WorldWideScience

Sample records for water organic acids

  1. Organic acids in naturally colored surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, William L.; Goerlitz, D.F.

    1966-01-01

    Most of the organic matter in naturally colored surface waters consists of a mixture of carboxylic acids or salts of these acids. Many of the acids color the water yellow to brown; however, not all of the acids are colored. These acids range from simple to complex, but predominantly they are nonvolatile polymeric carboxylic acids. The organic acids were recovered from the water by two techniques: continuous liquid-liquid extraction with n-butanol and vacuum evaporation at 50?C (centigrade). The isolated acids were studied by techniques of gas, paper, and column chromatography and infrared spectroscopy. About 10 percent of the acids recovered were volatile or could be made volatile for gas chromatographic analysis. Approximately 30 of these carboxylic acids were isolated, and 13 of them were individually identified. The predominant part of the total acids could not be made volatile for gas chromatographic analysis. Infrared examination of many column chromatographic fractions indicated that these nonvolatile substances are primarily polymeric hydroxy carboxylic acids having aromatic and olefinic unsaturation. The evidence suggests that some of these acids result from polymerization in aqueous solution. Elemental analysis of the sodium fusion products disclosed the absence of nitrogen, sulfur, and halogens.

  2. Economics of feeding drinking water containing organic acids to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A feeding trial was conducted to determine the economic effect of acidifying drinking water of broiler chickens with organic acids. The organic acids were acetic, butyric, citric and formic acids, each offered at 0.25%. The control did not contain any of the acids. One hundred and fifty (150) day old AborAcre - plus chicks were ...

  3. The Acid-Base Balance Between Organic Acids and Circumneutral Ground Waters in Large Peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, D. I.; Glaser, P. H.; So, J.

    2006-05-01

    Organic acids supply most of the acidity in the surface waters of bogs in peatlands. Yet, the fundamental geochemical properties of peatland organic acids are still poorly known. To assess the geochemical properties of typical organic acid assemblages in peatlands, we used a triprotic analog model for peat pore waters and surface waters in the Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands, optimizing on charge balance and calibrated to estimates of mole site density in DOC and triprotic acid dissociation constants. Before the calibration process, all bog waters and 76% of fen waters had more than +20% charge imbalance. After calibration, most electrochemically balanced within 20%. In the best calibration, the mole site denisty of bog DOC was estimated as ~0.05 mmol/mmol C., approximately 6 times smaller than that for fen DOC or the DOC in the fen deeper fen peats that underlie bogs. The three modeled de-protonation constants were; pKa1 = ~3.0, pKa2 = ~4.5 and pKa3 = ~7.0 for the bog DOC, and; pKa1 = ~5.2, pKa2 =~ 6.5 and pKa3 = ~7.0 for the fen DOC. Bog DOC, behaves as a strong acid despite its small mole site density. The DOC in bog runoff can therefore theoretically acidify the surface waters in adjacent fens wherever these waters do not receive sufficient buffering alkalinity from active groundwater seepage.

  4. DC diaphragm discharge in water solutions of selected organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnankova, Edita J.; Hammer, Malte U.; Reuter, Stephan; Krcma, Frantisek

    2015-07-01

    Effect of four simple organic acids water solution on a DC diaphragm discharge was studied. Efficiency of the discharge was quantified by the hydrogen peroxide production determined by UV-VIS spectrometry of a H2O2 complex formed with specific titanium reagent. Automatic titration was used to study the pH behaviour after the plasma treatment. Optical emission spectroscopy overview spectra were recorded and detailed spectra of OH band and Hβ line were used to calculate the rotational temperature and comparison of the line profile (reflecting electron concentration) in the acid solutions. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  5. Adsorption of organic arsenic acids from water over functionalized metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Mithun; Song, Ji Yoon; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2017-08-05

    Organic arsenic acids (OAAs) are regarded as water pollutants because of their toxicity and considerable solubility in water. Adsorption of OAAs such as phenylarsonic acid (PAA) and p-arsanilic acid (ASA) from water was investigated over functionalized (with OH groups) metal-organic framework (MOF, MIL-101), as well as over pristine MIL-101 and commercial activated carbon. The highly porous MIL-101 bearing three hydroxyl groups (MIL-101(OH)3) exhibited remarkable PAA and ASA adsorption capacities. Based on the effects of pH on PAA and ASA adsorption, hydrogen bonding was suggested as a plausible mechanism of OAA adsorption. Importantly, OAAs and MIL-101(OH)3 can be viewed as hydrogen-bond acceptors and donors, respectively. Moreover, MIL-101(OH)3 could be regenerated by acidic ethanol treatment, being a promising adsorbent for the removal of PAA and ASA from water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Recovery of Organic and Amino Acids from Sludge and Fish Waste in Sub Critical Water Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Faisal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of organic and amino acid production from the treatment of sludge and fish waste using water at sub critical conditions was investigated. The results indicated that at sub-critical conditions, where the ion product of water went through a maximum, the formation of organic acids was favorable. The presence of oxidant favored formation of acetic and formic acid. Other organic acids of significant amount were propionic, succinic and lactic acids. Depending on the type of wastes, formation of other organic acids was also possible. Knowing the organic acids obtained by hydrolysis and oxidation in sub-critical water of various wastes are useful in designing of applicable waste treatment process, complete degradation of organic wastes into volatile carbon and water, and also on the viewpoint of resource recovery. The production of lactic acid was discussed as well. The results indicated that temperature of 573 K, with the absence of oxidant, yield of lactic acid from fish waste was higher than sewage sludge. The maximum yield of total amino acids (137 mg/g-dry fish from waste fish entrails was obtained at subcritical condition (T = 523 K, P = 4 MPa at reaction time of 60 min by using the batch reactor. The amino acids obtained in this study were mainly alanine and glycine. Keywords:  organic acids, amino acids, sub-critical water, hydrothermal, resources recovery

  7. Water-enhanced solubility of carboxylic acids in organic solvents and its applications to extraction processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, John N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    The solubilities of carboxylic acids in certain organic solvents increase remarkably with an increasing amount of water in the organic phase. This phenomenon leads to a novel extract regeneration process in which the co-extracted water is selectively removed from an extract, and the carboxylic acid precipitates. This approach is potentially advantageous compared to other regeneration processes because it removes a minor component of the extract in order to achieve a large recovery of acid from the extract. Carboxylic acids of interest include adipic acid, fumaric acid, and succinic acid because of their low to moderate solubilities in organic solvents. Solvents were screened for an increase in acid solubility with increased water concentration in the organic phase. Most Lewis-base solvents were found to exhibit this increased solubility phenomena. Solvents that have a carbonyl functional group showed a very large increase in acid solubility. 71 refs., 52 figs., 38 tabs.

  8. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids: A new class of organic micropollutants in the water cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Daniel; Frömel, Tobias; Knepper, Thomas P

    2016-09-15

    Mobile and persistent organic micropollutants may impact raw and drinking waters and are thus of concern for human health. To identify such possible substances of concern nineteen water samples from five European countries (France, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Spain and Germany) and different compartments of the water cycle (urban effluent, surface water, ground water and drinking water) were enriched with mixed-mode solid phase extraction. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry non-target screening of these samples led to the detection and structural elucidation of seven novel organic micropollutants. One structure could already be confirmed by a reference standard (trifluoromethanesulfonic acid) and six were tentatively identified based on experimental evidence (chloromethanesulfonic acid, dichloromethanesulfonic acid, trichloromethanesulfonic acid, bromomethanesulfonic acid, dibromomethanesulfonic acid and bromochloromethanesulfonic acid). Approximated concentrations for these substances show that trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, a chemical registered under the European Union regulation REACH with a production volume of more than 100 t/a, is able to spread along the water cycle and may be present in concentrations up to the μg/L range. Chlorinated and brominated methanesulfonic acids were predominantly detected together which indicates a common source and first experimental evidence points towards water disinfection as a potential origin. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids were detected in drinking waters and thus may be new substances of concern. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Microgravity Compatible Reagentless Instrumentation for Detection of Dissolved Organic Acids and Alcohols in Potable Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akse, James R.; Jan, Darrell L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Organic Acid and Alcohol Monitor (OAAM) program has resulted in the successful development of a computer controlled prototype analyzer capable of accurately determining aqueous organic acids and primary alcohol concentrations over a large dynamic range with high sensitivity. Formic, acetic, and propionic acid were accurately determined at concentrations as low as 5 to 10 micrograms/L in under 20 minutes, or as high as 10 to 20 mg/L in under 30 minutes. Methanol, ethanol, and propanol were determined at concentrations as low as 20 to 100 micrograms/L, or as high as 10 mg/L in under 30 minutes. Importantly for space based application, the OAAM requires no reagents or hazardous chemicals to perform these analyses needing only power, water, and CO2 free purge gas. The OAAM utilized two membrane processes to segregate organic acids from interfering ions. The organic acid concentration was then determined based upon the conductiometric signal. Separation of individual organic acids was accomplished using a chromatographic column. Alcohols are determined in a similar manner after conversion to organic acids by sequential biocatalytic and catalytic oxidation steps. The OAAM was designed to allow the early diagnosis of under performing or failing sub-systems within the Water Recovery System (WRS) baselined for the International Space Station (ISS). To achieve this goal, several new technologies were developed over the course of the OAAM program.

  10. Aggregation behavior of cholic acid derivatives in organic solvents and in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemen, H.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis various cholic acid derivatives are reported that display aggregation in water or in organic solvents. Spontaneous aggregation of single molecules into larger, ordered structures occurs at the borderline of solubility. Amphiphilic compounds, or surfactants, which possess a

  11. Reactions between water-soluble organic acids and nitrates in atmospheric aerosols: Recycling of nitric acid and formation of organic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2) occurs when nitrogen oxides and nitric acid (HNO3) react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory-generated particles composed of water-soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e., NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates and release gaseous HNO3 during the dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase because of its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that, in turn, may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling that may further affect concentrations of gas and condensed phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  12. Spectrophotometric determination of the acidity constants of calcon in water and mixed water–organic solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD MAZLOUM-ARDAKANI

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The acid–base properties of calcon (1-(2-hydroxy-1-naphthylazo-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid in water and mixed water–organic solvents at 25 °C at an ionic strength of 0.10 M are studied by a multiwavelength spectrophotometric method. The organic solvents used were the amphiprotic (methanol, dipolar aprotic (dimethylsulfoxide, and low basic aprotic (acetonitrile. To evaluate the pH absorbance data, a resolution method based on the combination of soft- and hard-modeling was applied. The acidity constants of all related equilibria were estimated using the whole spectral fitting of the collected data to an established factor analysis model. The data analysis program Datan was applied for determination of the acidity constants. The corresponding pKa values were determined in water and mixed water–organic solvents. Linear relationship between the acidity constants and the mole fraction of the different sol-vents in the mixtures exist. The effect of solvent properties on acid–base behavior is discussed.

  13. Occurence of perfluorinated organic acids in the water of the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caliebe, C.; Gerwinski, W.; Theobald, N. [Bundesamt fuer Seeschiffahrt und Hydrographie, Hamburg (Germany); Huehnerfuss, H. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Organische Chemie

    2004-09-15

    Perfluorinated organic acids (PFC) and their derivatives are industrially produced since many years in very large quantities and are used for many purposes: Perfluoroalkyl sulfonates are applied, e.g., as surfactants and surface protectors to carpets, leather, paper, fabrics and many more. In addition, some sulfonated and carboxylated PFCs have been utilized in or as fire fighting foams, alkaline cleaners, shampoos, and insecticide formulations. Due to the large production quantities and the persistence in the environment, perfluorinated compounds are meanwhile globally distributed. Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and other long chain perfluorinated chemicals have been detected in blood of ringed seals, in polar bears, arctic foxes, mink, birds, and fishes collected in the USA, at the coasts of the Baltic and Mediterranean Sea and in the Arctic. Because of the findings of perfluorinated compounds in Arctic biota samples, it is of special interest to investigate their long range transport. Due to their high polarity, a transport by the water phase is likely. However up till now, only few studies report on the occurrence in surface or ground water and none in sea water. The aim of this work was, therefore, to develop a method for the determination of perfluorinated organic acids in seawater and to study their occurrence and distribution in the North Sea.

  14. New Particle Formation and Growth from Methanesulfonic Acid, Amines, Water, and Organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Particles in the atmosphere can influence visibility, negatively impact human health, and affect climate. The largest uncertainty in determining global radiative forcing is attributed to atmospheric aerosols. While new particle formation in many locations is correlated with sulfuric acid in air, neither the gas-phase binary nucleation of H2SO4-H2O nor the gas-phase ternary nucleation of H2SO4-NH3-H2O alone can fully explain observations. An additional potential particle source, based on previous studies in this laboratory, is methanesulfonic acid (MSA) with amines and water vapor. However, organics are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) being a major component of particles. Organics could be involved in the initial stages of particle formation by enhancing or inhibiting nucleation from sulfuric acid or MSA, in addition to contributing to their growth to form SOA. Experiments to measure the effects of a series of organics of varying structure on particle formation and growth from MSA, amines, and water were performed in a custom-built small volume aerosol flow tube reactor. Analytical instruments and techniques include a scanning mobility particle sizer to measure particle size distributions, sampling onto a weak cation exchange resin with analysis by ion chromatography to measure amine concentrations, and filter collection and analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to measure MSA concentrations. Organics were measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The impact of these organics on the initial particle formation as well as growth will be reported. The outcome is an improved understanding of fundamental chemistry of nucleation and growth to ultimately be incorporated into climate models to better predict how particles affect the global climate budget.

  15. Identification of humic acid-like and fulvic acid-like natural organic matter in river water using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, R H; Budman, H; Moresoli, C; Legge, R L

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the extent of humic acid (HA)-like and fulvic acid (FA)-like natural organic matter (NOM) present in natural water is important to assess disinfection by-product formation and fouling potential during drinking water treatment applications. However, the unique fluorescence properties related to HA-like NOM is masked by the fluorescence signals of the more abundant FA-like NOM. For this reason, it is not possible to accurately characterize HA-like and FA-like NOM components in a single water sample using direct fluorescence EEM analysis. A relatively simple approach is described here that demonstrates the feasibility of using a fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) approach for identifying HA-like and FA-like NOM fractions in water when used in combination with a series of pH adjustments and filtration steps. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence EEMS of HA-like and FA-like NOM fractions from the river water sample possessed different spectral properties. Fractionation of HA-like and FA-like NOM prior to fluorescence analysis is therefore proposed as a more reasonable approach.

  16. Highly sensitive detection of dipicolinic acid with a water-dispersible terbium-metal organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Neha; Bhardwaj, Sanjeev; Mehta, Jyotsana; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash

    2016-12-15

    The sensitive detection of dipicolinic acid (DPA) is strongly associated with the sensing of bacterial organisms in food and many types of environmental samples. To date, the demand for a sensitive detection method for bacterial toxicity has increased remarkably. Herein, we investigated the DPA detection potential of a water-dispersible terbium-metal organic framework (Tb-MOF) based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism. The Tb-MOF showed a highly sensitive ability to detect DPA at a limit of detection of 0.04nM (linear range of detection: 1nM to 5µM) and also offered enhanced selectivity from other commonly associated organic molecules. The present study provides a basis for the application of Tb-MOF for direct, convenient, highly sensitive, and specific detection of DPA in the actual samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Complex Formation of Selected Radionuclides with Ligands Commonly Found in Ground Water: Low Molecular Organic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bror Skytte; Jensen, H.

    1985-01-01

    A general approach to the analysis of potentiometric data on complex formation between cations and polybasic amphoteric acids is described. The method is used for the characterisation of complex formation between Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, La 3+, and Eu3+ with a α-hydroxy acids, tartaric acid and citric acid......, and with the α-amino acids, aspartic acid and L-cysteine. The cations have been chosen as typical components of reactor waste, and the acids because they are often found as products of microbial activity in pits or wherever organic material decays...

  18. Adsorptive removal of naproxen and clofibric acid from water using metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Zubair; Jeon, Jaewoo; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2012-03-30

    Adsorptive removal of naproxen and clofibric acid, two typical PPCPs (pharmaceuticals and personal care products), has been studied using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for the first time. The removal efficiency decreases in the order of MIL-101>MIL-100-Fe>activated carbon both in adsorption rate and adsorption capacity. The adsorption kinetics and capacity of PPCPs generally depend on the average pore size and surface area (or pore volume), respectively, of the adsorbents. The adsorption mechanism may be explained with a simple electrostatic interaction between PPCPs and the adsorbent. Finally, it can be suggested that MOFs having high porosity and large pore size can be potential adsorbents to remove harmful PPCPs in contaminated water. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Complex Formation of Selected Radionuclides with Ligands Commonly Found in Ground Water: Low Molecular Organic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bror Skytte; Jensen, H.

    1985-01-01

    A general approach to the analysis of potentiometric data on complex formation between cations and polybasic amphoteric acids is described. The method is used for the characterisation of complex formation between Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, La 3+, and Eu3+ with a α-hydroxy acids, tartaric acid and citric ac......, and with the α-amino acids, aspartic acid and L-cysteine. The cations have been chosen as typical components of reactor waste, and the acids because they are often found as products of microbial activity in pits or wherever organic material decays...

  20. Synthesis of Amino Acid Precursors with Organic Solids in Planetesimals with Liquid Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebukawa, Y; Misawa, S.; Matsukuma, J.; Chan, Q. H. S.; Kobayashi, J.; Tachibana, S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    Amino acids are important ingredients of life that would have been delivered to Earth by extraterrestrial sources, e.g., comets and meteorites. Amino acids are found in aqueously altered carbonaceous chondrites in good part in the form of precursors that release amino acids after acid hydrolysis. Meanwhile, most of the organic carbon (greater than 70 weight %) in carbonaceous chondrites exists in the form of solvent insoluble organic matter (IOM) with complex macromolecular structures. Complex macromolecular organic matter can be produced by either photolysis of interstellar ices or aqueous chemistry in planetesimals. We focused on the synthesis of amino acids during aqueous alteration, and demonstrated one-pot synthesis of a complex suite of amino acids simultaneously with IOM via hydrothermal experiments simulating the aqueous processing

  1. Is the habitation of acidic-water sanctuaries by galaxiid fish facilitated by natural organic matter modification of sodium metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Chris N; Donovan, Katherine A; Hill, Jonathan V

    2012-01-01

    Acidic waters of New Zealand's West Coast are hypothesized to be a refuge for native galaxiid fish, allowing them to escape predation from acid-sensitive invasive salmonid species. To determine the mechanisms by which galaxiids tolerate low pH, we investigated sodium metabolism in inanga Galaxias maculatus in response to water pH, short-term acclimation to acidic waters, the presence and source of natural organic matter (NOM), and fish life history. Contrary to expectation, inanga were physiologically sensitive to acid exposure, displaying inhibited sodium influx and exacerbated sodium efflux. Short-term (144 h) acclimation to acid did not modify this effect, and NOM did not exert a protective effect on sodium metabolism at low pH. Inanga sourced from naturally acidic West Coast waters did, however, display a sodium influx capacity (J(max)) that was significantly elevated when compared with that of fish collected from neutral waters. All inanga, independent of source, exhibited exceptionally high sodium uptake affinities (18-40 μM) relative to previously studied freshwater teleosts. Although inanga displayed relatively poor physiological tolerance to acidic waters, their high sodium influx affinity coupled with their occupation of near-coastal waters with elevated sodium levels may permit habitation of low-pH freshwaters.

  2. Effects of organic matter on acidic electrolysed water for reduction of foodborne pathogens on lettuce and spinach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, E-J; Alexander, E; Taylor, G A; Costa, R; Kang, D-H

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of acidic electrolysed water (EW) in the presence of organic matter (bovine serum) on the inoculated surfaces of lettuce and spinach. Lettuce and spinach leaves were inoculated with a cocktail of three strains each of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes and treated with deionized water, acidic EW and acidic EW containing bovine serum (5, 10, 15 and 20 ml l(-1)) for 15 s, 30 s, 1 min, 3 min and 5 min at room temperature (22 +/- 2 degrees C). In the absence of bovine serum, acidic EW treatment reduced levels of cells below the detection limit (0.7 log) in 5 min. In the presence of bovine serum, bactericidal activity of acidic EW decreased with increasing serum concentration. Organic matter reduces the effectiveness of acidic EW for reducing pathogens on the surfaces of lettuce and spinach. From a practical standpoint, organic matter reduces the efficacy of acidic EW. This study was conducted to confirm the effect of organic matter on the properties of acidic EW in the inactivation of foodborne pathogens on the surface of vegetables.

  3. Dominant amino acids, organic acids and sugars in water-soluble root exudates of C4 plants: a mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Vranová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this mini-review was to identify the dominant carbohydrates, organic acids and amino ­acids in water-soluble root exudates of plants which represent dominant compounds there. The study is focused on plants of C4-type of metabolism taking into account available literature. From group of carbohydrates, those dominant are represented glucose, fructose, arabinose and sucrose. Between dominant amino acids occurring in root exudates of C4-metabolism plants are alanine, se­rine, arginine, glutamine, glutamic and aspartic acid, glycine, proline, cystine, lysine and g-aminobutyric acid. Citric, malic, tartaric, succinic, trans-aconitic represent the dominant organic acids. This knowledge may be useful for planning analyses of these compounds in root exudates of C4 plants. Except for this preparation of synthetic root exudates to simulate rhizosphere of C4 plants may be performed based on these results.

  4. Salinity, dissolved organic carbon and water hardness affect peracetic acid (PAA) degradation in aqueous solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dibo; Steinberg, Christian E.W.; Straus, David L.

    2014-01-01

    -degradation of three commercial products, Wofasteril® E400, Wofasteril® E250 and Wofasteril® Lspez, at a nominal concentration of 1 mg L−1 in relation to two levels of salinity, water hardness, or dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The results showed that salinity and DOC stimulate PAA-degradation, while water hardness...

  5. Reactivity of Water Soluble Organic Acids with Chloride and Nitrate Particles Investigated by Micro-spectroscopy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; OBrien, R. E.; Kelly, S. T.; Shilling, J. E.; Tivanski, A.; Moffet, R.; Gilles, M. K.; Laskin, A.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric particles often consist of a complex organic and inorganic mixture. Interactions between organic and inorganic species may affect particles' chemical and physical properties thus atmospheric chemistry and climate. Water soluble organic acids (WSOA) can contribute a significant fraction of organic materials in condense phase. Inorganic particles, such as sea salt and mineral dust, are main components in the atmosphere and can undergo complex heterogeneous reactions. For example, depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with WSOA resulting in the release gaseous HCl and formation of organic salts. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where acid displacement reactions are mainly driven by the high volatility and evaporation of HNO3 as particles go through dehydration process. Furthermore, secondary organic material (SOM), which contains a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits a similar reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present field and laboratory studies on the reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA/SOM and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis such as computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), and micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show various potentials of chloride and nitrate depletion by WSOA and SOM. Formation of corresponding organic salts is confirmed and quantified.

  6. Organic materials retain high proportion of protons, iron and aluminium from acid sulphate soil drainage water with little subsequent release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Tan; Mosley, Luke M; Fitzpatrick, Rob; Marschner, Petra

    2016-12-01

    When previously oxidised acid sulphate soils are leached, they can release large amounts of protons and metals, which threaten the surrounding environment. To minimise the impact of the acidic leachate, protons and metals have to be retained before the drainage water reaches surrounding waterways. One possible amelioration strategy is to pass drainage water through permeable reactive barriers. The suitability of organic materials for such barriers was tested. Eight organic materials including two plant residues, compost and five biochars differing in feedstock and production temperature were finely ground and filled into PVC cores at 3.5 g dry wt/core. Field-collected acidic drainage water (pH 3, Al 22 mg L(-1) and Fe 48 mg L(-1)) was applied in six leaching events followed by six leaching events with reverse osmosis (RO) water (45 mL/event). Compost and biochars increased the leachate pH by up to 4.5 units and had a high retention capacity for metals. The metal and proton release during subsequent leaching with RO water was very small, cumulatively only 0.05-0.8 % of retained metals and protons. Retention was lower in the two plant residues, particularly wheat straw, which raised leachate pH by 2 units only in the first leaching event with drainage water, but had little effect on leachate pH in the following leaching events. It can be concluded that organic materials and particularly biochars and compost have the potential to be used in acid drainage treatment to remove and retain protons and metals.

  7. Hygroscopic properties of internally mixed particles composed of NaCl and water-soluble organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorai, Suman; Wang, Bingbing; Tivanski, Alexei; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-02-18

    Atmospheric aging of naturally emitted marine aerosol often leads to formation of internally mixed particles composed of sea salts and water-soluble organic compounds of anthropogenic origin. Mixing of sea salt and organic components has profound effects on the evolving chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of the resulted particles, which are poorly understood. Here, we have studied chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of laboratory generated NaCl particles mixed with malonic acid (MA) and glutaric acid (GA) at different molar ratios using micro-FTIR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray elemental microanalysis. Hygroscopic properties of internally mixed NaCl and organic acid particles were distinctly different from pure components and varied significantly with the type and amount of organic compound present. Experimental results were in a good agreement with the AIM modeling calculations of gas/liquid/solid partitioning in studied systems. X-ray elemental microanalysis of particles showed that Cl/Na ratio decreased with increasing organic acid component in the particles with MA yielding lower ratios relative to GA. We attribute the depletion of chloride to the formation of sodium malonate and sodium glutarate salts resulted by HCl evaporation from dehydrating particles.

  8. Highly selective luminescent sensing of picric acid based on a water-stable europium metal-organic framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Tifeng; Zhu, Fengliang; Cui, Yuanjing, E-mail: cuiyj@zju.edu.cn; Yang, Yu; Wang, Zhiyu; Qian, Guodong, E-mail: gdqian@zju.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    A water-stable metal-organic framework (MOF) EuNDC has been synthesized for selective detection of the well-known contaminant and toxicant picric acid (PA) in aqueous solution. Due to the photo-induced electron transfer and self-absorption mechanism, EuNDC displayed rapid, selective and sensitive detection of PA with a detection limit of 37.6 ppb. Recyclability experiments revealed that EuNDC retains its initial luminescent intensity and same quenching efficiency in each cycle, suggesting high photostability and reusability for long-term sensing applications. The excellent detection performance of EuNDC makes it a promising PA sensing material for practical applications. - Graphical abstract: A water-stable europium-based metal-organic framework has been reported for highly selective sensing of picric acid (PA) with a detection limit of 37.6 ppb in aqueous solution. - Highlights: • A water-stable metal-organic framework (MOF) EuNDC was synthesized. • The highly selective detection of picric acid with a detection limit of 37.6 ppb was realized. • The detection mechanism were also presented and discussed.

  9. Predicting the pKa and stability of organic acids and bases at an oil-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, M P; Olsson, M H M; Stipp, S L S

    2014-06-10

    We have used density functional theory and the implicit solvent model, COSMO-RS, to investigate how the acidity constant, pKa, of organic acids and bases adsorbed at the organic compound-aqueous solution interface changes, compared to its value in the aqueous phase. The pKa determine the surface charge density of the molecules that accumulate at the fluid-fluid interface. We have estimated the pKa by comparing the stability of the protonated and unprotonated forms of a series of molecules in the bulk aqueous solution and at an interface where parts of each molecule reside in the hydrophobic phase and the rest remains in the hydrophilic phase. We found that the pKa for acids is shifted by ∼1 pH unit to higher values compared to the bulk water pKa, whereas they are shifted to lower values by a similar amount for bases. Because this pKa shift is similar in magnitude for each of the molecules studied, we propose that the pKa for molecules at a water-organic compound interface can easily be predicted by adding a small shift to the aqueous pKa. This shift is general and correlates with the functional group. We also found that the relative composition of molecules at the fluid-fluid interface is not the same as in the bulk. For example, species such as carboxylic acids are enriched at the interface, where they can dominate surface properties, even when they are a modest component in the bulk fluid. For high surface concentrations of carboxylic acid groups at an interface, such as a self-assembled monolayer, we have demonstrated that the pKa depends on the degree of deprotonation through direct hydrogen bonding between protonated and deprotonated acidic headgroups.

  10. A fate for organic acids, formaldehyde and methanol in cloud water: their biotransformation by micro-organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Amato

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between microbial and chemical contents of cloud water were investigated. First, we observe that the bulk cloud water solution provides a substantial environment where bacteria can develop significantly. Then, a total number of 60 microbial strains originating from seven distinct samples of cloud water and affiliated to various taxonomic groups were examined for their ability to degrade some of the main atmospheric carboxylic compounds: formate, acetate, lactate, succinate, as well as formaldehyde and methanol. Biodegradation tests show that all these compounds can be transformed when used as single carbonaceous substrates, with activities depending on both the strain and the compound. The highest capacities of biodegradation are observed towards formaldehyde, formate and acetate, which are also the more concentrated compounds typically measured in cloud water. Hence, analyses by 1H NMR permitted to establish for instance that compounds like pyruvate or fumarate can be produced and released in the media in relation to the transformation of lactate or succinate. In addition, utilization of 13C labelled formaldehyde showed that it can be transformed through many metabolic pathways, similar to those induced by photochemistry and leading to the production of formate and/or methanol. These results suggest that microorganisms of cloud water can have various behaviours towards the chemical compounds present in the atmosphere: they can represent either a sink or source for organic carbon, and may have to be considered as actors of cloud chemistry.

  11. Predicting the pKa and stability of organic acids and bases at an oil-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Olsson, Mats Henrik Mikael; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2014-01-01

    We have used density functional theory and the implicit solvent model, COSMO-RS, to investigate how the acidity constant, pKa, of organic acids and bases adsorbed at the organic compound-aqueous solution interface changes, compared to its value in the aqueous phase. The pKa determine the surface...... phase and the rest remains in the hydrophilic phase. We found that the pKa for acids is shifted by ∼1 pH unit to higher values compared to the bulk water pKa, whereas they are shifted to lower values by a similar amount for bases. Because this pKa shift is similar in magnitude for each of the molecules...... is not the same as in the bulk. For example, species such as carboxylic acids are enriched at the interface, where they can dominate surface properties, even when they are a modest component in the bulk fluid. For high surface concentrations of carboxylic acid groups at an interface, such as a self...

  12. On line pre-concentration for simultaneous determination of low molecular weight organic acids and inorganic anions in Amazonian river water samples employing ion chromatography with conductivity detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cristiane Azevedo Tumang; Alex Vladimir Krusche; Reynaldo Luis Victoria; Jeffrey Edward Richey

    2009-01-01

    An ion chromatography procedure, employing an IonPac AC15 concentrator column was used to investigate on line preconcentration for the simultaneous determination of inorganic anions and organic acids in river water...

  13. Seasonal dynamics of particulate organic matter in the Changjiang Estuary and adjacent coastal waters illustrated by amino acid enantiomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Liu, Zongguang; Hu, Jun; Zhu, Zhuoyi; Liu, Sumei; Zhang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    Total suspended matter (TSM) was collected in the Changjiang Estuary and adjacent areas of the East China Sea in July, August, and November 2011, to study the composition and fate of particulate organic nitrogen (PON) during an August typhoon event and bottom trawling activities. Concentrations of particulate organic carbon (POC), particulate nitrogen (PN), and hydrolyzable particulate amino acids (PAA, D- and L-enantiomers) were higher during July and August than during November; however, D-arginine and alanine levels were significantly higher in November. Seasonal trends in the composition of PAAs indicate that in situ production is a key factor in their temporal distribution. No significant increase in TSM or decrease in labile organic matter was observed during the transit period following a typhoon event in August. In contrast, higher primary production was observed at this time as a result of the penetration of Changjiang Diluted Water caused by the typhoon event. Trawling effects were studied by comparing the calm season (July) with the bottom-trawling period (November) at similar sampling sites. The effect of trawling on the composition of bottom organic matter was studied by comparing D-amino acids concentrations and C/N ratios in the calm season (July) with the bottom-trawling period (November). A substantial contribution of microbial organic matter during the November cruise was indicated by a decrease in glutamic acid, an increase in TSM and D-alanine, and a lower carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio. In shallow coastal regions, anthropogenic activities (bottom trawling) may enhance the transfer of low-nutritional-value particulate organic matter into the benthic food chain.

  14. Highly selective luminescent sensing of picric acid based on a water-stable europium metal-organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tifeng; Zhu, Fengliang; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Wang, Zhiyu; Qian, Guodong

    2017-01-01

    A water-stable metal-organic framework (MOF) EuNDC has been synthesized for selective detection of the well-known contaminant and toxicant picric acid (PA) in aqueous solution. Due to the photo-induced electron transfer and self-absorption mechanism, EuNDC displayed rapid, selective and sensitive detection of PA with a detection limit of 37.6 ppb. Recyclability experiments revealed that EuNDC retains its initial luminescent intensity and same quenching efficiency in each cycle, suggesting high photostability and reusability for long-term sensing applications. The excellent detection performance of EuNDC makes it a promising PA sensing material for practical applications.

  15. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  16. Developing palaeolimnological records of organic content (DOC and POC) using the UK Acid Water Monitoring Network sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Fiona; Chiverrell, Richard; Boyle, John

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring programmes have shown increases in concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the surface waters of northern and central Europe (Monteith et al. 2007), and negative impacts of the browning of river waters have been reported for fish populations (Jonsson et al. 2012; Ranaker et al. 2012) and for ecosystem services such as water treatment (Tuvendal and Elmqvist 2011). Still the exact causes of the recent browning remain uncertain, the main contenders being climate change (Evans et al. 2005) and reduced ionic strength in surface water resulting from declines in anthropogenic sulphur and sea salt deposition (Monteith et al. 2007). There is a need to better understand the pattern, drivers and trajectory of these increases in DOC and POC in both recent and longer-term (Holocene) contexts to improve the understanding of carbon cycling within lakes and their catchments. In Britain there are some ideal sites for testing whether these trends are preserved and developing methods for reconstructing organic fluxes from lake sedimentary archives. There is a suite of lakes distributed across the country, the UK Acid Waters Monitoring Network (UKAWMN) sites, which have been monitored monthly for dissolved organic carbon and other aqueous species since 1988. These 12 lakes have well studied recent and in some case whole Holocene sediment records. Here four of those lakes (Grannoch, Chon, Scoat Tarn and Cwm Mynach) are revisited, with sampling focused on the sediment-water interface and very recent sediments (approx.150 years). At Scoat Tarn (approx. 1000 years) and Llyn Mynach (11.5k years) longer records have been obtained to assess equivalent patterns through the Holocene. Analyses of the gravity cores have focused on measuring and characterising the organic content for comparison with recorded surface water DOC measurements (UKAWMN). Data from pyrolysis measurements (TGA/DSC) in an N atmosphere show that the mass loss between 330-415°C correlates well with

  17. Efficacy of pressure-assisted thermal processing, in combination with organic acids, against Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores suspended in deionized water and carrot puree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratphitagsanti, Wannasawat; De Lamo-Castellvi, Silvia; Balasubramaniam, V M; Yousef, Ahmed Elmeleigy

    2010-01-01

    Effect of organic acids (acetic, citric, and lactic; 100 mM, pH 5) on spore inactivation by pressure-assisted thermal processing (PATP; 700 MPa and 105 degrees C), high pressure processing (HPP; 700 MPa, 35 degrees C), and thermal processing (TP; 105 degrees C, 0.1 MPa) was investigated. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores were inoculated into sterile organic acid solutions to obtain a final concentration of approximately 1.3 x 10(8) CFU/mL. B. amyloliquefaciens spores were inactivated to undetectable levels with or without organic acids after 3 min PATP holding time. At a shorter PATP treatment time (approximately 2 min), the inactivation was greater when spores were suspended in citric and acetic acids than in lactic acid or deionized water. Presence of organic acids during PATP resulted in 33% to 80% germination in the population of spores that survived the treatment. In contrast to PATP, neither HPP nor TP, for up to 5 min holding time with or without addition of organic acids, was sporicidal. In a separate set of experiments, carrot puree was tested, as a low-acid food matrix, to study spore recovery during extended storage following PATP. Results showed that organic acids were effective in inhibiting spore recovery in treated carrot puree during extended storage (up to 28 d) at 32 degrees C. In conclusion, addition of some organic acids provided significant lethality enhancement (P puree.

  18. Transition metal modified and partially calcined inorganic-organic pillared clays for the adsorption of salicylic acid, clofibric acid, carbamazepine, and caffeine from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Lafaurie, Wilman A; Román, Félix R; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J

    2012-11-15

    Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) are considered emerging contaminants, and their efficient removal from water is going to be a challenging endeavor. Microporous adsorbent materials, including pillared clays, could offer a potential solution if tailored properly. Although pillared clays have been employed previously for the removal of organics, the effective removal of PPCPs will only be possible if their surface and textural properties are manipulated from the bottom-up. This work presents the use of modified inorganic-organic pillared clays (IOCs) for the adsorption of salicylic acid, clofibric acid, carbamazepine, and caffeine. The IOCs have been modified with Co(2+), Cu(2+), or Ni(2+) to induce complexation-like adsorbate-adsorbent interactions at ambient conditions, in an attempt to provide an efficient and yet reversible driving force in the sub-ppm concentration range. Furthermore, the IOCs were partially calcined to increase effective surface area by an order of magnitude while preserving some hydrophobicity. In general, the Ni(2+) IOCs exhibited the greatest interaction with salicylic and clofibric acids, respectively, while the Co(2+) adsorbents excelled at adsorbing caffeine at low concentrations. All of the metal-modified IOCs showed comparable adsorption capacities for the case of carbamazepine, probably due to the lack of availability of particular functional groups in this adsorbate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Controlling Salmonella infection in weanling pigs through water delivery of direct-fed microbials or organic acids: Part II. Effects on intestinal histology and active nutrient transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of water-delivered direct-fed microbials (DFM) or organic acids on intestinal morphology and active nutrient absorption in weanling pigs following deliberate Salmonella infection. Pigs (n = 88) were weaned at 19 ± 2 d of age and assigned to one...

  20. Percent recoveries of anthropogenic organic compounds with and without the addition of ascorbic acid to preserve finished-water samples containing free chlorine, 2004-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valder, Joshua F.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Bender, David A.; Price, Curtis V.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents finished-water matrix-spike recoveries of 270 anthropogenic organic compounds with and without the addition of ascorbic acid to preserve water samples containing free chlorine. Percent recoveries were calculated using analytical results from a study conducted during 2004-10 for the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The study was intended to characterize the effect of quenching on finished-water matrix-spike recoveries and to better understand the potential oxidation and transformation of 270 anthropogenic organic compounds. The anthropogenic organic compounds studied include those on analytical schedules 1433, 2003, 2033, 2060, 2020, and 4024 of the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory. Three types of samples were collected from 34 NAWQA locations across the Nation: (1) quenched finished-water samples (not spiked), (2) quenched finished-water matrix-spike samples, and (3) nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples. Percent recoveries of anthropogenic organic compounds in quenched and nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples are presented. Comparisons of percent recoveries between quenched and nonquenched spiked samples can be used to show how quenching affects finished-water samples. A maximum of 18 surface-water and 34 groundwater quenched finished-water matrix-spike samples paired with nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples were analyzed. Percent recoveries for the study are presented in two ways: (1) finished-water matrix-spike samples supplied by surface-water or groundwater, and (2) by use (or source) group category for surface-water and groundwater supplies. Graphical representations of percent recoveries for the quenched and nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples also are presented.

  1. Salinity, water hardness, and dissolved organic carbon modulate degradation of peracetic acid (PAA) compounds in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is used in aquaculture under different conditions for disinfection purposes. However, there is a lack of information about its environmental fate, particularly its persistence in aquatic systems with different chemistries. Therefore, the impact of water hardness, salinity, and d...

  2. Taurine as a green bio-organic catalyst for the preparation of bio-active barbituric and thiobarbituric acid derivatives in water media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Nader; Shirini, Farhad; Langarudi, Mohaddeseh Safarpoor Nikoo; Karimi-Chayjani, Reyhaneh

    2017-12-21

    Taurine, a β-amino acid that is abundantly available in the tissues of human and animals, is efficiently used as a green bio-organic catalyst in the preparation of some of the biologically active barbituric and thiobarbituric acid derivatives. In the presence of taurine, 5-Arylidene (thio) barbituric acid derivatives were prepared via Knovenagel reaction between aldehydes and (thio)barbituric acid. Using this reagent also pyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidinone(thione) derivatives were synthesized through a three-component reaction between aldehydes, (thio)barbituric and malononitrile. Both reactions are performed in water with good to excellent yields during acceptable reaction times. No organic solvent was used during reaction or separation steps and no extra-purification was exerted. Meanwhile, reusability of taurine was easy and noticeably high. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Organic contaminates in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, M A; Belal, M; Nomrossy, A M; Yousse, A M

    1980-01-01

    The carbon adsorption method was used for separating organic matter from large samples of drainage, river and tap water. The carbon chloroform extract (CCE) was separated into different solubility fractions and the neutral fraction was separated into aliphatic, aromatic and oxy-compounds using column chromatography. The aromatic fraction was subjected to TLC, IR and UV analysis. The pesticide endrin was present in both river and tap water at concentrations of 0.7 and 1.5 ppb, respectively.

  4. Study of acid-base properties in various water-salt and water-organic solvent mixtures; Etude de proprietes acides-bases dans divers melanges eau-sels et eau-solvants organiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-02-01

    Acid-base reactions have been studied in water-salt mixtures and water organic solvent-mixtures. It has been possible to find some relations between the displacement of the equilibria and the numerical value of water activity in the mixture. First have been studied some equilibria H{sup +} + B {r_reversible} HB{sup +} in salt-water mixtures and found a relation between the pK{sub A} value, the solubility of the base and water activity. The reaction HO{sup -} + H{sup +} {r_reversible} H{sub 2}O has been investigated and a relation been found between pK{sub i} values, water activity and the molar concentration of the salt in the mixture. This relation is the same for every mixture. Then the same reactions have been studied in organic solvent-water mixtures and a relation found in the first part of the work have been used with success. So it has been possible to explain easily some properties of organic water-mixture as the shape of the curves of the Hammett acidity function Ho. (authors) [French] Nous avons envisage l'etude des reactions acides-bases dans des melanges eau-sels MX et des melanges d'eau et de solvants organiques. Les uns et les autres ont ete choisis de facon a ce que la basicite du solvant ou celle de l'anion X{sup -} soit negligeable devant celle de l'eau dans les melanges consideres. Dans un premier temps nous avons etudie dans les melanges eau-sels MX les equilibres H{sup +} + B {r_reversible} HB{sup +} et HA {r_reversible} H{sup +} + A{sup -}. On montre que connaissant la valeur de la solubilite de la base B et de l'acide HA dans le melange eau-sel considere et dans l'eau pure et celle de l'activite de l'eau dans le melange, il est possible de prevoir la valeur de la constante de l'equilibre acide-base etudiee. Dans un deuxieme temps nous avons cherche a generaliser ces resultats, lorsque l'on remplace le sel MX dans le melange avec l'eau par un solvant organique. De meme que precedemment

  5. Water purification using organic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  6. Study design and percent recoveries of anthropogenic organic compounds with and without the addition of ascorbic acid to preserve water samples containing free chlorine, 2004-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valder, Joshua F.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Price, Curtis V.; Sandstrom, Mark W.

    2008-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began implementing Source Water-Quality Assessments (SWQAs) in 2002 that focus on characterizing the quality of source water and finished water of aquifers and major rivers used by some of the larger community water systems in the United States. As used for SWQA studies, source water is the raw (ambient) water collected at the supply well prior to water treatment (for ground water) or the raw (ambient) water collected from the river near the intake (for surface water). Finished water is the water that is treated, which typically involves, in part, the addition of chlorine or other disinfection chemicals to remove pathogens, and is ready to be delivered to consumers. Finished water is collected before the water enters the distribution system. This report describes the study design and percent recoveries of anthropogenic organic compounds (AOCs) with and without the addition of ascorbic acid to preserve water samples containing free chlorine. The percent recoveries were determined by using analytical results from a laboratory study conducted in 2004 by the USGS's National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) and from data collected during 2004-06 for a field study currently (2008) being conducted by the USGS's NAWQA Program. The laboratory study was designed to determine if preserving samples with ascorbic acid (quenching samples) adversely affects analytical performance under controlled conditions. During the laboratory study, eight samples of reagent water were spiked for each of five analytical schedules evaluated. Percent recoveries from these samples were then compared in two ways: (1) four quenched reagent spiked samples analyzed on day 0 were compared with four quenched reagent spiked samples analyzed on day 7 or 14, and (2) the combined eight quenched reagent spiked samples analyzed on day 0, 7, or 14 were compared with eight laboratory reagent spikes (LRSs). Percent

  7. Controlling Salmonella infection in weanling pigs through water delivery of direct-fed microbials or organic acids. Part I: effects on growth performance, microbial populations, and immune status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, M C; Rostagno, M H; Gardiner, G E; Sutton, A L; Richert, B T; Radcliffe, J S

    2012-01-01

    Pigs (n = 88) weaned at 19 ± 2 d of age were used in a 14-d study to evaluate the effects of water-delivered direct-fed microbials (DFM) or organic acids on growth, immune status, Salmonella infection and shedding, and intestinal microbial populations after intranasal inoculation of Salmonella Typhimurium (10(10) cfu/pig). Pigs were challenged with Salmonella 6 d after commencement of water treatments. Treatments were 1) control diet; 2) control diet + DFM (Enterococcus faecium, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus licheniformis) in drinking water at 10(9) cfu/L for each strain of bacteria; 3) control diet + an organic acid-based blend (predominantly propionic, acetic, and benzoic acid) in drinking water at 2.58 mL/L; and 4) control diet + 55 mg/kg of carbadox. Serum samples were taken on d 6, 8, 10, and 14 for determination of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) concentrations. Fecal samples were taken on d 0, 5, 7, and 11 for determination of Salmonella shedding and enumeration of coliforms. Pigs were euthanized on d 6, 8, 10, and 14. Intestinal and cecal tissue and digesta and mesenteric lymph nodes were sampled and analyzed for Salmonella. Duodenal, jejunal, and ileal mucosal scrapings were sampled for measurement of mucosal TNFα concentrations. Water delivery of DFM prevented a decline in ADG on d 2 to 6 postchallenge compared with the negative control (P prevalence in the feces, gastrointestinal tract, or lymph nodes was not affected by water delivery of acids or DFM. Serum and mucosal TNFα concentrations were not affected by treatment throughout the study with the exception of ileal concentrations on d 4 postchallenge, which were greater in the negative control group compared with all other treatments (P antibiotic was the only treatment that reduced Salmonella prevalence and this was localized to the cecum on d 8 postinfection. In conclusion, the DFM and organic acid treatments used in this study offered little or no benefits to pigs infected with Salmonella and

  8. Water-enhanced solvation of organics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jane H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Water-enhanced solvation (WES) was explored for Lewis acid solutes in Lewis base organic solvents, to develop cheap extract regeneration processes. WES for solid solutes was determined from ratios of solubilities of solutes in water-sat. and low-water solvent; both were determined from solid-liquid equilibrium. Vapor-headspace analysis was used to determine solute activity coefficients as function of organic phase water concentration. WES magnitudes of volatile solutes were normalized, set equal to slope of log γs vs xw/xs curve. From graph shape Δ(log γs) represents relative change in solute activity coefficient. Solutes investigated by vapor-headspace analysis were acetic acid, propionic acid, ethanol, 1,2-propylene glycol, 2,3-butylene glycol. Monocarboxylic acids had largest decrease in activity coefficient with water addition followed by glycols and alcohols. Propionic acid in cyclohexanone showed greatest water-enhancement Δ(log γacid)/Δ(xw/xacid) = -0.25. In methylcyclohexanone, the decrease of the activity coefficient of propionic acid was -0.19. Activity coefficient of propionic acid in methylcyclohexanone stopped decreasing once the water reached a 2:1 water to acid mole ratio, implying a stoichiometric relation between water, ketone, and acid. Except for 2,3-butanediol, activity coefficients of the solutes studied decreased monotonically with water content. Activity coefficient curves of ethanol, 1,2-propanediol and 2,3-butanediol did not level off at large water/solute mole ratio. Solutes investigated by solid-liquid equilibrium were citric acid, gallic acid, phenol, xylenols, 2-naphthol. Saturation concentration of citric acid in anhydrous butyl acetate increased from 0.0009 to 0.087 mol/L after 1.3 % (g/g) water co-dissolved into organic phase. Effect of water-enhanced solvation for citric acid is very large but very small for phenol and its derivatives.

  9. Adsorption Behavior of High Stable Zr-Based MOFs for the Removal of Acid Organic Dye from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Deng Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Zirconium based metal organic frameworks (Zr-MOFs have become popular in engineering studies due to their high mechanical stability, thermostability and chemical stability. In our work, by using a theoretical kinetic adsorption isotherm, we can exert MOFs to an acid dye adsorption process, experimentally exploring the adsorption of MOFs, their external behavior and internal mechanism. The results indicate their spontaneous and endothermic nature, and the maximum adsorption capacity of this material for acid orange 7 (AO7 could be up to 358 mg·g−1 at 318 K, estimated by the Langmuir isotherm model. This is ascribed to the presence of an open active metal site that significantly intensified the adsorption, by majorly increasing the interaction strength with the adsorbates. Additionally, the enhanced π delocalization and suitable pore size of UiO-66 gave rise to the highest host–guest interaction, which further improves both the adsorption capacity and separation selectivity at low concentrations. Furthermore, the stability of UiO-66 was actually verified for the first time, through comparing the structure of the samples before and after adsorption mainly by Powder X-ray diffraction and thermal gravimetric analysis.

  10. Photodecomposition of humic acid and natural organic matter in swamp water using a TiO(2)-coated ceramic foam filter: potential for the formation of disinfection byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masanobu; Sugita, Tsuyoshi; Mase, Akinori; Funatogawa, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Masaru; Aizawa, Kazuhiko; Kato, Shigekazu; Saito, Yoichi; Ito, Tsukasa; Itabashi, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the photodecomposition of aqueous humic acid (HA) by a TiO(2)-coated ceramic foam filter (TCF) reactor and on the potential for the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) upon chlorination of the photocatalytically treated solutions. This photocatalytic reactor can also be applied to the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) in swamp waters. The proposed photocatalytic reaction system was operated as per standardized methodologies. First, the ability of the TCF to decompose HA (a representative compound of NOM) was evaluated from the changes in the total organic carbon (TOC) and UV(254) with the reaction time. Remarkably, TOC removal and UV(254) values ranging from 44% to 61% and from 60% to 83%, respectively, were achieved. The potential for the formation of DBPs (total trihalomethane and total haloacetic acid) by chlorination of the phototreated solution was strongly dependent on the TOC removal and UV(254) values in the solution. The degree of photodecomposition of NOMs in the swamp water samples and the DBP formation potential showed similar trends as in the case of the standard solutions containing HA. The method used in this study could be effectively used to evaluate the efficiency of TCF for reducing HA and NOM, while suppressing the formation of DBP products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Removal of antibiotics from water in the coexistence of suspended particles and natural organic matters using amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Shuying [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Yang, Zhen, E-mail: yangzhen@njnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Ren, Kexin [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Tian, Ziqi [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Dong, Chang; Ma, Ruixue; Yu, Ge [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Yang, Weiben, E-mail: yangwb007@njnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Novel amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants are employed to remove antibiotics. • Effects of different structures of amino acids and antibiotics are investigated. • Correlation analysis shows coexisted kaolin and HA have synergistic removal effect. • Theoretical DFT calculation clarifies the interactions in molecular level. - Abstract: Contamination of trace antibiotics is widely found in surface water sources. This work delineates removal of trace antibiotics (norfloxacin (NOR), sulfadiazine (SDZ) or tylosin (TYL)) from synthetic surface water by flocculation, in the coexistence of inorganic suspended particles (kaolin) and natural organic matter (humic acid, HA). To avoid extra pollution caused by petrochemical products-based modification reagents, environmental-friendly amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants, Ctrp and Ctyr, with different functional aromatic-rings structures were employed. Jar tests at various pHs exhibited that, Ctyr, owning phenol groups as electron donors, was favored for elimination of cationic NOR (∼50% removal; optimal pH: 6; optimal dosage: 4 mg/L) and TYL (∼60% removal; optimal pH: 7; optimal dosage: 7.5 mg/L), due to π–π electron donator-acceptor (EDA) effect and unconventional H-bonds. Differently, Ctrp with indole groups as electron acceptor had better removal rate (∼50%) of SDZ anions (electron donator). According to correlation analysis, the coexisted kaolin and HA played positive roles in antibiotics’ removal. Detailed pairwise interactions in molecular level among different components were clarified by spectral analysis and theoretical calculations (density functional theory), which are important for both the structural design of new flocculants aiming at targeted contaminants and understanding the environmental behaviors of antibiotics in water.

  12. Removal of antibiotics from water in the coexistence of suspended particles and natural organic matters using amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants: A combined experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shuying; Yang, Zhen; Ren, Kexin; Tian, Ziqi; Dong, Chang; Ma, Ruixue; Yu, Ge; Yang, Weiben

    2016-11-05

    Contamination of trace antibiotics is widely found in surface water sources. This work delineates removal of trace antibiotics (norfloxacin (NOR), sulfadiazine (SDZ) or tylosin (TYL)) from synthetic surface water by flocculation, in the coexistence of inorganic suspended particles (kaolin) and natural organic matter (humic acid, HA). To avoid extra pollution caused by petrochemical products-based modification reagents, environmental-friendly amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants, Ctrp and Ctyr, with different functional aromatic-rings structures were employed. Jar tests at various pHs exhibited that, Ctyr, owning phenol groups as electron donors, was favored for elimination of cationic NOR (∼50% removal; optimal pH: 6; optimal dosage: 4mg/L) and TYL (∼60% removal; optimal pH: 7; optimal dosage: 7.5mg/L), due to π-π electron donator-acceptor (EDA) effect and unconventional H-bonds. Differently, Ctrp with indole groups as electron acceptor had better removal rate (∼50%) of SDZ anions (electron donator). According to correlation analysis, the coexisted kaolin and HA played positive roles in antibiotics' removal. Detailed pairwise interactions in molecular level among different components were clarified by spectral analysis and theoretical calculations (density functional theory), which are important for both the structural design of new flocculants aiming at targeted contaminants and understanding the environmental behaviors of antibiotics in water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Preparation of fulvic acid and low-molecular organic acids by oxidation of weathered coal humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinozuka, T.; Ito, A.; Sasaki, O.; Yazawa, Y.; Yamaguchi, T. [Chiba Institute of Technolgy, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry

    2002-07-01

    Weathered coal contains much humic acid and a little fulvic acid. Therefore, the production of fulvic acid, the most valuable humic substance because of its water-solubility, was examined by ozone and hydrogen peroxide oxidation of humic acid extracted form Xinjiang (China) weathered coal. The resulting products of the oxidation were water soluble fulvic acid and organic acids, mainly formic acid and oxalic acid. The product yield of fulvic acid was 20 (C%) and that of organic acids were 39 (C%) for formic and acid 13 (C%) for oxalic acid. The formed fulvic acid showed a higher content of oxygen and carboxyl groups, than those of the extracted one from the original weathered coal.

  14. Partitioning of hexachlorobenzene in a kaolin/humic acid/surfactant/water system: Combined effect of surfactant and soil organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Jinzhong; Wang, Lingling [Environmental Science Research Institute, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lu, Xiaohua, E-mail: hust-esri2009@hotmail.com [Environmental Science Research Institute, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lin, Yusuo; Zhang, Shengtian [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Environmental Protection of China, Nanjing 210042 (China)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study HCB partitioning in a kaolin/humic acid/TX100/water system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We reveal influence of TX100-HA interaction on TX100 and HA sorption to kaolin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We verify combined effect of TX100 and HA on HCB desorption from clay. - Abstract: Understanding the combined effect of soil organic matter (SOM) and surfactants on the partitioning of hydrophobic organic compounds in soil/water systems is important to predict the effectiveness of surfactant-enhanced remediation (SER). In the present study we investigate the partitioning of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) within a humic acid (HA)-coated kaolin/Triton X-100 (TX100)/water system, with special emphasis on the interaction between TX100 and HA, and their combined effect on HCB sorption. HA firstly enhanced then suppressed TX100 sorption to kaolin as the amounts of HA increased, while the addition of TX100 led to a consistent reduction in HA sorption. In the HA-coated kaolin/TX100/water system, TX100 played a primary role in enhancing desorption of HCB, while the role could be suppressed and then enhanced as HA coating amounts increased. Only at HA coating above 2.4%, dissolved HA outcompeted clay-bound HA for HCB partitioning, resulting in dissolved HA enhanced desorption. The presence of dissolved HA at these conditions further promoted the effectiveness of TX100 enhanced desorption. Despite a reduced TX100 sorption to clay was achieved due to the presence of dissolved HA, the effect on HCB desorption was comparatively slight. A reliable cumulative influence of HA and TX100 on HCB desorption was observed, although HCB desorption by HA/TX100 mixed was less than the sum of HA and TX100 individually. Our study suggests that for soils of high organic contents, the combined effect of SOM and surfactants on HOCs desorption can be applied to improve the performance of SER.

  15. Identification of water-soluble heavy crude oil organic-acids, bases, and neutrals by electrospray ionization and field desorption ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Lateefah A; Kim, Sunghwan; Klein, Geoffrey C; Smith, Donald F; Rodgers, Ryan P; Marshall, Alan G

    2007-04-15

    We identify water-soluble (23 degrees C) crude oil NSO nonvolatile acidic, basic, and neutral crude oil hydrocarbons by negative-ion ESI and continuous flow FD FT-ICR MS at an average mass resolving power, m/deltam50% = 550,000. Of the 7000+ singly charged acidic species identified in South American crude oil, surprisingly, many are water-soluble, and much more so in pure water than in seawater. The truncated m/z distributions for water-soluble components exhibit preferential molecular weight, size, and heteroatom class influences on hydrocarbon solubility. Acidic water-soluble heteroatomic classes detected at >1% relative abundance include O, O2, O3, O4, OS, O2S, O3S, O4S, NO2, NO3, and NO4. Parent oil class abundance does not directly relate to abundance in the water-soluble fraction. Acidic oxygen-containing classes are most prevalent in the water-solubles, whereas acidic nitrogen-containing species are least soluble. In contrast to acidic nitrogen-containing heteroatomic classes, basic nitrogen classes are water-soluble. Water-soluble heteroatomic basic classes detected at >1% relative abundance include N, NO, NO2, NS, NS2, NOS, NO2S, N2, N2O, N2O2, OS, O2S, and O2S2.

  16. Occurrence of perfluorinated organic acids in the North and Baltic seas. Part 1: distribution in sea water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Norbert; Caliebe, Christina; Gerwinski, Wolfgang; Hühnerfuss, Heinrich; Lepom, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Due to their high water solubilities and mobilities, persistent, polar perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) such as perfluorinated carboxylates and sulfonates are likely to end up in the oceans. In part 1 of this study, their distribution in North and Baltic Sea water is reported, being of special interest because these seas are surrounded by highly industrialized countries with high population densities. A combination of solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used after optimisation to determine nine PFCs with chain lengths of C(4) to C(10) in water samples at ultra-trace levels. The observed concentration distribution and gradients were explained by oceanographic mixing processes and currents. The big rivers were identified as major input sources. At the mouth of the river Elbe, concentrations of 9 ng/L were observed for perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), and 8 ng/L for perfluorooctylsulfonate (PFOS); all other PFC concentrations ranged from 0.6 to 1.7 ng/L. At coastal stations, concentrations decreased to 3.8 ng/L (PFOA) and 1.8 ng/L (PFOS), dropping to 0.13 and 0.09 ng/L, respectively, towards the open sea. Along the Dutch coast, high perfluorobutylsulfonate concentrations (3.9 ng/L) were observed as regional characteristics. In the Baltic Sea, fairly even PFC distributions with low gradients were observed. Again, PFOA and PFOS were the major compounds (up to 1.1 and 0.9 ng/L). The results underline the necessity to include PFCs in marine monitoring programs. Water was found to be a good matrix for monitoring environmental levels, sources, and transport pathways of PFCs.

  17. Effect of the addition of organic acids in drinking water or feed during part of the finishing period on the prevalence of Salmonella in finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, Héctor; Carvajal, Ana; Costillas, Sara; Rubio, Pedro

    2013-10-01

    Pork is a major cause of foodborne salmonellosis. Consequently, effective measures that could reduce the prevalence of Salmonella at the farm are of interest. In the present study, three field trials were performed to evaluate the effect of strategic administration of organic acids, at concentrations estimated by economic criteria, on the Salmonella prevalence in finishing pigs. Pigs received either a mixture of acids (lactic, formic, propionic, and acetic) added to their drinking water at a concentration of 0.035% (trial A), or a basal diet containing 0.5% potassium-diformate, KH(COOH)₂, (trials B and C), during the last 6-7 weeks of the finishing period. Fecal Salmonella shedding and seroprevalence were monitored in the animals at four time points during the study. Mesenteric lymph nodes and cecal contents were collected from a subset of animals at the slaughterhouse and cultured for Salmonella. At the end of the finishing period in all three trials, the percentage of seropositive pigs was higher in the control group than in the experimental group, regardless of which cutoff value was used in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay. The frequency of fecal shedding was lower also in the treated pig groups from the trials A and B at the end of the finishing period. The results from the samples collected at the slaughterhouse did not yield differences between groups in trials A and B. However, Salmonella isolation was less frequent in the mesenteric lymph nodes from the experimental pigs in trial C. The seroprevalence reductions, together with some promising results in the reduction of shedding, support the idea that this intervention is a useful strategy to reduce Salmonella prevalence at the farm.

