for a global shear velocity model of the crust and upper mantle. Geophysical Journal International 151, 1–18.] and lithospheric temperatures [Artemieva I.M., Mooney W.D., 2001. Thermal structure......The goal of the present study is to extract non-thermal signal from seismic tomography models in order to distinguish compositional variations in the continental lithosphere and to examine if geochemical and petrologic constraints on global-scale compositional variations in the mantle...... are consistent with modern geophysical data. In the lithospheric mantle of the continents, seismic velocity variations of a non-thermal origin (calculated from global Vs seismic tomography data [Grand S.P., 2002. Mantle shear-wave tomography and the fate of subducted slabs. Philosophical Transactions...

  2. Development of a Demand Sensitive Drought Index and Its Forecasting for Climate Adaptation and Water Management over the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, E.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Devineni, N.

    2014-12-01

    Drought has cascading effects on the environment, economy and society. Seasonal water deficits resulting from natural variability in rainfall coupled with increased demands have severe implications for the adequacy of water storage in both surface and groundwater stores. Managers need better estimates of potential shortfalls in supply due to droughts of varying severity and duration. While global and national drought indicators exist, none directly connect existing or projected water demand to the potential deficit during the drought. They are essentially supply based. However, the temporal patterns of both demand and supply ultimately determine the stress or impact. Consequently, assessment of risk for various sectorial operations could be much better informed if appropriate stress indices were developed for drought conditions relative to current and projected demands, and their likelihood assessed for future climate scenarios. The present research addresses this methodological gap by (1) developing new drought indices that consider both water supply and current or projected sectorial demands, and (2) developing insights into the large-scale climatic drivers for forecasting drought onset, duration and severity up to one season ahead for climate informed adaptive risk assessment and long-term planning. We present an application at a county level for the conterminous United States considering more than 60 years of rainfall data as the renewable supply, and water demand patterns for 3 sectors (agricultural, industrial, and domestic use). The demand data are available at the county level. Consequently, we use the county rather than river basins as the unit of analysis. The county is also a spatial resolution consistent with political decision making. The index is useful for indicating whether small or large surface storage will suffice, or whether the extent of groundwater storage or external transfers, or changes in demand are needed to achieve a sustainable solution.

  3. The CMS Outer Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhandari, Virender; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Deshpande, Pandurang Vishnu; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguli, Som N; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Krishnaswamy, Marthi Ramaswamy; Kumar, Arun; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Narasimham, Vemuri Syamala; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L V; Satyanarayana, B; Sharma, Seema; Singh, B; Singh, Jas Bir; Sudhakar, Katta; Tonwar, Suresh C; Verma, Piyush

    2006-01-01

    The CMS hadron calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter with brass absorber and plastic scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fibres for carrying the light to the readout device. The barrel hadron calorimeter is complemented with a outer calorimeter to ensure high energy shower containment in CMS and thus working as a tail catcher. Fabrication, testing and calibrations of the outer hadron calorimeter are carried out keeping in mind its importance in the energy measurement of jets in view of linearity and resolution. It will provide a net improvement in missing $\\et$ measurements at LHC energies. The outer hadron calorimeter has a very good signal to background ratio even for a minimum ionising particle and can hence be used in coincidence with the Resistive Plate Chambers of the CMS detector for the muon trigger.

  4. High-grade iron ore deposits of the Mesabi Range, Minnesota-product of a continental-scale proterozoic ground-water flow system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, G.B.

    1999-01-01

    The Mesabi Range along the north edge of the Paleoproterozoic Penokean orogen in northern Minnesota has produced 3.6 billion metric tons of ore since its discovery in 1890. Of that amount, 2.3 billion metric tons were extracted from hematite- or geothite-rich deposits generally referred to as 'high-grade' ores. The high-grade ores formed as the Biwabik Iron-Formation was oxidized, hydrated, and leached by solutions flowing along open faults and fractures. The source of the ore-forming solutions has been debated since it was first proposed that the ores were weathering products formed by descending meteoritic ground-water flowing in late Mesozoic time. Subsequently others believed that the ores were better explained by ascending solutions, possbily hydrothermal solutions of pre-Phanerzoic age. Neither Wolff nor Gruner could reconcile their observations with a reasonable source for the solutions. In this paper, I build on modern mapping of the Mesabi Range and mine-specific geologic observations summarized in the literature to propose a conceptual model in which the high-grade ores formed from ascending solutions that were part of continent-scale topographic or gravity-driven ground-water system. I propose that the ground-water system was active during the later stages of the development of a coupled fold and thrust belt and foreland basin that formed during the Penokean orogen.

  5. Transform continental margins - part 1: Concepts and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    This paper reviews the geodynamic concepts and models related to transform continental margins, and their implications on the structure of these margins. Simple kinematic models of transform faulting associated with continental rifting and oceanic accretion allow to define three successive stages of evolution, including intra-continental transform faulting, active transform margin, and passive transform margin. Each part of the transform margin experiences these three stages, but the evolution is diachronous along the margin. Both the duration of each stage and the cumulated strike-slip deformation increase from one extremity of the margin (inner corner) to the other (outer corner). Initiation of transform faulting is related to the obliquity between the trend of the lithospheric deformed zone and the relative displacement of the lithospheric plates involved in divergence. In this oblique setting, alternating transform and divergent plate boundaries correspond to spatial partitioning of the deformation. Both obliquity and the timing of partitioning influence the shape of transform margins. Oblique margin can be defined when oblique rifting is followed by oblique oceanic accretion. In this case, no transform margin should exist in the prolongation of the oceanic fracture zones. Vertical displacements along transform margins were mainly studied to explain the formation of marginal ridges. Numerous models were proposed, one of the most used is being based on thermal exchanges between the oceanic and the continental lithospheres across the transform fault. But this model is compatible neither with numerical computation including flexural behavior of the lithosphere nor with timing of vertical displacements and the lack of heating related to the passing of the oceanic accretion axis as recorded by the Côte d'Ivoire-Ghana marginal ridge. Enhanced models are still needed. They should better take into account the erosion on the continental slope, and the level of coupling

  6. Comprehensive lake dynamics mapping at continental scales using Landsat 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inland lakes, important water resources, play a crucial role in the global water cycle and are sensitive to global warming and human activities. There clearly is a pressing need to understand temporal and spatial variations of lakes at global and continental scales. The recent operation of Landsat...

  7. The CMS tracker outer barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Final preparations are made to the CMS tracker outer barrel (TOB), ready for insertion in the tracker support tube. The TOB consists of 688 rods containing a total of 5208 silicon detector modules. The silicon tracker will measure the paths of particles produced in the proton-proton collisions at the CMS detector as they travel in the detector's magnetic field.

  8. Getting Sloshed in Outer Space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Getting Sloshed in Outer Space - Liquid Behavior in Microgravity. N Ananthkrishnan. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 40-45. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Methane fates in the benthos and water column at cold seep sites along the continental margin of Central and North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, Roberta L.; Thurber, Andrew R.; Levin, Lisa A.; Aluwihare, Lihini I.

    2017-02-01

    The potential influence of methane seeps on carbon cycling is a key question for global assessments, but the study of carbon cycling in surface sediments and the water column of cold seep environments is complicated by the high temporal and spatial variability of fluid and gas fluxes at these sites. In this study we directly examined carbon sources supporting benthic and planktonic food webs at venting methane seeps using isotopic and molecular approaches that integrate this variability. At four seep environments located along North and Central America, microorganisms from two size fractions were collected over several days from 2800 to 9050 l of seawater to provide a time-integrated measure of key microbial groups and the carbon sources supporting the overall planktonic microbial community. In addition to water column measurements, the extent of seafloor methane release was estimated at two of the sites by examining the stable carbon isotopic signature (δ13C) of benthic metazoan infauna. This signature reveals carbon sources fueling the base of the food chain and thus provides a metric that represents a time-integrated view of the dominant microbial processes within the sediment. The stable carbon isotopic composition of microbial DNA (δ13C-DNA), which had values between -17.0 and -19.5‰, indicated that bulk planktonic microbial production was not ultimately linked to methane or other 13C-depleted seep-derived carbon sources. Instead these data support the importance of organic carbon derived from either photo- or chemoautotrophic CO2 fixation to the planktonic food web. Results of qPCR of microbial DNA sequences coding for a subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase gene (pmoA) showed that only a small percentage of the planktonic microbial community were potential methane oxidizers possessing pmoA (planktonic microbial community.

  10. Effects of cold-water corals on fish diversity and density (European continental margin: Arctic, NE Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea): Data from three baited lander systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linley, T. D.; Lavaleye, M.; Maiorano, P.; Bergman, M.; Capezzuto, F.; Cousins, N. J.; D'Onghia, G.; Duineveld, G.; Shields, M. A.; Sion, L.; Tursi, A.; Priede, I. G.

    2017-11-01

    Autonomous photographic landers are a low-impact survey method for the assessment of mobile fauna in situations where methods such as trawling are not feasible or ethical. Three institutions collaborated through the CoralFISH project, each using differing lander systems, to assess the effects of cold-water corals on fish diversity and density. The Biogenic Reef Ichthyofauna Lander (BRIL, Oceanlab), Autonomous Lander for Biological Experiments (ALBEX, NIOZ) and the Marine Environment MOnitoring system (MEMO, CoNISMa) were deployed in four CoralFISH European study regions covering the Arctic, NE Atlantic and Mediterranean, namely Northern Norway (275-310 m depth), Belgica Mound Province (686-1025 m depth), the Bay of Biscay (623-936 m depth), and Santa Maria di Leuca (547-670 m depth). A total of 33 deployments were carried out in the different regions. Both the time of first arrival (Tarr) and the maximum observed number of fish (MaxN) were standardised between the different lander systems and compared between coral and reference stations as indicators of local fish density. Fish reached significantly higher MaxN at the coral stations than at the reference stations. Fish were also found to have significantly lower Tarr in the coral areas in data obtained from the BRIL and MEMO landers. All data indicated that fish abundance is higher within the coral areas. Fish species diversity was higher within the coral areas of Atlantic Ocean while in Northern Norway and Santa Maria di Leuca coral areas, diversity was similar at coral and reference stations but a single dominant species (Brosme brosme and Conger conger respectively) showed much higher density within the coral areas. Indicating that, while cold-water coral reefs have a positive effect on fish diversity and/or abundance, this effect varies across Europe's reefs.

  11. Ocean-Continent Transition Structure of the Pelotas Magma-Rich Continental Margin, South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkin, Caroline; Kusznir, Nick; Roberts, Alan; Manatschal, Gianreto; McDermott, Ken

    2017-04-01

    Rifted continental margins in the southern South Atlantic are magma-rich showing well developed volcanic extrusives known as seaward dipping reflectors (SDRs). Here we examine the magma-rich continental rifted margin of the Pelotas Basin, offshore Brazil. Deep seismic reflection data displays a large package of seaward dipping reflectors with an approximate width of 200 km and a varying thickness of 10 km to 17 km that have previously been interpreted as volcanic SDRs. We examine these SDRs to explore if they are composed predominantly of basaltic or sedimentary-volcaniclastic material. We also study the thickness of the crustal basement beneath the SDRs. Additionally we investigate if these SDRs are underlain by thin 'hyper-extended' continental crust or if they have been deposited on new magmatic basement. The answers to these questions are important in understanding the structure and formation processes of magma-rich continental margins. We use gravity inversion to investigate SDR composition by varying the proportion of basalt to sediments-volcaniclastics (basalt fraction) which determines the SDR densities in the gravity inversion. By matching the Moho depth and two-way travel time from gravity inversion and deep seismic reflection data, we determine the lateral variation in basalt fraction of the SDRs. Our analysis suggests: 1) There is an overall pattern of SDR basalt fraction and bulk density decreasing oceanward. This could be due to increasing sediment content oceanward or it could result from the change in basalt flows to hyaloclastites as water depth increases. 2) The SDR package can be split into two distinct sub packages based on the basalt fraction results, where the proximal side of each package has a higher basalt fraction and density. 3) The inner SDR package contains reflectors that bear a resemblance to the SDRs described by Hinz (1981) corresponding to syn-tectonic volcanic eruptions into an extensional basin, while the outer SDR package has

  12. Studying the impact of overshooting convection on the tropopause tropical layer (TTL) water vapor budget at the continental scale using a mesoscale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Abhinna; Rivière, Emmanuel; Marécal, Virginie; Claud, Chantal; Rysman, Jean-François; Geneviève, Seze

    2016-04-01

    Water vapour budget is a key component in the earth climate system. In the tropical upper troposphere, lower stratosphere (UTLS), it plays a central role both on the radiative and the chemical budget. Its abundance is mostly driven by slow ascent above the net zero radiative heating level followed by ice crystals' formation and sedimentation, so called the cold trap. In contrast to this large scale temperature driven process, overshooting convection penetrating the stratosphere could be one piece of the puzzle. It has been proven to hydrate the lower stratosphere at the local scale. Satellite-borne H2O instruments can not measure with a fine enough resolution the water vapour enhancements caused by overshooting convection. The consequence is that it is difficult to estimate the role of overshooting deep convection at the global scale. Using a mesoscale model i.e., Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (BRAMS), past atmospheric conditions have been simulated for the full wet season i.e., Nov 2012 to Mar 2013 having a single grid with horizontal resolution of 20 km × 20km over a large part of Brazil and South America. This resolution is too coarse to reproduce overshooting convection in the model, so that this simulation should be used as a reference (REF) simulation, without the impact of overshooting convection in the TTL water budget. For initialisation, as well as nudging the grid boundary in every 6 hours, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses has been used. The size distribution of hydrometeors and number of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are fitted in order to best reproduce accumulated precipitations derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Similarly, GOES and MSG IR mages have been thoroughly compared with model's outputs, using image correlation statistics for the position of the clouds. The model H2O variability during the wet season, is compared with the in situ balloon-borne measurements during

  13. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  14. Continental United States Hurricane Strikes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Continental U.S. Hurricane Strikes Poster is our most popular poster which is updated annually. The poster includes all hurricanes that affected the U.S. since...

  15. Landscape modelling at Regional to Continental scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, M. J.

    Most work on simulating landscape evolution has been focused at scales of about 1 Ha, there are still limitations, particularly in understanding the links between hillslope process rates and climate, soils and channel initiation. However, the need for integration with GCM outputs and with Continental Geosystems now imposes an urgent need for scaling up to Regional and Continental scales. This is reinforced by a need to incorporate estimates of soil erosion and desertification rates into national and supra-national policy. Relevant time-scales range from decadal to geological. Approaches at these regional to continental scales are critical to a fuller collaboration between geomorphologists and others interested in Continental Geosystems. Two approaches to the problem of scaling up are presented here for discussion. The first (MEDRUSH) is to embed representative hillslope flow strips into sub-catchments within a larger catchment of up to 5,000 km2. The second is to link one-dimensional models of SVAT type within DEMs at up to global scales (CSEP/SEDWEB). The MEDRUSH model is being developed as part of the EU Desertification Programme (MEDALUS project), primarily for semi-natural vegetation in southern Europe over time spans of up to 100 years. Catchments of up to 2500 km2 are divided into 50-200 sub-catchments on the basis of flow paths derived from DEMs with a horizontal resolution of 50 m or better. Within each sub-catchment a representative flow strip is selected and Hydrology, Sediment Transport and Vegetation change are simulated in detail for the flow strip, using a 1 hour time step. Changes within each flow strip are transferred back to the appropriate sub-catchment and flows of water and sediment are then routed through the channel network, generating changes in flood plain morphology.

  16. 77 FR 74213 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    .... and Central Planning Areas of the Gulf of Mexico. Stone Energy Corporation, South Marsh Island, 9/10... Mexico. Apache Corporation, Structure South Marsh Island, 9/26/2012 Removal, SEA ES/SR 11-159. Block 58... by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management...

  17. 78 FR 12085 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... Marsh 031. Island Addition, Central Planning Area of the Gulf of Mexico, located 50 miles from the..., SEA L12- Marsh Island in the 033. Central Planning Area of the Gulf of Mexico, located 110 miles from... by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management...

  18. 77 FR 9962 - Information Collection; Prospecting for Minerals Other Than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur on the Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Information Collection; Prospecting for Minerals Other Than Oil, Gas... paperwork requirements in the regulations under Prospecting for Minerals Other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur on...: 30 CFR Part 580, Prospecting for Minerals Other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur on the Outer Continental...

  19. Traditional Mapuche ecological knowledge in Patagonia, Argentina: fishes and other living beings inhabiting continental waters, as a reflection of processes of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigo, Juana; Ladio, Ana

    2016-12-07

    Understanding how people interpret environmental change and develop practices in response to such change is essential to comprehend human resource use. In the cosmology of the American indigenous peoples, as among the Mapuche people, freshwater systems are considered a living entity, where animals have an enormous role to play in the universe of meaning. However, human adaptive responses to freshwater system dynamics are scarcely examined. In this work a survey is carried out in three Mapuche communities of Argentine Patagonia to assess their traditional knowledge of the fishes and other non-human living beings that inhabit lakes and rivers. Both material and symbolic aspects are included, as are the differences in knowledge and use of the fishes between past and present times. Our methods were based on a quali-quantitative fieldwork approach. In-depth interviews were carried out with 36 individuals from three rural Mapuche populations in Neuquén province (Patagonia, Argentina). Free listing was used for inquiring about fish knowledge and use. Fishes were identified scientifically and ethnotaxonomically. In-depth analysis of the discourses was conducted, documenting the recognition, perception, and cultural significance of fluvial environments and their inhabitants. Quantitative survey results were analyzed with categorical statistical methods. The body of knowledge of the communities studied reflects the socio-environmental changes experienced by Patagonian freshwater bodies. According to local perception, non-human beings live in these water bodies, guarding the environment, and they should not be disturbed. At present, five different fish species are identified, three of which are exotic, having been introduced at the beginning of the 20th century by the white man. These exotic trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salvelinus fontinalis) are considered ill omens, indicators of the white man's presence, and therefore their appearance presages negative events for the

  20. Viscosity of Earth's Outer Core

    CERN Document Server

    Smylie, D E

    2007-01-01

    A viscosity profile across the entire fluid outer core is found by interpolating between measured boundary values, using a differential form of the Arrhenius law governing pressure and temperature dependence. The discovery that both the retrograde and prograde free core nutations are in free decay (Palmer and Smylie, 2005) allows direct measures of viscosity at the top of the outer core, while the reduction in the rotational splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of the inner core allows it to be measured at the bottom. We find 2,371 plus/minus 1,530 Pa.s at the top and 1.247 plus/minus 0.035 x 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom. Following Brazhkin (1998) and Brazhkin and Lyapin (2000) who get 10^2 Pa.s at the top, 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom, by an Arrhenius extrapolation of laboratory experiments, we use a differential form of the Arrhenius law to interpolate along the melting temperature curve to find a viscosity profile across the outer core. We find the variation to be closely log-linear between the meas...

  1. Density functional theory studies on the solvent effects in Al(H2O)63+water-exchange reactions: the number and arrangement of outer-sphere water molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Jing; Dong, Shaonan; Zhang, Fuping; Wang, Ye; Bi, Shuping

    2018-02-27

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations combined with cluster models are performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level for investigating the solvent effects in Al(H 2 O) 6 3+ water-exchange reactions. A "One-by-one" method is proposed to obtain the most representative number and arrangement of explicit H 2 Os in the second hydration sphere. First, all the possible ways to locate one explicit H 2 O in second sphere (N m ' = 1) based on the gas phase structure (N m ' = 0) are examined, and the optimal pathway (with the lowest energy barrier) for N m ' = 1 is determined. Next, more explicit H 2 Os are added one by one until the inner-sphere is fully hydrogen bonded. Finally, the optimal pathways with N m ' = 0-7 are obtained. The structural and energetic parameters as well as the lifetimes of the transition states are compared with the results obtained with the "Independent-minimum" method and the "Independent-average" method, and all three methods show that the pathway with N m ' = 6 may be representative. Our results give a new idea for finding the representative pathway for water-exchange reactions in other hydrated metal ion systems.

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer...