  18. Evaluation of the addition of organic acids in the feed and/or water for broilers and the subsequent recovery of Salmonella Typhimurium from litter and ceca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, D V; Wilson, K M; Ritz, C R; Kiepper, B K; Buhr, R J

    2018-01-01

    Three separate broiler Salmonella Typhimurium challenge experiments were conducted evaluating efficacy of formic and propionic acid feed supplements to suppress environmental and cecal Salmonella Typhimurium prevalence. In experiment 1, broilers were provided feed with 1 kg/ton formic acid or 5 kg/ton propionic acid feed additives or a basal control diet. At the day of placement, half of the pens were inoculated with seeder chicks orally challenged with a marker strain of Salmonella Typhimurium and to yield challenged and adjacent nonchallenged pens. No differences in weekly litter samples or cecal Salmonella prevalence at 3 or 6 wk among feeding treatments were detected. In experiment 2, treatments were: 2 kg/ton propionic acid in feed, 1.0 mL/L formic acid in water, both propionic acid in feed and formic acid in water, and a basal control. Every pen was challenged with seeder chicks inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium. By 6 wk all pens maintained detectable litter Salmonella, and broilers provided both propionic acid in feed and formic acid in water had the lowest cecal recovery (35%), compared to the control (60%). In experiment 3, treatments were: formic acid at 4 or 6 kg/ton from wk 0 to 6 or for only the last wk, propionic acid at 5 or 10 kg/ton for only the last wk, and a basal control. Each pen was challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium inoculated seeder chicks. By 6 wk, broilers fed formic acid (4 kg/ton) for the entire growout had no Salmonella-positive ceca (0/30). All treatments that provided acid supplemented feed for only the last wk had 3-13% Salmonella-positive ceca. These experiments indicate that adding formic acid to broiler feed appears to prevent Salmonella colonization from challenge pens entering into the adjacent nonchallenge pens. Feeding formic acid (4 kg/ton) for 6 wk resulted in no recovery of Salmonella from ceca compared to the control prevalence of 17%. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science

  19. Production of Valuables Organic Acids from Organic Wastes with Hydrothermal Treatment Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Faisal

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reports production of valuables organic acids from the hydrothermal treatment of representative organic wastes and compounds (i. e. domestic sludge, proteinaceous, cellulosic and plastic wastes with or without oxidant (H2O2. Organic acids such as acetic, formic, propionic, succinic and lactic acids were obtained in significant amounts. At 623 K (16.5 MPa, acetic acid of about 26 mg/g-dry waste fish entrails was obtained. This increased to 42 mg/g dry waste fish entrails in the presence of H2O2. Experiments on glucose to represent cellulosic wastes were also carried out, getting acetic acid of about 29 mg/g-glucose. The study was extended to terephthalic acid and glyceraldehyde, reaction intermediates of hydrothermal treatment of PET plastic wastes and glucose, respectively. Studies on temperature dependence of formation of organic acids showed thermal stability of acetic acid, whereas, formic acid decomposed readily under hydrothermal conditions. In general, results demonstrated that the presence of oxidants favored formation of organic acids with acetic acid being the major product. Keywords: hydrothermal treatment, organic acids, organic wastes, oxidant, supercritical water oxidation

  20. Astrobionibbler: In Situ Microfluidic Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noell, A. C.; Fisher, A. M.; Takano, N.; Fors-Francis, K.; Sherrit, S.; Grunthaner, F.

    2016-10-01

    A fluidic-chip based instrument for subcritical water extraction (SCWE) of amino acids and other organics from powder samples has been developed. A variety of soil analog extractions have been performed to better understand SCWE capabilities.

  1. Organic Acid Production by Filamentous Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnuson, Jon K.; Lasure, Linda L.

    2004-05-03

    Many of the commercial production processes for organic acids are excellent examples of fungal biotechnology. However, unlike penicillin, the organic acids have had a less visible impact on human well-being. Indeed, organic acid fermentations are often not even identified as fungal bioprocesses, having been overshadowed by the successful deployment of the β-lactam processes. Yet, in terms of productivity, fungal organic acid processes may be the best examples of all. For example, commercial processes using Aspergillus niger in aerated stirred-tank-reactors can convert glucose to citric acid with greater than 80% efficiency and at final concentrations in hundreds of grams per liter. Surprisingly, this phenomenal productivity has been the object of relatively few research programs. Perhaps a greater understanding of this extraordinary capacity of filamentous fungi to produce organic acids in high concentrations will allow greater exploitation of these organisms via application of new knowledge in this era of genomics-based biotechnology. In this chapter, we will explore the biochemistry and modern genetic aspects of the current and potential commercial processes for making organic acids. The organisms involved, with a few exceptions, are filamentous fungi, and this review is limited to that group. Although yeasts including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, species of Rhodotorula, Pichia, and Hansenula are important organisms in fungal biotechnology, they have not been significant for commercial organic acid production, with one exception. The yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, and related yeast species, may be in use commercially to produce citric acid (Lopez-Garcia, 2002). Furthermore, in the near future engineered yeasts may provide new commercial processes to make lactic acid (Porro, Bianchi, Ranzi, Frontali, Vai, Winkler, & Alberghina, 2002). This chapter is divided into two parts. The first contains a review of the commercial aspects of current and potential large

  2. Tannic acid- and natural organic matter-coated magnetite as green Fenton-like catalysts for the removal of water pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadejde, C., E-mail: claudianadejde@gmail.com; Neamtu, M., E-mail: mariana.neamtu@uaic.ro [‘Alexandru Ioan Cuza’ University, Interdisciplinary Research Department – Field Science (Romania); Hodoroaba, V.-D.; Schneider, R. J.; Paul, A. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (Germany); Ababei, G. [National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics (Romania); Panne, U. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The use of magnetic materials as heterogeneous catalysts has attracted increasing attention in the last years since they proved to be promising candidates for water treatment. In the present study, two types of surface-modified magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles, coated with non-hazardous naturally occurring agents—either tannic acid (TA) or dissolved natural organic matter—were evaluated as magnetic heterogeneous catalysts. Chemical synthesis (co-precipitation) was chosen to yield the nanocatalysts due to its well-established simplicity and efficiency. Subsequently, the properties of the final products were fully assessed by various characterization techniques. The catalytic activity in heterogeneous oxidation of aqueous solutions containing a model pollutant, Bisphenol A (BPA), was comparatively studied. The effect of operational parameters (catalyst loading, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dosage, and UV light irradiation) on the degradation performance of the oxidation process was investigated. The optimum experimental parameters were found to be 1.0 g/L of catalysts and 10 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, under UV irradiation. The highest mineralization rates were observed for Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-TA catalyst. More than 80 % of BPA was removed after 30 min of reaction time under the specified experimental conditions. The obtained results showed that the two catalysts studied here are suitable candidates for the removal of pollutants in wastewaters by means of heterogeneous reaction using a green sustainable treatment method.

  3. Characterization of Soluble Organics in Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostick, D.T.

    2002-01-16

    -selective electrodes and inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The WSO found in produced water samples was primarily polar in nature and distributed between the low and midrange carbon ranges. Typical levels of total extractable material (TEM) was about 20 mg/L; that associated with the aromatic fraction was present at 0.2 mg/L and that in the saturated hydrocarbon fraction was present at less than 0.02 mg/L. Formic, acetic, and propionic acids were also found in the produced water, occurring at a total concentration of 30 mg/L. It was estimated that the presence of 30 mg/L organic acids would artificially overstate TEM content by 2 mg/L. Of the five tested parameters, the factor that most controlled the total WSO in produced water was that of aqueous phase pH. Beyond a value of pH7 significant quantities of C{sub 10}-C{sub 20} range material become markedly soluble as they deprotonate in a basic aqueous phase. Both the absolute and relative volumes of GOM brine and crude additionally affected total WSO. Produced water appeared to reach a saturation level of WSO at a.50% water/oil ratio. Pressure slightly enhanced WSO by increasing the relative quantity of C{sub 6}-C{sub 10} range material. Temperature primarily altered the relative ratio of carbon ranges within the WSO without significantly elevating the total WSO in the GOM brine. Salinity had the least affect on the chemical character or the carbon size of WSO in produced water.

  4. Amine Chemistry at Aqueous Interfaces: The Study of Organic Amines in Neutralizing Acidic Gases at an Air/Water Surface Using Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, L.; Wren, S. N.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Small organic bases have been measured in atmospheric samples, with their sources ranging from industrial processing to animal husbandry. These small organic amines are often highly soluble, being found in atmospheric condensed phases such as fogwater and rainwater. Additionally, they display acid-neutralization ability often greater than ammonia, yet little is known regarding their kinetic and thermodynamic properties. This presentation will describe the molecular level details of a model amine system at the vapor/liquid interface in the presence of acidic gas. We find that this amine system shows very unique properties in terms of its bonding, structure, and orientation at aqueous surfaces. The results of our studies using a combination of computation, vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy, and surface tension will report the properties inherent to these atmospherically relevant species at aqueous surfaces.

  5. Dietary linseed oil supplemented with organic selenium improved the fatty acid nutritional profile, muscular selenium deposition, water retention, and tenderness of fresh pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiang; Tang, Xinyue; Xue, Yan; Lin, Gang; Xiong, Youling L

    2017-09-01

    Cross-bred pigs were fed a control diet (with 0.3ppm sodium selenite and 1.5% soybean oil) or organic selenium diets (0.3ppm Se-Yeast with 1.5% soybean or linseed oil) to investigate nutrient supplement effects on meat quality and oxidative stability. The organic selenium diets increased muscular selenium content up to 54%, and linseed oil increased n-3 fatty acids two-fold while lowering the n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio from 13.9 to 5.9 over the selenite control diet (Pmeat storage (4°C up to 6days) showed no appreciable difference (P>0.05) between diets, in agreement with the lack of notable difference in endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity between these meat groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Persistence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 during pilot-scale processing of iceberg lettuce using flume water containing peroxyacetic acid-based sanitizers and various organic loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Gordon R; Kaminski-Davidson, Chelsea N; Ryser, Elliot T

    2017-05-02

    In order to minimize cross-contamination during leafy green processing, chemical sanitizers are routinely added to the wash water. This study assessed the efficacy of peroxyacetic acid and mixed peracid against E. coli O157:H7 on iceberg lettuce, in wash water, and on equipment during simulated commercial production in a pilot-scale processing line using flume water containing various organic loads. Iceberg lettuce (5.4kg) inoculated to contain 10(6)CFU/g of a 4-strain cocktail of non-toxigenic, GFP-labeled, ampicillin-resistant E. coli O157:H7, was shredded using a commercial shredder, step-conveyed to a flume tank, washed for 90s using water alone or two different sanitizing treatments (50ppm peroxyacetic acid or mixed peracid) in water containing organic loads of 0, 2.5, 5 or 10% (w/v) blended iceberg lettuce, and then dried using a shaker table and centrifugal dryer. Thereafter, three 5.4-kg batches of uninoculated iceberg lettuce were identically processed. Various product (25g) and water (50ml) samples collected during processing along with equipment surface samples (100cm(2)) from the flume tank, shaker table and centrifugal dryer were then assessed for numbers of E. coli O157:H7. Organic load rarely impacted (P>0.05) the efficacy of either peroxyacetic acid or mixed peracid, with typical reductions of >5logCFU/ml in wash water throughout processing for all organic loads. Increases in organic load in the wash water corresponded to changes in total solids, chemical oxygen demand, turbidity, maximum filterable volume, and oxidation/reduction potential. After 90s of exposure to flume water, E. coli O157:H7 reductions on inoculated lettuce ranged from 0.97 to 1.74logCFU/g using peroxyacetic acid, with an average reduction of 1.35logCFU/g for mixed peracid. E. coli O157:H7 persisted on all previously uninoculated lettuce following the inoculated batch, emphasizing the need for improved intervention strategies that can better ensure end-product safety. Copyright

  7. Effects of fulvic acid and humic acid on aluminum speciation in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wendong; Yang, Hongwei; Wang, Xiaochang; Jiang, Jing; Zhu, Wanpeng

    2010-01-01

    This article focused on the influences of fulvic acid and humic acid on aluminum speciation in drinking water. Factors including the concentration of residual chlorine and pH value had been concerned. Aluminum species investigated in the experiments included inorganic mononuclear, organic mononuclear, mononuclear, polymer, soluble, and suspended forms. It was found that the effects of fulvic acid and humic acid on aluminum speciation depended mainly on their molecular weight. Fulvic acid with molecular weight less than 5000 Dalton had little influence on aluminum speciation; while fulvic acid with molecular weight larger than 5000 Dalton and humic acid would increase the concentration of soluble aluminum significantly even at concentration below 0.5 mg/L (calculated as TOC). Aluminum species, in the present of fulvic acid with molecular weight larger than 5000 Dalton and humic acid, were more stable than that in the present of fluvic acid with molecular mass less than 5000 Dalton, and varied little with reaction time. Within pH range 6.5-7.5, soluble aluminum increased notably in water with organic matter. As the concentration of residual chlorine increased, the effects of fulvic acid and humic acid became weak. The reactions between humic acid, fulvic acid with large molecular weight, and aluminum were considered to be a multi-dentate coordination process. With the consideration of aluminum bioavailability, reducing the concentration of fulvic acid and humic acid and keeping the pH value among 6.5-7.5 were recommended during drinking water treatment.

  8. Acid-base balance in lake water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosset, C.

    1980-02-01

    As expected, the acid-base content of lake water is composed of strong base or acid, weak acids (mainly fulvic acid) and carbonic acid. All of these may be determined by using a simple titration method. The concentration of undissociated carbonic acid sometimes appears not to be in equilibrium with the CO/sub 2/-concentration in air. Observed supersaturation seems to be connected to the concentration of fulvic acid.

  9. Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and uses thereof for producing organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-05-06

    Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-tolerant microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP), acrylic acid, and propionic acid. Further modifications to the microorganisms such as increasing expression of malonyl-CoA reductase and/or acetyl-CoA carboxylase provide or increase the ability of the microorganisms to produce 3HP. Methods of generating an organic acid with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers include replacing acsA or homologs thereof in cells with genes of interest and selecting for the cells comprising the genes of interest with amounts of organic acids effective to inhibit growth of cells harboring acsA or the homologs.

  10. Use of monascus in organic acid production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusthuis, R.A.; Wolbert, E.J.H.; Springer, J.; Oost, van der J.; Eggink, G.

    2012-01-01

    (EN)The present invention provides tools and methods for producing organic acids using strains of Monascus which are tolerant to high organicacid concentrations at low pH. (FR)La présente invention concerne des outils et des procédés pour produire des acides organiques en utilisant des souches de

  11. Iodometric microdetermination of certain organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, S N; Verma, R M

    1978-07-01

    A rapid and accurate method for the determination of certain organic acids is described. The acid sample solution is treated with suitable quantities of solid potassium iodate and potassium iodide followed by the titration of the liberated iodine with thiosulphate after 3-5 min. The results are accurate to within 0.3%.

  12. Mechanism of the extraction of nitric acid and water by organic solutions of tertiary alkyl-amines; Mecanisme d'extraction de l'acide nitrique et de l'eau par les solutions organiques d'alcoylamines tertiaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourisse, D

    1966-06-01

    The micellar aggregation of tri-alkyl-ammonium nitrates in low polarity organic solvents has been verified by viscosity, conductivity and sedimentation velocity measurements. The aggregation depends upon the polarity of solvent, the length of the alkyl radicals and the organic concentration of the various constituents (tri-alkyl-ammonium nitrate, tri-alkyl-amine, nitric acid, water). The amine salification law has been established and the excess nitric acid and water solubilities in the organic solutions have been measured. Nitric acid and water are slightly more soluble in micellar organic solutions than in molecular organic solutions. A description of excess nitric acid containing tri-alkyl-ammonium nitrate solutions is proposed. (author) [French] Mecanisme d'extraction de l'acide nitrique et de l'eau par les solutions organiques d'alcoylamines tertiaires. L'agregation micellaire des nitrates de trialcoylammonium dans les solvants peu polaires a ete verifiee par viscosimetrie, conductimetrie et ultracentrifugation des solutions organiques. L'agregation depend de la polarite du solvant, de la longueur des radicaux alcoyle, et des concentrations des differents constituants de la solution organique (nitrate de trialcoylammonium, alcoylamine tertiaire, acide nitrique, eau). La loi de salification de l'amine a ete determinee et les solubilites de l'acide nitrique en exces et de l'eau dans les solutions organiques ont ete mesurees. L'acide nitrique et l'eau sont legerement plus solubles dans les organiques micellaires que dans les solutions organiques moleculaires. Une description des solutions de nitrate de trialcoylammonium contenant de l'acide nitrique en exces est proposee. (auteur)

  13. Amino Acid, Organic Acid, and Sugar Profiles of 3 Dry Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, K M Maria; Luthria, Devanand

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we compared the amino acid, organic acid and sugar profiles of 3 different varieties of dry beans (black bean [BB], dark red bean [DRB], and cranberry bean [CB]). The efficiency of the 2 commonly used extraction solvents (water and methanol:chloroform:water [2.5:1:1, v/v/v/]) for cultivar differentiation based on their metabolic profile was also investigated. The results showed that the BB contained the highest concentration of amino acids followed by DRB and CB samples. Phenylalanine, a precursor for the biosynthesis of phenolic secondary metabolites was detected at low concentration in CB samples and correlated with the reduced anthocyanins content in CB extract as documented in the published literature. Comparing the extractability of 2 extraction solvents, methanol:chloroform:water (2.5:1:1, v/v/v/) showed higher recoveries of amino acids from 3 beans, whereas, sugars were extracted in higher concentration with water. Analytically, gas chromatography detected sugars (9), amino acids (11), and organic acids (3) in a single run after derivatization of the extracts. In comparison, ion chromatography detected only sugars in a single run without any derivatization step with the tested procedure. Bean samples are better differentiated by the sugar content extracted with water as compared to the aqueous organic solvent extracts using partial least-square discriminant analysis. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Quantification of Organic Acids in Fermented Shrimp Waste by HPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Isabel Sánchez-Machado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a simple, rapid, and reliable HPLC method for the determination of organic acids in fermented shrimp waste. Lactic, acetic and citric acids were quantified by HPLC with UV detection, on a 250×4.6 mm Extrasil ODS 5-μm column, mobile phase was ultrapure water adjusted with metaphosphoric acid to pH=2.1, flow rate 0.6 mL/min, column temperature 30 °C, and detection wavelength 210 nm. Under these conditions, the recovery (97.5 % and the method repeatability (RSD=6.2 % for lactic acid were of satisfying quality. Organic acids can preserve the quality and nutritive value of fermented shrimp waste.

  15. Formation of organic chloramines during water disinfection: chlorination versus chloramination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wontae; Westerhoff, Paul

    2009-05-01

    Many of the available studies on formation of organic chloramines during chlorination or chloramination have involved model organic nitrogen compounds (e.g., amino acids), but not naturally occurring organic nitrogen in water. This study assessed organic chloramine formation during chlorination and chloramination of 16 natural organic matter (NOM) solutions and 16 surface waters which contained dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). Chlorination rapidly formed organic chloramines within 10 min, whereas chloramination formed organic chloramination much more slowly, reaching the maximum concentration between 2 and 120 h after the addition of monochloramine into the solutions containing DON. The average organic chloramine formation upon addition of free chlorine and monochloramine into the NOM solutions were 0.78 mg-Cl(2)/mg-DON at 10 min and 0.16 mg-Cl(2)/mg-DON at 24h, respectively. Organic chloramine formation upon chlorination and chloramination increased as the dissolved organic carbon/dissolved organic nitrogen (DOC/DON) ratio decreased (i.e., DON contents increased). Chlorination of molecular weight (10,000 Da) fractionated water showed that molecular weight of DON would not impact the amount of organic chloramines produced. Comparison of three different disinfection schemes at water treatment plants (free chlorine, preformed monochloramine, and chlorine/ammonia additions) indicated organic chloramine formation could lead to a possible overestimation of disinfection capacity in many chloraminated water systems that add chlorine followed by an ammonia addition to form monochloramine.

  16. Highly thermal-stable and functional cellulose nanocrystals and nanofibrils produced using fully recyclable organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liheng Chen; Junyong Zhu; Carlos Baez; Peter Kitin; Thomas Elder

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the production of highly thermal stable and functional cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and nanofibrils (CNF) by hydrolysis using concentrated organic acids. Due to their low water solubility, these solid organic acids can be easily recovered after hydrolysis reactions through crystallization at a lower or ambient temperature. When dicarboxylic acids were...

  17. Hydroquinone-Mediated Redox Cycling of Iron and Concomitant Oxidation of Hydroquinone in Oxic Waters under Acidic Conditions: Comparison with Iron-Natural Organic Matter Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Garg, Shikha; Waite, T David

    2015-12-15

    Interactions of 1,4-hydroquinone with soluble iron species over a pH range of 3-5 in the air-saturated and partially deoxygenated solution are examined here. Our results show that 1,4-hydroquinone reduces Fe(III) in acidic conditions, generating semiquinone radicals (Q(•-)) that can oxidize Fe(II) back to Fe(III). The oxidation rate of Fe(II) by Q(•-)increases with increase in pH due to the speciation change of Q(•-) with its deprotonated form (Q(•-)) oxidizing Fe(II) more rapidly than the protonated form (HQ(•)). Although the oxygenation of Fe(II) is negligible at pH iron redox transformation by rapidly oxidizing Q(•-) to form benzoquinone (Q). A kinetic model is developed to describe the transformation of quinone and iron under all experimental conditions. The results obtained here are compared with those obtained in our previous studies of iron-Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) interactions in acidic solutions and support the hypothesis that hydroquinone moieties can reduce Fe(III) in natural waters. However, the semiquinone radicals generated in pure hydroquinone solution are rapidly oxidized by dioxygen, while the semiquinone radicals generated in SRFA solution are resistant to oxidation by dioxygen, with the result that steady-state semiquinone concentrations in SRFA solutions are 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than in solutions of 1,4-hydroquinone. As a result, semiquinone moieties in SRFA play a much more important role in iron redox transformations than is the case in solutions of simple quinones such as 1,4-hydroquinone. This difference in the steady-state concentration of semiquinone species has a dramatic effect on the cycling of iron between the +II and +III oxidation states, with iron turnover frequencies in solutions containing SRFA being 10-20 times higher than those observed in solutions of 1,4-hydroquinone.

  18. Projected stream water fluxes of NO3 and total organic carbon from the Storgama headwater catchment, Norway, under climate change and reduced acid deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Heleen A; Wright, Richard F

    2008-02-01

    Fluctuations in the 20-year record of nitrate (NO3) and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations and fluxes in runoff at the small headwater catchment Storgama, southern Norway, were related to climate and acid deposition. The long-term decline in NO3 related to reduced NO3 deposition and increased winter discharge, whereas the long-term increase in TOC related to reduced sulfur deposition. Multiple regression models describing long-term trends and seasonal variability in these records were used to project future concentrations given scenarios of climate change and acid deposition. All scenarios indicated reduced NO3 fluxes and increased TOC fluxes; the largest projected changes for the period 2071-2100 were -86% and +24%, respectively. Uncertainties are that the predicted future temperatures are considerably higher than the historical record. Also, nonlinear responses of ecosystem processes (nitrogen [N] mineralization) to temperature, N-enrichment of soils, and step-changes in environmental conditions may affect future leaching of carbon and N.

  19. Weak organic acid stress in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Beek, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Weak organic acids are commonly used food preservatives that protect food products from bacterial contamination. A variety of spore-forming bacterial species pose a serious problem to the food industry by causing extensive food spoilage or even food poisoning. Understanding the mechanisms of

  20. Progress on Zeolite-membrane-aided Organic Acid Esterification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertiharta, I. G. B. N.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    Esterification is a common route to produce carboxylic acid esters as important intermediates in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. However, the reaction is equilibrium limited and needs to be driven forward by selective removal one of the products. There have been some efforts to selectively remove water from reaction mixture via several separation processes (such as pervaporation and reactive distillation). Integrated pervaporation and esterification has gained increasing attention towards. Inorganic zeolite is the most popular material for pervaporation due to its high chemical resistant and separation performance towards water. Zeolite also has proven to be an effective material in removing water from organic compound. Zeolite can act not only as selective layer but also simultaneously act as a catalyst on promoting the reaction. Hence, there are many configurations in integrating zeolite membrane for esterification reaction. As a selective layer to remove water from reaction mixture, high Si/Al zeolite is preferred to enhance its hydrophilicity. However, low Si/Al zeolite is unstable in acid condition due to dealumination thus eliminate its advantages. As a catalyst, acid zeolites (e.g. H-ZSM-5) provide protons for autoprotolysis of the carboxylic acid similar to other catalyst for esterification (e.g. inorganic acid, and ion exchange resins). There are many studies related to zeolite membrane aided esterification. This paper will give brief information related to zeolite membrane role in esterification and also research trend towards it.

  1. Acid rain effects on aluminum mobilization clarified by inclusion of strong organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, G.B.; Sutherland, J.W.; Boylen, C.W.; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S. W.; Momen, B.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Simonin, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    Assessments of acidic deposition effects on aquatic ecosystems have often been hindered by complications from naturally occurring organic acidity. Measurements of pH and ANCG, the most commonly used indicators of chemical effects, can be substantially influenced by the presence of organic acids. Relationships between pH and inorganic Al, which is toxic to many forms of aquatic biota, are also altered by organic acids. However, when inorganic Al concentrations are plotted against ANC (the sum of Ca2+, Mg 2+, Na+, and K+, minus SO42-, NO3-, and Cl-), a distinct threshold for Al mobilization becomes apparent. If the concentration of strong organic anions is included as a negative component of ANC, the threshold occurs at an ANC value of approximately zero, the value expected from theoretical charge balance constraints. This adjusted ANC is termed the base-cation surplus. The threshold relationship between the base-cation surplus and Al was shown with data from approximately 200 streams in the Adirondack region of New York, during periods with low and high dissolved organic carbon concentrations, and for an additional stream from the Catskill region of New York. These results indicate that (1) strong organic anions can contribute to the mobilization of inorganic Al in combination with SO42- and NO 3-, and (2) the presence of inorganic Al in surface waters is an unambiguous indication of acidic deposition effects. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  2. Effects of slightly acidic electrolysed drinking water on mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Shibata, Yoshiko; Obata, Takahiro; Kawagoe, Masami; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Sato, Masayoshi; Toida, Kazumi; Kushima, Hidemi; Matsuda, Yukihisa

    2011-10-01

    Slightly acidic electrolysed (SAE) water is a sanitizer with strong bactericidal activity due to hypochlorous acid. We assessed the safety of SAE water as drinking water for mice at a 5 ppm total residual chlorine (TRC) concentration to examine the possibility of SAE water as a labour- and energy-saving alternative to sterile water. We provided SAE water or sterile water to mice for 12 weeks, during which time we recorded changes in body weight and weekly water and food intakes. At the end of the experiment, all of the subject animals were sacrificed to assess serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and creatinine levels and to examine the main organs histopathologically under a light microscope. In addition, we investigated the bacteria levels of both types of water. We found no difference in functional and morphological health condition indices between the groups. Compared with sterile water, SAE water had a relatively higher ability to suppress bacterial growth. We suggest that SAE water at 5 ppm TRC is a safe and useful alternative to sterile water for use as drinking water in laboratory animal facilities.

  3. Comparing the Effect of Diets Treated with Different Organic Acids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to compare the growth and economics of adding organic acids to diets of broiler chickens. The organic acids were sorbic benzoic lactic and propionic acids. 150 day old Hubbard chicks were used. There were five treatments. Diet 1 which served as control contained no organic acid. Diets 2, 3 ...

  4. Energy densification of biomass-derived organic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, M. Clayton; van Walsum, G. Peter; Schwartz, Thomas J.; van Heiningen, Adriaan

    2013-01-29

    A process for upgrading an organic acid includes neutralizing the organic acid to form a salt and thermally decomposing the resulting salt to form an energy densified product. In certain embodiments, the organic acid is levulinic acid. The process may further include upgrading the energy densified product by conversion to alcohol and subsequent dehydration.

  5. Separation of Acetic Acid from Aqueous Solution using Various Organic Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Zaved Hossain Khan

    2014-01-01

    In the study a model has been developed to separate the acetic acid from aqueous solution by liquid-liquid extraction and find out the proper solvent for this separation. Various solvents such as n-butanol, iso butanol, amyl alcohol and ethyl acetate are used for separation of acetic acid from water. The binodal curves (mutual solubility curves) for acetic acid distributed between water and an organic solvent were obtained by titrating known mixtures of two components (water and solvents) wit...

  6. Alleviating soil acidity through plant organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meda Anderson R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of water soluble plant extracts on soil acidity. The plant materials were: black oat, oil seed radish, white and blue lupin, gray and dwarf mucuna, Crotalaria spectabilis and C. breviflora, millet, pigeon pea, star grass, mato grosso grass, coffee leaves, sugar cane leaves, rice straw, and wheat straw. Plant extracts were added on soil surface in a PVC soil column at a rate of 1.0 ml min-1. Both soil and drainage water were analyzed for pH, Ca, Al, and K. Plant extracts applied on the soil surface increased soil pH, exchangeable Ca ex and Kex and decreased Al ex. Oil seed radish, black oat, and blue lupin were the best and millet the worst materials to alleviate soil acidity. Oil seed radish markedly increased Al in the drainage water. Chemical changes were associated with the concentrations of basic cations in the plant extract: the higher the concentration the greater the effects in alleviating soil acidity.

  7. Passive treatment of acid drainage waters from coal piles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groudev, S.N. [University of Mining and Geology, Sofia (Bulgaria). Dept. of Engineering Geoecology

    1997-12-31

    Acid drainage water from rich-in-pyrite coal piles were treated under pilot-scale conditions by means of a unit consisting of two-alkalinity producing and sulphate-reducing anoxic cells arranged in series. The cells contained organic substrate mixed with ground limestone and a consortium of interdependent microorganisms. The bacterial dissimilatory sulphate reduction was the main water clean-up process in the cells. (orig.)

  8. Protein and metabolic engineering for the production of organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2017-09-01

    Organic acids are natural metabolites of living organisms. They have been widely applied in the food, pharmaceutical, and bio-based materials industries. In recent years, biotechnological routes to organic acids production from renewable raw materials have been regarded as very promising approaches. In this review, we provide an overview of current developments in the production of organic acids using protein and metabolic engineering strategies. The organic acids include propionic acid, pyruvate, itaconic acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, malic acid and citric acid. We also expect that rapid developments in the fields of systems biology and synthetic biology will accelerate protein and metabolic engineering for microbial organic acid production in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Simultaneous analysis of small organic acids and humic acids using high performance size exclusion chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, X.P.; Liu, F.; Wang, G.C.; Weng, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    An accurate and fast method for simultaneous determination of small organic acids and much larger humic acids was developed using high performance size exclusion chromatography. Two small organic acids, i.e. salicylic acid and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and one purified humic acid material were used

  10. Effect of phenolic acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by lactic acid bacteria from wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Francisco M; Figueiredo, Ana R; Hogg, Tim A; Couto, José A

    2009-06-01

    The influence of phenolic (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic, gallic and protocatechuic) acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by two strains of wine lactic acid bacteria (Oenococcus oeni VF and Lactobacillus hilgardii 5) was investigated. Cultures were grown in modified MRS medium supplemented with different phenolic acids. Cellular growth was monitored and metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC-RI. Despite the strong inhibitory effect of most tested phenolic acids on the growth of O. oeni VF, the malolactic activity of this strain was not considerably affected by these compounds. While less affected in its growth, the capacity of L. hilgardii 5 to degrade malic acid was clearly diminished. Except for gallic acid, the addition of phenolic acids delayed the metabolism of glucose and citric acid in both strains tested. It was also found that the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic) increased the yield of lactic and acetic acid production from glucose by O. oeni VF and not by L. hilgardii 5. The results show that important oenological characteristics of wine lactic acid bacteria, such as the malolactic activity and the production of volatile organic acids, may be differently affected by the presence of phenolic acids, depending on the bacterial species or strain.

  11. Crystal growth, structural, spectral, thermal, linear and nonlinear optical characterization of a new organic nonlinear chiral compound: L-tryptophan-fumaric acid-water (1/1/1) suitable for laser frequency conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer Mohamed, M.; Jayaprakash, P.; Nageshwari, M.; Rathika Thaya Kumari, C.; Sangeetha, P.; Sudha, S.; Mani, G.; Lydia Caroline, M.

    2017-08-01

    A new organic active nonlinear optical crystal L-tryptophan fumaric acid water (1/1/1), (C15H17N2 O7. H2O)(LTFAW), consisting of zwitterion tryptophan molecule in conjunction with a fumaric acid molecule and a water molecule was grown by slow solvent evaporation technique from aqueous solution. The organic chromophore crystallizes from water in its zwitterions exhibiting tabular habit in monoclinic system with acentric space group C2 (Z = 4). The sharp peaks observed in Powder X-ray diffractogram depicts the crystalline nature. The presence of functional groups in the grown crystal was analyzed using FT-IR spectrum. The carbon and hydrogen environment in molecular structure was investigated using FT-NMR technique using deuterated DMSO solution. Ultraviolet-visible spectral analysis reveal that the crystal possess lower cut-off wavelength down to 275 nm, is a key factor to exhibit Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) signal. The direct optical band gap is evaluated to be 5.28 eV from the UV absorption profile. The evaluation of optical constants by employing UV-visible absorbance data such as, extinction coefficient, reflectance, refractive index, optical conductivity are supportive towards good performance as NLO devices. Temperature of decomposition was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis techniques (TG/DTA). The luminescence profile exhibited two peaks (362 nm, 683 nm) due to the donation of protons from carboxylic group to amino group. The nonlinear optical behavior from the noncentrosymmetric crystal was observed by the generation of frequency doubled (2ω) optical radiation when subjected to pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz) using Kurtz-Perry method. The variation of dielectric constant (εʹ) and dielectric loss (εʹʹ) vs. Log f for the title compound was analysed at a few selected temperatures and frequencies.

  12. Permittivity of naphthenic acid-water mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sabyasachi; Meda, Venkatesh; Dalai, Ajay

    2007-01-01

    Naphthenic acid (NA) is predominantly a mono-carboxylic acid obtained as a by-product of petroleum refining with variable composition and ingredients. It is reported that water affected by processes in the petroleum industries generally contains 40-120 mg IL of naphthenic acid which is considered to be in the range of toxicity to human consumption [Clemente et. al, 2005; McMartin, 2003]. This contaminated water needs treatment before its use as drinking water by remote communities. Recent literature suggests that NAs could be separated from diesel fuel using microwave radiation [Lingzhao et. al, 2004]. Removal of naphthenic acid from vacuum cut #1 distillate oil of Daqing using microwaves has also been reported by Huang et. al [2006]. The microwave treatment can be applied to drinking water containing small concentrations of naphthenic acid. In this case permittivity information is useful in designing a microwave applicator and modeling studies. Permittivity measurements were done using a HP 8510 Vector Network Analyzer and coaxial probe reflection method to study the dielectric properties of naphthenic acid in water. The effects of process variables such as frequency, concentration and temperature on dielectric properties were determined.

  13. Liquid-phase and vapor-phase dehydration of organic/water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu [Palo Alto, CA; Ly, Jennifer [San Jose, CA; Aldajani, Tiem [San Jose, CA; Baker, Richard W [Palo Alto, CA

    2011-08-23

    Processes for dehydrating an organic/water solution by pervaporation or vapor separation using fluorinated membranes. The processes are particularly useful for treating mixtures containing light organic components, such as ethanol, isopropanol or acetic acid.

  14. Acid-base properties of Baltic Sea dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Karoline; Schneider, Bernd; Kuliński, Karol; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2017-09-01

    Calculations related to the marine CO2 system that are based on alkalinity data may be strongly biased if the contributions of organic compounds are ignored. In coastal seas, concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) are frequently high and alkalinity from inorganic compounds is low. In this study, based on measurements of total alkalinity, total CO2, and pH, we determined the organic alkalinity, Aorg, in water from the central Baltic Sea. The maximum Aorg measured in the surface mixed layer during the spring bloom was > 50 μmol/kg-SW but the Aorg decreased with depth and approached zero below the permanent halocline. This behavior could be attributed to the decreased pH of deeper water layers. The data were used to calculate the bulk dissociation constant, KDOM, for marine DOM and the fraction f of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that acts as a carrier for acid-base functional groups. The p KDOM (7.27) agreed well with the value (7.34) previously estimated in a preliminary study of organic alkalinity in the Baltic Sea. The fraction of carbon atoms carrying acid-base groups was 17% and was somewhat higher than previously reported (12%). Spike experiments performed using artificial seawater and three different humic/fulvic substances tested whether the acid-base properties of these substances explain the results of our field study. Specifically, Aorg was determined at different concentrations (DOC) of the added humic/fulvic substances. The relationship between Aorg and the DOC concentrations indicated that humic/fulvic substances are more acidic (p KDOM < 6.5) than the bulk DOC natural occurring in the Baltic Sea.

  15. Bacterial Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase for Water Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Sujin; Mutlu, Baris R; Aksan, Alptekin; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2015-10-01

    Di- and trichloroisocyanuric acids are widely used as water disinfection agents, but cyanuric acid accumulates with repeated additions and must be removed to maintain free hypochlorite for disinfection. This study describes the development of methods for using a cyanuric acid-degrading enzyme contained within nonliving cells that were encapsulated within a porous silica matrix. Initially, three different bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases were compared: TrzD from Acidovorax citrulli strain 12227, AtzD from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, and CAH from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073. Each enzyme was expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and tested for cyanuric acid hydrolase activity using freely suspended or encapsulated cell formats. Cyanuric acid hydrolase activities differed by only a 2-fold range when comparing across the different enzymes with a given format. A practical water filtration system is most likely to be used with nonviable cells, and all cells were rendered nonviable by heat treatment at 70°C for 1 h. Only the CAH enzyme from the thermophile M. thermoacetica retained significant activity under those conditions, and so it was tested in a flowthrough system simulating a bioreactive pool filter. Starting with a cyanuric acid concentration of 10,000 μM, more than 70% of the cyanuric acid was degraded in 24 h, it was completely removed in 72 h, and a respike of 10,000 μM cyanuric acid a week later showed identical biodegradation kinetics. An experiment conducted with water obtained from municipal swimming pools showed the efficacy of the process, although cyanuric acid degradation rates decreased by 50% in the presence of 4.5 ppm hypochlorite. In total, these experiments demonstrated significant robustness of cyanuric acid hydrolase and the silica bead materials in remediation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Organic acid modeling and model validation: Workshop summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M.

    1992-08-14

    A workshop was held in Corvallis, Oregon on April 9--10, 1992 at the offices of E S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. The purpose of this workshop was to initiate research efforts on the entitled Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and testing of the revised model using Independent data sources.'' The workshop was attended by a team of internationally-recognized experts in the fields of surface water acid-bass chemistry, organic acids, and watershed modeling. The rationale for the proposed research is based on the recent comparison between MAGIC model hindcasts and paleolimnological inferences of historical acidification for a set of 33 statistically-selected Adirondack lakes. Agreement between diatom-inferred and MAGIC-hindcast lakewater chemistry in the earlier research had been less than satisfactory. Based on preliminary analyses, it was concluded that incorporation of a reasonable organic acid representation into the version of MAGIC used for hindcasting was the logical next step toward improving model agreement.

  17. Organic acid modeling and model validation: Workshop summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M.

    1992-08-14

    A workshop was held in Corvallis, Oregon on April 9--10, 1992 at the offices of E&S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. The purpose of this workshop was to initiate research efforts on the entitled ``Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and testing of the revised model using Independent data sources.`` The workshop was attended by a team of internationally-recognized experts in the fields of surface water acid-bass chemistry, organic acids, and watershed modeling. The rationale for the proposed research is based on the recent comparison between MAGIC model hindcasts and paleolimnological inferences of historical acidification for a set of 33 statistically-selected Adirondack lakes. Agreement between diatom-inferred and MAGIC-hindcast lakewater chemistry in the earlier research had been less than satisfactory. Based on preliminary analyses, it was concluded that incorporation of a reasonable organic acid representation into the version of MAGIC used for hindcasting was the logical next step toward improving model agreement.

  18. Separation and recovery of organic acids from fermented kitchen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... Organic acids produced from anaerobic digestion of kitchen waste were recovered using a new integrated method which consisted of .... Recovery of organic acid from fermentation broth. Figure 1 shows the recovery .... amino acids by acidogenic bacteria into volatile fatty acids and produces ammonia, ...

  19. Optical properties in the UV and visible spectral region of organic acids relevant to tropospheric aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Lund Myhre

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Refractive and absorption indices in the UV and visible region of selected aqueous organic acids relevant to tropospheric aerosols are reported. The acids investigated are the aliphatic dicarboxylic acids oxalic, malonic, tartronic, succinic and glutaric acid. In addition we report data for pyruvic, pinonic, benzoic and phthalic acid. To cover a wide range of conditions we have investigated the aqueous organic acids at different concentrations spanning from highly diluted samples to concentrations close to saturation. The density of the investigated samples is reported and a parameterisation of the absorption and refractive index that allows the calculation of the optical constants of mixed aqueous organic acids at different concentrations is presented. The single scattering albedo is calculated for two size distributions using measured and a synthetic set of optical constants. The results show that tropospheric aerosols consisting of only these organic acids and water have a pure scattering effect.

  20. [Rapid determination of eight organic acids in plant tissue by sequential extraction and high performance liquid chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tianzhi; Wang, Shijie; Liu Xiuming; Liu, Hong; Wu, Yanyou; Luo Xuqiang

    2014-12-01

    A sequential extraction method was developed to determine different forms of oxalate and seven oxalate-metabolism-related organic acids (glyoxylic acid, tartaric acid, glycolic acid, malic acid, acetic acid, citric acid, succinic acid) in plant tissue. The ultra-pure water was used as the extraction medium to obtain water-soluble oxalic acid and the other seven water-soluble organic acids. After the extraction of the water-soluble organic acids, the residues were extracted by dilute hydrochloric acid successively to get the acid-soluble oxalate which entered the liquid phase. A Hypersil ODS column was used with 5 mmol/L potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer solution (pH 2. 8) as the mobile phase. The diode array detector was set at 210 nm and the column temperature at 30 °C with the injection volume of 5 µL. The flow rate was controlled at different times which allowed a good and rapid separation of the organic acids and hydrochloric acid. Under these conditions, the linear ranges of the method were 1-2000 mg/L for oxalic acid, 25-2,000 mg/L for acetic acid, and 10-2,000 mg/L for glyoxylic acid, tartaric acid, glycolic acid, malic acid, citric acid and succinic acid, with the correlation coefficients of the eight organic acids ≥ 0. 9996. The average recoveries of the eight organic acids in leaves and roots were 93. 5%-104. 4% and 85. 3%-105. 4% with RSDs of 0. 15% -2.43% and 0. 31%-2. 9% (n=7), respectively. The limits of detection ranged from 1 to 10 ng (S/N=3). The results indicated that the method is accurate, rapid and reproducible for the determination of organic acids in plant samples.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of boric acid mediated metal-organic frameworks based on trimesic acid and terephthalic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Demet; Köse, Dursun A.; Şahin, Onur; Oztas, Nursen Altuntas

    2017-08-01

    The new metal-organic framework materials based on boric acid reported herein. Sodium and boron containing metal-organic frameworks were synthesized by one-pot self-assembly reaction in the presence of trimesic acid and terephthalic acid in water/ethanol solution. Boric acid is a relatively cheap boron source and boric acid mediated metal-organic framework prepared mild conditions compared to the other boron source based metal-organic framework. The synthesized compounds were characterized by FT-IR, p-XRD, TGA/DTA, elemental analysis, 13C-MAS NMR, 11B-NMR and single crystal measurements. The molecular formulas of compounds were estimated as C18H33B2Na5O28 and C8H24B2Na2O17 according to the structural analysis. The obtained complexes were thermally stable. Surface properties of inorganic polymer complexes were investigated by BET analyses and hydrogen storage properties of compound were also calculated.

  2. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  3. Acid mine water aeration and treatment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackman, Terry E.; Place, John M.

    1987-01-01

    An in-line system is provided for treating acid mine drainage which basically comprises the combination of a jet pump (or pumps) and a static mixer. The jet pump entrains air into the acid waste water using a Venturi effect so as to provide aeration of the waste water while further aeration is provided by the helical vanes of the static mixer. A neutralizing agent is injected into the suction chamber of the jet pump and the static mixer is formed by plural sections offset by 90 degrees.

  4. Organization and scaling in water supply networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Likwan; Karney, Bryan W.

    2017-12-01

    Public water supply is one of the society's most vital resources and most costly infrastructures. Traditional concepts of these networks capture their engineering identity as isolated, deterministic hydraulic units, but overlook their physics identity as related entities in a probabilistic, geographic ensemble, characterized by size organization and property scaling. Although discoveries of allometric scaling in natural supply networks (organisms and rivers) raised the prospect for similar findings in anthropogenic supplies, so far such a finding has not been reported in public water or related civic resource supplies. Examining an empirical ensemble of large number and wide size range, we show that water supply networks possess self-organized size abundance and theory-explained allometric scaling in spatial, infrastructural, and resource- and emission-flow properties. These discoveries establish scaling physics for water supply networks and may lead to novel applications in resource- and jurisdiction-scale water governance.

  5. Organic matter and heavy metals in grey-water sludge | Eriksson ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study grey-water sludge originating from bathroom grey-water has been screened with respect to organic matter; particles; short-chain fatty alcohols and acids; selected metals and basic parameters as well as characterization of the organic matter content by oxygen utilization rate (OUR). The grey-water sludge ...

  6. Capture and release of acid-gasses with acid-gas binding organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldebrant, David J; Yonker, Clement R; Koech, Phillip K

    2015-03-17

    A system and method for acid-gas capture wherein organic acid-gas capture materials form hetero-atom analogs of alkyl-carbonate when contacted with an acid gas. These organic-acid gas capture materials include combinations of a weak acid and a base, or zwitterionic liquids. This invention allows for reversible acid-gas binding to these organic binding materials thus allowing for the capture and release of one or more acid gases. These acid-gas binding organic compounds can be regenerated to release the captured acid gasses and enable these organic acid-gas binding materials to be reused. This enables transport of the liquid capture compounds and the release of the acid gases from the organic liquid with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems.

  7. In vitro study on the effect of organic acids on Campylobacter jejuni/coli populations in mixtures of water and feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaveerach, P.; Keuzenkamp, D.A.; Urlings, H.A.P.; Lipman, L.J.A.; Knapen, van F.

    2002-01-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by Campylobacter spp. infection has been recognized as one of the important public health problems in the developed countries. Outbreaks mostly originate from the consumption of contaminated poultry or infected water. The aim of this study was to determine the bactericidal

  8. Recovery of water from acid mine drainage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mulopo, J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metrohm 691 pH meter. BACKGRounD The CSIR patented Alkali Barium and Calcium (ABC) process uses the barium technology to remove sulphate from acid mine drainage (AMD) water and other industrial effluents. The sulphate removal process involves...

  9. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1996-10-08

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer is described made from monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  10. Acidic organic compounds in beverage, food, and feed production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitmann, Hendrich; Fan, Rong; Czermak, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Organic acids and their derivatives are frequently used in beverage, food, and feed production. Acidic additives may act as buffers to regulate acidity, antioxidants, preservatives, flavor enhancers, and sequestrants. Beneficial effects on animal health and growth performance have been observed when using acidic substances as feed additives. Organic acids could be classified in groups according to their chemical structure. Each group of organic acids has its own specific properties and is used for different applications. Organic acids with low molecular weight (e.g. acetic acid, lactic acid, and citric acid), which are part of the primary metabolism, are often produced by fermentation. Others are produced more economically by chemical synthesis based on petrochemical raw materials on an industrial scale (e.g. formic acid, propionic and benzoic acid). Biotechnology-based production is of interest due to legislation, consumer demand for natural ingredients, and increasing environmental awareness. In the United States, for example, biocatalytically produced esters for food applications can be labeled as "natural," whereas identical conventional acid catalyst-based molecules cannot. Natural esters command a price several times that of non-natural esters. Biotechnological routes need to be optimized regarding raw materials and yield, microorganisms, and recovery methods. New bioprocesses are being developed for organic acids, which are at this time commercially produced by chemical synthesis. Moreover, new organic acids that could be produced with biotechnological methods are under investigation for food applications.

  11. Physico-Chemical Properties of Kaolin-Organic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeo S.W.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil with more than 20% of organic content is classified as organic soil in Malaysia. Contents of organic soil consist of different types of organic and inorganic matter. Each type of organic matter has its own characteristic and its effect on the properties of the soil is different. Hence, a good understanding on the effect of specific organic and inorganic matter on the physico-chemical characteristic of organic soils can serve as a guide for predicting the properties of organic soils. The main objective is to unveil the effect of organic acid on the physico-chemical properties of soil. Artificial organic soil (kaolin mixed with organic acid was utilized in order to minimize the geochemical variability of studied soil. The organic acid which consists of humic acid and fulvic acid was extracted from highly humificated plant–based compost. The effect of organic acid on the physico-chemical properties of soil was determined by varying the concentration of organic acid. The specific gravity, Atterberg limits, pH, bulk chemical composition and the functional group of kaolin-organic acid were determined. It was found that the plasticity index, specific gravity and pH value were decreased with lowered concentration of organic acid. However, the liquid limits and plastic limits were found to be increased with the concentration decrement of organic acid. The analysis of XRF on the bulk chemical composition and analysis of FTIR spectra on the functional group of artificial organic soils with different concentration have confirmed little geochemical variability between samples.

  12. Effect of metabolic enzyme on organic acids in developing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of metabolic enzyme on organic acids in developing 'Dangshansuli' pear leaf. S Sha, J Li, J Wu, S Zhang. Abstract. Changes in the content of citric and malic acids and the activities of enzymes involved in the metabolism of these two organic acids, including citrate synthase (CS), cytoplast aconitase (Cyt-ACO), ...

  13. Separation and recovery of organic acids from fermented kitchen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Organic acids produced from anaerobic digestion of kitchen waste were recovered using a new integrated method which consisted of freezing and thawing, centrifugation, filtration and evaporation. The main organic acid produced was lactic acid (98%). After the freezing and thawing process, 73% of the total suspended ...

  14. Enhancement of organic acids production from model kitchen waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... The aim of this study was to obtain the optimal conditions for organic acids production from anaerobic digestion of kitchen waste using ... for its treatment in comparison with alternative treatments such as incineration, landfill and ... degradable plastic (Horiuchi et al., 2002). Organic acids such as lactic acid ...

  15. Leaching of organic acids from macromolecular organic matter by non-supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, P.; Glombitza, C.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-04-01

    The storage of CO2 in underground reservoirs is discussed controversly in the scientific literature. The worldwide search for suitable storage formations also considers coal-bearing strata. CO2 is already injected into seams for enhanced recovery of coal bed methane. However, the effects of increased CO2 concentration, especially on organic matter rich formations, are rarely investigated. The injected CO2 will dissolve in the pore water, causing a decrease in pH and resulting in acidic formation waters. Huge amounts of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) are chemically bound to the macromolecular matrix of sedimentary organic matter and may be liberated by hydrolysis, which is enhanced by the acidic porewater. Recent investigations outlined the importance of LMWOAs as a feedstock for microbial life in the subsurface [1]. Therefore, injection of CO2 into coal formations may result in enhanced nutrient supply for subsurface microbes. To investigate the effect of high concentrations of dissolved CO2 on the release of LMWOAs from coal we developed an inexpensive high-pressure high temperature system that allows manipulating the partial pressure of dissolved gases at pressures and temperatures up to 60 MPa and 120° C, respectively. In a reservoir vessel, gases are added to saturate the extraction medium to the desired level. Inside the extraction vessel hangs a flexible and inert PVDF sleeve (polyvinylidene fluoride, almost impermeable for gases), holding the sample and separating it from the pressure fluid. The flexibility of the sleeve allows for subsampling without loss of pressure. Coal samples from the DEBITS-1 well, Waikato Basin, NZ (R0 = 0.29, TOC = 30%). were extracted at 90° C and 5 MPa, either with pure or CO2-saturated water. Subsamples were taken at different time points during the extraction. The extracted LMWOAs such as formate, acetate and oxalate were analysed by ion chromatography. Yields of LMWOAs were higher with pure water than with CO2

  16. Method for eliminating micro-organisms in water bt filtration

    OpenAIRE

    Undabeytia López, Tomás; Nir, Shlomo; Sáiz-Jiménez, Cesáreo; Laiz Trobajo, L.; Morillo González, Esmeralda

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a method for the treatment and purification of water, aimed at eliminating micro-organisms, especially bacteria, but also useful for viruses and protozoa. The method is advantageous compared to current methods as it minimises the appearance of unwanted effects such as the formation of carcinogenic products, for example trihalomethanes or haloacetic acids generated in chlorination treatments or nitrosamines in chloramination treatments. The method is based on the ...

  17. Biobased organic acids production by metabolically engineered microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Bio-based production of organic acids via microbial fermentation has been traditionally used in food industry. With the recent desire to develop more sustainable bioprocesses for production of fuels, chemicals and materials, the market for microbial production of organic acids has been further...... expanded as organic acids constitute a key group among top building block chemicals that can be produced from renewable resources. Here we review the current status for production of citric acid and lactic acid, and we highlight the use of modern metabolic engineering technologies to develop high...... performance microbes for production of succinic acid and 3-hydroxypropionic acid. Also, the key limitations and challenges in microbial organic acids production are discussed...

  18. QUANTIFICATION OF ORGANIC ACIDS IN GRAPE MUSTS AND PORT WINES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunha, S. C; Fernandes, J. O; Faria, M. A; Ferreira, I.M.P.L. V.O; Ferreira, M. A

    2002-01-01

    A simple, rapid and accurate method for derivatization and quantitative HPLC analysis of organic acids, was optimised in order to provide the determination of the most important acids found in Port...

  19. Electrooxidation of organics in waste water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchens, G. D.; Murphy, Oliver J.; Kaba, Lamine; Verostko, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    Electrooxidation is a means of removing organic solutes directly from waste waters without the use of chemical expendables. Research sponsored by NASA is currently being pursued to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept for oxidation of organic impurities common to urine, shower waters and space-habitat humidity condensates. Electrooxidation of urine and waste water ersatz was experimentally demonstrated. This paper discusses the electrooxidation principle, reaction kinetics, efficiency, power, size, experimental test results and water-reclamation applications. Process operating potentials and the use of anodic oxidation potentials that are sufficiently low to avoid oxygen formation and chloride oxidation are described. The design of an electrochemical system that incorporates a membrane-based electrolyte based on parametric test data and current fuel-cell technology is presented.

  20. Life in acid: interactive effects of pH and natural organic acids on growth, development and locomotor performance of larval striped marsh frogs (Limnodynastes peronii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, B J; Wilson, R S

    2010-04-01

    The low pH of naturally acidic aquatic environments is the result of soft-water with low buffering capacity and high concentrations of natural organic acids. Our current understanding of the influence of pH on aquatic organisms is largely limited to laboratory studies conducted under controlled conditions with little incorporation of these organic acids. Recent studies suggest natural organic acids may influence the physiology of aquatic species independent of low pH. We examined the effects of pH and varying concentrations of natural wallum water, which is high in organic acids on the hatching success, growth and locomotor performance of larval striped marsh frogs (Limnodynastes peronii). Based on previous studies, we predicted that the detrimental effects of low pH would be further exacerbated by higher concentrations of naturally occurring organic acids (high concentrations of wallum water). In artificial soft-water, embryos experienced both reduced growth and reduced survival when exposed to low pH. However, greater concentrations of natural organic acids did not exacerbate these effects of low pH on growth and development. Instead, we found some evidence that the natural organic acids within wallum water improved growth and swimming performance across all pH treatments. Using path analyses to investigate the effects of pH and natural organic acid concentration on burst swimming performance, we found performance was directly affected by both body length and organic acid concentration. Our data further highlight our limited understanding of the importance of natural organic acids for aquatic organisms and the need to incorporate greater ecological relevance into these studies.

  1. New techniques for analysis of organic pollutants in drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kissinger, L.D.

    1979-01-01

    An abstractor packing prepared by coating Chromosorb G AW/DMCS with copper(II) chloride was effective for removal of amines from gas-chromatographic streams, but it did not affect the chromatographic behavior of nonamine compounds. By using pre-columns packed with the abstractor packing, solventless chromatograms were obtained for samples in pyridine. A method was developed for determining haloforms in drinking water by sorption of the haloforms on columns packed with acetylated XAD-2. A pre-column of the abstractor packing was used to remove the pyridine solvent from the samples containing the haloforms concentrated from waters. Detection limits for the four chloro-, bromo- haloforms in a 100-ml water sample using an electron capture detector were below 1 ppB. Addition of ascorbic acid to chlorinated waters was effective for stopping the production of haloforms. Design of the inlet allowed samples to be introduced to the capillary column in a Tracor model 550 gas chromatograph with or without splitting of the carrier-gas stream. An exit splitter was implemented that carried the effluent from the capillary column to two detectors. The capillary-column system was applied to the analysis of trace components in complex mixtures. Small columns packed with Florisil were used to fractionate mixtures of organic compounds by gravity-flow liquid chromatography. Three fractions of organic compounds were collected from the Florisil columns. The recovery and elution behavior of many organic compounds was investigated. Organic compounds from fifteen waters were fractionated on Florisil.

  2. Effects of organic acids, amino acids and ethanol on the radio-degradation of patulin in an aqueous model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hyejeong; Lim, Sangyong; Jo, Cheorun; Chung, Jinwoo; Kim, Soohyun; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Kim, Dongho

    2008-06-01

    The effects of organic acids, amino acids, and ethanol on the radio-degradation of patulin by gamma irradiation in an aqueous model system were investigated. The patulin, dissolved in distilled water at a concentration of 50 ppm, was practically degraded by the gamma irradiation at the dose of 1.0 kGy, while 33% of the patulin remained in apple juice. In the aqueous model system, the radio-degradation of patulin was partially inhibited by the addition of organic acids, amino acids, and ethanol. The proportions of remaining patulin after irradiation with the dose of 1.0 kGy in the 1% solution of malic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, ascorbic acid, and ethanol were 31.4%, 2.3%, 31.2%, 6.1%, 50.8%, and 12.5%, respectively. During 30 days of storage, the remaining patulin was reduced gradually in the solution of ascorbic acid and malic acid compared to being stable in other samples. The amino acids, serine, threonine, and histidine, inhibited the radio-degradation of patulin. In conclusion, it was suggested that 1 kGy of gamma irradiation (recommended radiation doses for radicidation and/or quarantine in fruits) is effective for the reduction of patulin, but the nutritional elements should be considered because the radio-degradation effects are environment dependent.

  3. Effects of organic acids, amino acids and ethanol on the radio-degradation of patulin in an aqueous model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hyejeong [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Chonbuk, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Food Science and Technology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sangyong [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Chonbuk, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Cheorun [Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jinwoo [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Chonbuk, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soohyun [Glycomics Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Joong-Ho [Department of Food Science and Technology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dongho [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Chonbuk, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: fungikim@kaeri.re.kr

    2008-06-15

    The effects of organic acids, amino acids, and ethanol on the radio-degradation of patulin by gamma irradiation in an aqueous model system were investigated. The patulin, dissolved in distilled water at a concentration of 50 ppm, was practically degraded by the gamma irradiation at the dose of 1.0 kGy, while 33% of the patulin remained in apple juice. In the aqueous model system, the radio-degradation of patulin was partially inhibited by the addition of organic acids, amino acids, and ethanol. The proportions of remaining patulin after irradiation with the dose of 1.0 kGy in the 1% solution of malic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, ascorbic acid, and ethanol were 31.4%, 2.3%, 31.2%, 6.1%, 50.8%, and 12.5%, respectively. During 30 days of storage, the remaining patulin was reduced gradually in the solution of ascorbic acid and malic acid compared to being stable in other samples. The amino acids, serine, threonine, and histidine, inhibited the radio-degradation of patulin. In conclusion, it was suggested that 1 kGy of gamma irradiation (recommended radiation doses for radicidation and/or quarantine in fruits) is effective for the reduction of patulin, but the nutritional elements should be considered because the radio-degradation effects are environment dependent.

  4. What Aerosol Water do Organic Compounds See?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large amounts of aerosol water are associated with inorganic salts such as ammonium sulfate with generally smaller but important contributions from hydrophilic organics. Ambient aerosols can be externally or internally mixed in addition to containing one or multiple phases. The d...