  3. Suspended particulate layers and internal waves over the southern Monterey Bay continental shelf: an important control on shelf mud belts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriton, Olivia M.; McPhee-Shaw, Erika E.; Shaw, William J.; Stanton, Timothy P.; Bellingham, James G.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2014-01-01

    Physical and optical measurements taken over the mud belt on the southern continental shelf of Monterey Bay, California documented the frequent occurrence of suspended particulate matter features, the majority of which were detached from the seafloor, centered 9–33 m above the bed. In fall 2011, an automated profiling mooring and fixed instrumentation, including a thermistor chain and upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler, were deployed at 70 m depth for 5 weeks, and from 12 to 16 October a long-range autonomous underwater vehicle performed across-shelf transects. Individual SPM events were uncorrelated with local bed shear stress caused by surface waves and bottom currents. Nearly half of all observed SPM layers occurred during 1 week of the study, 9–16 October 2011, and were advected past the fixed profiling mooring by the onshore phase of semidiurnal internal tide bottom currents. At the start of the 9–16 October period, we observed intense near-bed vertical velocities capable of lifting particulates into the middle of the water column. This “updraft” event appears to have been associated with nonlinear adjustment of high-amplitude internal tides over the mid and outer shelf. These findings suggest that nonlinear internal tidal motions can erode material over the outer shelf and that, once suspended, this SPM can then be transported shoreward to the middle and shallow sections of the mud belt. This represents a fundamental broadening of our understanding of how shelf mud belts may be built up and sustained.

  4. Muon track reconstruction in the Outer Detector of Borexino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurm, Michael; Feilitzsch, Franz von; Goeger-Neff, Marianne; Lewke, Timo; Meindl, Quirin; Oberauer, Lothar; Winter, Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Dpt. E15 (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The Borexino Detector is designed for the detection of low-energetic solar neutrinos. Cosmic muons and their spallation products are an important background for these measurements. The Inner Detector of the experiment containing the liquid-scintillator target is surrounded by an additional Water Cherenkov Detector. This Outer Detector can be used to reconstruct the tracks of cosmic muons that are crossing both Inner and Outer Detector. The approach of the reconstruction, estimates of the systematic uncertainties and its impact on data analysis are discussed.

  5. Bioenergetics of Continental Serpentinites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardace, D.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Serpentinization is the aqueous alteration of ultramafic (Fe- and Mg-rich) rocks, resulting in secondary mineral assemblages of serpentine, brucite, iron oxyhydroxides and magnetite, talc, and possibly carbonate and silica-rich veins and other minor phases-all depending on the evolving pressure-temperature-composition of the system. The abiotic evolution of hydrogen and possibly organic compounds via serpentinization (McCollom and Bach, 2009) highlights the relevance of this geologic process to carbon and energy sources for the deep biosphere. Serpentinization may fuel life over long stretches of geologic time, throughout the global seabed and in exposed, faulted peridotite blocks (as at Lost City Hydrothermal Field, Kelley et al., 2005), and in obducted oceanic mantle units in ophiolites (e.g., Tiago et al., 2004). Relatively little work has been published on life in continental serpentinite settings, though they likely host a unique resident microbiota. In this work, we systematically model the serpentinizing fluid as an environmental niche. Reported field data for high and moderate pH serpentinizing fluids were modeled from Cyprus, the Philippines, Oman, Northern California, New Caledonia, Yugoslavia, Portugal, Italy, Newfoundland Canada, New Zealand, and Turkey. Values for Gibbs Energy of reaction (ΔGr), kJ per mole of electrons transferred for a given metabolism, are calculated for each field site. Cases are considered both for (1) modest assumptions of 1 nanomolar hydrogen and 1 micromolar methane, based on unpublished data for a similar northern California field site (Cardace and Hoehler, in prep.) and (2) an upper estimate of 10 nanomolar hydrogen and 500 micromolar methane. We survey the feasibility of microbial metabolisms for key steps in the nitrogen cycle, oxidation of sulfur in pyrite, iron oxidation or reduction reactions, sulfate reduction coupled to hydrogen or methane oxidation, methane oxidation coupled to the reduction of oxygen, and

  6. The CDF Central Outer Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitts, K.T.; CDF Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    We describe the CDF Central Outer Tracker (COT), an open-cell drift chamber currently being constructed for the CDF detector to run at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron collider. This detector will provide central tracking with excellent momentum resolution in the high- density environment of a hadron collider. It will be able to resolve 132 ns beam crossings and provide tracking trigger information to the Level 1 trigger. The design is based upon the existing and successful CDF Central Tracking Chamber. The preliminary mechanical and electrical designs are presented. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Ooid turbidites from the Central Western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.

    Gravity displaced debris flows/turbidites have been observed in five box cores collected between water depths of 649 and 3,627 m from the Central Western continental margin of India. Studies on grain size, carbonate content, and coarse fraction...

  8. Modern sedimentary processes along the Doce river adjacent continental shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria da Silva Quaresma

    Full Text Available In areas of the continental shelf where sediment supply is greater than the sediment dispersion capacity, an extensive terrigenous deposits and consequently submerged deltas can be formed. The Eastern Brazilian shelf is characterized by the occurrence of river feed deltas in between starving coasts. Herein, modern sedimentary processes acting along the Doce river adjacent continental shelf are investigated. The main objective was to understand the shelf sediment distribution, recognizing distinct sedimentary patterns and the major influence of river sediment discharge in the formation of shelf deposits. The study used 98 surficial samples that were analyzed for grain size, composition and bulk density. Results revealed 3 distinct sectors: south - dominated by mud fraction with a recent deposition from riverine input until 30 m deep and from this depth bioclastic sands dominate; central north - sand mud dominated, been recognized as a bypass zone of resuspended sediment during high energy events; and north - relict sands with high carbonate content. The modern sedimentation processes along the Doce river continental shelf is dominated by distinct sedimentary regimes, showing a strong fluvial influence associated with wave/wind induced sediment dispersion and a carbonate regime along the outer shelf. These regimes seem to be controlled by the distance from the river mouth and bathymetric gradients.

  9. Toward a High-Resolution Monitoring of Continental Surface Water Extent and Dynamics, at Global Scale: from GIEMS (Global Inundation Extent from Multi-Satellites) to SWOT (Surface Water Ocean Topography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, Catherine; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Aires, Filipe; Papa, Fabrice

    2016-03-01

    Up to now, high-resolution mapping of surface water extent from satellites has only been available for a few regions, over limited time periods. The extension of the temporal and spatial coverage was difficult, due to the limitation of the remote sensing technique [e.g., the interaction of the radiation with vegetation or cloud for visible observations or the temporal sampling with the synthetic aperture radar (SAR)]. The advantages and the limitations of the various satellite techniques are reviewed. The need to have a global and consistent estimate of the water surfaces over long time periods triggered the development of a multi-satellite methodology to obtain consistent surface water all over the globe, regardless of the environments. The Global Inundation Extent from Multi-satellites (GIEMS) combines the complementary strengths of satellite observations from the visible to the microwave, to produce a low-resolution monthly dataset (0.25^circ × 0.25^circ) of surface water extent and dynamics. Downscaling algorithms are now developed and applied to GIEMS, using high-spatial-resolution information from visible, near-infrared, and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite images, or from digital elevation models. Preliminary products are available down to 500-m spatial resolution. This work bridges the gaps and prepares for the future NASA/CNES Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission to be launched in 2020. SWOT will delineate surface water extent estimates and their water storage with an unprecedented spatial resolution and accuracy, thanks to a SAR in an interferometry mode. When available, the SWOT data will be adopted to downscale GIEMS, to produce a long time series of water surfaces at global scale, consistent with the SWOT observations.

  10. Gravity anomalies over a segment of Pratap ridge and adjoining shelf margin basin, western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, V.; Rao, D.G.; Ramprasad, T.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Rao, M.G.

    Bathymetric and gravity data totalling 2000 line km on the continental margin off Goa and Mulki, west of India have been studied. The free-air gravity anomalies vary between -60 to 25 mgals with prominent NNW-SSE trends in the outer shelf region...

  11. The Myanmar continental shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Rao, P.S.

    stream_size 50292 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Geol_Soc_41_231a.pdf.txt stream_source_info Geol_Soc_41_231a.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Myanmar... belt and high turbid zone extends partly into the Martaban Canyon where strong tidal forces, gravity flows and possibly hyper- pycnal flows assist in transporting sediments directly to the deep Andaman Sea. Water column profiles of suspend sediment...

  12. Heavy minerals from the outer south-west continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gujar, A; Mislankar, P.G.; Wagle, B.G.

    stream_size 8 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Giornale_Geol_52_91.pdf.txt stream_source_info Giornale_Geol_52_91.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  13. 77 FR 5561 - Information Collection Activities: Oil, Gas, and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... life or health.'' The Independent Offices Appropriations Act (31 U.S.C. 9701), the Omnibus... . Performance Standards 109(a); 110 Submit welding, burning, and hot tapping plans 2 118; 121; 124 Apply for... all rigger personnel qualifications for at least 4 years. 109(b); 113(c) Retain welding plan and...

  14. 76 FR 29156 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... Compound Liquids (Adopted 01/18/01). Rule 327 Organic Liquid Cargo Tank Vessel Loading (Adopted 12/16/85... Petroleum Sumps, Pits, and Well Cellars (Adopted 11/10/94). Rule 346 Loading of Organic Liquid Cargo Vessels... (Adopted 09/16/99). Rule 353 Adhesives and Sealants (Adopted 08/19/ 99). Rule 359 Flares and Thermal...

  15. Outer Continental Shelf Submerged Lands Act Boundary - Atlantic Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the Submerged Lands Act (SLA) boundary line (also known as State Seaward Boundary (SSB), or Fed State Boundary) in ESRI shapefile formats for...

  16. 78 FR 42902 - Safety Zone; Olympus Tension Leg Platform, Mississippi Canyon Block 807, Outer Continental Shelf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... the purpose of protecting life, property and the marine environment (33 CFR 147.1). Placing a safety... purpose of the proposed rule is to protect life, property and the marine environment. Shell Exploration... will significantly reduce the threat of allisions, oil spills, and releases of natural gas, and thereby...

  17. 75 FR 3423 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... requirements of Section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (15 U.S.C. 272... not provide EPA with the discretionary authority to address, as appropriate, disproportionate human... direct effect on one or more Indian tribes, on the relationship between the Federal Government and Indian...

  18. 77 FR 4056 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (SC); Announcement of Plenary Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... meeting. SUMMARY: The OCS Scientific Committee will meet at the Sheraton Reston Hotel in Reston, Virginia..., from 8:30 to 5 p.m.; Thursday, February 9, 2012, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. ADDRESSES: Reston Sheraton Hotel... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, 5 U.S.C., Appendix I, and the Office of Management and Budget's Circular A...

  19. 75 FR 51950 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ..., Nitrogen dioxide, Ozone, Particulate matter, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Sulfur oxides. Dated... (Effective 4/2/2010) Section 7.04: U Fossil Fuel Utilization Facilities (Effective 4/2/ 2010) Section 7.05: U...) Section 7.15: U Asbestos (Effective 4/2/2010) Section 7.18: U Volatile and Halogenated Organic Compounds...

  20. 78 FR 27430 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... Corporation Union Oil Company of California Pure Partners, L.P. Group III. Eni Petroleum Co. Inc. Eni Petroleum US LLC Eni Oil US LLC Eni Marketing Inc. Eni BB Petroleum Inc. Eni US Operating Co. Inc. Eni BB...

  1. 76 FR 4129 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... Resources Offshore Inc. The Louisiana Land and Exploration Company. Inexeco Oil Company. Group VI Eni Petroleum Co. Inc. Eni Petroleum US LLC. Eni Oil US LLC. Eni Marketing Inc. Eni BB Petroleum Inc. Eni US Operating Co. Inc. Eni BB Pipeline LLC. Group VII Petrobras America Inc. Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. Group VIII...

  2. 75 FR 24966 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    .... Eni Petroleum Co. Inc., Eni Petroleum US LLC, Eni Oil US LLC, Eni Marketing Inc., Eni BB Petroleum Inc., Eni US Operating Co. Inc., Eni BB Pipeline LLC. Group VII. Petrobras America Inc., Petroleo Brasileiro...

  3. 77 FR 64826 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... Land and Exploration Company Inexeco Oil Company Group VI. Eni Petroleum Co. Inc. Eni Petroleum US LLC Eni Oil US LLC Eni Marketing Inc Eni BB Petroleum Inc. Eni US Operating Co. Inc. Eni BB Pipeline LLC...

  4. 76 FR 67759 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... Eni Petroleum Co. Inc. Eni Petroleum US LLC Eni Oil US LLC Eni Marketing Inc Eni BB Petroleum Inc. Eni US Operating Co. Inc. Eni BB Pipeline LLC Group VII Statoil ASA Statoil Gulf of Mexico LLC Statoil...

  5. 76 FR 28449 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... Company. Group VI. Eni Petroleum Co. Inc., Eni Petroleum US LLC, Eni Oil US LLC, Eni Marketing Inc., Eni BB Petroleum Inc., Eni US Operating Co. Inc., Eni BB Pipeline LLC. Group VII. Petrobras America Inc...

  6. 78 FR 64243 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... Corporation Union Oil Company of California Pure Partners, L.P. Group III Eni Petroleum Co. Inc. Eni Petroleum US LLC Eni Oil US LLC Eni Marketing Inc. Eni BB Petroleum Inc. Eni US Operating Co. Inc. Eni BB...

  7. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities. Pacific update: August 1987 - November 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slitor, Douglas L.; Wiese, Jeffrey D.; Karpas, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    This Pacific Update focuses on the geology and petroleum potential of the Central California and Washington-Oregon OCS Planning Areas. This report discusses the following topics: offshore oil and gas resources of the Pacific region; project-specific developments and status; and magnitude and timing of offshore developments. (CBS)

  8. Regional Patterns in Invertebrate Assemblages on Offshore Oil Platforms Along the Pacific Outer Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, S.; Page, H. M.; Miller, R. J.; Doheny, B.; Dugan, J. E.; Schroeder, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    Twenty-seven oil and gas platforms are arrayed offshore California from north of Point Conception south to San Pedro Bay (a coastline distance of >300 km). To test the hypothesis that variability in the structure of sessile invertebrate communities on the platforms is associated with regional differences in sea surface temperature, we sampled space-holding invertebrate taxa photographically on 23 platforms and compared the composition and cover of invertebrates among and within regions using multivariate analyses. To explore temporal variability in invertebrate assemblages, we also compared the cover and composition of invertebrates on a subset of platforms in the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) where data were collected over ten years previously. The composition of invertebrate assemblages differed significantly among regions, and was driven by variation in the relative abundance of certain anemone, bryozoan, tubiferous annelid, sponge, and bivalve taxa. The presence of non-native bryozoan and anemone taxa on some platforms in the south (San Pedro Bay) and southeast SBC contributed to the distinction of these assemblages from the others. Comparison of survey data on the subset of platforms in the SBC surveyed over ten years apart revealed little change in the cover of major space-holding taxa (e.g., anemones Metridium, Corynactis) across platforms, although there was an increase in cover of the non-native bryozoan Watersipora subtorquata between surveys. The existence of geographical patterns in the composition of platform invertebrate assemblages suggests that these assemblages may be useful as barometers of short and longer-term environmental change. For biogeographic transition zones, such as the SBC, monitoring of platform invertebrate assemblages could permit an evaluation of the concept that these zones are particularly susceptible to shifts in the composition of marine species driven by ocean climate.

  9. 78 FR 64237 - Information Collection: General and Oil and Gas Production Requirements in the Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... time, bottomhole temperature, kelly bushing elevation; and bottomhole pressure points that consist of... royalty interest (Form BOEM-0140, Bottomhole Pressure Survey Report). Specifically, BOEM uses the... burden annual responses hours 1153 Conduct static 14 1,161 surveys.... 16,254 bottomhole pressure survey...

  10. Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams and Lease Maps - Gulf of Mexico Region NAD27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This file is based on the Mapping and Boundary Branch's Official Protraction Diagram (OPD)and Leasing Maps (LM). Each offshore area is defined by an API Number...

  11. 78 FR 45965 - Research Lease on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Virginia, Request for Competitive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... 585.238 for renewable energy research activities, including wind turbine installation and operational... design, develop, and demonstrate a grid-connected 12 megawatt (MW) offshore wind test facility on the OCS...) to acquire an OCS lease for wind energy research activities; (2) solicit indications of interest in a...

  12. Outer Continental Shelf Submerged Lands Act Boundary - Pacific Region - West Coast NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the Submerged Lands Act (SLA)boundary line (also known as the State Seaward Boundary (SSB) and Fed State Boundary) for the BOEM Pacific Region...

  13. 75 FR 3617 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Update To Include New Jersey State Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Pollution by Volatile Organic Compounds (Effective 04/20/09) N.J.A.C. 7:27-16.1. Definitions N.J.A.C. 7:27...:27-22.28A. Emissions trading N.J.A.C. 7:27-22.28B. Facility-specific emissions averaging programs N.J...

  14. 76 FR 20367 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Off Delaware...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the... notice provides BOEMRE's determination that no competitive interest exists in acquiring a commercial wind... 21653). Bluewater Wind Delaware, LLC submitted the only valid expression of commercial interest in...

  15. 76 FR 14681 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Massachusetts...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the...: Request for Interest (RFI) in Commercial Wind Energy Leasing Offshore Massachusetts and Invitation for... Commercial Wind Energy Leasing Offshore Massachusetts and Invitation for Comments from Interested and...

  16. 75 FR 803 - Safety Zone; FRONTIER DISCOVERER, Outer Continental Shelf Drillship, Chukchi and Beaufort Sea...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-06

    ... exploration drilling operation the FRONTIER DISCOVERER will be anchored. The anchoring system utilized will...) Description. The FRONTIER DISCOVERER will be engaged in exploratory drilling operations at various locations... anchored while conducting exploratory drilling operations with the center point of the vessel located at...

  17. 78 FR 14917 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    .../13/00) Rule 74.16 Oil Field Drilling Operations (Adopted 01/08/91) Rule 74.20 Adhesives and Sealants... Operations (Adopted 11/11/03) Rule 74.24.1 Pleasure Craft Coating and Commercial Boatyard Operations (Adopted 01/08/02) Rule 74.26 Crude Oil Storage Tank Degassing Operations (Adopted 11/ 08/94) Rule 74.27...

  18. 75 FR 7515 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Mineral Exploration on the Alaska Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... drilling operations that would be conducted in accordance with the OCS Lands Act Amendments and MMS...-1941 (Flaxman Island block 6610). Drilling operations would be conducted from the drill ship M/V... all operations and removal of the drill ship and support vessels from the area beginning August 25...

  19. 78 FR 36571 - North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... Official Protraction Diagrams in the Pacific Ocean, Hawaiian Islands Description/Date NF04-08 (Kaua'i... with this publication two NAD 83-based OCS Provisional OPDs that represent the Island of Oahu and... Title 43, Code of Federal Regulations, has created provisional versions of the basic record used for the...

  20. Outer Continental Shelf Submerged Lands Act Boundary - Alaska Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the Submerged Lands Act (SLA) boundary (also known as State Seaward Boundary (SSB), or Fed State Boundary) in ESRI shapefile format for the...

  1. 75 FR 55277 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; Consistency Update for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... procedures, Air pollution control, Hydrocarbons, Incorporation by reference, Intergovernmental relations... of PM 10 And Ammonia Emissions From Fluid Catalytic Cracking Units (Adopted 11/07/03) Rule 1106...

  2. 76 FR 37274 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... area, as mandated by section 328(a)(1) of the Clean Air Act (``the Act''). The portion of the OCS air... discussed below is to be incorporated by reference into the Code of Federal Regulations and is listed in the... rules that comply with the statutory requirements of section 328 of the Clean Air Act that are...

  3. 76 FR 7518 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... with the requirements of the corresponding onshore area, as mandated by the Clean Air Act (``the Act... Code of Federal Regulations and is listed in the appendix to the OCS air regulations. DATES: Written... implements requirements specifically and explicitly set forth by the Congress in section 328 of the Clean Air...

  4. 76 FR 1389 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... the Clean Air Act, as amended in 1990 (``the Act''). The portion of the OCS air regulations that is... below are proposed to be incorporated by reference into the Code of Federal Regulations and listed in...: Regulatory Planning and Review Under the Clean Air Act, the Administrator is required to establish...

  5. 76 FR 79206 - Commercial Renewable Energy Transmission on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Mid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ...) transmission line that would collect power generated by wind power generation facilities on the OCS and deliver... System Operator, LLC (NYISO). When the wind power generation facilities are not functioning at full..., New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia. When wind power generation is not functioning at full...

  6. 77 FR 61308 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; Consistency Update for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ..., or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government.'' This... power and responsibilities among the various levels of government, as specified in Executive Order 13132.... Thus, Executive Order 13132 does not apply to this rule. In the spirit of Executive Order 13132, and...