  5. Subcritical-Water Extraction of Organics from Solid Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Grunthaner, Frank; Patrick, Steven; Kirby, James; Bickler, Donald; Willis, Peter; Pelletier, Christine; Bryson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for extracting organic compounds from soils, sands, and other solid matrix materials utilizes water at subcritical temperature and pressure as a solvent. The apparatus, called subcritical water extractor (SCWE), is a prototype of subsystems of future instrumentation systems to be used in searching for organic compounds as signs of past or present life on Mars. An aqueous solution generated by an apparatus like this one can be analyzed by any of a variety of established chromatographic or spectroscopic means to detect the dissolved organic compound( s). The apparatus can be used on Earth: indeed, in proof-of-concept experiments, SCWE was used to extract amino acids from soils of the Atacama Desert (Chile), which was chosen because the dryness and other relevant soil conditions there approximate those on Mars. The design of the apparatus is based partly on the fact that the relative permittivity (also known as the dielectric constant) of liquid water varies with temperature and pressure. At a temperature of 30 C and a pressure of 0.1 MPa, the relative permittivity of water is 79.6, due to the strong dipole-dipole electrostatic interactions between individual molecular dipoles. As the temperature increases, increasing thermal energy causes increasing disorientation of molecular dipoles, with a consequent decrease in relative permittivity. For example, water at a temperature of 325 C and pressure of 20 MPa has a relative permittivity of 17.5, which is similar to the relative permittivities of such nonpolar organic solvents as 1-butanol (17.8). In the operation of this apparatus, the temperature and pressure of water are adjusted so that the water can be used in place of commonly used organic solvents to extract compounds that have dissimilar physical and chemical properties.

  6. UTILITY OF ZEOLITES IN REMOVAL OF INORGANIC AND ORGANIC WATER POLLUTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange, adsorption and acid catalysis properties. Different inorganic and organic pollutants have been removed from water at room temperature using various zeolites. Synthetic zeolite Faujasite Y has been used to remove inorganic pollutants...

  7. Treatments of acid waters; Tratamientos pasivos de aguas acidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado Fernandez, J. L.

    2000-07-01

    The exploitation of coal mining locations causes acid effluents due to the oxidation of the sulfurous minerals content of the rocks, denominated acid waters. There are Pyritic materials, pyres and sulphates associated to acid waters that in presence of water, oxygen and certain bacteria (mainly Thiobacillus ferro oxidants), are oxidized, by means of a chemistry reaction, yielding different products. (Author)

  8. Removal of cyanobacterial amino acids in water treatment by activated carbon adsorption

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermáková, Lenka; Kopecká, Ivana; Pivokonský, Martin; Pivokonská, Lenka; Janda, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 173, č. 1 (2017), s. 330-338 ISSN 1383-5866 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : amino acids * activated carbon * adsorption * algal organic matter * water treatment * coagulation * microcystis aeruginosa * peptides/proteins * permanganate pre-oxidation * water treatment Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 3.359, year: 2016

  9. Occurrence and Determination of Haloacetic Acids in Metro Manila Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene B. Rodriguez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Haloacetic acids are found in chlorinated water with high organic matter content. An analytical method based on a US EPA method for measuring these compounds in water is described. The optimized method used diethyl ether as extraction solvent with sulphuric acid-methanol as esterification agent and subsequent detection by gas chromatography-electron capture detection. Evaluation of this method showed that it was linear in the concentration range of 10 to 150 µg L-1 and the method detection limits were from 17 to 57 µg L-1. Although the method demonstrated low recoveries (16 to 43%, it is useful in the quantitative determination of monochloroacetic acid as well as the qualitative determination of other haloacetic acids in water. Drinking water samples taken from different areas in Metro Manila serviced by the local treatment plants were analysed using the method. Monochloroacetic acid, monobromoacetic acid, and bromochloroacetic acid were detected in these samples. Monochloroacetic acid was quantified and found in concentrations ranging from 19 to 157 µg L-1. In most of the water samples, the concentration of monochloroacetic acid exceeded the US EPA maximum allowable total concentration of 60 µg L-1 for the five haloacetic acids (monochloro-, dichloro-, trichloro-, monobromo-, and dibromoacetic acids in drinking water. This initial study established the occurrence of potentially harmful haloacetic acids in the local drinking water supplies.

  10. Strategies to increase the stability of intermediate moisture foods towards Zygosaccharomyces rouxii: The effect of temperature, ethanol, pH and water activity, with or without the influence of organic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, A.; Nielsen, Cecilie Lykke Marvig; Daelman, J.

    2015-01-01

    models for Z. rouxii, developed by Vermeulen et al. (2012) were further extended by incorporating the factor temperature. Three different data sets were build: (i) without organic acids, (ii) with acetic acid (10,000 ppm on product basis) and (iii) with sorbic acid (1500 ppm on product basis). For each......, acetic acid had only an additive effect to ethanol and aw at low pH, whereas sorbic acid had also an additive effect at the higher pH values. For incubation periods longer than 30 days the growth/no growth boundary remained stable but enlarged gradually between day 60 and 90, except for the lower......Intermediate moisture foods (IMF) are in general microbiologically stable products. However, due to health concerns consumer demands are increasingly forcing producers to lower the fat, sugar and preservatives content, which impede the stability of the IMF products. One of the strategies...

  11. Dietary preferences of weaned piglets offered diets containing organic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. PARTANEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A preference test and a performance trial were carried out to examine weaned piglets’ feed intake response to diets containing either lactic acid,formic acid,calcium formate,or sodium benzoate (8 g kg-1 feed.In Experiment 1, throughout a 21-d post-weaning period,30 entire litters (306 piglets weaned at the age of 30 d were allowed to choose between two organic-acid-supplemented diets. All of the four different organic-acid-supplemented diets were tested in pairs against each other,and the six possible combinations were lactic acid +formic acid,lactic acid +calcium formate,lactic acid + sodium benzoate,formic acid +calcium formate,formic acid +sodium benzoate,and calcium for-mate +sodium benzoate.Piglets preferred diets supplemented with sodium benzoate to ones supplemented with formic acid or calcium formate.The acceptability of diets supplemented with lactic acid,formic acid,or calcium formate was similar.In Experiment 2,until the age of 58 d,60 piglets from 10 litters weaned at the age of 28 or 38 d were fed non-acidified diets or ones supplemented with lactic acid,formic acid,calcium formate,or sodium benzoate.Feed consumption did not differ between piglets fed non-acidified and those fed organic-acid-supplemented diets. Growth performance was reduced by dietary calcium formate supplementation, while the performance of piglets fed other organic-acid-supplemented diets did not differ significantly from those fed the non-acidified control diet.The frequency of post-weaning diarrhoea was highest in piglets fed diets supplemented with calcium formate and lowest in piglets fed diets supplemented with formic acid.;

  12. Review article: Herbal extracts and organic acids as natural feed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... on the intestinal microbiota. Therefore, these compounds could replace antibiotics as growth promoters for pig production. However, a systematic approach to the efficacy and safety of herbal extracts and organic acids as feed additives for swine is still non-existent. Keywords: Antimicrobial, botanicals, organic acids, swine ...

  13. Joint effect of organic acids and inorganic salts on cloud droplet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Frosch

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated CCN properties of internally mixed particles composed of one organic acid (oxalic acid dihydrate, succinic acid, adipic acid, citric acid, cis-pinonic acid, or Nordic reference fulvic acid and one inorganic salt (sodium chloride or ammonium sulphate. Surface tension and water activity of aqueous model solutions with concentrations relevant for CCN activation were measured using a tensiometer and osmometry, respectively. The measurements were used to calculate Köhler curves and critical supersaturations, which were compared to measured critical supersaturations of particles with the same chemical compositions, determined with a cloud condensation nucleus counter. Surfactant surface partitioning was not accounted for. For the aqueous solutions containing cis-pinonic acid and fulvic acid, a depression of surface tension was observed, but for the remaining solutions the effect on surface tension was negligible at concentrations relevant for cloud droplet activation. The surface tension depression of aqueous solutions containing both organic acid and inorganic salt was approximately the same as or smaller than that of aqueous solutions containing the same mass of the corresponding pure organic acids. Water activity was found to be highly dependent on the type and amount of inorganic salt. Sodium chloride was able to decrease water activity more than ammonium sulphate and both inorganic salts are predicted to have a smaller Raoult term than the studied organic acids. Increasing the mass ratio of the inorganic salt led to a decrease in water activity. Water activity measurements were compared to results from the E-AIM model and values estimated from both constant and variable van't Hoff factors. The correspondence between measurements and estimates was overall good, except for highly concentrated solutions. Critical supersaturations calculated with Köhler theory based on measured water activity and surface tension, but not

  14. Production of organic acids in an immobilized cell reactor using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immobilized cell reactor (ICR) was developed as a novel bioreactor to convert hydrolyzed sugars to organic acids. Sugar fermentation by Propionibacterium acid-propionici entraped by calcium alginate was carried out in continuous mode to produce propionic and acetic acids. In continuous fermentation, more than 90 ...

  15. Modeling the influence of organic acids on soil weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey R.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Maher, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Biological inputs and organic matter cycling have long been regarded as important factors in the physical and chemical development of soils. In particular, the extent to which low molecular weight organic acids, such as oxalate, influence geochemical reactions has been widely studied. Although the effects of organic acids are diverse, there is strong evidence that organic acids accelerate the dissolution of some minerals. However, the influence of organic acids at the field-scale and over the timescales of soil development has not been evaluated in detail. In this study, a reactive-transport model of soil chemical weathering and pedogenic development was used to quantify the extent to which organic acid cycling controls mineral dissolution rates and long-term patterns of chemical weathering. Specifically, oxalic acid was added to simulations of soil development to investigate a well-studied chronosequence of soils near Santa Cruz, CA. The model formulation includes organic acid input, transport, decomposition, organic-metal aqueous complexation and mineral surface complexation in various combinations. Results suggest that although organic acid reactions accelerate mineral dissolution rates near the soil surface, the net response is an overall decrease in chemical weathering. Model results demonstrate the importance of organic acid input concentrations, fluid flow, decomposition and secondary mineral precipitation rates on the evolution of mineral weathering fronts. In particular, model soil profile evolution is sensitive to kaolinite precipitation and oxalate decomposition rates. The soil profile-scale modeling presented here provides insights into the influence of organic carbon cycling on soil weathering and pedogenesis and supports the need for further field-scale measurements of the flux and speciation of reactive organic compounds.

  16. Modeling the influence of organic acids on soil weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey; Harden, Jennifer; Maher, Kate

    2014-08-01

    Biological inputs and organic matter cycling have long been regarded as important factors in the physical and chemical development of soils. In particular, the extent to which low molecular weight organic acids, such as oxalate, influence geochemical reactions has been widely studied. Although the effects of organic acids are diverse, there is strong evidence that organic acids accelerate the dissolution of some minerals. However, the influence of organic acids at the field-scale and over the timescales of soil development has not been evaluated in detail. In this study, a reactive-transport model of soil chemical weathering and pedogenic development was used to quantify the extent to which organic acid cycling controls mineral dissolution rates and long-term patterns of chemical weathering. Specifically, oxalic acid was added to simulations of soil development to investigate a well-studied chronosequence of soils near Santa Cruz, CA. The model formulation includes organic acid input, transport, decomposition, organic-metal aqueous complexation and mineral surface complexation in various combinations. Results suggest that although organic acid reactions accelerate mineral dissolution rates near the soil surface, the net response is an overall decrease in chemical weathering. Model results demonstrate the importance of organic acid input concentrations, fluid flow, decomposition and secondary mineral precipitation rates on the evolution of mineral weathering fronts. In particular, model soil profile evolution is sensitive to kaolinite precipitation and oxalate decomposition rates. The soil profile-scale modeling presented here provides insights into the influence of organic carbon cycling on soil weathering and pedogenesis and supports the need for further field-scale measurements of the flux and speciation of reactive organic compounds.

  17. Water and organics in interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, John

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and larger micrometeorites (MMs) impinge on the upper atmosphere where they decelerate at 90 km altitude and settle to the Earths surface. Comets and asteroids are the major sources and the flux, 30,000-40,000 tons/yr, is comparable to the mass of larger meteorites impacting the Earths surface. The sedimentary record suggests that the flux was much higher on the early Earth. The chondritic porous (CP) subset of IDPs together with their larger counterparts, ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites (UCMMs), appear to be unique among known meteoritic materials in that they are composed almost exclusively of anhydrous minerals, some of them contain >> 50% organic carbon by volume as well as the highest abundances of presolar silicate grains including GEMS. D/H and 15N abundances implicate the Oort Cloud or presolar molecular cloud as likely sources of the organic carbon. Prior to atmospheric entry, IDPs and MMs spend 104-105 year lifetimes in solar orbit where their surfaces develop amorphous space weathered rims from exposure to the solar wind (SW). Similar rims are observed on lunar soil grains and on asteroid Itokawa regolith grains. Using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) we have detected radiolytic water in the rims on IDPs formed by the interaction of solar wind protons with oxygen in silicate minerals. Therefore, IDPs and MMs continuously deliver both water and organics to the earth and other terrestrial planets. The interaction of protons with oxygen-rich minerals to form water is a universal process.

  18. 40 CFR 63.686 - Standards: Oil-water and organic-water separators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Oil-water and organic-water... Operations § 63.686 Standards: Oil-water and organic-water separators. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of air emissions from oil-water separators and organic-water separators for which...

  19. Reactive Distillation for Esterification of Bio-based Organic Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Nathan; Miller, Dennis J.; Asthana, Navinchandra S.; Kolah, Aspi K.; Vu, Dung; Lira, Carl T.

    2008-09-23

    The following is the final report of the three year research program to convert organic acids to their ethyl esters using reactive distillation. This report details the complete technical activities of research completed at Michigan State University for the period of October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2006, covering both reactive distillation research and development and the underlying thermodynamic and kinetic data required for successful and rigorous design of reactive distillation esterification processes. Specifically, this project has led to the development of economical, technically viable processes for ethyl lactate, triethyl citrate and diethyl succinate production, and on a larger scale has added to the overall body of knowledge on applying fermentation based organic acids as platform chemicals in the emerging biorefinery. Organic acid esters constitute an attractive class of biorenewable chemicals that are made from corn or other renewable biomass carbohydrate feedstocks and replace analogous petroleum-based compounds, thus lessening U.S. dependence on foreign petroleum and enhancing overall biorefinery viability through production of value-added chemicals in parallel with biofuels production. Further, many of these ester products are candidates for fuel (particularly biodiesel) components, and thus will serve dual roles as both industrial chemicals and fuel enhancers in the emerging bioeconomy. The technical report from MSU is organized around the ethyl esters of four important biorenewables-based acids: lactic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and propionic acid. Literature background on esterification and reactive distillation has been provided in Section One. Work on lactic acid is covered in Sections Two through Five, citric acid esterification in Sections Six and Seven, succinic acid in Section Eight, and propionic acid in Section Nine. Section Ten covers modeling of ester and organic acid vapor pressure properties using the SPEAD (Step Potential

  20. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V

    2013-04-30

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  1. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jian [East Lansing, MI; Kleff, Susanne [East Lansing, MI; Guettler, Michael V [Holt, MI

    2012-02-21

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  2. Subcritical water extraction of amino acids from Mars analog soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noell, Aaron C; Fisher, Anita M; Fors-Francis, Kisa; Sherrit, Stewart

    2018-01-18

    For decades, the Martian regolith has stymied robotic mission efforts to catalog the organic molecules present. Perchlorate salts, found widely throughout Mars, are the main culprit as they breakdown and react with organics liberated from the regolith during pyrolysis, the primary extraction technique attempted to date on Mars. This work further develops subcritical water extraction (SCWE) as a technique for extraction of amino acids on future missions. The effect of SCWE temperature (185, 200, and 215°C) and duration of extraction (10-120 min) on the total amount and distribution of amino acids recovered was explored for three Mars analog soils (JSC Mars-1A simulant, an Atacama desert soil, and an Antarctic Dry Valleys soil) and bovine serum albumin (as a control solution of known amino acid content). Total amounts of amino acids extracted increased with both time and temperature; however, the distribution shifted notably due to the destruction of the amino acids with charged or polar side chains at the higher temperatures. The pure bovine serum albumin solution and JSC Mars 1A also showed lower yields than the Atacama and Antarctic extractions suggesting that SCWE may be less effective at hydrolyzing large or aggregated proteins. Changing solvent from water to a dilute (10 mM) HCl solution allowed total extraction efficiencies comparable to the higher temperature/time combinations while using the lowest temperature/time (185°C/20 min). The dilute HCl extractions also did not lead to the shift in amino acid distribution observed at the higher temperatures. Additionally, adding sodium perchlorate salt to the extraction did not interfere with recoveries. Native magnetite in the JSC Mars-1A may have been responsible for destruction of glycine, as evidenced by its uncharacteristic decrease as the temperature/time of extraction increased. This work shows that SCWE can extract high yields of native amino acids out of Mars analog soils with minimal disruption of the

  3. Use of organic acids to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes on organic fresh apples and lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Mi-Ran; Park, Jeong-Woong; Park, Ki-Hwan; Chung, Myung-Sub; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2011-08-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the antimicrobial effect of organic acids against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes on whole red organic apples and lettuce. Several studies have been conducted to evaluate organic acids as sanitizers. However, no studies have compared antimicrobial effects of various organic acids on organic fresh produce, including evaluation of color changes of produce. Apples and lettuce were inoculated with a cocktail of 3 strains each of 3 foodborne pathogens provided above and treated with 1% and 2% organic acids (propionic, acetic, lactic, malic, and citric acid) for 0, 0.5, 1, 5, and 10 min. With increasing treatment time and acid concentration, organic acid treatments showed significant reduction compared to the control treatment (distilled water), and differences in antimicrobial effects between organic acids were observed. After 10 min of treatment with 1% and 2% organic acids in apples, propionic (0.92 to 2.75 log reduction), acetic (0.52 to 2.78 log reduction), lactic (1.69 to >3.42 log reduction), malic (1.48 to >3.42 log reduction), and citric acid (1.52 to >3.42 log reduction) exhibited significant (P lettuce, propionic (0.93 to 1.52 log reduction), acetic (1.13 to 1.74 log reduction), lactic (1.87 to 2.54 log reduction), malic (2.32 to 2.98 log reduction), and citric acid (1.85 to 2.86 log reduction) showed significant (P < 0.05) effects compared to the control treatment. Changes in sample color subjected to organic acids treatment were not significant during storage. It is suggested that organic acids have a potential as sanitizers for organic fresh produce. These data may help the organic produce industry provide safe fresh produce for consumers. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  4. Aliphatic, Cyclic, and Aromatic Organic Acids, Vitamins, and Carbohydrates in Soil: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranova, Valerie; Rejsek, Klement; Formanek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates represent important organic compounds in soil. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids play important roles in rhizosphere ecology, pedogenesis, food-web interactions, and decontamination of sites polluted by heavy metals and organic pollutants. Carbohydrates in soils can be used to estimate changes of soil organic matter due to management practices, whereas vitamins may play an important role in soil biological and biochemical processes. The aim of this work is to review current knowledge on aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil and to identify directions for future research. Assessments of organic acids (aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic) and carbohydrates, including their behaviour, have been reported in many works. However, knowledge on the occurrence and behaviour of D-enantiomers of organic acids, which may be abundant in soil, is currently lacking. Also, identification of the impact and mechanisms of environmental factors, such as soil water content, on carbohydrate status within soil organic matter remains to be determined. Finally, the occurrence of vitamins in soil and their role in biological and biochemical soil processes represent an important direction for future research. PMID:24319374

  5. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranova, Valerie; Rejsek, Klement; Formanek, Pavel

    2013-11-10

    Organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates represent important organic compounds in soil. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids play important roles in rhizosphere ecology, pedogenesis, food-web interactions, and decontamination of sites polluted by heavy metals and organic pollutants. Carbohydrates in soils can be used to estimate changes of soil organic matter due to management practices, whereas vitamins may play an important role in soil biological and biochemical processes. The aim of this work is to review current knowledge on aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil and to identify directions for future research. Assessments of organic acids (aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic) and carbohydrates, including their behaviour, have been reported in many works. However, knowledge on the occurrence and behaviour of D-enantiomers of organic acids, which may be abundant in soil, is currently lacking. Also, identification of the impact and mechanisms of environmental factors, such as soil water content, on carbohydrate status within soil organic matter remains to be determined. Finally, the occurrence of vitamins in soil and their role in biological and biochemical soil processes represent an important direction for future research.

  6. [Use of organic acids in acne and skin discolorations therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapuścińska, Alicja; Nowak, Izabela

    2015-03-22

    Acne is one of the most frequent skin disorders that occurs in puberty, but often adults also have acne. The most important factors responsible for acne are elevated production of sebum by hyperactive sebaceous glands and blockage of the follicle because of hyperkeratosis [14]. The third etiopathogenic factor of acne is excessive microflora reproduction [8]. The most significant bacterium that is responsible for formation of skin lesions is Propionibacterium acnes, a rod-shaped Gram-positive and aerotolerant anaerobic bacterium. It is estimated that P. acnes is responsible for acne in approximately 80% of people aged 11 to 30 [27,40]. Even healed skin lesions can often cause skin discolorations and scar formation [51]. Exfoliating chemical substances that are commonly used in dermatology and cosmetology are organic acids. Exfoliating treatment using organic acids is called "chemical peeling" and consists of controlled application of those substances on the skin [38]. The depth of exfoliation depends on organic acid concentration, type of substance and contact time with the skin [41]. Using exfoliating agents seems to be helpful in excessive keratinization - one of several factors responsible for acne. Moreover, epidermis exfoliation is a popular method of removing skin discoloration [22]. Considering chemical structure, exfoliating substances that are most often used in cosmetology contain alpha-hydroxyacids (glycolic acid, lactic acid, mandelic acid and citric acid), beta-hydroxyacids (salicylic acid) and other organic acids, such as trichloroacetic acid and pyruvic acid [47]. In this article, a literature review of use of organic acids in acne and skin discoloration therapy is presented.

  7. Use of organic acids in acne and skin discolorations therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Kapuścińska

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acne is one of the most frequent skin disorders that occurs in puberty, but often adults also have acne. The most important factors responsible for acne are elevated production of sebum by hyperactive sebaceous glands and blockage of the follicle because of hyperkeratosis [14]. The third etiopathogenic factor of acne is excessive microflora reproduction [8]. The most significant bacterium that is responsible for formation of skin lesions is Propionibacterium acnes, a rod-shaped Gram-positive and aerotolerant anaerobic bacterium. It is estimated that P. acnes is responsible for acne in approximately 80% of people aged 11 to 30 [27,40]. Even healed skin lesions can often cause skin discolorations and scar formation [51]. Exfoliating chemical substances that are commonly used in dermatology and cosmetology are organic acids. Exfoliating treatment using organic acids is called “chemical peeling” and consists of controlled application of those substances on the skin [38]. The depth of exfoliation depends on organic acid concentration, type of substance and contact time with the skin [41]. Using exfoliating agents seems to be helpful in excessive keratinization – one of several factors responsible for acne. Moreover, epidermis exfoliation is a popular method of removing skin discoloration [22]. Considering chemical structure, exfoliating substances that are most often used in cosmetology contain alpha-hydroxyacids (glycolic acid, lactic acid, mandelic acid and citric acid, beta-hydroxyacids (salicylic acid and other organic acids, such as trichloroacetic acid and pyruvic acid [47]. In this article, a literature review of use of organic acids in acne and skin discoloration therapy is presented.

  8. Acidity in organic horizons of arctic soils on the Barents Sea coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamrikova, E. V.; Deneva, S. V.; Kubik, O. S.; Punegov, V. V.; Kyz”yurova, E. V.; Bobrova, Yu. I.; Zueva, O. M.

    2017-11-01

    Parameters of water and KCl extracts from organic horizons of arctic soils on the coast of Khaipudyr Bay of the Barents Sea, in which the values of pH are 3.8-4.3 and 2.7-3.5, respectively, have been compared. It has been found that the content of water-extractable organic carbon is 0.2-0.5 g/dm3; the contents of low-molecular-weight carbohydrates and acids are 1-24 and 6 mg/dm3, respectively, and the content of Fe3+ ions is 1-4 mmol/dm3. The increase in the ionic strength of solution reduces the extraction efficiency of total organic carbon in 1.2 times and that of acids and carbohydrates in 3 times on the average at the simultaneous increase in the content of iron ions in the liquid phase in 7-15 times. It has been shown that organic acids and iron compounds are the main sources of acidity in salt extracts from organic soil horizons. The low contents of Ca2+ and Mg2+, which participate in the neutralization of acids, favor the high acidity of the studied horizons.

  9. Organics in water contamination analyzer, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The requirements which would result in identifying the components of an automatic analytical system for the analysis of specific organic compounds in the space station potable water supply are defined. The gas chromatographic system for such an analysis is limited to commercially available off-the-shelf hardware and includes the sample inlet, an ionization detector, capillary columns as well as computerized compound identification. The sampling system will be a special variation of the purge and trap Tenax mode using six-port valves and a 500 microliter water sample. Capillary columns used for the separating of contaminants will be bonded phase fused silica with a silicone stationary phase. Two detectors can be used: photoionization and far ultraviolet, since they are sensitive and compatible with capillary columns. A computer system evaluation and program with the principle of compound identification based on the retention index is presented.

  10. Low molecular weight organic acids in root exudates and cadmium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    –234. Cieslinski G, Van Rees KCJ, Szmigielska AM, Krishnamurti GSR,. Huang PM (1998). Lowmolecular-weight organic acids in rhizosphere soils of durum wheat and their effect on cadmium bioaccumulation. Plant Soil, 203: ...

  11. Strategies to increase the stability of intermediate moisture foods towards Zygosaccharomyces rouxii: the effect of temperature, ethanol, pH and water activity, with or without the influence of organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, A; Marvig, C L; Daelman, J; Xhaferi, R; Nielsen, D S; Devlieghere, F

    2015-02-01

    Intermediate moisture foods (IMF) are in general microbiologically stable products. However, due to health concerns consumer demands are increasingly forcing producers to lower the fat, sugar and preservatives content, which impede the stability of the IMF products. One of the strategies to counteract these problems is the storage of IMF products at lower temperatures. Thorough knowledge on growth/no growth boundaries of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in IMF products, also at different storage temperatures is an important tool for ensuring microbiologically stability. In this study, growth/no growth models for Z. rouxii, developed by Vermeulen et al. (2012) were further extended by incorporating the factor temperature. Three different data sets were build: (i) without organic acids, (ii) with acetic acid (10,000 ppm on product basis) and (iii) with sorbic acid (1500 ppm on product basis). For each of these data sets three different growth/no growth models were developed after 30, 60 and 90 days. The results show that the influence of temperature is only significant in the lower temperature range (8-15 °C). Also, the effect of pH is negligible (pH 5.0-6.2) unless organic acids are present. More specific, acetic acid had only an additive effect to ethanol and aw at low pH, whereas sorbic acid had also an additive effect at the higher pH values. For incubation periods longer than 30 days the growth/no growth boundary remained stable but enlarged gradually between day 60 and 90, except for the lower temperature range (<12 °C) where the boundary shifts to more stringent environmental conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Organic acid adsorption and mineralization in oxisols with different textures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Vaz Andrade

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Organic acids play an important role in the nutritional conditions of plants. Their relevance is related to their formation dynamics, mineralization rate and adsorption by soil colloids. This study was carried out to evaluate the dynamics of mineralization and adsorption of organic acid (acetic acid - AA, citric acid - CA and humic acid - HA applied to the soil. Samples of two Oxisols were used: Rhodic Haplustox (LV and Typic Haplustox (LVA. The mineralization experiment was arranged in a 2 x 3 x 5 factorial design, based on the factors: two soils (LV and LVA x three organic acid (OA types (AA, CA and HA x five OA rates (0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 mmol dm-3. Organic carbon mineralization in samples was measured by the C-CO2 efflux, produced by the microbial activity, in a 30-day (measurements after 4, 8, 12, 21, and 30 days and in a 4-day experiment (measured after 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. Organic acid adsorption was tested in a 2 x 2 x 5 x 4 factorial design, with the factors and levels: two Oxisols; two organic acids (AA and CA; five OA rates (0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 mmol dm-3 and four adsorption periods (6, 24, 48, and 72 h. The C-CO2 production of soil treated with CA was highest. In the adsorption experiment, the affinity of CA to soil adsorption sites was greatest. The adsorption of organic acids to soils may be an important mechanism by which bioavailability and thus mineralization capacity by microbial activity are reduced.

  13. Association Mapping of Main Tomato Fruit Sugars and Organic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiantao; Xu, Yao; Ding, Qin; Huang, Xinli; Zhang, Yating; Zou, Zhirong; Li, Mingjun; Cui, Lu; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Association mapping has been widely used to map the significant associated loci responsible for natural variation in complex traits and are valuable for crop improvement. Sugars and organic acids are the most important metabolites in tomato fruits. We used a collection of 174 tomato accessions composed of Solanum lycopersicum (123 accessions) and S. lycopersicum var cerasiforme (51 accessions) to detect significantly associated loci controlling the variation of main sugars and organic acids. The accessions were genotyped with 182 SSRs spreading over the tomato genome. Association mapping was conducted on the main sugars and organic acids detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) over 2 years using the mixed linear model (MLM). We detected a total of 58 significantly associated loci (P organic acids, including fructose, glucose, sucrose, citric acid, malic acid. These results not only co-localized with several reported QTLs, including fru9.1/PV, suc9.1/PV, ca2.1/HS, ca3.1/PV, ca4.1/PV, and ca8.1/PV, but also provided a list of candidate significantly associated loci to be functionally validated. These significantly associated loci could be used for deciphering the genetic architecture of tomato fruit sugars and organic acids and for tomato quality breeding. PMID:27617019

  14. Interaction of Humic Acids with Organic Toxicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Yudina, N. V.; Maltseva, E. V.; Nechaev, L. V.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    Interaction of humic acids with polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (naphthalene and anthracene) and triazole series fungicides (cyproconazole (CC) and tebuconazole (TC)) is investigated by the method of fluorescence quenching depending on the concentration of substances in solutions and their structural features. Humic acids were modified by mechanochemical activation in a planetary mill. The complex character of intermolecular interactions between PAH and fungicides with humic acids, including donor-acceptor and hydrophobic binding, is established. Thermodynamically stable conformations of biocide molecules were estimated using ChemOffice CS Chem3D 8.0 by methods of molecular mechanics (MM2) and molecular dynamics. Biocide molecules with pH 7 are in energetically favorable position when the benzene and triazole rings are almost parallel to each other. After acidification of solutions to pH 4.5, the CC molecule retains the geometry for which donor-acceptor interactions are possible: the benzene ring in the molecule represents the electron donor, and triazole is the acceptor. In this case, the electron density in CC is redistributed easier, which is explained by a smaller number of carbon atoms between the triazole and benzene rings, unlike TC. As a result, the TC triazole ring is protonated to a greater degree, acquiring a positive charge, and enters into donoracceptor interactions with humic acid (HA) samples. The above-indicated bond types allow HA to participate actively in sorption processes and to provide their interaction with biocides and PAH and hence, to act as detoxifying agents for recultivation of the polluted environment.

  15. Inborn errors of metabolism revealed by organic acid profile analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and types of inborn errors of amino acid or organic acid metabolism in a group of high risk Egyptian children with clinical signs and symptoms suggestive of inherited metabolic diseases. Subjects and Methods: 117 (79 males ═ 67.5 % and 38 females ═ 32.5 %) high risk patients with ...

  16. Production of Caproic Acid from Mixed Organic Waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei Shan; Strik, David P.B.T.B.; Buisman, Cees J.N.; Kroeze, Carolien

    2017-01-01

    Caproic acid is an emerging platform chemical with diverse applications. Recently, a novel biorefinery process, that is, chain elongation, was developed to convert mixed organic waste and ethanol into renewable caproic acids. In the coming years, this process may become commercialized, and

  17. Metabolic evolution of Escherichia coli strains that produce organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabar, Tammy; Gong, Wei; Yocum, R Rogers

    2014-10-28

    This invention relates to the metabolic evolution of a microbial organism previously optimized for producing an organic acid in commercially significant quantities under fermentative conditions using a hexose sugar as sole source of carbon in a minimal mineral medium. As a result of this metabolic evolution, the microbial organism acquires the ability to use pentose sugars derived from cellulosic materials for its growth while retaining the original growth kinetics, the rate of organic acid production and the ability to use hexose sugars as a source of carbon. This invention also discloses the genetic change in the microorganism that confers the ability to use both the hexose and pentose sugars simultaneously in the production of commercially significant quantities of organic acids.

  18. ORGANIC ACIDS CONCENTRATION IN WINE STOCKS AFTER Saccharomyces cerevisiae FERMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Bayraktar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical constituents in wine stocks that influence the flavor and quality of wine are investigated in the paper. The tested parameters consist of volume fraction of ethanol, residual sugar, phenolic compounds, tartaric, malic, citric, lactic, acetic acids, titratable acidity and volatile acids. The wine stocks that were received from white and red grape varieties Tairov`s selection were tested. There was a correlation between titratable acidity and volatile acids in the wine stocks from white and red grape varieties. High correlation was also found between lactic and acetic acids, between volatile acids, acetic acid and sugar. It was determined that wine stocks with a high concentration of ethanol originated from those yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in a fermented grape must of high speed of enzyme activity. The taste of wine stocks correlated with the ratio of tartaric to malic acid. Analysis showed significant differences between the varieties of white and red wine stocks in concentrations of organic acids, phenolic compounds, residual sugar, and volume fraction of ethanol. Positive correlation was indicated for both studied groups for volatile acids and acetic acid, tartaric, malic, lactic acids and total sugar. Prospective yeast cultures with high productivity of alcohol (ethanol were selected for winemaking biotechnology.

  19. Organic duckweed management with pelargonic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckweed (Lemna spp.) are small, free floating aquatic plants that flourish on stagnant or slow moving water surfaces throughout the continental U.S. They are among the smallest flowering plants, providing food for fish and fowl, but their aggressive growth and invasive tendencies make them formida...

  20. Organic Matter in Extraterrestrial Water-Bearing Salt Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.; Kebukwa, Y.; Fries, M.; Steele, A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Direct samples of early Solar System fluids are present in two thermally-metamorphosed ordinary chondrite regolith breccias (Monahans (1998) [H5] and Zag [H3-6]), which were found to contain brine-bearing halite (NaCl) crystals that have been added to the regolith of an S-type asteroid following asteroidal metamorphism [1, 2]. The brine-bearing halite grains were proposed to be formed on an icy C-type asteroids (possibly Ceres), and transferred to an S-type asteroid via cryovolcanic event(s) [3]. A unique aspect of these halites is that they contain abundant organic rich solid inclusions hosted within the halites alongside the water inclusions. Methods: We analyzed in detail the compositions of the organic solids and the amino acid content of the halite crystals with two-step laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectrometry (L(sup 2) MS), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS), and ultra-performance liquid chromatography fluorescence detection and quadrupole time of flight hybrid mass spectrometry (UPLC-FD/QToF-MS). Results and Discussion: The L(sup 2) MS results show signatures of low-mass polyaromatic hydro-carbons (PAHs) indicated by sequences of peaks separated by 14 atomic mass units (amu) due to successive addition of methylene (CH2) groups to the PAH skeletons [4]. Raman spectra of the micron-sized solid inclusions of the halites indicate the presence of abundant and highly variable organic matter that include a mixture of short-chain aliphatic compounds and macromolecular carbon. C-XANES analysis identified C-rich areas with peaks at 285.0 eV (aromatic C=C) and 286.6 eV (vinyl-keto C=O). However, there is no 1s-sigma* exciton peak (291.7 eV) that is indicative of the development of graphene structure [5], which suggests the organics were synthesized cold. Na-noSIMS analyses show C-rich and N-rich areas that exhibit similar isotopic values with that of the IOM in

  1. Humic and fluvic acids and organic colloidal materials in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Clark, S.B. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Humic substances are ubiquitous in the environment, occurring in all soils, waters, and sediments of the ecosphere. Humic substances arise from the decomposition of plant and animal tissues yet are more stable than their precursors. Their size, molecular weight, elemental composition, structure, and the number and position of functional groups vary, depending on the origin and age of the material. Humic and fulvic substances have been studied extensively for more than 200 years; however, much remains unknown regarding their structure and properties. Humic substances are those organic compounds found in the environment that cannot be classified as any other chemical class of compounds. They are traditionally defined according to their solubilities. Fulvic acids are those organic materials that are soluble in water at all pH values. Humic acids are those materials that are insoluble at acidic pH values (pH < 2) but are soluble at higher pH values. Humin is the fraction of natural organic materials that is insoluble in water at all pH values. These definitions reflect the traditional methods for separating the different fractions from the original mixture. The humic content of soils varies from 0 to almost 10%. In surface waters, the humic content, expressed as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), varies from 0.1 to 50 ppm in dark-water swamps. In ocean waters, the DOC varies from 0.5 to 1.2 ppm at the surface, and the DOC in samples from deep groundwaters varies from 0.1 to 10 ppm. In addition, about 10% of the DOC in surface waters is found in suspended matter, either as organic or organically coated inorganic particulates. Humic materials function as surfactants, with the ability to bind both hydrophobic and hydrophyllic materials, making numic and fluvic materials effective agents in transporting both organic and inorganic contaminants in the environment.

  2. Removal of Natural Organic Matter from Two Types of Humic Ground Waters by Nanofiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alborzfar, Maryam; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil; Grøn, Christian

    1998-01-01

    The efficiency of nano filtration (NF) in producing drinking water from two types of humic ground waters was studied on site at a pilot scale in Denmark. At one site, the natural organic matter (NOM) consisted almost entirely of humic acids with a concentration of 20-22 mg C/l, a broad molecular...

  3. Organic matter source discrimination by humic acid characterization: synchronous scan fluorescence spectroscopy and Ferrate(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Carolyn; Sharma, Virender K; Baum, J Clayton; Sohn, Mary

    2013-02-01

    In this study, seven soil and sedimentary humic acid samples were analyzed by synchronous scan fluorescence (SSF) spectroscopy. The spectra of these humic acids were compared to each other and characterized, based on three major SSF peaks centered at approximately 281, 367 and 470 nm. Intensity ratios were calculated based on these peaks that were used to numerically assist in source discrimination. All humic acid samples were then reacted with Ferrate(VI) and were again analyzed with SSF. Upon the addition of Ferrate(VI) SSF spectra were obtained which more readily differentiated humic acid source. This method will assist geochemists and water management districts in tracing sources of organic matter to receiving water bodies and may aid in the elucidation of the chemical nature of humic acids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Humic acid as a model for natural organic matter (NOM) in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current practices in some water-treatment facilities have reported that natural organic matter (NOM) blocks the adsorption sites of activated carbon resulting in lower geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) removal. Humic acid has been reported to compete with geosmin and 2-MIB removal in the same way. The removal ...

  5. Evaluation of Adsorption Characteristics of a Fibrous Adsorbent Containing Zwitter-Ionic Functional Group, Targeting Organic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Akira; Tang, Ning; Inoue, Yoshinori; Kamichatani, Waka; Katoh, Toshifumi; Saito, Mitsuru; Obara, Kenji; Toriba, Akira; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2017-01-01

    Diallylamine-maleic acid copolymer (DAM)-nonwoven fabric (DAM-f), a fibrous adsorbent, contains DAM with zwitter-ionic functional groups and forms a hydration layer on the surface. The aim of this report was to evaluate the adsorption selectivity of DAM-f to semi-volatile organic acid (C1-C5). In the aqueous phase, formic acid dissolved in the hydration layer bound to the imino group of DAM-f due to anion exchange interaction. In the gas phase, the adsorption amounts of organic acids increased with the exposure time. Moreover, the adsorption rate constants correlated with the air/water partition coefficients (log Kaw) for formic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid, valeric acid and isovaleric acid, except for acetic acid. These results indicate that DAM-f is highly selective to hydrophilic compounds which easily move from the air to the hydration layer of DAM-f.

  6. Effect of organic matter on determination of reactive mercury in contaminated waters

    OpenAIRE

    Ramalhosa, Elsa; Río-Segade, Susana; Pereira, Eduarda; Vale, Carlos; Duarte, Armando

    2003-01-01

    Dissolved reactive mercury was determined in water samples from Ria da Aveiro, a coastal lagoon contaminated by mercury. Concentrations increased with acid dilution to a maximum of 193% in samples containing organic matter with high aromaticity, as inferred from absorbances at 250, 280 and 365 nm. Laboratory experiments with potassium hydrogenoftalate and humic acids solutions proved the influence of aromaticity in complexing mercury, how acid dilution protonates the aromatic Hg-complexes and...

  7. Transport and cycling of iron and hydrogen peroxide in a freshwater stream: Influence of organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D.T.; Runkel, R.L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Voelker, B.M.; Kimball, B.A.; Carraway, E.R.

    2003-01-01

    An in-stream injection of two dissolved organic acids (phthalic and aspartic acids) was performed in an acidic mountain stream to assess the effects of organic acids on Fe photoreduction and H2O2 cycling. Results indicate that the fate of Fe is dependent on a net balance of oxidative and reductive processes, which can vary over a distance of several meters due to changes in incident light and other factors. Solution phase photoreduction rates were high in sunlit reaches and were enhanced by the organic acid addition but were also limited by the amount of ferric iron present in the water column. Fe oxide photoreduction from the streambed and colloids within the water column resulted in an increase in the diurnal load of total filterable Fe within the experimental reach, which also responded to increases in light and organic acids. Our results also suggest that Fe(II) oxidation increased in response to the organic acids, with the result of offsetting the increase in Fe(II) from photoreductive processes. Fe(II) was rapidly oxidized to Fe(III) after sunset and during the day within a well-shaded reach, presumably through microbial oxidation. H2O 2, a product of dissolved organic matter photolysis, increased downstream to maximum concentrations of 0.25 ??M midday. Kinetic calculations show that the buildup of H2O2 is controlled by reaction with Fe(III), but this has only a small effect on Fe(II) because of the small formation rates of H2O2 compared to those of Fe(II). The results demonstrate the importance of incorporating the effects of light and dissolved organic carbon into Fe reactive transport models to further our understanding of the fate of Fe in streams and lakes.

  8. Acid Rain in Niger Delta Region: Implication on Water Resources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research focused on the effect of acid rain on the water quality of the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. Three hundred water samples were collected: 100 water samples from rain, 100 from open wells and 100 from rivers. The water samples were analysed using the paired t-test and multiple correlation analysis to ascertain ...

  9. Tracking the morphology of fulvic acids during water uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenay, Veronika; Krepelova, Adela; Rudich, Yinon; Huthwelker, Thomas; Ammann, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric humic like substances (HULIS) denote a range of oxidized, polyfunctional organic aerosol components widespread in the atmosphere, which show similar extraction behaviour on exchange columns as humic substances. Stemming from oxidation of primary gas phase and particulate organics, from e.g. biomass burning events, the HULIS constitute to a major fraction of the water soluble organic aerosol components in the atmosphere. Highly oxidized organic compounds play an important role in atmospheric processes like cloud formation or modification. Important factors therein are their hygroscopic properties and their microstructure, which influences their optical properties. HULIS somewhat resemble humic substances from terrestrial and aquatic sources, which consist mainly of carboxylic, aromatic and phenolic moieties assembled into hydrogen and van der Waals bonded supermolecular structures. Hence, the Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA), a chemically well characterized fulvic acid obtained from the International Humic Substances Society, was used to obtain combined data on hygroscopic properties and microstructural evolution during water uptake. The measurements were performed using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS, near edge x-ray absorption fine structure) in combination with an x-ray microscope (STXM, scanning x-ray transmission microscope) with a spatial resolution of about 30 nm. The measurements were performed at the PolLux beamline (SLS, Paul Scherrer Institut). The NEXAFS spectroscopy provides the possibility to map important chemical functional groups of carbon (as the one mentioned above) and oxygen atoms, and also to quantify the amount of carbon and oxygen atoms. To follow the submicron structure during water uptake a new device - a microreactor - was developed for the STXM. Using this reactor, the samples could be kept in a microenvironment with controlled temperature and humidity from 0 to 95 %. The samples were deposited either as droplets with

  10. Activation of Aspen Wood with Carbon Dioxide and Phosphoric Acid for Removal of Total Organic Carbon from Oil Sands Produced Water: Increasing the Yield with Bio-Oil Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veksha, Andrei; Bhuiyan, Tazul I.; Hill, Josephine M.

    2016-01-01

    Several samples of activated carbon were prepared by physical (CO2) and chemical (H3PO4) activation of aspen wood and tested for the adsorption of organic compounds from water generated during the recovery of bitumen using steam assisted gravity drainage. Total organic carbon removal by the carbon samples increased proportionally with total pore volume as determined from N2 adsorption isotherms at −196 °C. The activated carbon produced by CO2 activation had similar removal levels for total organic carbon from the water (up to 70%) to those samples activated with H3PO4, but lower yields, due to losses during pyrolysis and activation. A method to increase the yield when using CO2 activation was proposed and consisted of recycling bio-oil produced from previous runs to the aspen wood feed, followed by either KOH addition (0.48%) or air pretreatment (220 °C for 3 h) before pyrolysis and activation. By recycling the bio-oil, the yield of CO2 activated carbon (after air pretreatment of the mixture) was increased by a factor of 1.3. Due to the higher carbon yield, the corresponding total organic carbon removal, per mass of wood feed, increased by a factor of 1.2 thus improving the overall process efficiency. PMID:28787817

  11. Activation of Aspen Wood with Carbon Dioxide and Phosphoric Acid for Removal of Total Organic Carbon from Oil Sands Produced Water: Increasing the Yield with Bio-Oil Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Veksha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several samples of activated carbon were prepared by physical (CO2 and chemical (H3PO4 activation of aspen wood and tested for the adsorption of organic compounds from water generated during the recovery of bitumen using steam assisted gravity drainage. Total organic carbon removal by the carbon samples increased proportionally with total pore volume as determined from N2 adsorption isotherms at −196 °C. The activated carbon produced by CO2 activation had similar removal levels for total organic carbon from the water (up to 70% to those samples activated with H3PO4, but lower yields, due to losses during pyrolysis and activation. A method to increase the yield when using CO2 activation was proposed and consisted of recycling bio-oil produced from previous runs to the aspen wood feed, followed by either KOH addition (0.48% or air pretreatment (220 °C for 3 h before pyrolysis and activation. By recycling the bio-oil, the yield of CO2 activated carbon (after air pretreatment of the mixture was increased by a factor of 1.3. Due to the higher carbon yield, the corresponding total organic carbon removal, per mass of wood feed, increased by a factor of 1.2 thus improving the overall process efficiency.

  12. Organic chloramines in chlorine-based disinfected water systems: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Zuo Tong; Kristiana, Ina; Busetti, Francesco; Linge, Kathryn L; Joll, Cynthia A

    2017-08-01

    This paper is a critical review of current knowledge of organic chloramines in water systems, including their formation, stability, toxicity, analytical methods for detection, and their impact on drinking water treatment and quality. The term organic chloramines may refer to any halogenated organic compounds measured as part of combined chlorine (the difference between the measured free and total chlorine concentrations), and may include N-chloramines, N-chloramino acids, N-chloraldimines and N-chloramides. Organic chloramines can form when dissolved organic nitrogen or dissolved organic carbon react with either free chlorine or inorganic chloramines. They are potentially harmful to humans and may exist as an intermediate for other disinfection by-products. However, little information is available on the formation or occurrence of organic chloramines in water due to a number of challenges. One of the biggest challenges for the identification and quantification of organic chloramines in water systems is the lack of appropriate analytical methods. In addition, many of the organic chloramines that form during disinfection are unstable, which results in difficulties in sampling and detection. To date research has focussed on the study of organic monochloramines. However, given that breakpoint chlorination is commonly undertaken in water treatment systems, the formation of organic dichloramines should also be considered. Organic chloramines can be formed from many different precursors and pathways. Therefore, studying the occurrence of their precursors in water systems would enable better prediction and management of their formation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Methods for Determining Organic Matter and Colour in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramunė Albrektienė

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article examines different methods for determining organic matter and colour in water. Most of organic compounds in water have a humic substance. These substances frequently form complexes with iron. Humic matter gives water a yellow-brownish colour. Water filtration through conventional sand filters does not remove colour and organic compounds, and therefore complicated water treatment methods shall be applied. The methods utilized for organic matter determination in water included research on total organic carbon, permanganate index and the bichromate number of UV absorption of 254 nm wave length. The obtained results showed the greatest dependence between water colour and permanganate index. However, UV adsorption could be used for organic matter determination during the operation of a water treatment plant and the start-up of plants as easy and fast methods.Article in Lithuanian

  14. The roles of organic acids in C4 photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha eLudwig

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic acids are involved in numerous metabolic pathways in all plants. The finding that some plants, known as C4 plants, have four-carbon dicarboxylic acids as the first product of carbon fixation showed these organic acids play essential roles as photosynthetic intermediates. Oxaloacetate, malate, and aspartate are substrates for the C4 acid cycle that underpins the CO2 concentrating mechanism of C4 photosynthesis. In this cycle, oxaloacetate is the immediate, short-lived, product of the initial CO2 fixation step in C4 leaf mesophyll cells. The malate and aspartate, resulting from the rapid conversion of oxaloacetate, are the organic acids delivered to the sites of carbon reduction in the bundle-sheath cells of the leaf, where they are decarboxylated, with the released CO2 used to make carbohydrates. The three-carbon organic acids resulting from the decarboxylation reactions are returned to the mesophyll cells where they are used to regenerate the CO2 acceptor pool. NADP-malic enzyme-type, NAD-malic enzyme-type and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-type C4 plants were identified, based on the most abundant decarboxylating enzyme in the leaf tissue. The genes encoding these C4 pathway-associated decarboxylases were co-opted from ancestral C3 plant genes during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. Malate was recognized as the major organic acid transferred in NADP-malic enzyme-type C4 species, while aspartate fills this role in NAD-malic enzyme-type and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-type plants. However, accumulating evidence indicates that many C4 plants use a combination of organic acids and decarboxylases during CO2 fixation, and the C4-type categories are not rigid. The ability to transfer multiple organic acid species and utilize different decarboxylases has been suggested to give C4 plants advantages in changing and stressful environments, as well as during development, by facilitating the balance of energy between the two cell types

  15. Hydrogen generation from magnesium hydride by using organic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yen-Hsi

    In this paper, the hydrolysis of solid magnesium hydride has been studied with the high concentration of catalyst at the varying temperature. An organic acid (acetic acid, CH3COOH) has been chosen as the catalyst. The study has three objectives: first, using three different weights of MgH 2 react with aqueous solution of acid for the hydrogen generation experiments. Secondly, utilizing acetic acid as the catalyst accelerates hydrogen generation. Third, emphasizing the combination of the three operating conditions (the weight of MgH2, the concentration of acetic acid, and the varying temperature) influence the amount of hydrogen generation. The experiments results show acetic acid truly can increase the rate of hydrogen generation and the weight of MgH2 can affect the amount of hydrogen generation more than the varying temperature.

  16. Surface complexation modeling or organic acid sorption to goethite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evanko, C.R.; Dzombak, D.A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1999-06-15

    Surface complexation modeling was performed using the Generalized Two-Layer Model for a series of low molecular weight organic acids. Sorption of these organic acids to goethite was investigated in a previous study to assess the influence of particular structural features on sorption. Here, the ability to describe the observed sorption behavior for compounds with similar structural features using surface complexation modeling was investigated. A set of surface reactions and equilibrium constants yielding optimal data fits was obtained for each organic acid over a range of total sorbate concentrations. Surface complexation modeling successfully described sorption of a number of the simple organic acids, but an additional hydrophobic component was needed to describe sorption behavior of some compounds with significant hydrophobic character. These compounds exhibited sorption behavior of some compounds with significant hydrophobic character. These compounds exhibited sorption behavior that was inconsistent with ligand exchange mechanisms since sorption behavior of some compounds with significant hydrophobic character. These compounds exhibited sorption behavior that was inconsistent with ligand exchange mechanisms since sorption did not decrease with increasing total sorbate concentration and/or exceeded surface site saturation. Hydrophobic interactions appeared to be most significant for the compound containing a 5-carbon aliphatic chain. Comparison of optimized equilibrium constants for similar surface species showed that model results were consistent with observed sorption behavior: equilibrium constants were highest for compounds having adjacent carboxylic groups, lower for compounds with adjacent phenolic groups, and lowest for compounds with phenolic groups in the ortho position relative to a carboxylic group. Surface complexation modeling was also performed to fit sorption data for Suwannee River fulvic acid. The data could be described well using reactions and

  17. Integrated process of distillation with side reactors for synthesis of organic acid esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Chandrakant B; Prindle, John C; Kolah, Aspri; Miller, Dennis J; Lira, Carl T

    2015-11-04

    An integrated process and system for synthesis of organic-acid esters is provided. The method of synthesizing combines reaction and distillation where an organic acid and alcohol composition are passed through a distillation chamber having a plurality of zones. Side reactors are used for drawing off portions of the composition and then recycling them to the distillation column for further purification. Water is removed from a pre-reactor prior to insertion into the distillation column. An integrated heat integration system is contained within the distillation column for further purification and optimizing efficiency in the obtaining of the final product.

  18. Solid-phase peptide synthesis using nanoparticulate amino acids in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Keiko; Ichikawa, Hideki; Maeda, Mitsuko; Kida, Shinya; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Kawasaki, Koichi

    2007-07-01

    Solid-phase peptide synthesis has many advantages compared with solution peptide synthesis. However, this procedure requires a large amount of organic solvents. Since safe organic solvent waste disposal is an important environmental problem, a technology based on coupling reaction of suspended nanoparticle reactants in water was studied. Fmoc-amino acids are used widely, but most of them show low solubility in water. We prepared well-dispersible Fmoc-amino acid nanoparticles in water by pulverization using a planetary ball mill in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol). Leu-enkephalin amide was prepared successfully using the nanoparticulate Fmoc-amino acid on a poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted Rink amide resin in water.

  19. Kinetics of aluminum-fulvic acid complexation in acidic waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plankey, B.J.; Patterson, H.H.

    1987-06-01

    A fluorescence technique has been used to study the complex formation kinetics of aluminum with a single metal-free fulvic acid isolated from an Adirondack Mountain forest soil. In the pH range of 3.0-4.5, two kinetically distinguishable components of the fulvic acid mixture have been identified, which define two types of average aluminum binding sites. Both fulvic acid average sites conform to a bidentate chelating binding site kinetic analysis, from which rate and equilibrium parameters have been obtained. From comparison of rate and equilibrium constants of aluminum-salicyclic acid complexation, the authors conclude that the faster reacting component of fulvic acid probably contains salicyclic acid type aluminum binding sites. Results are also compared with those of an aluminum-fluoride kinetic study. Fulvic acid and fluoride react with aluminum by the same mechanism and therefore have the same pH dependence. The dependence of the rate on temperature is, however, quite different for the two reactions. The environmental implications of these findings are discussed. 45 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  20. [VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS IN SALIVA--BIOLOGICAL MARKERS FOR ASSESSMENT OF DRINKING WATER POLLUTANTS ON CHILDREN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaizina, A E; Akaizin, E S; Starodumov, V L

    2015-01-01

    The use of modern methods of analysis is aimed to the search of ultimately novel biological markers. Volatile fatty acids in saliva were not used previously for the assessment of the effects of contaminating substances in the drinking water on the body of children. The aim of the study is to investigate the informative value of volatile fatty acids in saliva as biological markers of the impact for the assessment of the exposure to contaminating substances in the drinking water on the body of children. Hygienic assessment of drinking water quality was made according to data of the own research of drinking water from centralized supply system of the city of Ivanovo. For the comparison of indices there was investigated the drinking water from wells at the village Podvyaznovsky of the Ivanovo region. In the Ivanovo water from the distributing network of centralized drinking water supply system of the city of Ivanovo, there were identified indices of the permanganate oxidation and the total concentration of residual chlorine exceeding norms, and also chloroform and carbon tetrachloride were in concentrations not exceeding the norms. Studied by us the samples of drinking water from Podvyaznovsky village wells, the water met the standards for all investigated parameters. The was studied the informative value of volatile fatty acids in the saliva of children aged 9-14 years from the city of Ivanovo and the Podvyaznovsky village, Ivanovo region. There was established the fall in acetic, butyric, isovaleric acids and the total amount of volatile fatty acids in the saliva in children of the city of Ivanovo, consuming water treated with chlorine of Ivanovo centralized drinking water supply system. Indices of volatile fatty acids in saliva are informative for the assessment of the impact of organic pollutants, residual chlorine and organic chlorine compounds of drinking water on the body of children.

  1. Sugars, organic acids, minerals and lipids in jabuticaba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annete de Jesus Boari Lima

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the sugar, organic acid and mineral compositions of the whole fruit and fractions (skin, pulp and seed of the Paulista (Plinia cauliflora and Sabará (Plinia jaboticaba jabuticaba tree genotypes, as well as the oil compositions of their skin and seeds. High levels of sugar, especially fructose, followed by glucose and sucrose, were encountered in the fruit. In the Paulista genotype, higher levels of total and reducing sugars were found in the pulp and skin, which was not observed when comparing the whole fruit of both genotypes. Five organic acids were found in the whole fruit and in the fractions of the two jabuticaba genotypes in quantitative order: citric acid > succinic acid > malic acid > oxalic acid > acetic acid. Potassium was the most abundant mineral found. This fruit was also shown to be rich in magnesium, phosphorus, calcium and copper. The seed oil had nearly the same constitution as the oil extracted from the skin in both genotypes and the major compounds were an unidentified phytosterol, palmitic, linoleic and oleic acids, and squalene.

  2. Organic hydrogels as potential sorbent materials for water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linardatos, George; Bekiari, Vlasoula; Bokias, George

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogels are three-dimensional, hydrophilic, polymeric networks capable to adsorb large amounts of water or biological fluids. The networks are composed of homopolymers or copolymers and are insoluble due to the presence of chemical or physical cross-links. Depending on the nature of the structural units, swelling or shrinking of these gels can be activated by several external stimuli, such as solvent, heat, pH, electric stimuli. As a consequence, these materials are attractive for several applications in a variety of fields: drug delivery, muscle mimetic soft linear actuators, hosts of nanoparticles and semiconductors, regenerative medicine etc. Of special interest is the application of hydrogels for water purification, since they can effectively adsorb several water soluble pollutants such as metal ions, inorganic or organic anions, organic dyestaff, etc. In the present work, anionic hydrogels bearing negatively charged -COO- groups were prepared and investigated. These are based on the anionic monomer sodium acrylate (ANa) and the nonionic one N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAM). A series of copolymeric hydrogels (P(DMAM-co-ANax) were synthesized. The molar content x of ANa units (expressing the molar charged content of the hydrogel) varies from 0 (nonionic poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide), PDMAM, hydrogel) up to 1 (fully charged poly(sodium acrylate), PANa, hydrogel). The hydrogels were used to extract organic or inorganic solutes from water. Cationic and anionic model dyes, as well as multivalent inorganic ions, have been studied. It is found that cationic dyes are strongly adsorbed and retained by the hydrogels, while adsorbance of anionic dyes was negligible. Both maximum adsorption and equilibrium binding constant depend on the chemical structure of the dye, the presence of functional chemical groups and the hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance. In the case of metal cations, adsorption depends mostly on the charge of the cation. In addition, crucial factors controlling

  3. Isotherm-Based Thermodynamic Models for Solute Activities of Organic Acids with Consideration of Partial Dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, Lucy; Ohm, Peter B; Dutcher, Cari S

    2016-06-23

    Organic acids make up a significant fraction of the organic mass in atmospheric aerosol particles. The calculation of gas-liquid-solid equilibrium partitioning of the organic acid is therefore critical for accurate determination of atmospheric aerosol physicochemical properties and processes such as new particle formation and activation to cloud condensation nuclei. Previously, an adsorption isotherm-based statistical thermodynamic model was developed for capturing solute concentration-activity relationships for multicomponent aqueous solutions over the entire concentration range (Dutcher et al. J. Phys. Chem. C/A 2011, 2012, 2013), with model parameters for energies of adsorption successfully related to dipole-dipole electrostatic forces in solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions for both electrolytes and organics (Ohm et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015). However, careful attention is needed for weakly dissociating semivolatile organic acids. Dicarboxylic acids, such as malonic acid and glutaric acid are treated here as a mixture of nondissociated organic solute (HA) and dissociated solute (H(+) + A(-)). It was found that the apparent dissociation was greater than that predicted by known dissociation constants alone, emphasizing the effect of dissociation on osmotic and activity coefficient predictions. To avoid additional parametrization from the mixture approach, an expression was used to relate the Debye-Hückel hard-core collision diameter to the adjustable solute-solvent intermolecular distance. An improved reference state treatment for electrolyte-organic aqueous mixtures, such as that observed here with partial dissociation, has also been proposed. This work results in predictive correlations for estimation of organic acid and water activities for which there is little or no activity data.