  7. Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams - Pacific Region - West Coast NAD 83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Official Protraction Diagram (OPD) outlines in ESRI Arc/Info export and Arc/View shape file formats for the BOEM Pacific Region. The use of...

  8. 75 FR 61511 - Intent To Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement: Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... OCS Region, homepage; and (3) in the local media. Public hearings will be held following release of.... Cooperating Agencies: The DOI policy is to invite other Federal agencies, and State, Tribal, and local...

  9. 76 FR 43185 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... for sulfur dioxide. 9VAC5-40-290. Standard for hydrogen sulfide. 9VAC5-40-320. Standard for visible... facility. 9VAC5-40-5660. Definitions. 9VAC5-40-5670. Motor vehicles. 9VAC5-40-5680. Other mobile sources. 9VAC5-40-5690. Export/import of motor vehicles. Article 42--Portable Fuel Container Spillage Control...

  10. Outer Continental Shelf Lease Blocks - Gulf of Mexico Region NAD27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains OCS block outlines (clipped) to the GOM Planning Area Boundary in ArcGIS shape file format for the BOEM Gulf of Mexico Region. OCS blocks are...

  11. 75 FR 3387 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... exploration or development of the OCS. For the proposed rule, EPA reviewed the ACC as amended through November... Alaska Administrative Code (``ACC''). More specifically, as amended through June 18, 2009, Alaska revised...), (e) and (f) 18 AAC 50.065. Open Burning (effective 01/18/1997) 18 AAC 50.070. Marine Vessel Visible...

  12. 76 FR 30184 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Renewable Energy Program Interim Policy Leasing for Marine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... telemetry buoy (MTB) (similar to the Navy Oceanographic Meteorological Automatic Device (NOMAD) weather... generate electricity on the proposed leasehold. The proposed MTB would act as both a sensor and measurement... power and a three- meter rotor diameter from a vessel moored to the MTB. BOEMRE intends to prepare an EA...

  13. Outer Continental Shelf Lease Blocks - Gulf of Mexico Region NAD27-Unclipped

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains OCS block outlines not clipped to the SLA boundary in ArcGIS shape file format for the BOEM Gulf of Mexico Region. OCS blocks are used to...

  14. Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams and Lease Maps - Gulf of Mexico Region NAD27-Unclipped

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This file is based on the Mapping and Boundary Branch's Official Protraction Diagram (OPD)and Leasing Maps (LM). Each offshore area is defined by an API Number...

  15. Outer Continental Shelf Submerged Lands Act Boundary - Gulf of Mexico Region NAD27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the Submerged Lands Act (SLA) boundary line (also known as State Seaward Boundary (SSB), or Fed State Boundary)in ESRI shapefile formats for...

  16. 77 FR 10707 - Safety Zone; NOBLE DISCOVERER, Outer Continental Shelf Drillship, Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You... environment given the sensitivity of the environmental and subsistence importance to the indigenous population...

  17. Cretaceous transformation from passive to active continental margin in the Western Carpathians as indicated by the sedimentary record in the Infratatric unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putiš, Marián; Gawlick, Hans-Jürgen; Frisch, Wolfgang; Sulák, Marián

    2008-07-01

    The Cretaceous orogen of the Western Carpathians comprises fragments of the destructed northern Centrocarpathian domain, which is defined as Infratatric unit and formed a continental margin facing the Penninic Ocean in Jurassic and Cretaceous times. The breakup event and opening of the Penninic Ocean occurred in the Early Jurassic (Pliensbachian), which is recorded by an abrupt deepening event from shallow-water sediments to deep-water nodular limestone in the Infratatric sediment succession. The transformation of the passive into an active continental margin by the onset of subduction of the Penninic oceanic crust occurred in Santonian times and is reflected by the beginning of flysch deposition in the Infratatric Belice domain, which took the position of a forearc basin in the convergent margin setting. The forearc basin was supplied by clastic material from the more internal part of the Infratatric unit, which experienced nappe stacking, metamorphism, and subsequent exhumation in Late Cretaceous times. In the frontal part of the forearc basin an accretionary wedge was built up, which formed an outer-arc ridge and delivered detrital material into the forearc basin in Maastrichtian time. Final collision between the European and the Adriatic plate occurred in the Eocene period and is responsible for weak metamorphism in the Infratatric unit.

  18. Aft outer rim seal arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Tham, Kok-Mun; Schroeder, Eric; Meeroff, Jamie; Miller, Jr., Samuel R; Marra, John J; Campbell, Christian X

    2015-04-28

    An outer rim seal arrangement (10), including: an annular rim (70) centered about a longitudinal axis (30) of a rotor disc (31), extending fore and having a fore-end (72), an outward-facing surface (74), and an inward-facing surface (76); a lower angel wing (62) extending aft from a base of a turbine blade (22) and having an aft end (64) disposed radially inward of the rim inward-facing surface to define a lower angel wing seal gap (80); an upper angel wing (66) extending aft from the turbine blade base and having an aft end (68) disposed radially outward of the rim outward-facing surface to define a upper angel wing seal gap (80, 82); and guide vanes (100) disposed on the rim inward-facing surface in the lower angel wing seal gap. Pumping fins (102) may be disposed on the upper angel wing seal aft end in the upper angel wing seal gap.

  19. Chemistry of the outer planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scattergood, Thomas W.

    1992-05-01

    Various aspects were studied of past or present chemistry in the atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites using lab simulations. Three areas were studied: (1) organic chemistry induced by kinetically hot hydrogen atoms in the region of Jupiter's atmosphere containing the ammonia cirrus clouds; (2) the conversion of NH3 into N2 by plasmas associated with entry of meteors and other objects into the atmosphere of early Titan; and (3) the synthesis of simple hydrocarbons and HCN by lightning in mixtures containing N2, CH4, and NH3 representing the atmospheres of Titan and the outer planets. The results showed that: (1) hot H2 atoms formed from the photodissociation of NH3 in Jupiter's atmosphere could account for some of the atmospheric chemistry in the ammonia cirrus cloud region; (2) the thermalization of hot H2 atoms in atmospheres predominated by molecular H is not as rapid as predicted by elastic collision theory; (3) the net quantum loss of NH3 in the presence of a 200 fold excess of H2 is 0.02, much higher than was expected from the amount of H2 present; (4) the conversion of NH3 into N2 in plasmas associated with infalling meteors is very efficient and rapid, and could account for most of the N2 present on Titan; (5) the yields of C2H2 and HCN from lightning induced chemistry in mixtures of CH4 and N2 is consistent with quenched thermodynamic models of the discharge core; and (6) photolysis induced by the UV light emitted by the gases in the hot plasmas may account for some, if not most, of the excess production of C2H6 and the more complex hydrocarbons.

  20. Continental ridges in the Arctic Ocean: Lorex constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, J. F.; Weber, J. R.; Blasco, S. M.

    1982-10-01

    Recent multidisciplinary geophysical measurements over the Lomonosov Ridge close to the North Pole support the widely held belief that it was formerly part of Eurasia. The known lithologies, ages, P-wave velocity structure and thickness of the crust along the outer Barents and Kara continental shelves are similar to permitted or measured values of these parameters newly acquired over the Lomonosov Ridge. Seismic, gravity and magnetic data in particular show that the ridge basement is most likely formed of early Mesozoic or older sedimentary or low-grade metasedimentary rocks over a crystalline core that is intermediate to basic in composition. Short-wavelength magnetic anomaly highs along the upper ridge flanks and crest may denote the presence of shallow igneous rocks. Because of the uncertain component of ice-rafted material, seafloor sediments recovered from the ridge by shallow sampling techniques cannot be clearly related to ridge basement lithology without further detailed analysis. The ridge is cut at the surface and at depth by normal faults that appear related to the development of the Makarov Basin. This and other data are consistent with the idea that the Makarov Basin was formed by continental stretching rather than simple seafloor spreading. Hence the flanking Alpha and Lomonosov ridges may originally have been part of the same continental block. It is suggested that in Late Cretaceous time this block was sheared from Eurasia along a trans-Arctic left-lateral offset that may have been associated with the opening of Baffin Bay. The continental block was later separated from Eurasia when the North Altantic rift extended into the Arctic region in the Early Tertiary. The data suggest that the Makarov Basin did not form before the onset of rifting in the Artic.

  1. Marine geophysical studies along a transect across the continental margin off Bombay coast, west of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, D.G.; Ramana, M.V.; Bhattacharya, G.C.; SubbaRaju, L.V.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Ramprasad, T.

    Study of underway geophysical data along a transect of 415 km across the continental margin off Bombay, (Maharashtra, India), between 800 and 3600 m water depths reveals seven seismic sequences consisting of parallel and continuous wavy reflections...

  2. Geochemistry of the continental margin sediments of the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, Ch.M.; Murty, P.S.N.

    sediments accumulating on the western continental margin of India between 17 c and 13° latitude are composed predominantly of terrigenous material in the inner shelf with moderate organic carbon content (< 3%), carbonatesediments in the outer shelf with low... organic carbonI~ntent{< I%J and organic carbon rich (upto 12%) carbonate sediments in the slope regionl The b'ulk and partition geocfiemistry of the surface sediments renect the complex intermixture of several sedimentary components (lithogenic. authigenic...

  3. A global review of non-living resources on the extended continental shelf

    OpenAIRE

    Murton, Bramley J.

    2000-01-01

    This contribution reviews the current state of knowledge of non-living resource potentials within the extended "legal " continental shelf (ELCS). The ELCS lies beyond the 200 nautical mile jurisdiction of nation states' exclusive economic zones, but within the outer limits defined by the criteria established under the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, Article 76 (1982). The offshore non-living resource potentials are based on a statistical evaluation of known occurrences a...

  4. Energetic plumes over the western Ross Sea continental slope

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, A.; Zambianchi, E.; A. Orsi; Visbeck, Martin; Giulivi, C; Whitworth, T.; Spezie, G.

    2004-01-01

    Rapid descent of dense Drygalski Trough (western Ross Sea, Antarctica) shelf water over the continental slope, within 100 to 250 m thick benthic plumes, is described. Speeds of up to 1.0 m/s are recorded flowing at an average angle of 35° to the isobaths, entraining ambient Lower Circumpolar Deep Water en route. This process is predominant in determining the concentration and placement of the shelf water injected into the deep sea as a precursor Antarctic Bottom Water. Nonetheless, a 4-hour d...

  5. On the freshening of the northwestern Weddell Sea continental shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Hellmer

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed hydrographic data from the northwestern Weddell Sea continental shelf of the three austral winters 1989, 1997, and 2006 and two summers following the last winter cruise. During summer a thermal front exists at ~64° S separating cold southern waters from warm northern waters that have similar characteristics as the deep waters of the central basin of the Bransfield Strait. In winter, the whole continental shelf exhibits southern characteristics with high Neon (Ne concentrations, indicating a significant input of glacial melt water. The comparison of the winter data from the shallow shelf off the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, spanning a period of 17 yr, shows a salinity decrease of 0.09 for the whole water column, which has a residence time of <1 yr. We interpret this freshening as being caused by a combination of reduced salt input due to a southward sea ice retreat and higher precipitation during the late 20th century on the western Weddell Sea continental shelf. However, less salinification might also result from a delicate interplay between enhanced salt input due to sea ice formation in coastal areas formerly occupied by Larsen A and B ice shelves and increased Larsen C ice loss.

  6. Western Ross Sea continental slope gravity currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Arnold L.; Orsi, Alejandro H.; Muench, Robin; Huber, Bruce A.; Zambianchi, Enrico; Visbeck, Martin

    2009-06-01

    Antarctic Bottom Water of the world ocean is derived from dense Shelf Water that is carried downslope by gravity currents at specific sites along the Antarctic margins. Data gathered by the AnSlope and CLIMA programs reveal the presence of energetic gravity currents that are formed over the western continental slope of the Ross Sea when High Salinity Shelf Water exits the shelf through Drygalski Trough. Joides Trough, immediately to the east, offers an additional escape route for less saline Shelf Water, while the Glomar Challenger Trough still farther east is a major pathway for export of the once supercooled low-salinity Ice Shelf Water that forms under the Ross Ice Shelf. The Drygalski Trough gravity currents increase in thickness from ˜100 to ˜400 m on proceeding downslope from ˜600 m (the shelf break) to 1200 m (upper slope) sea floor depth, while turning sharply to the west in response to the Coriolis force during their descent. The mean current pathway trends ˜35° downslope from isobaths. Benthic-layer current and thickness are correlated with the bottom water salinity, which exerts the primary control over the benthic-layer density. A 1-year time series of bottom-water current and hydrographic properties obtained on the slope near the 1000 m isobath indicates episodic pulses of Shelf Water export through Drygalski Trough. These cold (34.75) pulses correlate with strong downslope bottom flow. Extreme examples occurred during austral summer/fall 2003, comprising concentrated High Salinity Shelf Water (-1.9 °C; 34.79) and approaching 1.5 m s -1 at descent angles as large as ˜60° relative to the isobaths. Such events were most common during November-May, consistent with a northward shift in position of the dense Shelf Water during austral summer. The coldest, saltiest bottom water was measured from mid-April to mid-May 2003. The summer/fall export of High Salinity Shelf Water observed in 2004 was less than that seen in 2003. This difference, if real

  7. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    The GABEX I experiment is designed to provide synoptic coverage of a series of Gulf Stream wave-like disturbances, the effect of these on the circulation of the entire shelf, and on biological and chemical processes. This study was initiated in February 1980 when current meter arrays were deployed. These meters will be removed in July 1980. In April three ships will simultaneously study the effects of Gulf Stream disturbances on the hydrography, chemistry, and biology of the shelf. One vessel will track a specific wave-like disturbance and provide synoptic coverage of the shelf area. The second vessel will determine the effect of shelf break processes on adjacent shelf water; and the third will study trace metal distributions in and outside of disturbances. Research progress is reported in continental shelf studies, nearshore and estuarine studies (diffusion of freshwater out of nearshore zone), tidal currents and material transport, and mixing of inlet plumes.

  8. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsvik, Trond H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D.; Griffin, William L.; Werner, Stephanie C.; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    The magmatic activity (0–16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland—and especially the Öræfajökull volcano—is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr–Nd–Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2–6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

  9. Continental growth and mantle hydration as intertwined feedback cycles in the thermal evolution of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höning, Dennis; Spohn, Tilman

    2016-06-01

    A model of Earth's continental coverage and mantle water budget is discussed along with its thermal evolution. The model links a thermal evolution model based on parameterized mantle convection with a model of a generic subduction zone that includes the oceanic crust and a sedimentary layer as carriers of water. Part of the subducted water is used to produce continental crust while the remainder is subducted into the mantle. The total length of the subduction zones is calculated from the total surface area of continental crust assuming randomly distributed continents. The mantle viscosity is dependent of temperature and the water concentration. Sediments are generated by continental crust erosion, and water outgassing at mid-oceanic ridges closes the water cycle. We discuss the strongly coupled, non-linear model using a phase plane defined by the continental coverage and mantle water concentration. Fixed points are found in the phase plane at which the rates of change of both variables are zero. These fixed points evolve with time, but in many cases, three fixed points emerge of which two are stable and an intermediate point is unstable with respect to continental coverage. With initial conditions from a Monte-Carlo scheme we calculate evolution paths in the phase plane and find a large spread of final states that all have a mostly balanced water budget. The present day observed 40% continental surface coverage is found near the unstable fixed point. Our evolution model suggests that Earth's continental coverage formed early and has been stable for at least 1.5 Gyr. The effect of mantle water regassing (and mantle viscosity depending on water concentration) is found to lower the present day mantle temperature by about 120 K, but the present day mantle viscosity is affected little. The water cycle thus complements the well-known thermostat effect of viscosity and mantle temperature. Our results further suggest that the biosphere could impact the feedback cycles by

  10. Role of Outer Membrane Vesicles of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 8. Role of Outer Membrance Vesicles of Bacteria. M V Jagannadham M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 20 Issue 8 ... Keywords. Outer membrane ves ic les (OMVs); secretion; communication; virulence; antibiotic resistance; vaccines.

  11. A relatively reduced Hadean continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaozhi; Gaillard, Fabrice; Scaillet, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    processes such as metamorphism, weathering and erosion. Thus, zircons in granites of shallow crust may record the chemical/isotopic composition of the deep crust that is otherwise inaccessible, and offer robust records of the magmatic and crust-forming events preserved in the continental crust. In fact, due to the absence of suitable rock records (in particular for periods older than ~4.0 Ga), studies in recent years concerning the nature, composition, growth and evolution of the continental crust, and especially the Hadean crust, have heavily relied on inherited/detrital zircons. Natural igneous zircons incorporate rare-earth elements (REE) and other trace elements in their structure at concentrations controlled by the temperature, pressure, fO2 and composition of their crystallization environment. Petrological observations and recent experiments have shown that the concentration of Ce relative to other REE in igneous zircons can be used to constrain the fO2 during their growth. By combining available trace-elements data of igneous zircons of crustal origin, we show that the Hadean continental crust was significantly more reduced than its modern counterpart and experienced progressive oxidation till ~3.6 billions years ago. We suggest that the increase in the oxidation state of the Hadean continental crust is related to the progressive decline in the intensity of meteorite impacts during the late veneer. Impacts of carbon- and hydrogen-rich materials during the formation of Hadean granitic crust must have favoured strongly reduced magmatism. The conjunction of cold, wet and reduced granitic magmatism during the Hadean implies the degassing of methane and water. When impacts ended, magma produced by normal decompression melting of the mantle imparted more oxidizing conditions to erupted lavas and the related crust.

  12. Malacofauna da plataforma continental portuguesa

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Jaime Alberto Jardim

    2009-01-01

    Este estudo tem como objectivo principal a identificação e caracterização da malacofauna da plataforma continental portuguesa. Baseia-se no estudo de 72 amostras de sedimentos colhidas em campanhas oceanográficas efectuadas ao longo da plataforma, de Caminha à Figueira da Foz e de Sagres a Vila Real de Santo António (incluindo alguns locais na Baía de Cádiz, Espanha). Foi recenseado um total de 1500 indivíduos, dos quais 1251 são representantes da classe Bivalvia, 201 ...

  13. Progress towards Continental River Dynamics modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cheng-Wei; Zheng, Xing; Liu, Frank; Maidment, Daivd; Hodges, Ben

    2017-04-01

    The high-resolution National Water Model (NWM), launched by U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in August 2016, has shown it is possible to provide real-time flow prediction in rivers and streams across the entire continental United States. The next step for continental-scale modeling is moving from reduced physics (e.g. Muskingum-Cunge) to full dynamic modeling with the Saint-Venant equations. The Simulation Program for River Networks (SPRNT) provides a computational approach for the Saint-Venant equations, but obtaining sufficient channel bathymetric data and hydraulic roughness is seen as a critical challenge. However, recent work has shown the Height Above Nearest Drainage (HAND) method can be applied with the National Elevation Dataset (NED) to provide automated estimation of effective channel bathymetry suitable for large-scale hydraulic simulations. The present work examines the use of SPRNT with the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and HAND-derived bathymetry for automated generation of rating curves that can be compared to existing data. The approach can, in theory, be applied to every stream reach in the NHD and thus provide flood guidance where none is available. To test this idea we generated 2000+ rating curves in two catchments in Texas and Alabama (USA). Field data from the USGS and flood records from an Austin, Texas flood in May 2015 were used as validation. Large-scale implementation of this idea requires addressing several critical difficulties associated with numerical instabilities, including ill-posed boundary conditions generated in automated model linkages and inconsistencies in the river geometry. A key to future progress is identifying efficient approaches to isolate numerical instability contributors in a large time-space varying solution. This research was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under grant number CCF-1331610.

  14. Hydrates of nat­ural gas in continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Barnard, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates in continental margin sediment can be inferred from the widespread occurrence of an anomalous seismic reflector which coincides with the predicted transition boundary at the base of the gas hydrate zone. Direct evidence of gas hydrates is provided by visual observations of sediments from the landward wall of the Mid-America Trench off Mexico and Guatemala, from the Blake Outer Ridge off the southeastern United States, and from the Black Sea in the U.S.S.R. Where solid gas hydrates have been sampled, the gas is composed mainly of methane accompanied by CO2 and low concentrations of ethane and hydrocarbons of higher molecular weight. The molecular and isotopic composition of hydrocarbons indicates that most of the methane is of biolog cal origin. The gas was probably produced by the bacterial alteration of organic matter buried in the sediment. Organic carbon contents of the sediment containing sampled gas hydrates are higher than the average organic carbon content of marine sediments. The main economic importance of gas hydrates may reside in their ability to serve as a cap under which free gas can collect. To be producible, however, such trapped gas must occur in porous and permeable reservoirs. Although gas hydrates are common along continental margins, the degree to which they are associated with significant reservoirs remains to be investigated.