  4. Sub products form a depuratives process of acid mine water with organic residues used as carbon source. part I; Subproductos en la depuracion de aguas acidas de mineria y empleo de residuos organicos como fuente carbonada, Parte I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Rodriguez, A. M.; Duran-Barrantes, M. M.; Martel-Villagran, F. J.

    2002-07-01

    Subproducts from the biological depurative process of acid mine water, such as H{sub 2}S in the biogas and HCO{sub 3} in the effluents are applied for the selective precipitation of metallic sulphides of Pb, Zn, Cu, Al an Mn, as a function of pH. To obtain the maximum H{sub 2}S concentration is principal,so several studies have been made to found the best working conditions between microorganisms and the carbon source choice. In this work,the results of the digestion process with an inoculum from the anaerobic digestion of swine manure and cheese whey as carbon source are showed. The optimal conditions obtained are: for a SO{sub 4}''=COD of 1:1,5 in HRT of 12 days, 65% of sulphate reduction, 30% of H2S in biogas. In the precipitation of metals, a reduction of 98,3% of Fe, 96,1% Cu, 79% Zn and 99% Al are obtained. AYESA (Aguas y Estructuras, S. A.) is developing the technical attendance. This study is being demonstrated under the Acid Water Treatment Program, conducted by the Consejeria del Medio Ambiente (Junta de Andalucia). (Author) 15 refs.

  5. Subproducts from a depurative process of acid mine water with organic residues used as carbon source. Part II; Subproductos en la depuracion de aguas acidas de mineria y empleo de residuos orgnicos como fuente carbonada (Parte II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran-Barrantes, M. M.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, A. M.; Martel-Villagran, F. J.

    2004-07-01

    The biological depurative process of acid mine water reducing sulphate concentration from Tinto River produces the alkalinity needed for the selective precipitation of Fe, Cu, Zn and Al. But a suitable carbon source for the working conditions of microorganisms to reduce sulphates is needed. In this work, the results obtained using urban sewage as a carbon source are presented. the optimal conditions obtained are: 65,5% of sulphate reduction in HRT of 10 days for a SO{sub '}'2{sub 4} COD of 1:1 and 580 mg HS/L in the reactor effluent. In the precipitation of metals, a reduction of 77,6% of Fe, 88,6% of Cu, 70,7% of Zn and 71,5% of Al, are obtained depending on the assay applied. Ayesa is developing the technical attendance. This study is being demonstrated under the Acid Water Treatment Program, conducted by the Consejeria del Medio Ambiente (Junta de Andalucia). (Author) 6 refs.

  6. Influence of dissolved organic carbon content on modelling natural organic matter acid-base properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Cédric; Mounier, Stéphane; Benaïm, Jean Yves

    2004-10-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) behaviour towards proton is an important parameter to understand NOM fate in the environment. Moreover, it is necessary to determine NOM acid-base properties before investigating trace metals complexation by natural organic matter. This work focuses on the possibility to determine these acid-base properties by accurate and simple titrations, even at low organic matter concentrations. So, the experiments were conducted on concentrated and diluted solutions of extracted humic and fulvic acid from Laurentian River, on concentrated and diluted model solutions of well-known simple molecules (acetic and phenolic acids), and on natural samples from the Seine river (France) which are not pre-concentrated. Titration experiments were modelled by a 6 acidic-sites discrete model, except for the model solutions. The modelling software used, called PROSECE (Programme d'Optimisation et de SpEciation Chimique dans l'Environnement), has been developed in our laboratory, is based on the mass balance equilibrium resolution. The results obtained on extracted organic matter and model solutions point out a threshold value for a confident determination of the studied organic matter acid-base properties. They also show an aberrant decreasing carboxylic/phenolic ratio with increasing sample dilution. This shift is neither due to any conformational effect, since it is also observed on model solutions, nor to ionic strength variations which is controlled during all experiments. On the other hand, it could be the result of an electrode troubleshooting occurring at basic pH values, which effect is amplified at low total concentration of acidic sites. So, in our conditions, the limit for a correct modelling of NOM acid-base properties is defined as 0.04 meq of total analysed acidic sites concentration. As for the analysed natural samples, due to their high acidic sites content, it is possible to model their behaviour despite the low organic carbon concentration.

  7. The solubilities of benzene polycarboxylic acids in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apelblat, Alexander [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)]. E-mail: apelblat@bgu.ac.il; Manzurola, Emanuel [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Abo Balal, Nazmia [Negev Academic College of Engineering, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    2006-05-15

    The solubilities in water of all benzene polycarboxylic acids are discussed, using data determined in this work (benzoic, terephthalic, trimellitic, trimesic, and pyromellitic acids) and available from the literature (benzoic, phthalic, isophthalic, terephthalic, hemimellitic, trimelitic, trimesic, mellophanic, prehnitic, pyromellitic, benzene-pentacarboxylic and mellitic acids). The apparent molar enthalpies of solution at the saturation point for these benzene polycarboxylic acids were determined from the temperature dependence of the solubilities.

  8. Comparison of fatty acid composition in conventional and organic milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anka Popović Vranješ

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the scientific research was to establish the differences between fatty acid composition in conventional milk and milk produced according to the organic production principles. In the period between February and December in 2009, the samples of raw conventional milk were analysed using the gas chromographic method to determine the fatty acid composition. Conventional milk was produced at the farm with around 700 dairy cows of Holstein breed. The farm is located in the Vrbas municipality. Organic milk was sampled from ten smaller farms with 12 dairy cows of Simmental breed on the average, located in clean environment of Fruška Gora slopes (Grabovo settlement. The results of fatty acids content were processed with the statistical package (Statistica 9, and a significant differences were determined with t-test and shown as statistically significant (p0.05. The ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 in organic milk was lower than in conventional milk, which is crucial to human health. The differences in fatty acid composition between conventional and organic milk may result from different feeding practices, because the organic breeding of cows is primarily based on grazing, while the conventional breeding implies mixed ration.

  9. Organic acids for control of Salmonella in different feed materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Sevinc; Andersson, Mats Gunnar; Löfström, Charlotta; Skandamis, Panagiotis N; Gounadaki, Antonia; Zentek, Jürgen; Häggblom, Per

    2013-04-18

    Salmonella control in animal feed is important in order to protect animal and public health. Organic acids is one of the control measures used for treatment of Salmonella contaminated feed or feed ingredients. In the present study, the efficacy of formic acid (FA) and different blends of FA, propionic acid (PA) and sodium formate (SF) was investigated. Four Salmonella strains isolated from feed were assayed for their acid tolerance. Also, the effect of lower temperatures (5°C and 15°C) compared to room temperature was investigated in rape seed and soybean meal. The efficacy of acid treatments varied significantly between different feed materials. The strongest reduction was seen in pelleted and compound mash feed (2.5 log10 reduction) followed by rapeseed meal (1 log10 reduction) after 5 days exposure. However, in soybean meal the acid effects were limited (less than 0.5 log10 reduction) even after several weeks' exposure. In all experiments the survival curves showed a concave shape, with a fast initial death phase followed by reduction at a slower rate during the remaining time of the experiment.No difference in Salmonella reduction was observed between FA and a blend of FA and PA, whereas a commercial blend of FA and SF (Amasil) was slightly more efficacious (0.5-1 log10 reduction) than a blend of FA and PA (Luprocid) in compound mash feed. The Salmonella Infantis strain was found to be the most acid tolerant strain followed by, S. Putten, S. Senftenberg and S. Typhimurium. The tolerance of the S. Infantis strain compared with the S. Typhimurium strain was statistically significant (pSalmonella in feed is a matter of reducing the number of viable bacterial cells rather than eliminating the organism. Recommendations on the use of acids for controlling Salmonella in feed should take into account the relative efficacy of acid treatment in different feed materials, the variation in acid tolerance between different Salmonella strains, and the treatment temperature.

  10. Effects of water on the esterification of free fatty acids by acid catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Deog-Keun; Lee, Jin-Suk [Korea Institute of Energy Research, 71-2, Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea); Wang, Zhong-Ming [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, No. 2 Nengyuan Rd, Wushan, Tianhe, Guangzhou 510-640 (China)

    2010-03-15

    To maximize the production of biodiesel from soybean soapstock, the effects of water on the esterification of high-FFA (free fatty acid) oils were investigated. Oleic acid and high acid acid oil (HAAO) were esterified by reaction with methanol in the presence of Amberlyst-15 as a heterogeneous catalyst or sulfuric acid as a homogeneous catalyst. The yield of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) was studied at oil to methanol molar ratios of 1:3 and 1:6 and reaction temperatures of 60 and 80 C. The rate of esterification of oleic acid significantly decreased as the initial water content increased to 20% of the oil. The activity of Amberlyst-15 decreased more rapidly than that of sulfuric acid, due to the direct poisoning of acid sites by water. Esterification using sulfuric acid was not affected by water until there was a 5% water addition at a 1:6 molar ratio of oil to methanol. FAME content of HAAO prepared from soapstock rapidly increased for the first 30 min of esterification. Following the 30-min mark, the rate of FAME production decreased significantly due to the accumulation of water. When methanol and Amberlyst-15 were removed from the HAAO after 30 min of esterification and fresh methanol and a catalyst were added, the time required to reach 85% FAME content was reduced from 6 h to 1.8 h. (author)

  11. Optimizing Hollow Fibre Nanofiltration for Organic Matter Rich Lake Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Keucken

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, various technologies have been utilized for Natural Organic Matter (NOM removal with varying degrees of success. Conventional treatment methods comprising of coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, or filtration are widely used to remove NOM. An alternative to these conventional methods is to use spiral wound membranes. These membranes tend to remove too much hardness whilst being ineffective in disinfection. They also have a low tolerance to chlorine and thus, have limited chemical cleaning options. In this study, we investigated how an alternative and new innovative filtration concept, based on capillary NF membranes from modified polyethersulfone (PES, may be used to treat soft but humus-rich surface waters. Comprehensive performance tests, with a fully automated membrane pilot equipped with a full-scale sized test module (40 m2 membrane surface, were conducted at WTP Görvälnverket, which is operated by the water utility Norrvatten, providing drinking water from Mälaren (SUVA = 2.7–3.3, TOC = 7.0–10.0 mg·L−1 for about 500,000 people in the northern part of the Swedish capital of Stockholm. The removal of both UV and DOC was modeled using a solution diffusion approach. The optimized parameters allow deducing optimal operation conditions with respect to energy, water consumption, and permeate water quality. Optimal cross flow velocity was determined to be 0.75 m·s−1 at 80% recovery and a flux of 12–18 L·m−2·h−1. Under these conditions, 80% of the UV, 75% of the Humic Substances (MW = 600 and 70% of TOC were removed (from 8 to below 2 mg·L−1. A higher cross flow velocity led to marginal improvement (+2% while both higher and lower membrane fluxes degraded permeate water quality. Apparent optimized diffusion coefficients for UV and TOC were around 1.2–2.4 × 10−10·m2·s−1 and were similar to values found in the literature. Due to their higher diffusion coefficients and higher permeability

  12. Engineering and Design: Trace Organic Compounds in Potable Water Supplies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1986-01-01

    This letter provides basic information pertaining to the occurrence, detection, and treatment of trace organic compounds that may be found in drinking water and existing and proposed drinking water...

  13. Organic Contaminants and Treatment Chemicals in Steam-Water Cycles : Thermal stability, decomposition products and flow-accelerated corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moed, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    Boiler feedwater and steam have to be of high purity, because of the susceptibility of the steam-water cycle to corrosion. Organic contaminants break down in boilers by hydrothermolysis, leading to the formation of organic acid anions, which are suspected to cause corrosion of steam-water cycle

  14. Removal of Natural Organic Matter Fractions by Anion Exchange : Impact on drinking water treatment processes and biological stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefte, A.

    2013-01-01

    This researched focused on improving drinking water quality, specifically the biological stability of the produced drinking water. Natural organic matter (NOM) can be a source of nutrients for bacteria present in the distribution system, which can cause regrowth. Specifically, small organic acids

  15. Reducing and verifying haloacetic acids in treated drinking water using a biological filter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jie C; Chan, Hung Y; Yang, Chih Y; Tseng, Wei B; Han, Jia Y

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on reducing the haloacetic acid (HAA) concentrations in treated drinking water. HAA has been thought to be one possible nutrient supporting heterotrophic bacteria regrowth in drinking water. In this study, experiments were conducted using a pilot-scale system to evaluate the efficiency of biological filters (BF) for reducing excess HAA concentrations in water. The BF system reduced the total HAA concentration and the concentrations of five HAA species in the water. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were the three main HAA5 species that were present in the treated drinking water in this investigation. Combined, these three species represent approximately 77% of the HAA5 in the finished water after BF. The verification of the empirical HAA equation for the outlet in the BF system indicated linear relationships with high correlation coefficients. The empirical equation for the HAA5 concentrations in the finished water was established by examining other nutrients (e.g., dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm wavelength (UV254), and ammonia nitrogen) that can reduce pathogenic contamination. These findings may be useful for designing advanced processes for conventional water treatment plants or for managing water treatment and distribution systems for providing high-quality drinking water.

  16. Organic acids for performance enhancement in pig diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Partanen, K.H.; Mroz, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Organic acids and their salts appear to be potential alternatives to prophylactic in-feed antibiotics and growth promoters in order to improve the performance of weaned piglets, fattening pigs and reproductive sows, although their growth-promoting effects are generally less than that of antibiotics.

  17. Enhancement of organic acids production from model kitchen waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to obtain the optimal conditions for organic acids production from anaerobic digestion of kitchen waste using response surface methodology (RSM). Fermentation was carried out using 250 ml shake flask which was incubated using an orbital shaker set at 200 rpm. Fermented kitchen wastes were ...

  18. PRESENCE OF ZINC POWDER AND VARIOUS ORGANIC ACIDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004-09-10

    department of Chemistry, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, U.K.. (Received July 31,2004; revised September 10, 2004). ABSTRACT. Catalytic transfer hydrogénation using palladium(II) chloride, zinc powder and various organic acids proved effective for the reduction of a variety of alkenes at ambient.

  19. Evaluation of antimicrobial activities of some organic acids on bacteria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of antimicrobial activities of some organic acids on bacteria. OO Ojo, CR Falegan, TO Femi-Ola, CD Nwobi. Abstract. No Abstract. Discovery and Innovation Vol. 17(1&2) 2005: 22-26. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  20. Lewis acidic metal catalysed organic transformations by designed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Further, few important Lewis acidic metal catalysed organic transformation reactions have been dis- ... rior of the material has limitations. Such chemical modifications are important for expanding and enhancing the catalytic performance of the resultant material. Third ..... envisage that this particular class of materials would.

  1. Relationship between plant growth and organic acid exudates from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant–mycorrhizal interaction is an important association in the ecosystem with significant impacts on the physical, biological and chemical properties of the soil. In the present study, potential relationships that exist between organic acid production by ectomycorrhizal pine seedlings and plant parameters in the absence of ...

  2. Effects of organic acid supplementation on antioxidant capacity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four commercial organic acids and a reference antibiotic, Neoxyval, were administered to commercial broilers to evaluate the efficacy of these products during pre- and post-challenge with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) on selected indicators of their antioxidant status and immune ...

  3. Organic acid production in Aspergillus niger and other filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odoni, Dorett I.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to increase the understanding of organic acid production in Aspergillus niger and other filamentous fungi, with the ultimate purpose to improve A. niger as biotechnological production host. In Chapter 1, the use of microbial cell-factories for the

  4. the performance of maize crop during acid amelioration with organic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    amelioration compared to senescent cowpea and wild spikenard, which had lower alkalinity. The performance of maize grown in respective soil incorporated with the organic residues followed the same pattern. The finding suggests different acid ameliorating potential of residues, pigeon peas and cordia being the most ...

  5. Nitrification in acid soils: micro-organisms and mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, W.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    Nitrification in acid soils was first reported in the beginning of the 20th century. Although this finding has been well substantiated by countless studies since then, it has until recently remained unclear which micro-organisms were responsible for nitrate production at low pH. Substantial evidence

  6. Effects of organic acid and probiotic on performance and gut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of organic acid, probiotic and a combination of the two on performance and gut morphology in broiler chickens were investigated. Two hundred and forty one-day-old Arbor Acre broiler chicks were randomly assigned to five dietary treatments with six replicates, each with eight birds. The treatments were basal ...

  7. Sulfation of metal-organic framework: Opportunities for acid catalysis and proton conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goesten, M.G.; Stavitski, E.; Juan-Alcaniz, J.; Ramos-Fernandez, E.V.; Sai Sankar Gupta, K.B.; van Bekkum, H.; Gascon, J. and Kapteijn, F.

    2011-05-24

    A new post-functionalization method for metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been developed to introduce acidity for catalysis. Upon treatment with a mixture of triflic anhydride and sulfuric acid, chemically stable MOF structures MIL-101(Cr) and MIL-53(Al) can be sulfated, resulting in a Broensted sulfoxy acid group attached to up to 50% of the aromatic terephthalate linkers of the structure. The sulfated samples have been extensively characterized by solid-state NMR, XANES, and FTIR spectroscopy. The functionalized acidic frameworks show catalytic activity similar to that of acidic polymers like Nafion{reg_sign} display in the esterification of n-butanol with acetic acid (TOF {approx} 1 min{sup -1} {at} 343 K). Water adsorbs strongly up to 4 molecules per sulfoxy acid group, and an additional 2 molecules are taken up at lower temperatures in the 1-D pore channels of S-MIL-53(Al). The high water content and Broensted acidity provide the structure S-MIL-53(Al) a high proton conductivity up to moderate temperatures.

  8. Effect of Organic Acids and Vermicompost on Potassium Transformations in Calcareous Soils of Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Sadri

    2017-02-01

    reaction, texture, electrical conductivity, calcium carbonate, and gypsum were identified. Soluble, exchangeable, non-exchangeable and mineral potassium were measured. The amounts of K forms in each sample were determined. Total K was determined following digestion of soil (110°C with 48 % HF and 6 M HCl. Water soluble K was measured in the saturated extract. Exchangeable K was extracted with 20 ml 1.0 M NH4OAc (pH 7.0 for 5 min. Nitric acid-extractable K was measured by extraction of a soil sample with boiling 1.0 M HNO3 for 1 h. Potassium was measured on all filtrated extracts by flame photometer. The content of clay minerals was determined semi-quantitatively, using peak areas on the diffractograms of ethylene glycol solvated specimens. Statistical analysis was accomplished using the SPSS 16.0 software and the comparison of mean values was done using the Duncan test at the 5% level of significance. Results and Discussion: The amount of different forms of K including water soluble, exchangeable, HNO3-extractable, and mineral K are relatively high in the studied soils. Mineralogical analysis indicated that smectite, illite, palygorskite and chlorite were the major minerals in the clay fractions. The results also showed that exchangeable, non-exchangeable and total potassium were in the range of 166 to 378, 282 to 1694, and 2312 to 8437 mg/kg-1, respectively.Organic acids and vermicompostwere led toa significant increase in soluble K at all times compared to control and vermicompost treatment exhibited greater effect. These treatments also significantly increased exchangeable potassium compared to control. Significant differences between exchangeable potassium of organic acids and vermicompost treatments were not observed at 5 and 15 days, but significant differences were observed between treatments of mallic and oxalic acids at 60 days. Compared to the control, the non exchancheable K showed significant increase in all three organic acid treatments and vermicompost at 15

  9. The migration and transformation of dissolved organic matter during the freezing processes of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shuang; Wen, Yang; Hui, Xiujuan; Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Zhaohong; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the partitioning behavior of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in liquid and ice phases, as well as the changes in the optical properties and chlorine reactivity of DOM during the freezing processes of water. DOM was rejected from the ice phase and accumulated in the remaining liquid phase during water freezing. Moreover, the decrease in freezing temperature, as well as the increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of feed water, caused an increase in DOM captured in the ice phase. The ultraviolet-absorbing compounds, trihalomethane precursors, as well as fulvic acid- and humic acid-like fluorescent materials, were more liable to be to be rejected from the ice phase and were more easily retained in the unfrozen liquid phase during water freezing, as compared with organics (on average) that comprise DOC. In addition, it was also found a higher accumulation of these organics in the unfrozen liquid phase during water freezing at higher temperature. The freeze/thaw processes altered the quantity, optical properties, and chlorine reactivity of DOM. The decrease in ultraviolet light at 254 nm as well as the production of aromatic protein- and soluble microbial byproduct-like fluorescent materials in DOM due to freeze/thaw were consistently observed. On the other hand, the changes in DOC, trihalomethane formation potential, and fulvic acid- and humic acid-like fluorescence caused by freeze/thaw varied significantly between samples. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Influence of organic compound functionality on aerosol hygroscopicity: dicarboxylic acids, alkyl-substituents, sugars and amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Aleksandra; Miles, Rachael E. H.; Rovelli, Grazia; Cowling, Alexander G.; Nandy, Lucy; Dutcher, Cari S.; Reid, Jonathan P.

    2017-05-01

    Hygroscopicity data for 36 organic compounds, including amino acids, organic acids, alcohols and sugars, are determined using a comparative kinetics electrodynamic balance (CK-EDB). The CK-EDB applies an electric field to trap-charged aqueous droplets in a chamber with controlled temperature and relative humidity (RH). The dual micro dispenser set-up allows for sequential trapping of probe and sample droplets for accurate determination of droplet water activities from 0.45 to > 0.99. Here, we validate and benchmark the CK-EDB for the homologous series of straight-chain dicarboxylic acids (oxalic-pimelic) with measurements in better agreement with Universal Quasichemical Functional Group Activity Coefficients (UNIFAC) predictions than the original data used to parametrise UNIFAC. Furthermore, a series of increasingly complex organic compounds, with subtle changes to molecular structure and branching, are used to rigorously assess the accuracy of predictions by UNIFAC, which does not explicitly account for molecular structure. We show that the changes in hygroscopicity that result from increased branching and chain length are poorly represented by UNIFAC, with UNIFAC under-predicting hygroscopicity. Similarly, amino acid hygroscopicity is under-predicted by UNIFAC predictions, a consequence of the original data used in the parametrisation of the molecular subgroups. New hygroscopicity data are also reported for a selection of alcohols and sugars and they show variable levels of agreement with predictions.

  11. Organic and inorganic aerosol compositions in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, during the cold winter of 2007 to 2008: Dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinsang; Tsatsral, Batmunkh; Kim, Young J.; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the distributions and sources of water-soluble organic acids in the Mongolian atmosphere, aerosol samples (PM2.5, n = 34) were collected at an urban site (47.92°N, 106.90°E, ˜1300 m above sea level) in Ulaanbaatar, the capital of Mongolia, during the cold winter. The samples were analyzed for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids (C2-C12) and related compounds (ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls), as well as organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon, water-soluble OC, and inorganic ions. Distributions of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds were characterized by a predominance of terephthalic acid (tPh; 130 ± 51 ng m-3, 19% of total detected organic acids) followed by oxalic (107 ± 28 ng m-3, 15%), succinic (63 ± 20 ng m-3, 9%), glyoxylic (55 ± 18 ng m-3, 8%), and phthalic (54 ± 27 ng m-3, 8%) acids. Predominance of terephthalic acid, which has not been reported previously in atmospheric aerosols, was mainly due to uncontrolled burning of plastic bottles and bags in home stoves for heating and waste incineration during the cold winter. This study demonstrated that most of the air pollutants were directly emitted from local sources such as heat and power plants, home stoves, and automobiles. Development of an inversion layer (pollutants, causing severe haze episodes during the winter season.

  12. Microbial activity inhibition in chilled mackerel (Scomber scombrus) by employment of an organic acid-icing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuás-Rey, Minia; Gallardo, José M; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge; Aubourg, Santiago P

    2012-05-01

    The present study concerns Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) traded as a chilled product. The study was aimed to investigate the effect of including a mixture of organic acids (citric, ascorbic, and lactic) in the icing medium employed during the fish chilled storage. To this end and according to preliminary trials results, an aqueous solution including 0.050% (w/v) of each acid was employed as icing medium; its effect on the microbial activity development in mackerel muscle was monitored for up to 13 d of chilled storage and compared to a counterpart-fish batch kept under traditional water ice considered as control. Results indicated a lower bacterial growth in mackerel muscle subjected to storage in the organic acid-icing system by comparison with control fish. Thus, statistically-significant (P ice during storage and the subsequent antimicrobial effect of such acids on skin microflora of the fish can be invoked as the main reasons for the limited bacterial growth found in the corresponding mackerel muscle. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. Contribution of sulfuric acid and oxidized organic compounds to particle formation and growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Riccobono

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lack of knowledge about the mechanisms underlying new particle formation and their subsequent growth is one of the main causes for the large uncertainty in estimating the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols in global models. We performed chamber experiments designed to study the contributions of sulfuric acid and organic vapors to the formation and early growth of nucleated particles. Distinct experiments in the presence of two different organic precursors (1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and α-pinene showed the ability of these compounds to reproduce the formation rates observed in the low troposphere. These results were obtained measuring the sulfuric acid concentrations with two chemical ionization mass spectrometers confirming the results of a previous study which modeled the sulfuric acid concentrations in presence of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene.

    New analysis methods were applied to the data collected with a condensation particle counter battery and a scanning mobility particle sizer, allowing the assessment of the size resolved growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The effect of organic vapors on particle growth was investigated by means of the growth rate enhancement factor (Γ, defined as the ratio between the measured growth rate in the presence of α-pinene and the kinetically limited growth rate of the sulfuric acid and water system. The observed Γ values indicate that the growth is already dominated by organic compounds at particle diameters of 2 nm. Both the absolute growth rates and Γ showed a strong dependence on particle size, supporting the nano-Köhler theory. Moreover, the separation of the contributions from sulfuric acid and organic compounds to particle growth reveals that the organic contribution seems to be enhanced by the sulfuric acid concentration. Finally, the size resolved growth analysis indicates that both condensation of oxidized organic compounds and reactive uptake contribute to particle growth.

  14. Effects of salinity and organic matter on the partitioning of perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAs) to clay particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Junho; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Lim, Byung J; An, Kwang Guk; Kim, Sang Don

    2011-06-01

    The influence of salinity and organic matter on the distribution coefficient (K(d)) for perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in a brackish water-clay system was studied. The distribution coefficients (K(d)) for PFAs onto inorganic clay surfaces increased with salinity, providing evidence for electrostatic interaction for the sorption of PFAs, whereas the relationship between K(d) and organic carbon content (f(oc)) suggested that hydrophobic interaction is the primary driving force for the sorption of PFAs onto organic matter. The organic carbon normalized adsorption coefficient (K(oc)) of PFAs can be slightly overestimated due to the electrostatic interaction within uncoated inorganic surfaces. In addition, the dissolved organic matter released from coated clay particles seemed to solvate PFA molecules in solution, which contributed to a decrease in K(d). A positive relationship between K(d) and salinity was apparent, but an empirical relationship for the 'salting-out' effect was not evident. The K(d) values of PFAs are relatively small compared with those reported for persistent organic pollutants. Thus, sorption may not be a significant route of mass transfer of PFAs from water columns in estuarine environments. However, enhancement of sorption of PFAs to particulate matter at high salinity values could evoke potential risks to benthic organisms in estuarine areas.

  15. Redox reactions and water quality in cultivated boreal acid sulphate soils in relation to water management

    OpenAIRE

    Virtanen, Seija

    2015-01-01

    Acid loading from cultivated acid sulphate soils (AS) deteriorates the quality of the recipient waters, especially on the coast of the Gulf of Bothnia. These fields reclaimed in the past without knowing their deleterious consequences still cause long-lasting hazards. The aim of this thesis was to explore redox processes in AS soils in relation to their water management aiming at mitigation the water quality. Redox processes and the quality of pore and discharge water were investigated fo...

  16. Transitioning organic synthesis from organic solvents to water. What's your E Factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Ghorai, Subir

    2014-01-01

    Traditional organic chemistry, and organic synthesis in particular, relies heavily on organic solvents, as most reactions involve organic substrates and catalysts that tend to be water-insoluble. Unfortunately, organic solvents make up most of the organic waste created by the chemical enterprise, whether from academic, industrial, or governmental labs. One alternative to organic solvents follows the lead of Nature: water. To circumvent the solubility issues, newly engineered “designer” surfactants offer an opportunity to efficiently enable many of the commonly used transition metal-catalyzed and related reactions in organic synthesis to be run in water, and usually at ambient temperatures. This review focuses on recent progress in this area, where such amphiphiles spontaneously self-aggregate in water. The resulting micellar arrays serve as nanoreactors, obviating organic solvents as the reaction medium, while maximizing environmental benefits. PMID:25170307

  17. Acid mine water neutralisation with ammonium hydroxide and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study showed that NH4OH can be used for treatment of acid mine drainage rich in sulphates and NH4OH can be recycled in the process. Hydrated lime treatment resulted in removal of the remaining ammonia using a rotary evaporator. Keywords: acid mine water, ammonium hydroxide, barium hydroxide, sulphate ...

  18. Sulfanilic acid functionalized mesoporous SBA-15: A water-tolerant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 8. Sulfanilic acid functionalized mesoporous SBA-15: A water-tolerant solid acid catalyst for the synthesis of uracil fused spirooxindoles as antioxidant agents. Robabeh Baharfar Razieh Azimi. Regular Articles Volume 127 Issue 8 August 2015 pp 1389- ...

  19. Peptide synthesis 'in water' by a solution-phase method using water-dispersible nanoparticle Boc-amino acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Keiko; Ichikawa, Hideki; Onishi, Mare; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Kawasaki, Koichi

    2011-07-01

    Regulatory pressure has compelled the chemical manufacturing industry to reduce the use of organic solvents in synthetic chemistry, and there is currently a strong focus on replacing these solvents with water. Here, we describe an efficient in-water solution-phase peptide synthesis method using Boc-amino acids. It is based on a coupling reaction utilizing suspended water-dispersible nanoparticle reactants. Using this method, peptides were obtained in good yield and with high purity. Copyright © 2011 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Biochemical composition of organic matter in UK Midlands catchments: implications for drinking water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieroza, M.; Bridgeman, J.; Baker, A.

    2007-12-01

    Insufficient removal of natural organic matter at treatment works can lead to the formation of potentially carcinogenic disinfection by-products (mainly trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids, THMs and HAAs) due to reactions of residual organic matter with chlorine added at the disinfection stage of water treatment process. However, the total organic carbon (TOC) removal efficiency is controlled by the content and character of organic matter in treated water, spatially and temporally dependent (e.g. the ratio of hydrophylic and hydrophobic fractions). Thus, a better understanding of organic matter composition can affect the treatment process strategies, improving the THM formation prediction and the quantification of coagulant and disinfection dosages. Fluorescence analysis of organic matter composition and treatment efficiency has been carried out on raw and partially-treated water samples from catchments in the Midlands region of the UK. The catchments cover an area of different water sources, ranging from upland, peaty-rich subcatchments with coloured, young waters, to agriculturally transformed lowland subcatchments. From the spectrophotometric analysis of raw water it was found that, the abstraction from river with water storage in reservoirs corresponds with a hydrophilic character of organic matter, rather high microbial fraction and high TOC. Opposite properties (hydrophobic, low microbial and variable TOC) are specific for sites with abstraction and storage processes within reservoirs. For direct abstraction from rivers, without water storing in reservoir, a common pattern is intermediate character of organic matter. The fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) technique was used for the assessment of water treatment works performance (TOC removal) and organic matter characterization. The freshwater organic matter exhibits specific fluorescence properties, with increased intensities of fluorescence in some regions of the EEM, resulting from the water

  1. Bio-based production of organic acids with Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieschalka, Stefan; Blombach, Bastian; Bott, Michael; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2013-03-01

    The shortage of oil resources, the steadily rising oil prices and the impact of its use on the environment evokes an increasing political, industrial and technical interest for development of safe and efficient processes for the production of chemicals from renewable biomass. Thus, microbial fermentation of renewable feedstocks found its way in white biotechnology, complementing more and more traditional crude oil-based chemical processes. Rational strain design of appropriate microorganisms has become possible due to steadily increasing knowledge on metabolism and pathway regulation of industrially relevant organisms and, aside from process engineering and optimization, has an outstanding impact on improving the performance of such hosts. Corynebacterium glutamicum is well known as workhorse for the industrial production of numerous amino acids. However, recent studies also explored the usefulness of this organism for the production of several organic acids and great efforts have been made for improvement of the performance. This review summarizes the current knowledge and recent achievements on metabolic engineering approaches to tailor C. glutamicum for the bio-based production of organic acids. We focus here on the fermentative production of pyruvate, L- and D-lactate, 2-ketoisovalerate, 2-ketoglutarate, and succinate. These organic acids represent a class of compounds with manifold application ranges, e.g. in pharmaceutical and cosmetics industry, as food additives, and economically very interesting, as precursors for a variety of bulk chemicals and commercially important polymers. © 2012 The Authors. Published by Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  2. Alteration of organic matter during infaunal polychaete gut passage and links to sediment organic geochemistry. Part I: Amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woulds, Clare; Middelburg, Jack J.; Cowie, Greg L.

    2012-01-01

    Of the factors which control the quantity and composition of organic matter (OM) buried in marine sediments, the links between infaunal ingestion and gut passage and sediment geochemistry have received relatively little attention. This study aimed to use feeding experiments and novel isotope tracing techniques to quantify amino acid net accumulation and loss during polychaete gut passage, and to link this to patterns of selective preservation and decay in sediments. Microcosms containing either Arenicolamarina or Hediste (formerly Nereis) diversicolor were constructed from defaunated sediment and filtered estuarine water, and maintained under natural temperature and light conditions. They were fed with 13C-labelled diatoms daily for 8 days, and animals were transferred into fresh, un-labelled sediment after ∼20 days. Samples of fauna, microcosm sediment and faecal matter were collected after 8, ∼20 and ∼40 days, and analysed for their bulk isotopic signatures and 13C-labelled amino acid compositions. Bulk isotopic data showed that, consistent with their feeding modes, Hediste assimilated added 13C more quickly, and attained a higher labelling level than Arenicola. Both species retained the added 13C in their biomass even after removal from the food. A principal component analysis of 13C-labelled amino acid mole percentages showed clear differences in composition between the algae, faunal tissues, and sediment plus faecal matter. Further, the two species of polychaete showed different compositions in their tissues. The amino acids phenylalanine, valine, leucine, iso-leucine, threonine and proline showed net accumulation in polychaete tissues. Serine, methionine, lysine, aspartic and glutamic acids and tyrosine were rapidly lost through metabolism, consistent with their presence in easily digestible cell components (as opposed to cell walls which offer physical protection). All sample types (polychaete tissues, sediments and faecal matter) were enriched in

  3. Opportunistic feeding on various organic food sources by the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, C.E.; Larsson, A.I.; Veuger, B.; Middelburg, J.J.; van Oevelen, D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa to exploit different food sources was investigated under standardized conditions in a flume. The tested food sources, dissolved organic matter (DOM, added as dissolved free amino acids), bacteria, algae, and zooplankton (Artemia) were deliberately

  4. River inputs and organic matter fluxes in the northern Bay of Bengal: Fatty acids

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reemtsma, T.; Ittekkot, V.; Bartsch, M.; Nair, R.R.

    period. It was ascribed to the flooding of ox-bow lakes in the delta and the drainage of degraded organic material deposited there. 3.2. Temporal development of terri genous and marine fatty acid fluxes 90. 60' 'E v 30' B00' soo. 400" 200' a... with falling water. A comparable mechanism, the inter- mediate storage within ox-bow lakes in the flood plains, was suggested for the Ganges (It- tekkot et al., 1986). The marine fatty acid flux has an additional third maximum in July (Fig. 5b, No. 8...

  5. Neutralization of acid-mine water with calcium-carbonate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maree, JP

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available required. The paper describes a pilot scale study to determine the technical feasibility of neutralising sulphuric acid-rich water using fluidised bed technology. Limestone was utilised completely when testing iron (III)-rich water, but with iron (II...

  6. Natural organic matter (NOM) in South African waters: NOM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to remove natural organic matter (NOM) from water in a water treatment train, the composition of the NOM in the source water must be taken into account, especially as it may not necessarily be uniform since the composition is dependent on the local environment. The main thrust of this study was to ascertain ...

  7. Natural organic matter (NOM) in South African waters: NOM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-10-10

    Oct 10, 2012 ... In order to remove natural organic matter (NOM) from water in a water treatment train, the composition of the NOM in the source water must be taken into account, especially as it may not necessarily be uniform since the composition is depend- ent on the local environment. The main thrust of this study was ...

  8. Organic fertilizer decomposition and nutrient loads in water reservoir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Decomposition in aquatic ecosystems is controlled by various factors. The study investigated the trend of decomposition and the potential nutrients loaded in reservoir water. Analysis of water samples and organic fertilizer composition was according to APHA (1995) and Klute (1986) respectively. Reservoir water ...

  9. The Role of Concentration and Solvent Character in the Molecular Organization of Humic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Klučáková

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The molecular organization of humic acids in different aqueous solutions was studied over a wide concentration range (0.01–10 g·dm−3. Solutions of humic acids were prepared in three different media: NaOH, NaCl, and NaOH neutralized by HCl after dissolution of the humic sample. Potentiometry, conductometry, densitometry, and high resolution ultrasound spectrometry were used in order to investigate conformational changes in the humic systems. The molecular organization of humic acids in the studied systems could be divided into three concentration ranges. The rearrangements were observed at concentrations of ~0.02 g·dm−3 and ~1 g·dm−3. The first “switch-over point” was connected with changes in the hydration shells of humic particles resulting in changes in their elasticity. The compressibility of water in the hydration shells is less than the compressibility of bulk water. The transfer of hydration water into bulk water increased the total compressibility of the solution, reducing the ultrasonic velocity. The aggregation of humic particles and the formation of rigid structures in systems with concentrations higher than 1 g·dm−3 was detected.

  10. Organic chloramines in drinking water: An assessment of formation, stability, reactivity and risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Zuo Tong; Linge, Kathryn L; Busetti, Francesco; Joll, Cynthia A

    2016-04-15

    Although organic chloramines are known to form during the disinfection of drinking water with chlorine, little information is currently available on their occurrence or toxicity. In a recent in vitro study, some organic chloramines (e.g. N-chloroglycine) were found to be cytotoxic and genotoxic even at micromolar concentrations. In this paper, the formation and stability of 21 different organic chloramines, from chlorination of simple amines and amino acids, were studied, and the competition between 20 amino acids during chlorination was also investigated. For comparison, chlorination of two amides was also conducted. The formation and degradation of selected organic chloramines were measured using either direct UV spectroscopic or colorimetric detection. Although cysteine, methionine and tryptophan were the most reactive amino acids towards chlorination, they did not form organic chloramines at the chlorine to precursor molar ratios that were tested. Only 6 out of the 21 organic chloramines formed had a half-life of more than 3 h, although this group included all organic chloramines formed from amines. A health risk assessment relating stability and reactivity data from this study to toxicity and precursor abundance data from the literature indicated that only N-chloroglycine is likely to be of concern due to its stability, toxicity and abundance in water. However, given the stability of organic chloramines formed from amines, more information about the toxicity and precursor abundance for these chloramines is desirable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biochar: a green sorbent to sequester acidic organic contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, Gabriel; Kah, Melanie; Sun, Huichao; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    Biochar is a carbon rich product of biomass pyrolysis that exhibits a high sorption potential towards a wide variety of inorganic and organic contaminants. Because it is a valuable soil additive and a potential carbon sink that can be produced from renewable resources, biochar has gained growing attention for the development of more sustainable remediation strategies. A lot of research efforts have been dedicated to the sorption of hydrophobic contaminants and metals to biochar. Conversely, the understanding of the sorption of acidic organic contaminants remains limited, and questions remain on the influence of biochar characteristics (e.g. ash content) on the sorption behaviour of acidic organic contaminants. To address this knowledge gap, sorption batch experiments were conducted with a series of structurally similar acidic organic contaminants covering a range of dissociation constant (2,4-D, MCPA, 2,4-DB and triclosan). The sorbents selected for experimentation included a series of 10 biochars covering a range of characteristics, multiwalled carbon nanotubes as model for pure carbonaceous phases, and an activated carbon as benchmark. Overall, sorption coefficient [L/kg] covered six orders of magnitude and generally followed the order 2,4-D < MCPA < 2,4-DB < triclosan. Combining comprehensive characterization of the sorbents with the sorption dataset allowed the discussion of sorption mechanisms and driving factors of sorption. Statistical analysis suggests that (i) partitioning was the main driver for sorption to sorbents with small specific surface area (< 25 m²/g), whereas (ii) specific mechanisms dominated sorption to sorbents with larger specific surface area. Results showed that factors usually not considered for the sorption of neutral contaminants play an important role for the sorption of organic acids. The pH dependent lipophilicity ratio (i.e. D instead of Kow), ash content and ionic strength are key factors influencing the sorption of acidic organic

  12. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of aryl boronic acids with aryl halides in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoyan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Zhizhi; Wang, Yue; Lei, Peng; Chi, Haijun

    2009-01-01

    An efficient Suzuki cross-coupling reaction using a variety of aryl halides in neat water was developed. The Pd-catalyzed reaction between aryl bromides or chlorides and phenyl boronic acids was compatible with various functional groups and affords biphenyls in good to excellent yields without requirement of organic cosolvents. The air stability and solubility in water of the palladium-phosphinous acid complexes were considered to facilitate operation of the coupling reaction and product isolation. The reaction conditions including Pd catalyst selection, temperature, base and catalyst recoverability were also investigated.

  13. Organic acids enhance the uptake of lead by wheat roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanhua; Shan, Xiaoquan; Liu, Tao; Xie, Yaning; Wen, Bei; Zhang, Shuzhen; Han, Fang; van Genuchten, Martinus Th

    2007-05-01

    The uptake and bioavailability of lead (Pb) in soil-plant systems remain poorly understood. This study indicates that acetic and malic acids enhance the uptake of Pb by wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots under hydroponic conditions. The net concentration-dependent uptake influx of Pb in the presence and absence of organic acids was characterized by Michaelis-Menten type nonsaturating kinetic curves that could be resolved into linear and saturable components. Fitted maximum uptake rates (V (max)) of the Michaelis-Menton saturable component in the presence of acetic and malic acids were, respectively, 2.45 and 1.63 times those of the control, while the Michaelis-Menten K (m) values of 5.5, 3.7 and 2.2 microM, respectively, remained unchanged. Enhanced Pb uptake by organic acids was partially mediated by Ca(2+) and K(+) channels, and also depended upon the physiological function of the plasma membrane P-type ATPase. Uptake may have been further enhanced by an effectively thinner unstirred layer of Pb adjacent to the roots, leading to more rapid diffusion towards roots. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies provided evidence that the coordination environment of Pb in wheat roots was similar to that of Pb(CH(3)COO)(2)x3H(2)O in that one Pb atom was coordinated to four oxygen atoms via the carboxylate group.

  14. Micro-organization of humic acids in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klučáková, Martina; Věžníková, Kateřina

    2017-09-01

    The methods of dynamic light scattering and micro-rheology were used to investigate the molecular organization of humic acids in solutions. The obtained results were supplemented by ultraviolet/visible spectrometry and measurement of the zeta potential. Particle tracking micro-rheology was used for the first time as a novel method in humic research. Solutions of humic acids were prepared in three different mediums: NaOH, NaCl, and NaOH neutralized by HCl after dissolution of the humic sample. The molecular organization of humic acids was studied over a wide concentration range (0.01-10 g dm-3). Two breaks were detected in the obtained concentration dependencies. The rearrangements were observed at concentrations around 0.02 g dm-3 and 1 g dm-3. Changes in the measured values observed at around 0.02 g dm-3 were less noticeable and were related to the formation of particles between 100 and 1000 nm in size and the strong bimodal character of humic systems diluted by NaCl. The ;switch-over point; at around 1 g dm-3 indicated changes in the secondary structure of humic acids connected with the increase in colloidal stability (decrease of zeta potential), the decrease in polydispersity, and minimal values of viscosity.

  15. Metal cycling during sediment early diagenesis in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres, Ester; Ayora, Carlos; Canovas, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    The discharge of acid mine drainage (AMD) into a reservoir may seriously affect the water quality. To investigate the metal transfer between the water and the sediment, three cores were collected from the Sancho Reservoir (Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain) during different seasons: turnover event......; oxic, stratified period; anoxic and under shallow perennially oxic conditions. The cores were sliced in an oxygen-free atmosphere, after which pore water was extracted by centrifugation and analyzed. A sequential extraction was then applied to the sediments to extract the water-soluble, monosulfide......, low crystallinity Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide, crystalline Fe(III)-oxide, organic, pyrite and residual phases. The results showed that, despite the acidic chemistry of the water column (pH

  16. The Role of Organic Acids on the Release of Phosphorus and Zinc in a Calcareous Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sareh Nezami

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phosphorus (P and zinc (Zn fixation by soil minerals and their precipitation is one of the major constraints for crop production in calcareous soils. Recent Studies show that root exudates are effective for the extraction of the large amounts of nutrients in calcareous soils. A part of the root exudations are Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids (LMWOAs. LMWOAs are involved in the nutrients availability and uptake by plants, nutrients detoxification, minerals weathering and microbial proliferation in the soil. At nutrients deficiency conditions citric and oxalic acids are released by plants root in large quantities and increase nutrient solubility like P, Zn, Fe, Mn and Cu in the rhizosphere. These components are the large portion of the carbon source in the soil after exudations are mineralized by microorganisms, quickly. In addition, soil surface sorption can affect their half-life and other behaviors in the soil. In order to study the effect of oxalic and citric organic acids on the extraction of phosphorus and zinc from a calcareous soil, an experiment was conducted. Materials and Methods: Studied soil was calcareous and had P and Zn deficiency. Soil sample was collected from A horizon (0-30 cm of Damavand region. 3 g of dried soil sample was extracted with 30 ml of oxalic and citric acids extraction solutions at different concentrations (0.1, 1 and 10 mM and different time periods (10, 60, 180 and 360 minutes on an orbital shaker at 200 rev min-1.The soil extracts then centrifuged for 10 minutes (16000g. After filtering, the pH of the extractions was recorded and then phosphorus, calcium and zinc amounts were determined. Soil extraction with distilled water was used as control. Each treatment was performed in 3 replications. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA test followed by the Bonferroni method significant level adjustments due to multiple comparisons. Results and Discussion: The results of variance analysis showed

  17. Steroidal aromatic 'naphthenic acids' in oil sands process-affected water: structural comparisons with environmental estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Steven J; West, Charles E; Jones, David; Scarlett, Alan G; Frank, Richard A; Hewitt, L Mark

    2011-11-15

    The large volumes, acute toxicity, estrogenicity, and antiandrogenicity of process-affected waters accruing in tailings ponds from the operations of the Alberta oil sands industries pose a significant task for environmental reclamation. Synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) suggest that oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) may contain aromatic carboxylic acids, which are among the potentially environmentally important toxicants, but no such acids have yet been identified, limiting interpretations of the results of estrogenicity and other assays. Here we show that multidimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) of methyl esters of acids in an OSPW sample produces mass spectra consistent with their assignment as C(19) and C(20) C-ring monoaromatic hydroxy steroid acids, D-ring opened hydroxy and nonhydroxy polyhydrophenanthroic acids with one aromatic and two alicyclic rings and A-ring opened steroidal keto acids. High resolution MS data support the assignment of several of the so-called 'O3' species. When fractions of distilled, esterified, OSPW acid-extractable organics were examined, the putative aromatics were mainly present in a high boiling fraction; when examined by argentation thin layer chromatography, some were present in a fraction with a retardation factor between that of the methyl esters of synthetic monoalicyclic and monoaromatic acids. Ultraviolet absorption spectra of these fractions indicated the presence of benzenoid moieties. SFS of model octahydro- and tetrahydrophenanthroic acids produced emissions at the characteristic excitation wavelengths observed in some OSPW extracts, consistent with the postulations from ultraviolet spectroscopy and mass spectrometry data. We suggest the acids originate from extensive biodegradation of C-ring monoaromatic steroid hydrocarbons and offer a means of differentiating residues at different biodegradation stages in tailings ponds. Structural similarities with estrone and

  18. Water uptake of multicomponent organic mixtures and their influence on hygroscopicity of inorganic salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Jing, Bo; Guo, Yucong; Li, Junling; Tong, Shengrui; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2016-07-01

    The hygroscopic behaviors of atmospherically relevant multicomponent water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) and their effects on ammonium sulfate (AS) and sodium chloride were investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) in the relative humidity (RH) range of 5%-90%. The measured hygroscopic growth was compared with predictions from the Extended-Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) method. The equal mass multicomponent WSOCs mixture containing levoglucosan, succinic acid, phthalic acid and humic acid showed gradual water uptake without obvious phase change over the whole RH range. It was found that the organic content played an important role in the water uptake of mixed particles. When organic content was dominant in the mixture (75%), the measured hygroscopic growth was higher than predictions from the E-AIM or ZSR relation, especially under high RH conditions. For mass fractions of organics not larger than 50%, the hygroscopic growth of mixtures was in good agreement with model predictions. The influence of interactions between inorganic and organic components on the hygroscopicity of mixed particles was related to the salt type and organic content. These results could contribute to understanding of the hygroscopic behaviors of multicomponent aerosol particles. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Forward osmosis filtration for removal of organic foulants: Effects of combined tannic and alginic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Zhang, Wanzhu; Chu, Huaqiang; Dong, Bingzhi

    2016-03-15

    The filtration performance of combined organic foulants by forward osmosis (FO) in active-layer-facing-the-draw-solution (AL-facing-DS) orientation was investigated systematically. Tannic acid and alginate were used as model organic foulants for polysaccharides and humic dissolved organic matters, respectively. The FO could reject combined and single tannic acid and alginate foulants effectively. The more severe fouling flux decline, accompanied with lower combined foulants' retention, was observed with increasing proportions of tannic acid in the combined foulants-containing feed, which was ascribed mainly to the more severe fouling resulting from tannic acid adsorption within the porous support layer of the FO membrane compared to minor alginate deposition on the membrane surface. It was found that the higher the initial flux level and cross flow velocity, the faster the flux decline with lower mixed foulants retention. It was also revealed that the calcium ions in a basic solution enhanced the combined fouling flux reduction and combined foulants retention. As the major constituent of the combined fouling layer, the adsorption of tannic acid might play a more significant role in the mixed fouling of the FO membrane, which was probably influenced by permeation drag caused by water flux and chemical interactions induced by feed solution pH and calcium ion concentration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Organic chemistry - Fast reactions 'on water'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, JE; Engberts, JBFN

    2005-01-01

    Efficient reactions in aqueous organic chemistry do not require soluble reactants, as had been thought. A newly developed ‘on-water’ protocol is characterized by short reaction times, and the products are easy to isolate.

  1. Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Contaminants in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photocatalytic treatment of organics, including regulated and contaminants of emerging concern, has been an important area of this field. Details are provided on the mechanism of degradation, reaction intermediates, kinetics, and nanointerfacial adsorption phenomena. The degradat...

  2. Organic substances in produced and formation water from unconventional natural gas extraction in coal and shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, William H.; Tatu, Calin A.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Lerch, Harry E.; Bates, Anne L.; Engle, Mark A.; Crosby, Lynn M.; McIntosh, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Organic substances in produced and formation water from coalbed methane (CBM) and gas shale plays from across the USA were examined in this study. Disposal of produced waters from gas extraction in coal and shale is an important environmental issue because of the large volumes of water involved and the variable quality of this water. Organic substances in produced water may be environmentally relevant as pollutants, but have been little studied. Results from five CBM plays and two gas shale plays (including the Marcellus Shale) show a myriad of organic chemicals present in the produced and formation water. Organic compound classes present in produced and formation water in CBM plays include: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic compounds, alkyl phenols, aromatic amines, alkyl aromatics (alkyl benzenes, alkyl biphenyls), long-chain fatty acids, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Concentrations of individual compounds range from exercised in the disposal and release of produced waters containing these organic substances into the environment because of the potential toxicity of many of these substances.

  3. Evolution of polyphenols and organic acids during the fermentation of apple cider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Mengqi; Yue, Tianli; Yuan, Yahong

    2014-11-01

    Polyphenols and organic acids are important constitutes in the cider because they greatly contribute to organoleptic quality. The determination of their changes is important for monitoring the fermentation process for purposes of quality control. In this study, the evolution of polyphenols and organic acids was monitored throughout the cider fermentation process. The samples were taken periodically and the polyphenols and organic acids contents were determined using HPLC methods. The contents of polyphenols and organic acids were in constant change. After fermentation, the content of (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, chlorogenic acid, cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, gallic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, rutin and phloridzin decreased by different degrees, while protocatechuic acid increased after fermentation. The content of organic acids was also affected by fermentation. Malic acid, lactic acid, quinic acid, pyruvic acid and citric acid showed different levels of increase, but succinic acid content decreased. The contents of polyphenols and organic acids were affected by fermentation. Their changing profiles during fermentation process were dependent on the type of phenolic compounds and organic acids studied. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  5. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyoshi Hoshino

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1 system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source and keto acids (oxylic acid sources. In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin.

  6. Sensitized photooxidation of phenols by fulvic acid and in natural waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faust, B.C.; Hoigne, J.

    1987-10-01

    In addition to singlet oxygen, irradiation of fulvic acid solutions and lake water with UV and visible light (lambda > 315 nm) produces another transient oxidant species. This transient oxidant (probably an organic peroxy radical) is derived from natural dissolved organic material (DOM) and controls DOM-sensitized photooxidations of various alkylphenols. On the basis of kinetic data for the transient oxidant, DOM-sensitized photooxidation half-lives of alkylphenols are estimated to range from 1 day to several months in middle-latitude shallow surface waters.

  7. Photolytic AND Catalytic Destruction of Organic Waste Water Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torosyan, V. F.; Torosyan, E. S.; Kryuchkova, S. O.; Gromov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The system: water supply source - potable and industrial water - wastewater - sewage treatment - water supply source is necessary for water supply and efficient utilization of water resources. Up-to-date technologies of waste water biological treatment require for special microorganisms, which are technologically complex and expensive but unable to solve all the problems. Application of photolytic and catalytically-oxidizing destruction is quite promising. However, the most reagents are strong oxidizers in catalytic oxidation of organic substances and can initiate toxic substance generation. Methodic and scientific approaches to assess bread making industry influence on the environment have been developed in this paper in order to support forecasting and taking technological decisions concerning reduction of this influence. Destructive methods have been tested: ultra violet irradiation and catalytic oxidation for extraction of organic compounds from waste water by natural reagents.

  8. Organic acid effect on calcium uptake by the wheat roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrize Caroline Nunes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the effect of the natural organic acids on the uptake of Ca by the wheat roots in a hydroponic solution. The following organic acids were evaluated: citric, oxalic, tartaric, malic, malonic, maleic, DL-malic, p-hydroxybenzoic, aconitic, and salicilic. The organic acids neither enhanced the root growth nor increased Ca uptake. The salicilic and malic acids were highly toxic and decreased the root growth. The citric, tartaric, maleic, aconitic, and salicilic decreased the Ca uptake by the roots due to their higher capacity to form the stable complexes with Ca in solution at pH 6.0. Decreasing the Ca valence from Ca++ to CaL+ or CaL2(0 through the organic ligand complexation reactions decreased the Ca uptake. The results suggested that the wheat roots do not absorb Ca-organic complexes.Ácidos orgânicos possuem grupos funcionais com cargas negativas que complexam íons metálicos em solução. Este trabalho avaliou o efeito de ácidos orgânicos naturais na absorção de Ca pelas raízes de trigo. Foram avaliados os seguintes ácidos orgânicos: cítrico, oxálico, tartarico, málico, malônico, maleico, DL-málico, p-hidroxibenzoico, aconítico e salicílico. Os ácidos orgânicos não estimularam o crescimento das raízes e não aumentaram a absorção de Ca. Os ácidos salicílico e maleico diminuíram drasticamente o crescimento radicular. Os ácidos cítrico, tartárico, maleico, aconítico e salicílico diminuíram a absorção de Ca pelas raízes devido à maior capacidade de formar complexos estáveis com Ca em solução no pH 6,0. A redução da valência de Ca++ para CaL+ e CaL2(0, através das reações de complexação, diminuiu a absorção de Ca pelas raízes. Os resultados sugerem que os complexos de Ca-orgânico não são absorvidos pelas raízes de trigo.

  9. Interfacial characteristics of petroleum bitumens in contact with acid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salou, M.; Siffert, B.; Jada, A. [Institut de Chimie des Surfaces et Interfaces, Mulhouse (France)

    1998-03-01

    The chemical and interfacial properties of two bitumens were compared. The chemical properties were characterized by determining the asphaltene and resin contents of the bitumens. The interfacial properties were studied by wettability measurements and by determining the zeta potential of bitumen dispersions in acid water, with and without maturation of asphaltene dispersions in acid water and of bitumen dispersions in acid water containing asphaltenes. The study of the influence of the maturation at 80{degree}C for 7 h and of the addition of asphaltenes on the stability of the bitumen dispersion showed that the evolution of the interfacial properties of the bitumen depends on the resin content of the bitumen. Short communication. 15 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Links between river water acidity, land use and hydrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarinen, T.; Celebi, A.; Kloeve, B. [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Water Resources and Environmental Eng. Lab.], Email: tuomas.saarinen@oulu.fi

    2013-11-01

    In western Finland, acid leaching to watercourses is mainly due to drainage of acid sulphate (As) soils. This study examined how different land-use and land-cover types affect water acidity in the northwestern coastal region of Finland, which has abundant drained AS soils and peatlands. Sampling conducted in different hydrological conditions in studied river basins revealed two different catchment types: catchments dominated by drained forested peatlands and catchments used by agriculture. Low pH and high electric conductivity (EC) were typical in rivers affected by agriculture. In rivers dominated by forested peatlands and wetlands, EC was considerably lower. During spring and autumn high runoff events, water quality was poor and showed large spatial variation. Thus it is important to ensure that in river basin status assessment, sampling is carried out in different hydrological situations and in also water from some tributaries is sampled. (orig.)

  11. Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Enid J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwon, Soondong [UT-AUSTIN; Katz, Lynn [UT-AUSTIN; Kinney, Kerry [UT-AUSTIN

    2008-01-01

    A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ

  12. Crystal and molecular structure of eight organic acid-base adducts from 2-methylquinoline and different acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Jin, Shouwen; Tao, Lin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Daqi

    2014-08-01

    Eight supramolecular complexes with 2-methylquinoline and acidic components as 4-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, malic acid, sebacic acid, and 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid were synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. All of the complexes are organic salts except compound 2. All supramolecular architectures of 1-8 involve extensive classical hydrogen bonds as well as other noncovalent interactions. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the classical hydrogen bonds (ionic or neutral) between acidic components and 2-methylquinoline are sufficient to bring about the formation of binary organic acid-base adducts. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These weak interactions combined, the complexes 1-8 displayed 2D-3D framework structure.

  13. Effect of fulvic acid on the kinetics of aluminum fluoride complexation in acidic waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plankey, B.J.; Patterson, H.H.

    1988-12-01

    Both fluoride ion and fulvic acid are important aluminum binding ligands present in soil and surface waters. As such they play a role in the speciation and toxicity of natural waters that have increased aluminum concentration due to acid precipitation. We report here a kinetic study of aluminum complexation in the presence of both of these naturally occurring ligands. An overall mechanism has been identified and rate constants have been obtained for several of the reactions involved. We find that an a priori model of the two ligands in competition for aluminum is incorrect. In fact, the rate of fluoride ion consumption is increased by the presence of fulvic acid. Evidence is presented that this effect is due to several equilibria, some of which involve mixed-ligand species. The important equilibria in this three-component system are identified and discussed, as are aluminum speciation and toxicity in acidic waters.

  14. Fulminic Acid in the History of Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzer, Frederick

    2000-07-01

    The story of the discovery, investigation, and eventual correct formulation of fulminic acid, HCNO, extends over a period of 200 years and reflects uniquely, in its many stages, the evolution of organic chemistry from post-alchemistic times to the age of wave mechanics. Fulminic acid was discovered in 1800 when E. Howard serendipitously prepared its highly explosive mercury and silver salts. The determination of its structure presented unusual difficulties and taxed the ingenuity of leading chemists of successive generations. Their work generated a procession of proposed and discarded formulations that was only finally ended in the 1960s with the recognition of fulminic acid as the mesomeric structure and hence with its identification as the parent compound of the important class of the nitrile N-oxides. Recently fulminic acid and several of its isotopomers have been subjected to the most searching spectroscopic investigations and ab initio computations, by which its molecular dimensions and geometry, and its "quasi-linear" structure have been revealed. In technology, mercury fulminate occupied for nearly a century a uniquely important position as the only available practical detonator for every kind of conventional explosive.

  15. Water Soluble Organic Compounds over the Eastern Mediterranean: Study of their occurrence and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziaras, T.; Spyros, A.; Mandalakis, M.; Apostolaki, M.; Stephanou, E. G.