  15. Mg/Ca of Continental Ostracode Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, E.; Forester, R. M.; Marco-Barba, J.; Mezquita, F.

    2007-12-01

    Marine ionic chemistry is thought to remain constant. This, together with the belief that marine calcifiers partition Mg/Ca in a systematic manner as functions of temperature (and Mg/Ca) of water forms the basis of the Mg/Ca thermometer. In continental settings both of these assumptions are usually not true. Continental waters contain a wide variety of solutes in absolute and relative ion concentrations. Hence, waters with identical Mg/Ca may have very different concentrations of Mg and Ca and very different anions. Here we use two examples to focus on the effects of ion chemistry on Mg/Ca partitioning in continental ostracode shells and we ignore the complexities of solute evolution, which can change Mg/Ca over timescales of minutes to millennia. Palacios-Fest and Dettman (2001) conducted a monthly study of ,Cypridopsis vidua at El Yeso Lake in Sonora, Mexico. They established a relation between temperature and average shell Mg/Ca using regression analyses on averaged data. When their Mg/Ca-temperature relation is applied to monthly ,C. vidua data from Page Pond near Cleveland, Ohio, water temperatures of -8 to -1°C are obtained. The observed Mg/Ca ranges for El Yeso Lake (0.31 to 0.46) and Page Pond (0.33 to 0.46) are similar, as are their specific conductivities (700 to 850μS for El Yeso Lake; 400 to 600μS for Page Pond). However, [Ca] is 140-260 mg/L for El Yeso, but only 70-90 mg/L for Page Pond. Page Pond data, in fact, shows a good temperature shell Mg/Ca relation for .C. vidua, but the relation is different from that at El Yeso. Hence, shell Mg/Ca is a multi-valued, family of curves function of temperature and Mg/Ca of water that depends on the [Mg] and [Ca] values in water and perhaps other factors. Our second example comes from sites near Valencia, Spain and involves shell data for ,Cyprideis torosa, an estuarine ostracode that is tolerant of a wide range of salinity and can live in continental waters as long as the carbonate alkalinity to Ca ratio is

  16. Deep sea sedimentation processes and geomorphology: Northwest Atlantic continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, David; Campbell, Calvin; Gardner, Jim; Chaytor, Jason; Piper, David; Rebesco, Michele

    2017-04-01

    Deep-sea sedimentation processes impart a fundamental control on the morphology of the western North Atlantic continental margin from Blake Spur to Hudson Strait. This fact is illustrated by the variable patterns of cross-margin gradients that are based on extensive new multibeam echo-sounder data informed by subbottom profiler and seismic reflection data. Erosion by off-shelf sediment transport in turbidity currents creates gullies, canyons and channels and a steep upper slope. Amalgamation of these conduits produces singular channels and turbidite fan complexes on the lower slope, flattening slope-profile gradients. The effect is an exponentially decaying "graded" slope profile. Comparatively, sediment mass failure produces steeper upper slopes due to head scarp development and a wedging architecture to the lower slope as deposits thin in the downslope direction. This process results in either a "stepped" slope, and/or a significant downslope gradient change where MTDs pinch out. Large drift deposits created by geostrophic currents are developed all along the margin. Blake Ridge, Sackville Spur, and Hamilton Spur are large detached drifts on disparate parts of the margin. They form a linear "above grade" profile along their crests from the shelf to abyssal plain. Deeper portions of the US continental margin are dominated by the Chesapeake Drift and Hatteras Outer Ridge; both plastered elongate mounded drifts. Farther north, particularly on the Grand Banks margin, are plastered and separated drifts. These drifts form "stepped" slope profiles, where they onlap the margin. Trough-mouth fan complexes become more common along the margin with increasing latitude. Sediment deposition and retention, particularly those dominated by glacigenic debris flows, characterize these segments producing an "above grade" slope profile. Understanding these geomorphological consequences of deep sea sedimentation processes is important to extended continental shelf mapping in which

  17. Considerations about the recommendations of the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf on the Amazon fan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Fernandes More

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, Brazil submitted to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS a Submission for the outer limit of the Brazilian continental shelf for its extension beyond the limits of 200 nautical miles. In 2007, the CLCS presented its recommendations, however it did not recommend four areas proposed by Brazil, the Amazon Fan among them. The objective of this study is to present the main legal and technical aspects of the controversy about the Amazon Fan, in order to evaluate some alternatives for a future submission, new or revised.

  18. Outer membrane proteins of pathogenic spirochetes

    OpenAIRE

    Cullen, Paul A.; Haake, David A.; Adler, Ben

    2004-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes are the causative agents of several important diseases including syphilis, Lyme disease, leptospirosis, swine dysentery, periodontal disease and some forms of relapsing fever. Spirochetal bacteria possess two membranes and the proteins present in the outer membrane are at the site of interaction with host tissue and the immune system. This review describes the current knowledge in the field of spirochetal outer membrane protein (OMP) biology. What is known concerning bi...

  19. Dynamics of the Outer Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    vorticty consrvatio directly from the shallow water equations: dv .+ fk x v=-gVh. and sad da•+hV~v=O where h := h, - h, is the layer thidmess, h. is the...Jovian vortices, su(ch as the Great Red Spot ( GIRS ) of Jupiter and White Ovals. In particular we argue that the GIRS shows both finite L,. effects. On...located just south of the flow’s stagnation point. The southern part of the GIRS has grown ill size until it lies in a. region of large prograde shear

  20. Considering bioactivity in modelling continental growth and the Earth's evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höning, D.; Spohn, T.

    2013-09-01

    The complexity of planetary evolution increases with the number of interacting reservoirs. On Earth, even the biosphere is speculated to interact with the interior. It has been argued (e.g., Rosing et al. 2006; Sleep et al, 2012) that the formation of continents could be a consequence of bioactivity harvesting solar energy through photosynthesis to help build the continents and that the mantle should carry a chemical biosignature. Through plate tectonics, the surface biosphere can impact deep subduction zone processes and the interior of the Earth. Subducted sediments are particularly important, because they influence the Earth's interior in several ways, and in turn are strongly influenced by the Earth's biosphere. In our model, we use the assumption that a thick sedimentary layer of low permeability on top of the subducting oceanic crust, caused by a biologically enhanced weathering rate, can suppress shallow dewatering. This in turn leads to greater vailability of water in the source region of andesitic partial melt, resulting in an enhanced rate of continental production and regassing rate into the mantle. Our model includes (i) mantle convection, (ii) continental erosion and production, and (iii) mantle water degassing at mid-ocean ridges and regassing at subduction zones. The mantle viscosity of our model depends on (i) the mantle water concentration and (ii) the mantle temperature, whose time dependency is given by radioactive decay of isotopes in the Earth's mantle. Boundary layer theory yields the speed of convection and the water outgassing rate of the Earth's mantle. Our results indicate that present day values of continental surface area and water content of the Earth's mantle represent an attractor in a phase plane spanned by both parameters. We show that the biologic enhancement of the continental erosion rate is important for the system to reach this fixed point. An abiotic Earth tends to reach an alternative stable fixed point with a smaller

  1. Distribution and sources of organic carbon, nitrogen and their isotopic signatures in sediments from the Ayeyarwady (Irrawaddy) continental shelf, northern Andaman Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Gaye, B.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Rao, P.S.; Chivas, A.R.; Wheeler, D.; Thwin, S.

    and source of organic matter. Comparatively higher TOC and TN concentrations are found in the inner-shelf mud belt, and on the continental slope sediments, whereas the outer-shelf sediments, composed mostly of relict sands, are low in TOC. The TOC contents...

  2. Arctic Ocean outflow and glacier-ocean interactions modify water over the Wandel Sea shelf (northeastern Greenland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrenko, Igor A.; Kirillov, Sergey A.; Rudels, Bert; Babb, David G.; Toudal Pedersen, Leif; Rysgaard, Søren; Kristoffersen, Yngve; Barber, David G.

    2017-12-01

    The first-ever conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) observations on the Wandel Sea shelf in northeastern Greenland were collected in April-May 2015. They were complemented by CTDs taken along the continental slope during the Norwegian FRAM 2014-2015 drift. The CTD profiles are used to reveal the origin of water masses and interactions with ambient water from the continental slope and the tidewater glacier outlet. The subsurface water is associated with the Pacific water outflow from the Arctic Ocean. The underlying halocline separates the Pacific water from a deeper layer of polar water that has interacted with the warm Atlantic water outflow through the Fram Strait, recorded below 140 m. Over the outer shelf, the halocline shows numerous cold density-compensated intrusions indicating lateral interaction with an ambient polar water mass across the continental slope. At the front of the tidewater glacier outlet, colder and turbid water intrusions were observed at the base of the halocline. On the temperature-salinity plots these stations indicate a mixing line that is different from the ambient water and seems to be conditioned by the ocean-glacier interaction. Our observations of Pacific water are set within the context of upstream observations in the Beaufort Sea and downstream observations from the Northeast Water Polynya, and clearly show the modification of Pacific water during its advection across the Arctic Ocean. Moreover, ambient water over the Wandel Sea slope shows different thermohaline structures indicating the different origin and pathways of the on-shore and off-shore branches of the Arctic Ocean outflow through the western Fram Strait.

  3. Arctic Ocean outflow and glacier–ocean interactions modify water over the Wandel Sea shelf (northeastern Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Dmitrenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The first-ever conductivity–temperature–depth (CTD observations on the Wandel Sea shelf in northeastern Greenland were collected in April–May 2015. They were complemented by CTDs taken along the continental slope during the Norwegian FRAM 2014–2015 drift. The CTD profiles are used to reveal the origin of water masses and interactions with ambient water from the continental slope and the tidewater glacier outlet. The subsurface water is associated with the Pacific water outflow from the Arctic Ocean. The underlying halocline separates the Pacific water from a deeper layer of polar water that has interacted with the warm Atlantic water outflow through the Fram Strait, recorded below 140 m. Over the outer shelf, the halocline shows numerous cold density-compensated intrusions indicating lateral interaction with an ambient polar water mass across the continental slope. At the front of the tidewater glacier outlet, colder and turbid water intrusions were observed at the base of the halocline. On the temperature–salinity plots these stations indicate a mixing line that is different from the ambient water and seems to be conditioned by the ocean–glacier interaction. Our observations of Pacific water are set within the context of upstream observations in the Beaufort Sea and downstream observations from the Northeast Water Polynya, and clearly show the modification of Pacific water during its advection across the Arctic Ocean. Moreover, ambient water over the Wandel Sea slope shows different thermohaline structures indicating the different origin and pathways of the on-shore and off-shore branches of the Arctic Ocean outflow through the western Fram Strait.

  4. Reproductive cycle and population structure of the deep-water shrimp Aristeus antillensis A. Milne Edwards & Bouvier, 1909 (Decapoda: Aristeidae on southeast Brazilian continental slope Ciclo reproductivo y estructura poblacional del camarón de aguas profundas Aristeus antillensis A. Milne Edwards & Bouvier, 1909 (Decapoda: Aristeidae en el talud continental del sureste de Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Ricardo Pezzuto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The "alistado shrimp" (Aristeus antillensis is one of the targets of the trawling fleet operating since 2002 along the continental slope of the Brazilian Economic Exclusive Zone between 700 and 800 m depth. Catches of the species occur mainly in two small fishing grounds located on the east coast of Espirito Santo State (19-22°S. This paper aimed to obtain the first biological data for this species along the Brazilian coast. A total of 13,797 individuals were sampled aboard fishing vessels by observers on almost all fishing hauls, corresponding to 10 to 20% of the total catch recorded in the period. Males and females are sexually mature at 25.4 and 40.2 mm carapace length, respectively, based on an analysis of the proportions of individuals with fused petasma (males and spermatophores in the thelycum (females. The proportion of impregnated females was higher than 80% year round, suggesting a continuous reproductive cycle, although preliminary in-formation on gonadal development points to possible seasonal reproduction. In general, mature females, which attain larger sizes than males, domínate the catches (M:F = 0.12:1. However, populational groups including males and juveniles of both sexes occupy the fishing grounds in different periods of the year, probably reflecting migratory movements whose directions and driving forces are not completely understood yet. A depth-stratified population structure by sex and size is hypothesized.La gamba de aguas profundas Aristeus antillensis es uno de los recursos explotados por la flota de arrastre, que está operando desde el año 2002 en el talud continental de la Zona Econômica Exclusiva de Brasil, entre 700 y 800 m de profundidad. Las capturas de esta especie se realizan básicamente en dos pequeños fondos de pesca que se encuentran en la costa este de la región de Espirito Santo (19-22°S. Este trabajo tiene por objetivo obtener los primeros antecedentes biológicos de esta especie en la costa

  5. How Continental Bank outsourced its "crown jewels.".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, R L

    1993-01-01

    No industry relies more on information than banking does, yet Continental, one of America's largest banks, outsources its information technology. Why? Because that's the best way to service the customers that form the core of the bank's business, says vice chairman Dick Huber. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Continental participated heavily with Penn Square Bank in energy investments. When falling energy prices burst Penn Square's bubble in 1982, Continental was stuck with more than $1 billion in bad loans. Eight years later when Dick Huber came on board, Continental was working hard to restore its once solid reputation. Executives had made many tough decisions already, altering the bank's focus from retail to business banking and laying off thousands of employees. Yet management still needed to cut costs and improve services to stay afloat. Regulators, investors, and analysts were watching every step. Continental executives, eager to focus on the bank's core mission of serving business customers, decided to outsource one after another in-house service--from cafeteria services to information technology. While conventional wisdom holds that banks must retain complete internal control of IT, Continental bucked this argument when it entered into a ten-year, multimillion-dollar contract with Integrated Systems Solutions Corporation. Continental is already reaping benefits from outsourcing IT. Most important, Continental staffers today focus on their true core competencies: intimate knowledge of customers' needs and relationships with customers.

  6. Modeling Continental Growth and Mantle Hydration in Earth's Evolution and the Impact of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höning, Dennis; Spohn, Tilman

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of planets with plate tectonics is significantly affected by several intertwined feedback cycles. On Earth, interactions between atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, crust, and interior determine its present day state. We here focus on the feedback cycles including the evolutions of mantle water budget and continental crust, and investigate possible effects of the Earth's biosphere. The first feedback loop includes cycling of water into the mantle at subduction zones and outgassing at volcanic chains and mid-ocean ridges. Water is known to reduce the viscosity of mantle rock, and therefore the speed of mantle convection and plate subduction will increase with the water concentration, eventually enhancing the rates of mantle water regassing and outgassing. A second feedback loop includes the production and erosion of continental crust. Continents are formed above subduction zones, whose total length is determined by the total size of the continents. Furthermore, the total surface area of continental crust determines the amount of eroded sediments per unit time. Subducted sediments affect processes in subduction zones, eventually enhancing the production rate of new continental crust. Both feedback loops affect each other: As a wet mantle increases the speed of subduction, continental production also speeds up. On the other hand, the total length of subduction zones and the rate at which sediments are subducted (both being functions of continental coverage) affect the rate of mantle water regassing. We here present a model that includes both cycles and show how the system develops stable and unstable fixed points in a plane defined by mantle water concentration and surface of continents. We couple these feedback cycles to a parameterized thermal evolution model that reproduces present day observations. We show how Earth has been affected by these feedback cycles during its evolution, and argue that Earth's present day state regarding its mantle water

  7. Oscillations of the Outer Boundary of the Outer Radiation Belt During Sawtooth Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hun Kim

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available We report three sawtooth oscillation events observed at geosynchronous orbit where we find quasi-periodic (every 2-3 hours sudden flux increases followed by slow flux decreases at the energy levels of ˜50-400 keV. For these three sawtooth events, we have examined variations of the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt. In order to determine L values of the outer boundary, we have used data of relativistic electron flux observed by the SAMPEX satellite. We find that the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt oscillates periodically being consistent with sawtooth oscillation phases. Specifically, the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt expands (namely, the boundary L value increases following the sawtooth particle flux enhancement of each tooth, and then contracts (namely, the boundary L value decreases while the sawtooth flux decreases gradually until the next flux enhancement. On the other hand, it is repeatedly seen that the asymmetry of the magnetic field intensity between dayside and nightside decreases (increases due to the dipolarization (the stretching on the nightside as the sawtooth flux increases (decreases. This implies that the periodic magnetic field variations during the sawtooth oscillations are likely responsible for the expansion-contraction oscillations of the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt.

  8. Deformation in the continental lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Physical Properties of Earth Materials Committee, a technical committee of AGU's Tectonophysics Section, is organizing a dinner/colloquium as part of the Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. This event will be held Monday, December 3rd, in the Gold Rush Room of the Holiday Inn Golden Gateway Hotel at 1500 Van Ness St. There will be a no-host bar from 6:30 to 7:30 P.M., followed by dinner from 7:30 to 8:30 P.M. Paul Tapponnier will deliver the after-dinner talk, “Large-Scale Deformation Mechanisms in the Continental Lithosphere: Where Do We Stand?” It will start at 8:30 P.M. and a business meeting will follow at 9:30 P.M.

  9. Continental flood basalts derived from the hydrous mantle transition zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan-Ce; Wilde, Simon A; Li, Qiu-Li; Yang, Ya-Nan

    2015-07-14

    It has previously been postulated that the Earth's hydrous mantle transition zone may play a key role in intraplate magmatism, but no confirmatory evidence has been reported. Here we demonstrate that hydrothermally altered subducted oceanic crust was involved in generating the late Cenozoic Chifeng continental flood basalts of East Asia. This study combines oxygen isotopes with conventional geochemistry to provide evidence for an origin in the hydrous mantle transition zone. These observations lead us to propose an alternative thermochemical model, whereby slab-triggered wet upwelling produces large volumes of melt that may rise from the hydrous mantle transition zone. This model explains the lack of pre-magmatic lithospheric extension or a hotspot track and also the arc-like signatures observed in some large-scale intracontinental magmas. Deep-Earth water cycling, linked to cold subduction, slab stagnation, wet mantle upwelling and assembly/breakup of supercontinents, can potentially account for the chemical diversity of many continental flood basalts.

  10. Antarctic new particle formation from continental biogenic precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.-M. Kyrö

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Over Antarctica, aerosol particles originate almost entirely from marine areas, with minor contribution from long-range transported dust or anthropogenic material. The Antarctic continent itself, unlike all other continental areas, has been thought to be practically free of aerosol sources. Here we present evidence of local aerosol production associated with melt-water ponds in continental Antarctica. We show that in air masses passing such ponds, new aerosol particles are efficiently formed and these particles grow up to sizes where they may act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. The precursor vapours responsible for aerosol formation and growth originate very likely from highly abundant cyanobacteria Nostoc commune (Vaucher communities of local ponds. This is the first time freshwater vegetation has been identified as an aerosol precursor source. The influence of the new source on clouds and climate may increase in future Antarctica, and possibly elsewhere undergoing accelerating summer melting of semi-permanent snow cover.

  11. Continental Growth and Mantle Hydration as Earth System Feedback Cycles and possible Effects of the Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höning, D.; Spohn, T.