    2010-05-01

    Fine marine aerosols influence the climate system by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the atmosphere. The organic chemical composition and origin of the marine fine particulate matter are still largely unknown, because of the insufficient reports on in situ studies, the large variability in the emission from the sea, from the complex transfer of gases and particles at the air-sea interface, and the transport of aerosol particles from very distant sources. As important processes of formation of marine organic aerosol production we consider: transport of terrestrial particles, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the oxidation of biogenic dimethyl-sulfide (DMS), and biogenic particle emissions through sea spray. Specific compounds related to the above-mentioned processes have been proposed as molecular markers: e.g. n-alkanoic acids and n-alkanes (terrestrial particles), levoglucosan (biomass burning aerosol), aminoacids (biological terrestrial or marine particles), methanesulphonate (MSA) (DMS oxidation), C8 and C9 dicarboxylic acids and oxo-carboxylic acids (marine SOA) and other short-chain dicarboxylic acids (marine or terrestrial SOA), and humic-like compounds (emission of marine organic carbon). In our study, we made an effort to characterize the water-soluble organic fraction of marine aerosols collected at a background sampling site of Eastern Mediterranean (Finokalia, N35o20', E25o40', Island of Crete, Greece). The sampling period was 2007-2008. In order to identify and quantify the water-soluble organic compounds of marine aerosols determined in the present study we have used gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and ion chromatography (IC). The origin of air masses arriving in the study area was studied by using backward trajectories calculation (NOAA HYSPLIT Model). In addition, we have used the "MODIS fire products" for fire

  16. Binary, ternary and quaternary liquid-liquid equilibria in 1-butanol, oleic acid, water and n-heptane mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkelman, J. G. M.; Kraai, G. N.; Heeres, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports on liquid-liquid equilibria in the system 1-butanol, oleic acid, water and n-heptane used for biphasic, lipase catalysed esterifications. The literature was studied on the mutual solubility in binary systems of water and each of the organic components. Experimental results were

  17. Control of Meloidogyne incognita Using Mixtures of Organic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhee Seo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to control the root-knot nematode (RKN Meloidogyne incognita using benign organo-chemicals. Second-stage juveniles (J2 of RKN were exposed to dilutions (1.0%, 0.5%, 0.2%, and 0.1% of acetic acid (AA, lactic acid (LA, and their mixtures (MX. The nematode bodies were disrupted severely and moderately by vacuolations in 0.5% of MX and single organic acids, respectively, suggesting toxicity of MX may be higher than AA and LA. The mortality of J2 was 100% at all concentrations of AA and MX and only at 1.0% and 0.5% of LA, which lowered slightly at 0.2% and greatly at 0.1% of LA. This suggests the nematicidal activity of MX may be mostly derived from AA together with supplementary LA toxicity. MX was applied to chili pepper plants inoculated with about 1,000 J2, for which root-knot gall formations and plant growths were examined 4 weeks after inoculation. The root gall formation was completely inhibited by 0.5% MX and standard and double concentrations of fosthiazate; and inhibited 92.9% and 57.1% by 0.2% and 0.1% MX, respectively. Shoot height, shoot weight, and root weight were not significantly (P ≤ 0.05 different among all treatments and the untreated and non-inoculated controls. All of these results suggest that the mixture of the organic acids may have a potential to be developed as an eco-friendly nematode control agent that needs to be supported by the more nematode control experiments in fields.

  18. Adsorption of Carboxylic Acids on Reservoir Minerals from Organic and Aqueous Phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lene; Lind, Ida

    1998-01-01

    Adsorption of organic acids onto North Sea chalk and pure minerals from a hydrocarbon phase and an aqueous phase show that the maximum adsorption is larger for calcite than for silicate surfaces in the hydrocarbon phase. The opposite is observed, however, in the aqueous phase. This suggests that ...... that the available silicate surfaces and oil/water ratio may play a role in the wettability of chalk.......Adsorption of organic acids onto North Sea chalk and pure minerals from a hydrocarbon phase and an aqueous phase show that the maximum adsorption is larger for calcite than for silicate surfaces in the hydrocarbon phase. The opposite is observed, however, in the aqueous phase. This suggests...

  19. [Simultaneous determination of twenty-one organic acids in food by ion chromatography with eluent autogeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huaying; Lin, Fenghua; Sheng, Lina; Li, Yidan; Zhang, Qiong

    2007-01-01

    A novel ion chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of organic acids in food samples including quinic acid, acetic acid, pyruvic acid, ketosuccinic acid, mannitic acid, lactic acid, succinic acid, malic acid, tartaric acid, oxalic acid, fumaric acid, ascorbic acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, cinnamic acid, salicylic acid, citric acid, isocitric acid, ferulic acid, cis-aconitic acid, trans-aconitic acid, beta-coumaric acid. 5 - 34 mmol/L KOH produced by an EG40 eluent autogenerator could achieve a flat baseline and lower background conductance when performing gradient elution. The flow rate was 0.6 - 2.5 mL/min and the injection volume was 25 microL. The separation was performed on an IonPac AS11 column and detected by suppressed conductivity with self-regenerating suppressor mode. The samples were prepared through extraction, decoloration and filtration before analysis. Twenty-one organic acids showed good linear relationship between the mass concentration and the peak area in the measurement ranges. The correlation coefficients were above 0.999 and the detection limits were 0.011 - 0.188 mg/L, and the average recoveries were 91.5% - 101.8%. The method is simple and rapid with good accuracy and reproducibility, and has been applied to determine twenty-one organic acids in diversiform samples with satisfactory results.

  20. Organobentonites as multifunctional adsorbents of organic and inorganic water pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović-Jovičić Natаša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find a low cost, easy to synthesize and efficient adsorbent for the simultaneous adsorption of both organic and inorganic pollutants (including textile dyes, toxic metals etc.. The starting material, domestic bentonite clay from Bogovina was modified with amounts of hexadecyltrimethylammonium cations corresponding to 0.5 and 1.0 times of the value of the cation exchange capacity value. The organobentonites were tested as adsorbents in a three-dye-containing solution, a three-component solution of Pb2+, Cd2+ and Ni2+ and a hexa- component solution containing all investigated dyes and toxic metal cations. The used adsorbents showed the highest affinity toward Acid Yellow 99 and Ni2+ ions. Dye adsorption was enhanced in the presence of toxic metal cations, while the adsorption of all toxic cations from the hexa-component solution was lower than from the three-component solution containing only toxic cations. The synthesized hexadecyltrimethylammonium bentonite could be regarded as an efficient multifunctional adsorbent for the investigated type of water pollutants.

  1. Calcium extraction from brine water and seawater using oxalic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natasha, Nadia Chrisayu; Lalasari, Latifa Hanum

    2017-01-01

    Calcium can be extracted not only from rocks but also from natural liquor such as seawater and brine water. In order to extract the calcium from seawater and brine water, oxalic acid was used in this research. Effect of variations of the volume of the oxalic acid at a constant concentration in seawater and brine water to produce calcium was investigated. The concentration of oxalic acid was 100 g/l and the variations of its volume were 2 ml, 4 ml, 6 ml, 8 ml, 10 ml, 20 ml, 30 ml, 40 ml, and 50 ml. The used seawater and brine water were firstly evaporated from 100 ml into 50 ml and then the oxalic acid was added into them with mixing to produce the calcium precipitates. The precipitates were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the filtrates were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The SEM analysis showed that the precipitates from brine water were consisted of only calcium compound while from seawater sodium one was also found along with calcium compound. The XRD analysis showed that the calcium was present in the form of calcium oxalate for both seawater and brine water. The ICP-OES analysis of the filtrate from seawater precipitation showed that the its calcium content was decreased from 826.20 ppm to 0.04 ppm while from brine water, it decreased from 170.06 ppm to 1.96 ppm. These results showed that both seawater and brine water have the potential to be a raw material for calcium production.

  2. Enzymatic regulation of organic acid metabolism in an alkali-tolerant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-10-05

    Oct 5, 2016 ... Organic acid analysis. The composition and content of organic acids in shoots was analyzed and compared to ... The analysis of organic acid composition showed that there were no changes in composition of ..... It had been shown that carrot cell lines with a high citrate efflux have reduced NADP-ICDH ...

  3. Wetlands receiving water treated with coagulants improve water quality by removing dissolved organic carbon and disinfection byproduct precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Angela M; Kraus, Tamara E C; Bachand, Sandra M; Horwath, William R; Bachand, Philip A M

    2017-12-06

    Constructed wetlands are used worldwide to improve water quality while also providing critical wetland habitat. However, wetlands have the potential to negatively impact drinking water quality by exporting dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that upon disinfection can form disinfection byproducts (DBPs) like trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). We used a replicated field-scale study located on organic rich soils in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to test whether constructed flow-through wetlands which receive water high in DOC that is treated with either iron- or aluminum-based coagulants can improve water quality with respect to DBP formation. Coagulation alone removed DOC (66-77%) and THM (67-70%) precursors, and was even more effective at removing HAA precursors (77-90%). Passage of water through the wetlands increased DOC concentrations (1.5-7.5mgL-1), particularly during the warmer summer months, thereby reversing some of the benefits from coagulant addition. Despite this addition, water exiting the wetlands treated with coagulants had lower DOC and DBP precursor concentrations relative to untreated source water. Benefits of the coagulation-wetland systems were greatest during the winter months (approx. 50-70% reduction in DOC and DBP precursor concentrations) when inflow water DOC concentrations were higher and wetland DOC production was lower. Optical properties suggest DOC in this system is predominantly comprised of high molecular weight, aromatic compounds, likely derived from degraded peat soils. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The growth of bacteria on organic compounds in drinking water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, van der D.

    1984-01-01

    Growth ("regrowth") of bacteria In drinking water distribution systems results in a deterioration of the water quality. Regrowth of chemoheterotrophic bacteria depends on the presence of organic. compounds that serve as a nutrient source for these bacteria. A batch-culture technique was

  5. Social capital in water user organizations of the Ecuadorian Highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogesteger van Dijk, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I explore how new water user organizations have developed in formerly state managed irrigation systems in the Ecuadorian highlands since the 1990s. The article is based on an in-depth case study of the Pillaro irrigation system and illustrations of other cases. These water user

  6. Trihalomethanes in drinking water: Effect of natural organic matter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of distribution of natural organic matter (NOM) on formation and distribution of trihalomethanes (THMs) in municipal water were investigated. Water samples were fractionated using serial ultrafiltration with membranes of molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) values of 500, 1 000 and 3 000 Da. The resulting 4 fractions of ...

  7. Speciation of Water-Extractable Organic Nutrients in Grassland Soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, G.H.; Tschudy, T.C.; Chardon, W.J.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Salm, van der C.; Koopmans, G.F.

    2010-01-01

    The release of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from agricultural land can have a large impact on the transport of N and phosphorus (P) to surface waters leading to water quality impairment. The speciation of DOM in agricultural grassland soils has received little attention thus far. Quantification of

  8. Phosphate and organic fertilizer recovery from black water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tervahauta, T.H.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis the integration of treatment systems for black and grey water was investigated to improve resource recovery within source-separated sanitation concepts. Special focus was set on phosphate and organic fertilizer recovery from vacuum collected black water. Currently, the soil

  9. Adsorptive uptake of water by semisolid secondary organic aerosols

    OpenAIRE

    Pajunoja, Aki; Andrew T. Lambe; Hakala, Jani; Rastak, Narges; Cummings, Molly J.; Brogan, James F.; Hao, Liqing; Paramonov, Mikhail; Hong, Juan; Prisle, Nonne L.; Malila, Jussi; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Lehtinen, Kari E.J.; Laaksonen, Ari; Kulmala, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol climate effects are intimately tied to interactions with water. Here we combine hygroscopicity measurements with direct observations about the phase of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles to show that water uptake by slightly oxygenated SOA is an adsorption-dominated process under subsaturated conditions, where low solubility inhibits water uptake until the humidity is high enough for dissolution to occur. This reconciles reported discrepancies in previous hygroscopicity closure...

  10. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ash

    Full Text Available Shredded card (SC was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water. We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4. Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49 were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC. In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC. In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC. In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil, and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC. A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption. SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing.

  11. Effects of sulphuric acid and hot water treatments on seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out to investigate the effects of sulphuric acid and hot water treatments on the germination of Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L). Seeds were placed on moistened filter papers in 28 cm diameter Petri dishes under laboratory condition for germination. 330 seeds of T. indica (10 seeds per Petri dish) with ...

  12. Sulfanilic acid functionalized mesoporous SBA-15: A water-tolerant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    led to a water-tolerant solid acid catalyst, SBA-15-PhSO3H, which showed excellent catalytic performance in synthesis of uracil-fused spirooxindoles in aqueous ethanol. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their antioxidant activity by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging assay. Keywords.

  13. Algae form brominated organic compounds in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetteroth, A.; Putschew, A.; Jekel, M. [Tech. Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    Monitoring of organic halogen compounds, measured as adsorbable organic bromine (AOBr) revealed seasonal high concentrations of organic bromine compounds in a surface water (Lake Tegel, Berlin, Germany). Usually, in late summer, concentrations are up to five times higher than during the rest of the year. The AOBr of the lake inflows (throughout the year less then 6 {mu}g/L) were always lower then those in the lake, which indicates a production of AOBr in the lake. A correlation of the AOBr and chlorophyll-a concentration (1) in the lake provides first evidence for the influence of phototrophic organisms. The knowledge of the natural production of organohalogens is relatively recent. Up to now there are more then 3800 identified natural organohalogen compounds that have been detected in marine plants, animals, and bacteria and also in terrestrial plants, fungi, lichen, bacteria, insects, some higher animals, and humans. Halogenated organic compounds are commonly considered to be of anthropogenic origin; derived from e.g. pharmaceuticals, herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, flame retardants, intermediates in organic synthesis and solvents. Additionally they are also produced as by-products during industrial processes and by waste water and drinking water disinfection. Organohalogen compounds may be toxic, persistent and/or carcinogenic. In order to understand the source and environmental relevance of naturally produced organobromine compounds in surface waters, the mechanism of the formation was investigated using batch tests with lake water and algae cultures.

  14. Contrasting fates of organic matter in locations having different organic matter inputs and bottom water O2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai-Thi, Ngoc-Nu; St-Onge, Guillaume; Tremblay, Luc

    2017-11-01

    The goals of this work were to study sedimentary organic matter (OM) composition and transformation since the end of the last deglaciation and to evaluate the influence of contrasting depositional conditions on these parameters. One station was located in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) where the current bottom waters are hypoxic and receive terrigenous and marine OM. The other station, located in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL), has more oxygenated bottom waters and almost only marine OM inputs. Analyses included enantiomers of amino acids (L and D-AA) and muramic acid that provide different markers of OM alteration state and reactivity and of bacterial contribution to OM composition and diagenesis. The markers clearly indicated the increase in OM alteration state with depth in the sediments of the LSLE and the GSL. The steady decrease in AA yields with depth confirmed the preferential degradation of AA compared to the rest of the OM. The OM in the surface sediment of the LSLE was less altered than that of the GSL and was enriched in bacterial biomass as indicated by much higher muramic acid yields. Results indicated that an important degradation of particulate organic matter occurs in the water column in the GSL, while it takes place mostly in the sediments in the LSLE. The presence of heterogeneous OM and hypoxic conditions in the LSLE likely reduce OM degradation rate in its deep water layer. However, the zone near the water-sediment interface is responsible for large variations in AA composition at both locations. A relatively new redox index, based on AA composition, was tested and appeared robust. This study highlights the importance of ambient conditions in determining the fate of OM and in the biogeochemical cycles of vital elements.

  15. An organic profile of a pressurised water reactor secondary plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eeden, Nestor van; Stwayi, Mandisibuntu; Gericke, Gerhard [Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd., Western Cape (South Africa). Koeberg Power Station

    2012-07-15

    Make-up water addition to the steam/water cycle at Koeberg Nuclear Power Station usually results in a corresponding increase of the chloride concentration in the steam generator blowdown system. During plant transients, when higher than normal make-up is required to the secondary plant, the concentration of chloride occasionally exceeds the limiting value for the station chemistry performance indicator. Irrespective of this, the demineralised water make-up supply tanks, which are routinely analysed for chloride, are within all recognised acceptable standards for secondary water make-up and therefore these tanks do not initially appear to be the source of chloride contamination. Water treatment at the plant relies essentially on ion exchange, which has been proven to be very effective in removing inorganic ionic species such as chloride. Organic compounds are less effectively removed by ion exchange and may pass through the treatment system, and these organics can reside undetected in the make-up water tanks. Historically, the elevated chloride concentration following high system make-up has been attributed to chlorinated organic compounds known as trihalomethanes being present in the make-up water tanks, but no rigorous study had been undertaken. As it has been assumed that the majority of chloride in the secondary system originates from the make-up water organic impurities, it was considered important to confirm this by compiling an organic profile of the secondary plant. The use of organic additives was also taken into account in the profile. This work has confirmed the contribution from trihalomethanes and has also found that other organochlorides contribute even more significantly to the overall chloride inventory of the secondary plant. (orig.)

  16. Photochemistry of excited-state species in natural waters: a role for particulate organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Barbara A; Timko, Stephen A; Devera, Lianne; Robinson, Alice K; Gonsior, Michael; Vizenor, Ashley E; Simpson, André J; Cooper, William J

    2013-09-15

    Laser flash photolysis (LFP) was used to characterize a triplet excited state species isolated from Black River and San Joaquin wetlands particulate organic matter (POM). The solubilized organic matter, isolated from POM by pH-independent diffusion in distilled water, was named PdOM. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs), and (1)H NMR were used to characterize the PdOM. While LFP of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is known to generate the solvated electron, LFP of the PdOM transient in argon-, air-, and nitrous oxide-saturated solutions indicated that this was a triplet excited state species ((3)PdOM*). The lifetime and the reactivity of (3)PdOM* with sorbic acid, a triplet state quencher, were compared with that of the triplet excited state of benzophenone, a DOM proxy. A second excited state species (designated DOM*), with a longer lifetime, was reported in a number of previous studies but not characterized. The lifetime of DOM*, measured for seventeen organic matter isolates, lignin, tannic acid, and three wetlands plant extracts, was shown to differentiate allochthonous from autochthonous DOM. (3)POM* and DOM* were also observed in lake water and a constructed wetlands' water. Aqueous extracts of fresh and aged plant material from the same wetland were shown to be one source of these excited state species. This study provides evidence of a role for POM in the photochemistry of natural and constructed wetland waters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 99. Solubility of Benzoic Acid and Substituted Benzoic Acids in Both Neat Organic Solvents and Organic Solvent Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, William E.

    2013-09-01

    Solubility data are compiled and reviewed for benzoic acid and 63 substituted benzoic acids dissolved in neat organic solvents and well-defined binary and ternary organic solvent mixtures. The compiled solubility data were retrieved from the published chemical and pharmaceutical literature covering the period from 1900 to the beginning of 2013.

  18. Liquid–liquid extraction combined with differential isotope dimethylaminophenacyl labeling for improved metabolomic profiling of organic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jun; Li, Liang, E-mail: Liang.Li@ualberta.ca

    2013-11-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •An improved method for profiling the carboxylic acid sub-metabolome is reported. •Liquid–liquid extraction was used for separating the organic acids from the amines. •{sup 12}C/{sup 13}C-p-dimethylaminophenacyl (DmPA) labeling of the organic acids was carried out on the extract. •Detection interference by amines and labeling efficiency reduction by water were reduced. •About 2500 {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C-peak pairs or putative metabolites could be detected from 20 μL of human urine. -- Abstract: A large fraction of the known human metabolome belong to organic acids. However, comprehensive profiling of the organic acid sub-metabolome is a major analytical challenge. In this work, we report an improved method for detecting organic acid metabolites. This method is based on the use of liquid–liquid extraction (LLE) to selectively extract the organic acids, followed by using differential isotope p-dimethylaminophenacyl (DmPA) labeling of the acid metabolites. The {sup 12}C-/{sup 13}C-labeled samples are analyzed by liquid chromatography Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC–FTICR–MS). It is shown that this LLE DmPA labeling method offers superior performance over the method of direct DmPA labeling of biofluids such as human urine. LLE of organic acids reduces the interference of amine-containing metabolites that may also react with DmPA. It can also remove water in a biofluid that can reduce the labeling efficiency. Using human urine as an example, it is demonstrated that about 2500 peak pairs or putative metabolites could be detected in a 30-min gradient LC–MS run, which is about 3 times more than that detected in a sample prepared using direct DmPA labeling. About 95% of the 1000 or so matched metabolites to the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) are organic acids. It is further shown that this method can be used to handle as small as 10 μL of urine. We believe that this method opens the

  19. Removal of Organic Pollutants from Water Using Superwetting Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingxiao; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Aiqin

    2018-02-01

    The frequent occurrence of water pollution accidents and the leakage of organic pollutants have caused severe environmental and ecological crisis. It is thus highly imperative to find efficient materials to solve the problem. Inspired by the lotus leaf, superwetting materials are receiving increasing attention in the field of removal of organic pollutants from water. Various superwetting materials have been successfully generated and integrated into devices for removal of organic pollutants from water. On the basis of our previous work in the field, we summarized in this account the progress of removal of (1) floating and underwater insoluble, (2) emulsified insoluble, and (3) both insoluble and soluble organic pollutants from water using superwetting materials including superhydrophobic & superoleophilic materials, superhydrophilic & underwater superoleophobic materials, and materials with controllable wettability. The superwetting materials are in the forms of 2D porous materials, 3D porous materials and particles, etc. Finally, the current state and future challenges in this field are discussed. We hope this account could shed light on the design of novel superwetting materials for efficient removal of organic pollutants from water. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Direct conversion of cellulose to glycolic acid with a phosphomolybdic acid catalyst in a water medium

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2012-08-03

    Direct conversion of cellulose to fine chemicals has rarely been achieved. We describe here an eco-benign route for directly converting various cellulose-based biomasses to glycolic acid in a water medium and oxygen atmosphere in which heteromolybdic acids act as multifunctional catalysts to catalyze the hydrolysis of cellulose, the fragmentation of monosaccharides, and the selective oxidation of fragmentation products. With commercial α-cellulose powder as the substrate, the yield of glycolic acid reaches 49.3%. This catalytic system is also effective with raw cellulosic biomass, such as bagasse or hay, as the starting materials, giving rise to remarkable glycolic acid yields of ∼30%. Our heteropoly acid-based catalyst can be recovered in solid form after reaction by distilling out the products and solvent for reuse, and it exhibits consistently high performance in multiple reaction runs. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  1. Formation of organic chloramines during chlor(am)ination and UV/chlor(am)ination of algae organic matter in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-Yang; Lin, Yi-Li; Xu, Bin; Cheng, Tuo; Xia, Sheng-Ji; Chu, Wen-Hai; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2016-10-15

    Surface water are frequently subjected to problems of algal blooms and release of algae organic matter (AOM) from the algae cells, which cause many water quality issues. This study investigated the formation of organic chloramines and nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) during chlor(am)ination and UV/chlor(am)ination of AOM in drinking water. AOM caused higher organic chloramine formation than humic acid and fulvic acid during chlor(am)ination. The formation of organic chloramines increased first and then decreased with the increase of free chlorine dosage, but kept increasing with the increase of NH2Cl dosage. During AOM chlorination, the formation of organic chloramines kept decreasing as the reaction time went by, and the maximum organic chloramine proportion (79.1%) in total chlorine occurred at 8 h. However, during AOM chloramination, the formation of organic chloramines increased first, decreased in the following and then increased again as the reaction time went by, and the maximum organic chloramine proportion (22.1%) in total chlorine occurred at 24 h. UV irradiation pretreatment did not effectively influence organic chloramine formation during AOM chlor(am)ination, but accelerated the degradation of organic chloramines during chloramination. Besides, UV pretreatment enhanced the formation of N-DBPs during the subsequent chlor(am)ination of AOM, especially dichloroacetonitrile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibition of ice crystallisation in highly viscous aqueous organic acid droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneous nucleation of ice within aqueous solution droplets and their subsequent crystallisation is thought to play a significant role in upper tropospheric ice cloud formation. It is normally assumed that homogeneous nucleation will take place at a threshold supersaturation, irrespective of the identity of the solute, and that rapid growth of ice particles will follow immediately after nucleation. However, it is shown here through laboratory experiments that droplets may not readily freeze in the very cold tropical tropopause layer (TTL, typical temperatures of 186–200 K. In these experiments ice crystal growth in citric acid solution droplets did not occur when ice nucleated below 197±6 K. Citric acid, 2-hydroxypropane-1,2,3-tricarboxyllic acid, is a molecule with similar functionality to oxygenated organic compounds which are ubiquitous in atmospheric aerosol. It is therefore thought to be a sensible proxy for atmospheric organic material. Evidence is presented that suggests citric acid solution droplets become ultra-viscous and form glassy solids under atmospherically relevant conditions. Diffusion of liquid water molecules to ice nuclei is expected to be very slow in ultra-viscous solution droplets and nucleation is negligible in glassy droplets; this most likely provides an explanation for the experimentally observed inhibition of ice crystallisation. The implications of ultra-viscous and glassy solution droplets for ice cloud formation and supersaturations in the TTL are discussed.

  3. PRODUCT SAFETY AND COLOR CHARACTERISTICS OF GROUND BEEF PROCESSED FROM BEEF TRIMMINGS TREATED WITH PEROXYACETIC ACID ALONE OR FOLLOWED BY NOVEL ORGANIC ACIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Pohlman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of antimicrobial interventions using peroxyacetic acetic acid (PAA followed by novel organic acids on beef trimmings prior to grinding with conventional spray (CS or electrostatic spray (ES on ground beef microbial populations and color. Beef trimmings (80/20; 25kg were inoculated with E. coli O157:H7, non- O157:H7 shiga toxin producing (STEC E. coli (EC and Salmonella spp. (SA at 105 CFU/g. Inoculated trimmings (1.5 kg /treatment/replicate, 2 replicates were treated with CS application of 0.02% PAA alone or followed by CS or ES application of 3% octanoic acid (PO, 3% pyruvic acid (PP, 3% malic acid (PM, saturated solution of fumaric acid (PF or deionized water (W. Findings from this study suggest that PA as a single or multiple chemical hurdle approach with malic, pyruvic, octanoic and fumaric acid on beef trimmings may be effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 as well as non-STEC serotypes and Salmonella in ground beef up to day 2 of simulated retail display. Results of this study showed that instrumental color properties of ground beef treated with peroxyacetic acid followed by organic acids had little or no difference (P > 0.05 compared to the untreated un-inoculated control ground beef samples. The results also indicate that ES application of some organic acids may have similar or greater efficiency in controlling ground beef microbial populations compared to the CS application of the same acid providing a more economical and waste manageable decontamination approach.

  4. Measurement of dissolved organic nitrogen in a drinking water treatment plant: size fraction, fate, and relation to water quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Ye, Tao; Li, Da-Peng; Hu, Chen-Yan; Lin, Yi-Li; Xia, Sheng-Ji; Tian, Fu-Xiang; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2011-02-15

    This paper investigates the characteristics of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in raw water from the Huangpu River and also in water undergoing treatment in the full-scale Yangshupu drinking water treatment plant (YDWTP) in Shanghai, China. The average DON concentration of the raw water was 0.34 mg/L, which comprised a relatively small portion (~5%) of the mass of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN). The molecular weight (MW) distribution of dissolved organic matter (DOM) was divided into five groups: >30, 10-30, 3-10, 1-3 and membranes. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV absorbance at wavelength of 254 nm (UV254) and DON of each MW fraction were analyzed. DON showed a similar fraction distribution as DOC and UV254. The water. However, this DON fraction cannot be effectively removed in the treatment line at the YDWTP including pre-ozonation, clarification and sand filtration processes. The results from linear regression analysis showed that DON is moderately correlated to DOC, UV254 and trihalomethane formation potential (FP), and strongly correlated to haloacetic acids FP and NDMAFP. Therefore, DON could serve as a surrogate parameter to evaluate the reactivity of DOM and disinfection by-products FP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evalution of toxicity of abcisic acid and gibberellic acid in rats: 50 days drinking water study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Ismail; Tuluce, Yasin; Isik, Ismail

    2007-04-01

    In the present study, the influence of subchronic effects of two plant growth regulators (PGRs) [Abcisic acid (ABA) and Gibberellic acid (GA3)] on antioxidant defense systems [reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT)] and lipid peroxidation level (malondialdehyde = MDA) in various tissues of the rat were investigated during treatment as a drinking water model. 75 ppm of ABA and GA3 in drinking water were continuously administered orally to rats (Sprague-Dawley albino) ad libitum for 50 days. The PGRs treatments caused different effects on the antioxidant defense systems and MDA content of dosed rats compared to controls. The lipid peroxidation end product MDA significantly increased in the lungs, heart and kidney of rats treated with GA3 without significant change in the spleen. ABA caused also a significant increase in MDA content in the spleen, lungs, heart and kidney. The GSH levels were significantly depleted in the spleen, lungs and stomach of rats treated with ABA without any change in the tissues of rats treated with GA3 except the kidney where it increased. Antioxidant enzyme activities such as SOD significantly increased in the lungs and stomach and decreased in the spleen and heart tissues of rats treated with GA3. Meanwhile, SOD significantly decreased in the spleen, heart and kidney and increased in the lungs of rats treated with ABA. While CAT activity significantly decreased in the lungs of rats treated with GA3, a significant increase occurred in the heart of rats treated with both PGRs. On the other hand, the ancillary enzyme GR activity in the tissues were either significantly depleted or not changed with PGRs treatment. The drug metabolizing enzyme GST activity significantly decreased in the lungs of rats treated with ABA but increased in the stomach of rats treated with both PGRs. As a conclusion, the rats resisted oxidative stress via the antioxidant

  6. Salmonella fecal excretion control in broiler chickens by organic acids and essential oils blend feed added

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Borsoi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is an important disease with economic impact as it may affect animal performance and may result in foodborne disease in humans through the eggs and carcass contamination. Regarding the Salmonella control, it is possible to decrease its fecal excretion and the contamination of chicken carcasses by adding organic acids to the feed or drinking water at appropriate times. The aim of this study was to test a blend of organic acids and essential oils in broilers challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE, and to verify the fecal excretion of Salmonella. Sixty broilers were placed in four groups. One group was the negative control. Another group was orally inoculated at 1 day-old with 10(5 CFU/mL of SE as a positive SE control. Two groups (T3 and T4 were orally inoculated at 1 day-old with 10(5 CFU/mL of SE and their feed was separately treated with 0.5 and 1% of organic acids and essential oils, respectively. To assess the fecal excretion of SE, cloacal swabs were collected from all birds at 2, 6, 13 and 20 days after inoculation. The T3 and T4 groups showed a reduction in fecal excretion of SE at 6 and 20 days after inoculation.

  7. Water-wire catalysis in photoinduced acid-base reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Mohammed, Omar F

    2012-07-07

    The pronounced ability of water to form a hyperdense hydrogen (H)-bond network among itself is at the heart of its exceptional properties. Due to the unique H-bonding capability and amphoteric nature, water is not only a passive medium, but also behaves as an active participant in many chemical and biological reactions. Here, we reveal the catalytic role of a short water wire, composed of two (or three) water molecules, in model aqueous acid-base reactions synthesizing 7-hydroxyquinoline derivatives. Utilizing femtosecond-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, we tracked the trajectories of excited-state proton transfer and discovered that proton hopping along the water wire accomplishes the reaction more efficiently compared to the transfer occurring with bulk water clusters. Our finding suggests that the directionality of the proton movements along the charge-gradient H-bond network may be a key element for long-distance proton translocation in biological systems, as the H-bond networks wiring acidic and basic sites distal to each other can provide a shortcut for a proton in searching a global minimum on a complex energy landscape to its destination.

  8. The effect of phytobiotics, organic acids and humic acids on the utility and egg quality of laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrieta Arpášová

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the assessment of an influence of supplement of dietary herbal additive in combination with organic acids into feed mixture or drinking water of laying hens on performance parameters and egg quality. The Lohmann Brown Lite laying hens (n = 30 were divided into 3 groups (n = 10, and fed for 20 weeks ad libitum with complete feed mixtures (CFM. Hens in the control group received the complete feed mixture (CFM and drank drinking water without any supplements. In the first experimental group hens received CFM without supplements but phytobiotics (bergamot oil (Citrus bergamia, thyme (Thymus vulgaris, clove (Syzygium aromaticum, pepper (Piper nigrum in combination with the fumaric acid and citric acid at 60 mg per 1 liter of water were added to their drinking water. In the second experimental group was CFM enriched with humic acids in the concentration of 0.5%, and phytobiotcs with organic acids at the same dose as in the first experimental group were added to their drinking water. Monitored parameters: body weight (g, egg production (%, the weight of all produced eggs (g, egg albumen weight (g, egg albumen index, Haugh unit (HU, egg yolk weight (g, egg yolk index, egg yolk colour (° HLR, egg shell weight (g and egg shell strength (N.cm-2. The results showed no significant differences between the both experimental groups and the control group in the parameter body weight of hens (P>0.05. The highest average body weight was found in the hens from the second experimental group (values in the order of groups:  1792.22 ± 80.85; 1768.42 ±55.55; 1820.12 ±78.56 g±S.D.. We observed positive trend of increasing of egg production by adding of used supplements, especially in the second experimental group with the addition of humic acids, although with no statistically significant difference compared to the control group (P>0.05. The mean laying intensity in the order of groups: 90.42; 91.16; 91.56%. We observed statistically

  9. Application of flow cytometry to monitor assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and microbial community changes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhadidy, Ahmed M; Van Dyke, Michele I; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M

    2016-11-01

    Flow cytometry is an efficient monitoring tool for rapid cell counting, and can be applied to research on water quality and treatment. In this study, a method that employs flow cytometry and a natural microbial inoculum to determine assimilable organic carbon (AOC) was adapted for use with challenging surface waters that have a high organic and particle content, and subsequently applied in a long term river water study. AOC method optimization showed that river water bacteria could pass through a 0.2μm membrane filter, and therefore membrane filtration combined with heat treatment was required for sample sterilization. Preparation of the natural river inoculum with an acceptable yield value could only be achieved when grown using the natural water source, since growth was limited on different types of inorganic minimal media and in natural spring water. The resulting flow cytometry AOC method was reliable and reproducible, and results were comparable to the standard plate count AOC method. Size exclusion chromatography showed that both high and low molecular weight organic matter fractions were utilized by the natural AOC inoculum. Flow cytometry was used to measure both AOC levels and total cell counts in a long term study to monitor the water quality of a river which was used as a drinking water source. The method could distinguish between high nucleic acid (HNA) and low nucleic acid (LNA) groups of bacteria, and HNA bacteria were found to respond faster than LNA bacteria to seasonal changes in nutrients and water temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanism and Kinetics Study for Photocatalytic Oxidation Degradation: A Case Study for Phenoxyacetic Acid Organic Pollutant

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Kian Mun; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee; Lai, Chin Wei

    2015-01-01

    ... are considered a wide variety of persistent organic pollutants introduced into the natural water resources or wastewater treatment systems. In fact, the release of the persistent organic struct...

  11. Biomass burning and its effects on fine aerosol acidity, water content and nitrogen partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Nenes, Athanasios; Paraskevopoulou, Despina; Fourtziou, Luciana; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Liakakou, Eleni; Myriokefalitakis, Stelios; Daskalakis, Nikos; Weber, Rodney; Kanakidou, Maria; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    Aerosol acidity is an important property that drives the partitioning of semi-volatile species, the formation of secondary particulate matter and metal and nutrient solubility. Aerosol acidity varies considerably between aerosol types, RH, temperature, the degree of atmospheric chemical aging and may also change during transport. Among aerosol different sources, sea salt and dust have been well studied and their impact on aerosol acidity and water uptake is more or less understood. Biomass burning (BB) on the other hand, despite its significance as a source in a regional and global scale, is much less understood. Currently, there is no practical and accurate enough method, to directly measure the pH of in-situ aerosol. The combination of thermodynamic models, with targeted experimental observations can provide reliable predictions of aerosol particle water and pH, using as input the concentration of gas/aerosol species, temperature (T), and relative humidity (RH). As such an example, ISORROPIA-II (Fountoukis and Nenes, 2007) has been used for the thermodynamic analysis of measurements conducted in downtown Athens during winter 2013, in order to evaluate the effect of BB on aerosol water and acidity. Biomass burning, especially during night time, was found to contribute significantly to the increased organics concentrations, but as well to the BC component associated with wood burning, particulate nitrates, chloride, and potassium. These increased concentrations were found to impact on fine aerosol water, with Winorg having an average concentration of 11±14 μg m-3 and Worg 12±19 μg m-3 with the organic component constituting almost 38% of the total calculated submicron water. When investigating the fine aerosol acidity it was derived that aerosol was generally acidic, with average pH during strong BB influence of 2.8±0.5, value similar to the pH observed for regional aerosol influenced by important biomass burning episodes at the remote background site of

  12. Experimental and kinetic modelling studies on the acid-catalysed hydrolysis of the water hyacinth plant to levulinic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girisuta, B.; Danon, B.; Manurung, R.; Janssen, L. P. B. M.; Heeres, H. J.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental and modelling study on the acid-catalysed hydrolysis of the water hyacinth plant (Eichhornia crassipes) to optimise the yield of levulinic acid (LA) is reported (T = 150-175 degrees C, C-H2SO4 - 0.1-1 M, water hyacinth intake = 1-5 wt%). At high acid concentrations (>

  13. Membrane fractionation of herring marinade for separation and recovery of fats, proteins, amino acids, salt, acetic acid and water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjerbæk Søtoft, Lene; Lizarazu, Juncal Martin; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz

    2015-01-01

    containing sugars, amino acids and smaller peptides and a NF permeate containing salt and acetic acid ready for reuse. 42% of the spent marinade is recovered to substitute fresh water and chemicals. The Waste water amount is reduced 62.5%. Proteins are concentrated 30 times, while amino acids and smaller...

  14. The influence of humic acids derived from earthworm-processed organic wastes on plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atiyeh, R.M.; Lee, S.; Edwards, C.A.; Arancon, N.Q.; Metzger, J.D. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Soil Ecology Lab.

    2002-08-01

    Some effects of humic acids, formed during the breakdown of organic wastes by earthworms (vermicomposting), on plant growth were evaluated. In the first experiment, humic acids were extracted from pig manure vermicompost using the classic alkali/acid fractionation procedure and mixed with a soilless container medium (Metro-Mix 360), to provide a range of 0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg of humate per kg of dry weight of container medium, and tomato seedlings were grown in the mixtures. In the second experiment, humates extracted from pig manure and food wastes vermicomposts were mixed with vermiculite to provide a range of 0, 50, 125, 250, 500, 1000 and 4000 mg of humate per kg of dry weight of the container medium, and cucumber seedlings were grown in the mixtures. Both tomato and cucumber seedlings were watered daily with a solution containing all nutrients required to ensure that any differences in growth responses were not nutrient-mediated. The incorporation of both types of vermicompost-derived humic acids, into either type of soilless plant growth media, increased the growth of tomato and cucumber plants significantly, in terms of plant heights, leaf areas, shoot and root dry weights. Plant growth increased with increasing concentrations of humic acids incorporated into the medium up to a certain proportion, but this differed according to the plant species, the source of the vermicompost, and the nature of the container medium. Plant growth tended to be increased by treatments of the plants with 50-500 mg/kg humic acids, but often decreased significantly when the concentrations of humic acids derived in the container medium exceeded 500-1000 mg/kg. These growth responses were most probably due to hormone-like activity of humic acids from the vermicomposts or could have been due to plant growth hormones adsorbed onto the humates. (author)

  15. Recoded organisms engineered to depend on synthetic amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Alexis J; Haimovich, Adrian D; Katz, Spencer R; Li, Zhe; Grome, Michael W; Gassaway, Brandon M; Amiram, Miriam; Patel, Jaymin R; Gallagher, Ryan R; Rinehart, Jesse; Isaacs, Farren J

    2015-02-05

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are increasingly used in research and industrial systems to produce high-value pharmaceuticals, fuels and chemicals. Genetic isolation and intrinsic biocontainment would provide essential biosafety measures to secure these closed systems and enable safe applications of GMOs in open systems, which include bioremediation and probiotics. Although safeguards have been designed to control cell growth by essential gene regulation, inducible toxin switches and engineered auxotrophies, these approaches are compromised by cross-feeding of essential metabolites, leaked expression of essential genes, or genetic mutations. Here we describe the construction of a series of genomically recoded organisms (GROs) whose growth is restricted by the expression of multiple essential genes that depend on exogenously supplied synthetic amino acids (sAAs). We introduced a Methanocaldococcus jannaschii tRNA:aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair into the chromosome of a GRO derived from Escherichia coli that lacks all TAG codons and release factor 1, endowing this organism with the orthogonal translational components to convert TAG into a dedicated sense codon for sAAs. Using multiplex automated genome engineering, we introduced in-frame TAG codons into 22 essential genes, linking their expression to the incorporation of synthetic phenylalanine-derived amino acids. Of the 60 sAA-dependent variants isolated, a notable strain harbouring three TAG codons in conserved functional residues of MurG, DnaA and SerS and containing targeted tRNA deletions maintained robust growth and exhibited undetectable escape frequencies upon culturing ∼10(11) cells on solid media for 7 days or in liquid media for 20 days. This is a significant improvement over existing biocontainment approaches. We constructed synthetic auxotrophs dependent on sAAs that were not rescued by cross-feeding in environmental growth assays. These auxotrophic GROs possess alternative genetic codes that

  16. Nucleic acid-metal organic framework (MOF) nanoparticle conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, William; Briley, William E; Auyeung, Evelyn; Cabezas, Maria D; Mirkin, Chad A

    2014-05-21

    Nanoparticles of a metal-organic framework (MOF), UiO-66-N3 (Zr6O4OH4(C8H3O4-N3)6), were synthesized. The surface of the MOF was covalently functionalized with oligonucleotides, utilizing a strain promoted click reaction between DNA appended with dibenzylcyclooctyne and azide-functionalized UiO-66-N3 to create the first MOF nanoparticle-nucleic acid conjugates. The structure of the framework was preserved throughout the chemical transformation, and the surface coverage of DNA was quantified. Due to the small pore sizes, the particles are only modified on their surfaces. When dispersed in aqueous NaCl, they exhibit increased stability and enhanced cellular uptake when compared with unfunctionalized MOF particles of comparable size.

  17. Organic acid compounds in root exudation of Moso Bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) and its bioactivity as affected by heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junren; Shafi, Mohammad; Wang, Ying; Wu, Jiasen; Ye, Zhengqian; Liu, Chen; Zhong, Bin; Guo, Hua; He, Lizhi; Liu, Dan

    2016-10-01

    Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) has great potential as phytoremediation material in soil contaminated by heavy metals. A hydroponics experiment was conducted to determine organic acid compounds of root exudates of lead- (Pb), zinc- (Zn), copper- (Cu), and cadmium (Cd)-tolerant of Moso bamboo. Plants were grown in nutrients solution which included Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd applied as Pb(NO3)2 (200 μM), ZnSO4·7H2O (100 μM), CuSO4·5H2O (25 μM), and CdCl2 (10 μM), respectively. Oxalic acid and malic acid were detected in all treatments. Lactic acid was observed in Cu, Cd, and control treatments. The oxalic was the main organic acid exudated by Moso bamboo. In the sand culture experiment, the Moso bamboo significantly activated carbonate heavy metals under activation of roots. The concentration of water-soluble metals (except Pb) in sand were significantly increased as compared with control. Organic acids (1 mM mixed) were used due to its effect on the soil adsorption of heavy metals. After adding mixed organic acids, the Cu and Zn sorption capacity in soils was decreased markedly compared with enhanced Pb and Cd sorption capacity in soils. The sorption was analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich equations with R 2 values that ranged from 0.956 to 0.999 and 0.919 to 0.997, respectively.

  18. Qualitative urinary organic acid analysis: 10 years of quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Verena; Bonham, James R; Hoffmann, Georg F; Scott, Camilla; Langhans, Claus-Dieter

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 10 years, a total of 90 urine samples from patients with metabolic disorders and controls were circulated to different laboratories in Europe and overseas, starting with 67 laboratories in 2005 and reaching 101 in 2014. The participants were asked to analyse the samples in their usual way and to prepare a report as if to a non-specialist pediatrician. The performance for the detection of fumarase deficiency, glutaric aciduria type I, isovaleric aciduria, methylmalonic aciduria, mevalonic aciduria, phenylketonuria and propionic aciduria was excellent (98-100 %). Over the last few years, detection has clearly improved for tyrosinaemia type I (39 % in 2008 to over 80 % in 2011/2014), maple syrup urine disease (85 % in 2005 to 98 % in 2012), hawkinsinuria (62 % in 2010 to 88 % in 2014), aminoacylase I deficiency (43 % in 2009 to 73 % in 2012) and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency (60 % in 2005 to 93 % by 2011). Normal urines were mostly considered as normal (83-100 %), but laboratories often made additional diagnostic suggestions. When the findings were unambiguous, the reports were mostly clear. However, when they were less obvious, the content and quality of reports varied greatly. Repetition of organic acid measurements on a fresh sample was rarely suggested, while more complex or invasive diagnostic strategies, including further metabolic screening or biopsy were recommended. Surprisingly very few participants suggested referral from the general paediatrician to a specialist metabolic centre to confirm a diagnosis and, if applicable, to initiate treatment despite evidence suggesting that this improves the outcome for patients with inherited metabolic disorders. The reliability of qualitative organic acid analysis has improved over the last few years. However, several aspects of reporting to non-specialists may need discussion and clinicians need to be aware of the uncertainty inherent in all forms of laboratory diagnostic

  19. Mannan-oligosaccharide and organic acids for weaned piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia de Souza Vieira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of acetic, propionic, and formic (50% organic acids and mannan-oligosaccharide (50% on growth performance, digestibility, and faecal score in challenged weaned piglets. Twenty male piglets (5.57 ± 0.32 kg of BW; 21-24 days of age were housed individually in metabolic cages for 28 days in an acclimatised room. The treatments were composed of the inclusion (0.1%; n = 10 or not (n = 10 of additive in the diet. The experimental design was completely randomised with two treatments, 10 replicates, and one piglet per replicate. The nutritional matrix was supplemented with 10% of barley and 35.9 to 34.0% of soybean meal in the pre-starter diet (3-14 days post-weaning and the starter diet (15-28 days post-weaning, respectively, to cause an intestinal challenge. Diets did not include any antimicrobial or growth promoters. Weekly, the animal and the leftover diet were weighed to evaluate growth performance. Digestibility was evaluated through total faeces and urine collection. Piglets fed diets with additive had 8.7% greater weight gain (P < 0.05 compared to those piglets in the control treatment in the starter phase. For other growth performance responses there was no treatment effect. Similarly, the inclusion of additive in the piglet diets did not affect the faecal score or the energy and nutrient digestibility. In the starter phase and throughout the experimental period, piglets fed diets with additive had 18.37% and 15.07% greater nitrogen (N intake and 19.53% and 16.05% greater N retention, respectively, compared to piglets in the control treatment (P < 0.05. In conclusion, the addition of additive composed by organic acids and mannan-oligosaccharide does not improve energy and nutrient digestibility but increases the N retention and weight gain in weaned piglets in the starting phase.

  20. Comparison of the SAWNUC model with CLOUD measurements of sulphuric acid-water nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ickes, Luisa; Almeida, Joao; Amorim, Antonio; Barmet, Peter; Bianchi, Federico; Dommen, Josef; Dunne, Eimear M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Franchin, Alessandro; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Kürten, Andreas; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Wagner, Paul E; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-10-27

    Binary nucleation of sulphuric acid-water particles is expected to be an important process in the free troposphere at low temperatures. SAWNUC (Sulphuric Acid Water Nucleation) is a model of binary nucleation that is based on laboratory measurements of the binding energies of sulphuric acid and water in charged and neutral clusters. Predictions of SAWNUC are compared for the first time comprehensively with experimental binary nucleation data from the CLOUD chamber at European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experimental measurements span a temperature range of 208-292 K, sulphuric acid concentrations from 1·10(6) to 1·10(9) cm(-3), and distinguish between ion-induced and neutral nucleation. Good agreement, within a factor of 5, is found between the experimental and modeled formation rates for ion-induced nucleation at 278 K and below and for neutral nucleation at 208 and 223 K. Differences at warm temperatures are attributed to ammonia contamination which was indicated by the presence of ammonia-sulphuric acid clusters, detected by an Atmospheric Pressure Interface Time of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer. APi-TOF measurements of the sulphuric acid ion cluster distributions ( (H2SO4)i·HSO4- with i = 0, 1, ..., 10) show qualitative agreement with the SAWNUC ion cluster distributions. Remaining differences between the measured and modeled distributions are most likely due to fragmentation in the APi-TOF. The CLOUD results are in good agreement with previously measured cluster binding energies and show the SAWNUC model to be a good representation of ion-induced and neutral binary nucleation of sulphuric acid-water clusters in the middle and upper troposphere.

  1. Effects of water on reactions for waste treatment, organic synthesis, and bio-refinery in sub- and supercritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akizuki, Makoto; Fujii, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Rumiko; Oshima, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    Current research analyzing the effects of water in the field of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions of organics in sub- and supercritical water are reviewed in this article. Since the physical properties of water (e.g., density, ion product and dielectric constants) can affect the reaction rates and mechanisms of various reactions, understanding the effects that water can have is important in controlling reactions. For homogeneous reactions, the effects of water on oxidation, hydrolysis, aldol condensation, Beckman rearrangement and biomass refining were introduced including recent experimental results up to 100 MPa using special pressure-resistance equipment. For heterogeneous reactions, the effects of ion product on acid/base-catalyzed reactions, such as hydrothermal conversion of biomass-related compounds, organic synthesis in the context of bio-refinery, and hydration of olefins were described and how the reaction paths are controlled by the concentration of water and hydrogen ions was summarized. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of water-soluble organic matter extracted from shales during leaching experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaling; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilke, Franziska D. H.; Horsfield, Brian

    2017-04-01

    The huge volumes and unknown composition of flowback and produced waters cause major public concerns about the environmental and social compatibility of hydraulic fracturing and the exploitation of gas from unconventional reservoirs. Flowback and produced waters contain not only residues of fracking additives but also chemical species that are dissolved from the shales themselves during fluid-rock interaction. Knowledge of the composition, size and structure of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as well as the main controls on the release of DOC are a prerequisite for a better understanding of these interactions and its effects on composition of flowback and produced water. Black shales from four different geological settings and covering a maturity range Ro = 0.3-2.6% were extracted with deionized water. The DOC yields were found to decrease rapidly with increasing diagenesis and remain low throughout catagenesis. Four DOC fractions have been qualitatively and quantitatively characterized using size-exclusion chromatography. The concentrations of individual low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) decrease with increasing maturity of the samples except for acetate extracted from the overmature Posidonia shale, which was influenced by hydrothermal brines. The oxygen content of the shale organic matter also shows a significant influence on the release of organic acids, which is indicated by the positive trend between oxygen index (OI) and the concentrations of formate and acetate. Based on our experiments, both the properties of the organic matter source and the thermal maturation progress of the shale organic matter significantly influence the amount and quality of extracted organic compounds during the leaching experiments.

  3. Implications of heterogeneous distributions of organisms on ballast water sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Eliardo G; Lopes, Rubens M; Singer, Julio M

    2015-02-15

    Ballast water sampling is one of the problems still needing investigation in order to enforce the D-2 Regulation of the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ship Ballast Water and Sediments. Although statistical "representativeness" of the sample is an issue usually discussed in the literature, neither a definition nor a clear description of its implications are presented. In this context, we relate it to the heterogeneity of the distribution of organisms in ballast water and show how to specify compliance tests under different models based on the Poisson and negative binomial distributions. We provide algorithms to obtain minimum sample volumes required to satisfy fixed limits on the probabilities of Type I and II errors. We show that when the sample consists of a large number of aliquots, the Poisson model may be employed even under moderate heterogeneity of the distribution of the organisms in the ballast water tank. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF SELECTED ORGANIC MICROPOLLUTANTS ON WATER ECOSYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Anna Kudlek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a literature review in terms of the impact of selected micropollutants from the group of pharmaceutical compounds, food preservatives, pesticides and organic UV filters on various plants and animals species, which inhabit the water ecosystems. During own studies the impact of concentrations of micropollutants in the water environment on selected indicator organisms was evaluated. The study was conducted using saltwater Aliivibrio fischer bacteria, freshwater Daphnia magna and saltwater Artemia fanciscana crustaceans, as well as vascular plants Lemna minor. It was shown that the test organisms are characterized by a different sensitivity for the presence of micropollutants. For all applied tests an increase in the response of indicator organisms with the increasing compound concentration was observed. It demonstrates the growing toxic impact of micropollutants. The solution of benzophenone-3 at a concentration of 5 mg/dm3 was characterized by the highest toxic effects against both bacteria, crustaceans and vascular plants.

  5. Thermodynamic properties of citric acid and the system citric acid-water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruif, C.G. de; Miltenburg, J.C. van; Sprenkels, A.J.J.; Stevens, G.; Graaf, W. de; Wit, H.G.M. de

    1982-01-01

    The binary system citric acid-water has been investigated with static vapour pressure measurements, adiabatic calorimetry, solution calorimetry, solubility measurements and powder X-ray measurements. The data are correlated by thermodynamics and a large part of the phase diagram is given. Molar heat

  6. Effects of pH adjustment and sodium ions on sour taste intensity of organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protonated organic acid species have been shown to be the primary stimuli responsible for sour taste of organic acids. However, we have observed that sour taste may be modulated when the pH of acid solutions is raised using sodium hydroxide. Objectives were to evaluate the effect of pH adjustment on...

  7. Advances in the hydrogeochemistry and microbiology of acid mine waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2000-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a plethora of research related to the hydrogeochemistry and microbiology of acid mine waters and associated tailings and waste-rock waters. Numerous books, reviews, technical papers, and proceedings have been published that examine the complex bio-geochemical process of sulfide mineral oxidation, develop and apply geochemical models to site characterization, and characterize the microbial ecology of these environments. This review summarizes many of these recent works, and provides references for those investigating this field. Comparisons of measured versus calculated Eh and measured versus calculated pH for water samples from several field sites demonstrate the reliability of some current geochemical models for aqueous speciation and mass balances. Geochemical models are not, however, used to predict accurately time-dependent processes but to improve our understanding of these systems and to constrain possible processes that contribute to actual or potential water quality issues. Microbiological studies are demonstrating that there is much we have yet to learn about the types of different microorganisms and their function and ecology in mine-waste environments. A broad diversity of green algae, bacteria, archaea, yeasts, and fungi are encountered in acid mine waters, and a better understanding of their ecology and function may potentially enhance remediation possibilities as well as our understanding of the evolution of life.

  8. Performance characterization of water recovery and water quality from chemical/organic waste products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, W. M.; Rogers, T. D.; Chowdhury, H.; Cullingford, H. S.

    1989-01-01

    The water reclamation subsystems currently being evaluated for the Space Shuttle Freedom are briefly reviewed with emphasis on a waste water management system capable of processing wastes containing high concentrations of organic/inorganic materials. The process combines low temperature/pressure to vaporize water with high temperature catalytic oxidation to decompose volatile organics. The reclaimed water is of potable quality and has high potential for maintenance under sterile conditions. Results from preliminary experiments and modifications in process and equipment required to control reliability and repeatability of system operation are presented.

  9. Protected organic Acid blends as an alternative to antibiotics in finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhaya, S D; Lee, K Y; Kim, I H

    2014-11-01

    A total of 120 finishing pigs ([Yorkshire×Landrace]×Duroc) with an average body weight (BW) of 49.72 ±1.72 kg were used in 12-wk trial to evaluate the effects of protected organic acids on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, fecal micro flora, meat quality and fecal gas emission. Pigs were randomly allotted to one of three dietary treatments (10 replication pens with 4 pigs per pen) in a randomly complete block design based on their initial BW. Each dietary treatment consisted of: Control (CON/basal diet), OA1 (basal diet+0.1% organic acids) and OA2 (basal diet+0.2% organic acids). Dietary treatment with protected organic acid blends linearly improved (pacid blends during 12 week. During week 6, a decrease (linear effect, p = 0.01) in fecal ammonia contents was observed with the increase in the level of protected organic acid blends on d 3 and d 5 of fermentation. Moreover, acetic acid emission decreased linearly (p = 0.02) on d7 of fermentation with the increase in the level of protected organic acid blends. During 12 weeks, linear decrease (pacetic acid content on d 5 of fermentation was observed with the increase in the level of protected organic acid blends. Supplementation of protected organic acid blends linearly increased the longissimus muscle area with the increasing concentration of organic acids. Moreover, color of meat increased (linear effect, quadratic effect, pacid in the diet. During the 6 week, increment in the level of protected organic acid blends decreased (linear effect, p = 0.01) Escherichia coli (E. coli) counts and increased (linear effect, p = 0.004) Lactobacillus counts. During 12-wk of experimental trial, feces from pigs fed diet supplemented with organic acid blends showed linear reduction (pacid blends. In conclusion, 0.2% protected organic acids blends positively affected growth performance, nutrient digestibility, fecal gas emission and meat quality in finishing pigs without any adverse effects on blood parameters.

  10. Speleothem records of acid sulphate deposition and organic carbon mobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Peter; Fairchild, Ian; Bourdin, Clement; Baldini, James; Muller, Wolfgang; Hartland, Adam; Bartlett, Rebecca

    2017-04-01

    Dramatic increases in measured surface water DOC in recent decades have been variously attributed to either temperature rise, or destabilisation of long-term soil carbon pools following sulphur peak emissions status. However, whilst both drivers of DOC dynamics are plausible, they remain difficult to test due to the restricted nature of the available records of riverine DOC flux (1978 to present), and the limited availability of SO2 emissions inventory data at the regional scale. Speleothems offer long term records of both sulphur and carbon. New techniques to extract sulphur concentrations and isotopes from speleothem calcite have enabled archives of pollution history and environmental acidification to be reconstructed. Due to the large dynamic range in sulphur isotopic values from end member sources (marine aerosol +21 ‰ to continental biogenic emissions -30 ‰) and limited environmental fractionation under oxidising conditions, sulphur isotopes form an ideal tracer of industrial pollution and environmental acidification in the palaeo-record. We couple this acidification history to the carbon record, using organic matter fluorescence and trace metals. Trace metal ratios and abundance can be used to infer the type and size of organic ligand and are therefore sensitive to changes in temperature as a driver of organic carbon processing and biodegradation. This allows fluorescent properties and ratios of trace metals in speleothem carbonate to be used to represent both the flux of organic carbon into the cave as well as the degradation pathway. Here we present some of the first results of this work, exploring sulphur acidification as a mechanistic control on carbon solubility and export throughout the twentieth century.

  11. Phosphoric acid loaded azo (-N═N-) based covalent organic framework for proton conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Suman; Kundu, Tanay; Kandambeth, Sharath; Babarao, Ravichandar; Marathe, Yogesh; Kunjir, Shrikant M; Banerjee, Rahul

    2014-05-07

    Two new chemically stable functional crystalline covalent organic frameworkds (COFs) (Tp-Azo and Tp-Stb) were synthesized using the Schiff base reaction between triformylphloroglucinol (Tp) and 4,4'-azodianiline (Azo) or 4,4'-diaminostilbene (Stb), respectively. Both COFs show the expected keto-enamine form, and high stability toward boiling water, strong acidic, and basic media. H3PO4 doping in Tp-Azo leads to immobilization of the acid within the porous framework, which facilitates proton conduction in both the hydrous (σ = 9.9 × 10(-4) S cm(-1)) and anhydrous state (σ = 6.7 × 10(-5) S cm(-1)). This report constitutes the first emergence of COFs as proton conducting materials.

  12. Lipoic Acid Gold Nanoparticles Functionalized with Organic Compounds as Bioactive Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, Ioana; Zarafu, Irina; Popa, Marcela; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Bleotu, Coralia; Culita, Daniela; Ghica, Corneliu; Ionita, Petre

    2017-02-16

    Water soluble gold nanoparticles protected by lipoic acid were obtained and further functionalized by standard coupling reaction with 1-naphtylamine, 4-aminoantipyrine, and 4'-aminobenzo-15-crown-5 ether. Derivatives of lipoic acid with 1-naphtylamine, 4-aminoantipyrine, and 4'-aminobenzo-15-crown-5 ether were also obtained and characterized. All these were tested for their antimicrobial activity, as well as for their influence on mammalian cell viability and cellular cycle. In all cases a decreased antimicrobial activity of the obtained bioactive nanoparticles was observed as compared with the organic compounds, proving that a possible inactivation of the bioactive groups could occur during functionalization. However, both the gold nanoparticles as well as the functionalized bioactive nanosystems proved to be biocompatible at concentrations lower than 50 µg/mL, as revealed by the cellular viability and cell cycle assay, demonstrating their potential for the development of novel antimicrobial agents.