    2016-12-01

    The evolution of Earth is charcterized by intertwined feedback cycles. We focus on two feedback cycles that include the mantle water budget and the continental crust and study possible effects of the Earth's biosphere. The first feedback loop includes cycling of water into the mantle at subduction zones and outgassing at volcanic chains and mid-ocean ridges. Water will reduce the viscosity of mantle rock, and therefore the speed of mantle convection and plate subduction will increase with the mantle water concentration, eventually enhancing the rates of mantle water regassing and outgassing. A second feedback loop includes the production and erosion of continental crust. Continents grow by volcanism above subduction zones, whose total length is determined by the total area of the continents. Furthermore, the erosion rate of the continents is proportional to the total surface area of continental crust. The rate of sediment subduction affects the rate of transport of water to the mantle and the production rate of new continental crust. We present a model that includes both cycles and show how the system develops stable and unstable fixed points in a plane defined by mantle water concentration and surface are of continents. The stable points represent either an Earth mostly covered by continents and a wet mantle or an Earth mostly covered by oceans with a dry mantle. The presently observed Earth is inbetween these extreme states but the state is intrinsically unstable. We couple the feedback model to a parameterized thermal evolution model. We show how Earth evolved towards its present unstable state. We argue that other feedback cycles such as the carbonate silicate cycle may act to stabilize the present state, however. By enhancing continental weathering and erosion, and eventually the sediment transport into subduction zones, the biosphere impacts both feedback cycles and might play a crucial role in regulating Earth's system and keep continental crust coverage and

  12. Molecular basis for photoreceptor outer segment architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Andrew F X; Moritz, Orson L; Williams, David S

    2016-11-01

    To serve vision, vertebrate rod and cone photoreceptors must detect photons, convert the light stimuli into cellular signals, and then convey the encoded information to downstream neurons. Rods and cones are sensory neurons that each rely on specialized ciliary organelles to detect light. These organelles, called outer segments, possess elaborate architectures that include many hundreds of light-sensitive membranous disks arrayed one atop another in precise register. These stacked disks capture light and initiate the chain of molecular and cellular events that underlie normal vision. Outer segment organization is challenged by an inherently dynamic nature; these organelles are subject to a renewal process that replaces a significant fraction of their disks (up to ∼10%) on a daily basis. In addition, a broad range of environmental and genetic insults can disrupt outer segment morphology to impair photoreceptor function and viability. In this chapter, we survey the major progress that has been made for understanding the molecular basis of outer segment architecture. We also discuss key aspects of organelle lipid and protein composition, and highlight distributions, interactions, and potential structural functions of key OS-resident molecules, including: kinesin-2, actin, RP1, prominin-1, protocadherin 21, peripherin-2/rds, rom-1, glutamic acid-rich proteins, and rhodopsin. Finally, we identify key knowledge gaps and challenges that remain for understanding how normal outer segment architecture is established and maintained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane.

  14. Distribution and composition of verdine and glaucony facies from the sediments of the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thamban, M.; Rao, V.P.

    Investigations on green grains from sediments of the western continental margin of India, between Ratnagiri and Cape Comorin, (water depth 37-330 m) indicate the presence of verdine and glaucony facies. Verdine facies occurs over an area of about...

  15. Changing sedimentary environments during Pleistocene-Holocene in a core from the eastern continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Rao, Ch.M.; Mascarenhas, A.; Rao, K.M.; Reddy, N.P.C.; Das, H.C.

    Sedimentological and geochemical investigations of the sediments in a core from the eastern continental margin of India, at a water depth of 1200 m, revealed two distinct types. The Late Pleistocene sediments are greyish-black in colour and consist...

  16. The meiofauna : macrofauna ratio across the continental slope of the Goban Spur (north-east Atlantic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flach, E.; Van Averbeke, J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    1999-01-01

    Meio- and macrofauna density and biomass were estimated at the OMEX-transect across the continental slope of the Goban Spur at water depths ranging from 208 to 4460 m in the north-east Atlantic. A linear increase in the ratio between meio- and macrofauna densities with increasing water depth was

  17. Effects of energy-related activities on the Atlantic Continental Shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B [ed.

    1975-01-01

    Sixteen papers were presented and are announced separately. Coastal waters, continental shelf geology and aquatic ecosystems are studied for modelling basic data for assessment of possible environmental impacts from offshore energy development. Sediment transport and wave phenomena are modelled for understanding water pollution transport and diffusion. (PCS)

  18. Outer rotor eddy current heater for wind turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudorache Tiberiu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a conversion system of wind energy into thermal energy by means of an outer rotor permanent magnet eddy current heater. The main advantages of this device are the following: compactness, easy temperature control by water flow rate regulation, reduced energy cost per kWh, possibility of combination with other heating systems. The analysis presented in the paper is based on the finite element method and its purpose is to optimize the device and to evaluate its performance and operation characteristics such as: analysis of demagnetization level of permanent magnets, output power–rotor speed and electromagnetic torque–rotor speed curves.

  19. Characterization of CHOS compounds in rainwater from continental and coastal storms by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Ralph N.; Felix, J. David; Avery, G. Brooks; Kieber, Robert J.; Willey, Joan D.; Podgorski, David C.

    2015-03-01

    Rainwater from four continental and three coastal storms was collected and analyzed by (-) ESI Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). This study presents a comprehensive comparison of the CHOS molecular formulas of rainwater dissolved organic matter from these two different storm trajectories. There were 899 and 695 total molecular formula assignments in the continental and coastal storms respectively. Of these, 33% and 15% were unique to continental and coastal storms. Kendrick mass analysis of methylene units highlighted oligomers present in both storm types illustrating their ubiquitous occurrence in atmospheric waters. There was also evidence of organo-sulfate containing molecular formulas as well as highly condensed aromatic structures containing one sulfur and one oxygen. These condensed aromatic sulfur containing structures likely originate from fossil fuel sources and were only detected in continental derived rainwater.

  20. Mantle Calcium Dominates Continental Magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J. I.; Depaolo, D. J.; Bachmann, O.

    2009-12-01

    Trace element and isotopic compositions of continental igneous rocks are often used to model the generation and evolution of crustal magmas. Here we report new Ca isotopic measurements of crystal-poor (35%) rhyolites from the Oligocene San Juan Volcanic Field (SJVF) and Pliocene to Pleistocene tuffs from Yellowstone Caldera. Because both volcanic fields are located within the North American craton the extruded magmas could have assimilated old crustal source components with radiogenic Ca that would be clearly distinguishable from that of the mantle. New Ca data are also reported for two crustal xenoliths found within the 28.2 Ma Fish Canyon Tuff (FCT) of the SJVF that yield ɛCa values of 3.8±0.6 (2 σ, n=3) and 7.5±0.4 (2 σ, n=3), respectively. The 40Ca excesses of these possible source rocks are due to long-term in situ 40K decay and suggest that they are Precambrian in age. In contrast to the excess radiogenic Ca signatures, most Cenozoic basalts and many silicic igneous rocks from Earth yield initial ɛCa values close to zero, which indicates that the 40Ca/44Ca ratio of the Earth’s mantle is well defined and virtually invariant at the resolution of our measurements. The crystal-rich FCT, inferred to result from batholith-scale remobilization of a shallow subvolcanic magma chamber, exhibits an ɛCai value of 0.32±0.02 (2 σ, n=5) that is indistinguishable from Ca in clinopyroxene from an ultramafic xenolith that has a mantle-like ɛCai value of -0.35±0.62 (2 σ, n=2). Simple mass balance calculations indicate that Ca in the FCT is greater than ~75% mantle derived. Similar mixing models based on published Nd data for the FCT that consider the range of possible crustal source components can deviate substantially from the Ca models. At face value the Nd data indicate that the FCT magma underwent significant crustal assimilation (i.e., at least ~10% and possibly ~75% of the Nd appears to have come from an enriched source component). So even in cases where a

  1. The Young Outer Disk of M83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-08-01

    Deep near-infrared images recorded with NICI on Gemini South are used to investigate the evolved stellar content in the outer southeast quadrant of the spiral galaxy M83. A diffuse population of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is detected, indicating that there are stars outside of the previously identified young and intermediate age star clusters in the outer disk. The brightest AGB stars have M K >= -8, and the AGB luminosity function (LF) is well matched by model LFs that assume ages Ciencia e Technologia (Brazil), and the Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologia e Innovacion Productiva (Argentina).

  2. Metamorphic zirconology of continental subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ren-Xu; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2017-09-01

    Zircon is widely used to date geological events and trace geochemical sources in high-pressure (HP) to ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks of continental subduction zones. However, protolith zircons may be modified by three different types of metamorphic recrystallization via mechanisms of solid-state transformation, metasomatic alteration and dissolution reprecipitation; new zircon growth may be induced by dehydration reactions below the wet solidus of crustal rocks (metamorphic zircon) or peritectic reactions above the wet solidus (peritectic zircon). As a consequence, there are different origins of zircon domains in high-grade metamorphic rocks from collisional orogens. Thus, determining the nature of individual zircon domains is substantial to correct interpretation of their origin in studies of isotopic geochronology and geochemical tracing. We advocate an integrated study of zircon mineragraphy (internal structure and external morphology), U-Pb ages, mineral inclusions, trace elements, and Lu-Hf and O isotope compositions. Only in this way we are in a position to advance the simple zircon applications to metamorphic zirconology, enabling discrimination between the different origins of zircon and providing constraints on the property of fluid activity at subduction-zone conditions. The metamorphic recrystallization of protolith zircons and the new growth of metamorphic and peritectic zircons are prominent in HP to UHP metamorphic rocks of collisional orogens. These different types of recrystallized and grown zircons can be distinguished by their differences in element and isotope compositions. While the protolith nature of metamorphosed rocks dictates water availability, the P-T conditions of subduction zones dictate the property of subduction-zone fluids. The fluids of different properties may be produced at different positions of subducting and exhuming crustal slices, and they may physically and chemically mix with each other in continental

  3. Prevention of the Outer Space Weaponization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Gennady P.

    2002-01-01

    9 states. The satellites of various functions (early warning, communication, data acquisition, reconnaissance and navigation) were actively used and continue to be used with the purposes of raising efficiency of ground armed forces, especially in fight against international terrorism. At the same time such satellites are not a weapon in the sense of that word since they do not create the threats of armed attack in outer space or from outer space. Moreover, they promote maintaining of stability in the international relations. For this reason the reconnaissance and data acquisition satellites used for the verification of observance by States of the arms limitation agreements are under international protection as national technical means of the control. Similar protection is enjoyed by the early warning satellites. With the help of space communication facilities the more reliable operative connection of the statesmen is organized in the strained situations. By this way the probability of making of the incorrect retaliatory decisions in critical political situations is reduced. At the same time it's necessary to take into consideration that the activities of such satellite systems are tightly connected with ground armed forces of the states. the earth, what from the point of view of international law may be qualified as establishing a partial demilitarization regime in outer space. After the prohibition of anti-satellite weapons (ASAT) and anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons it will be possible to speak about establishing of an international legal regime of complete demilitarization in outer space eliminating any kinds of weapon from outer space. in a peaceful time. weaponization.The main task of this paper is to analyze and to discuss the present binding regime of the outer space deweaponization and particular measures on consolidation and strengthening of this regime. agreements of the Russian Federation and the USA into multilateral Treaties. Such "immunity" would cover

  4. Carbonate sediment production in the equatorial continental shelf of South America: Quantifying Halimeda incrassata (Chlorophyta) contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Pedro Bastos de Macêdo; Morais, Jader Onofre de

    2016-12-01

    The middle and outer continental shelves of eastern equatorial South America (ESA) are characterized by intense production of carbonate sediments. Qualitative analyses of sediment deposits suggest that the calcareous green alga Halimeda incrassata is among the top CaCO3 producers. Nevertheless, no study so far has quantified its real contributions. To better understand the sediment dynamic in this area, we measured biomass, growth rates and calcium carbonate production by this alga. The species exhibited high growth rates (3.38 segments.individual-1.day-1), coverage (174 individuals.m-2) and biomass (214.02 g.m-2). Substitution of segments may allow a sedimentation rate of 1.53 mm.yr-1 and a complete turnover of the population every 60.2 days. The rapid growth indicates that this alga can produce as much CaCO3 (1.19 kg CaCO3.m-2.year-1) as other tropical organisms, such as corals and rhodoliths. In a conservative estimate, 773.500 tonnes of CaCO3 are produced per year in a 5000 km2 area off the northern coast of Brazil. Sedimentation rate seems to be higher than that promoted by continental inputs in middle and outer continental shelf. On the other hand, population turnover is twice as slow as in other H. incrassata assemblages, suggesting that South American populations are sensible to physical disturbances. New studies are necessary to accurately estimate H. incrassata coverage along the Brazilian coast and to integrate data on other CaCO3 producers, such as foraminifera and coralline algae. This would allow a better understanding of the role of South American continental shelf on the global carbon budget. Furthermore, analysis on the health of these organisms is urgent, since a decline in their populations could negatively affect ecosystems functioning and services.

  5. A Two-Dimensional Post-Stack Seismic Inversion for Acoustic Impedance of Gas and Hydrate Bearing Deep-Water Sediments Within the Continental Slope of the Ulleung Basin, East Sea, Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keumsuk Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A post-stack inversion of 2D seismic data was conducted to estimate the spatial distribution of acoustic impedance associated with gas and hydrates in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea, Korea constrained by logs from three boreholes drilled on its continental margin. A model-based inversion was applied to a Plio-Quaternary succession composed of alternations of unconsolidated mass-flow deposits/turbidites. A comparison of seismic reflections and synthetic data computed from impedance logs is shown for two zones. An upper (steep slope zone contains a moderately continuous, possibly bottom-simulating reflector feature along the corresponding section. This feature may be associated with a lithology boundary near a drill site in addition to, or instead of, a stability boundary of gas hydrates (i.e., gas below and hydrates above. The lower (gentle slope zone has locally cross-cutting reflection patterns that are more likely to be attributed to gas- and hydrate-related physical phenomena than to spatiotemporal changes in lithology. This seismic inversion is informative and useful, making a contribution to enhance the interpretability of the seismic profiles for a potential hydrate recovery.

  6. Comparative biogeochemistry-ecosystem-human interactions on dynamic continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Liu, Kon-Kee; Emeis, Kay-Christian; Breitburg, Denise L.; Cloern, James; Deutsch, Curtis; Giani, Michele; Goffart, Anne; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Lachkar, Zouhair; Limburg, Karin; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, Enrique; Naqvi, Wajih; Ragueneau, Olivier; Rabouille, Christophe; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Swaney, Dennis P.; Wassman, Paul; Wishner, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    The ocean’s continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1) provide an overview of the drivers of biogeochemical variation and change on margins, (2) compare temporal trends in hydrographic and biogeochemical data across different margins (3) review ecosystem responses to these changes, (4) highlight the importance of margin time series for detecting and attributing change and (5) examine societal responses to changing margin biogeochemistry and ecosystems. We synthesize information over a wide range of margin settings in order to identify the commonalities and distinctions among continental margin ecosystems. Key drivers of biogeochemical variation include long-term climate cycles, CO2-induced warming, acidification, and deoxygenation, as well as sea level rise, eutrophication, hydrologic and water cycle alteration, changing land use, fishing, and species invasion. Ecosystem responses are complex and impact major margin services including primary production, fisheries production, nutrient cycling, shoreline protection, chemical buffering, and biodiversity. Despite regional differences, the societal consequences of these changes are unarguably large and mandate coherent actions to reduce, mitigate and adapt to multiple stressors on continental margins.

  7. Comparative biogeochemistry-ecosystem-human interactions on dynamic continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Liu, Kon-Kee; Emeis, Kay-Christian; Breitburg, Denise L.; Cloern, James; Deutsch, Curtis; Giani, Michele; Goffart, Anne; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Lachkar, Zouhair; Limburg, Karin; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, Enrique; Naqvi, Wajih; Ragueneau, Olivier; Rabouille, Christophe; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Swaney, Dennis P.; Wassman, Paul; Wishner, Karen F.

    2015-01-01

    The oceans' continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1) provide an overview of the drivers of biogeochemical variation and change on margins, (2) compare temporal trends in hydrographic and biogeochemical data across different margins, (3) review ecosystem responses to these changes, (4) highlight the importance of margin time series for detecting and attributing change and (5) examine societal responses to changing margin biogeochemistry and ecosystems. We synthesize information over a wide range of margin settings in order to identify the commonalities and distinctions among continental margin ecosystems. Key drivers of biogeochemical variation include long-term climate cycles, CO2-induced warming, acidification, and deoxygenation, as well as sea level rise, eutrophication, hydrologic and water cycle alteration, changing land use, fishing, and species invasion. Ecosystem responses are complex and impact major margin services. These include primary production, fisheries production, nutrient cycling, shoreline protection, chemical buffering, and biodiversity. Despite regional differences, the societal consequences of these changes are unarguably large and mandate coherent actions to reduce, mitigate and adapt to multiple stressors on continental margins.

  8. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  9. Exchange of phytoplankton across the continental shelf-slope boundary of the Middle Atlantic Bight during spring 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirick, Creighton D.

    A moored array of current meters, transmissometers and fluorometers was deployed off the Delmarva Peninsula, United States, from 8 February to 9 June 1988 to measure the exchange of particles, phytoplankton and water between the continental shelf and the slope sea. The measurements were made at the 90-m isobath and near the shelf-slope front, which is the natural physical boundary between the shelf- and slope-water. The highest standing stocks of phytoplankton (>4 mg Chl a l -1) occurred during April and May directly above the shelf-slope front. Although the shelf-slope front and associated phytoplankton populations made large cross-shelf excursions (>40 km), the vertically averaged advective transport of phytoplankton was onshore at the 90-m isobath. Compared with the estimated primary production on the inner shelf, the advective transport across the 90-m isobath was -2.60% ± 5.52% of the spring production, with the negative values indicating import. These calculations suggest that primary production occurring landward of the 90-m isobath is not exported laterally, as phytoplankton or phytodetritus, to the ocean basin. This places a limit on the possible export from the shelf, but does not exclude shelf export because roughly half the volume of shelf water from Cape Cod to Cape Hatteras lies in a thin surface wedge outside the 100-m isobath [ WRIGHT and PARKER (1976) Limnology and Oceanography, 21, 563-571]. Carbon and nitrogen budgets of the Middle Atlantic Bight should acknowledge the limited exchange of phytoplankton between the inner and outer portions of the shelf.

  10. The carbon budget in the outer solar nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonelli, D P; Pollack, J B; McKay, C P; Reynolds, R T; Summers, A L

    1989-01-01

    Detailed models of the internal structures of Pluto and Charon, assuming rock and water ice as the only constituents, indicate that the mean silicate mass fraction of this two-body system is on the order of 0.7; thus the Pluto/Charon system is significantly "rockier" than the satellites of the giant planets (silicate mass fraction approximately 0.55). This compositional contrast reflects different formation mechanisms: it is likely that Pluto and Charon formed directly from the solar nebula, while the circumplanetary nebulae that produced the giant planet satellites were derived from envelopes that surrounded the forming giant planets (envelopes in which icy planetesimals dissolved more readily than rocky planetesimals). Simple cosmic abundance calculations, and the assumption that the Pluto/Charon system formed directly from solar nebula condensates, strongly suggest that the majority of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in the form of carbon monoxide; these results are consistent with (1) inheritance from the dense molecular clouds in the interstellar medium (where CH4/CO nebula chemistry. Theoretical predictions of the C/H enhancements in the atmospheres of the giant planets, when compared to the actual observed enhancements, suggest that 10%, or slightly more, of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in the form of condensed materials (although the amount of condensed C may have dropped slightly with increasing heliocentric distance). Strict compositional limits computed for the Pluto/Charon system using the densities of CH4 and CO ices indicate that these pure ices are at best minor components in the interiors of these bodies, and imply that CH4 and CO ices were not the dominant C-bearing solids in the outer nebula. Clathrate-hydrates could not have appropriated enough CH4 or CO to be the major form of condensed carbon, although such clathrates may be necessary to explain the presence of methane on Pluto after its formation from a CO-rich nebula

  11. Outer-2-independent domination in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of Technology, Gdansk, Poland. 3Department of Mathematics, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar, Iran. 4Department of Mathematics .... We have the following relation between the outer-2-independent domination number of a graph and the 2-independence number of the graph obtained from it by removing all leaves and ...

  12. The magnetospheres of the outer planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcnutt, R.L., Jr. (USAF, Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Research on the magnetospheres of all of the outer planets including Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto is reviewed for the 1987-1990 time period. Particular attention is given to magnetospheric structure, plasma transport, Jovian aurora, Io and the plasma torus, Titan and its magnetospheric interactions, rings and dusty plasmas, magnetospheric convection, and satellite interactions.

  13. Intershell correlations in photoionization of outer shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M.Ya. [The Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Chernysheva, L.V. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Drukarev, E.G. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    We demonstrate that the cross sections for photoionization of the outer shells are noticeably modified at the photon energies close to the thresholds of ionization of the inner shells due to correlations with the latter. The correlations may lead to increase or to decrease of the cross sections just above the ionization thresholds.

  14. Small RNAs controlling outer membrane porins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Johansen, Jesper; Rasmussen, Anders A

    2007-01-01

    Gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs has been recognized as an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism for several years. In Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella, these RNAs control stress response and translation of outer membrane proteins and therefore...

  15. Exploration of the continental margins of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Siddiquie, H.N.; Hashimi, N.H.; Vora, K.H.; Pathak, M.C.

    impetus from sponsored surveys of other organizations, chiefly the oil industry, ports and harbours as well as industries disposing of their effluents in the marine environment. By now the entire western continental shelf and a large part...

  16. Continental Shelf Boundary - Alaska NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Continental Shelf Boundaries (CSB) lines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. The CSB defines the seaward limit of federally...

  17. Atlantic NAD 83 Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB) lines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Atlantic Region. The CSB defines the seaward limit of federally...

  18. Neotectonism along the Atlantic passive continental margin: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Thomas W.

    1989-09-01

    An extensive body of geologic data including the modern state of stress, historical seismicity, surface and subsurface stratigraphy, numerical models of crustal deformation, surficial geomorphic systems, and historical precise leveling and tidal gauge records constrain the style and rate of neotectonic deformation for the Appalachians and Atlantic passive continental margin. There are two major styles of neotectonism in the eastern United States. The northeastern United States is dominated by isostatic uplift and northward migration of peripheral bulge collapse in response to deglaciation. This locally rapid, but decreasing rate of deformation is superimposed upon slower, long-term deformation along the Atlantic margin. Most of the long-term, continental margin deformation is attributed to lithospheric flexuring in response to sediment loading in sedimentary basins (especially the Baltimore Canyon Trough and Carolina Trough), isostatic deformation in response to continental denudation and water loading of the shelf, and stress from far-field plate tectonic sources. Significant deformational features include an uplift anomaly near Cape Fear, N.C.; northward and southward tilting of the Coastal Plain into the Salisbury and Southeast Georgia Embayments respectively; seaward tilting of the Coastal Plain/Piedmont, and a complex pattern of postglacial uplift and later subsidence in the northeast. Estimates of vertical crustal velocities for similar locations vary over several orders of magnitude. Measurement interval bias and systematic leveling errors may account for some of the discrepancies. Evidence for periodic deformation in the eastern United States in substantial and it is possible that historic data indicate a period of accelerated deformation along the Atlantic continental margin.

  19. Continental underplating after slab break-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, V.; Allen, M. B.; van Hunen, J.; Bouilhol, P.

    2017-09-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical models to investigate the dynamics of continental collision, and in particular what happens to the subducted continental lithosphere after oceanic slab break-off. We find that in some scenarios the subducting continental lithosphere underthrusts the overriding plate not immediately after it enters the trench, but after oceanic slab break-off. In this case, the continental plate first subducts with a steep angle and then, after the slab breaks off at depth, it rises back towards the surface and flattens below the overriding plate, forming a thick horizontal layer of continental crust that extends for about 200 km beyond the suture. This type of behaviour depends on the width of the oceanic plate marginal to the collision zone: wide oceanic margins promote continental underplating and marginal back-arc basins; narrow margins do not show such underplating unless a far field force is applied. Our models show that, as the subducted continental lithosphere rises, the mantle wedge progressively migrates away from the suture and the continental crust heats up, reaching temperatures >900 °C. This heating might lead to crustal melting, and resultant magmatism. We observe a sharp peak in the overriding plate rock uplift right after the occurrence of slab break-off. Afterwards, during underplating, the maximum rock uplift is smaller, but the affected area is much wider (up to 350 km). These results can be used to explain the dynamics that led to the present-day crustal configuration of the India-Eurasia collision zone and its consequences for the regional tectonic and magmatic evolution.

  20. Continental growth seen through the sedimentary record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuime, Bruno; Hawkesworth, Chris J.; Delavault, Hélène; Cawood, Peter A.

    2017-07-01

    Sedimentary rocks and detrital minerals sample large areas of the continental crust, and they are increasingly seen as a reliable archive for its global evolution. This study presents two approaches to model the growth of the continental crust through the sedimentary archive. The first builds on the variations in U-Pb, Hf and O isotopes in global databases of detrital zircons. We show that uncertainty in the Hf isotope composition of the mantle reservoir from which new crust separated, in the 176Lu/177Hf ratio of that new crust, and in the contribution in the databases of zircons that experienced ancient Pb loss(es), adds some uncertainty to the individual Hf model ages, but not to the overall shape of the calculated continental growth curves. The second approach is based on the variation of Nd isotopes in 645 worldwide fine-grained continental sedimentary rocks with different deposition ages, which requires a correction of the bias induced by preferential erosion of younger rocks through an erosion parameter referred to as K. This dimensionless parameter relates the proportions of younger to older source rocks in the sediment, to the proportions of younger to older source rocks present in the crust from which the sediment was derived. We suggest that a Hadean/Archaean value of K = 1 (i.e., no preferential erosion), and that post-Archaean values of K = 4-6, may be reasonable for the global Earth system. Models built on the detrital zircon and the fine-grained sediment records independently suggest that at least 65% of the present volume of continental crust was established by 3 Ga. The continental crust has been generated continuously, but with a marked decrease in the growth rate at 3 Ga. The period from > 4 Ga to 3 Ga is characterised by relatively high net rates of continental growth (2.9-3.4 km3 yr- 1 on average), which are similar to the rates at which new crust is generated (and destroyed) at the present time. Net growth rates are much lower since 3 Ga (0

  1. A model of rod outer segment derived lipofuscin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramitsu, T; Ishihama, H

    1995-01-01

    The rod outer segments (ROS) from pig eyes were incubated with ferrous iron and albumin. The fluorescent lipid peroxides formed in the reaction were extracted with chloroform-methanol, ethanol-ether or water. After centrifugation, the fluorescence intensities of the supernatant and the aqueous solution of the sediments were measured with a Fluorospectrophotometer. The sediments were observed with a fluorescence microscope. The fluorescence spectra has an excitation maximum at 365 nm and an emission maximum at 430-440 nm. The fluorescence intensities were greater in the water soluble fraction than in the organic solevent fraction. The fluorescence microscopy showed the blue emitting fluorophores. The fluorophores from ROS peroxidized with ferrous iron have different properties from the lipofuscin in human RPE extracted with the organic solvents.

  2. Condições hidrográficas na plataforma continental ao largo de Ubatuba: variações sazonais e em média escala Hydrographic conditions on the continental shelf off Ubatuba: seasonal and meso-scale variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belmiro Mendes de Castro Filho

    1987-01-01

    estruturas térmica e halina, tem provavelmente um importante papel na troca de massas de água entre a costa e o talude, contribuindo para o enriquecimento das águas da plataforma continental através dos movimentos ascendentes que ocorrem em seu núcleo.Hydrographic conditions on the continental shelf offshore of Ubatuba have shown different water mass distributions for summer (December, 1985 and winter (July, 1986. Two physical domains were identified: inner shelf and outer shelf, both separated by a front particularly well defined during the winter, The inner shelf has a two layer vertical stratification during summer, with a strong thermocline at mid-depths. During winter this region shows almost no stratification, During summer the upper layer (depths smaller than 20 m is filled with Coastal Water (CW, which interacts with Tropical Water (TW offshore. South Atlantic Central Water (SACA predominates in the lower layer during surrmer. Vertical interaction between CW and SACA is restricted to a band near the coast. During winter SACA does not penetrate towards the coast in the lower layer and, as a consequence, the inner shelf shows the presence of CW only. For winter interactions between CW and SACA are observed only across the front that separates inner and outer shelf. For this season there is also a noticeable intrusion of TW towards the coast on the upper layer of the outer shelf. A descriptive model for the wind driven seasonal circulation of the inner shelf is sugested, based on: 1 the water mass distributions observed and: 2 meteorological conditions from a coastal station located southward of Ubatuba, The outer shelf dynamics seems to suffer strong influence from the Brazil Current. Eddies or meanders with characteristics of frontal eddies, have been observed on both seasons on the outer shelf. These eddies should play an important role on the water mass exchange between the shelf and the slope, contributing for the enrichment of shelf waters by the upward

  3. Water physical and chemical data from current meter and bottle casts from the COLUMBUS ISELIN as part of the Ocean Continental Shelf - Mid Atlantic (OCS - Mid Atlantic) project, 27 October 1975 - 06 November 1975 (NODC Accession 7700454)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physical and chemical data were collected using current meter and bottle casts from the COLUMBUS ISELIN from October 27, 1975 to November 6, 1975. Data were...

  4. Water physical and chemical data from current meter and bottle casts from the GILLISS as part of the Ocean Continental Shelf - Mid Atlantic (OCS - Mid Atlantic) project, 04 February 1976 - 14 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700477)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physical and chemical data were collected using current meter and bottle casts from the GILLISS and other platforms from February 4, 1976 to September 14,...

  5. Water physical and chemical data from current meter and bottle casts from the G.W. PIERCE as part of the Ocean Continental Shelf - Mid Atlantic (OCS - Mid Atlantic) project, 22 October 1975 - 31 October 1975 (NODC Accession 8200067)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physical and chemical data were collected using current meter and bottle casts from the G.W. PIERCE from October 22, 1975 to October 31, 1975. Data were...

  6. Fault linkage and continental breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Derren; Lymer, Gaël; Reston, Tim; Stevenson, Carl; Bull, Jonathan; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia

    2017-04-01

    The magma-poor rifted margin off the west coast of Galicia (NW Spain) has provided some of the key observations in the development of models describing the final stages of rifting and continental breakup. In 2013, we collected a 68 x 20 km 3D seismic survey across the Galicia margin, NE Atlantic. Processing through to 3D Pre-stack Time Migration (12.5 m bin-size) and 3D depth conversion reveals the key structures, including an underlying detachment fault (the S detachment), and the intra-block and inter-block faults. These data reveal multiple phases of faulting, which overlap spatially and temporally, have thinned the crust to between zero and a few km thickness, producing 'basement windows' where crustal basement has been completely pulled apart and sediments lie directly on the mantle. Two approximately N-S trending fault systems are observed: 1) a margin proximal system of two linked faults that are the upward extension (breakaway faults) of the S; in the south they form one surface that splays northward to form two faults with an intervening fault block. These faults were thus demonstrably active at one time rather than sequentially. 2) An oceanward relay structure that shows clear along strike linkage. Faults within the relay trend NE-SW and heavily dissect the basement. The main block bounding faults can be traced from the S detachment through the basement into, and heavily deforming, the syn-rift sediments where they die out, suggesting that the faults propagated up from the S detachment surface. Analysis of the fault heaves and associated maps at different structural levels show complementary fault systems. The pattern of faulting suggests a variation in main tectonic transport direction moving oceanward. This might be interpreted as a temporal change during sequential faulting, however the transfer of extension between faults and the lateral variability of fault blocks suggests that many of the faults across the 3D volume were active at least in part

  7. Length and Time Scales in Continental Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, B. R.; Bunge, H.

    2003-12-01

    Nonlinear feedback between continents and the mantle through thermal blanketing has long been surmised as a mechanism for continental drift and Wilson cycles. Paleomagnetism provides ample evidence for large scale (10,000 km) continental motion on time scales of several hundred million years, indicative of large scale mantle circulation. While much has been learned about the interactions between continents and mantle flow from analog and numerical modeling studies in two and three dimensions, a rigorous sensitivity study on the effects of continents in high resolution 3D spherical mantle convection models has yet to be pursued. As a result, a quantitative understanding of the scales of continental motion as they relate to relevant fluid dynamic processes is lacking. Here we focus on the effect of continental size. Continents covering 30% of the surface are representative of a supercontinent such as Pangea, smaller continents (10% of Earth's surface) are representative of present day Asia, and still smaller continents (3% of Earth's surface) are similar to present day Antarctica. These continents are introduced into simple end-member mantle flow regimes characterized by combinations of bottom or internal heating and uniform or layered mantle viscosity. We find that large scale mantle structure, and correspondingly the large scale displacement of continents, depends not only on mantle heating mode and radial viscosity structure, but also on continental size. Supercontinents promote heterogeneity on the largest scales (spherical harmonic degree one), especially when combined with strong bottom heating and a high viscosity lower mantle. Degree one heterogeneities in turn drive cyclical continental motion, with continents moving from the hot to the cold hemisphere on time scales of several hundred million years. Smaller continents are unable to initiate degree one convection. As a result, their motion is governed by shorter length and time scales. We apply these

  8. The Outer Space as an Educational Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, Melquíades; Hernández-López, Montserrat

    2017-06-01

    STEAM is an educational approach to learning that uses Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics as access points for guiding student inquiry, dialogue, and critical thinking. The end results are students who take thoughtful risks, engage in experiential learning, persist in problem-solving, embrace collaboration, and work through the creative process. The Outer Space is a window to the past and the future of our travel around the history of the Universe and can be used as a educational tool in primary and secondary education. This paper talks about the integration of the resources of European Space Agency, Space Awareness, Nuclio, Scientix and Schoolnet as motivation to integrate STEAM methodology in secondary education. Keywords: STEAM, outer space, motivation, methodology

  9. Performance of the LHCb Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Arink, R; Bachmann, S.; Bagaturia, Y.; Band, H.; Bauer, Th.; Berkien, A.; Farber, Ch.; Bien, A.; Blouw, J.; Ceelie, L.; Coco, V.; Deckenhoff, M.; Deng, Z.; Dettori, F.; van Eijk, D.; Ekelhof, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Grillo, L.; Hulsbergen, W.D.; Karbach, T.M.; Koopman, R.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Langenbruch, Ch.; Lavrentyev, V.; Linn, Ch.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Meissner, M.; Michalowski, J.; Morawski, P.; Nawrot, A.; Nedos, M.; Pellegrino, A.; Polok, G.; van Petten, O.; Rovekamp, J.; Schimmel, F.; Schuylenburg, H.; Schwemmer, R.; Seyfert, P.; Serra, N.; Sluijk, T.; Spaan, B.; Spelt, J.; Storaci, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Swientek, S.; Tolk, S.; Tuning, N.; Uwer, U.; Wiedner, D.; Witek, M.; Zeng, M.; Zwart, A.

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb Outer Tracker is a gaseous detector covering an area of 5x6 m2 with 12 double layers of straw tubes. The detector with its services are described together with the commissioning and calibration procedures. Based on data of the first LHC running period from 2010 to 2012, the performance of the readout electronics and the single hit resolution and efficiency are presented. The efficiency to detect a hit in the central half of the straw is estimated to be 99.2%, and the position resolution is determined to be approximately 200 um. The Outer Tracker received a dose in the hottest region corresponding to 0.12 C/cm, and no signs of gain deterioration or other ageing effects are observed.

  10. Outer magnetospheric fluctuations and pulsar timing noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, K.S.

    1987-10-01

    The Cheng, Ho, and Ruderman (1986) outer-magnetosphere gap model was used to investigate the stability of Crab-type outer magnetosphere gaps for pulsars having the parameter (Omega-square B) similar to that of the Crab pulsar. The Lamb, Pines, and Shaham (1978) fluctuating magnetosphere noise model was applied to the Crab pulsar to examine the type of the equation of state that best describes the structure of the neutron star. The noise model was also applied to other pulsars, and the theoretical results were compared with observational data. The results of the comparison are consistent with the stiff equation of state, as suggested by the vortex creep model of the neutron star interior. The timing-noise observations also contribute to the evidence for the existence of superfluid in the core of the neutron star. 37 references.

  11. Outer spiral structure in disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsis, P. A.

    2017-03-01

    In several grand design barred-spiral galaxies it is observed a second, fainter, outer set of spiral arms. Typical examples of objects of this morphology can be considered NGC 1566 and NGC 5248. I suggest that such an overall structure can be the result of two dynamical mechanisms acting in the disc. The bar and both spiral systems rotate with the same pattern speed. The inner spiral is reinforced by regular orbits trapped around the stable, elliptical, periodic orbits of the central family, while the outer system of spiral arms is supported by chaotic orbits. Chaotic orbits are also responsible for a rhomboidal area surrounding the inner barred-spiral region. In general there is a discontinuity between the two spiral structures at the corotation region.

  12. The Outer Banks of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Robert; Lins, Harry; Smith, Jodi Jones

    2016-12-27

    The Outer Banks of North Carolina are excellent examples of the nearly 300 barrier islands rimming the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. These low, sandy islands are among the most dynamic natural landscapes occupied by man. Beach sands move offshore, onshore, and along the shore in the direction of the prevailing longshore currents. In this way, sandy coasts continuously adjust to different tide, wave, and current conditions and to rising sea level that causes the islands to migrate landward.Despite such changes, barrier islands are of considerable environmental importance. The Outer Banks are home to diverse natural ecosystems that are adapted to the harsh coastal environment. Native species tend to be robust and many are specifically adapted to withstand salt spray, periodic saltwater flooding, and the islands’ well-drained sandy soil. The Outer Banks provide an important stopover for birds on the Atlantic flyway, and many species inhabit the islands year round. In addition, Outer Banks beaches provide an important nesting habitat for five endangered or threatened sea turtle species.European explorers discovered North Carolina’s barrier islands in the 16th century, although the islands were not permanently settled until the middle 17th century. By the early 19th century, shipbuilding and lumber industries were among the most successful, until forest resources were depleted. Commercial fishing eventually followed, and it expanded considerably after the Civil War. By the Great Depression, however, little industry existed on the Outer Banks. In response to the effects of a severe hurricane in 1933, the National Park Service and the Civilian Conservation Corps proposed a massive sand-fixation program to stabilize the moving sand and prevent storm waves from sweeping across the entire width of some sections of the islands. Between 1933 and 1940, this program constructed sand fencing on 185 kilometers (115 miles) of beach and planted grass seedlings

  13. Cryovolcanism in the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Cryovolcanism is defined as the extrusion of liquids and vapors of materials that would be frozen solid at the planetary surface temperatures of the icy bodies of the outer solar system. Active cryovolcanism is now known to occur on Saturn's moon Enceladus and on Neptune's moon Triton and is suspected on Jupiter's moon Europa, while evidence for past cryovolcanic activity is widespread throughout the outer solar system. This chapter examines the mechanisms and manifestations of cryovolcanism, beginning with a review of the materials that make up these unusual ‘‘magmas’’ and the means by which they might erupt and concluding with a volcanologist's tour of the farthest reaches of the solar system.

  14. Photopolarimetry team outer planets mission definition phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The work is reported of the Photopolarimetry Team in identifying scientific objectives for photometer/polarimeter experiments for outer planet flyby missions. A discussion of the scientific objectives which can be attained with a photometer/polarimeter experiment, and summaries of the special studies which were performed for the Photopolarimetry Team are presented along with a description of the photometer/polarimeter design which was developed for the Meteoroid Detection Team.

  15. Limited grounding-line advance onto the West Antarctic continental shelf in the easternmost Amundsen Sea Embayment during the last glacial period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klages, Johann P; Kuhn, Gerhard; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Smith, James A; Graham, Alastair G C; Nitsche, Frank O; Frederichs, Thomas; Jernas, Patrycja E; Gohl, Karsten; Wacker, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    Precise knowledge about the extent of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; c. 26.5-19 cal. ka BP) is important in order to 1) improve paleo-ice sheet reconstructions, 2) provide a robust empirical framework for calibrating paleo-ice sheet models, and 3) locate potential shelf refugia for Antarctic benthos during the last glacial period. However, reliable reconstructions are still lacking for many WAIS sectors, particularly for key areas on the outer continental shelf, where the LGM-ice sheet is assumed to have terminated. In many areas of the outer continental shelf around Antarctica, direct geological data for the presence or absence of grounded ice during the LGM is lacking because of post-LGM iceberg scouring. This also applies to most of the outer continental shelf in the Amundsen Sea. Here we present detailed marine geophysical and new geological data documenting a sequence of glaciomarine sediments up to ~12 m thick within the deep outer portion of Abbot Trough, a palaeo-ice stream trough on the outer shelf of the Amundsen Sea Embayment. The upper 2-3 meters of this sediment drape contain calcareous foraminifera of Holocene and (pre-)LGM age and, in combination with palaeomagnetic age constraints, indicate that continuous glaciomarine deposition persisted here since well before the LGM, possibly even since the last interglacial period. Our data therefore indicate that the LGM grounding line, whose exact location was previously uncertain, did not reach the shelf edge everywhere in the Amundsen Sea. The LGM grounding line position coincides with the crest of a distinct grounding-zone wedge ~100 km inland from the continental shelf edge. Thus, an area of ≥6000 km2 remained free of grounded ice through the last glacial cycle, requiring the LGM grounding line position to be re-located in this sector, and suggesting a new site at which Antarctic shelf benthos may have survived the last glacial period.