  13. Lipoic Acid Gold Nanoparticles Functionalized with Organic Compounds as Bioactive Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Turcu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Water soluble gold nanoparticles protected by lipoic acid were obtained and further functionalized by standard coupling reaction with 1-naphtylamine, 4-aminoantipyrine, and 4′-aminobenzo-15-crown-5 ether. Derivatives of lipoic acid with 1-naphtylamine, 4-aminoantipyrine, and 4′-aminobenzo-15-crown-5 ether were also obtained and characterized. All these were tested for their antimicrobial activity, as well as for their influence on mammalian cell viability and cellular cycle. In all cases a decreased antimicrobial activity of the obtained bioactive nanoparticles was observed as compared with the organic compounds, proving that a possible inactivation of the bioactive groups could occur during functionalization. However, both the gold nanoparticles as well as the functionalized bioactive nanosystems proved to be biocompatible at concentrations lower than 50 µg/mL, as revealed by the cellular viability and cell cycle assay, demonstrating their potential for the development of novel antimicrobial agents.

  14. Sequential Washing with Electrolyzed Alkaline and Acidic Water Effectively Removes Pathogens from Metal Surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Nakano

    Full Text Available Removal of pathogenic organisms from reprocessed surgical instruments is essential to prevent iatrogenic infections. Some bacteria can make persistent biofilms on medical devices. Contamination of non-disposable equipment with prions also represents a serious risk to surgical patients. Efficient disinfection of prions from endoscopes and other instruments such as high-resolution cameras remains problematic because these instruments do not tolerate aggressive chemical or heat treatments. Herein, we develop a new washing system that uses both the alkaline and acidic water produced by electrolysis. Electrolyzed acidic water, containing HCl and HOCl as active substances, has been reported to be an effective disinfectant. A 0.15% NaCl solution was electrolyzed and used immediately to wash bio-contaminated stainless steel model systems with alkaline water (pH 11.9 with sonication, and then with acidic water (pH 2.7 without sonication. Two bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a fungus (Candida albicans were effectively removed or inactivated by the washing process. In addition, this process effectively removed or inactivated prions from the stainless steel surfaces. This washing system will be potentially useful for the disinfection of clinical devices such as neuroendoscopes because electrolyzed water is gentle to both patients and equipment and is environmentally sound.

  15. Comparative Effects of Water, Acid and Sodium Benzoate as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relative effects of water, sulphuric acid and sodium benzoate as additives on the micelle-catalyzed aquation reactions of the complexes:Fe(Me2Phen)3 2+ and FE(Me4Phen) were studied in acetone using Triton X-100 (TX-100), as the surfactant-catalyst. FE(Me4Phen)2+ equates faster than FE(Me2Phen)2+ in the ...

  16. Combined HPLC analysis of organic acids and furans formed during organosolv pulping of fiber hemp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselink, R.J.A.; Dam, van J.E.G.; Zomers, F.H.A.

    1995-01-01

    During organosolv pulping of fiber hemp (Cannabis sativa L) with a mixture of ethanol/water, delignification is catalyzed by released acetic acid and formic acid in the effluent. The major sources of acetic acid are the acetyl groups, as determined by means of the acetyl balance, whereas formic acid

  17. Dynamics of three organic acids (malic, acetic and succinic acid) in sunflower exposed to cadmium and lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhixin; Li, Xiaodong; Sun, Lina; Sun, Tieheng

    2013-01-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) has been considered as a good candidate for bioaccumulation of heavy metals. In the present study, sunflower was used to enrich the cadmium and lead in sand culture during 90 days. Biomass, Cd and Pb uptake, three organic acids and pH in cultures were investigated. Results showed that the existence of Cd and Pb showed different interactions on the organic acids exudation. In single Cd treatments, malic and acetic acids in Cd10 showed an incremental tendency with time. In the mixed treatments of Cd and Pb, malic acids increased when 10 and 40 mg x L(-1) Cd were added into Pb50, but acetic acids in Pb50 were inhibited by Cd addition. The Cd10 supplied in Pb10 stimulated the secretion of malic and succinic acids. Moreover, the Cd or Pb uptake in sunflower showed various correlations with pH and some organic acids, which might be due to the fact that the Cd and Pb interfere with the organic acids secretion in rhizosphere of sunflower, and the changes of organic acids altered the form and bioavailability of Cd and Pb in cultures conversely.

  18. Staining of proteins in gels with Coomassie G-250 without organic solvent and acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Ann-Marie; Besir, H Uuml Seyin

    2009-08-14

    In classical protein staining protocols using Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB), solutions with high contents of toxic and flammable organic solvents (Methanol, Ethanol or 2-Propanol) and acetic acid are used for fixation, staining and destaining of proteins in a gel after SDS-PAGE. To speed up the procedure, heating the staining solution in the microwave oven for a short time is frequently used. This usually results in evaporation of toxic or hazardous Methanol, Ethanol or 2-Propanol and a strong smell of acetic acid in the lab which should be avoided due to safety considerations. In a protocol originally published in two patent applications by E.M. Wondrak (US2001046709 (A1), US6319720 (B1)), an alternative composition of the staining solution is described in which no organic solvent or acid is used. The CBB is dissolved in bidistilled water (60-80 mg of CBB G-250 per liter) and 35 mM HCl is added as the only other compound in the staining solution. The CBB staining of the gel is done after SDS-PAGE and thorough washing of the gel in bidistilled water. By heating the gel during the washing and staining steps, the process can be finished faster and no toxic or hazardous compounds are evaporating. The staining of proteins occurs already within 1 minute after heating the gel in staining solution and is fully developed after 15-30 min with a slightly blue background that is destained completely by prolonged washing of the stained gel in bidistilled water, without affecting the stained protein bands.

  19. Microwave-assisted organic acids extraction of chromate copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Yu; Chung Y. Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2010-01-01

    The extraction effects of acid concentration, reaction time and temperature in a microwave reactor on recovery of CCA-treated wood were evaluated. Extraction of copper, chromium, and arsenic metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine wood samples with two different organic acids (i.e., acetic acid and oxalic acid) was investigated using a...

  20. Determination of organic acids evolution during apple cider fermentation using an improved HPLC analysis method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.; Zhou, F.; Ji, B.; Nout, M.J.R.; Fang, Q.; Zhang, Z.

    2008-01-01

    An efficient method for analyzing ten organic acids in food, namely citric, pyruvic, malic, lactic, succinic, formic, acetic, adipic, propionic and butyric acids, using HPLC was developed. Boric acid was added into the mobile phase to separate lactic and succinic acids, and a post-column buffer

  1. Amino acids and hexosamines as indicators of organic matter degradation state in North Sea sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dauwe, B.; Middelburg, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Sediment cores from six stations in the eastern North Sea were analyzed for protein amino acids, the nonprotein amino acids beta-alanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid and the hexosamines galactosamine and glucosamine, and bulk parameters (organic carbon, nitrogen, total hydrolyzable amino acids and

  2. Growth inhibition of Cronobacter spp. strains in reconstituted powdered infant formula acidified with organic acids supported by natural stomach acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S; Schnell, S; Fischer, M

    2013-09-01

    Cronobacter is associated with outbreaks of rare, but life-threatening cases of meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis, and sepsis in newborns. This study was conducted to determine the effect of organic acids on growth of Cronobacter in laboratory medium and reconstituted powdered infant formula (PIF) as well as the bacteriostatic effect of slightly acidified infant formula when combined with neonatal gastric acidity. Inhibitory effect of seven organic acids on four acid sensitive Cronobacter strains was determined in laboratory medium with broth dilution method at pH 5.0, 5.5 and 6.0. Acetic, butyric and propionic acids were most inhibitive against Cronobacter in the laboratory medium. The killing effect of these three acids was partially buffered in reconstituted PIF. Under neonatal gastric acid condition of pH 5.0, the slightly acidified formula which did not exert inhibition effect solely reduced significantly the Cronobacter populations. A synergistic effect of formula moderately acidified with organic acid combined with the physiological infant gastric acid was visible in preventing the rapid growth of Cronobacter in neonatal stomach. The study contributed to a better understanding of the inhibitory effect of organic acids on Cronobacter growth in different matrixes and provided new ideas in terms of controlling bacteria colonization and translocation by acidified formula. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Phenolic acid concentrations in organically and conventionally cultivated spring and winter wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchowski, Jerzy; Jonczyk, Krzysztof; Pecio, Lukasz; Oleszek, Wieslaw

    2011-04-01

    Organic crops are often thought to contain more phenolic secondary metabolites than conventional ones. This study evaluated the influence of organic and conventional farming on concentrations of phenolic acids in spring and winter wheat cultivars. Five phenolic acids were identified: ferulic, sinapic, p-coumaric, vanillic and p-hydroxybenzoic acid. Ferulic acid was the main phenolic acid in the grain of all tested wheat varieties. Significant differences among the examined cultivars in concentration of particular compounds were observed. Concentrations of phenolic acids varied significantly in organic and conventional wheat. Levels of ferulic and p-coumaric acids, as well as the total phenolic acid content were higher in organic crops. Concentrations of sinapic acid in spring wheat, as well as vanillic and p-hydroxybenzoic acid levels in both types of wheat were significantly higher in conventional grains. The 1000 kernel weight (TKW) of spring and winter wheat was significantly lower in organic crops. Organically produced spring and winter wheat had significantly higher concentrations of ferulic and p-coumaric acid as well as the total phenolic acid content than conventional wheat, though the differences in the levels of phenolics were not large. However, these differences are probably caused mainly by smaller size of organic wheat kernels (lower TKW). Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Dissolved organic matter in sea spray: a transfer study from marine surface water to aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Schmitt-Kopplin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols impose direct and indirect effects on the climate system, for example, by absorption of radiation in relation to cloud droplets size, on chemical and organic composition and cloud dynamics. The first step in the formation of Organic primary aerosols, i.e. the transfer of dissolved organic matter from the marine surface into the atmosphere, was studied. We present a molecular level description of this phenomenon using the high resolution analytical tools of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR. Our experiments confirm the chemoselective transfer of natural organic molecules, especially of aliphatic compounds from the surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes. Transfer from marine surface water to the atmosphere involves a chemical gradient governed by the physicochemical properties of the involved molecules when comparing elemental compositions and differentiating CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS bearing compounds. Typical chemical fingerprints of compounds enriched in the aerosol phase were CHO and CHOS molecular series, smaller molecules of higher aliphaticity and lower oxygen content, and typical surfactants. A non-targeted metabolomics analysis demonstrated that many of these molecules corresponded to homologous series of oxo-, hydroxy-, methoxy-, branched fatty acids and mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids as well as monoterpenes and sugars. These surface active biomolecules were preferentially transferred from surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes to form a significant fraction of primary organic aerosols. This way of sea spray production leaves a selective biological signature of the surface water in the corresponding aerosol that may be transported into higher altitudes up to the lower atmosphere, thus contributing to the formation of secondary organic aerosol on a global scale or transported

  5. Dissolved organic matter in sea spray: a transfer study from marine surface water to aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Liger-Belair, G.; Koch, B. P.; Flerus, R.; Kattner, G.; Harir, M.; Kanawati, B.; Lucio, M.; Tziotis, D.; Hertkorn, N.; Gebefügi, I.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impose direct and indirect effects on the climate system, for example, by absorption of radiation in relation to cloud droplets size, on chemical and organic composition and cloud dynamics. The first step in the formation of Organic primary aerosols, i.e. the transfer of dissolved organic matter from the marine surface into the atmosphere, was studied. We present a molecular level description of this phenomenon using the high resolution analytical tools of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Our experiments confirm the chemoselective transfer of natural organic molecules, especially of aliphatic compounds from the surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes. Transfer from marine surface water to the atmosphere involves a chemical gradient governed by the physicochemical properties of the involved molecules when comparing elemental compositions and differentiating CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS bearing compounds. Typical chemical fingerprints of compounds enriched in the aerosol phase were CHO and CHOS molecular series, smaller molecules of higher aliphaticity and lower oxygen content, and typical surfactants. A non-targeted metabolomics analysis demonstrated that many of these molecules corresponded to homologous series of oxo-, hydroxy-, methoxy-, branched fatty acids and mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids as well as monoterpenes and sugars. These surface active biomolecules were preferentially transferred from surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes to form a significant fraction of primary organic aerosols. This way of sea spray production leaves a selective biological signature of the surface water in the corresponding aerosol that may be transported into higher altitudes up to the lower atmosphere, thus contributing to the formation of secondary organic aerosol on a global scale or transported laterally with

  6. The diverse role of Pdr12 in resistance to weak organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygård, Yvonne; Mojzita, Dominik; Toivari, Mervi; Penttilä, Merja; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Ruohonen, Laura

    2014-06-01

    Resistance to weak organic acids is important relative to both weak organic acid preservatives and the development of inhibitor tolerant yeast as industrial production organisms. The ABC transporter Pdr12 is important for resistance to sorbic and propionic acid, but its role in tolerance to other weak organic acids with industrial relevance is not well established. In this study, yeast strains with altered expression of PDR12 and/or CMK1, a protein kinase associated with post-transcriptional negative regulation of Pdr12, were exposed to seven weak organic acids: acetic, formic, glycolic, lactic, propionic, sorbic and levulinic acid. These are widely used as preservatives, present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates or attractive as chemical precursors. Overexpression of PDR12 increased tolerance to acids with longer chain length, such as sorbic, propionic and levulinic acid, whereas deletion of PDR12 increased tolerance to the shorter acetic and formic acid. The viability of all strains decreased dramatically in acetic or propionic acid, but the Δpdr12 strains recovered more rapidly than other strains in acetic acid. Furthermore, our results indicated that Cmk1 plays a role in weak organic acid tolerance, beyond its role in regulation of Pdr12, since deletion of both Cmk1 and Pdr12 resulted in different responses to exposure to acids than were explained by deletion of Pdr12 alone. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Phenomenon of organic carbon change in natural waters (system "catchment - Lake") of Russian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinu, Marina; Tatyana, Moiseenko; Tatyana, Kremleva; Natalia, Gashkina

    2015-04-01

    In the last two decades in the Russian Federation was found significant increase in the concentration of dissolved organic carbon in many aqueous systems. Most obviously, these changes may be related to global warming. It is known that increasing the temperature dominate during dry periods and increases the concentration of nutrients, primary production increases, leading to an increase of the dissolved organic matter. At the same time, it is known that some of the increase in DOC may be largely due to a decrease of anthropogenic sulfur deposition and increasing organic matter in the soil. The European Russia (ER) is a region with substantial industrial emissions of sulphur. In the central part of ER are concentrated metallurgical productions. This has resulted in high concentrations of anthropogenic sulphate and an increase in the prevalence of acidification as well as a rise in metal concentrations in the lakes of North Kola. However, over the last 30 years, sulfur emissions in ?ola North have decreased substantially. The aim of this work was to explain the mechanisms to improve the content of natural organic matter and to assess its role in the processes of acidification and recovery of water quality while reducing the deposition of technogenic acid. The increasing of organic matter content in lake waters is being also observed for the totality of lakes in the Kola North. This conforms to the data reported by Skjelkvale et al. (2001a) which demonstrates the significant increase of DOC. Some authors explain the increased DOC levels by reduction in strong acid flow and return of water chemistry to its natural parameters of specifying organic matter concentrations in water. It is known that DOC level has a direct relationship with water color. In analyzing long-term study data with regard to the group of 75 lakes (obtained during 1990-2010) DOC is increased year-over-year, but the color decreased. The following chemical processes developing in water can explain

  8. Porous organic cage membranes for water desalination: a simulation exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xian; Jiang, Jianwen

    2017-07-19

    Porous organic cages (POCs) have emerged as a new class of porous materials and received considerable interest for their potential applications. Herein we report the first proof-of-concept simulation study on POC membranes for water desalination. Five [4+6] POCs (CC1, CC2, CC3, CC16, and CC17) are considered with similar crystal structures, but different periphery groups and pore morphologies. CC1 is found to be impermeable to water due to disconnected pores. With an interconnected tetrahedral pore network, CC3 and CC16 have an intermediate water permeability of 1-5 × 10-7 kg m (m2 h bar)-1. CC2 and CC17 contain straight pores and a widely open pore network, respectively, thus exhibit a high water permeability of 2-3 × 10-6 kg m (m2 h bar)-1; nevertheless, salt rejection in CC17 is only 89%. Among the five POC membranes, CC2 is the best for water desalination with performance superior to other membranes reported in the literature. The membrane flexibility is revealed to have a weak effect on water permeation. To provide further microscopic understanding, the permeation duration, diffusion and hydrogen bonding of water in the POC membranes are quantitatively analyzed. From this simulation study, the key factors governing water permeation in the POC membranes are unraveled and CC2 is identified to be an interesting candidate for water desalination.

  9. Delivery of Organic Material and Water through Asteroid Impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Michael; Frantseva, Kateryna; van der Tak, Floris; Helmich, Frank P.

    2014-01-01

    Meteorites, specifically carbonaceous chondrites, are frequently invoked as the primary source of Earth's water and organic materials, crucial ingredients for the formation of life. We have started developing a dynamical model of the delivery of their parent bodies, primitive low-albedo asteroids,

  10. Growth engineering of Propionibacterium freudenreichii shermanii for organic acids and other value-added products formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Vijita V; Prakash, Gunjan; Lali, Arvind M

    2018-01-02

    Propionic acid production from glucose was studied using Propionibacterium freudenreichii shermanii. Conditions were optimized for high yields of propionic acid and total organic acids by sequential optimization of parameters like pH, inoculum age, inoculum volume and substrate concentration. Near-theoretical yield (0.54 ± 0.023 g/g) was achieved for propionic acid with fermentation of 1% glucose using 20% (v/v) of 48 hr old P. shermanii at 30°C, pH maintained at 5.5. Total organic acid yield under these conditions was 0.74 ± 0.06 g/g. The study resulted in achieving 98% and 95% theoretical yields of propionic acid and total organic acids, respectively. Under optimized conditions, along with organic acids, P. shermanii also produced vitamin B12 and trehalose intracellularly, showing its potential to be used as a cell factory.

  11. Passive sampling of perfluorinated acids and sulfonates using polar organic chemical integrative samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, Ganna; Golovko, Oksana; Randak, Tomas; Grabic, Roman

    2013-03-01

    The applicability of a polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) for detection and determination of perfluorinated acids and sulfonates in water was studied under field conditions. Standard POCIS configurations (i.e., pharmaceutical and pesticide) were deployed in effluent from a wastewater treatment plant for 1, 2, and 3 weeks. Ten of 15 target compounds were found in POCIS, five of which were quantified in wastewater. Pest-POCIS appeared more effective for the sampling, while Pharm-POCIS had a more rapid uptake kinetic, which leads to faster saturation or equilibrium. The results showed that the pesticide configuration is probably more suitable for the sampling of this class of compounds. Based on average concentration in water over the sampling period and amount of compound adsorbed in the POCIS, we calculated sampling rates for five studied compounds and obtained values of 0.034 to 0.222 L day(-1).

  12. Adsorption of marine phycotoxin okadaic acid on a covalent organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Laura M; Pinela, Sara R; Fernandes, Soraia P S; Louçano, João; Carbó-Argibay, Enrique; Sarriá, Marisa P; Rodríguez-Abreu, Carlos; Peixoto, João; Espiña, Begoña

    2017-11-24

    Phycotoxins, compounds produced by some marine microalgal species, can reach high concentrations in the sea when a massive proliferation occurs, the so-called harmful algal bloom. These compounds are especially dangerous to human health when concentrated in the digestive glands of seafood. In order to generate an early warning system to alert for approaching toxic outbreaks, it is very important to improve monitoring methods of phycotoxins in aquatic ecosystems. Solid-phase adsorption toxin tracking devices reported thus far based on polymeric resins have not been able to provide an efficient harmful algal bloom prediction system due to their low adsorption capabilities. In this work, a water-stable covalent organic framework (COF) was evaluated as adsorbent for the hydrophobic toxin okadaic acid, one of the most relevant marine toxins and the parental compound of the most common group of toxins responsible for the diarrhetic shellfish poisoning. Adsorption kinetics of okadaic acid onto the COF in seawater showed that equilibrium concentration was reached in only 60min, with a maximum experimental adsorption of 61mgg -1 . Desorption of okadaic acid from the COF was successful with both 70% ethanol and acetonitrile as solvent, and the COF material could be reused with minor losses in adsorption capacity for three cycles. The results demonstrate that COF materials are promising candidates for solid-phase adsorption in water monitoring devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Porous poly(perfluorosulfonic acid) membranes for alkaline water electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Hansen, Martin Kalmar; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel

    2015-01-01

    Poly(perfluorosulfonic acid) (PFSA) is one of a few polymer types that combine excellent alkali resistance with extreme hydrophilicity. It is therefore of interest as a base material in separators for alkaline water electrolyzers. In the pristine form it, however, shows high cation selectivity...... for the unmodified membrane. The technological feasibility was demonstrated by testing the membranes in an alkaline water electrolysis cell with encouraging performance....... and washed out and the obtained porous materials allowed for swelling to reach water contents up to λ=85 [H2O] [−SO3K]−1. After equilibration in 22 wt% aqueous KOH, ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm−1 was recorded for this membrane type at room temperature, which is significantly higher than 0.01 S cm−1...

  14. [Effects of organic manure application on dry land soil organic matter and water stable aggregates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Juan; Zhi-Kuan, Jia; Lian-You, Liang; Qing-Fang, Han; Rui-Xia, Ding; Bao-Ping, Yang

    2012-01-01

    A four-year (2007-2010) field experiment was conducted to study the effects of applying different amounts (7500, 15000, and 22500 kg x hm(-2)) of organic manure on the organic matter content, aggregate particle size distribution, and aggregate stability in different soil layers in a continuously cropped maize field on the Weibei Dry Land, Shaanxi Province of Northwest China. In 0-20 cm soil layer, the organic matter content in treatment 22500 kg x hm(-2) of organic manure was 4.1%-4.6% higher than that in treatment 7500 kg x hm(-2) of organic manure (P soil layer was 4.7%-6.3% higher than that of CK (P soil layer, all treatments with organic manure application had an increased amount of soil water stable aggregates (> 5 mm), and the amount of the aggregates increased significantly with the increasing application rate of organic manure. Applying organic manure increased the amount of soil water stable aggregates (> 0.25 mm), aggregate mean mass diameter, and aggregate stability in 0-30 cm soil layer, as compared with CK, and these three indices increased significantly with increasing organic manure application rate.

  15. Cranberry juice and combinations of its organic acids are effective against experimental urinary tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Heidi Dorthe; Struve, Carsten; Christensen, Søren Brøgger

    2017-01-01

    The antibacterial effect of cranberry juice and the organic acids therein on infection by uro28 pathogenic Escherichia coli was studied in an experimental mouse model of urinary tract infection (UTI). Reduced bacterial counts were found in the bladder (P ... juice. Commercially available cranberry juice cocktail also significantly reduced (P juice (P juice, were tested...... in combination and individually. The four organic acids also decreased bacterial levels in the bladder when administered together (P plus citric acid (P plus quinic acid (P

  16. Phosphatidic acid, a versatile water-stress signal in roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fionn eMcLoughlin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adequate water supply is of utmost importance for growth and reproduction of plants. In order to cope with water deprivation, plants have to adapt their development and metabolism to ensure survival. To maximize water use efficiency, plants use a large array of signaling mediators such as hormones, protein kinases and phosphatases, Ca2+, reactive oxygen species and low abundant phospholipids that together form complex signaling cascades. Phosphatidic acid (PA is a signaling lipid that rapidly accumulates in response to a wide array of abiotic stress stimuli. PA formation provides the cell with spatial and transient information about the external environment by acting as a protein-docking site in cellular membranes. PA reportedly binds to a number of proteins that play a role during water limiting conditions, such as drought and salinity and has been shown to play an important role in maintaining root system architecture. Members of two osmotic stress-activated protein kinase families, sucrose non-fermenting 1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2 and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs were recently shown bind PA and are also involved in the maintenance of root system architecture and salinity stress tolerance. In addition, PA regulates several proteins involved in abscisic acid (ABA-signaling. PA-dependent recruitment of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH under water limiting conditions indicates a role in regulating metabolic processes. Finally, a recent study also shows the PA recruits the clathrin heavy chain and a potassium channel subunit, hinting towards additional roles in cellular trafficking and potassium homeostasis. Taken together, the rapidly increasing number of proteins reported to interact with PA implies a broad role for this versatile signaling phospholipid in mediating salt and water stress responses.

  17. Secondary formation of oxalic acid and related organic species from biogenic sources in a larch forest at the northern slope of Mt. Fuji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Miyazaki, Yuzo; Wada, Ryuichi; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Saigusa, Nobuko; Tani, Akira

    2017-10-01

    To better understand the formation of water-soluble organic aerosols in the forest atmosphere, we measured low molecular weight (LMW) dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in aerosols from a Larix kaempferi forest located at the northern slope of Mt. Fuji, Japan, in summer 2012. Concentrations of dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, and WSOC showed maxima in daytime. Relative abundance of oxalic acid in LMW dicarboxylic acids was on average 52% and its average concentration was 214 ng m-3. We found that diurnal and temporal variations of oxalic acid are different from those of isoprene and α-pinene, whereas biogenic secondary organic aerosols (BSOAs) derived from isoprene and α-pinene showed similar variations with oxalic acid. The mass concentration ratios of oxalic acid/BSOAs were relatively constant, although a large variation in the concentrations of toluene that is an anthropogenic volatile organic compound was observed. These results suggest that formation of oxalic acid is associated with the oxidation of isoprene and α-pinene with O3 and other oxidants in the forest atmosphere. In addition, concentrations of UFAs were observed, for the first time, to decrease dramatically during daytime in the forest. Mass concentration ratios of azelaic acid to UFAs showed a positive correlation with O3, suggesting that UFAs are oxidized to yield azelaic acid, which may be further decomposed to oxalic acid in the forest atmosphere. We found that contributions of oxalic acid to WSOC are significantly high ranging from 3.7 to 9.7% (average 6.0%). This study demonstrates that forest ecosystem is an important source of oxalic acid and other dicarboxylic acids in the atmosphere.

  18. Comparison of the SAWNUC model with CLOUD measurements of sulphuric acid-water nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrhart, Sebastian; Almeida, Joao; Amorim, Antonio; Barmet, Peter; Bianchi, Federico; Dommen, Josef; Dunne, Eimear M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Franchin, Alessandro; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Kürten, Andreas; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Wagner, Paul E; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Binary nucleation of sulphuric acid-water particles is expected to be an important process in the free troposphere at low temperatures. SAWNUC (Sulphuric Acid Water Nucleation) is a model of binary nucleation that is based on laboratory measurements of the binding energies of sulphuric acid and water in charged and neutral clusters. Predictions of SAWNUC are compared for the first time comprehensively with experimental binary nucleation data from the CLOUD chamber at European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experimental measurements span a temperature range of 208–292 K, sulphuric acid concentrations from 1·106 to 1·109 cm−3, and distinguish between ion-induced and neutral nucleation. Good agreement, within a factor of 5, is found between the experimental and modeled formation rates for ion-induced nucleation at 278 K and below and for neutral nucleation at 208 and 223 K. Differences at warm temperatures are attributed to ammonia contamination which was indicated by the presence of ammonia-sulphu...

  19. Effect of Pre-ozonation on Haloacetic Acids Formation in Ganga River Water at Kanpur, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naladala, Nagasrinivasa Rao; Singh, Rambabu; Katiyar, Kumud Lata Devi; Bose, Purnendu; Dutta, Venkatesh

    2017-11-01

    Almost all natural water bodies which are considered to be sustainable sources of drinking water contain organic matter in dissolved form and pathogens. This dissolved organic matter and pathogens cannot be removed effectively through traditional filtering processes in drinking water treatment plants. Chlorination of such water for disinfection results in large amounts of disinfection by-products (DBPs), mainly trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids (HAAs), which showed many health effects like cancer and reproductive problems in lab animals and in human beings as well. Complete removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), which is a precursor compound for HAAs formation, is impossible from a practical point of view; hence, it will be better if DOC activity towards DBPs formation can be reduced via some process. The present article describes the process of pre-ozonating post-coagulated Ganga River water at Kanpur in a continuous flow mode and its effect on HAAs formation. Nearly 58% reduction in HAAs formation was observed during this study at higher doses of ozone.

  20. Rapid estimation of organic nitrogen in oil shale waste waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B.M.; Daughton, C.G.; Harris, G.J.

    1984-04-01

    Many of the characteristics of oil shale process waste waters (e.g., malodors, color, and resistance to biotreatment) are imparted by numerous nitrogenous heterocycles and aromatic amines. For the frequent performance assessment of waste treatment processes designed to remove these nitrogenous organic compounds, a rapid and colligative measurement of organic nitrogen is essential. Quantification of organic nitrogen in biological and agricultural samples is usually accomplished using the time-consuming, wet-chemical Kjeldahl method. For oil shale waste waters, whose primary inorganic nitorgen constituent is amonia, organic Kjeldahl nitrogen (OKN) is determined by first eliminating the endogenous ammonia by distillation and then digesting the sample in boiling H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The organic material is oxidized, and most forms of organically bound nitrogen are released as ammonium ion. After the addition of base, the ammonia is separated from the digestate by distillation and quantified by acidimetric titrimetry or colorimetry. The major failings of this method are the loss of volatile species such as aliphatic amines (during predistillation) and the inability to completely recover nitrogen from many nitrogenous heterocycles (during digestion). Within the last decade, a new approach has been developed for the quantification of total nitrogen (TN). The sample is first combusted, a

  1. PCI-GC-MS-MS approach for identification of non-amino organic acid and amino acid profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hemi; Yang, Lin; Ji, Fenfen; Cai, Zongwei

    2017-03-15

    Alkyl chloroformate have been wildly used for the fast derivatization of metabolites with amino and/or carboxyl groups, coupling of powerful separation and detection systems, such as GC-MS, which allows the comprehensive analysis of non-amino organic acids and amino acids. The reagents involving n-alkyl chloroformate and n-alcohol are generally employed for providing symmetric labeling terminal alkyl chain with the same length. Here, we developed an asymmetric labeling strategy and positive chemical ionization gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (PCI-GC-MS-MS) approach for determination of non-amino organic acids and amino acids, as well as the short chain fatty acids. Carboxylic and amino groups could be selectively labelled by propyl and ethyl groups, respectively. The specific neutral loss of C3H8O (60Da), C3H5O2 (74Da) and C4H8O2 (88Da) were useful in the selective identification for qualitative analysis of organic acids and amino acid derivatives. PCI-GC-MS-MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was applied for semi-quantification of typical non-amino organic acids and amino acids. This method exhibited a wide range of linear range, good regression coefficient (R2) and repeatability. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of targeted metabolites showed excellent intra- and inter-day precision (GC-MS-MS, coupled with alkyl chloroformate derivatization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Long-term Response of the Quantity and Quality Dissolved Organic Matter to Decreases in Acid Deposition in Adirondack, NY Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraei, H.; Driscoll, C. T.

    2016-12-01

    The Adirondack region of NY has been historically impacted by acid deposition, resulting in the acidification of soil and surface waters. Decreases in emissions of acidifying compounds in recent decades have driven decreases on sulfate and nitrate deposition and recovery of surface waters. Long-term decreases in concentrations of sulfate plus nitrate have been observed in all of the 48 lakes of the Adirondack Long Term Monitoring program since 1992. These decreases have resulted in widespread increases in the acid neutralizing capacity and decreases in concentrations of inorganic monomeric aluminum in these lakes. The extent of acidification recovery varies by lake class, with highly acid impacted perched seepage lakes and thin till drainage lakes showing the greatest recovery. One intriguing aspect of surface water recovery from acid deposition is a potential compensatory increase in concentrations of dissolved organic matter (29 of 48 Adirondack lakes show significant increases in dissolved organic carbon). Measured increases in acid neutralizing capacity are on average only 63% of theoretical values. This discrepancy increases with increases in dissolved organic carbon and varies by lake class. This analysis indicates that the recovery of the acid neutralizing capacity of Adirondack lakes from acid deposition is curtailed by a compensatory increase in concentrations of naturally occurring organic acids. Time series analysis suggests that the quality of dissolved organic matter is also changing. We observed a pattern of increasing charge density of dissolved organic matter (charge per mol of dissolved organic carbon), with much of this increase associated with strongly acidic functional groups. Changes in the quantity and quality of dissolved organic matter are limiting the recovery of Adirondack lakes from acid deposition.

  3. Acid-sensitive semiperfluoroalkyl resorcinarene: an imaging material for organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Kyun; Chatzichristidi, Margarita; Zakhidov, Alexander A; Taylor, Priscilla G; DeFranco, John A; Hwang, Ha Soo; Fong, Hon Hang; Holmes, Andrew B; Malliaras, George G; Ober, Christopher K

    2008-09-03

    An acid-sensitive semiperfluoroalkyl resorcinarene was synthesized, and its lithographic properties were evaluated. Its solubility in segregated hydrofluoroether solvents enables the patterning of delicate organic electronic materials.

  4. Organ- and species-specific biological activity of rosmarinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iswandana, R; Pham, B T; van Haaften, W T; Luangmonkong, T; Oosterhuis, D; Mutsaers, H A M; Olinga, P

    2016-04-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA), a compound found in several plant species, has beneficial properties, including anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. We investigated the toxicity, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects of RA using precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) and precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) prepared from human, mouse, and rat tissue. PCLS and PCIS were cultured up to 48 h in the absence or presence of RA. Gene expression of the inflammatory markers: IL-6, IL-8/CXCL1/KC, and IL-1β, as well as the fibrosis markers: pro-collagen 1a1, heat shock protein 47, α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin (Fn2) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were evaluated by qPCR. RA was only toxic in murine PCIS. RA failed to mitigate the inflammatory response in most models, while it clearly reduced IL-6 and CXCL1/KC gene expression in murine PCIS at non-toxic concentrations. With regard to fibrosis, RA decreased the gene levels of Fn2 and PAI-1 in murine PCLS, and Fn2 in murine PCIS. Yet, no effect was observed on the gene expression of fibrosis markers in human and rat PCIS. In conclusion, we observed clear organ- and species-specific effects of RA. RA had little influence on inflammation. However, our study further establishes RA as a potential candidate for the treatment of liver fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Low-Vacuum Deposition of Glutamic Acid and Pyroglutamic Acid: A Facile Methodology for Depositing Organic Materials beyond Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Iwao; Maeda, Shunsaku; Suda, Yoriko; Makihara, Kenji; Takahashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Thin layers of pyroglutamic acid (Pygl) have been deposited by thermal evaporation of the molten L-glutamic acid (L-Glu) through intramolecular lactamization. This deposition was carried out with the versatile handmade low-vacuum coater, which was simply composed of a soldering iron placed in a vacuum degassing resin chamber evacuated by an oil-free diaphragm pump. Molecular structural analyses have revealed that thin solid film evaporated from the molten L-Glu is mainly composed of L-Pygl due to intramolecular lactamization. The major component of the L-Pygl was in β-phase and the minor component was in γ-phase, which would have been generated from partial racemization to DL-Pygl. Electron microscopy revealed that the L-Glu-evaporated film generally consisted of the 20 nm particulates of Pygl, which contained a periodic pattern spacing of 0.2 nm intervals indicating the formation of the single-molecular interval of the crystallized molecular networks. The DL-Pygl-evaporated film was composed of the original DL-Pygl preserving its crystal structures. This methodology is promising for depositing a wide range of the evaporable organic materials beyond amino acids. The quartz crystal resonator coated with the L-Glu-evaporated film exhibited the pressure-sensing capability based on the adsorption-desorption of the surrounding gas at the film surface.

  6. Organosulfates and organic acids in Arctic aerosols: Speciation, annual variation and concentration levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Maria Kaldal; Kristensen, Kasper; Nguyen, Quynh

    2014-01-01

    Sources, composition and occurrence of secondary organic aerosols in the Arctic were investigated at Zeppelin Mountain, Svalbard, and Station Nord, northeastern Greenland, during the full annual cycle of 2008 and 2010, respectively. Speciation of organic acids, organosulfates and nitrooxy organos...

  7. Organic mutagens and drinking water in The Netherlands : a study on mutagenicity of organic constituents in drinking water in The Netherlands and their possible carcinogenic effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Several mutagenic and carcinogenic organic compounds have been detected in Dutch surface waters and in drinking water prepared from these surface waters. Although the levels of these compounds in drinking- and surface water are relatively low, in general below μg per litre, it appeared that organic

  8. Impact of Fluorescent Lighting on Oxidation of Model Wine Solutions Containing Organic Acids and Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant-Preece, Paris; Barril, Celia; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Clark, Andrew C

    2017-03-22

    Previous studies have provided evidence that light exposure can increase oxygen consumption in wine and that the photodegradation of iron(III) tartrate could contribute to this process. In the present study, model wine solutions containing iron(III) and various organic acids, either alone or combined, were stored in sealed clear glass wine bottles and exposed to light from fluorescent lamps. Dissolved oxygen was monitored, and afterward the organic acid degradation products were determined and the capacity of the solutions to bind sulfur dioxide, the main wine preservative, was assessed. In the dark controls, little or no dissolved oxygen was consumed and the organic acids were stable. In the irradiated solutions, dissolved oxygen was consumed at a rate that was dependent on the specific organic acid present, and the latter were oxidized to various carbonyl compounds. For the solutions containing tartaric acid, malic acid, and/or citric acid, irradiation increased their sulfur dioxide-binding capacity.

  9. Sugars, Organic Acids and Phenolic Compunds in Shahani, Piarom and Deiry Date Palm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    somayeh rastegar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research different compounds such as moisture,protein,nutrition,fructose and glucose,cartenoid,organic acid,phenolic acid of piarom,shahani and deiry were studied.Suger was analyzed by (HPAEC-PAD. organic acids and phenoilc acids were studied by (HPLC. According to our result, shahani, piarom and deiry as soft, semi-dry and dry cultivars showed significant differences (p < 0.05 between most properties. Piarom has the highest organic acid compared other cultivar. Piarom has the highest organic acid, but in nutrition, total phenol and phenolic acids, deiry has first value. In three cultivars, among the minerals studied, potassium was most abundant with a concentration of 1170–2440 mg/100 g. Shahani has the highest reducing sugar (68.8% and showed significant differences in compared to piarom and deiry. Deiry has the highest proteins (7.3% as compared to other cultivars

  10. Concentration and determination of trace organic pollutants in water. [Phenols; organics; halomethanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, R.C.Y.

    1976-10-01

    A method was developed for determining phenols in natural water, treated drinking water, and wastewater. They are determined by selective sorption on a macroreticular anion-exchange resin, elution with acetone-water, concentration by evaporation after extraction with methylene chloride, and measurement by gas chromatography. Techniques are given for preventing phenol loss. Common inorganic ions and many organic substances cause no interference; neutral organics that are retained by the resin can be removed by a methanol wash. The method gives accurate results for phenol, alkyl- and chloro-substituted phenols in the ppB to ppM range. Volatile compounds, as well as less volatile gas chromatographable compounds can also be determined. Resin purification, sorption columns preparation, thermal desorptions, the mini-sampler, method for analysis of real water for organics and development of analytical method are presented. Finally, a rapid method was developed for concentrating and determining halomethanes in drinking water. The halomethanes are determined by sorption on mini-samplers of macroreticular resin. The halomethanes sorbed on resin are eluted with two milliliters of methanol. Halomethanes are separated on a Tenax-GC column and determined by electron capture gas chromatography. Storage of halomethanes on the mini-sampler was studied. Real water samples were analyzed. (DLC)

  11. Recent Developments for Remediating Acidic Mine Waters Using Sulfidogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitencourt, José A. P.; Sahoo, Prafulla K.; Alves, Joner Oliveira; Siqueira, José O.

    2017-01-01

    Acidic mine drainage (AMD) is regarded as a pollutant and considered as potential source of valuable metals. With diminishing metal resources and ever-increasing demand on industry, recovering AMD metals is a sustainable initiative, despite facing major challenges. AMD refers to effluents draining from abandoned mines and mine wastes usually highly acidic that contain a variety of dissolved metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni, and Zn) in much greater concentration than what is found in natural water bodies. There are numerous remediation treatments including chemical (lime treatment) or biological methods (aerobic wetlands and compost bioreactors) used for metal precipitation and removal from AMD. However, controlled biomineralization and selective recovering of metals using sulfidogenic bacteria are advantageous, reducing costs and environmental risks of sludge disposal. The increased understanding of the microbiology of acid-tolerant sulfidogenic bacteria will lead to the development of novel approaches to AMD treatment. We present and discuss several important recent approaches using low sulfidogenic bioreactors to both remediate and selectively recover metal sulfides from AMD. This work also highlights the efficiency and drawbacks of these types of treatments for metal recovery and points to future research for enhancing the use of novel acidophilic and acid-tolerant sulfidogenic microorganisms in AMD treatment. PMID:29119111

  12. Recent Developments for Remediating Acidic Mine Waters Using Sulfidogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Nancucheo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acidic mine drainage (AMD is regarded as a pollutant and considered as potential source of valuable metals. With diminishing metal resources and ever-increasing demand on industry, recovering AMD metals is a sustainable initiative, despite facing major challenges. AMD refers to effluents draining from abandoned mines and mine wastes usually highly acidic that contain a variety of dissolved metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni, and Zn in much greater concentration than what is found in natural water bodies. There are numerous remediation treatments including chemical (lime treatment or biological methods (aerobic wetlands and compost bioreactors used for metal precipitation and removal from AMD. However, controlled biomineralization and selective recovering of metals using sulfidogenic bacteria are advantageous, reducing costs and environmental risks of sludge disposal. The increased understanding of the microbiology of acid-tolerant sulfidogenic bacteria will lead to the development of novel approaches to AMD treatment. We present and discuss several important recent approaches using low sulfidogenic bioreactors to both remediate and selectively recover metal sulfides from AMD. This work also highlights the efficiency and drawbacks of these types of treatments for metal recovery and points to future research for enhancing the use of novel acidophilic and acid-tolerant sulfidogenic microorganisms in AMD treatment.

  13. Water Footprint in Nitrate Vulnerable Zones: Mineral vs. Organic Fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos Serrano, María Teresa; Requejo Mariscal, María Isabel; Villena Gordo, Raquel; Cartagena Causapé, María Carmen; Arce Martínez, Augusto; Ribas Elcorobarrutia, Francisco; María Tarquis Alfonso, Ana

    2017-04-01

    In intensive agriculture, it is necessary to apply irrigation and fertilizers to increase the crop yield. An optimization of water and N application is necessary. An excess of irrigation implies nitrates washing which would contribute to the contamination of the groundwater. An excess of N, besides affecting the yield and fruit quality, causes serious environmental problems. Nitrate vulnerable zones (NVZs) are areas designated as being at risk from agricultural nitrate pollution. They include around 16% of land in Spain and in Castilla-La Mancha, the area studied, represents 45% of the total land. In several zones, the N content of the groundwater could be approximately 140 mg L-1, or even higher [1]. The input of nitrogen fertilizers (mineral or organic), applied with a poor management, could be increased considerably the pollution risks. The water footprint (WF) is as indicator for the total volume of direct and indirect freshwater used, consumed and/or polluted [2]. The WF includes both consumptive water use: blue water (volume of surface and groundwater consumed) and green water (rainwater consumed)). A third element is the water required to assimilate pollution (grey water) [2]. Under semiarid conditions with low irrigation water quality, green WF is zero because the effective rainfall is negligible. Blue WF includes: i) extra consumption or irrigation water that the farmer has to apply to compensate the fail of uniformity on discharge of drips, ii) percolation out of control or salts leaching, which depends on the salt tolerance of the crop, soil and quality of irrigation water, to ensure the fruit yield. In the NVZs, the major concern is grey WF, because the irrigation and nitrogen dose have to be adjusted to the crop needs in order to minimize nitrate pollution. This study focus on the assessment of mineral and organic fertilization on WF in a fertirrigated melon crop under semiarid conditions with a low water quality. During successive years, a melon crop

  14. Organic and Inorganic Species in CBM Produced Water: Implications for Water Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaka, Y. K.; Rice, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    Coal-bed methane (CBM) wells currently produce close to one billion bbl of water annually and deliver about 8% of total natural gas in the USA. The salinity of this produced water generally is lower than that of water from conventional petroleum wells; salinity commonly is 1,000-20,000 mg/L, but ranges from 200 to 150,000 mg/L TDS. Most CBM wells produce Na-HCO3-Cl type water that is low in trace metals and has no reported NORMs. This water generally has no oil and grease and has relatively low (2-10 mg/L) dissolved organic carbon (DOC), but its organic composition has not been characterized in detail. The water is disposed of by injection into saline aquifers, through evaporation and/or percolation in disposal pits, road spreading, and surface discharge. Water that has low (USA. The feasibility and cost of reclaiming produced water to meet irrigation, industrial and drinking water standards was evaluated in a 10 gpm pilot field study. The estimated treatment cost was high at about 0.39/bbl (3,000/acre-ft) for potable water, but would be substantially lower and competitive for irrigation and industrial uses in some arid regions of the USA.

  15. Predicting soil water repellency by hydrophobic organic compounds and their vegetation origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J.; Nierop, K. G. J.; Rietkerk, M.; Dekker, S. C.

    2015-02-01

    It is widely accepted that soil water repellency (SWR) is mainly caused by plant-derived hydrophobic organic compounds in soils; such hydrophobic compounds are defined as SWR-markers. However, the detailed influence of SWR-markers on SWR is yet unclear and the knowledge of their original sources is still limited. The aims of this study are to select important SWR-markers to predict SWR based on their correlation with SWR and to determine their origin. In our study, sandy soils with different SWR were collected, along with their covering vegetation, i.e. plant leaves/needles and roots. A sequential extraction procedure was applied to the soils to obtain three organic fractions: DCM / MeOH soluble fraction (D), DCM / MeOH insoluble fraction of IPA / NH3 extract (AI) and DCM / MeOH soluble fraction of IPA / NH3 extract (AS), which were subdivided into ten dominant SWR-marker groups: (D) fatty acid, (D) alcohol, (D) alkane, (AI) fatty acid, (AI) alcohol, (AI) ω-hydroxy fatty acid, (AI) α, ω-dicarboxylic acid, (AS) fatty acid, (AS) alcohol and (AS) ω-hydroxy fatty acid. Waxes and biopolyesters of the vegetation were also sequentially extracted from plants. In short, the soils with higher SWR have significantly higher relative concentrations of (AS) alcohols. A number of indications suggest that (AS) alcohols are mainly derived from roots and most likely produced by microbial hydrolysis of biopolyesters/suberins. In addition, the strong correlation between the biomarkers of plant tissues and SWR-markers in soils suggests that it is more accurate to predict SWR of topsoils using ester-bound alcohols from roots, and to predict SWR of subsoils using root-derived ω-hydroxy fatty acids and α, ω-dicarboxylic acids. Our analysis indicates that plant roots have a primary role influencing SWR relative to plant leaves.

  16. Quality Characteristics of Tteokgalbi with Black Rice Bran and Organic Acid to Substitute Synthetic Caramel Colorant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Kyung; Hong, Seung-Hee; Ku, Su-Kyung; Kim, Young-Boong; Jeon, Ki-Hong; Choi, Hee-Don; Park, Jong-Dae; Park, Kwoan-Sik; Choi, Yun-Sang

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the quality characteristics of Tteokgalbi with 1% (w/w) black rice bran only (T1), or with black rice bran and one of the following four types of organic acid: ascorbic acid (T2), citric acid (T3), tartaric acid (T4), or maleic acid (T5) as a substitute for caramel colorant. Tteokgalbi with only black rice bran showed the highest (p0.05). All the treated samples with any one of the four organic acids showed lower pH than controls (p0.05). The results reported in this study show that Tteokgalbi with black rice bran and any one of the four organic acids listed above not only improved quality characteristics in cooking loss, WHC, lipid oxidation but also could successfully replace the synthetic caramel colorant. Overall, the most satisfactory results were obtained by adding black rice bran and ascorbic acid.

  17. Effect of organic acids on the growth and lipid accumulation of oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial lipids have drawn increasing attention in recent years as promising raw materials for biodiesel production, and the use of lignocellulosic hydrolysates as carbon sources seems to be a feasible strategy for cost-effective lipid fermentation with oleaginous microorganisms on a large scale. During the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials with dilute acid, however, various kinds of inhibitors, especially large amounts of organic acids, will be produced, which substantially decrease the fermentability of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. To overcome the inhibitory effects of organic acids, it is critical to understand their impact on the growth and lipid accumulation of oleaginous microorganisms. Results In our present work, we investigated for the first time the effect of ten representative organic acids in lignocellulosic hydrolysates on the growth and lipid accumulation of oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans cells. In contrast to previous reports, we found that the toxicity of the organic acids to the cells was not directly related to their hydrophobicity. It is worth noting that most organic acids tested were less toxic than aldehydes to the cells, and some could even stimulate the growth and lipid accumulation at a low concentration. Unlike aldehydes, most binary combinations of organic acids exerted no synergistic inhibitory effects on lipid production. The presence of organic acids decelerated the consumption of glucose, whereas it influenced the utilization of xylose in a different and complicated way. In addition, all the organic acids tested, except furoic acid, inhibited the malic activity of T. fermentans. Furthermore, the inhibition of organic acids on cell growth was dependent more on inoculum size, temperature and initial pH than on lipid content. Conclusions This work provides some meaningful information about the effect of organic acid in lignocellulosic hydrolysates on the lipid production of

  18. Interactions Between Prokaryotes and Dissolved Organic Matter in Marine Waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traving, Sachia Jo

    organic bound carbon equal in size to atmospheric carbon dioxide. Prokaryotes mediate the fate of a large part of marine DOM, which is their principal source of energy and substrate. However, a large fraction is also left behind in the water column persisting for millennia, and prokaryotes may hold...... the key to understanding the mechanisms controlling the cycling of DOM within marine waters. In the thesis presented here, the aim was to investigate the activity and composition of prokaryotes to determine their functional role in DOM utilization. The thesis incorporates a range of study systems...

  19. Ice nucleation in sulfuric acid/organic aerosols: implications for cirrus cloud formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Beaver

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Using an aerosol flow tube apparatus, we have studied the effects of aliphatic aldehydes (C3 to C10 and ketones (C3 and C9 on ice nucleation in sulfuric acid aerosols. Mixed aerosols were prepared by combining an organic vapor flow with a flow of sulfuric acid aerosols over a small mixing time (~60 s at room temperature. No acid-catalyzed reactions were observed under these conditions, and physical uptake was responsible for the organic content of the sulfuric acid aerosols. In these experiments, aerosol organic content, determined by a Mie scattering analysis, was found to vary with the partial pressure of organic, the flow tube temperature, and the identity of the organic compound. The physical properties of the organic compounds (primarily the solubility and melting point were found to play a dominant role in determining the inferred mode of nucleation (homogenous or heterogeneous and the specific freezing temperatures observed. Overall, very soluble, low-melting organics, such as acetone and propanal, caused a decrease in aerosol ice nucleation temperatures when compared with aqueous sulfuric acid aerosol. In contrast, sulfuric acid particles exposed to organic compounds of eight carbons and greater, of much lower solubility and higher melting temperatures, nucleate ice at temperatures above aqueous sulfuric acid aerosols. Organic compounds of intermediate carbon chain length, C4-C7, (of intermediate solubility and melting temperatures nucleated ice at the same temperature as aqueous sulfuric acid aerosols. Interpretations and implications of these results for cirrus cloud formation are discussed.

  20. Organic acid excretion in Penicillium ochrochloron increases with ambient pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eVrabl

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite being of high biotechnological relevance, many aspects of organic acid excretion in filamentous fungi like the influence of ambient pH are still insufficiently understood. While the excretion of an individual organic acid may peak at a certain pH value, the few available studies investigating a broader range of organic acids indicate that total organic acid excretion rises with increasing external pH.We hypothesized that this phenomenon might be a general response of filamentous fungi to increased ambient pH. If this is the case, the observation should be widely independent of the organism, growth conditions or experimental design and might therefore be a crucial key point in understanding the function and mechanisms of organic acid excretion in filamentous fungi.In this study we explored this hypothesis using ammonium limited chemostat cultivations (pH 2-7, and ammonium or phosphate limited bioreactor batch cultivations (pH 5 and 7. Two strains of Penicillium ochrochloron were investigated differing in the spectrum of excreted organic acids.Confirming our hypothesis, the main result demonstrated that organic acid excretion in P. ochrochloron was enhanced at high external pH levels compared to low pH levels independent of the tested strain, nutrient limitation and cultivation method. We discuss these findings against the background of three hypotheses explaining organic acid excretion in filamentous fungi, i.e. overflow metabolism, charge balance and aggressive acidification hypothesis.

  1. New insight into photo-bromination processes in saline surface waters: The case of salicylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamtam, Fatima; Chiron, Serge, E-mail: serge.chiron@msem.univ-montp2.fr

    2012-10-01

    It was shown, through a combination of field and laboratory observations, that salicylic acid can undergo photo-bromination reactions in sunlit saline surface waters. Laboratory-scale experiments revealed that the photochemical yields of 5-bromosalicylic acid and 3,5-dibromosalicylic acid from salicylic acid were always low (in the 4% range at most). However, this might be of concern since these compounds are potential inhibitors of the 20{alpha}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme, with potential implications in endocrine disruption processes. At least two mechanisms were involved simultaneously to account for the photo-generation of brominated substances. The first one might involve the formation of reactive brominated radical species (Br{center_dot}, Br{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup -}) through hydroxyl radical mediated oxidation of bromide ions. These ions reacted more selectively than hydroxyl radicals with electron-rich organic pollutants such as salicylic acid. The second one might involve the formation of hypobromous acid, through a two electron oxidation of bromine ions by peroxynitrite. This reaction was catalyzed by nitrite, since these ions play a crucial role in the formation of nitric oxide upon photolysis. This nitric oxide further reacts with superoxide radical anions to yield peroxynitrite and by ammonium through the formation of N-bromoamines, probably due to the ability of N-bromoamines to promote the aromatic bromination of phenolic compounds. Field measurements revealed the presence of salicylic acid together with 5-bromosalicylic and 3,5-dibromosalicylic acid in a brackish coastal lagoon, thus confirming the environmental significance of the proposed photochemically induced bromination pathways. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brominated derivatives of salicylic acid were detected in a brackish lagoon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A photochemical pathway was hypothesized to account for bromination of salicylic acid. Black

  2. Vertical profiles of low molecular weight organic acids in sediment porewaters of six Chinese lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, M.; Wu, F. C.; Liao, H. Q.; Li, W.; Lee, X. Q.; Huang, R. S.

    2009-02-01

    SummaryThe composition and contents of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) were determined, their contributions to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and vertical profiles were investigated in sediment porewaters of six lakes, China: Lake Sihai-Longwan (SHLW), Lake Bosten (BST), Lake Qinghai (QH), Lake Chenghai (CH), Lake Erhai (EH) and Lake Dianchi (DC). The sources and behaviors of LMWOAs during early diagenesis were also discussed. The results show that up to eight species of LMWOAs were detected in those sediment porewaters: lactic acid, acetic acid, formic acid, methanesulfonic acid (MSA), pyruvic acid, trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), sorbic acid and oxalic acid; acetic acid was the predominant species. The contents of organic acids in six lakes decrease in the rank order of QH > SHLW > BST > EH > DC > CH, with the total amount of organic acids in the northern lakes being about 27 times higher than those in the southern lakes. In total amounts of various organic acids, acetic acid were the highest and MSA was the lowest, they were 62.7 and 0.3 μM, respectively. The highest total amount of organic acids was in QH, with the average value of 92.0 μM and the contribution to DOC was 10.9% followed by SHLW, BST, EH and DC, which were 43.7 μM, 2.7%; 42.3 μM, 5.6%; 5.6 μM, 1.1%; 4.4 μM, 0.7%, respectively. Organic acid was the lowest in CH, with the average value of 0.5 μM and the contribution to DOC was just 0.04%. The main organic acids were acetic acid, pyruvic acid, sorbic acid and formic acid in SHLW, BST, DC and CH, lactic acid in both EH and QH. Vertical profiles of LMWOAs varied among different species and lakes due to the sources and complex microbial processes in early diagenesis. This study suggests LMWOAs played a significant role in the sources and transformation of DOM in the sediments in lakes.

  3. Organic and inorganic species in produced water: Implications for water reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaka, Yousif K.; Rice, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    Currently 20-30 billion barrels of formation water are co-produced annually in the USA with conventional oil and natural gas. The large database on the geochemistry of this produced water shows salinities that vary widely from ~5,000 to >350,000 mg/L TDS. Chloride, Na and Ca are generally the dominant ions, and concentrations of Fe, Mn, B, NH3 and dissolved organics, including, BTEX, phenols and poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may be relatively high. Hazardous concentrations of NORMs, including Ra-226 and Rn-222 have been reported in produced water from several states.Coal-bed methane (CBM) wells currently produce close to a billion barrels of water and deliver ~8% of total natural gas. The salinity of this produced water generally is lower than that of water from petroleum wells; salinity commonly is 1,000-20,000 mg/L, but ranges to150,000 mg/L TDS. Most CBM wells produce Na-HCO3-Cl type water that is low in trace metals and has no reported NORMs. This water commonly has no oil and grease and has relatively low DOC, but its organic composition has not been characterized in detail. The water is disposed of by injection into saline aquifers, through evaporation and/or percolation in disposal pits, road spreading, and surface discharge. Water that has an acceptable salinity and sodium absorption ratio (SAR) is considered acceptable for surface discharge and for injection into freshwater aquifers.As an alternative to costly disposal, low salinity produced water is being considered for reclamation, especially in the arid western USA. The cost of reclaiming this water to meet irrigation, industrial and drinking water standards was evaluated in a 10 gpm pilot field study at Placerita oil field, California. This produced water had a low salinity of ~8,000 mg/L, but high concentration of Si and organics. Removal of B, Si, NH3 and especially organics from this water proved difficult, and the estimated treatment cost was high at $0.08-$0.39/bbl for water treated for

  4. Organic coal-water fuel: Problems and advances (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, D. O.; Strizhak, P. A.; Chernetskii, M. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    The study results of ignition of organic coal-water fuel (OCWF) compositions were considered. The main problems associated with investigation of these processes were identified. Historical perspectives of the development of coal-water composite fuel technologies in Russia and worldwide are presented. The advantages of the OCWF use as a power-plant fuel in comparison with the common coal-water fuels (CWF) were emphasized. The factors (component ratio, grinding degree of solid (coal) component, limiting temperature of oxidizer, properties of liquid and solid components, procedure and time of suspension preparation, etc.) affecting inertia and stability of the ignition processes of suspensions based on the products of coaland oil processing (coals of various types and metamorphism degree, filter cakes, waste motor, transformer, and turbine oils, water-oil emulsions, fuel-oil, etc.) were analyzed. The promising directions for the development of modern notions on the OCWF ignition processes were determined. The main reasons limiting active application of the OCWF in power generation were identified. Characteristics of ignition and combustion of coal-water and organic coal-water slurry fuels were compared. The effect of water in the composite coal fuels on the energy characteristics of their ignition and combustion, as well as ecological features of these processes, were elucidated. The current problems associated with pulverization of composite coal fuels in power plants, as well as the effect of characteristics of the pulverization process on the combustion parameters of fuel, were considered. The problems hindering the development of models of ignition and combustion of OCWF were analyzed. It was established that the main one was the lack of reliable experimental data on the processes of heating, evaporation, ignition, and combustion of OCWF droplets. It was concluded that the use of high-speed video recording systems and low-inertia sensors of temperature and gas

  5. Analysis of organic acids in electron beam irradiated chestnuts (Castanea sativa Mill.): Effects of radiation dose and storage time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carocho, Márcio; Barros, Lillian; Antonio, Amilcar L; Barreira, João C M; Bento, Albino; Kaluska, Iwona; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2013-05-01

    Since 2010, methyl bromide, a widely used fumigant was banned from the European Union under the Montreal Protocol guidelines, due to its deleterious effects on health and risk to the environment. Since then, many alternatives for chestnut conservation have been studied (hot water dip treatment being the most common), among them, electron beam irradiation has been proposed as being a safe, clean and cheap alternative. Herein, the effects of this radiation at different doses up to 6kGy and over storage up to 60days in the amounts and profile of nutritionally important organic acids were evaluated. Chestnuts contained important organic acids with quinic and citric acids as main compounds. Storage time, which is traditionally well accepted by consumers, caused a slight decrease on quinic (13-9mg/g), ascorbic (1.2-0.8mg/g), malic (5-4mg/g), fumaric (0.4-0.3mg/g) and total organic (33-26mg/g) acids content. Otherwise, irradiation dose did not cause appreciable changes, either individually or in total (28-27mg/g) organic acid contents. Electron beam irradiation might constitute a valuable alternative for chestnut conservation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. EU-wide survey of polar organic persistent pollutants in European river waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, Robert [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Via Enrico Fermi, 21020 Ispra (Italy)], E-mail: robert.loos@jrc.it; Gawlik, Bernd Manfred; Locoro, Giovanni; Rimaviciute, Erika; Contini, Serafino; Bidoglio, Giovanni [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Via Enrico Fermi, 21020 Ispra (Italy)

    2009-02-15

    This study provides the first EU-wide reconnaissance of the occurrence of polar organic persistent pollutants in European river waters. More than 100 individual water samples from over 100 European rivers from 27 European Countries were analysed for 35 selected compounds, comprising pharmaceuticals, pesticides, PFOS, PFOA, benzotriazoles, hormones, and endocrine disrupters. Around 40 laboratories participated in this sampling exercise. The most frequently and at the highest concentration levels detected compounds were benzotriazole, caffeine, carbamazepine, tolyltriazole, and nonylphenoxy acetic acid (NPE{sub 1}C). Only about 10% of the river water samples analysed could be classified as 'very clean' in terms of chemical pollution. The rivers responsible for the major aqueous emissions of PFOS and PFOA from the European Continent could be identified. For the target compounds chosen, we are proposing 'indicative warning levels' in surface waters, which are (for most compounds) close to the 90th percentile of all water samples analysed. - More than 100 river water samples from 27 European Countries were analysed for 35 selected polar organic contaminants.