  16. Limited grounding-line advance onto the West Antarctic continental shelf in the easternmost Amundsen Sea Embayment during the last glacial period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann P Klages

    Full Text Available Precise knowledge about the extent of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; c. 26.5-19 cal. ka BP is important in order to 1 improve paleo-ice sheet reconstructions, 2 provide a robust empirical framework for calibrating paleo-ice sheet models, and 3 locate potential shelf refugia for Antarctic benthos during the last glacial period. However, reliable reconstructions are still lacking for many WAIS sectors, particularly for key areas on the outer continental shelf, where the LGM-ice sheet is assumed to have terminated. In many areas of the outer continental shelf around Antarctica, direct geological data for the presence or absence of grounded ice during the LGM is lacking because of post-LGM iceberg scouring. This also applies to most of the outer continental shelf in the Amundsen Sea. Here we present detailed marine geophysical and new geological data documenting a sequence of glaciomarine sediments up to ~12 m thick within the deep outer portion of Abbot Trough, a palaeo-ice stream trough on the outer shelf of the Amundsen Sea Embayment. The upper 2-3 meters of this sediment drape contain calcareous foraminifera of Holocene and (pre-LGM age and, in combination with palaeomagnetic age constraints, indicate that continuous glaciomarine deposition persisted here since well before the LGM, possibly even since the last interglacial period. Our data therefore indicate that the LGM grounding line, whose exact location was previously uncertain, did not reach the shelf edge everywhere in the Amundsen Sea. The LGM grounding line position coincides with the crest of a distinct grounding-zone wedge ~100 km inland from the continental shelf edge. Thus, an area of ≥6000 km2 remained free of grounded ice through the last glacial cycle, requiring the LGM grounding line position to be re-located in this sector, and suggesting a new site at which Antarctic shelf benthos may have survived the last glacial period.

  17. Outer membrane proteins of pathogenic spirochetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Paul A; Haake, David A; Adler, Ben

    2004-06-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes are the causative agents of several important diseases including syphilis, Lyme disease, leptospirosis, swine dysentery, periodontal disease and some forms of relapsing fever. Spirochetal bacteria possess two membranes and the proteins present in the outer membrane are at the site of interaction with host tissue and the immune system. This review describes the current knowledge in the field of spirochetal outer membrane protein (OMP) biology. What is known concerning biogenesis and structure of OMPs, with particular regard to the atypical signal peptide cleavage sites observed amongst the spirochetes, is discussed. We examine the functions that have been determined for several spirochetal OMPs including those that have been demonstrated to function as adhesins, porins or to have roles in complement resistance. A detailed description of the role of spirochetal OMPs in immunity, including those that stimulate protective immunity or that are involved in antigenic variation, is given. A final section is included which covers experimental considerations in spirochetal outer membrane biology. This section covers contentious issues concerning cellular localization of putative OMPs, including determination of surface exposure. A more detailed knowledge of spirochetal OMP biology will hopefully lead to the design of new vaccines and a better understanding of spirochetal pathogenesis.

  18. CLOSURE WELD DEVELOPMENT FOR 3013 OUTER CONTAINERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W.; Howard, S.; Peterson, K.; Stokes, M.

    2009-11-10

    Excess plutonium materials in the DOE complex are packaged and stored in accordance with DOE-STD-3013. This standard specifies requirements for the stabilization of such materials and subsequent packaging in dual nested seal-welded containers. Austenitic stainless steels have been selected for container fabrication. The inner 3013 container provides contamination control while the outer 3013 container is the primary containment vessel and is the focus of this paper. Each packaging site chose a process for seal welding the outer 3013 containers in accordance with its needs and expertise. The two processes chosen for weld closure were laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Following development efforts, each system was qualified in accordance with DOE-STD-3013 prior to production use. The 3013 outer container closure weld joint was designed to accommodate the characteristics of a laser weld. This aspect of the joint design necessitated some innovative process and equipment considerations in the application of the GTAW process. Details of the weld requirements and the development processes are presented and several potential enhancements for the GTAW system are described.

  19. Seasonal Dynamics of Dissolved Organic Carbon Under Complex Circulation Schemes on a Large Continental Shelf: The Northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Feifei; Dai, Minhan; Cao, Zhimian; Wu, Kai; Zhao, Xiaozheng; Li, Xiaolin; Chen, Junhui; Gan, Jianping

    2017-12-01

    We examined the distribution and seasonality of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) based on a large data set collected from the northern South China Sea (NSCS) shelf under complex circulation schemes influenced by river plume, coastal upwelling, and downwelling. The highest surface values of ˜117 μmol L-1 were observed nearshore in summer suggesting high DOC supplies from the river inputs, whereas the lowest surface values of ˜62 μmol L-1 were on the outer shelf in winter due to entrainment of DOC-poor subsurface water under strengthened vertical mixing. While the summer coastal upwelling brought lower DOC from offshore depth to the nearshore surface, the winter coastal downwelling delivered higher surface DOC to the midshelf deep waters from the inner shelf fueled by the China Coastal Current (CCC) transporting relatively high DOC from the East China Sea to the NSCS. The intensified winter downwelling generated a cross-shelf DOC transport of 3.1 × 1012 g C over a large shelf area, which induced a significant depression of the NSCS DOC inventory in winter relative to in autumn. In addition to the variable physical controls, net biological production of DOC was semiquantified in both the river plume (2.8 ± 3.0 μmol L-1) and coastal upwelling (3.1 ± 1.3 μmol L-1) in summer. We demonstrated that the NSCS shelf had various origins of DOC including riverine inputs, inter-shelf transport and in situ production. Via cross-shelf transport, the accumulated DOC would be exported to and stored in the deep ocean, suggesting that continental shelves are a potentially effective carbon sink.

  20. Contribution to the study of maximum levels for liquid radioactive waste disposal into continental and sea water. Treatment of some typical samples; Contribution a l'etude des niveaux limites relatifs a des rejets d'effluents radioactifs liquides dans les eaux continentales et oceaniques. Traitement de quelques exemples types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittel, R.; Mancel, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, departement de la protection sanitaire

    1968-10-01

    The most important carriers of radioactive contamination of man are the whole of foodstuffs and not only ingested water or inhaled air. That is the reason why, in accordance with the spirit of the recent recommendations of the ICRP, it is proposed to substitute the idea of maximum levels of contamination of water to the MPC. In the case of aquatic food chains (aquatic organisms and irrigated foodstuffs), the knowledge of the ingested quantities and of the concentration factors food/water permit to determinate these maximum levels, or to find out a linear relation between the maximum levels in the case of two primary carriers of contamination (continental and sea waters). The notion of critical food-consumption, critical radioelements and formula of waste disposal are considered in the same way, taking care to attach the greatest possible importance to local situations. (authors) [French] Les vecteurs essentiels de la contamination radioactive de l'homme sont les aliments dans leur ensemble, et non seulement l'eau ingeree ou l'air inhale. C'est pourquoi, en accord avec l'esprit des recentes recommandations de la C.I.P.R., il est propose de substituer aux CMA la notion de niveaux limites de contamination des eaux. Dans le cas des chaines alimentaires aquatiques (organismes aquatiques et aliments irrigues), la connaissance des quantites ingerees et celle des facteurs de concentration aliments/eau permettent de determiner ces niveaux limites dans le cas de deux vecteurs primaires de contamination (eaux continentales et eaux oceaniques). Les notions de regime alimentaire critique, de radioelement critique et de formule de rejets sont envisagees, dans le meme esprit, avec le souci de tenir compte le plus possible des situations locales. (auteurs)

  1. The basins on the Argentine continental margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urien, C.M. [Buenos Aires Technological Institute Petroleum School, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1996-08-01

    After the stabilization of the central Gondwana Craton, orogenic belts were accreted, as a result of convergence events and an extensive passive margin developed in southwestern Gondwana. Thermal subsidence in Parana, Karoo-Ventania basins and the Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic rifts, were modified by the Gondwana breakup and the South Atlantic opening. Early Paleozoic marine transgressions deposited the Table Mountain Group in Ventania. In southwestern Patagonia foreland clastics were deposited. Magmatic arcs and marine units indicate a tectonic trough was formed, alternating with continental sequences, over Late Paleozoic metamorphics and intrusives, resulting from plastered terrains along the Gondwana margin. In Patagonia, Permo-Carboniferous continental and glacio marine clastics infill the basins, while in Ventania, paralic sequences, grade from neritic to continental to the northeast, extending beneath the continental margin. The Triassic-Jurassic rift basins progressed onto regional widespread acid lavas and were infilled by lagoonal organic-rich sequences. Early drift phase built basins transverse to the margin, with fluvio-lacustrine sequences: Salado, Colorado, Valdes-Rawson, San Julian and North Malvinas intracratonic basins, which underwent transtensional faulting. Post-Oxfordian to Neocomian brackish sequences, onlapped the conjugate basins during the margin`s drift, with petroleum systems, as in Austral and Malvinas. In the Valanginian, basic extrusions commenced to form on the continental border, heralding the oceanic phase. Due to thermal subsidence, offlaping sediments prograded onto the remaining half-grabens. Several petroleum systems, proven and hypothetical, are identified in this region.

  2. 76 FR 20530 - Safety Zone; Boom Days, Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... intended to restrict vessels from Doug's Dive, the NFTA small boat harbor and a portion of the Buffalo... celebrate the removal of the ice boom in Lake Erie and the beginning of spring. Establishing a safety zone... waters of the NFTA small boat marina known as Doug's Dive and part of the Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo...

  3. Diurnal tides on the Barents Sea continental slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarðhamar, Jofrid; Skagseth, Øystein; Albretsen, Jon

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of diurnal tides over the continental slope between the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea shelf are presented. Numerical 3D simulations, in agreement with field data, show strong cross-slope velocities and large vertical displacements of the interface between Atlantic Water and intermediate water over the slope. The striking correspondence between the prominent observed and modeled diurnal oscillations gives confidence that this is well represented by the model. This variability, interpreted as tidally induced diurnal period topographic waves, is confined to the diverging topography of the continental slope west of Tromsøflaket. The model results reveal highly variable magnitudes of the oscillations and the cross shelf currents in time, related to variable strength of the background flow, the Norwegian Atlantic Current. We suggest that the diurnal topographic wave can be an effective mechanism for cross slope exchange between the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea shelf, and important for benthic and pelagic biological processes on the shelf and slope.

  4. Geochemical zonation and characteristics of cold seeps along the Makran continental margin off Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D.; Bohrmann, G.; Zabel, M.; Kasten, S.

    2009-04-01

    Several highly dynamic and spatially extended cold seeps were found and analyzed on the Makran accretionary wedge off Pakistan during R/V Meteor cruise M74-3 in 2007. In water depths of 550m to 2870m along the continental slope nine different gas escape structures were examined some of which are situated within a stable oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) between 150m and 1100m water depth (von Rad et al., 1996, 2000). Echosounder data indicate several gas bubble streams in the water column. The gas seepage presumably originates from squeezing of massive sediment packages being compressed by subduction at the continental margin off Pakistan. Gas- and fluid venting and associated surface-near anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) feed several cold seepage systems in the seabed. The seep sites show strong inter- and intraspecific variability of benthic chemosynthetic microhabitats. Singular seeps are often colonized by different chemosynthetic organisms in a concentric fashion. The seep-center, where active bubble ebullition occurs, is often colonized by large hydrogen sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, which are surrounded by a rim inhabited by small chemosynthetic clams and tube worms. These different habitats and the associated sediments show distinct geochemical zonations and gradients. Geochemical analyses of pore water and sediment samples obtained via ROV (push corer) show that concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and alkalinity rapidly increase to >15 mmol/l and >35 mmol/l respectively several cm below the seafloor in the center of the cold seep. In places, sulfate is depleted to concentrations below detection limit at the same depth (ROV push core GeoB 12313-6). Ammonium concentrations in this core on the other hand show a different pattern: In the center of the cold seep, which is colonized by bacterial assemblages, ammonium concentrations fluctuate around 100 µmol/l and peak with 274.4 µmol/l just above the aforementioned sulfide maximum values at 5 cm followed by a rapid

  5. Hypoxia over the Continental Margin in the Northern California Current: The Role of Shelf-Deep Ocean Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, J. A.; Chan, F.; Pierce, S. D.; Adams, K.; Shearman, R. K.; Erofeev, A.

    2016-02-01

    Near-bottom waters over the continental shelf off Oregon in the northern California Current have become increasingly hypoxic over the last decade, including the appearance of anoxia in summer 2006. Observed ecosystem impacts include the absence of fish and invertebrate die-offs. Near-bottom, inner-shelf hypoxia is driven by upwelling of low-oxygen, nutrient-rich source water onto the continental shelf, followed by the decay of organic matter from surface phytoplankton blooms. We are using data from moorings, ship surveys, and from over 60,000 kilometers of autonomous underwater glider tracks to understand the temporal and spatial distribution of dissolved oxygen over the continental margin off Oregon. The inshore side of Heceta Bank, a submarine bank that deflects the coastal upwelling jet seaward creating a region of weaker velocities inshore, is particularly vulnerable to hypoxia. Near-bottom dissolved oxygen variability is driven by changes in both the dissolved oxygen concentrations in offshore upwelling source water and local wind forcing. "Source water" is defined as being seaward of the continental shelf break on density surfaces that upwell onto the continental shelf. The strength and depth of the onshore source water flux due to wind-driven upwelling can vary through the upwelling season, influencing near-bottom shelf hypoxia. Late in the upwelling season, upwelled source waters can become lower in oxygen due to off-shelf flux of continental shelf water that has undergone respiration and is, therefore, lower in oxygen than unmodified upwelling source water. For present day source water dissolved oxygen concentrations ( 2.3 ml/l), hypoxia over the inner shelf on the inshore side of Heceta Bank during the summer upwelling season is observed about 50% of the time. Given the recent declining trend in source water dissolved oxygen concentration, in 50 years the frequency of the hypoxia over the inner shelf on the inshore side of Heceta Bank is predicted to be

  6. Durophagous Predation by King Crabs on the Continental Slope off Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K.; Aronson, R. B.; Steffel, B. V.; McClintock, J. B.; Amsler, M.; Thatje, S.

    2016-02-01

    For perhaps tens of millions of years, marine communities in Antarctica have been essentially devoid of durophagous (shell-crushing) predators, which have been excluded by low temperatures. In their absence, the resident species have evolved in isolation and are slow-moving with limited defenses. Rapidly rising sea temperatures around Antarctica are now relaxing the cold-thermal barrier and appear to be allowing deep-water king crabs (Lithodidae) to move up the continental slope, into shallower water. Their potential to emerge on the continental shelf could drastically restructure the endemic communities that live there; in other areas of the world, lithodids are typically generalist predators of invertebrates. Their diet in Antarctic waters remains unknown and it has been speculated that they are opportunistic scavengers. We report the findings of a trapping study conducted in deep water off the western Antarctic Peninsula in 2015. Stomach contents were analyzed for 18 adult Paralomis birsteini trapped on the continental slope. P. birsteini feed primarily on invertebrates such as echinoderms, gastropods and polychaetes. By understanding the prey species targeted by slope-dwelling lithodids, we can begin to project the future impact of an expansion of king crabs onto the Antarctic continental shelf.

  7. Subsurface precambrian ridge on the continental shelf of western India between Coondapoor and Kasaragod

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, V.; Rao, M.G.; SubbaRaju, L.V.

    Bathymetric and magnetic data along seven ENE-WSW and seventeen NNW-SSE and N-S profiles collected on the southwestern continental shelf of India between Coondapoor and Kasaragod within water depths of 20-2000 m are studied. Model studies...

  8. Early diagenesis of amino acids in NE Atlantic continental margin sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grutters, M.M.C.H.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis concentrates on early diagenesis of amino acids in sediments across the NE Atlantic continental slope. Early diagenesis comprises the degradation and transformation processes that take place during transport of amino acids through the water column and the early stages of burial in the

  9. Authigenic carbonates in the sediments of Goa offshore basin, western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kocherla, M.

    Euhedral crystals (approx. 1 mm) of authigenic carbonates are identified in 5 m long sediment cores collected from the western continental margin of India in water depths between 2665 and 3070 m. Low-Mg calcite and aragonite are the dominant...

  10. Tidal and subtidal flow patterns o a tropical continental shelf semi-insulated by coral reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarya, A.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Vegt, van der M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study sets out to describe the tidal and subtidal water motion at the Berau coastal shelf, which represents a tropical continental shelf area of variable width hosting a complex of barrier reefs along its oceanic edge. Moored and shipboard measurements on currents and turbulence were

  11. Morphology of pockmarks along the western continental margin of India: Employing multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dandapath, S.; Chakraborty, B.; Karisiddaiah, S.M.; Menezes, A.A.A.; Ranade, G.; Fernandes, W.A.; Naik, D.K.; PrudhviRaju, K.N.

    ) for understanding the morphology of pockmarks from the western continental margin of India. The pockmarks observed in water depths of 145-330 m are circular, elliptical or elongated in plan-view, with an average length and width of 157 (+ or - 72) m and 83...

  12. 13000 cal years upwelling variation in southwestern Atlantic (Brazil): continental paleoclima implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, A.

    2009-12-01

    Ana Luiza ALBUQUERQUE(1); Bruno TURCq(2); Abdel SIFEDDINE(1,2). (1) Departamento de Geoquímica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, Brazil. (2) LOCEAN, IRD/UPMC/CNRS/MNHN, Bondy, France. The Cabo Frio region as indicated by its name is a place of low SST due to a local upwelling triggered by the Northeast trade winds, the northward flow of cool South Atlantic Central Water and vortex of the Brazilian current in the upper warm Tropical Water. Paleoceanographic conditions during the last 13000 years have been reconstructed based on two cores collected on the outer shelf. The studied proxies included mineral and heavy metal quantification, bulk organic matter characteristics and planktonic foraminifera. A first phase of sedimentation between 13000 and 7000 cal BP is characterized by high mineral content probably due to the lower sea level. SST reconstruction indicate cool and highly variable temperatures that were probably not related to upwelling events made difficult by the low sea level but to lower regional SSTs. This is in good agreement with observations of continental climate dryer in southwest Brazil with intense events of precipitation. A second phase between 7000 and 3000 cal BP shows higher SST indicating few occurrences of upwelling. Its may be due to the decrease of South Atlantic Convergence Zone (ZCAS) intensity linked to the lower summer insolation and the reduced monsoonal flux at that time. On the adjacent continent the decrease monsoon is evidenced by low lake levels and poorly developed forests. The third and last phase, post 3000 cal BP, is characterized by the onset of upwelling events that may be related to an intensification of the South American Monsoon and of the ZCAS activity leading to an increase of Northeast winds during summer which is typically the upwelling season. On the continent this period was marked by forest development. The transition at 3000 yrs BP is very late compared to other Holocene Record. Paleoclimate model

  13. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Allowance. 38.629 Section 38.629 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial receptacle... section provides for payment of a monetary allowance for an outer burial receptacle for any interment in a...

  14. Benthic organism data from the South Texas Outer Continental Shelf (STOCS) and the Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida (MAFLA) Outer Continental Shelf studies from 16 May 1974 to 20 February 1978 (NODC Accession 8500179)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms data were collected using sediment sampler and net casts BELLOWS and other platforms in the Gulf of Mexico from 16 May 1974 to 20 February 1978....

  15. Assessment of marine debris on the Belgian Continental Shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cauwenberghe, Lisbeth; Claessens, Michiel; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Mees, Jan; Janssen, Colin R

    2013-08-15

    A comprehensive assessment of marine litter in three environmental compartments of Belgian coastal waters was performed. Abundance, weight and composition of marine debris, including microplastics, was assessed by performing beach, sea surface and seafloor monitoring campaigns during two consecutive years. Plastic items were the dominant type of macrodebris recorded: over 95% of debris present in the three sampled marine compartments were plastic. In general, concentrations of macrodebris were quite high. Especially the number of beached debris reached very high levels: on average 6429±6767 items per 100 m were recorded. Microplastic concentrations were determined to assess overall abundance in the different marine compartments of the Belgian Continental Shelf. In terms of weight, macrodebris still dominates the pollution of beaches, but in the water column and in the seafloor microplastics appear to be of higher importance: here, microplastic weight is approximately 100 times and 400 times higher, respectively, than macrodebris weight. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ion anisotropies in the outer Jovian magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbary, J. F.; Krimigis, S. M.; Keath, E. P.; Gloeckler, G.; Axford, W. I.; Armstrong, T. P.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented from Voyager 1 and 2 low-energy charged particle measurements of ion anisotropies in the outer Jovian magnetosphere (more than about 20 Jupiter radii). These anisotropies are the first observed from an instrument rotating in the spin plane of Jupiter. For the several ion species investigated, all the first-order anisotropies are strongly in the corotational sense throughout most of the Jovian magnetosphere and out to the magnetopause on the dayside. Evidence exists for a small component of outward flow in the corotating region. Beyond about 130-150 Jupiter radii along the Voyager outbound trajectories, the anisotropies suggest a magnetospheric wind flowing outward from Jupiter.