  7. Water absorbency of chitosan grafted acrylic acid hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrini, N.; Anah, L.; Haryono, A.

    2017-07-01

    Acrylic acid (AA) monomer was directly grafted onto chitosan (CTS) using potassium persulfate (KPS) as an initiator and methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as a crosslinking agent under an inert atmosphere. One factor affecting the swelling capacity of the obtained hydrogel, KPS concentration, were studied. The hydrogel products were characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for chemical structure and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology. Swelling of the hydrogel samples in distilled water and saline solution ( 9% NaCl ) was examined. Swelling capacity of the CTS-g-PAA hydrogels in distilled water (88.53 g/g) was higher than in NaCl solution (29.94 g/g) The highest swelling capacity value was obtained when the grafted reaction was carried out using 2.5wt% initiator

  8. Characterization and disinfection by-product formation potential of natural organic matter in surface and ground waters from Northern Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, C.E.; Leenheer, J.A.; Katz, B.; Martin, B.S.; Noyes, T.I.

    2000-01-01

    Streamwaters in northern Florida have large concentrations of natural organic matter (NOM), and commonly flow directly into the ground water system through karst features, such as sinkholes. In this study NOM from northern Florida stream and ground waters was fractionated, the fractions characterized by infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and then chlorinated to investigate their disinfection by-product (DBP) formation potential (FP). As the NOM character changed (as quantified by changes in NOM distribution in various fractions, such as hydrophilic acids or hydrophobic neutrals) due to migration through the aquifer, the total organic halide (TOX)-FP and trihalomethane (THM)-FP yield of each of these fractions varied also. In surface waters, the greatest DBP yields were produced by the colloid fraction. In ground waters, DBP yield of the hydrophobic acid fraction (the greatest in terms of mass) decreased during infiltration.

  9. Water uptake by fresh Indonesian peat burning particles is limited by water-soluble organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Hapsari Budisulistiorini, Sri; Itoh, Masayuki; Lee, Wen-Chien; Miyakawa, Takuma; Komazaki, Yuichi; Qing Yang, Liu Dong; Kuwata, Mikinori

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between hygroscopic properties and chemical characteristics of Indonesian biomass burning (BB) particles, which are dominantly generated from peatland fires, was investigated using a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer. In addition to peat, acacia (a popular species at plantation) and fern (a pioneering species after disturbance by fire) were used for experiments. Fresh Indonesian peat burning particles are almost non-hygroscopic (mean hygroscopicity parameter, κ dry diameter = 100 nm, hereinafter) for Riau peat burning particles, while that for Central Kalimantan ranges from 0.05 to 0.06. Fern combustion particles are more hygroscopic (κ = 0. 08), whereas the acacia burning particles have a mediate κ value (0.04). These results suggest that κ is significantly dependent on biomass types. This variance in κ is partially determined by fractions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), as demonstrated by a correlation analysis (R = 0.65). κ of water-soluble organic matter is also quantified, incorporating the 1-octanol-water partitioning method. κ values for the water extracts are high, especially for peat burning particles (A0 (a whole part of the water-soluble fraction): κ = 0.18, A1 (highly water-soluble fraction): κ = 0.30). This result stresses the importance of both the WSOC fraction and κ of the water-soluble fraction in determining the hygroscopicity of organic aerosol particles. Values of κ correlate positively (R = 0.89) with the fraction of m/z 44 ion signal quantified using a mass spectrometric technique, demonstrating the importance of highly oxygenated organic compounds to the water uptake by Indonesian BB particles. These results provide an experimentally validated reference for hygroscopicity of organics-dominated particles, thus contributing to more accurate estimation of environmental and climatic impacts driven by Indonesian BB particles on both regional and global scales.

  10. The effect of cocoa fermentation and weak organic acids on growth and ochratoxin A production by Aspergillus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Copetti, Marina V.; Iamanaka, Beatriz T.; Mororó, Raimundo C.

    2012-01-01

    The acidic characteristics of cocoa beans have influence on flavor development in chocolate. Cocoa cotyledons are not naturally acidic, the acidity comes from organic acids produced by the fermentative microorganisms which grow during the processing of cocoa. Different concentrations of these met......The acidic characteristics of cocoa beans have influence on flavor development in chocolate. Cocoa cotyledons are not naturally acidic, the acidity comes from organic acids produced by the fermentative microorganisms which grow during the processing of cocoa. Different concentrations...

  11. Engineering and Design: Trace Organic Compounds in Potable Water Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-20

    suspected carcinogens , even in minutu concentrations. These compounds may be present in finished water as a result of chlorine reacting with naturally...Table 3. Organic compounds being considered for regulation* — Aldicarb Chlordane Dalapon Diquat Endothall Glyphosate Carbofuran 1,1,2-Trichloroethane...compounds known or suspected to be carcinogenic ? Are there several more than one nants. Other types--for example, some volatile and some nonvolatile

  12. Secretion of Organic Acids by Phosphate Solubilizing Bacteria Isolated from Oxisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Dwidya Prijambada

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus availability is a major limiting for crop production. Bacterial solubilization of insoluble inorganic phosphate has been studied as a means of providing available phosphorus for crop production. Bacterial abilities to solubilize calcium phosphate and rock phosphate have been identified to be related with their abilities to produce gluconic acid and ketogluconic acid. However, there is no information regarding the relationship between bacterial ability to solubilize aluminum phosphate and their ability to produce organic acids. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between bacterial ability to solubilize calcium and aluminum phosphates with their ability to produce organic acids. Bacterial ability to solubilize calcium and aluminum phosphates were determined as the concentration of soluble phosphate in the filtrate of bacterial cultivation media, while bacterial ability to produce organic acids were assessed from the accumulated organic acids in its. The results showed that bacterial abilities to solubilize calcium and aluminum phosphates well related to their abilities to produce organic acids. Organic acids related with the solubilization of calcium phosphate differ from the ones related with the solubilization of aluminum phosphate. Moreover, there is similarity in the production of organic acids related to the solubilization of aluminum phosphates and iron phosphate.

  13. (Liquid + liquid) equilibria in ternary aqueous mixtures of phosphoric acid with organic solvents at T = 298.2 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanadzadeh, H., E-mail: hggilani@guilan.ac.i [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanadzadeh, A., E-mail: aggilani@guilan.ac.i [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghajani, Z.; Abbasnejad, S.; Shekarsaraee, S. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data for the ternary mixtures of left bracewater (1) + phosphoric acid (2) + organic solvents (3)right brace were determined at T = 298.2 K and atmospheric pressure. The organic solvents were cyclohexane, 2-methyl-2-butanol (tert-amyl alcohol), and isobutyl acetate. All the investigated systems exhibit Type-1 behaviour of LLE. The immiscibility region was found to be larger for the (water + phosphoric acid + cyclohexane) ternary system. The experimental LLE results were correlated with the NRTL model, and the binary interaction parameters were obtained. The reliability of the experimental tie-line results was tested through the Othmer-Tobias and Bachman correlation equations. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated over the immiscibility regions and a comparison of the extracting capabilities of the solvents was made with respect to these factors. The experimental results indicate the superiority of cyclohexane as the preferred solvent for the extraction of phosphoric acid from its aqueous solutions.

  14. Opportunistic feeding on various organic food sources by the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, C. E.; Larsson, A. I.; Veuger, B.; Middelburg, J. J.; van Oevelen, D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa to exploit different food sources was investigated under standardized conditions in a flume. The tested food sources, dissolved organic matter (DOM, added as dissolved free amino acids), bacteria, algae, and zooplankton (Artemia) were deliberately enriched in 13C and 15N. The incorporation of 13C and 15N was traced into bulk tissue, fatty acids, hydrolysable amino acids, and the skeleton (13C only) of L. pertusa. Incorporation rates of carbon (ranging from 0.8-2.4 μg C g-1 DW d-1) and nitrogen (0.2-0.8 μg N g-1 DW d-1) into coral tissue did not differ significantly among food sources indicating an opportunistic feeding strategy. Although total food assimilation was comparable among sources, subsequent food processing was dependent on the type of food source ingested and recovery of assimilated C in tissue compounds ranged from 17% (algae) to 35% (Artemia). De novo synthesis of individual fatty acids by L. pertusa occurred in all treatments as indicated by the 13C enrichment of individual phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFAs) in the coral that were absent in the added food sources. This indicates that the coral might be less dependent on its diet as a source of specific fatty acids than expected, with direct consequences for the interpretation of in situ observations on coral nutrition based on lipid profiles.

  15. Effects of organic acid pickling on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Blawert, C.; Scharnagl, N.

    2010-01-01

    Organic acids were used to clean AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet and the effect of the cleaning processes on the surface condition and corrosion performance of the alloy was investigated. Organic acid cleanings reduced the surface impurities and enhanced the corrosion resistance. Removal of at least 4...

  16. Effect of fermentation period on the organic acid and amino acid contents of Ogiri from castor oil bean seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojinnaka, M-T. C.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To monitor the changes in the concentration of organic acid and amino acid contents during the fermentation of castor oil bean seed into ogiri.Methodology and results: In this study, ogiri, a Nigerian fermented food condiment was prepared from castor oil bean using Bacillus subtilis as a monoculture starter for the production of three different fermented castor oil bean condiment samples: B1 (0% NaCl/lime, B2 (2% NaCl, B3 (3% lime. Variations in the composition of the castor oil bean with fermentation over 96 h periods were evaluated for organic acid and amino acid contents using High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Organic acids were detected in the fermented castor oil bean samples as fermentation period increased to 96 h. Organic acids identified were oxalic, citric, tartaric, malic, succinic, lactic, formic, acetic, propionic and butyric acids. The lactic acid contents in sample B1 (0% NaCl/lime decreased initially and then increased as the fermentation period progressed. The value at 96 h fermentation was 1.336 µg/mL as against 0.775 µg/mL at 0 h fermentation. Sample B3 (3% lime had lactic acid content that increased as fermentation period increased with lactic acid content of 1.298 µg/mL at 96 h fermentation. The acetic acid content of sample B1 increased as fermentation progressed and at 96 h fermentation, its value was 1.204 µg/mL while those of B2 and B3 were 0.677 µg/mL and 1.401 µg/mL respectively. The three fermented castor oil bean samples also contained sufficient amount of amino acids. Sample B1 had the highest values in isoleucine glycine and histidine with values 1.382 µg/mL, 0.814 µg/mL and 1.022 µg/mL respectively while sample B2 had the highest value in leucine content with 0.915 µg/mL at 96 h fermentation, closely followed by sample B3 and B1 with 0.798 µg/mL and 0.205 µg/mL respectively. The results of amino acid analysis indicated a high concentration of all amino acids at 96 h of fermentation

  17. Surfactant-enhanced disinfection of the human norovirus surrogate, Tulane virus, with organic acids and surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combination treatments of surfactants and phenolic or short-chained organic acids (SCOA) may act synergistically or additively as sanitizers to inactive foodborne viruses and prevent outbreaks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of gallic acid (GA), tannic acid (TA), p-coumaric ...

  18. Volatile fatty acids production from anaerobic treatment of cassava waste water: effect of temperature and alkalinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Salah Din Mahmud; Giongo, Citieli; Fiorese, Mônica Lady; Gomes, Simone Damasceno; Ferrari, Tatiane Caroline; Savoldi, Tarcio Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs), intermediates in the anaerobic degradation process of organic matter from waste water, was evaluated in this work. A batch reactor was used to investigate the effect of temperature, and alkalinity in the production of VFAs, from the fermentation of industrial cassava waste water. Peak production of total volatile fatty acids (TVFAs) was observed in the first two days of acidogenesis. A central composite design was performed, and the highest yield (3400 mg L(-1) of TVFA) was obtained with 30°C and 3 g L(-1) of sodium bicarbonate. The peak of VFA was in 45 h (pH 5.9) with a predominance of acetic (63%) and butyric acid (22%), followed by propionic acid (12%). Decreases in amounts of cyanide (12.9%) and chemical oxygen demand (21.6%) were observed, in addition to the production of biogas (0.53 cm(3) h(-1)). The process was validated experimentally and 3400 g L(-1) of TVFA were obtained with a low relative standard deviation.

  19. Evaluation of the potentials of humic acid removal in water by gas phase surface discharge plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Yan, Qiuhe; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-02-01

    Degradation of humic acid (HA), a predominant type of natural organic matter in ground water and surface waters, was conducted using a gas phase surface discharge plasma system. HA standard and two surface waters (Wetland, and Weihe River) were selected as the targets. The experimental results showed that about 90.9% of standard HA was smoothly removed within 40 min's discharge plasma treatment at discharge voltage 23.0 kV, and the removal process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in HA removal were studied by evaluating the effects of solution pH and OH radical scavenger; and the results presented that O3 and OH radical played significant roles in HA removal. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and FTIR analysis showed that HA surface topography and molecular structure were changed during discharge plasma process. The mineralization of HA was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrum, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA), UV absorption ratios, and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. The formation of disinfection by-products during HA sample chlorination was also identified, and CHCl3 was detected as the main disinfection by-product, but discharge plasma treatment could suppress its formation to a certain extent. In addition, approximately 82.3% and 67.9% of UV254 were removed for the Weihe River water and the Wetland water after 40 min of discharge plasma treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Removal of dissolved humic acid from water by photocatalytic oxidation using a silver orthophosphate semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatakeyama, Keisuke, E-mail: hatakeyamak@pref.tottori.jp [Tottori Prefectural Institute of Public Health and Environmental Science, 526-1, Minamidani, Yurihama-cho, Tottori 682-0704 (Japan); Okuda, Masukazu; Kuki, Takahiro [Tottori Prefectural Institute of Public Health and Environmental Science, 526-1, Minamidani, Yurihama-cho, Tottori 682-0704 (Japan); Esaka, Takao [Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Tottori University, Minami 4-101, Koyama-cho, Tottori 680-8552 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► The photocatalytic property of a silver orthophosphate (Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) was investigated for humic acid degradation. ► The Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} shows high photocatalytic activity under visible light. ► The photocatalytic activity was greatly improved by employing the precipitation method. -- Abstract: In order to remove dissolved organic matter such as humic acid from water, a silver orthophosphate (Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) was newly employed as a heterogeneous photocatalyst. Here, Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} was prepared by simple ion-exchange and precipitation methods, and the physico-chemical properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet–visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, particle distribution measurements and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analysis. The degradation of humic acid was faster over Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} catalyst than over conventional TiO{sub 2} (P-25). The total photocatalytic properties were improved by employing not an ion-exchange method but a precipitation method; humic acid degradation was performed with a removal ratio of dissolved organic carbon of 75% under visible light (λ = 451 nm) for 2-h irradiation.

  1. Potential Impacts of Organic Wastes on Small Stream Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, S. S.; Groffman, P. M.; Findlay, S. E.; Fischer, D. T.; Burke, R. A.; Molinero, J.

    2005-05-01

    We monitored concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved oxygen (DO) and other parameters in 17 small streams of the South Fork Broad River (SFBR) watershed on a monthly basis for 15 months. The subwatersheds were chosen to reflect a range of land uses including forested, pasture, mixed, and developed. The SFBR watershed is heavily impacted by organic wastes, primarily from its large poultry industry, but also from its rapidly growing human population. The poultry litter is primarily disposed of by application to pastures. Our monthly monitoring results showed a strong inverse relationship between mean DOC and mean DO and suggested that concentrations of total nitrogen (TN), DOC, and the trace gases nitrous oxide, methane and carbon dioxide are impacted by organic wastes and/or nutrients from animal manure applied to the land and/or human wastes from wastewater treatment plants or septic tanks in these watersheds. Here we estimate the organic waste loads of these watersheds and evaluate the impact of organic wastes on stream DOC and alkalinity concentrations, electrical conductivity, sediment potential denitrification rate and plant stable nitrogen isotope ratios. All of these water quality parameters are significantly correlated with watershed waste loading. DOC is most strongly correlated with total watershed waste loading whereas conductivity, alkalinity, potential denitrification rate and plant stable nitrogen isotope ratio are most strongly correlated with watershed human waste loading. These results suggest that more direct inputs (e.g., wastewater treatment plant effluents, near-stream septic tanks) have a greater relative impact on stream water quality than more dispersed inputs (land applied poultry litter, septic tanks far from streams) in the SFBR watershed. Conductivity, which is generally elevated in organic wastes, is also significantly correlated with total watershed waste loading suggesting it may be a useful indicator of overall

  2. Structure of six organic acid-base adducts from 6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine and acidic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Daqi; Tao, Lin; Zhou, Mengjian; Shen, Yinyan; Chen, Quan; Lin, Zhanghui; Gao, Xingjun

    2014-05-01

    Six anhydrous organic acid-base adducts of 6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine were prepared with organic acids as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, salicylic acid, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, malonic acid and sebacic acid. The compounds 1-6 were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, and elemental analysis. The melting points of all the adducts were given. Of the six adducts, 1, 3, 4, and 5 are organic salts, while 2, and 6 are cocrystals. The supramolecular arrangement in the crystals 2-6 is based on the R22(8) synthon. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-6 suggests that there are strong NH⋯O, OH⋯N, and OH⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between acid and base components in the supramolecular assemblies. When the hydroxyl group is present in the ortho position of the carboxy, the intramolecular S6 synthon is present, as expected. Besides the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, other noncovalent interactions also play important roles in structure extension. Due to the synergetic effect of these weak interactions, compounds 1-6 display 1D-3D framework structure.

  3. Structural insights into two inorganic-organic hybrids based on chiral amino acids and polyoxomolybdates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefian, Mina; Mirzaei, Masoud; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein

    2018-03-01

    A new chiral inorganic-organic hybrid with the formula (L-His)2(H7CoMo6O24)·6H2O (1), based on natural amino acid and Anderson type polyoxomolybdate was synthesized through mild condition. The chiral L-histidine molecules induced chirality to the whole structure through various types of strong and unconventional hydrogen bond (HB) interactions (CH⋯O, NH⋯O and CH···π interactions), as well as bifurcated hydrogen bonds (BHBs) between L-histidine amino acid, hexamer water cluster molecules, and H7CoMo6O24·xH2O. Following, important non-covalent CH⋯O interactions is investigated in another chiral inorganic-organic hybrid structure, (L-Pro)3(PMo12O40).4.5H2O (2), in detail. The CH⋯O hydrogen bonds lead to a chiral network similar to the DNA strands affording a promising candidate to bio-inorganic studies.

  4. Implications of organic carbon in the deterioration of water quality in reclaimed water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, Lauren A; Jjemba, Patrick K; Giraldo, Eugenio; LeChevallier, Mark W

    2010-10-01

    Changes in water quality in reclaimed water distribution systems are a major concern especially when considering the potential for growth of pathogenic microbes. A survey of 21 wastewater process configurations confirmed the high quality effluent produced using membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology, but suggests that other technologies can be operated to produce similar quality. Data from an intensive twelve-month sampling campaign in four reclaimed water utilities revealed the important trends for various organic carbon parameters including total organic carbon (TOC), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC), and assimilable organic carbon (AOC). Of the four utilities, two were conventional wastewater treatment with open reservoir storage and two employed MBR technology with additional treatment including UV, ozone, and/or chlorine disinfection. Very high BDOC concentrations occurred in conventional systems, accounting for up to 50% of the TOC loading into the system. BDOC concentrations in two conventional plants averaged 1.4 and 6.3 mg/L and MBR plants averaged less than 0.6 mg/L BDOC. Although AOC showed wide variations, ranging from 100 to 2000 μg/L, the AOC concentrations in the conventional plants were typically 3-10 times higher than in the MBR systems. Pipe-loop studies designed to understand the impact of disinfection on the microbiology of reclaimed water in the distribution system revealed that chlorination will increase the level of biodegradable organic matter, thereby increasing the potential for microbial growth in the pipe network. This study concludes that biodegradable organic carbon is an important factor in the microbial quality and stability of reclaimed water and could impact the public health risk of reclaimed water at the point of use. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hammerhead ribozyme activity and oligonucleotide duplex stability in mixed solutions of water and organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Nakano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids are useful for biomedical targeting and sensing applications in which the molecular environment is different from that of a dilute aqueous solution. In this study, the influence of various types of mixed solutions of water and water-soluble organic compounds on RNA was investigated by measuring the catalytic activity of the hammerhead ribozyme and the thermodynamic stability of an oligonucleotide duplex. The compounds with a net neutral charge, such as poly(ethylene glycol, small primary alcohols, amide compounds, and aprotic solvent molecules, added at high concentrations changed the ribozyme-catalyzed RNA cleavage rate, with the magnitude of the effect dependent on the NaCl concentration. These compounds also changed the thermodynamic stability of RNA base pairs of an oligonucleotide duplex and its dependence on the NaCl concentration. Specific interactions with RNA molecules and reduced water activity could account for the inhibiting effects on the ribozyme catalysis and destabilizing effects on the duplex stability. The salt concentration dependence data correlated with the dielectric constant, but not with water activity, viscosity, and the size of organic compounds. This observation suggests the significance of the dielectric constant effects on the RNA reactions under molecular crowding conditions created by organic compounds.

  6. CCQM-K126: low polarity organic in water: carbamazepine in surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai-mei Sin, Della; Wong, Yiu-chung; Lehmann, Andreas; Schneider, Rudolf J.; Kakoulides, Elias; Tang Lin, Teo; Qinde, Liu; Cabillic, Julie; Lardy-fontan, Sophie; Nammoonnoy, Jintana; Prevoo-Franzsen, Désirée; López, Eduardo Emilio; Alberti, Cecilia; Su, Fuhai

    2017-01-01

    The key comparison CCQM-K126 low polarity organic in water: carbamazepine in surface water was coordinated by Government Laboratory Hong Kong under the auspices of the Organic Analysis Working Group (OAWG) of the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière (CCQM). Eight National Metrology institutes or Designated Institutes participated and participants were requested to report the mass fraction of carbamazepine in surface water study material. The surface water sample was collected in Hong Kong and was gravimetrically spiked with standard solution. This study provided the means for assessing measurement capabilities for determination of low molecular weight analytes (mass range 100-500) and low polarity (pKOWpeer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. Trihalomethanes and haloacetic acid species from the chlorination of algal organic matter and bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y Y; Liu, Y; Dai, R H; Liu, X; Wu, J J; Shi, Z; Ren, J; Zhang, Y

    2011-01-01

    Bromide and algal pollution are important factors influencing disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation and speciation in reservoir water in coastal areas. In this study, the chlorination of model algal cellular compounds (bovine serum albumin, fish oil and starch), Microcystis aeruginosa and its extra-cellular organic matter (EOM) were conducted in the absence and presence of bromide. The main aim of the present study is to explore their potential as precursors for trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acid (HAAs) speciation upon chlorination in the presence of bromide. The results showed that all brominated THMs species were generated, whereas only bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA) or/and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) was/were produced as for brominated HAAs (Br-HAAs) from the three model compounds in the presence of bromide. The effect of bromide on Br-HAAs speciation upon fish oil chlorination was more evident than with BSA and starch. There was a good correlation between the species predicted from the model compounds and those obtained from specific algal species. Br-HAAs and Br-THMs species from Microcystis aeruginosa cells or EOM were the same as those from bovine serum albumin in the presence of bromide.

  8. Identification of dissolved organic matter in raw water supply from reservoirs and canals as precursors to trihalomethanes formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musikavong, Charongpun; Wattanachira, Suraphong

    2013-01-01

    The characteristic and quantity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) as trihalomethanes precursors in water from the U-Tapao Basin, Songkhla, Thailand was investigated. The sources of water in the basin consisted of two reservoirs and the U-Tapao canal. The canal receives water discharge from reservoirs, treated and untreated wastewater from agricultural processes, communities and industries. Water downstream of the canal is utilized as a raw water supply. Water samples were collected from two reservoirs, upstream and midstream of the canal, and the raw water supply in the rainy season and summer. The DOM level in the canal water was higher than that of the reservoir water. The highest trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) was formed in the raw water supply. Fourier-transform infrared peaks of the humic acid were detected in the reservoir and canal waters. Aliphatic hydrocarbon and organic nitrogen were the major chemical classes in the reservoir and canal water characterized by a pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometer. The optimal condition of the poly aluminum chloride (PACl) coagulation was obtained at a dosage of 40 mg/L at pH 7. This condition could reduce the average UV-254 to 57%, DOC to 64%, and THMFP to 42%. In the coagulated water, peaks of O-H groups or H-bonded NH, C˭O of cyclic and acyclic compounds, ketones and quinines, aromatic C˭C, C-O of alcohols, ethers, and carbohydrates, deformation of COOH, and carboxylic acid salts were detected. The aliphatic hydrocarbon, organic nitrogen and aldehydes and ketones were the major chemical classes. These DOM could be considered as the prominent DOM for the water supply plant that utilized PACl as a coagulant.

  9. Acid Water Neutralization Using Microbial Fuel Cells: An Alternative for Acid Mine Drainage Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Leiva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD is a complex environmental problem, which has adverse effects on surface and ground waters due to low pH, high toxic metals, and dissolved salts. New bioremediation approach based on microbial fuel cells (MFC can be a novel and sustainable alternative for AMD treatment. We studied the potential of MFC for acidic synthetic water treatment through pH neutralization in batch-mode and continuous-flow operation. We observed a marked pH increase, from ~3.7 to ~7.9 under batch conditions and to ~5.8 under continuous-flow operation. Likewise, batch reactors (non-MFC inoculated with different MFC-enriched biofilms showed a very similar pH increase, suggesting that the neutralization observed for batch operation was due to a synergistic influence of these communities. These preliminary results support the idea of using MFC technologies for AMD remediation, which could help to reduce costs associated with conventional technologies. Advances in this configuration could even be extrapolated to the recovery of heavy metals by precipitation or adsorption processes due to the acid neutralization.

  10. Exploration of amino acid biomarkers in polar ice with the Mars Organic Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarajah, C.; Botta, O.; Aubrey, A.; Parker, E.; Bada, J.; Mathies, R.

    2009-05-01

    A portable microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) system named the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA) has been developed to analyze fluorescently-labeled biomarkers including amino acids, amines, nucleobases, and amino sugars with the goal of life detection on Mars (1,2). This technology has also been shown to be effective in screening the formation of biogenic amines during fermentation (3). The MOA is a part of the Urey instrument package that has been selected for the 2016 European ExoMars mission by ESA. The identification of recent gully erosion sites, observations of ice on and beneath the surface of Mars, and the discovery of large reservoirs of sub-surface ice on Mars point to water-ice as an important target for astrobiological analyses. In addition, the ice samples on the Moon, Mercury, Europa and Enceladus are of interest due to the possibility that they may contain information on biogenic material relevant to the evolution of life. We explore here the use of the MOA instrument for the analysis of amino acids in polar ice samples. The amino acids valine, alanine/serine, glycine, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid were found in the parts-per-billion range from Greenland ice-core samples. Chiral analysis of these samples yielded D/L ratios of 0.51/0.09 for alanine/serine and 0.14/0.06 for aspartic acid. Individual amino acids in the parts-per-trillion range were found in Antarctic ice samples collected from the surface of a meteorite collection area. The distinct amino acid and amine content of these samples indicates that further biomarker characterization of ice samples as a function of sampling location, depth, and structural features will be highly informative. The rapid sensitive analysis capabilities demonstrated here establish the feasibility of using the MOA to analyze the biomarker content of ice samples in planetary exploration. 1. Skelley, A. M.; Scherer, J. R.; Aubrey, A. D.; Grover, W. H.; Ivester, R. H. C., Ehrenfreund, P.; Grunthaner, F. J

  11. Review article Herbal extracts and organic acids as natural feed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-16

    Jul 16, 2013 ... acids and their salts have the ability to lower the gastric pH, resulting in an increased gastric retention time and improved ... levels of herbal extracts must be considered in order to have control of the balance between synergism ...... Fumaric and citric acid as feed additives in starter pig nutrition. J. Anim. Sci.

  12. An improved method for total organic iodine in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayess, Rassil; Reckhow, David A

    2017-01-01

    A concise, rapid, and sensitive method is developed to measure organically-bound iodine in water. Total organic iodine (TOI) is used as an integrative surrogate that reflects the amount of iodinated organics in a water sample and is quantified using a refined method that builds on previous adsorption and detection approaches. The proposed method combines adsorption, combustion, and trapping of combustion products, with an offline inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) for iodide detection. During method development, three analytical variables (factors) were varied across two levels each in order to optimize the method for iodine recovery: 1) the sample pH prior to adsorption on the granular activated carbon (GAC); 2) the amount of base addition to the trap solution; and 3) composition of the ICP-MS wash solution. These factors were tested with solutions of eight iodinated model organic compounds, two iodinated inorganic compounds, and field water samples using a full factorial experimental design. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) and related statistical methods were deployed to identify the best combination of conditions (i.e., treatment) that results in the most complete recovery of iodine from the model compounds and the highest rejection of inorganic iodine. The chosen treatment for TOI measurement incorporates a sample pH of less than 1 prior to adsorption onto the GAC, a solution of 2% (v/v) tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) for trapping of combustion products, and a TMAH wash solution of 0.1% (v/v) for the ICP-MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phenolic and short-chained aliphatic organic acid constituents of wild oat (Avena fatua L.) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, R S; Ananth, R; Granger, K; Bradley, B; Anderson, J V; Fuerst, E P

    2010-01-13

    The objective of this research was to identify and quantify the phenolic and short-chained aliphatic organic acids present in the seeds of three wild-type populations of wild oat and compare these results to the chemical composition of seeds from two commonly utilized wild oat isolines (M73 and SH430). Phenolic acids have been shown to serve as germination inhibitors, as well as protection for seeds from biotic and abiotic stress factors in other species, whereas aliphatic organic acids have been linked to germination traits and protection against pathogens. Wild oat populations were grown under a "common garden" environment to remove maternal variation, and the resulting seeds were extracted to remove the readily soluble and chemically bound phenolic and aliphatic organic acid components. Compounds were identified and quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Ferulic and p-coumaric acid comprised 99% of the total phenolic acids present in the seeds, of which 91% were contained in the hulls and 98% were in the chemically bound forms. Smaller quantities of OH benzoic and vanillic acid were also detected. Soluble organic acids concentrations were higher in the M73 isoline compared to SH430, suggesting that these chemical constituents could be related to seed dormancy. Malic, succinic, fumaric and azelaic acid were the dominant aliphatic organic acids detected in all seed and chemical fractions.

  14. Adsorption of organic acids from dilute aqueous solution onto activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.W.

    1980-06-01

    The radioisotope technique was used to study the removal of organic acid contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions onto activated carbon. Acetic acid, propionic acid, n-butyric acid, n-hexanoic acid and n-heptanoic acid were studied at 278, 298, and 313/sup 0/K. Three bi-solute acid mixtures (acetic and propionic acids, acetic and butanoic acids, and propionic and butanoic acids) were studied at 278 and 298/sup 0/K. Isotherms of the single-solute systems were obtained at three different temperatures in the very dilute concentration region (less than 1% by weight). These data are very important in the prediction of bi-solute equilibrium data. A Polanyi-based competitive adsorption potential theory was used to predict the bi-solute equilibrium uptakes. Average errors between calculated and experimental data ranges from 4% to 14%. It was found that the competitive adsorption potential theory gives slightly better results than the ideal adsorbed solution theory.

  15. Is Your Drinking Water Acidic? A Comparison of the Varied pH of Popular Bottled Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kellie F

    2015-06-01

    Dental professionals continually educate patients on the dangers of consuming acidic foods and beverages due to their potential to contribute to dental erosion and tooth decay. Excess acid in the diet can also lead to acidosis, which causes negative systemic side effects. However, water is not typically categorized as acidic. The purpose of this in-vitro study was to investigate the pH levels of several popular brands of bottled water and compare them to various other acidic beverages. Two different brands of marketed alkaline water (with a pH of 8.8 or higher) were also studied, tested for acidity and described. A pilot in-vitro study was conducted to determine the pH levels of a convenience sample of popular brands of bottled water, tap water and other known acidic beverages in comparison with the pH values reported on the respective manufacturers' website. Each beverage was tested in a laboratory using a calibrated Corning pH meter model 240, and waters were compared to the corresponding company's testified pH value. Waters were also compared and contrasted based on their process of purification. The data was then compiled and analyzed descriptively. The pH values for the tested beverages and bottled waters were found to be predominantly acidic. Ten out of the 14 beverages tested were acidic (pHwaters were neutral (pH=7) and 2 bottled waters were alkaline (pH>7). The majority of waters tested had a more acidic pH when tested in the lab than the value listed in their water quality reports. It is beneficial for the health care provider to be aware of the potential acidity of popular bottled drinking waters and educate patients accordingly. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  16. Impact of dietary organic acids and botanicals on intestinal integrity and inflammation in weaned pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Grilli, Ester; Tugnoli, Benedetta; Passey, Jade L; Stahl, Chad H; Piva, Andrea; Moeser, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    Background Organic acids, such as citric and sorbic acid, and pure plant-derived constituents, like monoterpens and aldehydes, have a long history of use in pig feeding as alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters. However, their effects on the intestinal barrier function and inflammation have never been investigated. Therefore, aim of this study was to assess the impact of a microencapsulated mixture of citric acid and sorbic acid (OA) and pure botanicals, namely thymol and vanillin, (PB) ...

  17. Pathogenesis of CNS involvement in disorders of amino and organic acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölker, S; Sauer, S W; Hoffmann, G F; Müller, I; Morath, M A; Okun, J G

    2008-04-01

    Inherited disorders of amino and organic acid metabolism have a high cumulative frequency, and despite heterogeneous aetiology and varying clinical presentation, the manifestation of neurological disease is common. It has been demonstrated for some of these diseases that accumulating pathological metabolites are directly involved in the manifestation of neurological disease. Various pathomechanisms have been suggested in different in vitro and in vivo models including an impairment of brain energy metabolism, an imbalance of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission, altered transport across the blood-brain barrier and between glial cells and neurons, impairment of myelination and disturbed neuronal efflux of metabolic water. This review summarizes recent knowledge on pathomechanisms involved in phenylketonuria, glutaric aciduria type I, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency and aspartoacylase deficiency with examples, highlighting general as well as disease-specific concepts and their putative impact on treatment.

  18. Profile of preoperative fecal organic acids closely predicts the incidence of postoperative infectious complications after major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection: Importance of fecal acetic acid plus butyric acid minus lactic acid gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Mizuno, Takashi; Sugawara, Gen; Asahara, Takashi; Nomoto, Koji; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Ebata, Tomoki; Nagino, Masato

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the association between preoperative fecal organic acid concentrations and the incidence of postoperative infectious complications in patients undergoing major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection for biliary malignancies. The fecal samples of 44 patients were collected before undergoing hepatectomy with bile duct resection for biliary malignancies. The concentrations of fecal organic acids, including acetic acid, butyric acid, and lactic acid, and representative fecal bacteria were measured. The perioperative clinical characteristics and the concentrations of fecal organic acids were compared between patients with and without postoperative infectious complications. Among 44 patients, 13 (30%) developed postoperative infectious complications. Patient age and intraoperative bleeding were significantly greater in patients with postoperative infectious complications compared with those without postoperative infectious complications. The concentrations of fecal acetic acid and butyric acid were significantly less, whereas the concentration of fecal lactic acid tended to be greater in the patients with postoperative infectious complications. The calculated gap between the concentrations of fecal acetic acid plus butyric acid minus lactic acid gap was less in the patients with postoperative infectious complications (median 43.5 vs 76.1 μmol/g of feces, P = .011). Multivariate analysis revealed that an acetic acid plus butyric acid minus lactic acid gap acid profile (especially low acetic acid, low butyric acid, and high lactic acid) had a clinically important impact on the incidence of postoperative infectious complications in patients undergoing major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Machine learning and hurdle models for improving regional predictions of stream water acid neutralizing capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas A. Povak; Paul F. Hessburg; Keith M. Reynolds; Timothy J. Sullivan; Todd C. McDonnell; R. Brion Salter

    2013-01-01

    In many industrialized regions of the world, atmospherically deposited sulfur derived from industrial, nonpoint air pollution sources reduces stream water quality and results in acidic conditions that threaten aquatic resources. Accurate maps of predicted stream water acidity are an essential aid to managers who must identify acid-sensitive streams, potentially...

  20. Relating freshwater organic matter fluorescence to organic carbon removal efficiency in drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieroza, Magdalena; Baker, Andy; Bridgeman, John

    2009-02-15

    Monthly raw and clarified water samples were obtained for 16 UK surface water treatment works. The fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) technique was used for the assessment of total organic carbon (TOC) removal and organic matter (OM) characterisation. The impact of algae presence in water on TOC removal, and its relationship with fluorescence, was analysed. Fluorescence peak C intensity was found to be a sensitive and reliable measure of OM content. Fluorescence peak C emission wavelength and peak T intensity (reflecting the degree of hydrophobicity and the microbial fraction, respectively) were found to characterize the OM; the impact of both on TOC removal efficiency was apparent. OM fluorescence properties were shown to predict TOC removal, and identify spatial and temporal variations. Previous work indicates that the trihalomethane (THM) concentration of treated water can be predicted from the raw water TOC concentration. The simplicity, sensitivity, speed of analysis and low cost, combined with potential for incorporation into on-line monitoring systems, mean that fluorescence spectroscopy offers a robust analytical technique to be used in conjunction with, or in place of, other approaches to OM characterisation and THM formation prediction.

  1. Recycling acetic acid from polarizing film of waste liquid crystal display panels by sub/supercritical water treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruixue; Chen, Ya; Xu, Zhenming

    2015-05-19

    Waste liquid crystal display (LCD) panels mainly contain inorganic materials (glass substrate) and organic materials (polarizing film and liquid crystal). The organic materials should be removed first since containing polarizing film and liquid crystal is to the disadvantage of the indium recycling process. In the present study, an efficient and environmentally friendly process to obtain acetic acid from waste LCD panels by sub/supercritical water treatments is investigated. Furthermore, a well-founded reaction mechanism is proposed. Several highlights of this study are summarized as follows: (i) 99.77% of organic matters are removed, which means the present technology is quite efficient to recycle the organic matters; (ii) a yield of 78.23% acetic acid, a quite important fossil energy based chemical product is obtained, which can reduce the consumption of fossil energy for producing acetic acid; (iii) supercritical water acts as an ideal solvent, a requisite reactant as well as an efficient acid-base catalyst, and this is quite significant in accordance with the "Principles of Green Chemistry". In a word, the organic matters of waste LCD panels are recycled without environmental pollution. Meanwhile, this study provides new opportunities for alternating fossil-based chemical products for sustainable development, converting "waste" into "fossil-based chemicals".

  2. Water Dynamics at the Root of Metamorphosis in Living Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rosa Spinetti

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Liquid water has been recognized long ago to be the matrix of many processes, including life and also rock dynamics. Interactions among biomolecules occur very differently in a non-aqueous system and are unable to produce life. This ability to make living processes possible implies a very peculiar structure of liquid water. According to modern Quantum Field Theory (QFT, a complementary principle (in the sense of Niels Bohr holds between the number N of field quanta (including the matter field whose quanta are just the atoms/molecules and the phase Ф. This means that when we focus on the atomic structure of matter it loses its coherence properties and, vice versa, when we examine the phase dynamics of the system its atomic structure becomes undefined. Superfluid liquid Helium is the first example of this peculiar quantum dynamics. In the present paper we show how consideration of the phase dynamics of liquid water makes the understanding of its peculiar role in the onset of self-organization in living organisms and in ecosystems possible.

  3. Hydrochloric vs. sulphuric acid in water for Ziehl-Neelsen staining of acid-fast bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, K J M; Nandi, P; Hamid Salim, A; Hossain, A; Van Deun, A

    2011-07-01

    Damien Foundation Bangladesh tuberculosis (TB) control projects. To compare 25% sulphuric acid in water (H(2)SO(4)) with hydrochloric acid in water (HCl) to differentiate acid-fast bacilli in sputum smears stained with 1% carbolfuchsin. For 1 year, all 158 microscopy laboratories used either H(2)SO(4) or 3%/6%/10% HCl for their routine work, alternating monthly between H(2)SO(4) and HCl. Each month a sample of five smears per laboratory was rechecked blind. After recording qualitative staining aspects, all sample smears were restained before rechecking, using H(2)SO(4) for destaining. A total of 368,059 H(2)SO(4) and 335,436 HCl smears were routinely read, yielding 7.2% positive or scanty results in both groups. Of these, 9492 were rechecked. There was no difference in false-negatives detected (0.66%, 95%CI 0.44-0.95 for H(2)SO(4) vs. 0.68%, 95%CI 0.46-0.98 for HCl), but apparently there were more false-positives with H(2)SO(4) (2.12%, 95%CI 0.92-4.14 vs. 0.28%, 95%CI 0.00-1.54, P = 0.05). Qualitatively, only 3% HCl yielded significantly inferior differentiation results. HCl 6-10% in water can be recommended for Ziehl-Neelsen destaining above H(2)SO(4). Diluting is easier and safer, and it may cause less confusion with false-positives during rechecking, including a restaining step.

  4. Organic acids for control of Salmonella in different feed materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koyuncu, Sevinc; Andersson, Mats Gunnar; Löfström, Charlotta

    2013-01-01

    of FA, propionic acid (PA) and sodium formate (SF) was investigated. Four Salmonella strains isolated from feed were assayed for their acid tolerance. Also, the effect of lower temperatures (5°C and 15°C) compared to room temperature was investigated in rape seed and soybean meal. Results The efficacy....... Typhimurium. The tolerance of the S. Infantis strain compared with the S. Typhimurium strain was statistically significant (p5°C and 15°C compared to room temperatures. Conclusions Acid treatment of Salmonella...

  5. Arachidonic Acid and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Metabolism in Juvenile Atlantic Salmon as Affected by Water Temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Norambuena

    Full Text Available Salmons raised in aquaculture farms around the world are increasingly subjected to sub-optimal environmental conditions, such as high water temperatures during summer seasons. Aerobic scope increases and lipid metabolism changes are known plasticity responses of fish for a better acclimation to high water temperature. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of high water temperature on the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in juvenile Atlantic salmon fed different dietary ARA/EPA ratios (arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6/ eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3, with particular focus on apparent in vivo enzyme activities and gene expression of lipid metabolism pathways. Three experimental diets were formulated to be identical, except for the ratio EPA/ARA, and fed to triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar kept either at 10°C or 20°C. Results showed that fatty acid metabolic utilisation, and likely also their dietary requirements for optimal performance, can be affected by changes in their relative levels and by environmental temperature in Atlantic salmon. Thus, the increase in temperature, independently from dietary treatment, had a significant effect on the β-oxidation of a fatty acid including EPA, as observed by the apparent in vivo enzyme activity and mRNA expression of pparα -transcription factor in lipid metabolism, including β-oxidation genes- and cpt1 -key enzyme responsible for the movement of LC-PUFA from the cytosol into the mitochondria for β-oxidation-, were both increased at the higher water temperature. An interesting interaction was observed in the transcription and in vivo enzyme activity of Δ5fad-time-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis pathway of EPA and ARA. Such, at lower temperature, the highest mRNA expression and enzyme activity was recorded in fish with limited supply of dietary EPA, whereas at higher temperature these were recorded in fish with limited ARA supply. In consideration that fish at higher

  6. Microbial-processing of fruit and vegetable wastes for production of vital enzymes and organic acids: Biotechnology and scopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Sandeep K; Mishra, Swati S; Kayitesi, Eugenie; Ray, Ramesh C

    2016-04-01

    Wastes generated from fruits and vegetables are organic in nature and contribute a major share in soil and water pollution. Also, green house gas emission caused by fruit and vegetable wastes (FVWs) is a matter of serious environmental concern. This review addresses the developments over the last one decade on microbial processing technologies for production of enzymes and organic acids from FVWs. The advances in genetic engineering for improvement of microbial strains in order to enhance the production of the value added bio-products as well as the concept of zero-waste economy have been briefly discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of quarantine treatments on the carbohydrate and organic acid content of mangoes (cv. Tommy Atkins)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, J. N.; Soares, C. A.; Fabbri, A. D. T.; Cordenunsi, B. R.; Sabato, S. F.

    2012-08-01

    Brazil is one of the largest mango producers and the third largest mango exporter worldwide. Irradiation treatment and its commercial feasibility have been studied in our country to make it possible to develop new markets and, consequently, to compete with the major exporters of mangoes, Mexico and India. This work was designed to compare irradiation treatment with the hot water dip treatment in mangoes cv. Tommy Atkins for export and to verify that the main attributes for acceptance, color and texture, as well as carbohydrate and organic acid contents, were maintained. In this study, the fruit was divided into groups: control, hot water dip-treated (46 °C for 90 min), and irradiation-treated at doses of 0.4 kGy and 1.0 kGy. The fruit was stored at low temperature (11 °C±2) for 14 days and then at room temperature (23 °C±2) until the end of the study. The results indicated that the fruit given a dose of 1.0 kGy remained in a less advanced stage of ripening (stage 3) throughout the storage period, but experienced a greater loss of texture in the beginning of the experiment. It was noted that only the control group had higher levels of citric acid and succinic acid on the last day of the experiment. There were no significant differences in the total sugar content between any treatment groups. Gamma radiation can be used as a quarantine treatment and does not interfere negatively with the quality attributes of mangoes.

  8. A water-soluble triiodo amino acid and its dendrimer conjugate for computerized tomography (CT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARTIN W. BRECHBIEL

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Prolonging the circulation of an imaging agent is vital for making it suitable for blood pool (vascular imaging. Medical applications of vascular imaging include cardiovascular disease, abnormal capillary permeability, and tumor neovascularity. As low molecular weight computerized tomography (CT enhancement agents are characterized by inconveniently fast clearance, macromolecular compounds (both natural and synthetic have gained a wide recongnition for possessing better characteristics for performing blood imaging tasks. Herein, the syntheses and characterization of a new water-soluble triiodo amino acid, 3-[(N,N-dimethylaminoacetyl amino]-a-ethyl-2,4,6-triiodobenzenepropanoic acid (DMAA-IPA and its Starburst PAMAMgeneration 4.0 dendrimer conjugate, G-4-(DMAA-IPA37 are described. The applicability of G-4-(DMAA-IPA37 as a potential macromolecular angiographic CT contrast agent is discussed. The linear relationship between organically bound iodine concentration and CT Hounsfield units has been established thus allowing for quantification uses of CT imaging as well.

  9. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 90. Hydroxybenzoic Acid Derivatives in Binary, Ternary, and Multicomponent Systems. Part I. Hydroxybenzoic Acids, Hydroxybenzoates, and Hydroxybenzoic Acid Salts in Water and Aqueous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Rensuke; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Königsberger, Erich; Königsberger, Lan-Chi

    2011-03-01

    The solubility data for well-defined binary, ternary, and multicomponent systems of solid-liquid type are reviewed. One component, which is 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids, 4-hydroxybenzoate alkyl esters (parabens), or hydroxybenzoic acid salts, is in the solid state at room temperature and another component is liquid water, meaning that all of the systems are aqueous solutions. The ternary or multicomponent systems include organic substances of various classes (hydrocarbons of several structural types, halogenated hydrocarbons, alcohols, acids, ethers, esters, amides, and surfactants) or inorganic substances. Systems reported in the primary literature from 1898 through 2000 are compiled. For seven systems, sufficient binary data for hydroxybenzoic acids or parabens in water are available to allow critical evaluation. Almost all data are expressed as mass and mole fractions as well as the originally reported units, while some data are expressed as molar concentration.

  10. Application of several activity coefficient models to water-organic-electrolyte aerosols of atmospheric interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Raatikainen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, existing and modified activity coefficient models are examined in order to assess their capabilities to describe the properties of aqueous solution droplets relevant in the atmosphere. Five different water-organic-electrolyte activity coefficient models were first selected from the literature. Only one of these models included organics and electrolytes which are common in atmospheric aerosol particles. In the other models, organic species were solvents such as alcohols, and important atmospheric ions like NH4+ could be missing. The predictions of these models were compared to experimental activity and solubility data in aqueous single electrolyte solutions with 31 different electrolytes. Based on the deviations from experimental data and on the capabilities of the models, four predictive models were selected for fitting of new parameters for binary and ternary solutions of common atmospheric electrolytes and organics. New electrolytes (H+, NH4+, Na+, Cl-, NO3- and SO42- and organics (dicarboxylic and some hydroxy acids were added and some modifications were made to the models if it was found useful. All new and most of the existing parameters were fitted to experimental single electrolyte data as well as data for aqueous organics and aqueous organic-electrolyte solutions. Unfortunately, there are very few data available for organic activities in binary solutions and for organic and electrolyte activities in aqueous organic-electrolyte solutions. This reduces model capabilities in predicting solubilities. After the parameters were fitted, deviations from measurement data were calculated for all fitted models, and for different data types. These deviations and the calculated property values were compared with those from other non-electrolyte and organic-electrolyte models found in the literature. Finally, hygroscopic growth factors were calculated for four 100 nm organic-electrolyte particles and these predictions were compared to

  11. Overexpression of malate dehydrogenase in transgenic alfalfa enhances organic acid synthesis and confers tolerance to aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, M; Temple, S J; Allan, D L; Vance, C P; Samac, D A

    2001-12-01

    Al toxicity is a severe impediment to production of many crops in acid soil. Toxicity can be reduced through lime application to raise soil pH, however this amendment does not remedy subsoil acidity, and liming may not always be practical or cost-effective. Addition of organic acids to plant nutrient solutions alleviates phytotoxic Al effects, presumably by chelating Al and rendering it less toxic. In an effort to increase organic acid secretion and thereby enhance Al tolerance in alfalfa (Medicago sativa), we produced transgenic plants using nodule-enhanced forms of malate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase cDNAs under the control of the constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. We report that a 1.6-fold increase in malate dehydrogenase enzyme specific activity in root tips of selected transgenic alfalfa led to a 4.2-fold increase in root concentration as well as a 7.1-fold increase in root exudation of citrate, oxalate, malate, succinate, and acetate compared with untransformed control alfalfa plants. Overexpression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase enzyme specific activity in transgenic alfalfa did not result in increased root exudation of organic acids. The degree of Al tolerance by transformed plants in hydroponic solutions and in naturally acid soil corresponded with their patterns of organic acid exudation and supports the concept that enhancing organic acid synthesis in plants may be an effective strategy to cope with soil acidity and Al toxicity.

  12. Anaerobic organic acid metabolism of Candida zemplinina in comparison with Saccharomyces wine yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Ildikó; Nyitrai-Sárdy, Diána; Leskó, Annamária; Pomázi, Andrea; Kállay, Miklós

    2014-05-16

    Organic acid production under oxygen-limited conditions has been thoroughly studied in the Saccharomyces species, but practically never investigated in Candida zemplinina, which seems to be an acidogenic species under oxidative laboratory conditions. In this study, several strains of C. zemplinina were tested for organic acid metabolism, in comparison with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces uvarum and Candida stellata, under fermentative conditions. Only C. stellata produced significantly higher acidity in simple minimal media (SM) with low sugar content and two different nitrogen sources (ammonia or glutamic acid) at low level. However, the acid profile differed largely between the Saccharomyces and Candida species and showed inverse types of N-dependence in some cases. Succinic acid production was strongly enhanced on glutamic acid in Saccharomyces species, but not in Candida species. 2-oxoglutarate production was strongly supported on ammonium nitrogen in Candida species, but remained low in Saccharomyces. Candida species, C. stellata in particular, produced more pyruvic acid regardless of N-sources. From the results, we concluded that the anaerobic organic acid metabolisms of C. zemplinina and C. stellata are different from each other and also from that of the Saccharomyces species. In the formation of succinic acid, the oxidative pathway from glutamic acid seems to play little or no role in C. zemplinina. The reductive branch of the TCA cycle, however, produces acidic intermediates (malic, fumaric, and succinic acid) in a level comparable with the production of the Saccharomyces species. An unidentified organic acid, which was produced on glutamic acid only by the Candida species, needs further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biotechnological Production of Organic Acids from Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleissner, Daniel; Dietz, Donna; van Duuren, Jozef Bernhard Johann Henri; Wittmann, Christoph; Yang, Xiaofeng; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; Venus, Joachim

    2017-03-07

    Biotechnological processes are promising alternatives to petrochemical routes for overcoming the challenges of resource depletion in the future in a sustainable way. The strategies of white biotechnology allow the utilization of inexpensive and renewable resources for the production of a broad range of bio-based compounds. Renewable resources, such as agricultural residues or residues from food production, are produced in large amounts have been shown to be promising carbon and/or nitrogen sources. This chapter focuses on the biotechnological production of lactic acid, acrylic acid, succinic acid, muconic acid, and lactobionic acid from renewable residues, these products being used as monomers for bio-based material and/or as food supplements. These five acids have high economic values and the potential to overcome the "valley of death" between laboratory/pilot scale and commercial/industrial scale. This chapter also provides an overview of the production strategies, including microbial strain development, used to convert renewable resources into value-added products.

  14. Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.; Chendrayan, K.; Quinby, H.L.

    1987-04-16

    The present invention related to an anaerobic bacterial culture of Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 which solubilizes lead oxide under anaerobic conditions in coal and industrial wastes and therefore presents a method of removing lead from such wastes before they are dumped into the environment. The rat of lead dissolution during logarithmic growth of the bacteria in 40 ml medium containing 3.32 ..mu..moles of lead as lead oxide was 0.042 ..mu..moles m1/sup /-/1/ hr/sup /-/1/. Dissolution of lead oxide by the bacterial isolate is due to the production of metabolites and acidity in the culture medium. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 can be used in the recovery of the strategic metals from ores and wastes and also for the production of lactic acid for commercial purposes. The process yields large quantities of lactic acid as well as lead complexed in a stable form with said acids. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Crystal engineering approach to forming cocrystals of amine hydrochlorides with organic acids. Molecular complexes of fluoxetine hydrochloride with benzoic, succinic, and fumaric acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Scott L; Chyall, Leonard J; Dunlap, Jeanette T; Smolenskaya, Valeriya N; Stahly, Barbara C; Stahly, G Patrick

    2004-10-20

    A crystal engineering strategy for designing cocrystals of pharmaceuticals is presented. The strategy increases the probability of discovering useful cocrystals and decreases the number of experiments that are needed by selecting API:guest combinations that have the greatest potential of forming energetically and structurally robust interactions. Our approach involves multicomponent cocrystallization of hydrochloride salts, wherein strong hydrogen bond donors are introduced to interact with chloride ions that are underutilized as hydrogen bond acceptors. The strategy is particularly effective in producing cocrystals of amine hydrochlorides with neutral organic acid guests. As an example of the approach, we report the discovery of three cocrystals containing fluoxetine hydrochloride (1), which is the active ingredient in the popular antidepressant Prozac. A 1:1 cocrystal was prepared with 1 and benzoic acid (2), while succinic acid and fumaric acid were each cocrystallized with 1 to provide 2:1 cocrystals of fluoxetine hydrochloride:succinic acid (3) and fluoxetine hydrochloride:fumaric acid (4). The presence of a guest molecule along with fluoxetine hydrochloride in the same crystal structure results in a solid phase with altered physical properties when compared to the known crystalline form of fluoxetine hydrochloride. On the basis of intrinsic dissolution rate experiments, cocrystals 2 and 4 dissolve more slowly than 1, and 3 dissolves more quickly than 1. Powder dissolution experiments demonstrated that the solid present at equilibrium corresponds to the cocrystal for 2 and 4, while 3 completely converted to 1 upon prolonged slurry in water.

  16. Destruction of trace organics in otherwise ultra pure water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prairie, M.R.; Stange, B.M.; Showalter, S.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magrini, K.A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A number of experiments were conducted to determine the economic viability of applying various ultraviolet (UV) oxidation processes to a waste water stream containing approximately 12 mg/L total organic carbon (TOC), predominately ethylene glycol. In all experiments, a test solution was illuminated with either near-UV or a far-UV light alone or in combination with a variety of photocatalysts and oxidants. Based upon the outcomes of this project, both UV/photocatalysis and UV/ozone processes are capable of treating the water sample to below detection capabilities of TOC. However, the processes are fairly energy intensive; the most efficient case tested required 11 kWh per order of magnitude reduction in TOC per 1000 L. If energy consumption rates of 5-10 kWh/1000 L are deemed reasonable, then further investigation is recommended.

  17. Destruction of Trace Organics in Otherwise Ultra Pure Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prairie, M. R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stange, B. M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Showalter, S. K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magrini, K. A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A number of experiments were conducted to determine the economic viability of applying various ultraviolet (UV) oxidation processes to a waste water stream containing approximately 12 mg/L total organic carbon (TOC), predominately ethylene glycol. In all experiments, a test solution was illuminated with either near-UV or a far-UV light alone or in combination with a variety of photocatalysts and oxidants. Based upon the outcomes of this project, both UV/photocatalysis and UV/ozone processes are capable of treating the water sample to below detection capabilities of TOC. However, the processes are fairly energy intensive; the most efficient case tested required 11 kWh per order of magnitude reduction in TOC per 1000 L. If energy consumption rates of 5-10 kWh/1000 L are deemed reasonable, then further investigation is recommended.

  18. Determination of iodide, iodate and organo-iodine in waters with a new total organic iodine measurement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tingting; Zhang, Xiangru

    2013-11-01

    The dissolved iodine species that dominate aquatic systems are iodide, iodate and organo-iodine. These species may undergo transformation to one another and thus affect the formation of iodinated disinfection byproducts during disinfection of drinking waters or wastewater effluents. In this study, a fast, sensitive and accurate method for determining these iodine species in waters was developed by derivatizing iodide and iodate to organic iodine and measuring organic iodine with a total organic iodine (TOI) measurement approach. Within this method, organo-iodine was determined directly by TOI measurement; iodide was oxidized by monochloramine to hypoiodous acid and then hypoiodous acid reacted with phenol to form organic iodine, which was determined by TOI measurement; iodate was reduced by ascorbic acid to iodide and then determined as iodide. The quantitation limit of organo-iodine or sum of organo-iodine and iodide or sum of organo-iodine, iodide and iodate was 5 μg/L as I for a 40 mL water sample (or 2.5 μg/L as I for an 80 mL water sample, or 1.25 μg/L as I for a 160 mL water sample). This method was successfully applied to the determination of iodide, iodate and organo-iodine in a variety of water samples, including tap water, seawater, urine and wastewater. The recoveries of iodide, iodate and organo-iodine were 91-109%, 90-108% and 91-108%, respectively. The concentrations and distributions of iodine species in different water samples were obtained and compared. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Noncontact, reagentless, nondestructive, detection of organics, biosignatures, and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhartia, R.; Hug, William F.; Reid, Ray; Salas, Everett C.

    2012-06-01

    We present a new active, non-invasive, non-desctructive, in situ spectroscopic method that enable a better understanding of the spatial distribution of microbes, organics, and water on natural surfaces that could support life-detection, organic stability assessment, and in-situ resource utilization missions on planetary bodies. Analytical and spectroscopic methods that have been employed to attempt to address these types of questions provide detection over a limited spatial area, provide either significant false positives/false negatives, or are limited to either morphological or chemical information. Furthermore, apart from the spectroscopic analyses, the methods are limited to invasive treatments that alter the samples or remove critical spatial context. Active spectroscopic methods such Raman and or LIBS have been employed as a means to approach these questions however, traditional Raman scatting is an extremely weak phenomenon and LIBS provides looses information regarding chemical structure. As an alternative, we present the use of deep UV native fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging from proximity (1-10 cm) to standoff (1-5m). Deep UV native fluorescence, coupled to resonance Raman spectroscopy, can provide a solution that has a means to map large areas with sensitivities to organics, that are expected to be present from meteoritic infall, biosignatures indicating extant or extinct life, and detect the presence of water for in-situ resource utilization. The methodology and the data presented will demonstrate the ability to detect and differentiate organics a natural surface - relevant to Mars and other planetary surfaces, and also elucidate the distribution to enable an understanding of their provenance.

  20. The Effect of Freezing on Thylakoid Membranes in the Presence of Organic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarius, Kurt A.

    1971-01-01

    The effect of salts of organic acids on washed and non-washed chloroplast membranes during freezing was investigated. Thylakoids were isolated from spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea L.) and, prior to freezing, salts of various organic acids or inorganic salts or both were added. Freezing occurred for 3 to 4 hours at −25 C. After thawing membrane integrity was investigated by measuring the activity of cyclic photophosphorylation. At very low NaCl levels (1 to 3 mm, washed thylakoids) salts of organic acids either could not prevent membrane inactivation in the course of freezing (succinate) or were effective only at relatively high concentrations (0.1 m or more of acetate, pyruvate, malate, tartrate, citrate). If NaCl was present at higher concentrations (e.g., 0.1 m) some organic acids, e.g. succinate, malate, tartrate, and citrate, were able to protect frost-sensitive thylakoids at surprisingly low concentrations (10 to 20 mm). Other inorganic salts such as KCl, MgCl2, NaNO3 could also induce protection by organic acids which otherwise were ineffective or poorly effective. For effective protection, a more or less constant ratio between inorganic salt and organic acid or between two or more organic acids had to be maintained. Departure to either side from the optimal ratio led to progressive inactivation. The unspecificity of the protective effect of organic acids suggests that these compounds protect colligatively. There are also indications that, in addition, more specific interaction with the membranes contributes to protection. At temperatures above the freezing point, the presence of salts of organic acids decreased the rate of membrane inactivation by high electrolyte concentrations. PMID:16657754

  1. Approaches to setting organism-based ballast water discharge standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Henry; Reusser, Deborah A.; Frazier, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    As a vector by which foreign species invade coastal and freshwater waterbodies, ballast water discharge from ships is recognized as a major environmental threat. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) drafted an international treaty establishing ballast water discharge standards based on the number of viable organisms per volume of ballast discharge for different organism size classes. Concerns that the IMO standards are not sufficiently protective have initiated several state and national efforts in the United States to develop more stringent standards. We evaluated seven approaches to establishing discharge standards for the >50-μm size class: (1) expert opinion/management consensus, (2) zero detectable living organisms, (3) natural invasion rates, (4) reaction–diffusion models, (5) population viability analysis (PVA) models, (6) per capita invasion probabilities (PCIP), and (7) experimental studies. Because of the difficulty in synthesizing scientific knowledge in an unbiased and transparent fashion, we recommend the use of quantitative models instead of expert opinion. The actual organism concentration associated with a “zero detectable organisms” standard is defined by the statistical rigor of its monitoring program; thus it is not clear whether such a standard is as stringent as other standards. For several reasons, the natural invasion rate, reaction–diffusion, and experimental approaches are not considered suitable for generating discharge standards. PVA models can be used to predict the likelihood of establishment of introduced species but are limited by a lack of population vital rates for species characteristic of ballast water discharges. Until such rates become available, PVA models are better suited to evaluate relative efficiency of proposed standards rather than predicting probabilities of invasion. The PCIP approach, which is based on historical invasion rates at a regional scale, appears to circumvent many of the indicated problems

  2. Effect of Organic Acids and Marination Ingredients on the Survival of Campylobacter jejuni on Meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Tina; Grønlund, Anne Christine Jørgensen; Christensen, Bjarke Bak

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether marination of chicken meat in different food ingredients call be used to reduce populations of Campylobacter jejuni strains, were exposed to different organic acids (tartaric, acetic. lactic, malic, and citric acids) and food marinating ingredients...... at 4 degrees C in broth and on chicken meat. The organic acids (0.5%) reduced populations of C. jejuni broth (chicken juice and brain heart infusion broth) by 4 to 6 1011 units (after 24 h): tartaric acid was the most efficient treatment. Large strain variation was observed among 14 C. jejuni isolates...... inoculated in brain heart infusion broth containing 0.3% tartaric acid. On chicken meat medallions, reductions of C. jejuni were 0.5 to 2 log units when tartaric acid solutions (2, 4, 6, and 10%) were spread onto the meal. Analysis of acidic food ingredient (e.g., vinegar. lemon juice, pomegranate syrup...

  3. Removal of Foodborne Pathogen Biofilms by Acidic Electrolyzed Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Han

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms, which are complex microbial communities embedded in the protective extracellular polymeric substances (EPS, are difficult to remove in food production facilities. In this study, the use of acidic electrolyzed water (AEW to remove foodborne pathogen biofilms was evaluated. We used a green fluorescent protein-tagged Escherichia coli for monitoring the efficiency of AEW for removing biofilms, where under the optimal treatment conditions, the fluorescent signal of cells in the biofilm disappeared rapidly and the population of biofilm cells was reduced by more than 67%. Additionally, AEW triggered EPS disruption, as indicated by the deformation of the carbohydrate C-O-C bond and deformation of the aromatic rings in the amino acids tyrosine and phenylalanine. These deformations were identified by EPS chemical analysis and Raman spectroscopic analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images confirmed that the breakup and detachment of biofilm were enhanced after AEW treatment. Further, AEW also eradicated biofilms formed by both Gram-negative bacteria (Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Gram-positive bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes and was observed to inactivate the detached cells which are a potential source of secondary pollution. This study demonstrates that AEW could be a reliable foodborne pathogen biofilm disrupter and an eco-friendly alternative to sanitizers traditionally used in the food industry.

  4. Antimicrobial activity and stability of weakly acidified chlorous acid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Isanori; Kawata, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Tamiko; Imaohji, Haruyuki; Murakami, Kazuya; Kino, Yasuhiro; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Koyama, A Hajime; Fujita, Yatsuka; Goda, Hisataka; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of weakly acidified chlorous acid water (WACAW) against Staphylococcus aureus, non-pathogenic Escherichia coli, enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC O157:H7), Candida albicans, and spore-forming Bacillus and Paenibacillus species was evaluated in vitro. The antiviral activity was also examined using feline calicivirus (FCV). Diluted WACAW (>100 ppm) effectively reduced the number of non-spore-forming bacteria (>4 log10 CFU reductions) within 5 min. Treatment with this sanitizer at 400 ppm for 30 min achieved>5 log10 CFU reductions in spore-forming Bacillus and Paenibacillus species while an equivalent concentration of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) resulted in only a 0.98 and 2.72 log10 CFU reduction, respectively. The effect of this sanitizer against FCV was equivalent to that of NaClO. Immersion in WACAW (400 ppm) achieved >4 and 2.26 log10 CFU reductions in Campylobacter jejuni and EHEC, respectively, on artificially contaminated broiler carcass pieces. Finally, theantimicrobial activity of this sanitizer was shown to be maintained for at least 28 d when in contact with nonwoven fabric (100% cotton). This study showed that pH control of chlorous acid is expected to modify its antimicrobial activity and stability. WACAW is expected to have applications in various settings such as the food processing and healthcare industries.

  5. Relative efficacy of organic acids and antibiotics as growth promoters in broiler chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikrant Laxman Bagal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of organic acids as replacer to antibiotics in their various combinations on feed consumption, body weight gain, and feed conversion ratio (FCR in broiler chicks during different phases of growth. Materials and Methods: Antibiotics and organic acids were incorporated into boiler feed in different combinations to form 10 maize based test diets (T1 to T10. Each test diet was offered to four replicates of 10 birds each constituting a total of 400 birds kept for 45 days. Results: Significantly better effect in terms of body weight gain from supplementation of 1% citric acid and 1% citric acid along with antibiotic was observed throughout the entire study, whereas the effect of tartaric acid supplementation was similar to control group. Citric acid (1% along with antibiotic supplementation showed highest feed intake during the experimental period. Significantly better FCR was observed in groups supplemented with 1% citric acid and 1% citric acid along with antibiotic followed by antibiotic along with organic acids supplemented group. Conclusion: Growth performance of birds in terms of body weight, body weight gain, and FCR improved significantly in 1% citric acid which was significantly higher than antibiotic supplemented group. 1% citric acid can effectively replace antibiotic growth promoter (chlortetracycline without affecting growth performance of birds.

  6. Relative efficacy of organic acids and antibiotics as growth promoters in broiler chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagal, Vikrant Laxman; Khatta, Vinod Kumar; Tewatia, Bachu Singh; Sangwan, Sandeep Kumar; Raut, Subhash Shamrao

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of organic acids as replacer to antibiotics in their various combinations on feed consumption, body weight gain, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) in broiler chicks during different phases of growth. Antibiotics and organic acids were incorporated into boiler feed in different combinations to form 10 maize based test diets (T1 to T10). Each test diet was offered to four replicates of 10 birds each constituting a total of 400 birds kept for 45 days. Significantly better effect in terms of body weight gain from supplementation of 1% citric acid and 1% citric acid along with antibiotic was observed throughout the entire study, whereas the effect of tartaric acid supplementation was similar to control group. Citric acid (1%) along with antibiotic supplementation showed highest feed intake during the experimental period. Significantly better FCR was observed in groups supplemented with 1% citric acid and 1% citric acid along with antibiotic followed by antibiotic along with organic acids supplemented group. Growth performance of birds in terms of body weight, body weight gain, and FCR improved significantly in 1% citric acid which was significantly higher than antibiotic supplemented group. 1% citric acid can effectively replace antibiotic growth promoter (chlortetracycline) without affecting growth performance of birds.

  7. Cranberry juice and combinations of its organic acids are effective against experimental urinary tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Heidi Dorthe; Struve, Carsten; Christensen, Søren Brøgger

    2017-01-01

    The antibacterial effect of cranberry juice and the organic acids therein on infection by uro28 pathogenic Escherichia coli was studied in an experimental mouse model of urinary tract infection (UTI). Reduced bacterial counts were found in the bladder (P ... juice. Commercially available cranberry juice cocktail also significantly reduced (P juice (P juice, were tested...... administered singly, did not have any effect in the UTI model. Apparently, the antibacterial effect of the organic acids from cranberry juice on UTI can be obtained by administering a combination of malic acid and either citric or quinic acid. This study show for the first time that cranberry juice reduce E...

  8. Gene deletion of cytosolic ATP: citrate lyase leads to altered organic acid production in Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijer, Susan Lisette; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2009-01-01

    factory platform for production of chemicals. Using molecular biology techniques, this study focused on metabolic engineering of A. niger to manipulate its organic acid production in the direction of succinic acid. The gene target for complete gene deletion was cytosolic ATP: citrate lyase (acl), which...... the acl gene. Additionally, the total amount of organic acids produced in the deletion strain was significantly increased. Genome-scale stoichiometric metabolic model predictions can be used for identifying gene targets. Deletion of the acl led to increased succinic acid production by A. niger....

  9. Chiral metal-organic frameworks bearing free carboxylic acids for organocatalyst encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Xi, Xiaobing; Ye, Chengcheng; Gong, Tengfei; Yang, Zhiwei; Cui, Yong

    2014-12-08

    Two chiral carboxylic acid functionalized micro- and mesoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are constructed by the stepwise assembly of triple-stranded heptametallic helicates with six carboxylic acid groups. The mesoporous MOF with permanent porosity functions as a host for encapsulation of an enantiopure organic amine catalyst by combining carboxylic acids and chiral amines in situ through acid-base interactions. The organocatalyst-loaded framework is shown to be an efficient and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for the asymmetric direct aldol reactions with significantly enhanced stereoselectivity in relative to the homogeneous organocatalyst. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Effect of water hardness on the production and microbicidal efficacy of slightly acidic electrolyzed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani, Fereidoun; Park, Joong-Hyun; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-06-01

    Slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) has been proved as an effective sanitizer against microorganisms attached to foods. However, its physical properties and inactivation efficacy are affected by several factors such as water hardness. Therefore, in this study the effect of water hardness on SAEW properties were studied. Pure cultures of foodborne bacteria were used in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the inactivation efficacy of the SAEWs produced. Results obtained showed water hardness to be an important factor in the production of SAEW. Low water hardness may result in the necessity of further optimization of production process. In this study the addition of 5% HCl and 2 M NaCl at 1.5 mL/min flow rate was found to be the best electrolyte concentration for the optimization of SAEW production from low hardness water (34 ± 2 mg/L). Furthermore, the results showed that pre-heating was a better approach compared to post-production heating of SAEW, resulting in higher ACC values and therefor better sanitization efficacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Partitioning regularity of non-ionic organic mixtures in organic phase/water system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The partitioning regularity of nonionic organic mixtures in organic phase/water system is revealed. The equation for calculating the partition coefficients of mixtures (KMD), together with the determination model, is derived from the equilibrium partitioning models (EPMs). Based on these derived equations, the KMD values of 20 mixtures conraining halogenated benzenes are obtained. The results show that stronger hydrophobicity of an individual chemical in the mixture results in the stronger hydrophobicity of the mixture and the greater the proportion of this chemical, the stronger the hydrophobicity of the mixture will be. This partitioning regularity is helpful to the study of the toxicity for mixtures and the environmental behavior, such as transfer or accumuiation, for mixed organic pollutants.``

  12. Mass spectral characterisation of a polar, esterified fraction of an organic extract of an oil sands process water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, S J; Pereira, A S; Martin, J W; Scarlett, A G; West, C E; Lengger, S K; Wilde, M J; Pureveen, J; Tegelaar, E W; Frank, R A; Hewitt, L M

    2014-11-15

    Characterising complex mixtures of organic compounds in polar fractions of heavy petroleum is challenging, but is important for pollution studies and for exploration and production geochemistry. Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) stored in large tailings ponds by Canadian oil sands industries contains such mixtures. A polar OSPW fraction was obtained by silver ion solid-phase extraction with methanol elution. This was examined by numerous methods, including electrospray ionisation (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS) and ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (uHPLC)/Orbitrap MS, in multiple ionisation and MS/MS modes. Compounds were also synthesised for comparison. The major ESI ionisable compounds detected (+ion mode) were C15-28 SO3 species with 3-7 double bond equivalents (DBE) and C27-28 SO5 species with 5 DBE. ESI-MS/MS collision-induced losses were due to water, methanol, water plus methanol and water plus methyl formate, typical of methyl esters of hydroxy acids. Once the fraction was re-saponified, species originally detected by positive ion MS, could be detected only by negative ion MS, consistent with their assignment as sulphur-containing hydroxy carboxylic acids. The free acid of a keto dibenzothiophene alkanoic acid was added to an unesterified acid extract of OSPW in known concentrations as a putative internal standard, but attempted quantification in this way proved unreliable. The results suggest the more polar acidic organic SO3 constituents of OSPW include C15-28  S-containing, alicyclic and aromatic hydroxy carboxylic acids. SO5 species are possibly sulphone analogues of these. The origin of such compounds is probably via further biotransformation (hydroxylation) of the related S-containing carboxylic acids identified previously in a less polar OSPW fraction. The environmental risks, corrosivity and oil flow assurance effects should be easier to assess, given that partial structures are now known

  13. Liver function and bacteriology of organs in broiler inoculated with nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium and treated with organic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane M. Rocha

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available AbAns etxrpaecritment was carried out with 630 one-day-old chicks to evaluate the effects of organic acids when birds were experimentally inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium. Liver damage and the persistence of the bacterium in the organs were evaluated as well. Broilers were distributed in a completely randomised experimental design in a 3×2 factorial arrangement of six treatments with seven replicates of 15 birds each. Birds were inoculated with saline solution or the bacterium via gavage at 1 day of age, or were offered a feed containing or not the organic acid blend for the period of 7 to 14 days of age. A dose of 5.0x102 colony-forming units (CFU/0.5 mL of Salmonella Typhimurium was used for inoculation both via gavage and feed. The parameters evaluated are weight, liver histopathology, liver and serum biochemistry, and bacteriological analyses of the caeca, crop, spleen, and liver and heart pool. At 21 and 28 days of age, the liver of the non-inoculated groups was significantly lighter as compared to the other treatments. Birds fed organic acids presented lower bacterial isolation rates in all organs tested. Birds inoculated in the crop and treated with organic acids presented lower E. coli CFU counts (P<0.05. Birds inoculated with Salmonella presented significant changes (P<0.05 in liver enzymes, as detected by serum biochemistry, and in liver histopathology. It was concluded that organic acids effectively controlled Salmonella Typhimurium and did not cause any liver damage.

  14. Toxicity of peracetic acid to fish: Variation among species and impact of water chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straus, David L.; Meinelt, Thomas; Liu, Dibo

    2017-01-01

    of fingerling fish that are important to aquaculture were exposed to PAA for 24 h in static toxicity bioassays in well water. These fish were: fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas; black-nose crappie, Pomoxis nigromaculatus; bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus; blue tilapia, Oreochromis aureus; channel catfish......There has been strong interest in the use of peracetic acid (PAA) in aquaculture as it can be used to disinfect water and hard surfaces and thereby eliminate or lower the burden of fish pathogens. Unfortunately, there has been little research on the toxicity of PAA to fish. Twelve species...... of dissolved organic content had no effect on PAA toxicity. Results of the present study are important information on the safe application of PAA for the aquaculture industry...

  15. The coagulation characteristics of humic acid by using acid-soluble chitosan, water-soluble chitosan, and chitosan coagulant mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Wu, Chung-Yu; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a potential substitute for traditional aluminium salts in water treatment systems. This study compared the characteristics of humic acid (HA) removal by using acid-soluble chitosan, water-soluble chitosan, and coagulant mixtures of chitosan with aluminium sulphate (alum) or polyaluminium chloride (PACl). In addition, we evaluated their respective coagulation efficiencies at various coagulant concentrations, pH values, turbidities, and hardness levels. Furthermore, we determined the size and settling velocity of flocs formed by these coagulants to identify the major factors affecting HA coagulation. The coagulation efficiency of acid- and water-soluble chitosan for 15 mg/l of HA was 74.4% and 87.5%, respectively. The optimal coagulation range of water-soluble chitosan (9-20 mg/l) was broader than that of acid-soluble chitosan (4-8 mg/l). Notably, acid-soluble chitosan/PACl and water-soluble chitosan/alum coagulant mixtures exhibited a higher coagulation efficiency for HA than for PACl or alum alone. Furthermore, these coagulant mixtures yielded an acceptable floc settling velocity and savings in both installation and operational expenses. Based on these results, we confidently assert that coagulant mixtures with a 1:1 mass ratio of acid-soluble chitosan/PACl and water-soluble chitosan/alum provide a substantially more cost-effective alternative to using chitosan alone for removing HA from water.

  16. Quantitative detection of Amino Acid, Organic Acid and Sugar using an Electrode-separated Piezoelectric Quartz Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Toshiaki; Yamamura, Satoshi; Arikawa, Yukihiko

    An electrode-separated piezoelectric quartz crystal (electrode-separated PQC) is constructed with no electrode attached to either side of the quartz plate, but electrodes are separately inserted in the electrolyte solution on both sides of the quartz plate, and are connected to an oscillator. The frequency shifts due to the solution properties and the mass change on the quartz plate is just the same as for a normal piezoelectric quartz crystal (normal PQC) having two electrodes. The electrode-separated PQC will be more useful than the normal PQC because it can be made smaller, higher frequency, and then cheaper. Amino acid, organic acid and sugar are important substances in the alcoholic beverage made by fermentation, such as sake. The Amino acids were determined using electrode-separated PQC coated with chitosan in copper (II) solution. Formation of complex with chitosan on the quartz plate, Cu(II) and amino acid in the sample solution induced the frequency shift of PQC. On the other hand, using non-coated electrode-separated PQC, concentration of organic acid and sugar in the liquid were determined, because the frequency of the crystal filled with the liquid containing organic acid and sugar was shifted with the viscosity and conductivity, respectively.

  17. The effect of water, ascorbic acid, and cranberry derived supplementation on human urine and uropathogen adhesion to silicone rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habash, MB; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Reid, G

    In this study, urine was collected from groups of volunteers following the consumption of water, ascorbic acid, or cranberry supplements. Only ascorbic acid intake consistently produced acidic urine. Photospectroscopy data indicated that increased water consumption produced urine with lower protein

  18. The Use of Supported Acidic Ionic Liquids in Organic Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Skoda-Földes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catalysts obtained by the immobilisation of acidic ionic liquids (ILs on solid supports offer several advantages compared to the use of catalytically active ILs themselves. Immobilisation may result in an increase in the number of accessible active sites of the catalyst and a reduction of the amount of the IL required. The ionic liquid films on the carrier surfaces provide a homogeneous environment for catalytic reactions but the catalyst appears macroscopically as a dry solid, so it can simply be separated from the reaction mixture. As another advantage, it can easily be applied in a continuous fixed bed reactor. In the present review the main synthetic strategies towards the preparation of supported Lewis acidic and Brønsted acidic ILs are summarised. The most important characterisation methods and structural features of the supported ionic liquids are presented. Their efficiency in catalytic reactions is discussed with special emphasis on their recyclability.

  19. Particulate organic matter distribution along the lower Amazon River: addressing aquatic ecology concepts using fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortillaro, Jean-Michel; Rigal, François; Rybarczyk, Hervé; Bernardes, Marcelo; Abril, Gwenaël; Meziane, Tarik

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in understanding the Amazon basin functioning is to ascertain the role played by floodplains in the organic matter (OM) cycle, crucial for a large spectrum of ecological mechanisms. Fatty acids (FAs) were combined with environmental descriptors and analyzed through multivariate and spatial tools (asymmetric eigenvector maps, AEM and principal coordinates of neighbor matrices, PCNM). This challenge allowed investigating the distribution of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM), in order to trace its seasonal origin and quality, along a 800 km section of the Amazon river-floodplain system. Statistical analysis confirmed that large amounts of saturated FAs (15:0, 18:0, 24:0, 25:0 and 26:0), an indication of refractory OM, were concomitantly recorded with high pCO(2) in rivers, during the high water season (HW). Contrastingly, FAs marker which may be attributed in this ecosystem to aquatic plants (18:2ω6 and 18:3ω3) and cyanobacteria (16:1ω7), were correlated with higher O(2), chlorophyll a and pheopigments in floodplains, due to a high primary production during low waters (LW). Decreasing concentrations of unsaturated FAs, that characterize labile OM, were recorded during HW, from upstream to downstream. Furthermore, using PCNM and AEM spatial methods, FAs compositions of SPOM displayed an upstream-downstream gradient during HW, which was attributed to OM retention and the extent of flooded forest in floodplains. Discrimination of OM quality between the Amazon River and floodplains corroborate higher autotrophic production in the latter and transfer of OM to rivers at LW season. Together, these gradients demonstrate the validity of FAs as predictors of spatial and temporal changes in OM quality. These spatial and temporal trends are explained by 1) downstream change in landscape morphology as predicted by the River Continuum Concept; 2) enhanced primary production during LW when the water level decreased and its residence time

  20. Estimation of the soil-water partition coefficient normalized to organic carbon for ionizable organic chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Antonio; Trapp, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    calculated by the software ACD/Labs®. The Henderson-Hasselbalch equation was applied to calculate dissociation. Regressions were developed to predict separately for the neutral and the ionic molecule species the distribution coefficient (Kd) normalized to organic carbon (KOC) from log KOW and pKa. The log...... was highly correlated to log KOW. For bases, a nonlinear regression was developed, too. The new regression equations are applicable in the whole pKa range of acids, bases, and amphoters and are useful in particular for relatively strong bases and amphoters, for which no predictive methods specifically have...

  1. Detection of trace amino acid biomarkers in ice from extreme environments with the Mars Organic Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarajah, Christine; Jayarajah, Christine; Botta, Oliver; Aubrey, Andrew; Parker, Eric; Bada, Jeffrey; Mathies, Richard

    A portable microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) system named the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA) has been developed to analyze fluorescently-labeled biomarkers including amino acids, amines, nucleobases, and amino sugars with the goal of life detection on Mars (1,2). This system consists of a multilayer microfabricated glass wafer containing electrophoresis channels as well as microfluidic valves and pumps for sample manipulation, a confocal laser excitation and fluorescence detection system, and integrated CE power supplies. The MOA has been successfully field tested in the Panoche Valley, CA and in the Atacama Desert, Chile, detecting amino acids at the ppb levels (3). In addition, this technology has been shown to be effective in screening the formation of biogenic amines during fermentation (4). The MOA is a part of the Urey instrument package that has been selected for the 2013 European ExoMars mission by ESA. The identification of recent gully erosion sites, observations of ice on and beneath the surface of Mars, and the discovery of large reservoirs of sub-surface ice on Mars point to water-ice as an important target for astrobiological analyses (5). In addition, the ice moons Europa and Enceladus are of astrobiological interest due to the possibility that they may contain liquid water under their ice crusts. Consequently, we explore here the use of the MOA instrument for the analysis of amino acids in polar ice samples. Soil extracts as well as concentrated icecore samples tend to be highly saline and inhomogeneous. Furthermore, brine pockets in ice form potential refugia for extant extra-terrestrial life, rendering near surface ice a key target for the search for a record of past life on the planet (6). Therefore, we have determined the effect of salinity on sample injection parameters in ice-core samples retrieved from Greenland. The amino acids valine, alanine/serine, glycine, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid were found in the parts

  2. Determination of biological removal of recalcitrant organic contaminants in coal gasification waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qinhong; Tabassum, Salma; Yu, Guangxin; Chu, Chunfeng; Zhang, Zhenjia

    2015-01-01

    Coal gasification waste water treatment needed a sustainable and affordable plan to eliminate the organic contaminants in order to lower the potential environmental and human health risk. In this paper, a laboratory-scale anaerobic-aerobic intermittent system carried out 66 operational cycles together for the treatment of coal gasification waste water and the removal capacity of each organic pollutant. Contaminants included phenols, carboxylic acids, long-chain hydrocarbons, and heterocyclic compounds, wherein the relative content of phenol is up to 57.86%. The long-term removal of 77 organic contaminants was evaluated at different hydraulic retention time (anaerobic24 h + aerobic48 h and anaerobic48 h +aerobic48 h). Contaminant removal ranged from no measurable removal to near-complete removal with effluent concentrations below the detection limit. Contaminant removals followed one of four trends: steady-state removal throughout, increasing removal to steady state (acclimation), decreasing removal, and no removal. Organic degradation and transformation in the reaction were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technology.

  3. Viscous organic aerosol particles in the upper troposphere: diffusivity-controlled water uptake and ice nucleation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Lienhard

    2015-12-01

    secondary organic aerosol (SOA material produced by oxidation of α-pinene and in a number of organic/inorganic model mixtures (3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA, levoglucosan, levoglucosan/NH4HSO4, raffinose are presented. These indicate that water diffusion coefficients are determined by several properties of the aerosol substance and cannot be inferred from the glass transition temperature or bouncing properties. Our results suggest that water diffusion in SOA particles is faster than often assumed and imposes no significant kinetic limitation on water uptake and release at temperatures above 220 K. The fast diffusion of water suggests that heterogeneous ice nucleation on a glassy core is very unlikely in these systems. At temperatures below 220 K, model simulations of SOA particles suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation may occur in the immersion mode on glassy cores which remain embedded in a liquid shell when experiencing fast updraft velocities. The particles absorb significant quantities of water during these updrafts which plasticize their outer layers such that these layers equilibrate readily with the gas phase humidity before the homogeneous ice nucleation threshold is reached. Glass formation is thus unlikely to restrict homogeneous ice nucleation. Only under most extreme conditions near the very high tropical tropopause may the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient be reduced as a consequence of slow condensed-phase water diffusion. Since the differences between the behavior limited or non limited by diffusion are small even at the very high tropical tropopause, condensed-phase water diffusivity is unlikely to have significant consequences on the direct climatic effects of SOA particles under tropospheric conditions.

  4. Application of the CPA equation of state to organic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derawi, Samer; Zeuthen, Frederik Jacob; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2004-01-01

    a strong tendency to dimerise in the vapor phase at normal condition resulting in strong non-ideal behavior, even at low pressures. Pure compound parameters have been determined from vapor pressure and liquid density data for the three acids. Among the three tested association schemes (one-site, two......-site, and four-site), only the one-site association scheme describes satisfactorily the association in both the gas and the liquid phase. Second virial coefficients axe predicted well with the proposed one-site model. Excellent binary VLE and acceptable LLE correlations have been obtained for acid + aliphatic...

  5. Effect of Periodic Water Addition on Citric Acid Production in Solid State Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utpat, Shraddha S.; Kinnige, Pallavi T.; Dhamole, Pradip B.

    2013-09-01

    Water addition is one of the methods used to control the moisture loss in solid state fermentation (SSF). However, none of the studies report the timing of water addition and amount of water to be added in SSF. Therefore, this work was undertaken with an objective to evaluate the performance of periodic water addition on citric acid production in SSF. Experiments were conducted at different moistures (50-80 %) and temperatures (30-40 °C) to simulate the conditions in a fermenter. Citric acid production by Aspergillus niger (ATCC 9029) using sugarcane baggase was chosen as a model system. Based on the moisture profile, citric acid and sugar data, a strategy was designed for periodic addition of water. Water addition at 48, 96, 144 and 192 h enhanced the citric acid production by 62 % whereas water addition at 72, 120, and 168 h increased the citric acid production by just 17 %.

  6. Semi-volatile organic pollutants in Jordanian surface water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya R. Tahboub

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Jordan relies heavily on rainwater stored in reservoirs because it has extremely limited alternative water resources. These reservoirs are essential for drinking water and irrigation, so monitoring their water quality is extremely important. In this study we monitored 55 semi-volatile organic chemicals (SVOCs in monthly samples from the Zarqa River and three reservoirs between April and August 2010, and also screened the samples for non-target pollutants. Twelve SVOCs were detected and quantified at King Talal Dam followed by ten at Zarqa River and four each at Wadi Al-Arab and Mujib dams. Phenol and phthalate esters were detected at wide range concentrations (0.01–25 μg/L in all water samples. Phenol has the highest level at the Zarqa River (18.5 ± 5.5 μg/L followed by King Talal (12.5 ± 2.5 μg/L and Wadi Al-Arab (2.5 ± 0.63 μg/L. Phthalate esters (total were detected at the Zarqa River, King Talal, Wadi Al-Arab, and Mujib dams at levels 3.85, 3.75, 1.03 and 0.12 μg/L. Other contaminants, including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, were detected at low concentrations in the King Talal Dam reservoir and Zarqa River samples. Two non-targeted phosphate plasticizers, tri-n-butylphosphate and tris(2-chloroethylphosphate were identified in the July and August Zarqa River samples. A comparison study reveals that SVOC pollution of surface water in Jordan is within acceptable international limits, but long-term monitoring programs should be implemented.

  7. Pattern of Aluminum-Induced Secretion of Organic Acids Differs between Rye and Wheat1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao Feng; Ma, Jian Feng; Matsumoto, Hideaki

    2000-01-01

    Al-Induced secretion of organic acids from the roots has been considered as a mechanism of Al tolerance, but the processes leading to the secretion of organic acids are still unknown. In this study, the secretion pattern and alteration in the metabolism of organic acids under Al stress were examined in rye (Secale cereale L. cv King) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Atlas 66). Al induced rapid secretion of malate in the wheat, but a lag (6 and 10 h for malic and citric acids, respectively) between the exposure to Al and the secretion of organic acids was observed in the rye. The activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, and malate dehydrogenase were not affected by Al in either plant. The activity of citrate synthase was increased by the exposure to Al in the rye, but not in the wheat. The secretion of malate was not suppressed at low temperature in the wheat, but that of citrate was stopped in the rye. The Al-induced secretion of citrate from roots of the rye was inhibited by the inhibitors of a citrate carrier, which transports citrate from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm. All of these results suggest that alteration in the metabolism of organic acids is involved in the Al-induced secretion of organic acids in rye, but only activation of an anion channel seems to be responsible for the rapid secretion of malate in the wheat. PMID:10938369

  8. Relative Order of Sulfuric Acid, Bisulfate, Hydronium, and Cations at the Air-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wei; Verreault, Dominique; Allen, Heather C

    2015-11-04

    Sulfuric acid (H2SO4), bisulfate (HSO4(-)), and sulfate (SO4(2-)) are among the most abundant species in tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols due to high levels of atmospheric SO2 emitted from biomass burning and volcanic eruptions. The air/aqueous interfaces of sulfuric acid and bisulfate solutions play key roles in heterogeneous reactions, acid rain, radiative balance, and polar stratospheric cloud nucleation. Molecular-level knowledge about the interfacial distribution of these inorganic species and their perturbation of water organization facilitates a better understanding of the reactivity and growth of atmospheric aerosols and of the aerosol surface charge, thus shedding light on topics of air pollution, climate change, and thundercloud electrification. Here, the air/aqueous interface of NaHSO4, NH4HSO4, and Mg(HSO4)2 salt solutions as well as H2SO4 and HCl acid solutions are investigated by means of vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) and heterodyne-detected (HD) VSFG spectroscopy. VSFG spectra of all acid solutions show higher SFG response in the OH-bonded region relative to neat water, with 1.1 M H2SO4 being more enhanced than 1.1 M HCl. In addition, VSFG spectra of bisulfate salt solutions highly resemble that of the dilute H2SO4 solution (0.26 M) at a comparable pH. HD-VSFG (Im χ((2))) spectra of acid and bisulfate salt solutions further reveal that hydrogen-bonded water molecules are oriented preferentially toward the bulk liquid phase. General agreement between Im χ((2)) spectra of 1.1 M H2SO4 and 1.1 M HCl acid solutions indicate that HSO4(-) ions have a similar surface preference as that of chloride (Cl(-)) ions. By comparing the direction and magnitude of the electric fields arising from the interfacial ion distributions and the concentration of each species, the most reasonable relative surface preference that can be deduced from a simplified model follows the order H3O(+) > HSO4(-) > Na(+), NH4(+), Mg(2+) > SO4(2-). Interestingly

  9. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, glyoxylic acid and glyoxal in tropical aerosols: implications for photochemical processes of organic aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelyus L. Mkoma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tropical aerosols of PM2.5 and PM10 were collected at a rural site in Morogoro, Tanzania (East Africa, and analysed for stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C of dicarboxylic acids (C2–C9, glyoxylic acid (ωC2 and glyoxal (Gly using gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometer. PM2.5 samples showed that δ13C of oxalic (C2 acid are largest (mean, −18.3±1.7‰ followed by malonic (C3, −19.6±1.0‰ and succinic (C4, −21.8±2.2‰ acids, whereas those in PM10 are a little smaller: −19.9±3.1‰ (C2, −20.2±2.7‰ (C3 and −23.3±3.2‰ (C4. The δ13C of C2–C4 diacids showed a decreasing trend with an increase in carbon numbers. The higher δ13C values of oxalic acid can be explained by isotopic enrichment of 13C in the remaining C2 due to the atmospheric decomposition of oxalic acid or its precursors. δ13C of ωC2 and Gly that are precursors of oxalic acid also showed larger values (mean, −22.5‰ and −20.2‰, respectively in PM2.5 than those (−26.7‰ and −23.7‰ in PM10. The δ13C values of ωC2 and Gly are smaller than those of C2 in both PM2.5 and PM10. On the other hand, azelaic acid (C9; mean, −28.5‰ is more depleted in 13C, which is consistent with the previous knowledge; that is, C9 is produced by the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids emitted from terrestrial higher plants. A significant enrichment of 13C in oxalic acid together with its negative correlations with relative abundance of C2 in total diacids and ratios of water-soluble organic carbon and organic carbon further support that a photochemical degradation of oxalic acid occurs during long-range transport from source regions.

  10. Adsorption and Separation of Aromatic Amino Acids from Aqueous Solutions Using Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, Dries; Steele, Julian A; Claes, Birgit; Bueken, Bart; Claes, Laurens; Lagrain, Bert; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; De Vos, Dirk E

    2017-09-06

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are investigated for the adsorption of aromatic amino acids l-phenylalanine (l-Phe), l-tryptophan (l-Trp), and l-tyrosine (l-Tyr) from aqueous solutions. After screening a range of water-stable MOFs, the hydrophobic Zr-MOF MIL-140C emerged as the best performing material, exhibiting uptakes of 15 wt % for l-Trp and 20 wt % for l-Phe. These uptakes are 5-10 wt % higher than those of large-pore zeolites Beta and Y. Both single-compound and competitive adsorption isotherms for l-Phe and l-Trp were experimentally obtained at the natural pH of these amino acid mixtures (pH 6.5-7) without additional pH modification. We find that the hydrophobic nature of MIL-140C and the capacity of l-Trp to form hydrogen bonds favor the uptake of l-Trp with its larger indole moiety compared to the smaller phenyl side group of l-Phe. On the basis of literature and vibrational analysis, observations of hydrogen-bonded l-Trp within the MIL-140C framework are evidenced by red- and blue-shifted -NH vibrations (3400 cm -1 ) in Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, which were attributed to types N-H l-Trp ···π MIL-140C and N-H l-Trp ···O MIL-140C , respectively. MIL-140C is shown to be recycled at least three times for both aromatic amino acids without any loss of adsorption capacity, separation performance, or crystallinity. Desorption of aromatic amino acids proceeds easily in aqueous ethanol. Substantial coadsorption of negatively charged amino acids l-glutamate and l-aspartate (l-Glu and l-Asp) was observed from a model solution for wheat straw protein hydrolysate at pH 4.3. On the basis of these results, we conclude that MIL-140C is an interesting material for the recovery of essential aromatic amino acids l-Tyr, l-Phe, and l-Trp and of l-Glu and l-Asp from waste protein hydrolysates.

  11. Water and organic nitrate detection in an AMS. Laboratory characterization and application to ambient measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensah, Amewu A.

    2011-08-12

    Atmospheric aerosols were studied by three different means. Laboratory experiments determined the relative ionization efficiency of water (RIE{sub H2O}) in an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS), simulation chamber experiments gave insight to the reaction products of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) oxidation products, and the findings were applied to two field campaign measurements at Cabauw, NL, in May 2008 and February 2009. Knowing the liquid water content of aerosol particles is vital for the assessment of their climate forcing potential. A value of 2 for RIE{sub H2O} was determined by studying oxalate salts with different amounts of crystal water. BVOCs contribute much more to the global budget of VOCs than anthropogenic ones but oxidation products in terms of secondary organic aerosol often correlate to anthropogenic tracers such as NO{sub x} from fossil fuel burning. In atmospheric simulation chamber experiments, organic nitrates from BVOC-NO{sub 3} oxidation showed higher vapor pressures than pure organic compounds produced in the same reactions. Organic nitrates comprised up to approx. 41 % of the particulate phase. A specific fragmentation ratio of nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup +}/NO{sup +}) of 0.1 was found by high resolution AMS analysis differing strongly from the value of 0.4 known for the most abundant ambient NO{sub 3} specie (NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}). Ambient average particulate mass loadings were 9.72 {mu}g/m{sup 3} dominated by organics (40 %) in 2008 and 5.62 {mu}g/m{sup 3} dominated by nitrate (42 %) in 2009. Data comparison to collocated instruments showed good agreement. Positive Matrix Factorization analysis of the particulate organic fraction distinguished semi and low volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) as well as hydrocarbon like organic aerosol (HOA) in both campaigns. An additional highly oxygenated OA with a mass spectrum very similar to fulvic acid was found in 2008. The average contribution of organic nitrate to the

  12. Organ- and species-specific biological activity of rosmarinic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iswandana, R.; Pham, B.T.; van Haaften, W.T.; Luangmonkong, T.; Oosterhuis, D.; Mutsaers, H.A.M.; Olinga, P.

    2016-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA), a compound found in several plant species, has beneficial properties, including anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. We investigated the toxicity, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects of RA using precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) and precision-cut intestinal

  13. Students' Understanding of Acids/Bases in Organic Chemistry Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartrette, David P.; Mayo, Provi M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding key foundational principles is vital to learning chemistry across different contexts. One such foundational principle is the acid/base behavior of molecules. In the general chemistry sequence, the Bronsted-Lowry theory is stressed, because it lends itself well to studying equilibrium and kinetics. However, the Lewis theory of…

  14. Production of organic acids in an immobilized cell reactor using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-17

    Sep 17, 2008 ... form granules. The culture medium is then supplied to the fermentor to initiate the fermentation (Summers, ... was used to transfer feed medium from a 20-liter polypropylene autoclaveable Nalgene carboy (Cole- Parmer, Vernon ... Micrococcus luteus. CM-cellulose. Urocanic acid. Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  15. Recombinant cells and organisms having persistent nonstandard amino acid dependence and methods of making them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Mandell, Daniel J.; Lajoie, Marc J.

    2017-12-05

    Recombinant cells and recombinant organisms persistently expressing nonstandard amino acids (NSAAs) are provided. Methods of making recombinant cells and recombinant organisms dependent on persistently expressing NSAAs for survival are also provided. These methods may be used to make safe recombinant cells and recombinant organisms and/or to provide a selective pressure to maintain one or more reassigned codon functions in recombinant cells and recombinant organisms.

  16. Sensitive Amino Acid Composition and Chirality Analysis with the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Alison M.; Scherer, James R.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Grover, William H.; Ivester, Robin H. C.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of life on Mars requires definition of a suitable biomarker and development of sensitive yet compact instrumentation capable of performing in situ analyses. Our studies are focused on amino acid analysis because amino acids are more resistant to decomposition than other biomolecules, and because amino acid chirality is a well-defined biomarker. Amino acid composition and chirality analysis has been previously demonstrated in the lab using microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) chips. To analyze amino acids in the field, we have developed the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA), a portable analysis system that consists of a compact instrument and a novel multi-layer CE microchip.

  17. AMINO ACID-BASED FERTILIZER AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO CALDA VIÇOSA IN ORGANIC AGRICULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Fontebasso Pelizari Pinto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to propose a mixture of micronutrients with amino acid-based foliar fertilizer as an alternative to calda viçosa for application in organic agriculture. The study was conducted in two simultaneous trials in an experimental field in Ipeúna, SP, Brazil. The test plant was carioca type dry edible bean cv. Pérola. The treatments in trial 1 were: Control 1 = water; FA = JK® amino acid-based foliar fertilizer; and FA+Mi = FA + CuSO4 + ZnSO4 + MnSO4 + H3BO3. In trial 2, the FA treatment was substituted by calda viçosa (CVi. The treatments were through spray application three times. Dry edible bean leaves were sampled for determination of macronutrient and micronutrient concentrations. Platings of the application rates used in the treatments were performed in the laboratory in a mixture with Bacillus thuringiensis and with Beauveria bassiana to compare the degree of compatibility by means of colony forming units (CFU. The FA+Mi and CVi treatments raised the concentrations of Zn, Cu, and Mn in the leaves. The FA+Mi was compatible, the FA was a stimulant, and the CVi was noxious to B. bassiana and to B. thuringiensis when integrated in the spray mixture.

  18. Water adsorption and proton conduction in metal-organic frameworks: Insights from molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paesani, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a relatively new class of porous materials that hold great potential for a wide range of applications in chemistry, materials science, and nanoengineering. Compared to other porous materials such as zeolites, MOF properties are highly tunable. In particular, it has been shown that both size and shape of the MOF pores can be rationally designed for specific applications. For example, the ability to modify the framework properties with respect to hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity and acidity/basicity can enable the direct control of proton conduction through carrier molecules adsorbed inside the pores. Here, I report on our current efforts aimed at providing a molecular-level characterization of water-mediated proton conduction through the MOF pores. Particular emphasis will be put on correlation between proton conduction and both structural and chemical properties of the frameworks as well as on the dynamical behavior of water confined in the MOF pores. NSF award number: DMR-130510

  19. Ultrafast water sensing and thermal imaging by a metal-organic framework with switchable luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Ye, Jia-Wen; Wang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Mei; Yin, Shao-Yun; Wei, Zhang-Wen; Zhang, Lu-Yin; Wu, Kai; Fan, Ya-Nan; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2017-06-01

    A convenient, fast and selective water analysis method is highly desirable in industrial and detection processes. Here a robust microporous Zn-MOF (metal-organic framework, Zn(hpi2cf)(DMF)(H2O)) is assembled from a dual-emissive H2hpi2cf (5-(2-(5-fluoro-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,5-bis(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-imidazol-1-yl)isophthalic acid) ligand that exhibits characteristic excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). This Zn-MOF contains amphipathic micropores (sensing material, showing a fast (on the order of seconds) and highly selective response to water on a molecular level. Furthermore, paper or in situ grown ZnO-based sensing films have been fabricated and applied in humidity sensing (RHorganic solvents, thermal imaging and as a thermometer.

  20. Ceramic membrane ozonator for soluble organics removal from produced water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siagian, U. W. R.; Dwipramana, A. S.; Perwira, S. B.; Khoiruddin; Wenten, I. G.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, the performance of ozonation for degradation of soluble organic compounds in produced water was investigated. Tubular ceramic membrane diffuser (with and without a static mixer in the lumen side) was used to facilitate contact between ozone and produced water. The ozonation was conducted at ozone flow rate of 8 L.min-1, ozone concentration of 0.4 ppm, original pH of the solution, and pressure of 1.2 bar, while the flow rates of the produced water were varied (192, 378 and 830 mL.min-1). It was found that the reduction of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene were 85%, 99%, 85%, and 95%, respectively. A lower liquid flow rate in a laminar state showed a better component reduction due to the longer contacting time between the liquid and the gas phase. The introduction of the static mixer in the lumen side of the membrane as a turbulence promoter provided a positive effect on the performance of the membrane diffuser. The twisted static mixer exhibited the better removal rate than the spiral static mixer.

  1. Partitioning of tetra- and pentabromo diphenyl ether and benzo[a]pyrene among water and dissolved and particulate organic carbon along a salinity gradient in coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuivikko, Miika; Sorsa, Karoliina; Kukkonen, Jussi V K; Akkanen, Jarkko; Kotiaho, Tapio; Vähätalo, Anssi V

    2010-11-01

    This study assessed the partitioning of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromo diphenyl ether (BDE-47), 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromo diphenyl ether (BDE-99) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) among water, dissolved organic carbon (DOC: 4.93-8.72 mg/L), and particulate organic carbon (POC: 191-462 µg/L) along the salinity gradient (0-5.5‰) of the Baltic Sea off the coast of Finland. Equilibrium dialysis and two solid-phase extraction techniques using polyoxymethylene polymer (POM) were used to determine partitioning coefficients. Experiments using artificial coastal water (ACW) with Nordic fulvic (FAs) and humic acids (HAs) were used to assess the effect of salinity (0 and 5.5‰) on the DOC-water partitioning of the model compounds. All three compounds bound more (2.2-3.8-fold) to the HAs than to the FAs. Increasing salinity from 0 to 5.5‰ decreased sorption to dissolved humic substances in the ACW and Baltic Sea water samples. Along the salinity gradient, the sorption of compounds to organic material decreased when the salinity increased. Particulate organic matter sorbed model compounds per unit of carbon more than dissolved organic matter. Along the studied salinity gradient, the freely dissolved portion increased from 10 to 29% to 52 to 80% in the coastal water samples, mainly because of the increasing salinity and changes in DOC and quality of POC. © 2010 SETAC.

  2. Impact of water quality and irrigation management on organic greenhouse horticulture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorais, M.; Alsanius, B.W.; Voogt, W.; Pepin, S.; Tuzel, Hakki; Tuzel, Yuksel; Möller, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Water quality and water supply are essential for organic greenhouse grown crops to prevent soil contamination by undesirable chemicals and microorganisms, while providing the correct amount of water required for plant growth. The absence of natural precipitation combined with higher

  3. Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN behavior of organic aerosol particles generated by atomization of water and methanol solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Rissman

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN experiments were carried out for malonic acid, succinic acid, oxalacetic acid, DL-malic acid, glutaric acid, DL-glutamic acid monohydrate, and adipic acid, using both water and methanol as atomization solvents, at three operating supersaturations (0.11%, 0.21%, and 0.32% in the Caltech three-column CCN instrument (CCNC3. Predictions of CCN behavior for five of these compounds were made using the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM. The experiments presented here expose important considerations associated with the laboratory measurement of the CCN behavior of organic compounds. Choice of atomization solvent results in significant differences in CCN activation for some of the compounds studied, which could result from residual solvent, particle morphology differences, and chemical reactions between the particle and gas phases. Also, significant changes in aerosol size distribution occurred after classification in a differential mobility analyzer (DMA for malonic acid and glutaric acid, preventing confident interpretation of experimental data for these two compounds. Filter analysis of adipic acid atomized from methanol solution indicates that gas-particle phase reactions may have taken place after atomization and before methanol was removed from the sample gas stream. Careful consideration of these experimental issues is necessary for successful design and interpretation of laboratory CCN measurements.

  4. Comparison of Cultivable Acetic Acid Bacterial Microbiota in Organic and Conventional Apple Cider Vinegar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aleksandra Stornik; Barbara Skok; Janja Trcek

    2016-01-01

      The authors compared the cultivable acetic acid bacterial microbiota in the production of organic and conventional apple cider vinegars from a smoothly running oxidation cycle of a submerged industrial process...

  5. Organic acid based sanitizers and free chlorine to improve the microbial quality and shelf-life of sugar snaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Haute, Sam; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Sampers, Imca

    2013-10-15

    A screening in a sugar snap packaging company showed a converged build-up of aerobic psychrotrophic plate count (APC) (ca. 6.5 log CFU/100mL), yeasts and molds (Y&M), and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) (both ca. 4.5 log CFU/100mL) in the wash water in the absence of water sanitizer, and a low build-up of chemical oxygen demand (30 ± 5 mg O2/L) and turbidity (5.2 ± 1.1 NTU). Decontamination experiments were performed in the lab with Purac FCC 80® (80% L(+) lactic acid), two other commercial water sanitizers based on organic acids (NATRApHASe-ABAV®, and NATRApHASe-FVS®) and chlorine to evaluate their performance in reduction of the sugar snap microbial load as well as their functionality as disinfectant of the wash water to avoid cross-contamination. An additional 1 log reduction of APC on the sugar snaps was achieved with lactic acid in the range 0.8 to 1.6%, ABAV 0.5%, and free chlorine 200mg/L when compared to a water wash, while no significant difference in the numbers of Y&M was obtained when washing in sanitizer compared to water. There was no significant influence of the studied concentration and contact time on decontamination efficiency. Treatment with lactic acid 0.8% resulted in a lower APC contamination on the sugar snaps than on the untreated and water washed samples for 10 days. Chlorine 200mg/L was the only treatment able to maintain the Y&M load lower than the untreated samples throughout the entire storage duration. The use of water sanitizers could not extend the sensorial shelf-life. Microbial loads were not indicative/predictive of visual microbial spoilage (shelf-life limiting factor), whereas maturity and amount of damage at the calyx end of the pods were. The APC wash water contamination (5.2 log CFU/100mL) was reduced significantly by chlorine 20 to 200mg/L (to 1.4 log CFU/100mL), ABAV 0.5 to 1.5% (to 2.7 log CFU/100mL), FVS 0.5% (to 2.7 log CFU/100mL) and lactic acid 0.8 to 1.6% (to 3.4 log CFU/100mL). Only the use of chlorine enabled the

  6. Preservation effect of organic acids on microbial, chemical and organoleptic parameters of chicken meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hajipour

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adding edible acids to food products not only has inhibitory effects on microorganisms, but also causes an appropriate flavor and color. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the preservation effect of organic acids on microbial, chemical and organoleptic parameters of chicken meat. Methods: This experimental study was conducted in 200 samples of chicken meat in Koohdasht, 2014. The chicken thighs were sprayed with sterilized citric acid 1%, acetic acid 1%, and propionic acid 1%. The samples were packed and were kept at 4º C temperature, and were examined with 2 days intervals. The effect of different treatments were studied in terms of microbial (count of mesophilic aerobes, coliforms, psychotropic bacteria and anaerobes, chemical (pH, total volatile nitrogen, and organoleptic (drip loss, flavor, and color quality parameters. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, LSD and Kruskal–Wallis tests. Findings: The bacterial growth and shelf life were significantly different between the controls and the samples treated with acetic acid and propionic acid. The samples treated with citric acid were significantly different from the samples treated with acetic acid and propionic acid in terms of bacterial growth and shelf life. But there was no significant difference between the samples treated with acetic acid and propionic acid. With regards to the microbial, chemical, and organoleptic parameters, the controls, the samples treated with citric acid, and the samples treated with acetic acid and propionic acid were preserved for 4 days, 5 days, and 6-7 days, respectively. Conclusion: With regards to the results, organic acids (1% were effective in extending the shelf life of chicken meat without adverse effect on organoleptic parameters.

  7. Characterization of interaction between amino acids and fulvic-like organic matter by fluorescence spectroscopy combining thermodynamic calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Hou, Bingwei; Wang, Jian; Xu, Yaqun; Chen, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM), as a very fine colloidal suspension, could inevitably affect the transformation process of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in drinking water treatment. Tryptophan and tyrosine were used as representatives of DON to investigate the interactions between amino acids and fulvic-like components of fluorescent DOM using titration experiments. The fluorescence intensity decreased significantly with the increasing fulvic acid (FA) concentration, suggesting that FA could greatly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of amino acids such as tryptophan and tyrosine. The absolute spectrum peaks of amino acids (AA) were changed in the presence of FA, possibly being resulted from non-covalent interactions between amino acids and FA. The specific hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces played dominant roles in the interactions according to the results of theoretical analysis and thermodynamic calculation. The distance between donor and acceptor was 1.25 and 1.14 nm for the FA-tyrosine and FA-tryptophan system, indicating the energy transfer from tyrosine or tryptophan to FA. The association constant (K) decreased with the increase of temperature and pH value, while the change of ionic strength had no obvious influence on K value.

  8. Sixteen isostructural phosphonate metal-organic frameworks with controlled Lewis acidity and chemical stability for asymmetric catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Peng, Yongwu; Han, Xing; Liu, Yan; Lin, Xiaochao; Cui, Yong

    2017-12-19

    Heterogeneous catalysts typically lack the specific steric control and rational electronic tuning required for precise asymmetric catalysis. Here we demonstrate that a phosphonate metal-organic framework (MOF) platform that is robust enough to accommodate up to 16 different metal clusters, allowing for systematic tuning of Lewis acidity, catalytic activity and enantioselectivity. A total of 16 chiral porous MOFs, with the framework formula [M3 L 2(solvent)2] that have the same channel structures but different surface-isolated Lewis acid metal sites, are prepared from a single phosphono-carboxylate ligand of 1,1'-biphenol and 16 different metal ions. The phosphonate MOFs possessing tert-butyl-coated channels exhibited high thermal stability and good tolerances to boiling water, weak acid and base. The MOFs provide a versatile family of heterogeneous catalysts for asymmetric allylboration, propargylation, Friedel-Crafts alkylation and sulfoxidation with good to high enantioselectivity. In contrast, the homogeneous catalyst systems cannot catalyze the test reactions enantioselectively.

  9. Different pathways for copper sulphate and copper nitrate antioxidation and organic acid excretion in Typha latifolia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubenova L.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The major topic of the present experiment was the investigation of the antioxidative enzymes and the root exudate excretion after plant exposure to copper. The copper was added for each treatment as copper sulphate and copper nitrate in the concentrations of 10 μM, 50 μM and 100 μM, respectively. The plant species chosen for the study was Typha latifolia. The experiment gives insight into the plant responses to different copper supplies during the same conditions of exposure. Remarkable results were obtained during the time course about the excretion of organic acids from Typha latifolia roots during one week of copper exposure. Oxalic acid, malic acid, acetic acid and lactic acid were detected. Interestingly, not all organic acids are excreted from the roots in the first hours after copper addition.

  10. Crystal structures of seven molecular salts derived from benzylamine and organic acidic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xianhong; Jin, Xiunan; Lv, Chengcai; Jin, Shouwen; Zheng, Xiuqing; Liu, Bin; Wang, Daqi; Guo, Ming; Xu, Weiqiang

    2017-07-01

    Cocrystallization of the commonly available organic amine, benzylamine, with a series of organic acids gave a total of seven molecular salts with the compositions: (benzylamine): (p-toluenesulfonic acid) (1) [(HL)+ · (tsa-)], (benzylamine): (o-nitrobenzoic acid) (2) [(HL+) · (onba)-], (benzylamine): (3,4-methylenedioxybenzoic acid) (3) [(HL+) · (mdba-)], (benzylamine): (mandelic acid) (4) [(HL+) · (mda-)], (benzylamine): (5-bromosalicylic acid)2(5) [(HL+) · (bsac-) · (Hbsac)], (benzylamine): (m-phthalic acid) (6) [(HL+) · (Hmpta-)], and (benzylamine)2: (trimesic acid) (7) [(HL+)2 · (Htma2-)]. The seven salts have been characterised by X-ray diffraction technique, IR, and elemental analysis, and the melting points of all the salts were also reported. And their structural and supramolecular aspects are fully analyzed. The result reveals that among the seven investigated crystals the NH2 groups in the benzylamine moieties are protonated when the organic acids are deprotonated, and the crystal packing is interpreted in terms of the strong charge-assisted Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond formation between the ammonium and the deprotonated acidic groups. Except the Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond, the Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) were also found at the salts 4-7. Further analysis of the crystal packing of the salts indicated that a different family of additional CHsbnd O/CH2sbnd O, CHsbnd π/CH2sbnd π, Osbnd O, and Osbnd Cπ associations contribute to the stabilization and expansion of the total high-dimensional (2D-3D) framework structures. For the coexistence of the various weak nonbonding interactions these structures adopted homo or hetero supramolecular synthons or both. Some classical supramolecular synthons, such as R42(8), R43(10) and R44(12), usually observed in organic solids of organic acids with amine, were again shown to be involved in constructing most of these hydrogen bonding networks.

  11. Comparison of Cultivable Acetic Acid Bacterial Microbiota in Organic and Conventional Apple Cider Vinegar

    OpenAIRE

    Štornik, Aleksandra; Skok, Barbara; Trček, Janja

    2016-01-01

    Organic apple cider vinegar is produced from apples that go through very restricted treatment in orchard. During the first stage of the process, the sugars from apples are fermented by yeasts to cider. The produced ethanol is used as a substrate by acetic acid bacteria in a second separated bioprocess. In both, the organic and conventional apple cider vinegars the ethanol oxidation to acetic acid is initiated by native microbiota that survived alcohol fermentation. We compared the cultivable ...

  12. Usnic Acid and the Intramolecular Hydrogen Bond: A Computational Experiment for the Organic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Thomas K.; Lane, Charles A.

    2006-01-01

    A computational experiment is described for the organic chemistry laboratory that allows students to estimate the relative strengths of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds of usnic and isousnic acids, two related lichen secondary metabolites. Students first extract and purify usnic acid from common lichens and obtain [superscript 1]H NMR and IR…

  13. 1,3,5-Triazine-2,4,6-triyltrisulfamic acid (TTSA): A new organic solid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    1,3,5-Triazine-2,4,6-triyltrisulfamic acid (TTSA): A new organic solid acid for the nitrosation of secondary amines ... dDepartment of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Ilam University, Ilam 69315516, Iran e-mail: chehardoli@umsha.ac.ir; ... in handling, decreased reactor and plant corrosion problems, and more environmentally ...

  14. Quantitative analysis of the modes of growth inhibition by weak organic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ullah, A.; Orij, R.; Brul, S.; Smits, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Weak organic acids are naturally occurring compounds that are commercially used as preservatives in the food and beverage industries. They extend the shelf life of food products by inhibiting microbial growth. There are a number of theories that explain the antifungal properties of these weak acids,

  15. Fast pyrolysis of organic acid leached wood, straw, hay and bagasse: Improved oil and sugar yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudenhoven, Stijn; Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Organic acid leaching of pine wood, straw, bagasse and hay effectively reduced the amount of catalytically active alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEMs). Using the (acetic) acid produced by pyrolysis as leaching agent, the AAEMs content could be reduced to 90–600 mg/kg. Tests with AAEMs

  16. Resource recovery from waste LCD panel by hydrothermal transformation of polarizer into organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Bai, Lan; He, Wenzhi; Li, Guangming; Huang, Juwen

    2015-12-15

    Based on the significant advantages of hydrothermal technology, it was applied to treat polarizer from the waste LCD panel with the aim of transforming it into organic acids (mainly acetic acid and lactic acid). Investigation was done to evaluate the effects of different factors on yields of organic acids, including the reaction temperature, reaction time and H2O2 supply, and the degradation process of polarizer was analyzed. Liquid samples were analyzed by GC/MS and HPLC, and solid-phase products were characterized by SEM and FTIR. Results showed that at the condition of temperature 300 °C and reaction time 5 min, the organic materials reached its highest conversion rate of 71.47% by adding 0.2 mL H2O2 and acetic acid was dominant in the products of organic acids with the yield of 6.78%. When not adding H2O2 to the system, the yields of lactic and acetic acid were respectively 4.24% and 3.80% at a nearly equal degree, they are suitable for esterification to form ethyl lactate instead of separating them for this case. In the hydrothermal process, polarizer was first decomposed to monosaccharides, alkane, etc., and then furfural and acids are produced with further decomposition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Lipid microencapsulation allows slow release of organic acids and natural identical flavors along the swine intestine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Piva, A; Pizzamiglio, V; Morlacchini, M; Tedeschi, M; Piva, G

    2007-01-01

    ... Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 29100 Piacenza, Italy 3 Corresponding author: andrea.piva{at}unibo.it The purpose of the present work was to investigate the in vivo concentrations of sorbic acid and vanillin as markers of the fate of organic acids (OA...

  18. Pilot-scale recovery of low molecular weight organic acids from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-05

    Nov 5, 2008 ... Palm oil mill generates large quantities of liquid wastes which are ... food waste. More recently, electrodialysis (ED) has been used for acetic acid recovery from wastewater (Yu et al.,. 2000) as