  17. Outer Rail for Wall Plate Covering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The outer rail retains two lateral screw webs of an intermediate rail to construct a base for wall plate covering. Two retention devices are disposed oppositely on respective inner sides of each retention web for retaining a respective screw web of the intermediate rail. Each retention device...... including an abutment part, which extends inwards from the inner side of the retention web such as to form an abutment surface for the respective screw web when the latter is positioned to be retained in the retention device, and extends from the abutment part into a locking part, which extends at an angle...

  18. Turbo Codes Extended with Outer BCH Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jakob Dahl

    1996-01-01

    The "error floor" observed in several simulations with the turbo codes is verified by calculation of an upper bound to the bit error rate for the ensemble of all interleavers. Also an easy way to calculate the weight enumerator used in this bound is presented. An extended coding scheme is propose...... including an outer BCH code correcting a few bit errors.......The "error floor" observed in several simulations with the turbo codes is verified by calculation of an upper bound to the bit error rate for the ensemble of all interleavers. Also an easy way to calculate the weight enumerator used in this bound is presented. An extended coding scheme is proposed...

  19. The urgency of outer territories anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Milenković

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of transforming a part of Serbian anthropology into social theoretic management of identity, I suggest both comparative historiographic and ethnographic learning from societies with similar post-colonial experience, with the aim to include the discipline into an urgent defense of Serbia and Belgrade from further ethno-profiteering interests of elites in/from outer territories, left over on the ruins of our ill judged, resource incompatible, exaggerated or immoral twentieth century adventures. Serbian anthropology, written by anthropologists to whom Serbia and Belgrade are "homeland" by origin or civilized choice, should play the key role in the defense of Serbian citizens from the interest of elites in/from the outer "homelands", particularly by revealing the processes for which it is, as a discipline, most expert at – the professionalization of ethnicity, interactive and hybrid nature of identity, instrumental nature of tradition and the identity politics in general. Having in mind the latest attempt, a particularly successful one, conducted by the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century that the lives, health, well-being, dignity and future of persons born in and loyal to the interest of Serbia and Belgrade, in large scale, thoroughly and long term be sacrificed and dedicated to the interests of ethno-profiteering elites in/from outer territories, in this article I point to the possibility to, along with the comparative learning from the above mentioned post-colonial experiences, delicate experiences of urgent anthropology be applied as well as the rich tradition of collective research. This text analyzes the results of first such research, that represenst the initial, praiseworthy and a brave step in the wise striving to engage social sciences and humanities in a search of expert and not mythical/daily-political solutions of the key problem of the Serbian nation – that of how to settle the interests of the

  20. Dark matter in the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, T.; Cruikshank, D.; De Bergh, C.; Geballe, T.

    1994-01-01

    There are now a large number of small bodies in the outer solar system that are known to be covered with dark material. Attempts to identify that material have been thwarted by the absence of discrete absorption features in the reflection spectra of these planetesimals. An absorption at 2.2 micrometers that appeared to be present in several objects has not been confirmed by new observations. Three absorptions in the spectrum of the unusually red planetesimal 5145 Pholus are well-established, but their identity remains a mystery.

  1. A regional assessment of potential environmental hazards to and limitations on petroleum development of the Southeastern United States Atlantic continental shelf, slope, and rise, offshore North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popenoe, Peter; Coward, E.L.; Cashman, K.V.

    1982-01-01

    More than 11,000 km of high-resolution seismic-reflection data, 325 km of mid-range sidescan-sonar data, and 500 km of long-range sidescan-sonar data were examined and used to construct an environmental geology map of the Continental Shelf, Slope, and Rise for the area of the U.S. Atlantic margin between lats. 32?N. and 37?N. Hardgrounds and two faults described in previous literature also are shown on the map. On the Continental Shelf, at least two faults, the Helena Banks fault and the White Oak lineament, appear to be tectonic in origin. However, a lack of historical seismicity associated with these faults indicates that they are probably not active at the present time. Hardgrounds are widely scattered but are most abundant in Onslow Bay. Although paleostream channels are common nearshore, they do not appear to be common on the central and outer shelf except off Albemarle Sound where extensive Pleistocene, Pliocene, and late Miocene channels extend across the shelf. Mobile bottom sediments are confined mainly to the shoals off Cape Romain, Cape Fear, Cape Lookout, and Cape Hatteras. Elsewhere the sand cover is thin, and older more indurated rocks are present in subcrop. No slope-instability features were noted on the Florida-Hatteras slope off North Carolina. The lack of features indicates that this slope is relatively stable. Evidence for scour by strong currents is ubiquitous on the northern Blake Plateau although deep-water reefs are sparse. The outer edge of the plateau is dominated by a major growth fault and numerous splay and antithetic faults. These faults are the product of salt tectonism in the Carolina trough and thus are not associated with seismicity. Displacements observed near the sea floor and breached diapirs offshore indicate that the main fault is still moving. Associated with the faults are collapse features that are interpreted to be caused by karst solution and cavernous porosity in Eocene and Oligocene limestones at depth. Major slumps

  2. Modification of Salmonella Lipopolysaccharides Prevents the Outer Membrane Penetration of Novobiocin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobre, Thatyane M.; Martynowycz, Michael W.; Andreev, Konstantin; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Gidalevitz, David

    2015-12-01

    Small hydrophilic antibiotics traverse the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria through porin channels. Large lipophilic agents traverse the outer membrane through its bilayer, containing a majority of lipopolysaccharides in its outer leaflet. Genes controlled by the two-component regulatory system PhoPQ modify lipopolysaccharides. We isolate lipopolysaccharides from isogenic mutants of Salmonella sp., one lacking the modification, the other fully modified. These lipopolysaccharides were reconstituted asmonolayers at the air-water interface, and their properties, aswell as their interaction with a large lipophilic drug, novobiocin, was studied. X-ray reflectivity showed that the drug penetrated the monolayer of the unmodified lipopolysaccharides reaching the hydrophobic region,butwas prevented fromthis penetration intothemodified lipopolysaccharides.Results correlatewith behavior of bacterial cells, which become resistant to antibiotics after PhoPQ-regulated modifications. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction showed that novobiocin produced a striking increase in crystalline coherence length, and the size of the near-crystalline domains.

  3. (AJST) PHYSICO-CHEMISTRY OF CONTINENTAL BENTONITES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT:- Growing demand for bentonite and kaolin applications in the ceramic industry motivated this study which aimed at physico-chemically characterizing some selected continental clayey materials from Botswana, Mozambique, Pakistan, Senegal, South Africa and the United. States of America. The hydrogen ion ...

  4. Coordination: Southeast Continental Shelf studies. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    An overview of the Oceanograhic Program of Skidaway Institute of Oceanograhy is presented. Included are the current five year plan for studies of the Southeast Continental Shelf, a summary of research accomplishments, proposed research for 1981-1982, current status of the Savannah Navigational Light Tower, and a list of publications. (ACR)

  5. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  6. Root zone of a continental rift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsch, Moritz; Svenningsen, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Mafic magmatic rocks formed between ca. 615 and 560 Ma along the Neoproterozoic margins of Baltica and Laurentia are classically attributed to continental rifting heralding the opening of the Iapetus Ocean. We report new data for the Kebnekaise Intrusive Complex (KIC) exposed in the Seve Nappes i...

  7. Geologic framework of the northern North Carolina, USA inner continental shelf and its influence on coastal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieler, E. Robert; Foster, David S.; Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Mallinson, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The inner continental shelf off the northern Outer Banks of North Carolina was mapped using sidescan sonar, interferometric swath bathymetry, and high-resolution chirp and boomer subbottom profiling systems. We use this information to describe the shallow stratigraphy, reinterpret formation mechanisms of some shoal features, evaluate local relative sea-levels during the Late Pleistocene, and provide new constraints, via recent bedform evolution, on regional sediment transport patterns. The study area is approximately 290 km long by 11 km wide, extending from False Cape, Virginia to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, in water depths ranging from 6 to 34 m. Late Pleistocene sedimentary units comprise the shallow geologic framework of this region and determine both the morphology of the inner shelf and the distribution of sediment sources and sinks. We identify Pleistocene sedimentary units beneath Diamond Shoals that may have provided a geologic template for the location of modern Cape Hatteras and earlier paleo-capes during the Late Pleistocene. These units indicate shallow marine deposition 15–25 m below present sea-level. The uppermost Pleistocene unit may have been deposited as recently as Marine Isotope Stage 3, although some apparent ages for this timing may be suspect. Paleofluvial valleys incised during the Last Glacial Maximum traverse the inner shelf throughout the study area and dissect the Late Pleistocene units. Sediments deposited in the valleys record the Holocene transgression and provide insight into the evolutionary history of the barrier-estuary system in this region. The relationship between these valleys and adjacent shoal complexes suggests that the paleo-Roanoke River did not form the Albemarle Shelf Valley complex as previously proposed; a major fluvial system is absent and thus makes the formation of this feature enigmatic. Major shoal features in the study area show mobility at decadal to centennial timescales, including nearly a kilometer of

  8. 75 FR 55970 - Safety Zone; VERMILION 380A at Block 380 Outer Continental Shelf Fixed Platform in the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... collisions, allisions, oil spills, and releases of natural gas, and thereby protect the safety of life... of collisions, allisions, oil spills, and releases of natural gas and increase the safety of life..., in the aggregate, or by the private sector of $100,000,000 (adjusted for inflation) or more in any...

  9. 78 FR 52239 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations on the Outer Continental Shelf-Oil and Gas Production Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... operations. Sec. 250.871 Welding and burning practices and procedures. Sec. 250.804 Production safety-system... that section. What must I do to protect health, safety, property, and the environment? (Sec. 250.107..., wherever failure of equipment would have a significant effect on safety, health, or the environment, except...

  10. 78 FR 54417 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations on the Outer Continental Shelf-Oil and Gas Production Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... safety devices in injection wells--dry trees. Sec. 250.817 Temporary removal of subsurface safety devices...--subsea trees. Sec. 250.830 Subsurface safety devices in injection wells--subsea trees. Sec. 250.832.... Sec. 250.860 Chemical firefighting system. Sec. 250.861 Foam firefighting system. Sec. 250.865 Surface...

  11. 77 FR 52353 - Right-of-Way Grant of Submerged Lands on the Outer Continental Shelf to Support Renewable Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... Support Renewable Energy Development AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION...) renewable energy right-of-way (ROW) grants in order to streamline this process and increase efficiency and... product generated or produced from renewable energy, but does not constitute a project easement. The...

  12. 78 FR 60208 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Adjustment of Service Fees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... reflect advancements in technology and new information. The BSEE also conducts onsite inspections to... inflation according to changes in the Implicit Price Deflator for Gross Domestic Product (IPD-GDP), which is.... The calculation of these adjustments is based on the change in the BEA IPD-GDP. The amount of the...

  13. 75 FR 19880 - Safety Zone; BW PIONEER at Walker Ridge 249, Outer Continental Shelf FPSO, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... shuttle tanker will connect its bow to the FPSO BW PIONEER and its stern to an attendant tug that will.... Basis and Purpose The Coast Guard is establishing a safety zone of 500 meters around the stern of the...) around the stern of the FPSO when it is moored to the turret buoy is a safety zone. If the FPSO detaches...

  14. 77 FR 51568 - Outer Continental Shelf, Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales, Western Planning Area Lease...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ..., Western Planning Area Lease Sale 233 and Central Planning Area Lease Sale 231 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... announced its intent to prepare a Supplemental EIS for proposed Western Planning Area (WPA) Lease Sale 233 and Central Planning Area (CPA) Lease Sale 231 (WPA/CPA Supplemental EIS) (77 FR 40380). Due to a BOEM...

  15. 77 FR 40380 - Outer Continental Shelf, Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales, Western Planning Area Lease...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ..., Western Planning Area Lease Sale 233 and Central Planning Area Lease Sale 231 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... proposed Western Planning Area (WPA) Lease Sale 233 and Central Planning Area (CPA) Lease Sale 231 (WPA/CPA... circumstances and information arising, among other things, from the Deepwater Horizon event. The WPA/CPA...

  16. 77 FR 74204 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore North Carolina-Call for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... United Kingdom's Maritime Guidance Note MGN-371, and consulted with its own waterways subject matter... economy and that in 2010, the NPS recorded more than 2.1 million recreational visits to Cape Hatteras National Seashore and a contribution of $115 million and approximately 1,800 jobs to the local economy. The...

  17. 77 FR 40376 - Outer Continental Shelf, Oil and Gas Lease Sales in the Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area (CPA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... Mexico Planning Area (CPA) and the Western Gulf of Mexico Planning Area (WPA), Beginning With WPA Sale... Call, by undertaking a series of important steps to increase the transparency of the process and... Ocean Energy Management, Gulf of Mexico OCS Region, 1201 Elmwood Park Boulevard, New Orleans, Louisiana...

  18. 75 FR 81950 - Flaring Versus Venting To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Outer Continental Shelf; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... the proposed rule. Commenters pointed out that converting existing facilities that are equipped to... pointed out that there are many factors in determining whether to flare natural gas or vent natural gas... production, it may become necessary to burn or release natural gas for a number of operational reasons...

  19. 75 FR 70023 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western and Central Planning Areas, Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Oil and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... (excluding whole and partial blocks within the boundary of the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary... expectations for handling predecisional information. Agencies should also consider the ``Factors for... Environment (MS 5410), Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Gulf of Mexico OCS...

  20. 75 FR 25291 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Mid-Atlantic Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 220

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... State University Fine Arts Complex in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. These meetings are cancelled... 5410), Minerals Management Service, Gulf of Mexico OCS Region, 1201 Elmwood Park Boulevard, New Orleans...

  1. 77 FR 1019 - Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf-Acquire a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-09

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management 30 CFR Part 585 RIN 1010-AD79 Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of... for offshore renewable energy projects. DATES: Effective Date: This correction is effective on January..., fax (703) 787-1555, or email [email protected] or Timothy Redding, Renewable Energy, BOEM, at...

  2. 78 FR 47748 - Right-of-Way Grant of Submerged Lands on the Outer Continental Shelf to Support Renewable Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... Support Renewable Energy Development AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice. ] SUMMARY: BOEM will use Form 0009 to issue a renewable energy right-of- way (ROW) grant on the... http://www.boem.gov/Renewable-Energy Program/ Regulatory-Information/Index.aspx. DATES: The ROW grant...

  3. 77 FR 5820 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Massachusetts-Call for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... available ecosystem data and information within the area under consideration and identify gaps therein. To..., Environmental Entrepreneurs, Fishing Vessel Holly and Abby, Martha's Vineyard Commission, National Marine... Alliance to Protect Nantucket Sound, Defenders of Wildlife, Environmental Entrepreneurs, Marine Mammal...

  4. 75 FR 16833 - Preliminary Revised 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2007-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... oil and gas activities: marine habitats, marine productivity, and marine fauna (i.e., birds, fish... activities as the South Atlantic, Eastern Gulf of Mexico, Mid-Atlantic, and Central Gulf of Mexico, and the... sales in 6 areas (2 areas off Alaska, 1 area off the Atlantic coast, and 3 areas in the Gulf of Mexico...

  5. 75 FR 63345 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Increased Safety Measures for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ..., Regulation and Enforcement; Attention: Regulations and Standards Branch (RSB); 381 Elden Street, MS-4024..., Regulations and Standards Branch, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, 703-787-1665... Act (APA) requires that an agency publish a proposed rule in the Federal Register with notice and an...

  6. 77 FR 5039 - Accommodation Service Provided on Vessels Engaged in U.S. Outer Continental Shelf Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... August 10, 2010, while accommodating 270 workers off Barrow Island, Western Australia, the Norwegian flag... stability, fire safety, safe means of escape, and training. Despite the lack of current federal regulations... with fire safety systems, lifesaving equipment, means of escape, subdivision and stability. In the case...

  7. 78 FR 65705 - Request for Comments on the Annual Progress Report on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... includes the following information: Statistics of sales that have occurred in the previous year, including... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... the Five Year Program is available online at http://www.boem.gov/Oil-and-Gas-Energy-Program/Leasing...

  8. 77 FR 65408 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Western Planning Area (WPA) Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Oil and Gas Lease...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... Boulevard, New Orleans, Louisiana 70123-2394, (504) 736- 2519 or (800) 200-GULF. BOEM Internet Web site at... the BOEM Gulf of Mexico Internet Web site at http://www.boem.gov/About-BOEM/BOEM-Regions/Gulf-of... under existing BSEE regulations at 30 CFR part 203 and BOEM regulations at 30 CFR part 560. Deep and...

  9. 76 FR 51383 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode Island and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the.... ACTION: Call for Information and Nominations for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the OCS Offshore... commercial leases that would allow a lessee to propose the construction of a wind energy project(s) on the...

  10. 76 FR 4716 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Off Delaware, Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the... public notice of a proposed lease area for commercial wind development on the OCS off Delaware and... from Bluewater Wind Delaware LLC (Bluewater) and another from Occidental Development & Equities, LLC...

  11. 77 FR 50855 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations on the Outer Continental Shelf-Increased Safety Measures for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE) published the Interim Final Rule (75 FR 63346... incorporation by reference to the second edition of API Standard 65--Part 2, which was issued December 2010..., 2011, the BOEMRE, formerly the Minerals Management Service, was replaced by the Bureau of Ocean Energy...

  12. 75 FR 63609 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Safety and Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... text premised on the four critical elements of API RP 75 (hazards analysis, management of change... management system to work effectively, including flexibility inherent in the API RP 75 approach. Five... of a Safety and Environmental Management Program for Offshore Operations and Facilities (API RP 75...

  13. 78 FR 55230 - Safety and Environmental Management System Requirements for Vessels on the U.S. Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... on whether a SEMS that incorporates the management program and principles of API RP 75 is appropriate... in 1993. API RP 75 provides an example of a ] systematic and proactive management approach that will.... Implementing a vessel-specific SEMS that incorporates the management program and principles of API RP 75 would...

  14. 78 FR 67326 - Safety and Environmental Management System Requirements for Vessels on the U.S. Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... incorporates the management program and principles of API RP 75. This requirement would apply to MODUs, well... incorporating the management program and principles of API RP 75 as the basis for the Coast Guard's SEMS... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Parts 140-147 RIN 1625-AC05 Safety and Environmental Management System...

  15. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas technology: short course held in Washington, D. C. , May 26--27, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Manuscript is presented here from tape recordings of this two-day short course, which was concerned with the institutional factors, emphasizing nontechnical and technical aspects and barriers--social, environmental, economic, etc. Sponsored by ERDA and the University of Oklahoma, background information is first presented on ERDA's energy authorities, priorities, goals and mission. Later, such subjects as economic growth and energy demands, energy supplies in the near future, and domestic energy supplies are addressed; finally, the present status of offshore activities are summarized.

  16. 77 FR 27054 - Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Permits Issued to Shell Offshore, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... final permit decision on the OCS permit for Shell's operation of the Kulluk drilling unit in the... the operation of the Kulluk conical drilling unit to conduct exploratory drilling operations in the.... for the Kulluk Conical Drilling Unit AGENCY: United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA...

  17. 75 FR 62418 - Notice of Intent To Conduct a Review of Categorical Exclusions for Outer Continental Shelf Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ... drilling beyond 50 feet of consolidated rock or beyond 300 feet of unconsolidated rock, including contracts... dating back to the late 1970s and now BOEMRE is initiating another cycle of review as proposed herein. To...

  18. 78 FR 59715 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Proposed Oil and Gas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... the United States-Russia Provisional Maritime Boundary on the west at longitude 168 58' 37'' W. As... referred to as the ``Table''), which is designed to track the history and treatment of suggestions for... extensive Environmental Studies Program, including environmental, social, and economic studies in the...

  19. 78 FR 60892 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Proposed Oil and Gas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... longitude 156 W (roughly north of the village of Barrow) on the east to the United States-Russia Provisional... referred to as the ``Table''), which is designed to track the history and treatment of suggestions for... Information An extensive Environmental Studies Program, including environmental, social, and economic studies...

  20. 76 FR 70156 - Proposed 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ...-4010), Room 3120, 381 Elden Street, Herndon, Virginia 20170. Please label your comments and the....gov for public review and comment: (1) Economic Analysis for the OCS 5-Year Program 2012-2017: Theory...